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Sample records for 1p36 deletion defines

  1. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes.

  2. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Valerie K; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Scott, Daryl A

    2015-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. PMID:26345236

  3. FISH analysis of a patient with a constitutional 1p36 deletion defines a region for a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Biegel, J.; Hilliard, C.; White, P.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular and cytogenetic studies of neuroblastoma have implicated the presence of one or more tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 1p. We previously reported a neuroblastoma patient with a constitutional interstitial deletion of 1p36. As one means of further defining the deleted region, we have analyzed a series of chromosome 1p36 specific probes by FISH to metaphase chromosomes from a lymphoblastoid cell line established from the patient. We have also tested these probes on a neuroblastoma cell line, NGP, which has a t(1;15) translocation involving 1p36. The probes analyzed to date in order from centromere to telomere include ID-3 (heir-1), D1S56, D1S160, and CDC2L1 (p58). Cosmids for ID-3 and D1S56 were present in 2 copies and proximal to the breakpoint in the constitutional case, and retained on the derivative 1 in NGP. CDC2L1 was also present in 2 copies in the constitutional case, but is distal to the deletion. In NGP, CDC2L1 was translocated to the derivative 15. The D1S160 locus was deleted from one of the chromosomes 1 in the constitutional case, and was present in three copies in NGP: on the normal chromosome 1, the derivative chromosome 1, and the derivative chromosome 15. Molecular studies have suggested that there is a duplication involving this region in NGP, and so it is not clear where the translocation breakpoint is in this cell line. These studies have localized a critical region for a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene to 1p36.2, distal to D1S56, proximal to CDC2L1, and including D1S160. This region overlaps with the smallest area of deletion defined by loss of heterozygosity studies of primary neuroblastomas and neuroblastoma cell lines. Additional studies with probes that flank the D1S160 locus will facilitate a molecular cloning approach for a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene.

  4. Growth patterns of patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Shimada, Shino; Ando, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome is one of the most common subtelomeric deletion syndromes. Obesity is frequently observed in patients with this syndrome. Thus, it is important to evaluate the growth status of an individual patient. For this purpose, we accumulated recorded growth data from 44 patients with this syndrome and investigated the growth patterns of patients. Most of the patients showed weight parameters within normal limits, whereas a few of these patients showed intrauterine growth delay and microcephaly. The length of the patients after birth was under the 50th centile in most patients. Many patients showed poor weight gain after birth, and only two female patients were overweight. These findings indicate two different phenotypes of the 1p36 deletion syndrome. The overweight patients with 1p36 deletion started excessive weight gain after two years of life. This characteristic of the patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome is similar to Prader-Willi syndrome.

  5. Identification of critical regions and candidate genes for cardiovascular malformations and cardiomyopathy associated with deletions of chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Hitisha P; Beck, Tyler F; Hernández-García, Andrés; Shelly, Katharine E; Montgomery, Tara; van Haeringen, Arie; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Patel, Chirag; Goel, Himanshu; Houge, Gunnar; Morrow, Bernice E; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Scott, Daryl A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations and cardiomyopathy are among the most common phenotypes caused by deletions of chromosome 1p36 which affect approximately 1 in 5000 newborns. Although these cardiac-related abnormalities are a significant source of morbidity and mortality associated with 1p36 deletions, most of the individual genes that contribute to these conditions have yet to be identified. In this paper, we use a combination of clinical and molecular cytogenetic data to define five critical regions for cardiovascular malformations and two critical regions for cardiomyopathy on chromosome 1p36. Positional candidate genes which may contribute to the development of cardiovascular malformations associated with 1p36 deletions include DVL1, SKI, RERE, PDPN, SPEN, CLCNKA, ECE1, HSPG2, LUZP1, and WASF2. Similarly, haploinsufficiency of PRDM16-a gene which was recently shown to be sufficient to cause the left ventricular noncompaction-SKI, PRKCZ, RERE, UBE4B and MASP2 may contribute to the development of cardiomyopathy. When treating individuals with 1p36 deletions, or providing prognostic information to their families, physicians should take into account that 1p36 deletions which overlie these cardiac critical regions may portend to cardiovascular complications. Since several of these cardiac critical regions contain more than one positional candidate gene-and large terminal and interstitial 1p36 deletions often overlap more than one cardiac critical region-it is likely that haploinsufficiency of two or more genes contributes to the cardiac phenotypes associated with many 1p36 deletions.

  6. A region of consistent deletion in neuroblastoma maps within human chromosome 1p36.2-36.3

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.S.; Maris, J.M.; Beltinger, C.

    1995-06-06

    Deletion of the short arm of human chromosome 1 is the most common cytogenetic abnormality observed in neuroblastoma. To characterize the region of consistent deletion, we performed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies on 122 neuroblastoma tumor samples with 30 distal chromosome 1p polymorphisms. LOH was detected in 32 of the 122 tumors (26%). A single region of LOH, marked distally by D1Z2 and proximally by D1S228, was detected in all tumors demonstrating loss. Also, cells from a patient with a constitutional deletion of 1p36, and from a neuroblastoma cell line with a small 1p36 deletion, were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cells from both sources had interstitial deletions of 1p36.2-36.3 which overlapped the consensus region of LOH defined by the tumors. Interstitial deletion in the constitutional case was confirmed by allelic loss studies using the panel of polymorphic markers. Four proposed candidate genes-DAN, ID3 (heir-1), CDC2L1 (p58), and TNFR2-were shown to lie outside of the consensus region of allelic loss, as defined by the above deletions. These results more precisely define the location of a neuroblastoma suppressor gene within 1p36.2-36.3, eliminating 33 centimorgans of proximal 1p36 from consideration. Furthermore, a consensus region of loss, which excludes the four leading candidate genes, was found in all tumors with 1p36 LOH. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  7. FISH analysis of hematological neoplasias with 1p36 rearrangements allows the definition of a cluster of 2.5 Mb included in the minimal region deleted in 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lahortiga, Idoya; Vázquez, Iria; Belloni, Elena; Román, José P; Gasparini, Patrizia; Novo, Francisco J; Zudaire, Isabel; Pelicci, Pier G; Hernández, Jesús M; Calasanz, María J; Odero, María D

    2005-05-01

    Rearrangements in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1 are recurrent aberrations in a broad spectrum of human neoplasias. However, neither the location of the breakpoints (BP) on 1p36 nor the candidate genes have been fully determined. We have characterized, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the BP in 26 patients with hematological neoplasias and 1p36 rearrangements in the G-banding karyotype. FISH allowed a better characterization of all samples analyzed. Nine cases (35%) showed reciprocal translocations, 15 (58%) unbalanced rearrangements, and two (7%) deletions. We describe two new recurrent aberrations. In 18 of the 26 cases analyzed the BP were located in band 1p36, which is 25.5 Mb long. In 14 of these 18 cases (78%) and without distinction between myeloid and lymphoid neoplasias, the BP clustered in a 2.5 Mb region located between 1p36.32 and the telomere. Interestingly, this region is contained in the 10.5 Mb cluster on 1p36.22-1pter defined in cases with 1p36 deletion syndrome. The 2.5 Mb region, located on 1p36.32-1pter, has a higher frequency of occurrence of tandem repeats and segmental duplications larger than 1 kb, when compared with the 25.5 Mb of the complete 1p36 band. This could explain its proneness for involvement in chromosomal rearrangements in hematological neoplasias.

  8. Contiguous ∼16 Mb 1p36 deletion: Dominant features of classical distal 1p36 monosomy with haplo-lethality.

    PubMed

    Nicoulaz, A; Rubi, F; Lieder, L; Wolf, R; Goeggel-Simonetti, B; Steinlin, M; Wiest, R; Bonel, H M; Schaller, A; Gallati, S; Conrad, B

    2011-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 results from heterozygous deletions of the terminal short chromosome 1 arm, the most common terminal deletion in humans. The microdeletion is split in two usually non-overlapping and clinically distinct classical distal and proximal 1p36 monosomy syndromes. Using comparative genome hybridization, MLPA and qPCR we identified the largest contiguous ∼16 Mb terminal 1p36 deletion reported to date. It covers both distal and proximal regions, causes a neonatally lethal variant with virtually exclusive features of distal 1p36 monosomy, highlighting the key importance of the gene-rich distal region for the "compound" 1p36 phenotype and a threshold deletion-size effect for haplo-lethality.

  9. Mini-Review: Monosomy 1p36 syndrome: reviewing the correlation between deletion sizes and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F; Vasques, R B; Santos, S R; Paiva, C L A

    2016-01-01

    The major clinical features of monosomy 1p36 deletion are developmental delay and hypotonia associated with short stature and craniofacial dysmorphisms. The objective of this study was to review the cases of 1p36 deletion that was reported between 1999 and 2014, in order to identify a possible correlation between the size of the 1p36-deleted segment and the clinical phenotype of the disease. Scientific articles published in the (National Center for Biotechnology Information; NCBI http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) and Scientific Electronic Library Online (www.scielo.com.br) databases were searched using key word combinations, such as "1p36 deletion", "monosomy 1p36 deletion", and "1p36 deletion syndrome". Articles in English or Spanish reporting the correlation between deletion sizes and the respective clinical phenotypes were retrieved, while letters, reviews, guidelines, and studies with mouse models were excluded. Among the 746 retrieved articles, only 17 (12 case reports and 5 series of cases), comprising 29 patients (9 males and 20 females, aged 0 months (neonate) to 22 years) bearing the 1p36 deletions and whose clinical phenotypes were described, met the inclusion criteria. The genotype-phenotype correlation in monosomy 1p36 is a challenge because of the variability in the size of the deleted segment, as well as in the clinical manifestations of similar size deletions. Therefore, the severity of the clinical features was not always associated with the deletion size, possibly because of the other influences, such as stochastic factors, epigenetic events, or reduced penetration of the deleted genes.

  10. Novel airway findings in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferril, Geoffrey R; Barham, Henry P; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    1p36 deletion syndrome comprises a phenotypic presentation that includes central nervous system, cardiac, and craniofacial anomalies. There has been no report of associated airway anomalies with this syndrome. We present here a case report and literature review. Prenatally, amniocentesis for chromosomal analysis was performed on our patient, with results consistent with 1p36 deletion syndrome. Respiratory distress and unsuccessful attempts at intubation prompted transfer to Children's Hospital of Colorado. Microlaryngoscopy was subsequently performed, revealing a persistent buccopharyngeal membrane and unidentifiable larynx. Emergent tracheostomy was then performed to secure the airway. Airway anomalies may be associated with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

  11. [Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome misdiagnosed as thyropenia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xubiao; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Tingting; Wen, Zhiming

    2013-12-01

    A 21-year-old woman with a short stature presented with primary amenorrhoea and a 45X karyotype, and comparative genomic hybridization revealed 1p36 deletion and abnormal genes in multiple chromosomes to support the diagnosis of Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The main clinical features of this condition include microsomia, poor sexual development, menoschesis, gigantorectum, absence of internal genitalia, sometimes with thyropenia and low intelligence. This disease can be easily diagnosed for its heterogeneous clinical manifestations.

  12. Mild developmental delay and obesity in two patients with mosaic 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We identified mosaic 1p36 deletions in two patients with developmental delay, distinctive features, and obesity, who can walk alone and communicate with others. Thus, their neurological defects are milder than those in typical patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome because most patients with 1p36 deletion cannot acquire expressive language. Chromosomal microarray testing revealed 3.0 and 4.5 Mb aberrations in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Mean signal ratios of the identified aberrations were -0.4 and -0.5, indicating mosaicism, which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with a mosaic ratio of 70% and 77%, respectively. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of the distal 2-3 Mb region would be responsible for hyperphagia and obesity seen in patients. On the other hand, the severity of the neurological defect often correlates with the size of the terminal deletion of 1p36, and patients with larger deletions of 1p36 would usually show severely impaired developmental milestones and be immobile and aphasic. In such cases, hyperphagia and obesity could be clinically masked. In this study, two patients with mosaic deletions of 1p36 showed obesity as a consequence of hyperphagia. This study suggests that patients with 1p36 deletion would be at risk for hyperphagia and obesity when they have both risk factors, that is, (1) deletions including the 2-3 Mb critical region and (2) milder phenotypes that allow them to reach food on their own and to overeat.

  13. Polymicrogyria and infantile spasms in a patient with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaya; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ichihashi, Izumi; Kaneko, Yuu; Hattori, Ayako; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2011-05-01

    A 3-months-old boy presented with partial seizures that soon evolved into infantile spasms. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with right-sided predominance. ACTH therapy successfully controlled epilepsy and electroencephalograms were normalized. Conventional G-banded chromosomal analysis was performed due to his distinctive features and a derivative chromosome 1 derived from parental balanced translocation with a karyoptype of 46,XY,der(1)t(1;4)(p36.23;q35) was detected. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis confirmed the deleted region of 1p36 as large as 8.6Mb. This is the first delineation of concurrent complications of infantile spasms and polymicrogyria in patient with 1p36 deletion. 1p36 deletion syndrome should be broadly recognized as a differential diagnosis of regional polymicrogyria and/or infantile spasms.

  14. Delineating the phenotype of 1p36 deletion in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Ashley; Stanford, Kevin; Smolarek, Teresa; Hopkin, Robert

    2014-10-01

    1p36 deletion is the most common telomeric deletion syndrome, with an incidence of 1/5,000-1/10,000. A variety of clinical complications have been reported including seizures, hypotonia, heart malformations, cardiomyopathy, vision problems, and hearing loss. Approximately 90% are reported to have severe to profound intellectual disability and 75% to have absent expressive language. Little is known about long-term outcomes. The current literature suggests a poor prognosis for most patients. This study attempted to assess medical conditions and function of adolescent and adult patients with 1p36 deletion. A survey was distributed through three support groups to identify patients >12 years of age to assess functional status and medical problems in older patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome. 40 patients were identified between 12 and 46 years old. Among our survey sample, medical complications including seizures, hypotonia, structural heart defects, hearing loss, and vision problems, were similar to previous reports. However, functional skills were better than anticipated, with an overwhelming majority reported to independently sit, walk, and receive the majority of nutrition orally. Forty-four percent were reported to use complex speech abilities. While medical problems in patients with 1p36 deletion were similar to those that have been previously reported, we also demonstrated these same concerns persist into adolescence and adulthood. Additionally, patients were reported to have better functional skills than anticipated. Thus, quality of life and level of function appear to be better than anticipated from previous studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identification of 1p36 deletion syndrome in patients with facial dysmorphism and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Go Hun; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The 1p36 deletion syndrome is a microdeletion syndrome characterized by developmental delays/intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism, and other congenital anomalies. To date, many cases of this syndrome have been reported worldwide. However, cases with this syndrome have not been reported in Korean populations anywhere. This study was performed to report the clinical and molecular characteristics of five Korean patients with the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Methods The clinical characteristics of the 5 patients were reviewed. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses were performed for genetic diagnoses. Results All 5 patients had typical dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, flat right parietal bone, low-set ears, straight eyebrows, down-slanting palpebral fissure, hypotelorism, flat nasal roots, midface hypoplasia, pointed chins, small lips, and variable degrees of developmental delay. Each patient had multiple and variable anomalies such as a congenital heart defect including ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and patent duct arteriosus, ventriculomegaly, cryptorchism, or hearing loss. Karyotyping revealed the 1p36 deletion in only 1 patient, although it was confirmed in all 5 patients by MLPA analyses. Conclusion All the patients had the typical features of 1p36 deletion. These hallmarks can be used to identify other patients with this condition in their early years in order to provide more appropriate care. PMID:26893599

  16. Recurrent interstitial 1p36 deletions: Evidence for germline mosaicism and complex rearrangement breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Gajecka, Marzena; Saitta, Sulagna C; Gentles, Andrew J; Campbell, Lindsey; Ciprero, Karen; Geiger, Elizabeth; Catherwood, Anne; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaikh, Tamim; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-12-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 are one of the most frequently encountered subtelomeric alterations. Clinical features of monosomy 1p36 include neurocognitive impairment, hearing loss, seizures, cardiac defects, and characteristic facial features. The majority of cases have occurred sporadically, implying that genomic instability plays a role in the prevalence of the syndrome. Here, we report two siblings with mild phenotypic features of the deletion syndrome, including developmental delay, hearing loss, and left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC). Microarray analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome and oligonucleotide microarrays indicated the deletions were identical, suggesting germline mosaicism. Parental phenotypes were normal, and analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) did not show mosaicism. These small interstitial deletions were not detectable by conventional subtelomeric FISH analysis. To investigate the mechanism of deletion further, the breakpoints were cloned and sequenced, demonstrating the presence of a complex rearrangement. Sequence analysis of genes in the deletion interval did not reveal any mutations on the intact homologue that may have contributed to the LVNC seen in both children. This is the first report of apparent germline mosaicism for this disorder. Thus, our findings have important implications for diagnostic approaches and for recurrence risk counseling in families with a child with monosomy 1p36. In addition, our results further refine the minimal critical region for LVNC and hearing loss.

  17. Is 1p36 deletion associated with anterior body wall defects?

    PubMed

    Çöllü, Medis; Yüksel, Şirin; Şirin, Başak Kumbasar; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Alanay, Yasemin

    2016-07-01

    Epispadias and exstrophy of the cloaca, also known as OEIS complex (omphalocele, exstrophy, imperforate anus, spinal defects), respectively constitute the most benign and severe ends of the bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) spectrum. In 2009, El-Hattab et al. reported the first patient with OEIS complex associated with a chromosome 1p36 deletion. Here we report a second patient with 1p36 deletion who also has classic bladder exstrophy, supporting the possible role of genes in this region in the development of BEEC. The absence of omphalocele and imperforate anus in our patient places him toward classic bladder exstrophy while presence of spina bifida and the absence of coccyx suggest an overlap with OEIS complex. An additional differential diagnosis is the pentalogy of Cantrell in our patient as he also has a diaphragmatic hernia and an incomplete sternum. This is the second observation of a ventral midline birth defect in association with 1p36 deletion syndrome, following El-Hattab et al.'s report [2009]. The three genes (NOCL2, DVL1, and MMP23B) discussed as possible candidates are also among the deleted ones in our patient, supporting the possible role of these genes in BEEC spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Complex structural rearrangement features suggesting chromoanagenesis mechanism in a case of 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Montenegro, Marília Moreira; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Costa, Thaís Virgínia Moura Machado; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2014-12-01

    Genome rearrangements are caused by the erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks, leading to several alterations that result in loss or gain of the structural genomic of a dosage-sensitive genes. However, the mechanisms that promote the complexity of rearrangements of congenital or developmental defects in human disease are unclear. The investigation of complex genomic abnormalities could help to elucidate the mechanisms and causes for the formation and facilitate the understanding of congenital or developmental defects in human disease. We here report one case of a patient with atypical clinical features of the 1p36 syndrome and the use of cytogenomic techniques to characterize the genomic alterations. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array revealed a complex rearrangement in the 1p36.3 region with deletions and duplication interspaced by normal sequences. We also suggest that chromoanagenesis could be a possible mechanism involved in the repair and stabilization of this rearrangement.

  19. Dying at 23 with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Laura's family story.

    PubMed

    Tandy, P A

    2012-09-01

    Laura was unusual. She had always been different and at times difficult. She was born with a genetic disorder, diagnosed as 1p36 deletion syndrome when she was 21 years old. At 23 she suffered her first cardiac arrest at home and entered the hospital system for the first time apart from infancy. After initially appearing to do well, she suffered a second cardiac arrest 10 weeks after admission. This was followed by an irreversible deterioration and she died 14 weeks after admission. We her family had been with her throughout her traumatic experience. This is our story.

  20. Refinement of causative genes in monosomy 1p36 through clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of small interstitial deletions.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Crolla, John A; Tomkins, Susan; Bader, Patricia; Morrow, Bernice; Gorski, Jerome; Troxell, Robin; Forster-Gibson, Cynthia; Cilliers, Deirdre; Hislop, R Gordon; Lamb, Allen; Torchia, Beth; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome seen in humans, occurring in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. Common features include mental retardation, characteristic dysmorphic features, hypotonia, seizures, hearing loss, heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and behavior abnormalities. Similar phenotypes are seen among patients with a variety of deletion sizes, including terminal and interstitial deletions, complex rearrangements, and unbalanced translocations. Consequently, critical regions harboring causative genes for each of these features have been difficult to identify. Here we report on five individuals with 200-823 kb overlapping deletions of proximal 1p36.33, four of which are apparently de novo. They present with features of monosomy 1p36, including developmental delay and mental retardation, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, behavioral abnormalities including hyperphagia, and seizures. The smallest region of deletion overlap is 174 kb and contains five genes; these genes are likely candidates for some of the phenotypic features in monosomy 1p36. Other genes deleted in a subset of the patients likely play a contributory role in the phenotypes, including GABRD and seizures, PRKCZ and neurologic features, and SKI and dysmorphic and neurologic features. Characterization of small deletions is important for narrowing critical intervals and for the identification of causative or candidate genes for features of monosomy 1p36 syndrome.

  1. Pathologic features of dilated cardiomyopathy with localized noncompaction in a child with deletion 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pearce, F Bennett; Litovsky, Silvio H; Dabal, Robert J; Robin, Nathaniel; Dure, Leon J; George, James F; Kirklin, James K

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular noncompaction have been reported in association with deletion 1p36 syndrome. Previous descriptions include echocardiographic and/or gross pathologic descriptions. There are no previous reports of microscopic findings. We report a case with descriptions of echocardiographic, gross pathologic, and microscopic findings.

  2. Fine mapping of the 1p36 deletion syndrome identifies mutation of PRDM16 as a cause of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef; Sabeh, M Khaled; Plovie, Eva R; Caliebe, Almuth; Klopocki, Eva; Musso, Gabriel; Werdich, Andreas A; Kalwa, Hermann; Heinig, Matthias; Padera, Robert F; Wassilew, Katharina; Bluhm, Julia; Harnack, Christine; Martitz, Janine; Barton, Paul J; Greutmann, Matthias; Berger, Felix; Hubner, Norbert; Siebert, Reiner; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Cook, Stuart A; MacRae, Calum A; Klaassen, Sabine

    2013-07-11

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). With our own data and publically available data from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we identified a minimal deletion for the cardiomyopathy associated with 1p36del syndrome that included only the terminal 14 exons of the transcription factor PRDM16 (PR domain containing 16), a gene that had previously been shown to direct brown fat determination and differentiation. Resequencing of PRDM16 in a cohort of 75 nonsyndromic individuals with LVNC detected three mutations, including one truncation mutant, one frameshift null mutation, and a single missense mutant. In addition, in a series of cardiac biopsies from 131 individuals with DCM, we found 5 individuals with 4 previously unreported nonsynonymous variants in the coding region of PRDM16. None of the PRDM16 mutations identified were observed in more than 6,400 controls. PRDM16 has not previously been associated with cardiac disease but is localized in the nuclei of cardiomyocytes throughout murine and human development and in the adult heart. Modeling of PRDM16 haploinsufficiency and a human truncation mutant in zebrafish resulted in both contractile dysfunction and partial uncoupling of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM.

  3. Deletion or epigenetic silencing of AJAP1 on 1p36 in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ningjing; Di, Chunhui; Bortoff, Kathy; Fu, Jinrong; Truszkowski, Peter; Killela, Patrick; Duncan, Chris; McLendon, Roger; Bigner, Darell; Gregory, Simon; Adamson, David Cory

    2012-02-01

    Glioblastoma is universally fatal because of its propensity for rapid recurrence due to highly migratory tumor cells. Unraveling the genomic complexity that underlies this migratory characteristic could provide therapeutic targets that would greatly complement current surgical therapy. Using multiple high-resolution genomic screening methods, we identified a single locus, adherens junctional associated protein 1 (AJAP1) on chromosome 1p36 that is lost or epigenetically silenced in many glioblastomas. We found AJAP1 expression absent or reduced in 86% and 100% of primary glioblastoma tumors and cell lines, respectively, and the loss of expression correlates with AJAP1 methylation. Restoration of AJAP1 gene expression by transfection or demethylation agents results in decreased tumor cell migration in glioblastoma cell lines. This work shows the significant loss of expression of AJAP1 in glioblastoma and provides evidence of its role in the highly migratory characteristic of these tumors.

  4. Significance of the small subtelomeric area of chromosome 1 (1p36.3) in the progression of malignant melanoma: FISH deletion screening with YAC DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, M; Woenckhaus, C; Dittberner, T; Pambor, M; Lorenz, G; Herrmann, F H

    1999-08-01

    The short arm of chromosome 1 (1p), especially the subtelomeric region of 1p36, is a common site for abnormalities in malignant melanoma of the skin. In a recent study nodular melanomas displayed deletions of 1p36 in an augmented percentage of cases. To evaluate the dimension of these deletions and to study their significance for the progression of malignant melanoma we analyzed seven melanoma cell lines, 32 primary tumors, and 32 metastatic tumors by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the DNA probe D1Z2 in 1p36.3 and eight YAC DNA probes hybridizing to 1p36, 1p32, 1p31, and 1p21. All cell lines, 91% of the metastatic tumors and 63% of nodular melanomas showed a deletion of 1p36.3. In the YAC hybridization experiments, the most frequent deletions were found in 1p36 in all cell lines, in 13% of nodular melanoma, and in 44% of metastatic tumors. Deletions in 1p36 were mostly confined to a rather small area near the locus D1Z2. The frequent occurrence of this deletion in melanomas with a high metastatic potential and the abundant accumulation of this deletion in metastasis point to genes located on 1p36, which might be of significance for the metastatic capability of malignant melanoma.

  5. 576 kb deletion in 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI is associated with limb malformation, congenital heart disease and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-Fu; Yang, Yi-Feng; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-10

    1p36 deletion (monosomy 1p36) is one of the most common terminal deletions observed in humans, characterized by special facial features, mental retardation, heart defects, development delay and epilepsy. Previously, we reported molecular findings in patients with limb, congenital heart disease (CHD) and other malformations with SNP-array. In a syndromic patient of the same cohort, we detected a small deletion of 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI (Sloan-Kettering Institute protooncoprotein). Recently, dominant mutations in SKI were identified to be correlated with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. Retrospective examination revealed this patient with limb malformations, CHD, epilepsy and mild development delay. Together with previous reports, our study suggests that the 1p36.33-1p36.32 deletion encompassing SKI may represents a previous undescribed microdeletion disorder.

  6. Telomeric 1p36.3 deletion and Ki-67 expression in B-Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma patients associated with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mosad, E; Said Abd El-Rahman Allam, M; Moustafa, H M; Mohammed, A Eliaw; El kebeer, A M; Abdel-Moneim, S S

    2014-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is able to accumulate genetic p53 mutations and may be considered co-oncogenic. This study investigates 1p36.3 telomere deletion in B-non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients with chronic HCV infection using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in relation to survival to assess Ki-67 antigen expression. A study group and a control group of 100 patients with B-NHL (50 HCV positive and 50 HCV negative) and 60 control bone marrow biopsies were subjected to FISH for the detection of 1P36.3 deletion and to immunohistochemical staining with Ki-67 antigens. 1p36.3 deletion by FISH was detected in 40% of the study group, and Ki-67 was expressed in approximately 74% of patients. A significant difference was found between positive and negative HCV patients in their overall survival, the qualitative expression of Ki-67 and the quantitative detection of 1p36.3 deletion by FISH. The overall survival was shorter with the presence of an 1p36 deletion by FISH and HCV positive. We concluded that the coexistence of Ki-67 positivity, HCV positivity and 1p36.3 deletion may contribute to infection-related cancers at the 1p36.3 locus.

  7. Deletion of the mouse homolog of KCNAB2, a gene linked to monosomy 1p36, results in associative memory impairments and amygdala hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Perkowski, John J; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 1 [1p36 deletion syndrome (1p36DS)] is one of the most commonly occurring terminal deletion syndromes in humans, occurring in ∼1 in 5000 newborns. Subjects with 1p36DS manifest a wide range of clinical features including growth delay, congenital heart defects, and craniofacial dysmorphism. In addition, individuals with 1p36DS often exhibit some form of neurological abnormality and are typically cognitively impaired. Although there is significant variability with regard to the extent of the deletion, several genes have been mapped to region 1p36 that are known to regulate neuronal function. One such gene--KCNAB2--encodes the potassium channel auxiliary subunit Kvβ2, which has been previously shown to modulate voltage-gated potassium currents in heterologous expression systems. Here, we present experiments characterizing mice in which the ortholog of KCNAB2 was deleted. We find that deletion of Kcnab2 in mice leads to deficits in associative learning and memory. In addition, using whole-cell current-clamp, we find that deletion of Kcnab2 leads to a reduction in the slow afterhyperpolarization following a burst of action potentials and a concomitant increase in neuronal excitability in projection neurons in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala. Our results suggest that loss of Kvβ2 likely contributes to the cognitive and neurological impairments observed in 1p36DS patients.

  8. Duplication of the DR3 gene on human chromosome 1p36 and its deletion in human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Grenet, J; Valentine, V; Kitson, J; Li, H; Farrow, S N; Kidd, V J

    1998-05-01

    The human DR3 gene, whose product is also known as Wsl-1/APO-3/TRAMP/LARD, encodes a tumor necrosis factor-related receptor that is expressed primarily on the surface of thymocytes and lymphocytes. DR3 is capable of inducing both NF-kappa B activation and apoptosis when overexpressed in mammalian cells, although its ligand has not yet been identified. We report here that the DR3 gene locus is tandemly duplicated on human chromosome band 1p36.2-p36.3 and that these genes are hemizygously deleted and/or translocated to another chromosome in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines with amplified MYCN. Duplication of at least a portion of the DR3 gene, including the extracellular and transmembrane regions but not the cytoplasmic domain, was demonstrated by both fluorescence in situ hybridization and genomic Southern blotting. In most NB cell lines, both the DR3 and the DR3L sequences are simultaneously deleted and/or translocated to another chromosome. Finally, DR3/ Wsl-1 protein expression is quite variable among these NB cell lines, with very low or undetectable levels in 7 of 17 NB cell lines.

  9. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K.; Cho, Megan T.; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Monaghan, Kristin G.; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H.; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G.M.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R.; van Haelst, Mieke M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A. James; Scott, Daryl A.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2016-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions. PMID:27087320

  10. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions.

    PubMed

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K; Cho, Megan T; Schnur, Rhonda E; Monaghan, Kristin G; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G M; de Vries, Bert B A; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R; van Haelst, Mieke M; van Gassen, Koen L I; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A James; Scott, Daryl A; Sherr, Elliott H

    2016-05-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions.

  11. Clinical presentation of two β-thalassemic Indian patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Case report.

    PubMed

    De, Puspal; Chatterjee, Tridip; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit

    2014-09-01

    Here, we present two thalassemic patients (one male and one female), having unusual clinical phenotypes. Both had mental retardation in which one was associated with microcephaly and other had congenital cataract. They were referred to our institute for clinical evaluation and cytogenetic testing. Both patients were tested for presence of abnormal hemoglobin by high performance liquid chromatography and found to be thalassemic. Their β-globin mutation was also determined by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The male patient was found to have intervening sequence 1-5 (G-C)/+, indicating β-thalassemia trait and the female was found to have Cod 26 (G-A)/IVS 1-5 (G-C), indicating hemoglobin E-β thalassemia. Their cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes were studied with high-resolution GTG-banding analysis by using chromosome profiling (Cyto-vision software 3.6) on their chromosomes. Results revealed 46,XY,del(1)(p36.21) in the male and 46,XX,del(1)(p36.3) in the female. Their genotype variation showed (based on genome browser) significant gene loss which probably leads to marked phenotype variation. We believe, thalassemia with mental retardation associated with microcephaly and congenital cataract, both having loss in chromosome 1, p36 position, is reported probably first time from India. This report will definitely enlighten all concerns and add to the information in growing literature.

  12. Clinical presentation of two β-thalassemic Indian patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    De, Puspal; Chatterjee, Tridip; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present two thalassemic patients (one male and one female), having unusual clinical phenotypes. Both had mental retardation in which one was associated with microcephaly and other had congenital cataract. They were referred to our institute for clinical evaluation and cytogenetic testing. Both patients were tested for presence of abnormal hemoglobin by high performance liquid chromatography and found to be thalassemic. Their β-globin mutation was also determined by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The male patient was found to have intervening sequence 1-5 (G-C)/+, indicating β-thalassemia trait and the female was found to have Cod 26 (G-A)/IVS 1-5 (G-C), indicating hemoglobin E-β thalassemia. Their cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes were studied with high-resolution GTG-banding analysis by using chromosome profiling (Cyto-vision software 3.6) on their chromosomes. Results revealed 46,XY,del(1)(p36.21) in the male and 46,XX,del(1)(p36.3) in the female. Their genotype variation showed (based on genome browser) significant gene loss which probably leads to marked phenotype variation. We believe, thalassemia with mental retardation associated with microcephaly and congenital cataract, both having loss in chromosome 1, p36 position, is reported probably first time from India. This report will definitely enlighten all concerns and add to the information in growing literature. PMID:27625875

  13. Clinical presentation of two β-thalassemic Indian patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome: Case report.

    PubMed

    De, Puspal; Chatterjee, Tridip; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit

    2014-09-01

    Here, we present two thalassemic patients (one male and one female), having unusual clinical phenotypes. Both had mental retardation in which one was associated with microcephaly and other had congenital cataract. They were referred to our institute for clinical evaluation and cytogenetic testing. Both patients were tested for presence of abnormal hemoglobin by high performance liquid chromatography and found to be thalassemic. Their β-globin mutation was also determined by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The male patient was found to have intervening sequence 1-5 (G-C)/+, indicating β-thalassemia trait and the female was found to have Cod 26 (G-A)/IVS 1-5 (G-C), indicating hemoglobin E-β thalassemia. Their cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes were studied with high-resolution GTG-banding analysis by using chromosome profiling (Cyto-vision software 3.6) on their chromosomes. Results revealed 46,XY,del(1)(p36.21) in the male and 46,XX,del(1)(p36.3) in the female. Their genotype variation showed (based on genome browser) significant gene loss which probably leads to marked phenotype variation. We believe, thalassemia with mental retardation associated with microcephaly and congenital cataract, both having loss in chromosome 1, p36 position, is reported probably first time from India. This report will definitely enlighten all concerns and add to the information in growing literature. PMID:27625875

  14. Interstitial deletion 1p36.32 in two brothers with a distinct phenotype--overgrowth, macrocephaly and nearly normal intellectual function.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, N; Klink, B; Hahn, G; Schrock, E; Hackmann, K

    2014-09-01

    We report on two adult patients, who both presented with overgrowth and one of them additionally with macrocephaly while carrying an 1p36 microdeletion of about 2.1 Mb. They are full brothers born to unaffected parents. Although both brothers attended special schools, they lived independently without a legal guardian and were able to succeed in regular jobs. One of the brothers received a professional education. Genetic analysis of the parents revealed neither the microdeletion nor a cryptical translocation or inversion. We suggest that the recurrent deletion is a result of germline mosaicism, a phenomenon reported only once in the context of the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome. Our report confirms the recurrence of the apparently de novo 1p36 microdeletion due to a likely germline mosaicism of one of the parents. Furthermore, it illustrates the possibility of the distinct phenotype with a nearly normal intellectual outcome of the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome that might be due to the region involved in our patients.

  15. An allelic series of mice reveals a role for RERE in the development of multiple organs affected in chromosome 1p36 deletions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Jun; Zaveri, Hitisha P; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Yu, Zhiyin; Hernández-García, Andrés; Seymour, Michelle L; Oghalai, John S; Pereira, Fred A; Stockton, David W; Justice, Monica J; Lee, Brendan; Scott, Daryl A

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with terminal and interstitial deletions of chromosome 1p36 have a spectrum of defects that includes eye anomalies, postnatal growth deficiency, structural brain anomalies, seizures, cognitive impairment, delayed motor development, behavior problems, hearing loss, cardiovascular malformations, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. The proximal 1p36 genes that contribute to these defects have not been clearly delineated. The arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide (RE) repeats gene (RERE) is located in this region and encodes a nuclear receptor coregulator that plays a critical role in embryonic development as a positive regulator of retinoic acid signaling. Rere-null mice die of cardiac failure between E9.5 and E11.5. This limits their usefulness in studying the role of RERE in the latter stages of development and into adulthood. To overcome this limitation, we created an allelic series of RERE-deficient mice using an Rere-null allele, om, and a novel hypomorphic Rere allele, eyes3 (c.578T>C, p.Val193Ala), which we identified in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-based screen for autosomal recessive phenotypes. Analyses of these mice revealed microphthalmia, postnatal growth deficiency, brain hypoplasia, decreased numbers of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN)-positive hippocampal neurons, hearing loss, cardiovascular malformations-aortic arch anomalies, double outlet right ventricle, and transposition of the great arteries, and perimembranous ventricular septal defects-spontaneous development of cardiac fibrosis and renal agenesis. These findings suggest that RERE plays a critical role in the development and function of multiple organs including the eye, brain, inner ear, heart and kidney. It follows that haploinsufficiency of RERE may contribute-alone or in conjunction with other genetic, environmental, or stochastic factors-to the development of many of the phenotypes seen in individuals with terminal and interstitial deletions that include the proximal region of

  16. Frequent hemizygous deletion at 1p36 and hypermethylation downregulate RUNX3 expression in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yanada, Masashi; Yaoi, Takeshi; Shimada, Junichi; Sakakura, Chouhei; Nishimura, Motohiro; Ito, Kazuhiro; Terauchi, Kunihiko; Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji

    2005-10-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer because its expression level was reduced or disappeared due to epigenetic changes. To evaluate the usefulness of the RUNX3 gene as a biomarker of lung cancer, we have analyzed the expression of the RUNX3 gene in 15 lung cancer cell lines by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and demonstrated that RUNX3 gene expression was reduced or disappeared in all cell lines examined (100%). In addition, we have attempted to classify all the cell lines into three groups according to the expression level; less than 10% (group I), 10-30% (group II) and approximately 50% (group III). We further investigated methylation status of the CpG sites in the exon 1 region of RUNX3 by methylation specific PCR (MSP), and studied the correlation between the expression level and hemizygous deletion as revealed by bicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The CpG sites were hypermethylated in 8 cell lines (53%) and the RUNX3 loci were hemizygously deleted in another 8 cell lines (53%). Furthermore group I, II, and III corresponded well to methylation-positive cell lines, cell lines showing hemizygous deletion, and the rest of cell lines without methylation or hemizygous deletion, respectively. These results suggest that a comprehensive study on RUNX3 using real-time RT-PCR, MSP, and FISH could be beneficial in understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of human lung cancer at the molecular level. PMID:16142337

  17. Primary Cutaneous Follicle Center Lymphomas Expressing BCL2 Protein Frequently Harbor BCL2 Gene Break and May Present 1p36 Deletion: A Study of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Vanessa; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Baia, Maryse; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Helene; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The classification of cutaneous follicular lymphoma (CFL) into primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) or secondary cutaneous follicular lymphoma (SCFL) is challenging. SCFL is suspected when tumor cells express BCL2 protein, reflecting a BCL2 translocation. However, BCL2 expression is difficult to assess in CFLs because of numerous BCL2+ reactive T cells. To investigate these issues and to further characterize PCFCL, we studied a series of 25 CFLs without any extracutaneous disease at diagnosis, selected on the basis of BCL2 protein expression using 2 BCL2 antibodies (clones 124 and E17) and BOB1/BCL2 double immunostaining. All cases were studied using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization with BCL2, BCL6, IGH, IGK, IGL breakapart, IGH-BCL2 fusion, and 1p36/1q25 dual-color probes. Nineteen CFLs were BCL2 positive, and 6 were negative. After a medium follow-up of 24 (6 to 96) months, 5 cases were reclassified as SCFL and were excluded from a part of our analyses. Among BCL2+ PCFCLs, 60% (9/15) demonstrated a BCL2 break. BCL2-break-positive cases had a tendency to occur in the head and neck and showed the classical phenotype of nodal follicular lymphoma (CD10+, BCL6+, BCL2+, STMN+) compared with BCL2-break-negative PCFCLs. Del 1p36 was observed in 1 PCFCL. No significant clinical differences were observed between BCL2+ or BCL2- PCFCL. In conclusion, we show that a subset of PCFCLs harbor similar genetic alterations, as observed in nodal follicular lymphomas, including BCL2 breaks and 1p36 deletion. As BCL2 protein expression is usually associated with the presence of a BCL2 translocation, fluorescence in situ hybridization should be performed to confirm this hypothesis.

  18. Prader-Willi-like phenotype: investigation of 1p36 deletion in 41 patients with delayed psychomotor development, hypotonia, obesity and/or hyperphagia, learning disabilities and behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Da Paz, José A; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; Castro, Claudia I E; Varela, Monica C; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2006-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is one of the most commonly observed mental retardation (MR) syndromes that results in a clinically recognizable phenotype including delayed psychomotor development and/or MR, hypotonia, epilepsy, hearing loss, growth delay, microcephaly, deep-set eyes, flat nasal bridge and pointed chin. Besides, a Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-like phenotype has been described in patients with 1p36 monosomy. Forty-one patients presenting hypotonia, developmental delay, obesity and/or hyperphagia and behavioral problems who tested negative for PWS were investigated by FISH and/or microsatellite markers. Twenty-six were analyzed with a 1p-specific subtelomeric probe, and one terminal deletion was identified. Thirty patients (15 of which also studied by FISH) were investigated by microsatellite markers, and no interstitial 1p36 deletion was found. Our patient presenting the 1p36 deletion did not have the striking features of this monosomy, but her clinical and behavioral features were quite similar to those observed in patients with PWS, except for the presence of normal sucking at birth. The extent of the deletion could be limited to the most terminal 2.5 Mb of 1p36, within the chromosomal region 1p36.33-1p36.32, that is smaller than usually seen in monosomy 1p36 patients. Therefore, chromosome 1p36.33 deletion should be investigated in patients with hypotonia, developmental delay, obesity and/or hyperphagia and behavioral problems who test negative for PWS.

  19. Detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization of microdeletions at 1p36 in lymphomas, unidentified on cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajgopal, Achuthan; Carr, Ian M; Leek, Jack P; Hodge, Donald; Bell, Sandra M; Roberts, Paul; Horgan, Kieran; Bonthron, David T; Selby, Peter J; Markham, Alexander F; MacLennan, Kenneth A

    2003-04-01

    The chromosomal band 1p36 exhibits frequent loss of heterozygosity in a variety of human malignancies, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor gene. The faint terminal subbands often make cytogenetic analysis of 1p36 particularly difficult. Small deletions at this locus may therefore escape detection on analysis by conventional cytogenetics, a hypothesis that we have explored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in malignant lymphoma. The study cohort consisted of 20 cases of lymphoma of various subtypes without any 1p abnormality on G-banded karyotyping. FISH was performed using a human chromosome 1 paint and a bacterial artificial chromosome probe RP4-755G5 localizing to 1p36.33, the most telomeric subband of 1p36. Tumors demonstrating 1p36.33 deletions were additionally analyzed by FISH using a second probe from the proximal 1p36.1 subband, to further define the breakpoint. Eight cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), 5 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), 2 Hodgkin disease, 2 B-cell small lymphocytic lymphomas, 2 T-cell lymphomas, and 1 marginal zone lymphoma were analyzed. FISH identified deletions at 1p36.33 in 5 of the 20 cases: 3 DLBCL and 2 FL. FISH is considerably more sensitive for identifying lymphoma genetic alterations than conventional cytogenetics. Deletion of the distal part of the 1p36 may be a much more common aberration than previously recognized in lymphoma.

  20. PRDM16 (1p36) translocations define a distinct entity of myeloid malignancies with poor prognosis but may also occur in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Francois P; Ameye, Geneviève; Montano-Almendras, Carmen P; Bahloula, Khadija; Mozziconacci, Marie J; Laibe, Sophy; Wlodarska, Iwona; Michaux, Lucienne; Talmant, Pascaline; Richebourg, Steven; Lippert, Eric; Speleman, Frank; Herens, Christian; Struski, Stéphanie; Raynaud, Sophie; Auger, Nathalie; Nadal, Nathalie; Rack, Katrina; Mugneret, Francine; Tigaud, Isabelle; Lafage, Marina; Taviaux, Sylvie; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Latinne, Dominique; Libouton, Jeanne M; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Poirel, Hélène A

    2012-01-01

    The PRDM16 (1p36) gene is rearranged in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with t(1;3)(p36;q21), sharing characteristics with AML and MDS with MECOM (3q26.2) translocations. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization to study 39 haematological malignancies with translocations involving PRDM16 to assess the precise breakpoint on 1p36 and the identity of the partner locus. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed in selected cases in order to confirm the partner locus. PRDM16 expression studies were performed on bone marrow samples of patients, normal controls and CD34(+) cells using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR. PRDM16 was rearranged with the RPN1 (3q21) locus in 30 cases and with other loci in nine cases. The diagnosis was AML or MDS in most cases, except for two cases of lymphoid proliferation. We identified novel translocation partners of PRDM16, including the transcription factors ETV6 and IKZF1. Translocations involving PRDM16 lead to its overexpression irrespective of the consequence of the rearrangement (fusion gene or promoter swap). Survival data suggest that patients with AML/MDS and PRDM16 translocations have a poor prognosis despite a simple karyotype and a median age of 65 years. There seems to be an over-representation of late-onset therapy-related myeloid malignancies.

  1. Role of Evaluating MGMT Status and 1p36 Deletion in Radiosurgery-Induced Anaplastic Ependymoma That Rapidly and Completely Resolved by Temozolomide Alone: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Iwadate, Yasuo; Kambe, Michiyo; Hiwasa, Takaki; Takiguchi, Masaki; Nakatani, Yukio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2015-07-01

    Stereotactic gamma knife surgery (GKS)-induced brain tumors are extremely rare, and no ependymal tumors induced by GKS have been reported. Therefore, little is known about their clinical, pathologic, and genetic features. In addition, a regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for anaplastic ependymoma (AE) has not been established. A 77-year-old man presented with a gait disturbance and left-side cerebellar ataxia more than 19 years after GKS performed for a cerebellar arteriovenous malformation. Imaging studies demonstrated an enhancing mass in the irradiated field with signs of intraventricular dissemination. Surgical resection confirmed the diagnosis of AE. Temozolomide (TMZ) was administrated postoperatively because the methylated promoter region of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and 1p36 deletion were observed. Surprisingly, images 16 days after TMZ initiation demonstrated a complete resolution of the residual tumor that was maintained after three cycles of TMZ. This first case report of GKS-induced AE emphasizes the importance of genetic evaluation of MGMT and chromosomal deletion of 1p36 that are not commonly performed in primary ependymal tumors. In addition, it is speculated that a GKS-induced tumor may have a different genetic background compared with the primary tumor because the pathogenesis of the tumors differed.

  2. 1p36 tumor suppression--a matter of dosage?

    PubMed

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Schwab, Manfred; Westermann, Frank

    2012-12-01

    A broad range of human malignancies is associated with nonrandom 1p36 deletions, suggesting the existence of tumor suppressors encoded in this region. Evidence for tumor-specific inactivation of 1p36 genes in the classic "two-hit" manner is scarce; however, many tumor suppressors do not require complete inactivation but contribute to tumorigenesis by partial impairment. We discuss recent data derived from both human tumors and functional cancer models indicating that the 1p36 genes CHD5, CAMTA1, KIF1B, CASZ1, and miR-34a contribute to cancer development when reduced in dosage by genomic copy number loss or other mechanisms. We explore potential interactions among these candidates and propose a model where heterozygous 1p36 deletion impairs oncosuppressive pathways via simultaneous downregulation of several dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes.

  3. CNV analysis in a large schizophrenia sample implicates deletions at 16p12.1 and SLC1A1 and duplications at 1p36.33 and CGNL1.

    PubMed

    Rees, Elliott; Walters, James T R; Chambert, Kimberly D; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Szatkiewicz, Jin; Richards, Alexander L; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Mahoney-Davies, Gerwyn; Legge, Sophie E; Moran, Jennifer L; Genovese, Giulio; Levinson, Douglas; Morris, Derek W; Cormican, Paul; Kendler, Kenneth S; O'Neill, Francis A; Riley, Brien; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina; Pato, Carlos; Pato, Michele; Sullivan, Patrick F; Gejman, Pablo V; McCarroll, Steven A; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Kirov, George

    2014-03-15

    Large and rare copy number variants (CNVs) at several loci have been shown to increase risk for schizophrenia. Aiming to discover novel susceptibility CNV loci, we analyzed 6882 cases and 11 255 controls genotyped on Illumina arrays, most of which have not been used for this purpose before. We identified genes enriched for rare exonic CNVs among cases, and then attempted to replicate the findings in additional 14 568 cases and 15 274 controls. In a combined analysis of all samples, 12 distinct loci were enriched among cases with nominal levels of significance (P < 0.05); however, none would survive correction for multiple testing. These loci include recurrent deletions at 16p12.1, a locus previously associated with neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 0.0084 in the discovery sample and P = 0.023 in the replication sample). Other plausible candidates include non-recurrent deletions at the glutamate transporter gene SLC1A1, a CNV locus recently suggested to be involved in schizophrenia through linkage analysis, and duplications at 1p36.33 and CGNL1. A burden analysis of large (>500 kb), rare CNVs showed a 1.2% excess in cases after excluding known schizophrenia-associated loci, suggesting that additional susceptibility loci exist. However, even larger samples are required for their discovery.

  4. Are Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes more similar than we thought? Food-related behavior problems in Angelman, Cornelia de Lange, fragile X, Prader-Willi and 1p36 deletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Welham, Alice; Lau, Johnny; Moss, Joanna; Cullen, Jenny; Higgs, Suzanne; Warren, Gemma; Wilde, Lucy; Marr, Abby; Cook, Faye; Oliver, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Food-related behavior problems are well documented in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), with impaired satiety, preoccupation with food and negative food-related behaviors (such as taking and storing food) frequently reported as part of the behavioral phenotype of older children and adults. Food-related behavior problems in other genetic neurodevelopmental syndromes remain less well studied, including those seen in Angelman Syndrome (AS), the 'sister imprinted disorder' of PWS. Food-related behavior problems were assessed in 152 participants each with one of five genetic neurodevelopmental syndromes – PWS, AS, 1p36 deletion, Cornelia de Lange, and fragile X. Predictably, levels of food-related behavior problems reported in participants with PWS significantly exceeded those of at least one other groups in most areas (impaired satiety; preoccupation with food; taking and storing food; composite negative behavior). However, in some areas people with AS were reported to display food-related problems at least as severe as those with PWS, with the AS group reported to display significantly more food-related behavior problems than at least one comparison group on measures of taking and storing food, composite negative behaviors, impaired satiety and preoccupation with food. Over 50% of participants in the AS group scored above the median point of the distribution of PWS scores on a measure of taking and storing food. These findings indicate further investigation of eating problems in AS are warranted and have implications for current theoretical interpretations of the behavioral differences between AS and PWS. PMID:25691410

  5. Are Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes more similar than we thought? Food-related behavior problems in Angelman, Cornelia de Lange, fragile X, Prader-Willi and 1p36 deletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Welham, Alice; Lau, Johnny; Moss, Joanna; Cullen, Jenny; Higgs, Suzanne; Warren, Gemma; Wilde, Lucy; Marr, Abby; Cook, Faye; Oliver, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Food-related behavior problems are well documented in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), with impaired satiety, preoccupation with food and negative food-related behaviors (such as taking and storing food) frequently reported as part of the behavioral phenotype of older children and adults. Food-related behavior problems in other genetic neurodevelopmental syndromes remain less well studied, including those seen in Angelman Syndrome (AS), the 'sister imprinted disorder' of PWS. Food-related behavior problems were assessed in 152 participants each with one of five genetic neurodevelopmental syndromes – PWS, AS, 1p36 deletion, Cornelia de Lange, and fragile X. Predictably, levels of food-related behavior problems reported in participants with PWS significantly exceeded those of at least one other groups in most areas (impaired satiety; preoccupation with food; taking and storing food; composite negative behavior). However, in some areas people with AS were reported to display food-related problems at least as severe as those with PWS, with the AS group reported to display significantly more food-related behavior problems than at least one comparison group on measures of taking and storing food, composite negative behaviors, impaired satiety and preoccupation with food. Over 50% of participants in the AS group scored above the median point of the distribution of PWS scores on a measure of taking and storing food. These findings indicate further investigation of eating problems in AS are warranted and have implications for current theoretical interpretations of the behavioral differences between AS and PWS.

  6. Monosomy 1p36 uncovers a role for OX40 in survival of activated CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, M M; Perez, E E; Heltzer, M L; Laney, A; Shaffer, L G; Saitta, S; Nachman, S; Spinner, N B; June, C H; Orange, J S

    2008-08-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is a subtelomeric deletion syndrome associated with congenital anomalies presumably due to haploinsufficiency of multiple genes. Although immunodeficiency has not been reported, genes encoding costimulatory molecules of the TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) are within 1p36 and may be affected. In one patient with monosomy 1p36, comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in- situ hybridization confirmed that TNFRSF member OX40 was included within the subtelomeric deletion. T cells from this patient had decreased OX40 expression after stimulation. Specific, ex vivo T cell activation through OX40 revealed enhanced proliferation, and reduced viability of patient CD4+ T cells, providing evidence for the association of monosomy 1p36 with reduced OX40 expression, and decreased OX40-induced T cell survival. These results support a role for OX40 in human immunity, and calls attention to the potential for haploinsufficiency deletions of TNFRSF costimulatory molecules in monosomy 1p36.

  7. Neuropathology of brain and spinal malformations in a case of monosomy 1p36

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric chromosomal deletion linked to mental retardation and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest that monosomy 1p36 is associated with brain malformations including polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia, but the histopathology of these lesions is unknown. Here we present postmortem neuropathological findings from a 10 year-old girl with monosomy 1p36, who died of respiratory complications. The findings included micrencephaly, periventricular nodular heterotopia in occipitotemporal lobes, cortical dysgenesis resembling polymicrogyria in dorsolateral frontal lobes, hippocampal malrotation, callosal hypoplasia, superiorly rotated cerebellum with small vermis, and lumbosacral hydromyelia. The abnormal cortex exhibited “festooned” (undulating) supragranular layers, but no significant fusion of the molecular layer. Deletion mapping demonstrated single copy loss of a contiguous 1p36 terminal region encompassing many important neurodevelopmental genes, among them four HES genes implicated in regulating neural stem cell differentiation, and TP73, a monoallelically expressed gene. Our results suggest that brain and spinal malformations in monosomy 1p36 may be more extensive than previously recognized, and may depend on the parental origin of deleted genes. More broadly, our results suggest that specific genetic disorders may cause distinct forms of cortical dysgenesis. PMID:24252393

  8. Neuropathology of brain and spinal malformations in a case of monosomy 1p36.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoko; Daza, Ray A M; Shaffer, Lisa G; Barkovich, A James; Dobyns, William B; Hevner, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric chromosomal deletion linked to mental retardation and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest that monosomy 1p36 is associated with brain malformations including polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia, but the histopathology of these lesions is unknown. Here we present postmortem neuropathological findings from a 10 year-old girl with monosomy 1p36, who died of respiratory complications. The findings included micrencephaly, periventricular nodular heterotopia in occipitotemporal lobes, cortical dysgenesis resembling polymicrogyria in dorsolateral frontal lobes, hippocampal malrotation, callosal hypoplasia, superiorly rotated cerebellum with small vermis, and lumbosacral hydromyelia. The abnormal cortex exhibited "festooned" (undulating) supragranular layers, but no significant fusion of the molecular layer. Deletion mapping demonstrated single copy loss of a contiguous 1p36 terminal region encompassing many important neurodevelopmental genes, among them four HES genes implicated in regulating neural stem cell differentiation, and TP73, a monoallelically expressed gene. Our results suggest that brain and spinal malformations in monosomy 1p36 may be more extensive than previously recognized, and may depend on the parental origin of deleted genes. More broadly, our results suggest that specific genetic disorders may cause distinct forms of cortical dysgenesis.

  9. Correlation of modified Shimada classification with MYCN and 1p36 status detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Altungoz, Oguz; Aygun, Nevim; Tumer, Sait; Ozer, Erdener; Olgun, Nur; Sakizli, Meral

    2007-01-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood cancer derived from neural crest cells, with a highly variable clinical course and biologic behavior. NB cells harbor complex genetic changes. Also, MYCN amplification is a well-known molecular marker for aggressive progression, and deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 is frequently observed in NB. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between genetic markers and prognostic morphological parameters to address the biology and underlying the clinical complexity of NB. Therefore, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of chromosome band 1p36 and MYCN in a series of tumors from 43 cases classified according to the recommendation of International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (modification of Shimada classification). The correlations of MYCN amplification status and two distinct types of 1p36 alterations (deletion and imbalance) with Shimada classification and histologic prognostic factors were statistically analyzed. Amplification of MYCN and 1p36 deletion was present in 14 (32.6%) and 18 (41.9%) cases, respectively. Sixteen cases (37.2%) displayed a favorable histology, while 27 (62.8%) had an unfavorable histology. The 1p36 deletion was found to be an independent predictor of unfavorable histology by multivariate analysis (logistic regression test, P = 0.03), but the 1p36 imbalance did not show any significance. Both 1p36 deletion and MYCN amplification showed significant correlation with undifferentiated tumors (chi-square test, P = 0.002 and 0.03, respectively). Highly significant correlation was found between the higher mitotic karyorrhectic index (MKI) and MYCN amplification (chi-square test, P < 0.001), whereas neither 1p36 deletion nor 1p36 imbalance significantly correlated with a higher MKI (chi-square test, P > 0.05). We conclude that 1p36 deletion may be a reliable parameter in determining unfavorable histology and predicting prognosis in NB. Further studies with prognostic data

  10. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity. PMID:22605691

  11. Morbid obesity in a child with monosomy 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zagalo, Ana; Dias, Patricia; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Maria de Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    The monosomy 1p36 syndrome is a cause of syndromic obesity. It is characterised by psychomotor delay, hypotonia and typical craniofacial dysmorphism. Other features commonly associated are behavioural anomalies including hyperphagia and self-injuring, seizures, congenital heart disease and hypothyroidism. The authors report the case of a 9-year and 5-month-boy referred to the paediatric endocrinology clinics for morbid obesity. Clinical findings were generalised obesity with a body mass index >95th centile, acanthosis nigricans of the neck, arms with self inflicted lesions, deep-set eyes, straight eyebrows, broad nasal bridge and pointed chin. He was unable to walk and had no expressive language. Cytogenetic analysis identified 1p36.33-pter deletion (~139 Mb terminal deletion in chromosome 1 short arm) and Y chromosome duplication. The blood analysis showed insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The authors emphasise the need to consider monosomy 1p36 as a cause of severe psychomotor delay and obesity.

  12. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: A distinctive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; King. R.A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a series of five patients with a partial monosomy of 1p36.3 presenting with a similar syndromic appearance. The phenotype of deletion 1p36.3 patients includes abnormal facies, multiple congenital malformations, and mental retardation.The ages of the patients in our series ranged from 3 to 50 years. As the deletion is very small, detection in the present cases relied upon high resolution G-band analyses and was confirmed with FISH in cases 3 and 5. Patients 2 and 3 were diagnosed as adults; thus smaller deletions in 1p36.33 may be associated with longer life expectancy, but include the critical region for the above phenotype. We noted that the dysmorphic features of the patients are more prominent with older age and are difficult to appreciate in infancy. Observation of this specific 1p36 appears as a white, terminal G-band; detection of a small partial deletion or rearrangement may require greater than 550 band level resolution. FISH utilizing a probe to 1pter can facilitate and confirm these analyses.

  13. Partial monosomy of chromosome 1p36.3: Characterization of the critical region and delineation of a syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, O.; Berry, S.A.; Hirsch, B.

    1995-12-04

    We describe 5 patients ranging in age from 3 to 47 years, with karyotypic abnormalities resulting in monosomy for portion of 1p36.3, microcephaly, mental retardation, prominent forehead, deep-set eyes, depressed nasal bridge, flat midface, relative prognathism, and abnormal ears. Four patients have small hands and feet. All exhibited selfabusive behavior. Additional findings in some of the patients include brain anomalies, optic atrophy, hearing loss and skeletal deformities. The breakpoints within chromosome 1 were designated at 1p36.31 (3 cases), 1p36.32 (1 case) and 1p36.33 (1 case). Thus, the smallest region of deletion overlap is 1p36.33{r_arrow}pter. Detection of the abnormal 1 relied on high resolution G-band analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) utilizing a DNA probe (Oncor D1Z2) containing the repetitive sequences in distal 1p36, confirmed a deletion of one 1 homologue in all 5 cases. The abnormal 1 resulted from a de novo deletion in only one patient. The remaining patients were either confirmed (3 cases) or suspected (1 case) to have unbalanced translocations. Despite the additional genetic imbalance present in these four cases, monosomy of 1p36.33 appears to be responsible for a specific clinical phenotype. Characterization of this phenotype should assist in the clinical diagnosis of this chromosome abnormality. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Accurate, fast and cost-effective diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36 using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5-0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs.

  15. Accurate, Fast and Cost-Effective Diagnostic Test for Monosomy 1p36 Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B.; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5–0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs. PMID:24839341

  16. Refinement of 1p36 alterations not involving PRDM16 in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Francois P; Ameye, Geneviève; Lambot, Virginie; Herens, Christian; Lambert, Frédéric; Raynaud, Sophie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Michaux, Lucienne; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Labis, Elise; Taviaux, Sylvie; Chapiro, Elise; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Khac, Florence Nguyen; Struski, Stéphanie; Dobbelstein, Sophie; Dastugue, Nicole; Lippert, Eric; Speleman, Frank; Van Roy, Nadine; De Weer, An; Rack, Katrina; Talmant, Pascaline; Richebourg, Steven; Mugneret, Francine; Tigaud, Isabelle; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Laibe, Sophy; Nadal, Nathalie; Terré, Christine; Libouton, Jeanne-Marie; Decottignies, Anabelle; Vikkula, Miikka; Poirel, Hélène A

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to characterize 81 cases of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies with cytogenetic 1p36 alterations not affecting the PRDM16 locus. In total, three subgroups were identified: balanced translocations (N = 27) and telomeric rearrangements (N = 15), both mainly observed in myeloid disorders; and unbalanced non-telomeric rearrangements (N = 39), mainly observed in lymphoid proliferations and frequently associated with a highly complex karyotype. The 1p36 rearrangement was isolated in 12 cases, mainly myeloid disorders. The breakpoints on 1p36 were more widely distributed than previously reported, but with identifiable rare breakpoint cluster regions, such as the TP73 locus. We also found novel partner loci on 1p36 for the known multi-partner genes HMGA2 and RUNX1. We precised the common terminal 1p36 deletion, which has been suggested to have an adverse prognosis, in B-cell lymphomas [follicular lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with t(14;18)(q32;q21) as well as follicular lymphomas without t(14;18)]. Intrachromosomal telomeric repetitive sequences were detected in at least half the cases of telomeric rearrangements. It is unclear how the latter rearrangements occurred and whether they represent oncogenic events or result from chromosomal instability during oncogenesis.

  17. Extending the phenotype of monosomy 1p36 syndrome and mapping of a critical region for obesity and hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Kohl, Ilana; Varela, Monica Castro; de Castro, Cláudia I E; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; Lourenço, Charles M; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2010-01-01

    Rearrangements of 1p36 are the most frequently detected abnormalities in diagnostic testing for chromosomal cryptic imbalances and include variably sized simple terminal deletions, derivative chromosomes, interstitial deletions, and complex rearrangements. These rearrangements result in the specific pattern of malformation and neurodevelopmental disabilities that characterizes monosomy 1p36 syndrome. Thus far, no individual gene within this region has been conclusively determined to be causative of any component of the phenotype. Nor is it known if the rearrangements convey phenotypes via a haploinsufficiency mechanism or through a position effect. We have used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for deletions of 1p36 in a group of 154 hyperphagic and overweight/obese, PWS negative individuals, and in a separate group of 83 patients initially sent to investigate a variety of other conditions. The strategy allowed the identification and delineation of rearrangements in nine subjects with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Our work reinforces the association of monosomy 1p36 and obesity and hyperphagia, and further suggests that these features may be associated with non-classical manifestations of this disorder in addition to a submicroscopic deletion of approximately 2-3 Mb in size. Multiplex ligation probe amplification using the monosomy 1p36 syndrome-specific kit coupled to the subtelomeric kit is an effective approach to identify and delineate rearrangements at 1p36.

  18. CAMTA1, a 1p36 tumor suppressor candidate, inhibits growth and activates differentiation programs in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Bauer, Tobias; Schulte, Johannes; Ehemann, Volker; Deubzer, Hedwig; Gogolin, Sina; Muth, Daniel; Fischer, Matthias; Benner, Axel; König, Rainer; Schwab, Manfred; Westermann, Frank

    2011-04-15

    A distal portion of human chromosome 1p is often deleted in neuroblastomas and other cancers and it is generally assumed that this region harbors one or more tumor suppressor genes. In neuroblastoma, a 261 kb region at 1p36.3 that encompasses the smallest region of consistent deletion pinpoints the locus for calmodulin binding transcription activator 1 (CAMTA1). Low CAMTA1 expression is an independent predictor of poor outcome in multivariate survival analysis, but its potential functionality in neuroblastoma has not been explored. In this study, we used inducible cell models to analyze the impact of CAMTA1 on neuroblastoma biology. In neuroblastoma cells that expressed little endogenous CAMTA1, its ectopic expression slowed cell proliferation, increasing the relative proportion of cells in G(1)/G(0) phases of the cell cycle, inhibited anchorage-independent colony formation, and suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts. CAMTA1 also induced neurite-like processes and markers of neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells. Further, retinoic acid and other differentiation- inducing stimuli upregulated CAMTA1 expression in neuroblastoma cells. Transciptome analysis revealed 683 genes regulated on CAMTA1 induction and gene ontology analysis identified genes consistent with CAMTA1-induced phenotypes, with a significant enrichment for genes involved in neuronal function and differentiation. Our findings define properties of CAMTA1 in growth suppression and neuronal differentiation that support its assignment as a 1p36 tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

  19. 1p36.32 rearrangements and the role of PI-PLC η2 in nervous tumours.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita

    2011-07-01

    Deletions in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p36) are widely diffuse, both in congenital 1p36 Deletion Syndrome and as somatic abnormalities in tumours. Rearrangements in 1p36 have been described in a broad spectrum of human neoplasias in addition to other chromosomal abnormalities. In neuroblastomas, wide hemizygous deletions in 1p36.23-1p36.32 have been described suggesting that the 1p36 region contains a tumour-suppressor gene involved in malignancy. A role for phosphoinositide (PI)-specific phospholipase C (PLC) η2, whose gene maps on 1p36.32, was suggested. PI-PLC η2 belongs to a family of enzymes related to the phosphoinositide signalling pathway, which provide an important intracellular signalling system involved in a variety of cell functions such as hormone secretion, neurotransmitter signal transduction, cell growth, membrane trafficking, ion channel activity, regulation of the cytoskeleton, cell cycle control and apoptosis. Expression of PI-PLC η2 occurs after birth and continues throughout the life. Synapse formation occurs during a short period of postnatal development. Thus, it is likely that PI-PLC η2 acts in formation and maintenance of the neuronal network in the brain. The fact that PI-PLC η2, a highly neuron-specific isozyme, is abundantly expressed in the postnatal brain suggests the importance of PI-PLC η2 in formation and maintenance of the neuronal network in the postnatal brain. Further studies are required to verify the possible involvement of PI-PLC η2 mutation/deletion in central nervous tumour tissues presenting abnormalities of the 1p36 chromosomal band.

  20. Monosomy 1p36 - a multifaceted and still enigmatic syndrome: four clinically diverse cases with shared white matter abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Puusepp, Sanna; Talvik, Inga; Vaher, Ulvi; Rein, Reet; Tammur, Pille; Reimand, Tiia; Teek, Rita; Žilina, Olga; Tomberg, Tiiu; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-05-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome seen in humans. Uniform features of the syndrome include early developmental delay and consequent intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, and characteristic dysmorphic facial features. The gene-rich nature of the chromosomal band, inconsistent deletion sizes and overlapping clinical features have complicated relevant genotype-phenotype correlations. We describe four patients with isolated chromosome 1p36 deletions. All patients shared white matter abnormalities, allowing us to narrow the critical region for white matter involvement to the deletion size of up to 2.5 Mb from the telomere. We hypothesise that there might be a gene(s) responsible for myelin development in the 1p36 subtelomeric region. Other significant clinical findings were progressive spastic paraparesis, epileptic encephalopathy, various skeletal anomalies, Prader-Willi-like phenotype, neoplastic changes - a haemangioma and a benign skin tumour, and in one case, sleep myoclonus, a clinical entity not previously described in association with 1p36 monosomy. Combined with prior studies, our results suggest that the clinical features seen in monosomy 1p36 have more complex causes than a classical contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

  1. Characterization of a variant of t(14;18) negative nodal diffuse follicular lymphoma with CD23 expression, 1p36/TNFRSF14 abnormalities, and STAT6 mutations.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Imran N; Friedman, Julia; Barry-Holson, Keegan Q; Ma, Charles; Thodima, Venkata; Kang, Irene; Padmanabhan, Raghavendra; Dias, Lizalynn M; Kelly, Kevin R; Brynes, Russell K; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Houldsworth, Jane

    2016-06-01

    A predominantly diffuse growth pattern and CD23 co-expression are uncommon findings in nodal follicular lymphoma and can create diagnostic challenges. A single case series in 2009 (Katzenberger et al) proposed a unique morphologic variant of nodal follicular lymphoma, characterized by a predominantly diffuse architecture, lack of the t(14;18) IGH/BCL2 translocation, presence of 1p36 deletion, frequent inguinal lymph node involvement, CD23 co-expression, and low clinical stage. Other studies on CD23+ follicular lymphoma, while associating inguinal location, have not specifically described this architecture. In addition, no follow-up studies have correlated the histopathologic and cytogenetic/molecular features of these cases, and they remain a diagnostic problem. We identified 11 cases of diffuse, CD23+ follicular lymphoma with histopathologic features similar to those described by Katzenberger et al. Along with pertinent clinical information, we detail their histopathology, IGH/BCL2 translocation status, lymphoma-associated chromosomal gains/losses, and assessment of mutations in 220 lymphoma-associated genes by massively parallel sequencing. All cases showed a diffuse growth pattern around well- to ill-defined residual germinal centers, uniform CD23 expression, mixed centrocytic/centroblastic cytology, and expression of at least one germinal center marker. Ten of 11 involved inguinal lymph nodes, 5 solely. By fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, the vast majority lacked IGH/BCL2 translocation (9/11). Deletion of 1p36 was observed in five cases and included TNFRSF14. Of the six cases lacking 1p36 deletion, TNFRSF14 mutations were identified in three, highlighting the strong association of 1p36/TNFRSF14 abnormalities with this follicular lymphoma variant. In addition, 9 of the 11 cases tested (82%) had STAT6 mutations and nuclear P-STAT6 expression was detectable in the mutated cases by immunohistochemistry. The proportion of STAT6 mutations is higher than

  2. ECK, a human EPH-related gene, maps to 1p36.1, a common region of alteration in human cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Sulman, E.P.; Brodeur, G.M.; Ikegaki, N.

    1997-03-01

    Mouse eck, a member of the EPH gene family, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 4. The syntenic relationship between this chromosome and human chromosome 1 suggests that the human ECK gene maps to the distal short arm of human chromosome 1 (1p). Since this region is frequently deleted or altered in certain tumors of neuroectodermal origin, it is important to define the specific chromosomal localization of the human ECK gene. PCR screening of a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel by ECK-specific primers showed that ECK is indeed localized to human chromosome 1. Additional PCR screening of a regional screening panel for chromosome 1p indicated that ECK is localized to 1p36, distal to FUCA1. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with an ECK-specific P1 clone showed that ECK maps proximal to genetic marker D1S228. Taken together, the data suggest that ECK maps to 1p36.1, a region that is frequently deleted in neuroblastoma, melanoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  3. RAP1GA1: A candidate tumor suppressor locus in 1p36.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ranade, K.; Hussussian, C.J.; Higgins, P.

    1994-09-01

    The rap1/Krev-1 gene (RAP1A) encodes a p21-related protein that suppresses transformation by activated p21{sup ras}. The GTPase activating protein (GAP) gene for p21{sup rap1A} (RAP1GA1) has recently been assigned to chromosome 1p36.1-p35, a region of the genome that is frequently involved in deletions and rearrangements in several different tumors including breast, colon and hepatocellular carcinomas, melanoma, and neuroblastoma. GAP genes negatively regulate the activity of p21 proteins by catalyzing the conversion of the active GTP-bound forms to the inactive GDP-bound forms. The physiological function of p21{sup rap1A}-GAP makes it a strong candidate as a tumor suppressor gene that may have a role in the development of one or more of these malignancies. We have refined the localization of RAP1GA1 by linkage analysis with a highly informative (CA){sub n} repeat contained within the gene, and demonstrated that it is within the minimal deleted region for breast and colon carcinomas, and that it is excluded from the minimally deleted region in melanoma and neuroblastoma. Genetic mapping in the mouse demonstrated that Rap1ga1 is located {approximately}10 cM proximal to Pnd and therefore maps within the interval containing the modifier of Min gene (Mom-1) and the plasmocytoma susceptibility locus (Pcts). The human RAP1GA1 gene contains at least 27 exons. The coding region contains 22 exons, and there are at least five 5{prime}-UT exons that are assembled in a complex pattern of alternative splicing in different tissues. The localization of RAP1GA1 makes it a very strong candidate for a role as a modifier gene involved in the common secondary abnormalities involving 1p36 in several different carcinomas. The potential role of RAP1GA1 in these malignancies is currently being investigated by sequence analysis of breast and colon carcinomas with loss of heterozygosity in 1p36.

  4. Disruption of chromosomal locus 1p36 differentially modulates TAp73 and ΔNp73 expression in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hesham M.; Varney, Michelle L.; Jain, Smrati; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dave, Bhavana J.

    2015-01-01

    The TP73 gene is located at the chromosome 1p36 locus that is commonly disrupted or deleted in follicular lymphoma (FL) with poor prognosis. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of the pro-apoptotic TAp73 and anti-apoptotic ΔNp73 isoforms in FL cases with normal or abnormal 1p36. We observed a significant increase in ΔNp73 expression and ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio, lower expression of cleaved caspase-3 and a higher frequency of Ki-67 and PCNA positive cells in FL cases with abnormal 1p36. A negative correlation between the ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and a positive correlation between ΔNp73 expression and Ki-67 or PCNA were observed. The expression of TAp73 and its pro-apoptotic transcriptional targets Bim, Puma, and Noxa were significantly lower in FL compared to reactive follicular hyperplasia. Together, our data demonstrates that 1p36 disruption is associated with increased ΔNp73 expression, decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation in FL. PMID:24660851

  5. Disruption of chromosomal locus 1p36 differentially modulates TAp73 and ΔNp73 expression in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hesham M; Varney, Michelle L; Jain, Smrati; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Singh, Rakesh K; Dave, Bhavana J

    2014-12-01

    The TP73 gene is located at the chromosome 1p36 locus that is commonly disrupted or deleted in follicular lymphoma (FL) with poor prognosis. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of the pro-apoptotic TAp73 and anti-apoptotic ΔNp73 isoforms in cases of FL with normal or abnormal 1p36. We observed a significant increase in ΔNp73 expression and ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio, lower expression of cleaved caspase-3 and a higher frequency of Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in cases of FL with abnormal 1p36. A negative correlation between the ΔNp73:TAp73 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression, and a positive correlation between ΔNp73 expression and Ki-67 or PCNA, were observed. The expression of TAp73 and its pro-apoptotic transcriptional targets BIM. PUMA and NOXA were significantly lower in FL compared to reactive follicular hyperplasia. Together, our data demonstrate that 1p36 disruption is associated with increased ΔNp73 expression, decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation in FL.

  6. Recurrent loss of heterozygosity in 1p36 associated with TNFRSF14 mutations in IRF4 translocation negative pediatric follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Salaverria, Itziar; Burkhardt, Birgit; Szczepanowski, Monika; Baudis, Michael; Bens, Susanne; de Leval, Laurence; Garcia-Orad, Africa; Horn, Heike; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Pellissery, Shoji; Klapper, Wolfram; Oschlies, Ilske; Siebert, Reiner

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric follicular lymphoma is a rare disease that differs genetically and clinically from its adult counterpart. With the exception of pediatric follicular lymphoma with IRF4-translocation, the genetic events associated with these lymphomas have not yet been defined. We applied array-comparative genomic hybridization and molecular inversion probe assay analyses to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 18 patients aged 18 years and under with IRF4 translocation negative follicular lymphoma. All evaluable cases lacked t(14;18). Only 6 of 16 evaluable cases displayed chromosomal imbalances with gains or amplifications of 6pter-p24.3 (including IRF4) and deletion and copy number neutral-loss of heterozygosity in 1p36 (including TNFRSF14) being most frequent. Sequencing of TNFRSF14 located in the minimal region of loss in 1p36.32 showed nine mutations in 7 cases from our series. Two subsets of pediatric follicular lymphoma were delineated according to the presence of molecular alterations, one with genomic aberrations associated with higher grade and/or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma component and more widespread disease, and another one lacking genetic alterations associated with more limited disease.

  7. Ebstein anomaly: Genetic heterogeneity and association with microdeletions 1p36 and 8p23.1.

    PubMed

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Laura; Lepri, Francesca; Giuffrida, Maria Grazia; Guida, Valentina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Capolino, Rossella; Torres, Barbara; De Luca, Alessandro; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2011-09-01

    Ebstein anomaly is an uncommon congenital heart defect (CHD), characterized by downward displacement of the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. To uncover the genetic associations with Ebstein anomaly, we have searched chromosomal imbalances using standard cytogenetic and array-CGH analysis, and single gene conditions associated with syndromic Ebstein anomaly (with extracardiac anomalies), and screened GATA4 and NKX2.5 mutations in nonsyndromic patients (without extracardiac anomalies). Between January 1997 and September 2009, 44 consecutive patients with Ebstein anomaly were evaluated in two centers of Pediatric Cardiology. Ebstein anomaly was syndromic in 12 (27%) patients, and nonsyndromic in 32 (73%). A recognizable syndrome or complex was diagnosed by clinical criteria in seven patients. In one syndromic patient an 18q deletion was diagnosed by standard cytogenetic analysis. Array-CGH analysis performed in 10 of the 12 syndromic patients detected an interstitial deletion of about 4 Mb at 8p23.1 in one patient, and a deletion 1pter > 1p36.32/dup Xpter- > Xp22.32 in another patient. In the 28 of 32 nonsyndromic patients who underwent molecular testing, no mutation in GATA4 and NKX2.5 genes were detected. We conclude that Ebstein anomaly is a genetically heterogeneous defect, and that deletion 1p36 and deletion 8p23.1 are the most frequent chromosomal imbalances associated with Ebstein anomaly. Candidate genes include the GATA4 gene (in patients with del 8p23.1), NKX2.5 (based on published patients with isolated Ebstein anomaly) and a hypothetical gene in patients with del 1p36).

  8. Further delineation of novel 1p36 rearrangements by array-CGH analysis: narrowing the breakpoints and clarifying the "extended" phenotype.

    PubMed

    Giannikou, Krinio; Fryssira, Helen; Oikonomakis, Vasilis; Syrmou, Areti; Kosma, Konstantina; Tzetis, Maria; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Kanavakis, Emmanouel

    2012-09-15

    High resolution oligonucleotide array Comparative Genome Hybridization technology (array-CGH) has greatly assisted the recognition of the 1p36 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. The 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered to be one of the most common subtelomeric microdeletion syndromes and has an incidence of ~1 in 5000 live births, while respectively the "pure" 1p36 microduplication has not been reported so far. We present seven new patients who were referred for genetic evaluation due to Developmental Delay (DD), Mental Retardation (MR), and distinct dysmorphic features. They all had a wide phenotypic spectrum. In all cases previous standard karyotypes were negative. Array-CGH analysis revealed five patients with interstitial 1p36 microdeletion (four de novo and one maternal) and two patients with de novo reciprocal duplication of different sizes. These were the first reported "pure" 1p36 microduplication cases so far. Three of our patients carrying the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome were also found to have additional pathogenetic aberrations. These findings (del 3q27.1; del 4q21.22-q22.1; del 16p13.3; dup 21q21.2-q21.3; del Xp22.12) might contribute to the patients' severe phenotype, acting as additional modifiers of their clinical manifestations. We review and compare the clinical and array-CGH findings of our patients to previously reported cases with the aim of clearly delineating more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations for the 1p36 syndrome that could allow for a more precise prognosis.

  9. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  10. Further delineation of nonhomologous-based recombination and evidence for subtelomeric segmental duplications in 1p36 rearrangements.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Gajecka, Marzena; Kim, Chong A; Gentles, Andrew J; Glotzbach, Caron D; Shaffer, Lisa G; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2009-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of subtelomeric rearrangements are now beginning to be elucidated. Breakpoint sequencing analysis of 1p36 rearrangements has made important contributions to this line of inquiry. Despite the unique architecture of segmental duplications inherent to human subtelomeres, no common mechanism has been identified thus far and different nonexclusive recombination-repair mechanisms seem to predominate. In order to gain further insights into the mechanisms of chromosome breakage, repair, and stabilization mediating subtelomeric rearrangements in humans, we investigated the constitutional rearrangements of 1p36. Cloning of the breakpoint junctions in a complex rearrangement and three non-reciprocal translocations revealed similarities at the junctions, such as microhomology of up to three nucleotides, along with no significant sequence identity in close proximity to the breakpoint regions. All the breakpoints appeared to be unique and their occurrence was limited to non-repetitive, unique DNA sequences. Several recombination- or cleavage-associated motifs that may promote non-homologous recombination were observed in close proximity to the junctions. We conclude that NHEJ is likely the mechanism of DNA repair that generates these rearrangements. Additionally, two apparently pure terminal deletions were also investigated, and the refinement of the breakpoint regions identified two distinct genomic intervals ~25-kb apart, each containing a series of 1p36 specific segmental duplications with 90-98% identity. Segmental duplications can serve as substrates for ectopic homologous recombination or stimulate genomic rearrangements.

  11. Chromothripsis with at least 12 breaks at 1p36.33-p35.3 in a boy with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Bruno Faulin; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Costa, Silvia; Rosenberg, Carla; Ribeiro-Bicudo, Lucilene Arilho

    2015-12-01

    Terminal deletion in the short arm of chromosome 1 results in a disorder described as 1p36 deletion syndrome. The resulting phenotype varies among patients including mental retardation, developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, seizures, heart defects, and distinct facies. In the present case, we performed array-comparative genomic hybridization in a boy with multiple congenital malformations presenting some features overlapping the 1p36 deletion phenotype for whom chromosomal analysis did not reveal a terminal deletion in 1p. Results showed complex chromosome rearrangements involving the 1p36.33-p35.3 region. While the mechanism of origin of these rearrangements is still unclear, chromothripsis-a single catastrophic event leading to shattering chromosomes or chromosome regions and rejoining of the segments-has been described to occur in a fraction of cancers. The presence of at least 12 clustered breaks at 1p and apparent lack of mosaicism in the present case suggests that a single event like chromothripsis occurred. This finding suggests that chromothripsis is responsible for some constitutive complex chromosome rearrangements.

  12. The 1p36 Tumor Suppressor KIF 1Bβ Is Required for Calcineurin Activation, Controlling Mitochondrial Fission and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuijie; Fell, Stuart M; Surova, Olga; Smedler, Erik; Wallis, Karin; Chen, Zhi Xiong; Hellman, Ulf; Johnsen, John Inge; Martinsson, Tommy; Kenchappa, Rajappa S; Uhlén, Per; Kogner, Per; Schlisio, Susanne

    2016-01-25

    KIF1Bβ is a candidate 1p36 tumor suppressor that regulates apoptosis in the developing sympathetic nervous system. We found that KIF1Bβ activates the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CN) by stabilizing the CN-calmodulin complex, relieving enzymatic autoinhibition and enabling CN substrate recognition. CN is the key mediator of cellular responses to Ca(2+) signals and its deregulation is implicated in cancer, cardiac, neurodegenerative, and immune disease. We show that KIF1Bβ affects mitochondrial dynamics through CN-dependent dephosphorylation of Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), causing mitochondrial fission and apoptosis. Furthermore, KIF1Bβ actuates recognition of all known CN substrates, implying a general mechanism for KIF1Bβ in Ca(2+) signaling and how Ca(2+)-dependent signaling is executed by CN. Pathogenic KIF1Bβ mutations previously identified in neuroblastomas and pheochromocytomas all fail to activate CN or stimulate DRP1 dephosphorylation. Importantly, KIF1Bβ and DRP1 are silenced in 1p36 hemizygous-deleted neuroblastomas, indicating that deregulation of calcineurin and mitochondrial dynamics contributes to high-risk and poor-prognosis neuroblastoma.

  13. Cloning and characterization of CpG islands of the human chromosome 1p36 region

    SciTech Connect

    Ellmeier, W.; Barnas, C.; Kobrna, A.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of CpG islands to human chromosome 1p36 as a means for the isolation of genes using hybridization techniques. Two cDNA clones encode the human transcription factor E2F-2 and the dominant-negative helix-loop-helix gene ID3. Further information regarding the organization of human chromosome 1 was accomplished using electrophoresis. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Analysis of chromosome band 1p36 alterations by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with a microclone DNA bank.

    PubMed

    Zink, D; Weith, A; Martinsson, T; Schwab, M

    1991-09-01

    Alterations of the distal portion of chromosome Ip are a recurrent abnormality of several types of human cancer. In this study we show that chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with a regional 1p36 DNA bank generated by microdissection and microcloning can be employed to detect translocations involving 1p36.

  15. Adherens junctional associated protein-1: a novel 1p36 tumor suppressor candidate in gliomas (Review).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Fee, Brian E; Rivas, Miriam V; Lin, James; Adamson, David Cory

    2014-07-01

    In a broad range of human cancers 1p36 has been a mutational hotspot which strongly suggests that the loss of tumor suppressor activity maps to this genomic region during tumorigenesis. Adherens junctional associated protein-1 (AJAP1; also known as Shrew1) was initially discovered as a novel transmembrane protein of adherent junctions in epithelial cells. Gene profiling showed AJAP1 on 1p36 is frequently lost or epigenetically silenced. AJAP1 may affect cell motility, migration, invasion and proliferation by unclear mechanisms. AJAP1 may be translocated to the nucleus, via its interaction with β-catenin complexes, where it can regulate gene transcription, then possibly have a potent impact on cell cycling and apoptosis. Significantly, loss of AJAP1 expression predicts poor clinical outcome of patients with malignant gliomas such as GBM and it may serve as a promising tumor suppressor-related target. In this review, we summarize and discuss current knowledge that may identify AJAP1 as a tumor suppressor in gliomas.

  16. Common variants at 1p36 are associated with superior frontal gyrus volume.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Ikeda, M; Yamashita, F; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Fukunaga, M; Nemoto, K; Takahashi, T; Tochigi, M; Onitsuka, T; Yamasue, H; Matsuo, K; Iidaka, T; Iwata, N; Suzuki, M; Takeda, M; Kasai, K; Ozaki, N

    2014-01-01

    The superior frontal gyrus (SFG), an area of the brain frequently found to have reduced gray matter in patients with schizophrenia, is involved in self-awareness and emotion, which are impaired in schizophrenia. However, no genome-wide association studies of SFG volume have investigated in patients with schizophrenia. To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with SFG volumes, we demonstrated a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gray matter volumes in the right or left SFG of 158 patients with schizophrenia and 378 healthy subjects. We attempted to bioinformatically ascertain the potential effects of the top hit polymorphism on the expression levels of genes at the genome-wide region. We found associations between five variants on 1p36.12 and the right SFG volume at a widely used benchmark for genome-wide significance (P<5.0 × 10(-8)). The strongest association was observed at rs4654899, an intronic SNP in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma, 3 (EIF4G3) gene on 1p36.12 (P=7.5 × 10(-9)). No SNP with genome-wide significance was found in the volume of the left SFG (P>5.0 × 10(-8)); however, the rs4654899 polymorphism was identified as the locus with the second strongest association with the volume of the left SFG (P=1.5 × 10(-6)). In silico analyses revealed a proxy SNP of rs4654899 had effect on gene expression of two genes, HP1BP3 lying 3' to EIF4G3 (P=7.8 × 10(-6)) and CAPN14 at 2p (P=6.3 × 10(-6)), which are expressed in moderate-to-high levels throughout the adult human SFG. These results contribute to understand genetic architecture of a brain structure possibly linked to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  17. Chromosome 1p36 in migraine with aura: association study of the 5HT(1D) locus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Miles D; Noble-Topham, Sandra; Percy, Maire E; Andrade, Danielle M; Ebers, George C

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with aura (MA) may share some but not all risk factors with other forms of migraine. As common migraine without aura (MO) has been associated with the chromosome 1p36 locus, we tested its involvement in MA by using two-point parametric linkage analysis to analyze 64 multiplex MA families. A logarithm of the odds score of 1.9 was suggestive of chromosome 1p36 linkage to MA. The transmission disequilibrium test analysis was then performed in 79 nuclear families with one MA parent and one MA offspring. We identified the presence of genetic association at chromosome 1p36 with MA (P=0.045, Bonferroni corrected): the locus encoding the 5HT(1D) receptor gene. Although these data suggest that the 1p36 locus may protect against MA, consistent with the role of the 5HT(1D) receptor in migraine treatment with triptan drugs, the study is subject to the limitations associated with studying a small number of affected families. As a result, we contrast evidence suggesting that the chromosome 1p36 locus is strongly MO associated with our finding that 1p36 has a more limited contribution to MA in the families we analyzed. Further work using a genome-wide association study approach in familial typical migraine, consisting of those affected by MO or MA, will serve to further distinguish how and why MA differs from MO.

  18. Physical mapping of the retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger gene RIZ to D1S228 on chromosome 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Buyse, I.M.; Huang, Shi; Takahashi, Ei-ichi

    1996-05-15

    The retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger gene RIZ is a member of the recently discovered PR domain family that includes the MDS1-EVI1 breakpoint gene involved in human leukemia. To help understand the role of RIZ in human diseases, we have determined the cytogenetic and physical localizations of the RIZ gene. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we determined that RIZ maps to 1p36. On the physical map, RIZ is adjacent to the polymorphic marker D1S228. We suggest that the RIZ gene may be a candidate target of 1p36 alterations that commonly occur in neuroendocrine, breast, liver, colon, and lymphoid tumors. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  19. A deletion mutant defines DQ beta variants with DR4 positive DQw3 positive haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Nepom, B S; Kim, S J; Nepom, G T

    1986-10-01

    We describe the production of an HLA deletion mutation by radiation mutagenesis of a DR4- and DQw3-homozygous, Dw4- and Dw14-heterozygous cell line designed to analyze polymorphisms associated with DR4 and DQw3. Southern blot analysis confirms a deletion of class I and class II genes on one haplotype. Variation in DQ beta alleles associated with DQw3 was previously described by characteristic RFLP patterns for a DQ beta bene. One pattern, which correlated precisely with A-10-83 monoclonal antibody reactivity (TA10), defined an allele which we call DQ"3.1". The mutant cell line has lost the polymorphic bands on Southern blots corresponding to the DQ"3.1" allele, while the intact Dw14 haplotype retains the alternate allele at DQ beta which is DQw-3 positive. TA10-negative. These data demonstrate the segregation of two DQw3 positive DQ beta allelic variants, both associated with DR4, which can be distinguished on the basis of both RFLP and monoclonal antibody reactivity. PMID:2875977

  20. CD137, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, is located on chromosome 1p36, in a cluster of related genes, and colocalizes with several malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, H; Arden, K; Lotz, M

    1997-06-27

    CD137 (ILA/4-1BB) is a member of the tumor-necrosis-factor receptor family. Members of this receptor family and their structurally related ligands are important regulators of a wide variety of physiological processes and play an especially important role in the regulation of immune responses. CD137 regulates cell proliferation and survival of T-lymphocytes. Using Southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction, we localized the CD137 gene to chromosome 1p36. This chromosomal region harbors the genes of several other members of this receptor family and is associated with deletions and rearrangements in several malignancies.

  1. The human paired domain gene PAX7 (Hup1) maps to chromosome 1p35-1p36. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, B.W. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-07-01

    The human PAX7 gene encodes a protein containing a domain homologous to the Drosophila paired box first described in three segmentation genes. In addition to the paired box, the gene contains the conserved octa-peptide and a paired-type homeobox. Two of the five known human PAX genes have been implicated in human disorders so far. Here the authors have used a somatic cell hybrid panel to localize PAX7 to human chromosome 1. In situ hybridization shows that PAX7 is confined to the short arm of chromosome 1 at 1p35-1p36.2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Fine mapping of variants associated with endometriosis in the WNT4 region on chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Luong, Hien Tt; Painter, Jodie N; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Chapman, Brett; Henders, Anjali K; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Montgomery, Grant W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies show strong evidence of association with endometriosis for markers on chromosome 1p36 spanning the potential candidate genes WNT4, CDC42 and LINC00339. WNT4 is involved in development of the uterus, and the expression of CDC42 and LINC00339 are altered in women with endometriosis. We conducted fine mapping to examine the role of coding variants in WNT4 and CDC42 and determine the key SNPs with strongest evidence of association in this region. We identified rare coding variants in WNT4 and CDC42 present only in endometriosis cases. The frequencies were low and cannot account for the common signal associated with increased risk of endometriosis. Genotypes for five common SNPs in the region of chromosome 1p36 show stronger association signals when compared with rs7521902 reported in published genome scans. Of these, three SNPs rs12404660, rs3820282, and rs55938609 were located in DNA sequences with potential functional roles including overlap with transcription factor binding sites for FOXA1, FOXA2, ESR1, and ESR2. Functional studies will be required to identify the gene or genes implicated in endometriosis risk.

  3. Bone mineral density is linked to 1p36 and 7p15-13 in a southern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Hoi Yee Gloria; Kung, Wai Chee Annie; Huang, Qing Yang

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage scans have identified a number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting bone mineral density (BMD), mainly in the Caucasian population. In this study, we aim to determine whether seven well-replicated QTLs also contribute to BMD variation in the southern Han Chinese population. Thirty-three microsatellite markers in the proximity of seven QTLs were genotyped in 1,459 subjects from 306 families ascertained through a proband with BMD Z-score equal to or less than -1.3 at either the lumbar spine or hip. Regression-based multipoint linkage analysis was performed. In the entire study population, good linkage evidence of total hip BMD to 7p14 [maximum log of odds (LOD) score (MLS) = 2.75; nominal P = 0.0002] and 1p36 (MLS = 1.6, P = 0.003) was revealed. In the subgroup analysis of 1,166 female subjects, MLS of 3.42, 2.65, 2.42, and 1.54 were obtained on 7p12 for total hip, lumbar spine, trochanter, and femoral neck BMD, respectively. A suggestive linkage signal was achieved at 7p14-15 with a MLS of 3.38 and 3.15 for trochanter and total hip BMD in the 678 premenopausal women, and at 7p12 for femoral neck and total hip BMD with MLS of 2.22 and 3.04 in postmenopausal women. Subgroup analysis of premenopausal women also provided additional evidence of suggestive linkage of total hip BMD to 1p36, with a MLS of 2.84 at 17.07 cM. Thus, linkage of BMD to 1p36 and 7p15-13 is confirmed in southern Chinese. Computational prioritization strategy and published genome-wide association studies suggested RERE and SFRP4 as two promising candidate genes in which variants responsible for the linkage signal may be identified by follow-up gene-wide association studies.

  4. Localization of the human B-type natriuretic peptide precursor (NPPB) gene to chromosome 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.; Weiss, S.

    1995-03-20

    Cardiac myocytes synthesize and secrete a family of peptide hormones with potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory properties. These peptides are derived from precursor molecules that are encoded by two different genes, the atrial natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) and the B-type natriuretic peptide or natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB). A human genomic clone for the NPPB gene was used to determine the chromosomal location of the NPPB gene. Analysis of Southern blot hybridization to DNAs from various somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization allowed assignment of the NPPB locus to human chromosome 1p36. This location coincided with that of the NPPA locus; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis placed NPPA and NPPB within 50 kb of each other. This close chromosomal linkage, together with the conserved primary sequences and structural organization of the two natriuretic peptide precursor genes, suggests that the natriuretic peptide loci may have evolved from a common ancestor gene. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Use of a multiethnic approach to identify rheumatoid- arthritis-susceptibility loci, 1p36 and 17q12.

    PubMed

    Kurreeman, Fina A S; Stahl, Eli A; Okada, Yukinori; Liao, Katherine; Diogo, Dorothée; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Freudenberg, Jan; Kochi, Yuta; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Gupta, Namrata; Sandor, Cynthia; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Padyukov, Leonid; Suzuki, Akari; Siminovitch, Kathy; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K; Hughes, Laura B; Reynolds, Richard J; Bridges, S Louis; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M

    2012-03-01

    We have previously shown that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk alleles overlap between different ethnic groups. Here, we utilize a multiethnic approach to show that we can effectively discover RA risk alleles. Thirteen putatively associated SNPs that had not yet exceeded genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10(-8)) in our previous RA genome-wide association study (GWAS) were analyzed in independent sample sets consisting of 4,366 cases and 17,765 controls of European, African American, and East Asian ancestry. Additionally, we conducted an overall association test across all 65,833 samples (a GWAS meta-analysis plus the replication samples). Of the 13 SNPs investigated, four were significantly below the study-wide Bonferroni corrected p value threshold (p < 0.0038) in the replication samples. Two SNPs (rs3890745 at the 1p36 locus [p = 2.3 × 10(-12)] and rs2872507 at the 17q12 locus [p = 1.7 × 10(-9)]) surpassed genome-wide significance in all 16,659 RA cases and 49,174 controls combined. We used available GWAS data to fine map these two loci in Europeans and East Asians, and we found that the same allele conferred risk in both ethnic groups. A series of bioinformatic analyses identified TNFRSF14-MMEL1 at the 1p36 locus and IKZF3-ORMDL3-GSDMB at the 17q12 locus as the genes most likely associated with RA. These findings demonstrate empirically that a multiethnic approach is an effective strategy for discovering RA risk loci, and they suggest that combining GWASs across ethnic groups represents an efficient strategy for gaining statistical power.

  6. Linkage and linkage disequilibrium in chromosome band 1p36 in American Chaldeans with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, J H; Nicolae, D L; Ramos, R; Fields, C T; Rabenau, K; Corradino, S; Brant, S R; Espinosa, R; LeBeau, M; Hanauer, S B; Bodzin, J; Bonen, D K

    2000-05-22

    The idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are complex genetic disorders involving chronic inflammation of the intestines. Multiple genetic loci have been implicated through genome-wide searches, but refinement of localization sufficient to undertake positional cloning efforts has been problematic. This difficulty can be obviated through identification of ancestrally shared regions in genetic isolates, such as the Chaldean population, a Roman Catholic group from Iraq. We analyzed four multiply affected American Chaldean families with inflammatory bowel disease not known to be related. We observed evidence for linkage and linkage disequilibrium in precisely the same region of chromosome band 1p36 reported previously in an outbred population. Maximal evidence for linkage was observed near D1S1597 by multipoint analysis (MLOD = 3.01, P = 6.1 x 10(-5)). A shared haplotype (D1S507 to D1S1628) was observed over 27 cM between two families. There was homozygous sharing of a 5 cM portion of that haplotype in one family and over a <1 cM region in the second family. Homozygous sharing of this haplotype near D1S2697 and D1S3669 was observed in one individual in a third multiply affected family, with heterozygous sharing in a fourth family. Linkage in outbred families as well as in this genetic isolate indicates that a pathophysiologically crucial IBD susceptibility gene is located in 1p36. These findings provide a unique opportunity to refine the localization and identify a major susceptibility gene for a complex genetic disorder.

  7. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J.; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  8. Effects of B vitamin deletion in chemically defined diets on brood development in Camponotus vicinus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Mankowski, Mark E; Morrell, J J

    2014-08-01

    The potential contributions of B vitamins by a yeast associate to the nutrition of the carpenter ant Camponotus vicinus Mayr was examined as part of an effort to develop a chemically defined diet. This diet was used to test the effects of individual B vitamin and other nutrient deletions on larval development. The chemically defined diet contained amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and other growth factors in a liquid sucrose matrix. C. vicinus worker colonies with third- and fourth-instar larvae were fed a complete artificial diet or that diet with a component deleted for a 12-wk period. There was a significant effect of diet on larval growth and number of adult worker ants produced in the overall nutrient deletion test, but ant development was often better on incomplete diets with one B vitamin deleted compared with the complete holidic basal diet. Thiamine deletion resulted in significantly higher brood weights compared with the complete diet. Diets of sugar water plus all B vitamins, sugar water only, or a diet minus all B vitamins and cholesterol were associated with significantly lower brood weights. Significantly more adult worker ants were produced by worker colonies fed diets minus cholesterol, choline, thiamine, or riboflavin compared with the complete basal diet. The results suggest that the diet, while suitable for rearing, could benefit from further study to better define component levels. The potential relationship of C. vicinus with yeast associates is discussed in relation to further studies. PMID:25195415

  9. Effects of B vitamin deletion in chemically defined diets on brood development in Camponotus vicinus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Mankowski, Mark E; Morrell, J J

    2014-08-01

    The potential contributions of B vitamins by a yeast associate to the nutrition of the carpenter ant Camponotus vicinus Mayr was examined as part of an effort to develop a chemically defined diet. This diet was used to test the effects of individual B vitamin and other nutrient deletions on larval development. The chemically defined diet contained amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and other growth factors in a liquid sucrose matrix. C. vicinus worker colonies with third- and fourth-instar larvae were fed a complete artificial diet or that diet with a component deleted for a 12-wk period. There was a significant effect of diet on larval growth and number of adult worker ants produced in the overall nutrient deletion test, but ant development was often better on incomplete diets with one B vitamin deleted compared with the complete holidic basal diet. Thiamine deletion resulted in significantly higher brood weights compared with the complete diet. Diets of sugar water plus all B vitamins, sugar water only, or a diet minus all B vitamins and cholesterol were associated with significantly lower brood weights. Significantly more adult worker ants were produced by worker colonies fed diets minus cholesterol, choline, thiamine, or riboflavin compared with the complete basal diet. The results suggest that the diet, while suitable for rearing, could benefit from further study to better define component levels. The potential relationship of C. vicinus with yeast associates is discussed in relation to further studies.

  10. Monosomy 1p36.31-33{yields}pter due to a paternal reciprocal translocation: Prognostic significance of FISH analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Bui, The-Hung; Wallin, A.

    1996-10-02

    A rare monosomy 1p36.31-33{r_arrow}pter was found in a child with physical anomalies, psycho-motor retardation, and seizures. Cytogenetic investigation suggested an unbalanced translocation between 1p and an acrocentric chromosome, but the rearrangement was difficult to assess accurately using conventional chromosome banding techniques. The half-cryptic translocation was further characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization, and the aberrant chromosome 1 was shown to be a derivate of a paternal reciprocal translocation t(1;15)(p36.31-33;p11.2-12). The breakpoints on chromosome 1 and 15 were defined in detail using locus specific probes. The rearrangement did not include the region on chromosome 1p which previously has been suggested to predispose to the development of neuroblastoma in a case with a constitutional translocation. At 3 6/12 years, the patient has no clinical signs of this disease, which illustrates the prognostic significance of this investigation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Clinical features of nine males with molecularly defined deletions of the Y chromosome long arm.

    PubMed

    Salo, P; Ignatius, J; Simola, K O; Tahvanainen, E; Kääriäinen, H

    1995-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome have previously been associated with azoospermia and short stature. We report the results of a detailed clinical and molecular study of nine males with partial deletions of Yq. Special emphasis was laid on congenital anomalies and dysmorphic features. Some of the patients have developmental problems or distinct facial features, namely a small chin and mouth, a high arched or cleft palate, downward slanting palpebral fissures, high nasal bridge, and dysmorphic ears. As far as we know, similar facial dysmorphism has not been previously described in association with del(Yq). These features are not, however, simply correlated to the size of the deletion. In none of these patients could evidence of aberrant Xq-Yq interchange be found.

  12. Setleis syndrome due to inheritance of the 1p36.22p36.21 duplication: evidence for lack of penetrance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Kasparis, Christos; Chen, Brenden; Mei, Hui; Edelmann, Lisa; Moss, Celia; Weaver, David D; Desnick, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Setleis syndrome, focal facial dermal dysplasia type III (FFDD3, MIM #227260), is characterized by scar-like bitemporal lesions and other ocular and facial dysmorphic features. The syndrome results from recessive mutations in the TWIST2 gene, encoding a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor or de novo genomic duplication or triplication, which include 1.3 Mb at 1p36.22p36.21, or other yet undefined lesions, emphasizing the syndrome's genetic heterogeneity. Recently, three patients were reported with 1p36.22p36.21 duplications/triplication that had the characteristic FFDD3 features and developmental delay or intellectual disabilities. Here, we describe a male with this microduplication, and the typical FFDD3 phenotype, but normal intelligence. Notably, his duplication was inherited from his father who did not have any FFDD3 manifestations, indicating lack of penetrance of the 1p36.22p36.21 microduplication. These findings emphasize phenotypic heterogeneity of the 1p36.22p36.21 copy number variant and the importance of screening the parents of patients with the 1p36.22p36.21 copy number variant to determine whether the duplication/triplication is de novo or inherited, for informed reproductive and genetic counseling.

  13. Constitutional Ip36 deletion in a child with neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Biegel, J.A.; Zackai, E.H.; Scher, C.D.; Emanuel, B.S. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia ); White, P.S.; Marshall, H.N.; Fujimori, Minoru; Brodeur, G.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a child with dysmorphic features, as well as developmental and growth delay, who developed neuroblastoma at 5 mo of age. Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes revealed an interstitial deletion of 1p36.1 [r arrow] 1p36.2, which was apparent only with high-resolution banding. Molecular analysis with a collection of polymorphic DNA probes for 1p confirmed an interstitial deletion involving subbands of 1p36. Deletions of this region are a common finding in neuroblastoma cells from patients with advanced stages of disease. Therefore, these results (a) suggest that constitutional deletion of this region predisposed the patient to the development of neuroblastoma and (b) support the localization of a neuroblastoma tumor-suppressor locus to 1p36. 48 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Deletions of a differentially methylated CpG island at SNRPN define a putative imprinting control region

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, J.S.,; Nakao, M.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are associated with paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, of gene expression within human chromosome 15q11-q13, and are caused by deletion, uniparental disomy, or other mutations. Four transcripts designated PAR-5, PAR-7, PAR-1 and PAR-4 were isolated and localized to a region within 300 kb telomeric to the gene encoding small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN). Analysis of the transcripts in cultured fibroblasts and lymphoblasts from deletion patients demonstrated that SNRPN, PAR-5 and PAR-1 are expressed exclusively from the paternal chromosome, defining an imprinted domain that spans at least 200 kb. All three imprinted transcripts were absent in cells from three PWS patients (one pair of sibs and one sporadic case) with small deletions that involve a differentially methylated CpG island containing a previously undescribed 5{prime} untranslated exon ({alpha}) of SNRPN. Methylation of the CpG island is specific for the maternal chromosome consistent with paternal expression of the imprinted domain. One deletion, which is benign when maternally transmitted, extends upstream <30 kb from the CpG island, and is associated with altered methylation centromeric to SNRPN, and loss of transcription telomeric to SNRPN, implying the presence of an imprinting control region around the CpG island containing exon {alpha}.

  15. The RAP1GA1 locus for human Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 maps to chromosome 1p36.1-->p35.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P G; McCormick, F; Cavenee, W K; Arden, K C

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the locus for Rap1-GTPase activating protein 1 (RAP1GA1) to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments independently confirmed the chromosomal localization and refined it to 1p36.1-->p35.

  16. Assignment of the human FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP) gene to chromosome 1p36 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.A.; Rosen, C.A.; Carter, K.C.

    1996-04-15

    This report describes the localization of the human FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP) gene to human chromosome 1p36 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This protein is the binding site for rapamycin and FK506, two potent immunosuppressive drugs. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Copy number increase of 1p36.33 and mitochondrial genome amplification in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Baik, Seung-Youn; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2007-03-01

    Array CGH has been applied to detect chromosomal aberrations in cancer and genetic diseases. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B lymphocytes are transformed to continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), which are a very common genome resource for human genetic studies. We used bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array CGH to assess a chromosomal aberration of LCLs in EBV-induced B-cell transformation. At early passages, LCLs exhibited a greater copy number variation in 1p36.33 compared to primary B-cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the increase in the copy number in 1p36.33. Because a segment of 1p36.33 is nearly identical to a part of the mitochondrial DNA, this increase was attributed to an increase in the copy number of mitochondrial DNA. The expression levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes were elevated in the LCLs, which is consistent with the increased copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA, suggesting that increased mitochondrial biogenesis is indicative of the progression of EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. In addition, our array CGH of LCLs revealed potential copy number polymorphisms of chromosomal segments among Korean populations. Taken together, these findings suggest that LCLs in the early passages preserve the chromosomal integrity of primary B-cells at the cytogenetic level during EBV-transformed B-cell immortalization, except for a copy number variation in 1p36.33 due to increased mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Thus, analyses of array CGH profiles of diseases should take into account the potential for copy number variation of 1p36.33.

  18. Chromosome 1p36.22p36.21 duplications/triplication causes Setleis syndrome (focal facial dermal dysplasia type III).

    PubMed

    Weaver, David D; Norby, Audrey R; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Proud, Virginia K; Spangler, Brooke E; Ming, Jeffrey E; Chisholm, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H; Lee, Beom Hee; Edelmann, Lisa; Desnick, Robert J

    2015-05-01

    Focal facial dermal dysplasias (FFDD) are characterized by congenital bitemporal or preauricular atrophic skin lesions, and either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive inheritance. Setleis syndrome (SS), FFDD type III, is a severe form of FFDD with the ectodermal lesions plus other striking facial features. Autosomal recessive nonsense and frameshift mutations in TWIST2 have been found to cause SS in some but not all individuals. Here, we report on four unrelated individuals, one with an unclassified FFDD and the other three with classic SS. Chromosomal microarray analyses revealed unique copy number variants of 1p36 in two individuals with duplications at 1p36.22p36.21 and one with a triplication at 1p36.22p36.21. The fourth patient had normal chromosomes by microarray analysis. All four patients had normal TWIST2 exonic sequences. We propose that a dosage effect of one or more of the 30 genes in the 1.3 Mb 1p36.22p36.21 region of overlap is responsible for FFDD/SS manifestations in some individuals, and this mechanism would be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. In patients with no duplication/triplication of the 1p36.22p36.21 region and no mutations in TWIST2, there are mutation(s) in one of the 30 genes in this region or mutations in other as yet unidentified genes at different locations that may affect the expressions of genes in this region or act independently to cause this developmental disease phenotype.

  19. High-resolution cytogenetic mapping of the short arm of chromosome 1 with newly isolated 411 cosmid markers by fluorescence in situ hybridization: The precise order of 18 markers on 1p36.1 on prophase chromosomes and {open_quotes}stretched{close_quotes} DNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyama, Takeshi; Inazawa, Johji; Abe, Toshihiko

    1995-01-01

    A high-resolution cytogenetic map of the short arm of chromosome 1 with newly isolated 411 cosmid markers was constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These markers were scattered throughout chromosome 1p, but they were preferentially concentrated on R-band dominant regions such as 1p36, 1p34, 1p32, 1p22, and 1p13. Among these markers, 197 were localized on chromosome band 1p36, a region frequently deleted in neuroblastoma. Of these, 18 were precisely ordered on 1p36.1 by multicolor FISH of prophase chromosomes and {open_quotes}stretched{close_quotes} DNAs as follows: 1pter-163-41-11-1-226-586-568-614-631-665-451-199-190-561-241-74-176-652-1cen. The high-density map of chromosome 1p constructed here can provide useful landmarks for constructing a contig map of the short arm of chromosome 1 with YACs and cosmid clones and will expedite the identification of breakpoints and/or tumor suppressor gene(s) associated with several types of malignant tumors that frequently exhibit chromosomal aberrations or deletions of chromosome 1p. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Defining the Ligand Specificity of the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Luis, Elizabeth; Quiñones, Gabriel; Wranik, Bernd J.; Ramani, Sree R.; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Gonzalez, Lino C.

    2014-01-01

    The growth and guidance of many axons in the developing nervous system require Netrin-mediated activation of Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and other still unknown signaling cues. Commissural axon guidance defects are more severe in DCC mutant mice than Netrin-1 mutant mice, suggesting additional DCC activating signals besides Netrin-1 are involved in proper axon growth. Here we report that interaction screens on extracellular protein microarrays representing over 1,000 proteins uniquely identified Cerebellin 4 (CBLN4), a member of the C1q-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, and Netrin-1 as extracellular DCC-binding partners. Immunofluorescence and radio-ligand binding studies demonstrate that Netrin-1 competes with CBLN4 binding at an overlapping site within the membrane-proximal fibronectin domains (FN) 4–6 of DCC and binds with ∼5-fold higher affinity. CBLN4 also binds to the DCC homolog, Neogenin-1 (NEO1), but with a lower affinity compared to DCC. CBLN4-null mice did not show a defect in commissural axons of the developing spinal cord but did display a transient increase in the number of wandering axons in the brachial plexus, consistent with a role in axon guidance. Overall, the data solidifies CBLN4 as a bona fide DCC ligand and strengthens its implication in axon guidance. PMID:24400119

  1. The human CHC1 gene encoding RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) (CHC1) is localized to human chromosome 1p36.1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, T.; Seino, H.; Seki, N. |; Hori, T.A.

    1994-10-01

    The human CHC1 gene encoding RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) encodes a chromosomal protein of 45 kDa that has seven internal homologous repeats and functions as a guanine nucleotide releasing factor on the nuclear Ras-like small G protein. We report here the precise localization of the RCC1 gene to human chromosome 1p36.1. There is a conserved region of homology between the 1p36 region of human and a distal region of mouse chromosome 4. Thus, the assignment of the human gene encoding RCC1 adds another marker to the conserved region of homology between human chromosome 1p and mouse chromosome 4. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  2. [First two Mexican cases of monosomy 1p36: possible diagnosis in patients with mental retardation and dysmorphism].

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Camilo E; Álvarez, Rosa M; Gómez-Laguna, Laura; Ramos, Sandra; González-Del Ángel, Ariadna

    2011-06-01

    It is calculated that distal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 occurs in one out of every 5000 live births and causes approximately 1.2% of cases of mental retardation of unknown origin. This alteration usually cannot be detected in the standard karyotype, requiring molecular cytogenetic techniques for the diagnosis. In addition to the neurological manifestations, it may cause internal organs malformations, such as congenital heart disease, and a characteristic facial phenotype. This report describes the clinical and cytogenetic findings from the first two cases diagnosed in Mexico, confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization test, and compares them to those described in the literature. The probable subdiagnosis of this entity, the importance of improves its recognition and the useful data for the clinical suspicion are also discussed.

  3. Deletion and Gene Expression Analyses Define the Paxilline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Penicillium paxilli

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Barry; Young, Carolyn A.; Saikia, Sanjay; McMillan, Lisa K.; Monahan, Brendon J.; Koulman, Albert; Astin, Jonathan; Eaton, Carla J.; Bryant, Andrea; Wrenn, Ruth E.; Finch, Sarah C.; Tapper, Brian A.; Parker, Emily J.; Jameson, Geoffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    The indole-diterpene paxilline is an abundant secondary metabolite synthesized by Penicillium paxilli. In total, 21 genes have been identified at the PAX locus of which six have been previously confirmed to have a functional role in paxilline biosynthesis. A combination of bioinformatics, gene expression and targeted gene replacement analyses were used to define the boundaries of the PAX gene cluster. Targeted gene replacement identified seven genes, paxG, paxA, paxM, paxB, paxC, paxP and paxQ that were all required for paxilline production, with one additional gene, paxD, required for regular prenylation of the indole ring post paxilline synthesis. The two putative transcription factors, PP104 and PP105, were not co-regulated with the pax genes and based on targeted gene replacement, including the double knockout, did not have a role in paxilline production. The relationship of indole dimethylallyl transferases involved in prenylation of indole-diterpenes such as paxilline or lolitrem B, can be found as two disparate clades, not supported by prenylation type (e.g., regular or reverse). This paper provides insight into the P. paxilli indole-diterpene locus and reviews the recent advances identified in paxilline biosynthesis. PMID:23949005

  4. CD5+ true SLL/CLL with plasmacytic differentiation and an unusual 1p36 translocation: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Evans, H L; Polski, J M; Deshpande, V; Dunphy, C H

    2000-11-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL)are distinct clinicopathologic entities. Although some cases of SLL/CLL may show plasmacytic differentiation and be associated with monoclonal immunoglobulin in serum, such cases appear to be very rare, and if plasma cell differentiation were marked, differentiation of SLL/CLL from LPL could be difficult. We report a rare case of true CD5-positive small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia with unequivocal plasmacytic differentiation. This case also showed an abnormality of chromosome 1p36 not previously described in small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  5. The gene for PAX7, a member of the paired-box-containing genes, is localized on human chromosome arm 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.N.; Morris, S.W. Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN ); Sublett, J.E.; Li, Baitao; Valentine, M.B. ); Noll, M. )

    1993-09-01

    The murine Pax-7 gene and the cognate human gene, formerly designated HuP1, are members of the multigene paired-box-containing class of developmental regulatory genes first identified in Drosophila. By analysis of somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes, the gene encoding PAX7 was localized to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed this assignment and allowed mapping of the gene to the terminal region of the short arm (1p36) of the extensive homology between human chromosome 1p and the distal segment of mouse chromosome 4, extending from bands C5 through E2. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Genome-wide scan for serum ghrelin detects linkage on chromosome 1p36 in Hispanic children: results from the Viva La Familia study.

    PubMed

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Göring, Harald H H; Diego, Vincent P; Cai, Guowen; Mehta, Nitesh R; Haack, Karin; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate genetic influence on serum ghrelin and its relationship with adiposity-related phenotypes in Hispanic children (n=1030) from the Viva La Familia study (VFS). Anthropometric measurements and levels of serum ghrelin were estimated and genetic analyses conducted according to standard procedures. Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and serum ghrelin were 11+/-0.13 y, 25+/-0.24 kg/m2 and 38+/-0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Significant heritabilities (p<0.001) were obtained for BMI, weight, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and ghrelin. Bivariate analyses of ghrelin with adiposity traits showed significant negative genetic correlations (p<0.0001) with weight, BMI, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. A genome-wide scan for ghrelin detected significant linkage on chromosome 1p36.2 between STR markers D1S2697 and D1S199 (LOD=3.2). The same region on chromosome 1 was the site of linkage for insulin (LOD=3.3), insulinlike growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) (LOD=3.4), homeostatic model assessment method (HOMA) (LOD=2.9), and C-peptide (LOD=2.0). Several family-based studies have reported linkages for obesity-related phenotypes in the region of 1p36. These results indicate the importance of this region in relation to adiposity in children from the VFS.

  7. Multiple quantitative trait loci for cortical and trabecular bone regulation map to mid-distal mouse chromosome 4 that shares linkage homology to human chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Wesley G; Shultz, Kathryn L; Coombs, Harold F; Horton, Lindsay G; Donahue, Leah Rae; Rosen, Clifford J

    2012-01-01

    The mid-distal region of mouse chromosome 4 (Chr 4) is homologous with human Chr 1p36. Previously, we reported that mouse Chr 4 carries a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with strong regulatory effect on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD). The intent of this study is to utilize nested congenic strains to decompose the genetic complexity of this gene-rich region. Adult females and males from 18 nested congenic strains carrying discrete C3H sequences were phenotyped for femoral mineral and volume by pQCT and for trabecular bone volume (BV), tissue volume (TV), trabecular number (Trab.no), and trabecular thickness (Trab.thk) by MicroCT 40. Our data show that the mouse Chr 4 region consists of at least 10 regulatory QTL regions that affected either or both pQCT and MicroCT 40 phenotypes. The pQCT phenotypes were typically similar between sexes, whereas the MicroCT 40 phenotypes were divergent. Individual congenic strains contained one to seven QTL regions. These regions conferred large positive or negative effects in some congenic strains, depending on the particular bone phenotype. The QTL regions II to X are syntenic with human 1p36, containing from 1 to 102 known genes. We identified 13 candidate genes that can be linked to bone within these regions. Six of these genes were linked to osteoblasts, three linked to osteoclasts, and two linked to skeletal development. Three of these genes have been identified in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) linked to 1p36. In region III, there is only one gene, Lck, which conferred negative pQCT and MicroCT 40 phenotypes in both sexes. This gene is important to development and functioning of T cells, has been associated with osteoclast activity, and represents a novel bone regulatory gene that merits further experimental evaluation. In summary, congenic strains are powerful tools for identifying regulatory regions that influence bone biology and offer models for testing hypotheses about gene-gene and gene

  8. Multiple quantitative trait loci for cortical and trabecular bone regulation map to mid-distal mouse chromosome 4 that shares linkage homology to human chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Wesley G; Shultz, Kathryn L; Coombs, Harold F; Horton, Lindsay G; Donahue, Leah Rae; Rosen, Clifford J

    2012-01-01

    The mid-distal region of mouse chromosome 4 (Chr 4) is homologous with human Chr 1p36. Previously, we reported that mouse Chr 4 carries a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with strong regulatory effect on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD). The intent of this study is to utilize nested congenic strains to decompose the genetic complexity of this gene-rich region. Adult females and males from 18 nested congenic strains carrying discrete C3H sequences were phenotyped for femoral mineral and volume by pQCT and for trabecular bone volume (BV), tissue volume (TV), trabecular number (Trab.no), and trabecular thickness (Trab.thk) by MicroCT 40. Our data show that the mouse Chr 4 region consists of at least 10 regulatory QTL regions that affected either or both pQCT and MicroCT 40 phenotypes. The pQCT phenotypes were typically similar between sexes, whereas the MicroCT 40 phenotypes were divergent. Individual congenic strains contained one to seven QTL regions. These regions conferred large positive or negative effects in some congenic strains, depending on the particular bone phenotype. The QTL regions II to X are syntenic with human 1p36, containing from 1 to 102 known genes. We identified 13 candidate genes that can be linked to bone within these regions. Six of these genes were linked to osteoblasts, three linked to osteoclasts, and two linked to skeletal development. Three of these genes have been identified in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) linked to 1p36. In region III, there is only one gene, Lck, which conferred negative pQCT and MicroCT 40 phenotypes in both sexes. This gene is important to development and functioning of T cells, has been associated with osteoclast activity, and represents a novel bone regulatory gene that merits further experimental evaluation. In summary, congenic strains are powerful tools for identifying regulatory regions that influence bone biology and offer models for testing hypotheses about gene-gene and gene

  9. Murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) gene is disrupted by a neonatally lethal albino deletion that defines the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Homozygous deletion of the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus in mouse chromosome 7 results in perinatal death and a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities of the liver and kidney, failure of induction of a number of specific transcription units in the liver and kidney during late gestation, and marked overexpression of an enzyme that defends against oxidative stress. Previously, the breakpoints of two albino (c) deletions (c{sup 14CoS} and c{sup IFAFyh}) that genetically define hsdr-1 were localized, on a long-range map, in the vicinity of the distal breakpoint of a viable albino deletion (c{sup 24R75M}) that breaks proximally within the c locus. Here the authors report the use of a probe derived from a deletion breakpoint fusion fragment cloned from c{sup 24R75M}/c{sup 24R75M} DNA to clone a breakpoint fusion fragment caused by the c{sup 14CoS} deletion. The proximal breakpoint of the c{sup 14CoS} deletion was discovered to disrupt a gene (Fah) encoding fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine degradation pathway. These mouse mutants may also provide models for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia, which is associated with fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and liver and kidney dysfunction.

  10. Cerebriform variant type of T cell prolymphocytic leukemia with complex karyotype including an additional segment at 1p36.1.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Senji; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Shibata, Yuhei; Matsumoto, Takuro; Nakamura, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Nobuhiro; Goto, Naoe; Hara, Takeshi; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2012-11-01

    We describe two patients with T cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) who exhibited the same complex karyotype, including an additional segment at 1p36.1. One presented with secondary progression following an initial stable clinical course, and the other with typically progressive disease. Features of the cerebriform variant were identified in the peripheral blood of both patients. Aggressive symptoms, such as lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusion, cutaneous involvement and hepatosplenomegaly, developed during the progressive phases. Levels of serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor increased when symptoms worsened. These patients did not have the karyotypic 14q11 abnormality and trisomy 8q that are features of non-Japanese patients. The prognoses of these patients were poor; one survived for 2 months and the other survived for 10 months after progression. A chromosomal abnormality may occur in other types of aggressive T-PLL, particularly when extramedullary infiltration is a feature.

  11. Deletion mapping of four loci defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced postimplantation-lethal mutations within the pid-Hbb region of mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.; Carpenter, D.A.; Long, C.L. )

    1993-12-01

    As part of a long-term effort to refine the physical and functional maps of the Fes-Hbb region of mouse chromosome 7, four loci [l(7)1Rn, l(7)2Rn, l(7)3Rn, l(7)4Rn] defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced, prenatally lethal mutations were mapped by means of trans complementation crosses to mice carrying lethal deletions of the mouse chromosome-7 albino (c) locus. Each locus was assigned to a defined subregion of the deletions map at the distal end of the Fes-Hbb interval. Of particular use for this mapping were preimplantation-lethal deletions having distal breakpoints localized between pid and Omp. Hemizygosity or homozygosity for each of the ENU-induced lethals was found to arrest development after uterine implantation; the specific time of postimplantation death varied, and depended on both the mutation itself and on whether it was hemizygous or homozygous. Based on their map positions outside of and distal to deletions that cause death at preimplantation stages, these ENU-induced mutations identify loci, necessary for postimplantation development, that could not have been discovered by phenotypic analyses of mice homozygous for any albino deletion. The mapping of these loci to specific genetic intervals defined by deletion breakpoints suggests a number of positional-cloning strategies for the molecular isolation of these genes. Phenotypic and genetic analyses of these mutations should provide useful information on the functional composition of the corresponding segment of the human genome (perhaps human 11q13.5). 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. A new autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment locus DFNB96 on chromosome 1p36.31-p36.13.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Naqvi, Syed Kamran-Ul-Hassan; Andrade, Paula B; Basit, Sulman; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2011-12-01

    A novel locus for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI), DFNB96, was mapped to the 1p36.31-p36.13 region. A whole-genome linkage scan was performed using DNA samples from a consanguineous family from Pakistan with ARNSHI. A maximum two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 3.2 was obtained at marker rs8627 (chromosome 1: 8.34 Mb) at θ=0 and a significant maximum multipoint LOD score of 3.8 was achieved at 15 contiguous markers from rs630075 (9.3 Mb) to rs10927583 (15.13 Mb). The 3-unit support interval and the region of homozygosity were both delimited by markers rs3817914 (6.42 Mb) and rs477558 (18.09 Mb) and contained 11.67 Mb. Of the 125 genes within the DFNB96 interval, the previously identified ARNSHI gene for DFNB36, ESPN, and two genes that cause Bartter syndrome, CLCNKA and CLCNKB, were sequenced, but no potentially causal variants were identified.

  13. Tests of linkage and allelic association between markers in the 1p36 PRKCZ (protein kinase C zeta) gene region and bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Radhika; McQuillin, Andrew; Curtis, David; Gurling, Hugh

    2012-03-01

    Three linkage studies of families with multiple cases of bipolar disorder and/or unipolar affective disorder have confirmed the involvement of the chromosome 1p36 region in the etiology of affective disorders with LOD scores of 2.7, 3.6, and 3.97. We investigated the protein kinase C zeta gene (PRKCZ) as a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder because it is highly brain expressed and is localized close to the marker D1S243 which was linked to affective disorder in a single large UCL bipolar disorder family with a LOD of 3.1. PRKCZ encodes an unusual type of protein kinase which affects axonal differentiation through Wnt-signaling. We genotyped four microsatellite markers and nine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers within or near the PRKCZ gene in the UCL case-control sample of 600 bipolar disorder patients and up to 605 supernormal controls. Markers D1S243 and rs3128396 were significantly associated with bipolar disorder (empirical P = 0.037 and P = 0.040, respectively). We also included data from eight SNPs which were genotyped as part of our GWA study on bipolar disorder for association analysis. Tests of haplotypic association found that a haplotype block comprising markers rs3128296, rs2503706, and rs3128309 was associated with bipolar disorder (empirical P = 0.004). A previous linkage study had shown greater evidence for linkage within female cases compared to males. Therefore, to assess if the association was sex-specific, we performed a female-only allelic-association analysis, which resulted in SNPs rs3128296 and rs3128309 becoming associated with bipolar disorder (P = 0.004 and P = 0.016, respectively). PRKCZ may play a role in susceptibility to bipolar affective disorder.

  14. Comparison of Genome Screens for Two Independent Cohorts Provides Replication of Suggestive Linkage of Bone Mineral Density to 3p21 and 1p36

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. G.; Reed, P. W.; Bansal, A.; Chiano, M.; Lindersson, M.; Langdown, M.; Prince, R. L.; Thompson, D.; Thompson, E.; Bailey, M.; Kleyn, P. W.; Sambrook, P.; Shi, M. M.; Spector, T. D.

    2003-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a major risk factor for osteoporotic fracture. Studies of BMD in families and twins have shown that this trait is under strong genetic control. To identify regions of the genome that contain quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BMD, we performed independent genomewide screens, using two complementary study designs. We analyzed unselected nonidentical twin pairs (1,094 pedigrees) and highly selected, extremely discordant or concordant (EDAC) sib pairs (254 pedigrees). Nonparametric multipoint linkage (NPL) analyses were undertaken for lumbar spine and total-hip BMD in both cohorts and for whole-body BMD in the unselected twin pairs. The maximum evidence of linkage in the unselected twins (spine BMD, LOD 2.7) and the EDAC pedigrees (spine BMD, LOD 2.1) was observed at chromosome 3p21 (76 cM and 69 cM, respectively). These combined data indicate the presence, in this region, of a gene that regulates BMD. Furthermore, evidence of linkage in the twin cohort (whole-body BMD; LOD 2.4) at chromosome 1p36 (17 cM) supports previous findings of suggestive linkage to BMD in the region. Weaker evidence of linkage (LOD 1.0–2.3) in either cohort, but not both, indicates the locality of additional QTLs. These studies validate the use, in linkage analysis, of large cohorts of unselected twins phenotyped for multiple traits, and they highlight the importance of conducting genome scans in replicate populations as a prelude to positional cloning and gene discovery. PMID:12478480

  15. Chromosome 1 aneusomy with 1p36 under-representation is related to histologic grade, DNA aneuploidy, high c-erb B-2 and loss of bcl-2 expression in ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Ceccarelli, C; Santini, D; Trerè, D; Baldini, N; Taffurelli, M; Derenzini, M

    1996-10-21

    Chromosome 1 abnormalities with loss of 1p36 have been investigated in 95 breast-cancer samples by means of a dual-target fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique using the pUC 1.77 and p1-79 probes, specific for the 1q12 and 1p36 regions, respectively. Abnormalities for one or both probes were detected in 83/95 samples. Relative 1p36 under-representation was found in 79/95. The clinical relevance of these alterations was studied by comparing the FISH results with several parameters currently used in breast-cancer pathology. Distinct patterns of chromosome 1 abnormalities were found among the histologic types of breast carcinoma. Lobular or mucinous samples showed few or no alterations, whereas most ductal samples had high chromosome 1 polysomy with under-representation of 1p36. In ductal carcinomas, chromosome 1 alterations increased with histologic grade, DNA aneuploidy, loss of bcl-2 and high c-erb B-2 expression. These associations were found to be statistically significant. No correlation between chromosome 1 alterations and nuclear grade, age, size, lymph-node involvement, hormonal receptor presence, proliferation activity or p53 protein expression was detected. These results indicate the utility of this FISH technique for a better definition of the biological characteristics of ductal carcinomas.

  16. Assignment of the genes encoding the human chloride channels, CLCNKA and CLCNKB, to 1p36 and of CLCN3 to 4q32-q33 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Saito-Ohara, Fumiko; Uchida, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the localization of the genes encoding the human chloride channels, CLCNKA and CLCNKB, to human chromosome 1p36 and of CLCN3 to human chromosome 4q32-33 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mutations in these voltage-gated chloride channel genes have been implicated in various hereditary diseases. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  17. BRAF Mutation and CDKN2A Deletion Define a Clinically Distinct Subgroup of Childhood Secondary High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Matthew; Zhukova, Nataliya; Merico, Daniele; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Krishnatry, Rahul; Shago, Mary; Stavropoulos, James; Alon, Noa; Pole, Jason D.; Ray, Peter N.; Navickiene, Vilma; Mangerel, Joshua; Remke, Marc; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Guerreiro Stucklin, Ana; Li, Martin; Young, Edwin J.; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Bakry, Doua; Laughlin, Suzanne; Shlien, Adam; Chan, Jennifer; Ligon, Keith L.; Rutka, James T.; Dirks, Peter B.; Taylor, Michael D.; Greenberg, Mark; Malkin, David; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Tabori, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To uncover the genetic events leading to transformation of pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGG) to secondary high-grade glioma (sHGG). Patients and Methods We retrospectively identified patients with sHGG from a population-based cohort of 886 patients with PLGG with long clinical follow-up. Exome sequencing and array CGH were performed on available samples followed by detailed genetic analysis of the entire sHGG cohort. Clinical and outcome data of genetically distinct subgroups were obtained. Results sHGG was observed in 2.9% of PLGGs (26 of 886 patients). Patients with sHGG had a high frequency of nonsilent somatic mutations compared with patients with primary pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG; median, 25 mutations per exome; P = .0042). Alterations in chromatin-modifying genes and telomere-maintenance pathways were commonly observed, whereas no sHGG harbored the BRAF-KIAA1549 fusion. The most recurrent alterations were BRAF V600E and CDKN2A deletion in 39% and 57% of sHGGs, respectively. Importantly, all BRAF V600E and 80% of CDKN2A alterations could be traced back to their PLGG counterparts. BRAF V600E distinguished sHGG from primary HGG (P = .0023), whereas BRAF and CDKN2A alterations were less commonly observed in PLGG that did not transform (P < .001 and P < .001 respectively). PLGGs with BRAF mutations had longer latency to transformation than wild-type PLGG (median, 6.65 years [range, 3.5 to 20.3 years] v 1.59 years [range, 0.32 to 15.9 years], respectively; P = .0389). Furthermore, 5-year overall survival was 75% ± 15% and 29% ± 12% for children with BRAF mutant and wild-type tumors, respectively (P = .024). Conclusion BRAF V600E mutations and CDKN2A deletions constitute a clinically distinct subtype of sHGG. The prolonged course to transformation for BRAF V600E PLGGs provides an opportunity for surgical interventions, surveillance, and targeted therapies to mitigate the outcome of sHGG. PMID:25667294

  18. Kinetics and Epigenetics of Retroviral Silencing in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Defined by Deletion of the D4Z4 Element

    PubMed Central

    Rival-Gervier, Sylvie; Lo, Mandy YM; Khattak, Shahryar; Pasceri, Peter; Lorincz, Matthew C; Ellis, James

    2013-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are silenced in embryonic stem (ES) cells by epigenetic mechanisms whose kinetics are poorly understood. We show here that a 3′D4Z4 insulator directs retroviral expression with persistent but variable expression for up to 5 months. Combining an internal 3′D4Z4 with HS4 insulators in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) shows that these elements cooperate, and defines the first retroviral vector that fully escapes long-term silencing. Using FLP recombinase to induce deletion of 3′D4Z4 from the provirus in ES cell clones, we established retroviral silencing at many but not all integration sites. This finding shows that 3′D4Z4 does not target retrovirus integration into favorable epigenomic domains but rather protects the transgene from silencing. Chromatin analyses demonstrate that 3′D4Z4 blocks the spread of heterochromatin marks including DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications such as H3K9 methylation. In addition, our deletion system reveals three distinct kinetic classes of silencing (rapid, gradual or not silenced), in which multiple epigenetic pathways participate in silencing at different integration sites. We conclude that vectors with both 3′D4Z4 and HS4 insulator elements fully block silencing, and may have unprecedented utility for gene transfer applications that require long-term gene expression in pluripotent stem (PS) cells. PMID:23752310

  19. Linkage disequlibrium in the DTNBP1 (dysbindin) gene region and on chromosome 1p36 among psychotic patients from a genetic isolate in Israel: findings from identity by descent haplotype sharing analysis.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Yoav; Danilovich, Eduardo; Filon, Dvorah; Oppenheim, Ariella; Karni, Osnat; Kanyas, Kyra; Turetsky, Neil; Korner, Mira; Lerer, Bernard

    2004-07-01

    Several genes have been reported recently to be associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Because of the complexity of the inheritance of these disorders, there is an urgent need to replicate these findings and to search for additional candidate genes. The study of genetic isolates is a powerful technique that may overcome some of the obstacles caused by genetic heterogeneity and ambiguity of phenotype definition. Identity by descent (IBD) haplotype sharing analysis in these populations may be used to detect mutations within shared haplotypes in smaller samples of affected individuals. In this study, we used IBD haplotype sharing analysis to replicate positive linkage and association findings in psychotic disorders, and to identify other regions of interest. Fifty-two patients with major psychiatric disorders from a genetically isolated village in Israel were studied. By studying eight Y chromosome markers, we were able to confirm the oral tradition of members of this isolate regarding a common paternal origin. Three hundred fifty nine microsatellite markers on 9 candidate chromosomes were genotyped, and haplotypes were reconstructed using information from family members. Two highly significant (P < 0.0001) peaks of haplotype sharing were found. One was for psychotic patients with any diagnosis at the location of dysbindin, a gene previously associated with schizophrenia. The other peak was for patients with schizophrenia on chromosome 1p36. Thus, this study both replicates an earlier finding and points to a novel region of interest, which might be unique to this population.

  20. [Allelic imbalance of loci 17p13.1 (TP53), 1p36.1 (RUNX3), 16p22 (CDH1) and microsatellite instability in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Nemtsova, M V; Bykov, I I; Udilova, A A; Zaletaev, D V; Khorobrykh, T V

    2013-01-01

    We examined allelic imbalance (AI) on loci 17p13.1 (TP53), 1p36.1 (RUNX) and 16p22 (CDHI) and microsatellite instability (MI) with BAT26 in 78 patients with gastric cancer. We have shown a significant difference in the frequency of allelic imbalance of the studied loci among different types of gastric cancer. Frequency of AI in 16p22.1 (CDH1) (p = 0.023), 17p13.1 (TP53) (p = 0.038), microsatellite instability (p = 0.047) and AD two and more loci in a single sample (p = 0.0176) was significantly higher in the intestinal type of gastric cancer than in the diffuse type. We have shown, that, frequency of AI in 16p22.1 (CDH1), and AD two and more loci in a single sample, was higher in thetumors with high or moderate type of tumor cells differentiation (p = 0.0414, p = 0.0057 respectively). We found no significant differences in the groups with metastases in regional lymph nodes, different tumor stage, localization of tumors and the generalization process.

  1. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  2. Structural Analysis and Deletion Mutagenesis Define Regions of QUIVER/SLEEPLESS that Are Responsible for Interactions with Shaker-Type Potassium Channels and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meilin; Liu, Clifford Z.; Joiner, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Ly6 proteins are endogenous prototoxins found in most animals. They show striking structural and functional parallels to snake α-neurotoxins, including regulation of ion channels and cholinergic signaling. However, the structural contributions of Ly6 proteins to regulation of effector molecules is poorly understood. This question is particularly relevant to the Ly6 protein QUIVER/SLEEPLESS (QVR/SSS), which has previously been shown to suppress excitability and synaptic transmission by upregulating potassium (K) channels and downregulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in wake-promoting neurons to facilitate sleep in Drosophila. Using deletion mutagenesis, co-immunoprecipitations, ion flux assays, surface labeling and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that only loop 2 is required for many of the previously described properties of SSS in transfected cells, including interactions with K channels and nAChRs. Collectively our data suggest that QVR/SSS, and by extension perhaps other Ly6 proteins, target effector molecules using limited protein motifs. Mapping these motifs may be useful in rational design of drugs that mimic or suppress Ly6-effector interactions to modulate nervous system function. PMID:26828958

  3. Partial trisomy 1p (1p36.22-->pter) and partial monosomy 9p (9p22.2-->pter) associated with achalasia, flexion deformity of the fingers and epilepsy in a girl.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Lee, C C; Town, D D; Wang, W

    2006-01-01

    We report on a 12-year-old girl presenting with mental retardation, trigonocephaly, midface hypoplasia, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, arched eyebrows, bilateral epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, a flattened nasal bridge, a short nose, anteverted nares, a long philtrum, a small mouth, micrognathia, low-set ears, a short neck, long digits, flexion deformity of the fingers of the hands, hypoplasia of the labia majora, hyperplasia of the labia minora, flat feet, dysphagia, frequent regurgitation, prominent esophageal dilation, and achalasia. Seizures were noted since 5 years of age. Cytogenetic analysis of her peripheral blood revealed a karyotype of 46,XX, der(9)t(1;9)(p36.22;p22.2)pat. Achalasia, an uncommon esophageal motor disorder, has not been previously described in association with either a deletion of 9p or a duplication of 1p.

  4. Molecular and genetic studies on the region of translocation and duplication in the neuroblastoma cell line NGP at the 1p36.13-p36.32 chromosomal site.

    PubMed

    Casciano, I; Marchi, J V; Muresu, R; Volpi, E V; Rozzo, C; Opdenakker, G; Romani, M

    1996-05-16

    Cytogenetic and molecular studies suggest that chromosome 1p might contain oncosuppressor genes involved in the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma and other adult tumors. The isolation of these genes by the 'positional cloning' approach will be facilitated by the characterization of cell lines with well defined chromosomal aberrations. In the present report we provide molecular data on the NGP neuroblastoma cell line which contains a reciprocal t(1;15) translocation. Two regions, possibly hosting oncosuppressor genes, have been identified: one is distal to the ENO1 locus, the other one is comprised between PND and A12M2 and corresponds to that of a constitutional t(1;17) translocation described in a neuroblastoma patient. Genetic data also suggest that the NGP cell line, despite the presence of two chromosomes 1, might be hemizygous for the subtelomeric 1p region.

  5. Prevalence of selected genomic deletions and duplications in a French-Canadian population-based sample of newborns.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Tracy; Giroux, Sylvie; Clément, Valérie; Langlois, Sylvie; Friedman, Jan M; Rousseau, François

    2013-07-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has identified many novel microdeletions or microduplications that produce neurodevelopmental disorders with a recognizable clinical phenotype and that are not observed in normal individuals. However, imbalance of other genomic regions is associated with a variable phenotype with intellectual disability (ID) or autism in some individuals but are also observed in completely normal individuals. Several large studies have reported the prevalence of copy number (CN) variants in people with particular features (e.g., ID, autism, schizophrenia, or epilepsy); few studies have investigated the prevalence of genomic CN changes in the general population. We used a high-throughput method to screen 6813 consecutive cord blood samples from a predominantly French-Canadian population to assess genomic CN in five genomic regions: 1p36, 15q11-q13, 16p11.2, 16p11.2-p12.2, and 22q11.2. We identified one deletion and one duplication within 1p36, two deletions of 15q11-q13, eight deletions of 16p11.2-p12.2, two deletions and five duplications of 16p11.2, and six duplications of 22q11.2. This study provides estimates of the frequency of CN variants in an unselected population. Our findings have important implications for genetic counseling. PMID:24498606

  6. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A.; Morris, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  7. Phenotypic characterization of rare interstitial deletion of chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Samira; Helmy, Nivine A.; Mahmoud, Wael M.; El-Ruby, Mona O.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 4 is rare. Patients with interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 4 differ from those with terminal deletions. Phenotypes may be variable, depending upon the specific length and location of the deleted portion. Here, we report on a boy exhibiting most of the congenital malformations encountered in terminal 4q syndrome. The conventional karyotyping and Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed a de novo interstitial del (4)(q31q32). The current report is a further document highlighting that deletion of segment q31 could be contributing to the expression of most of the phenotype of 4q deletion syndrome. Using array comparative genome hybridization methodology is recommended for investigating further cases with similar segmental interstitial deletions to support and delineate findings and to define genes implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

  8. Defining "Development".

    PubMed

    Pradeu, Thomas; Laplane, Lucie; Prévot, Karine; Hoquet, Thierry; Reynaud, Valentine; Fusco, Giuseppe; Minelli, Alessandro; Orgogozo, Virginie; Vervoort, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible, and in the first place is it even desirable, to define what "development" means and to determine the scope of the field called "developmental biology"? Though these questions appeared crucial for the founders of "developmental biology" in the 1950s, there seems to be no consensus today about the need to address them. Here, in a combined biological, philosophical, and historical approach, we ask whether it is possible and useful to define biological development, and, if such a definition is indeed possible and useful, which definition(s) can be considered as the most satisfactory.

  9. Defining Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Defining infertility What is infertility? Infertility is “the inability to conceive after 12 months ... to conceive after 6 months is generally considered infertility. How common is it? Infertility affects 10%-15% ...

  10. Homozygous deletion of TNFRSF4, TP73, PPAP2B and DPYD at 1p and PDCD5 at 19q identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis in pediatric anaplastic glioma with questionable oligodendroglial component

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric oligodendrogliomas are rare and appear to show a different molecular profile from adult tumors. Some gliomas display allelic losses at 1p/19q in pediatric patients, although less frequently than in adult patients, but this is rare in tumors with an oligodendroglial component. The molecular basis of this genomic abnormality is unknown in pediatric gliomas, but it represents a relatively common finding in pediatric oligodendroglioma-like neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination. Results Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis using SALSA P088-B1 for the analysis of the 1p/19q allelic constitution in a pediatric anaplastic (oligodendro)-glioma showed homozygous co-deletion for markers: TNFRSF4 (located at 1p36.33), TP73 (1p36.32), PPAP2B (1pter-p22.1), DPYD (1p21.3), and PDCD5 (19q13.12), and hemizygous deletion of BAX (19q13.3-q13.4). No sequence changes for R132 and R172 of the IDH1/2 genes were identified. Conclusions The molecular findings in this pediatric anaplastic glioma do not allow for a clearly definitive pathological diagnosis. However, the findings provide data on a number of 1p/19q genomic regions that, because of homozygotic deletion, might be the location of genes that are important for the development and clinical evolution of some malignant gliomas in children. PMID:24387276

  11. Defining cure.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Paul; Robinson, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a summary of the presentations made as Proposal 2-"Defining cure" to the 2nd Annual meeting of the ICI-Research Society, in Bristol, 16th June 2010. It reviews definitions of 'cure' and 'outcome', and considers the impact that varying definition may have on prevalence studies and cure rates. The difference between subjective and objective outcomes is considered, and the significance that these different outcomes may have for different stakeholders (e.g. clinicians, patients, carers, industry etc.) is discussed. The development of patient reported outcome measures and patient defined goals is reviewed, and consideration given to the use of composite end-points. A series of proposals are made by authors and discussants as to how currently validated outcomes should be applied, and where our future research activity in this area might be directed.

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of Pathogenic Deletion Variants in Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Elizabeth K.; Kamat, Aparna; Lach, Francis P.; Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Narisu, Narisu; Sanborn, Erica; Boulad, Farid; Davies, Stella M.; Gillio, Alfred P.; Harris, Richard E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Wagner, John E.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease resulting from mutations in one of at least 16 different genes. Mutation types and phenotypic manifestations of FA are highly heterogeneous and influence the clinical management of the disease. We analyzed 202 FA families for large deletions, using high-resolution Comparative Genome Hybridization arrays (arrayCGH), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism arrays (SNParrays) and DNA sequencing. We found pathogenic deletions in 88 FANCA, seven FANCC, two FANCD2, and one FANCB families. We find 35% of FA families carry large deletions, accounting for 18% of all FA pathogenic variants. Cloning and sequencing across the deletion breakpoints revealed that 52 FANCA deletion ends, and one FANCC deletion end extended beyond the gene boundaries, potentially affecting neighboring genes with phenotypic consequences. Seventy-five percent of the FANCA deletions are Alu-Alu mediated, predominantly by AluY elements, and appear to be caused by Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination. Individual Alu hotspots were identified. Defining the haplotypes of four FANCA deletions shared by multiple families revealed that three share a common ancestry. Knowing the exact molecular changes that lead to the disease may be critical for a better understanding of the FA phenotype, and to gain insight into the mechanisms driving these pathogenic deletion variants. PMID:25168418

  13. Deletion (2)(q37)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; Tolworthy, J.A.; Young, R.S.

    1994-06-01

    We report on a 5-month-old girl with widely spaced nipples, redundant nuchal skin, coarctation of the aorta, anal atresia with distal fistula, postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia, and sparse scalp hair. Initial clinical assessment suggested the diagnosis of Ullrich-Turner syndrome. Chromosome analysis showed a 46,XX,del(2)(q37) karyotype in peripheral lymphocytes. We compare her findings to those of other reported patients with terminal deletions of 2q. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Defining chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Brian R.; Ott, Edward

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we propose, discuss, and illustrate a computationally feasible definition of chaos which can be applied very generally to situations that are commonly encountered, including attractors, repellers, and non-periodically forced systems. This definition is based on an entropy-like quantity, which we call “expansion entropy,” and we define chaos as occurring when this quantity is positive. We relate and compare expansion entropy to the well-known concept of topological entropy to which it is equivalent under appropriate conditions. We also present example illustrations, discuss computational implementations, and point out issues arising from attempts at giving definitions of chaos that are not entropy-based.

  15. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Frequency and textent of 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Goldberg, R.; Jurecic, V.

    1995-07-03

    Velo-cardio-facial (VCFS) or Shprintzen syndrome is associated with deletions in a region of chromosome 22q11.2 also deleted in DiGeorge anomaly and some forms of congenital heart disease. Due to the variability of phenotype, the evaluation of the incidence of deletions has been hampered by uncertainty of diagnosis. In this study, 54 patients were diagnosed with VCFS by a single group of clinicians using homogeneous clinical criteria independent of the deletion status. Cell lines of these patients were established and the deletion status evaluated for three loci within the commonly deleted region at 22q11.2 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In 81% of the patients all three loci were hemizygous. In one patient we observed a smaller interstitial deletion than that defined by the three loci. The phenotype of this patient was not different from that observed in patients with larger deletions. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Multigenerational autosomal dominant inheritance of 5p chromosomal deletions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Willing, Marcia; Grange, Dorothy K; Shinawi, Marwan; Manwaring, Linda; Vineyard, Marisa; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cottrell, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) is associated with phenotypic features including a cat-like cry in infancy, dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, and intellectual disability, and when encompassing a minimal critical region, may be defined as Cri-du-Chat syndrome (CdCS). Most 5p deletions are de novo in origin, and familial cases are often associated with translocation and inversion. Herein, we report three multigenerational families carrying 5p terminal deletions of different size transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner causing variable clinical findings. Terminal 5p deletions and the mode of inheritance were clinically characterized and molecularly analyzed by a combination of microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Shared phenotypic features documented in this cohort included neuropsychiatric findings, poor growth, and dysmorphic facial features. This study supports newly recognized effects of aberrant SEMA5A and CTNND2 dosage on severity of autistic and cognitive phenotypes. Comparative analysis of the breakpoints narrows the critical region for the cat-like cry down to an interval less than 1 Mb encompassing a candidate gene ICE1, which regulates small nuclear RNA transcription. This study also indicates that familial terminal 5p deletion is a rare presentation displaying intra- and inter-familial phenotypic variability, the latter of which may be attributed to size and gene content of the deletion. The observed intra-familial phenotypic heterogeneity suggests that additional modifying elements including genetic and environmental factors may have an impact on the clinical manifestations observed in 5p deletion carriers, and in time, further high resolution studies of 5p deletion breakpoints will continue to aid in defining genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:26601658

  17. Multigenerational autosomal dominant inheritance of 5p chromosomal deletions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Willing, Marcia; Grange, Dorothy K; Shinawi, Marwan; Manwaring, Linda; Vineyard, Marisa; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cottrell, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) is associated with phenotypic features including a cat-like cry in infancy, dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, and intellectual disability, and when encompassing a minimal critical region, may be defined as Cri-du-Chat syndrome (CdCS). Most 5p deletions are de novo in origin, and familial cases are often associated with translocation and inversion. Herein, we report three multigenerational families carrying 5p terminal deletions of different size transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner causing variable clinical findings. Terminal 5p deletions and the mode of inheritance were clinically characterized and molecularly analyzed by a combination of microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Shared phenotypic features documented in this cohort included neuropsychiatric findings, poor growth, and dysmorphic facial features. This study supports newly recognized effects of aberrant SEMA5A and CTNND2 dosage on severity of autistic and cognitive phenotypes. Comparative analysis of the breakpoints narrows the critical region for the cat-like cry down to an interval less than 1 Mb encompassing a candidate gene ICE1, which regulates small nuclear RNA transcription. This study also indicates that familial terminal 5p deletion is a rare presentation displaying intra- and inter-familial phenotypic variability, the latter of which may be attributed to size and gene content of the deletion. The observed intra-familial phenotypic heterogeneity suggests that additional modifying elements including genetic and environmental factors may have an impact on the clinical manifestations observed in 5p deletion carriers, and in time, further high resolution studies of 5p deletion breakpoints will continue to aid in defining genotype-phenotype correlations.

  18. Genetic studies of coliphage P1. I. Mapping by use of prophage deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D H; Walker, J T

    1975-01-01

    One hundred and ten amber mutants of coliphage P1 were isolated and localized into groups with respect to the existing genetic map by use of nonpermissive Escherichia coli K-12 strains lysogenic for P1 with deletions. These lysogens contain one of three types of deletion prophages: P1cry and its derivatives, P1dlacs, and P1dpros. Fourteen such lysogens were tested for their ability to rescue the amber mutants which were then assigned to one of nine deletion segments of the P1 genome defined by the termini of the various prophage deletions. The relationship of the nine deletion segments with the published P1 map is described, two new segments having been added. The deletions of the 14 prophages overlapped sufficiently to indicate that the P1 genetic prophage map should be represented in circular form, which is consistent with the fact that P1 is normally a circular plasmid in the prophage state. The distribution of mutants into deletion segments is nonrandom for at least one segment. In addition, the deletion termini of the 14 defective prophages coincided in five out of nine regions separating the nine deletion segments. Various possible explanations are discussed for the nonrandom recurrence of these deletion termini, including the evidence of hot spots of recombination. PMID:1099231

  19. Molecular analysis of three patients with interstitial deletions of chromosome band 14q31.

    PubMed Central

    Byth, B C; Costa, M T; Teshima, I E; Wilson, W G; Carter, N P; Cox, D W

    1995-01-01

    Two patients and one three generation family with interstitial deletions of distal chromosome band 14q31 are described. The deletions were initially identified by chromosome analysis; we have used highly informative simple sequence repeat polymorphisms to define the deletions at the molecular level. This analysis also establishes the parental origin of the deleted chromosome. One of the patients was initially described as having a terminal deletion of chromosome 14 from 14q31 to 14qter; we show here that this child has instead an interstitial deletion of band 14q31. The smallest deletion involves a single anonymous DNA marker and is associated with an almost normal phenotype. The two patients with larger deletions have phenotypes similar to those seen in previously described cases of interstitial deletions of chromosome 14, including minor dysmorphic features and developmental delay. Delineation of these deletions allows the ordering of markers within the 14q31 region, in which the gene for the degenerative neurological disorder Machado-Joseph disease is localised. Images PMID:7562974

  20. Molecular dissection of the 5q deletion in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2011-01-01

    The 5q- syndrome is a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with a defined clinical phenotype associated with heterozygous deletions of Chromosome 5q. While no genes have been identified that undergo recurrent homozygous inactivation, functional studies have revealed individual genes that contribute to the clinical phenotype of MDS through haploinsufficient gene expression. Heterozygous loss of the RPS14 gene on 5q leads to activation of p53 in the erythroid lineage and the macrocytic anemia characteristic of the 5q- syndrome. The megakaryocytic and platelet phenotype of the 5q- syndrome has been attributed to heterozygous deletion of miR145 and miR146a. Murine models have implicated heterozygous loss of APC, EGR1, DIAPH1, and NPM1 in the pathophysiology of del(5q) MDS. These findings indicate that the phenotype of MDS patients with deletions of Chromosome 5q is due to haploinsufficiency of multiple genes. PMID:21943668

  1. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A.

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: 18q deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Veltman JA, van Ravenswaaij-Arts CM. Genotype-phenotype mapping of chromosome 18q deletions by high-resolution array ... L, Pihko H. 18q deletions: clinical, molecular, and brain MRI findings of 14 individuals. Am J Med ...

  3. Molecular definition of the smallest region of deletion overlap in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, K.Y.; Gibson, L.; Meyn, M.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1992-09-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), associated with a deletion of chromosome 4p, is characterized by mental and growth retardation and typical dysmorphism. A girl with clinical features of WHS was found to carry a subtle deletion of chromosome 4p. Initially suggested by high-resolution chromosome analysis, her deletion was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid probes, E13, and Y2, of D4S113. To delineate this 4p deletion, the authors performed a series of FISH and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis by using probes from 4p16.3. A deletion of [approximately]2.5 Mb with the breakpoint at [approximately]80 kb distal to D4S43 was defined in this patient and appears to be the smallest WHS deletion so far identified. To further refine the WHS critical region, they have studied three unrelated patients with presumptive 4p deletions, two resulting from unbalanced segregations of parental chromosomal translocations and one resulting from an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation. Larger deletions were identified in two patients with WHS. One patient who did not clinically present with WHS had a smaller deletion that thus eliminates the distal 100-300 kb from the telomere as being part of the WHS region. This study has localized the WHS region to [approximately]2 MB between D4S43 and D4S142. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 78 FR 46927 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to delete products and services from the Procurement...

  5. 77 FR 66181 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

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    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to delete products from the Procurement List that...

  6. 76 FR 9555 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

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    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed deletions from the Procurement...'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 46- 48c) in connection with the products proposed for deletion from the...

  7. 76 FR 22680 - Procurement List; Deletions

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    2011-04-22

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action deletes services from the Procurement List that will be provided by nonprofit agencies...

  8. 75 FR 16757 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions From the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to delete from the Procurement List services...

  9. Interstitial deletions are not the main mechanism leading to 18q deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Strathdee, G.; Harrison, W.; Goodart, S.A.; Overhauser, J. ); Riethman, H.C. )

    1994-06-01

    Most patients who present with the 18q- syndrome have an apparent terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 18. For precise phenotypic mapping of this syndrome, it is important to determine whether the deletions are terminal deletions or interstitial deletions. A human telomeric YAC clone has been identified that hybridizes specifically to the telomeric end of 18q. This clone was characterized and used to analyze seven patients with 18q deletions. By FISH and Southern blotting analysis, all patients were found to lack this chromosomal region on their deleted chromosome, demonstrating that the patients do not have cryptic interstitial deletions. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Hereditary spherocytosis associated with deletion of human erythrocyte ankyrin gene on chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Lux, S E; Tse, W T; Menninger, J C; John, K M; Harris, P; Shalev, O; Chilcote, R R; Marchesi, S L; Watkins, P C; Bennett, V

    1990-06-21

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common hereditary haemolytic anaemias. HS red cells from both autosound dominant and recessive variants are spectrin-deficient, which correlates with the severity of the disease. Some patients with recessive HS have a mutation in the spectrin alpha-2 domain (S.L.M. et al., unpublished observations), and a few dominant HS patients have an unstable beta-spectrin that is easily oxidized, which damages the protein 4.1 binding site and weakens spectrin-actin interactions. In most patients, however, the cause of spectrin deficiency is unknown. The alpha- and beta-spectrin loci are on chromosomes 1 and 14 respectively. The only other genetic locus for HS is SPH2, on the short arm of chromosome 8 (8p11). This does not correspond to any of the known loci of genes for red cell membrane proteins including protein 4.1 (1p36.2-p34), the anion exchange protein (AE1, band 3; 17q21-qter), glycophorin C (2q14-q21), and beta-actin (7pter-q22). Human erythrocyte ankyrin, which links beta-spectrin to the anion exchange protein, has recently been cloned. We now show that the ankyrin gene maps to chromosome 8p11.2, and that one copy is missing from DNA of two unrelated children with severe HS and heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8 (del(8)(p11-p21.1)). Affected red cells are also ankyrin-deficient. The data suggest that defects or deficiency or ankyrin are responsible for HS at the SPH2 locus.

  11. Gene Deletion by Synthesis in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsil; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2017-01-01

    Targeted gene deletion is a useful tool for understanding the function of a gene and its protein product. We have developed an efficient and robust gene deletion approach in yeast that employs oligonucleotide-based gene synthesis. This approach requires a deletion cassette composed of three modules: a central 1397-bp KanMX4 selection marker module and two 366-bp gene-specific flanking modules. The invariable KanMX4 module can be used in combination with different pairs of flanking modules targeting different genes. The two flanking modules consist of both sequences unique to each cassette (chromosomal homologous regions and barcodes) and those common to all deletion constructs (artificial linkers and restriction enzyme sites). Oligonucleotides for each module and junction regions are designed using the BatchBlock2Oligo program and are synthesized on a 96-well basis. The oligonucleotides are ligated into a single deletion cassette by ligase chain reaction, which is then amplified through two rounds of nested PCR to obtain sufficient quantities for yeast transformation. After removal of the artificial linkers, the deletion cassettes are transformed into wild-type diploid fission yeast SP286 cells. Verification of correct clone and gene deletion is achieved by performing check PCR and tetrad analysis. This method with proven effectiveness, as evidenced by a high success rate of gene deletion, can be potentially applicable to create systematic gene deletion libraries in a variety of yeast species. PMID:27671940

  12. 78 FR 56679 - Procurement List; Deletions

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    2013-09-13

    ... 8/2/2013 (78 FR 46927-46928), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  13. Alagille syndrome and deletion of 20p.

    PubMed Central

    Anad, F; Burn, J; Matthews, D; Cross, I; Davison, B C; Mueller, R; Sands, M; Lillington, D M; Eastham, E

    1990-01-01

    We add five cases of 20p deletion to the 10 cases already published. Four had craniofacial, vertebral, ocular, and cardiovascular features of Alagille syndrome, which adds weight to the assignment of this disorder to the short arm of chromosome 20. Included in our series is the first report of familial transmission of a 20p deletion. Images PMID:2074558

  14. Defining Early Adolescent Childbearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Maureen G.; Sowers, MaryFran

    2002-01-01

    Determined the age group for defining early adolescent childbearing based on rates of adverse clinical outcomes. Data on infant mortality, very low birth weight, and very pre-term delivery per 1,000 live births for women age 12-23 years in the 1995 U.S. birth cohort indicate that early adolescent childbearing is best defined as giving birth at age…

  15. Delineation of the critical deletion region for congenital heart defects, on chromosome 8p23.1.

    PubMed Central

    Devriendt, K; Matthijs, G; Van Dael, R; Gewillig, M; Eyskens, B; Hjalgrim, H; Dolmer, B; McGaughran, J; Bröndum-Nielsen, K; Marynen, P; Fryns, J P; Vermeesch, J R

    1999-01-01

    Deletions in the distal region of chromosome 8p (del8p) are associated with congenital heart malformations. Other major manifestations include microcephaly, intrauterine growth retardation, mental retardation, and a characteristic hyperactive, impulsive behavior. We studied genotype-phenotype correlations in nine unrelated patients with a de novo del8p, by using the combination of classic cytogenetics, FISH, and the analysis of polymorphic DNA markers. With the exception of one large terminal deletion, all deletions were interstitial. In five patients, a commonly deleted region of approximately 6 Mb was present, with breakpoints clustering in the same regions. One patient without a heart defect or microcephaly but with mild mental retardation and characteristic behavior had a smaller deletion within this commonly deleted region. Two patients without a heart defect had a more proximal interstitial deletion that did not overlap with the commonly deleted region. Taken together, these data allowed us to define the critical deletion regions for the major features of a del8p. PMID:10090897

  16. Defining Overweight and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Defining Adult Overweight and ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  17. Targeted chromosomal deletions and inversions in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankit; Hall, Victoria L; Kok, Fatma O; Shin, Masahiro; McNulty, Joseph C; Lawson, Nathan D; Wolfe, Scot A

    2013-06-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) provide powerful platforms for genome editing in plants and animals. Typically, a single nuclease is sufficient to disrupt the function of protein-coding genes through the introduction of microdeletions or insertions that cause frameshifts within an early coding exon. However, interrogating the function of cis-regulatory modules or noncoding RNAs in many instances requires the excision of this element from the genome. In human cell lines and invertebrates, two nucleases targeting the same chromosome can promote the deletion of intervening genomic segments with modest efficiencies. We have examined the feasibility of using this approach to delete chromosomal segments within the zebrafish genome, which would facilitate the functional study of large noncoding sequences in a vertebrate model of development. Herein, we demonstrate that segmental deletions within the zebrafish genome can be generated at multiple loci and are efficiently transmitted through the germline. Using two nucleases, we have successfully generated deletions of up to 69 kb at rates sufficient for germline transmission (1%-15%) and have excised an entire lincRNA gene and enhancer element. Larger deletions (5.5 Mb) can be generated in somatic cells, but at lower frequency (0.7%). Segmental inversions have also been generated, but the efficiency of these events is lower than the corresponding deletions. The ability to efficiently delete genomic segments in a vertebrate developmental system will facilitate the study of functional noncoding elements on an organismic level.

  18. Defining departmental mission.

    PubMed

    Hartman, M D; Barrow, J A; Sawyer, W R

    1990-02-01

    Mission statements have long been recognized by corporate America as a way to define an enterprise. The necessary business orientation of the health care industry requires that hospitals and hospital departments define their scope of services and reason for existence. The accelerating reprofessionalization affecting departments of pharmacy requires the same. "Improving the quality of patient care" can no longer represent a euphemism for simply reacting to external factors or acting on a whim without clear meaningful intent. Professional departments and hospitals must demonstrate a sense of direction and purpose and be able to justify costs to a budget-conscious management and skeptical public. Mission statements are not substitutes for a clearly defined sense of professional mission. However, well-constructed mission statements contribute to clarity of departmental and professional purpose and effective achievement of goals. PMID:10128549

  19. Defining Risk Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts to prevent alcohol-related harm are aimed at reducing risk drinking. This article outlines the many conceptual and methodological challenges to defining risk drinking. It summarizes recent evidence regarding associations of various aspects of alcohol consumption with chronic and acute alcohol-related harms, including mortality, morbidity, injury, and alcohol use disorders, and summarizes the study designs most appropriate to defining risk thresholds for these types of harm. In addition, it presents an international overview of low-risk drinking guidelines from more than 20 countries, illustrating the wide range of interpretations of the scientific evidence related to risk drinking. This article also explores the impact of drink size on defining risk drinking and describes variation in what is considered to be a standard drink across populations. Actual and standard drink sizes differ in the United States, and this discrepancy affects definitions of risk drinking and prevention efforts. PMID:22330212

  20. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  1. Molecular definition of deletions of different segments of distal 5p that result in distinct phenotypic features

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.M.; Bengtsson, U.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Niebuhr, E.

    1995-05-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CDC) is a segmental aneusomy associated with deletions of chromosome 5p15. In an effort to define regions that produce the phenotypes associated with CDC, we have analyzed deletions from 17 patients. The majority of these patients had atypical CDC features or were asymptomatic. Using these patients, we have mapped several phenotypes associated with deletions of 5p, including speech delay, catlike cry, newborn facial dysmorphism, and adult facial dysmorphism. This phenotypic map should provide a framework with which to begin identification of genes associated with various phenotypic features associated with deletions of distal 5p. We have also analyzed the parental origin of the de novo deletions, to determine if genomic imprinting could be occurring in this region. In addition, we have isolated cosmids that could be useful for both prenatal and postnatal assessments of del5(p) individuals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Defining Faculty Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter J.; Diamond, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    A process of planned change is proposed for redefining college faculty work. Legitimate faculty work is defined in broad terms, and information sources and methods for collecting information to support redefinition are identified. The final step in the redefinition process is the development of new mission statements for the institution and its…

  3. Defining Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovannoni, Jeanne M.; Becerra, Rosina M.

    In seeking to clarify the meaning of the terms "child abuse" and "child neglect" it has been assumed that, like other forms of social deviance, they are socially defined phenomena. Interviews were conducted with those professionals (lawyers, pediatricians, police officers, and social workers) who daily handle the problems of abuse and neglect for…

  4. Defined by Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriola, Sonya; Murphy, Katy

    2010-01-01

    Undocumented students are a population defined by limitations. Their lack of legal residency and any supporting paperwork (e.g., Social Security number, government issued identification) renders them essentially invisible to the American and state governments. They cannot legally work. In many states, they cannot legally drive. After the age of…

  5. Defining Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  6. Defining and Assessing Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    The seven papers in this monograph focus on defining and assessing quality. The paper are: (1) "Reflections on Design Ideals" (E. Grady Bogue), which addresses some "governing ideals" of collegiate quality; (2) "Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Investment and Quality in Higher Education" (Sven Groennings), which sees the competitive quality of…

  7. On Defining Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherritt, Caroline A.

    Defining literacy is a compelling challenge to educators. They generally use three models: instrumental, functional, and empowerment. The latter two approaches, which were increasingly evident in the 1980s, identify literacy by the social functions required in a given context or by the qualities needed for illiterate people to take control of…

  8. On Defining Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Though central to any pedagogical development of physics, the concept of mass is still not well understood. Properly defining mass has proven to be far more daunting than contemporary textbooks would have us believe. And yet today the origin of mass is one of the most aggressively pursued areas of research in all of physics. Much of the excitement…

  9. Defining Equality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Ronald E.

    1977-01-01

    Defines equality of education in three areas: 1) by the degree of integration of school systems; 2) by a comparison of material resources and assets in education; and 3) by the effects of schooling as measured by the mean scores of groups on standardized tests. Available from: College of Education, 107 Quadrangle, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa…

  10. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  11. Deletion of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital hypothyroidism and mild mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Anneren, G.; Sidenvall, R.

    1996-08-23

    We report on a girl with a large interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 21 and with mild mental retardation, congenital hypothyroidism, and hyperopia. The deletion [del(21)(q11.1-q22.1)] extends molecularly from marker D21S215 to D21S213. The distal breakpoint is not clearly defined but is situated between markers D21S213 and IFNAR. This patient has the largest deletion of chromosome 21 known without having severe mental retardation or malformations. The deletion does not involve the {open_quotes}Down syndrome chromosome{close_quotes} region, the region of chromosome 21 which in trisomy causes most of the manifestations of Down syndrome. Apparently, the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 21 does not include genes that are responsible for severe clinical effects in the event of either deletion or duplication, since several reported patients with either trisomy or deletion of this region have mild phenotypic abnormalities. Congenital hypothyroidism is much more common in Down syndrome than in the average population. Thus, the congenital hypothyroidism of the present patient might indicate that there is one or several genes on the proximal part of chromosome 21, which might be of importance for the thyroid function. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Molecular definition of 22q11 deletions in 151 velo-cardio-facial syndrome patients.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, C; Sirotkin, H; Pandita, R; Goldberg, R; McKie, J; Wadey, R; Patanjali, S R; Weissman, S M; Anyane-Yeboa, K; Warburton, D; Scambler, P; Shprintzen, R; Kucherlapati, R; Morrow, B E

    1997-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies and conotruncal heart defects. Many VCFS patients have hemizygous deletions for a part of 22q11, suggesting that haploinsufficiency in this region is responsible for its etiology. Because most cases of VCFS are sporadic, portions of 22q11 may be prone to rearrangement. To understand the molecular basis for chromosomal deletions, we defined the extent of the deletion, by genotyping 151 VCFS patients and performing haplotype analysis on 105, using 15 consecutive polymorphic markers in 22q11. We found that 83% had a deletion and >90% of these had a similar approximately 3 Mb deletion, suggesting that sequences flanking the common breakpoints are susceptible to rearrangement. We found no correlation between the presence or size of the deletion and the phenotype. To further define the chromosomal breakpoints among the VCFS patients, we developed somatic hybrid cell lines from a set of VCFS patients. An 11-kb resolution physical map of a 1,080-kb region that includes deletion breakpoints was constructed, incorporating genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) isolated by the hybridization selection method. The ordered markers were used to examine the two separated copies of chromosome 22 in the somatic hybrid cell lines. In some cases, we were able to map the chromosome breakpoints within a single cosmid. A 480-kb critical region for VCFS has been delineated, including the genes for GSCL, CTP, CLTD, HIRA, and TMVCF, as well as a number of novel ordered ESTs. PMID:9326327

  13. NF1 Microdeletion Syndrome: Refined FISH Characterization of Sporadic and Familial Deletions with Locus-Specific Probes

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Paola; Corrado, Lucia; Natacci, Federica; Castorina, Pierangela; Wu, Bai-Li; Schneider, Gretchen H.; Clementi, Maurizio; Tenconi, Romano; Korf, Bruce R.; Larizza, Lidia

    2000-01-01

    Summary Two familial and seven sporadic patients with neurofibromatosis 1—who showed dysmorphism, learning disabilities/mental retardation, and additional signs and carried deletions of the NF1 gene—were investigated by use of a two-step FISH approach to characterize the deletions. With FISH of YAC clones belonging to a 7-Mb 17q11.2 contig, we estimated the extension of all of the deletions and identified the genomic regions harboring the breakpoints. Mosaicism accounted for the mild phenotype in two patients. In subsequent FISH experiments, performed with locus-specific probes generated from the same YACs by means of a novel procedure, we identified the smallest region of overlapping (SRO), mapped the deletion breakpoints, and identified the genes that map to each deletion interval. From centromere to telomere, the ∼0.8-Mb SRO includes sequence-tagged site 64381, the SUPT6H gene (encoding a transcription factor involved in chromatin structure), and NF1. Extending telomerically from the SRO, two additional genes—BLMH, encoding a hydrolase involved in bleomycin resistance, and ACCN1, encoding an amiloride-sensitive cation channel expressed in the CNS—were located in the deleted intervals of seven and three patients, respectively. An apparently common centromeric deletion breakpoint was shared by all of the patients, whereas a different telomeric breakpoint defined a deletion interval of 0.8–3 Mb. There was no apparent correlation between the extent of the deletion and the phenotype. This characterization of gross NF1 deletions provides the premise for addressing correctly any genotype-phenotype correlation in the subset of patients with NF1 deletions. PMID:10631140

  14. The prognostic significance of various 13q14 deletions in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ouillette, Peter; Collins, Roxane; Shakhan, Sajid; Li, Jinghui; Li, Cheng; Shedden, Kerby; Malek, Sami N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To further our understanding of the biology and prognostic significance of various chromosomal 13q14 deletions in CLL. Experimental Design We have analyzed data from SNP 6.0 arrays to define the anatomy of various 13q14 deletions in a cohort of 255 CLL patients and have correlated two subsets of 13q14 deletions (type I: exclusive of RB1 and type II: inclusive of RB1) with patient survival. Further, we have measured the expression of the 13q14-resident microRNAs by Q-PCR in 242 CLL patients and subsequently assessed their prognostic significance. We have sequenced all coding exons of RB1 in patients with monoallelic Rb1 deletion and have sequenced the 13q14-resident miR locus in all patients. Results Large 13q14 (type II) deletions were detected in ~20% of all CLL patients and were associated with shortened survival. A strong association between 13q14 type II deletions and elevated genomic complexity, as measured through CLL-FISH or SNP 6.0 array profiling, was identified, suggesting that these lesions may contribute to CLL disease evolution through genomic destabilization. Sequence and copy number analysis of the RB1 gene identified a small CLL subset that is RB1 null. Finally, neither the expression levels of the 13q14-resident microRNAs nor the degree of 13q14 deletion, as measured through SNP 6.0 array-based copy number analysis, had significant prognostic importance. Conclusions Our data suggest that the clinical course of CLL is accelerated in patients with large (type II) 13q14 deletions that span the RB1 gene, therefore justifying routine identification of 13q14 subtypes in CLL management. PMID:21890456

  15. Molecular analyses of 17p11.2 deletions in 62 Smith-Magenis syndrome patients.

    PubMed Central

    Juyal, R. C.; Figuera, L. E.; Hauge, X.; Elsea, S. H.; Lupski, J. R.; Greenberg, F.; Baldini, A.; Patel, P. I.

    1996-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome caused by an interstitial deletion involving band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Toward the molecular definition of the interval defining this microdeletion syndrome, 62 unrelated SMS patients in conjunction with 70 available unaffected parents were molecularly analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of 14 loci in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 17. A multifaceted approach was used to determine deletion status at the various loci that combined (i) FISH analysis, (ii)PCR and Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 17 from selected patients, and (iii) genotype determination of patients for whom a parent(s) was available at four microsatellite marker loci and at four loci with associated RFLPs. The relative order of two novel anonymous markers and a new microsatellite marker was determined in 17p11.2. The results confirmed that the proximal deletion breakpoint in the majority of SMS patients is located between markers D17S58 (EW301) and D17S446 (FG1) within the 17p11.1-17p11.2 region. The common distal breakpoint was mapped between markers cCI17-638, which lies distal to D17S71, and cCI17-498, which lies proximal to the Charcot Marie-Tooth disease type 1A locus. The locus D17S258 was found to be deleted in all 62 patients, and probes from this region can be used for diagnosis of the SMS deletion by FISH. Ten patients demonstrated molecularly distinct deletions; of these, two patients had smaller deletions and will enable the definition of the critical interval for SMS. Images Figure 2 PMID:8651284

  16. Parameterized Complexity of Eulerian Deletion Problems.

    PubMed

    Cygan, Marek; Marx, Dániel; Pilipczuk, Marcin; Pilipczuk, Michał; Schlotter, Ildikó

    2014-01-01

    We study a family of problems where the goal is to make a graph Eulerian, i.e., connected and with all the vertices having even degrees, by a minimum number of deletions. We completely classify the parameterized complexity of various versions: undirected or directed graphs, vertex or edge deletions, with or without the requirement of connectivity, etc. The collection of results shows an interesting contrast: while the node-deletion variants remain intractable, i.e., W[1]-hard for all the studied cases, edge-deletion problems are either fixed-parameter tractable or polynomial-time solvable. Of particular interest is a randomized FPT algorithm for making an undirected graph Eulerian by deleting the minimum number of edges, based on a novel application of the color coding technique. For versions that remain NP-complete but fixed-parameter tractable we consider also possibilities of polynomial kernelization; unfortunately, we prove that this is not possible unless NP⊆coNP/poly. PMID:24415818

  17. Somatic mosaicism for a DMD gene deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kayoko; Ikeya, Kiyoko; Kondo, Eri

    1995-03-13

    Mosaicism is a mixed state, with two cell populations of different genetic origins caused by a cell mutation occurring after fertilization. In the present case, DNA analysis of lymphocytes led to a DMD diagnosis before death. Postmortem immunocytochemical and DNA analysis showed somatic mosaicism. At age 18 years, blood lymphocyte DNA analysis showed a DMD gene deletion, upstream from exon 7 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. As the patient`s mother and elder sister had no deletions, he was considered to have a new mutation. Immunocytochemical studies of postmortem tissues showed that dystrophin was absent from the tongue, deltoid, intercostal, psoas and rectus femoris muscles, but there was a mix of dystrophin-positive and negative fibers in the rectus abdominis, cardiac, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles. All diaphragm cells were dystrophin positive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification from all tissues except the temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles, diaphragm and kidney, in which no deletion was found, showed the deletion from at least exon 6 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. In this case, a genomic deletion of the DMD gene contributed to the formation of tissues derived from both ectoderm and endoderm, and cells of mesodermal origin showed genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Our results indicate a mutation of the present case may have occurred just before the period of germ layer formation. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Maternal mosaicism for IDUA deletion clarifies recurrence risk in MPS I

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Catherine; Mercer, Jean; Jones, Simon A; Jahic, Amir; Heptinstall, Lesley; Tylee, Karen; Newman, William G; Beetz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem lysosomal storage disorder. It is caused by biallelic loss-of-function variants in IDUA, encoding alpha-l iduronidase. Here, we describe an individual affected by MPS I due to a paternally inherited deletion of IDUA exons 1 and 2, c.(?_-88)_(299+1_300-1)del and a whole-gene deletion of IDUA (?_-88?)_(*136?)del secondary to maternal somatic mosaicism. We define a previously unreported mutational mechanism for this disorder. PMID:27766162

  19. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  20. Method for introducing unidirectional nested deletions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment in the context of a cloning vector which contains an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes utilizing the same cloning vector. An optimal vector, PZIP is described. Methods for introducing unidirectional deletions into a terminal location of a cloned DNA sequence which is inserted into the vector of the present invention are also disclosed. These methods are useful for introducing deletions into either or both ends of a cloned DNA insert, for high throughput sequencing of any DNA of interest.

  1. IAP gene deletion and conditional knockout models.

    PubMed

    Silke, John; Vaux, David L

    2015-03-01

    Gene deletion studies have helped reveal the unique and overlapping roles played by IAP proteins. Crossing IAP mutant mice has helped unravel the complex feed-back regulatory circuits in which cIAP1, cIAP2 and XIAP allow innate defensive responses to microbial pathogens, without the development of auto-inflammatory syndromes. Deletion of genes for Survivin and its homologs in yeasts, invertebrates and mammals has shown that it functions differently, as it is not a regulator of innate immunity or apoptosis, but acts together with INCENP, aurora kinase B and Borealin to allow chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:25545814

  2. TAPERED DEFINING SLOT

    DOEpatents

    Pressey, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    An improvement is reported in the shape and formation of the slot or opening in the collimating slot member which forms part of an ion source of the type wherein a vapor of the material to be ionized is bombarded by electrons in a magnetic field to strike an arc-producing ionization. The defining slot is formed so as to have a substantial taper away from the cathode, causing the electron bombardment from the cathode to be dispersed over a greater area reducing its temperature and at the same time bringing the principal concentration of heat from the electron bombardment nearer the anode side of the slot, thus reducing deterioration and prolonging the life of the slot member during operation.

  3. Defining the mobilome.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Janet L

    2009-01-01

    This chapter defines the agents that provide for the movement of genetic material which fuels the adaptive potential of life on our planet. The chapter has been structured to be broadly comprehensive, arbitrarily categorizing the mobilome into four classes: (1) transposons, (2) plasmids, (3) bacteriophage, and (4) self-splicing molecular parasites.Our increasing understanding of the mobilome is as dynamic as the mobilome itself. With continuing discovery, it is clear that nature has not confined these genomic agents of change to neat categories, but rather the classification categories overlap and intertwine. Massive sequencing efforts and their published analyses are continuing to refine our understanding of the extent of the mobilome. This chapter provides a framework to describe our current understanding of the mobilome and a foundation on which appreciation of its impact on genome evolution can be understood.

  4. Defining critical thoughts.

    PubMed

    Lovatt, Abbie

    2014-05-01

    Nursing education has long struggled to define critical thinking and explain how the process of critical thinking fits into the context of nursing. Despite this long time struggle, nurses and nurse educators continue to strive to foster critical thinking skills in nursing students as intuitively most nurses believe that critical thinking is necessary to function competently in the workplace. This article explores the most recent work of Dr. Stephen Brookfield and ties the concepts which are explored in Brookfield's work to nursing practice. Brookfield identifies that learners understand the meaning of critical thinking the best when the process is first demonstrated. Role modeling is a method educators can use to demonstrate critical thinking and is a strategy which nurses often use in the clinical area to train and mentor new nursing staff. Although it is not a new strategy in nursing education, it is a valuable strategy to engage learners in critical thinking activities. PMID:24418065

  5. Defining clinical 'workstation'.

    PubMed

    Safran, C

    1994-01-01

    Interest in the physician's workstation has increased, yet often seems to focus on technological issues. At Boston's Beth Israel Hospital, the Center for Clinical Computing includes heavily used clinical workstations. Their evolution over the past 20 years suggests design criteria: the workstation must be patient-centered, the interface must be uniform, and data acquisition must be addressed at a system level. However, it is clinical function that really defines a workstation. The workstation should do the following: display patient information rapidly and flexibly; assist with administrative tasks; facilitate communication; and provide four important types of decision support: access to literature, access to databases, clinical calculation, and 'synthetic vision,' or different views of patient data. The solutions to our healthcare problems are not in 'workboxes' we can buy, but in creative approaches we can imagine. We need a patient-centered infrastructure and a reduced workload for the clinician-perhaps a 'worklesstation'. PMID:8125637

  6. Phenotypic variability in Angelman syndrome: comparison among different deletion classes and between deletion and UPD subjects.

    PubMed

    Varela, Monica Castro; Kok, Fernando; Otto, Paulo Alberto; Koiffmann, Celia Priszkulnik

    2004-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) can result from either a 15q11-q13 deletion (del), paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting, or UBE3A mutations. Here, we describe the phenotypic and behavioral variability detected in 49 patients with different classes of deletions and nine patients with UPD. Diagnosis was made by methylation pattern analysis of exon 1 of the SNRPN-SNURF gene and by microsatellite profiling of loci within and outside the 15q11-q13 region. There were no major phenotypic differences between the two main classes (BP1-BP3; BP2-BP3) of AS deletion patients, except for the absence of vocalization, more prevalent in patients with BP1-BP3 deletions, and for the age of sitting without support, which was lower in patients with BP2-BP3 deletions. Our data suggest that gene deletions (NIPA1, NIPA2, CYF1P1, GCP5) mapped to the region between breakpoints BP1 and BP2 may be involved in the severity of speech impairment, since all BP1-BP3 deletion patients showed complete absence of vocalization, while 38.1% of the BP2-BP3 deletion patients were able to pronounce syllabic sounds, with doubtful meaning. Compared to UPD patients, deletion patients presented a higher incidence of swallowing disorders (73.9% del x 22.2% UPD) and hypotonia (73.3% del x 28.57% UPD). In addition, children with UPD showed better physical growth, fewer or no seizures, a lower incidence of microcephaly, less ataxia and higher cognitive skills. As a consequence of their milder or less typical phenotype, AS may remain undiagnosed, leading to an overall underdiagnosis of the disease.

  7. 22q11.2 Deletions in Patients with Conotruncal Defects: Data from 1610 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, Shabnam; Lupo, Philip J; Garbarini, Jennifer; Woyciechowski, Stacy; Edman, Sharon; Emanuel, Beverly S; Mitchell, Laura; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies including conotruncal cardiac defects. Identifying the patient with a 22q11.2 deletion (22q11del) can be challenging because many extracardiac features become apparent later in life. We sought to better define the cardiac phenotype associated with a 22q11del to help direct genetic testing. Methods 1,610 patients with conotruncal defects were sequentially tested for a 22q11del. Counts and frequencies for primary lesions and cardiac features were tabulated for those with and without a 22q11del. Logistic regression models investigated cardiac features that predicted deletion status in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Results Deletion frequency varied by primary anatomic phenotype. Regardless of the cardiac diagnosis, a concurrent aortic arch anomaly (AAA) was strongly associated with deletion status (OR 5.07, 95% CI: 3.66–7.04). In the TOF subset, the strongest predictor of deletion status was an AAA (OR 3.14, 95% CI: 1.87–5.27, p <0.001), followed by pulmonary valve atresia (OR 2.03, 95% CI: 1.02–4.02, p= 0.04). Among those with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of the great arteries, only those with an AAA had a 22q11del. However, five percent of patients with an isolated conoventricular ventricular septal defect and normal aortic arch anatomy had a 22q11del, while no one with an IAA-A had a 22q11del. Conclusion A subset of patients with conotruncal defects are at risk for a 22q11del. A concurrent AAA increases the risk regardless of the intracardiac anatomy. These findings help direct genetic screening for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in the cardiac patient. PMID:23604262

  8. Molecular Definition of the 22q11 Deletions in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Bernice; Goldberg, Rosalie; Carlson, Christine; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Sirotkin, Howard; Collins, John; Dunham, Ian; O'Donnell, Hilary; Scambler, Peter; Shprintzen, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1995-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a common genetic disorder among individuals with cleft palate and is associated with hemizygous deletions in human chromosome 22q11. Toward the molecular definition of the deletions, we constructed a physical map of 22q11 in the form of overlapping YACs. The physical map covers >9 cM of genetic distance, estimated to span 5 Mb of DNA, and contains a total of 64 markers. Eleven highly polymorphic short tandem-repeat polymorphic (STRP) markers were placed on the physical map, and 10 of these were unambiguously ordered. The 11 polymorphic markers were used to type the DNA from a total of 61 VCFS patients and 49 unaffected relatives. Comparison of levels of heterozygosity of these markers in VCFS patients and their unaffected relatives revealed that four of these markers are commonly hemizygous among VCFS patients. To confirm these results and to define further the breakpoints in VCFS patients, 15 VCFS individuals and their unaffected parents were genotyped for the 11 STRP markers. Haplotypes generated from this study revealed that 82% of the patients have deletions that can be defined by the STRP markers. The results revealed that all patients who have a deletion share a common proximal breakpoint, while there are two distinct distal breakpoints. Markers D22S941 and D22S944 appear to be consistently hemizygous in patients with deletions. Both of these markers are located on a single nonchimeric YAC that is 400 kb long. The results also show that the parental origin of the deleted chromosome does not have any effect on the phenotypic manifestation ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:7762562

  9. Defining the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  10. Expanding the ocular phenotype of 14q terminal deletions: A novel presentation of microphthalmia and coloboma in ring 14 syndrome with associated 14q32.31 deletion and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salter, Claire G; Baralle, Diana; Collinson, Morag N; Self, James E

    2016-04-01

    A variety of ocular anomalies have been described in the rare ring 14 and 14q terminal deletion syndromes, yet the character, prevalence, and extent of these anomalies are not well defined. Identification of these ocular anomalies can be central to providing diagnoses and facilitating optimal individual patient management. We report a child with a 14q32.31 terminal deletion and ring chromosome formation, presenting with severe visual impairment secondary to significant bilateral coloboma and microphthalmia. This patient is compared to previously reported patients with similar ocular findings and deletion sizes to further refine a locus for coloboma in the 14q terminal region. Those with ring formation and linear deletions are compared and the possibility of ring formation affecting the proximal 14q region is discussed. This report highlights the severity of ocular anomalies that can be associated with ring 14 and 14q terminal deletion syndromes and reveals the limited documentation of ocular examination in these two related syndromes. This suggests that many children with these genetic changes do not undergo an ophthalmology examination as part of their clinical assessment, yet it is only when this evaluation becomes routine that the true prevalence and extent of ocular involvement can be defined. This report therefore advocates for a thorough ophthalmological exam in children with ring 14 or 14q terminal deletion syndrome.

  11. 77 FR 68737 - Procurement List, Proposed Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions from the Procurement... Must Be Received On or Before: 12/17/2012. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are...

  12. 78 FR 65618 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions from the Procurement... Received on or Before: 12/2/2013. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or...

  13. Deletion 5q35.3

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; Tedrowe, N.A.; Tolworthy, J.A.; Patterson, R.M.; Ryan, S.G.; Young, R.S.

    1994-06-01

    The authors report on a 15-month-old boy with a de novo deletion of the terminal band of 5q, macrocephaly, mild retrognathia, anteverted nares with low flat nasal bridge, telecanthus, minor earlobe anomalies, bellshaped chest, diastasis recti, short fingers, and mild developmental delay.

  14. Interstitial deletion (6)q13q15

    SciTech Connect

    Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Mandel, H.; Bar El, H.; Bar-Nizan, N.; Borochowitz, Z.; Dar, Hanna

    1996-04-24

    We report on a 2-year-old child with psychomotor retardation, facial and urogenital anomalies. His chromosome constitution was 46,XY,del(6)(q13q15). This case further contributes to the karyotype-phenotype correlation of proximal deletion 6q syndromes. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. 78 FR 23543 - Procurement List Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...--Medical Equipment Set, X-Ray, Field NSN: 6545-00-920-7125--First Aid Kit, Gun Crew NPA: Ontario County...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Deletions On 3/8/2013 (78 FR 15000) and 11/2/2012 (77 FR...

  16. 22q11 deletion syndrome: current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hacıhamdioğlu, Bülent; Hacıhamdioğlu, Duygu; Delil, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11 is characterized by the presence of chromosome-specific low-copy repeats or segmental duplications. This region of the chromosome is very unstable and susceptible to mutations. The misalignment of low-copy repeats during nonallelic homologous recombination leads to the deletion of the 22q11.2 region, which results in 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). The 22q11.2 deletion is associated with a wide variety of phenotypes. The term 22q11DS is an umbrella term that is used to encompass all 22q11.2 deletion-associated phenotypes. The haploinsufficiency of genes located at 22q11.2 affects the early morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arches, heart, skeleton, and brain. TBX1 is the most important gene for 22q11DS. This syndrome can ultimately affect many organs or systems; therefore, it has a very wide phenotypic spectrum. An increasing amount of information is available related to the pathogenesis, clinical phenotypes, and management of this syndrome in recent years. This review summarizes the current clinical and genetic status related to 22q11DS. PMID:26056486

  17. Deletion of GPIHBP1 causing severe chylomicronemia.

    PubMed

    Rios, Jonathan J; Shastry, Savitha; Jasso, Juan; Hauser, Natalie; Garg, Abhimanyu; Bensadoun, André; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2012-05-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a hydrolase that cleaves circulating triglycerides to release fatty acids to the surrounding tissues. The enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells and is transported to its site of action on the capillary endothelium by glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1). Inactivating mutations in LPL; in its cofactor, apolipoprotein (Apo) C2; or in GPIHBP1 cause severe hypertriglyceridemia. Here we describe an individual with complete deficiency of GPIHBP1. The proband was an Asian Indian boy who had severe chylomicronemia at 2 months of age. Array-based copy-number analysis of his genomic DNA revealed homozygosity for a 17.5-kb deletion that included GPIHBP1. A 44-year-old aunt with a history of hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis was also homozygous for the deletion. A bolus of intravenously administered heparin caused a rapid increase in circulating LPL and decreased plasma triglyceride levels in control individuals but not in two GPIHBP1-deficient patients. Thus, short-term treatment with heparin failed to attenuate the hypertriglyceridemia in patients with GPIHBP1 deficiency. The increasing resolution of copy number microarrays and their widespread adoption for routine cytogenetic analysis is likely to reveal a greater role for submicroscopic deletions in Mendelian conditions. We describe the first neonate with complete GPIHBP1 deficiency due to homozygosity for a deletion of GPIHBP1. PMID:22008945

  18. 78 FR 77106 - Procurement List; Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

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  19. Molecular and clinical characterization of patients with overlapping 10p deletions.

    PubMed

    Lindstrand, Anna; Malmgren, Helena; Verri, Annapia; Benetti, Elisa; Eriksson, Maud; Nordgren, Ann; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Golovleva, Irina; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Blennow, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Chromosome 10p terminal deletions have been associated with DiGeorge phenotype, and within the same genomic region haploinsufficiency of GATA3 causes the HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia). We have performed detailed molecular analysis of four patients with partial overlapping 10p deletions by using FISH-mapping, array-CGH, and custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array. All four patients had mental retardation and speech impairment and three of them showed variable signs of HDR syndrome. In addition, two patients had autistic behaviors and had similar dysmorphic features giving them a striking physical resemblance. A review of the literature identified 10 previously published cases with similar 10p deletions and reliable molecular or molecular cytogenetic mapping data. The combined information of present and previous cases suggests that partial deletions of 10p14-p15 represent a syndrome with a distinct and more severe phenotype than previously assumed. The main characteristics include severe mental retardation, language impairment, autistic behavior, and characteristic clinical features. A critical region involved in mental retardation and speech impairment is defined within 1.6 Mb in 10p15.3. In addition, deletion of 4.3 Mb within 10p14 is associated with autism and characteristic clinical findings. PMID:20425828

  20. Defining an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future. PMID:26470448

  1. Defining an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future.

  2. Interstitial 11q deletion: genomic characterization and neuropsychiatric follow up from early infancy to adolescence and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interstitial deletions of chromosome 11 long arm are rarely observed and the associated phenotype ranges from normal to severe, depending on the position and size of the deletion and on the presence of unmasked recessive genes on the normal homologous. To our knowledge 32 cases are reported in literature with three family cases. Phenotype-genotype correlation is not very clear and the most common features are characteristic facial dysmorphisms, palate anomalies and developmental delay. Growth retardation is not typical and other major malformations are reported in some cases. Case Presentation We described a child with 11q interstitial deletion diagnosed at birth with hypotonia and minor dysmorphisms using standard cytogenetic techniques; array CGH was subsequently performed to define the deletion at a molecular level. Conclusions This case gave us the opportunity to attempt a genotype-phenotype correlation reviewing the literature and to describe a rehabilitative program that improved the development perspectives of this child. PMID:24742288

  3. Fine structure mapping and deletion analysis of the murine piebald locus

    SciTech Connect

    Metallinos, D.L.; Tilghman, S.M. ); Oppenheimer, A.J. ); Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. ); Dietrich, W. )

    1994-01-01

    Piebald (s) is a recessive mutation that affects the development of two cell types of neural crest origin: melanocytes, responsible for pigment synthesis in the skin, and enteric ganglia, which innervate the lower bowel. As a result, mice carrying piebald mutations exhibit white spotting in the coat and aganglionic megacolon. Previously the gene had been localized to the distal half of mouse chromosome 14. To determine its precise location relative to molecular markers, an intersubspecific backcross was generated. Two anchor loci of chromosome 14, slaty and hypogonadal, in addition to simple sequence length repeat markers, were used to localize s to a 2-cM interval defined by the markers D14Mit38 and D14Mit42. The molecular markers were also used to characterize nine induced s alleles. Three of these mutations exhibited no deletions or rearrangements of the flanking markers, whereas the other six had two or more of these markers deleted. The extent of the deletions was found to be consistent with the severity of the homozygous phenotype. The location of deletion breakpoints in the induced alleles, coupled with the recombination breakpoints in the backcross progeny, provide useful molecular landmarks to define the location of the piebald gene.

  4. Interstitial deletion of distal 13q associated with Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, M A; Fitchett, M; Dennis, N R

    1989-01-01

    Three cases of interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 involving the common segment 13q22.1----q32.1 are reported. In addition to the recognised clinical features of this deletion, two had Hirschsprung's disease. Images PMID:2918536

  5. Deletion of 3p25.3 in a patient with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features with further definition of a critical region.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Gregory; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Several recent reports of interstitial deletions at the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 3 have helped to define the critical region whose deletion causes 3p deletion syndrome. We report on an 11-year-old girl with intellectual disability, obsessive-compulsive tendencies, hypotonia, and dysmorphic facial features in whom a 684 kb interstitial 3p25.3 deletion was characterized using array-CGH. This deletion overlaps with interstitial 3p25 deletions reported in three recent case reports. These deletions share a 124 kb overlap region including only three RefSeq annotated genes, THUMPD3, SETD5, and LOC440944. The current patient had phenotypic similarities, including intellectual disability, hypotonia, depressed nasal bridge, and long philtrum, with previously reported patients, while she did not have the cardiac defects, seizures ormicrocephaly reported in patients with larger deletions. Therefore, this patient furthers our knowledge of the consequences of 3p deletions, while suggesting genotype-phenotype correlations.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions 22q11.2 deletion syndrome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (which is also known by several ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions 22q13.3 deletion syndrome 22q13.3 deletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 22q13.3 deletion syndrome , which is also commonly known as ...

  8. Rac1 deletion causes thymic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Lukas; Benitah, Salvador Aznar; Aznar Benitah, Salvador; Braun, Kristin M; Jensen, Kim; McNulty, Katrina; Butler, Colin; Potton, Elspeth; Nye, Emma; Boyd, Richard; Laurent, Geoff; Glogauer, Michael; Wright, Nick A; Watt, Fiona M; Janes, Sam M

    2011-04-29

    The thymic stroma supports T lymphocyte development and consists of an epithelium maintained by thymic epithelial progenitors. The molecular pathways that govern epithelial homeostasis are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deletion of Rac1 in Keratin 5/Keratin 14 expressing embryonic and adult thymic epithelial cells leads to loss of the thymic epithelial compartment. Rac1 deletion led to an increase in c-Myc expression and a generalized increase in apoptosis associated with a decrease in thymic epithelial proliferation. Our results suggest Rac1 maintains the epithelial population, and equilibrium between Rac1 and c-Myc may control proliferation, apoptosis and maturation of the thymic epithelial compartment. Understanding thymic epithelial maintenance is a step toward the dual goals of in vitro thymic epithelial cell culture and T cell differentiation, and the clinical repair of thymic damage from graft-versus-host-disease, chemotherapy or irradiation.

  9. Duplication/deletion of chromosome 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, J.H.

    1995-09-11

    The article by Guo et al. provides evidence for deletion of D8S596 loci (assigned to 8p23) in at least some patients with inverted duplications of 8p. Cytogenetic break points forming the inverted duplication are remarkably similar among most of their patients and those reported previously, suggesting a common mechanism for this interesting rearrangement. Why should similar breaks occur in 8p and why is a FISH signal absent in the distal short arm when the ONCOR digoxigenin-labeled probe for loci D8S596 is used? Other studies also indicate that duplication for the region 8p12-p22 is associated with a deletion distal to the duplication itself. 4 refs.

  10. A review of 18p deletions.

    PubMed

    Hasi-Zogaj, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Soileau, Bridgette; Hill, Annice; Rupert, David; Perry, Brian; Atkinson, Sidney; O'Donnell, Louise; Gelfond, Jon; Lancaster, Jack; Fox, Peter T; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-09-01

    Since 18p- was first described in 1963, much progress has been made in our understanding of this classic deletion condition. We have been able to establish a fairly complete picture of the phenotype when the deletion breakpoint occurs at the centromere, and we are working to establish the phenotypic effects when each gene on 18p is hemizygous. Our aim is to provide genotype-specific anticipatory guidance and recommendations to families with an 18p- diagnosis. In addition, establishing the molecular underpinnings of the condition will potentially suggest targets for molecular treatments. Thus, the next step is to establish the precise effects of specific gene deletions. As we look forward to deepening our understanding of 18p-, our focus will continue to be on the establishment of robust genotype-phenotype correlations and the penetrance of these phenotypes. We will continue to follow our 18p- cohort closely as they age to determine the presence or absence of some of these diagnoses, including spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and dystonia. We will also continue to refine the critical regions for other phenotypes as we enroll additional (hopefully informative) participants into the research study and as the mechanisms of the genes in these regions are elucidated. Mouse models will also be developed to further our understanding of the effects of hemizygosity as well as to serve as models for treatment development. PMID:26250845

  11. Probabilistic phylogenetic inference with insertions and deletions.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Elena; Eddy, Sean R

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental task in sequence analysis is to calculate the probability of a multiple alignment given a phylogenetic tree relating the sequences and an evolutionary model describing how sequences change over time. However, the most widely used phylogenetic models only account for residue substitution events. We describe a probabilistic model of a multiple sequence alignment that accounts for insertion and deletion events in addition to substitutions, given a phylogenetic tree, using a rate matrix augmented by the gap character. Starting from a continuous Markov process, we construct a non-reversible generative (birth-death) evolutionary model for insertions and deletions. The model assumes that insertion and deletion events occur one residue at a time. We apply this model to phylogenetic tree inference by extending the program dnaml in phylip. Using standard benchmarking methods on simulated data and a new "concordance test" benchmark on real ribosomal RNA alignments, we show that the extended program dnamlepsilon improves accuracy relative to the usual approach of ignoring gaps, while retaining the computational efficiency of the Felsenstein peeling algorithm. PMID:18787703

  12. Experimental quantum deletion in an NMR quantum information processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yu; Feng, GuanRu; Pearson, Jasong; Long, GuiLu

    2014-07-01

    We report an NMR experimental realization of a rapid quantum deletion algorithm that deletes marked states in an unsorted database. Unlike classical deletion, where search and deletion are equivalent, quantum deletion can be implemented with only a single query, which achieves exponential speed-up compared to the optimal classical analog. In the experimental realization, the GRAPE algorithm was used to obtain an optimized NMR pulse sequence, and the efficient method of maximum-likelihood has been used to reconstruct the experimental output state.

  13. Deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase by a new method for efficient markerless gene deletions in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Junker, Anja; Brauer, Katharina; Mühlthaler, Bernadette; Kostner, David; Mientus, Markus; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2013-03-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans, a biotechnologically relevant species which incompletely oxidizes a large variety of carbohydrates, alcohols, and related compounds, contains a gene for pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). This enzyme is found only in very few species of bacteria where it is normally involved in anaerobic ethanol formation via acetaldehyde. In order to clarify the role of PDC in the strictly oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria, we developed a markerless in-frame deletion system for strain G. oxydans 621H which uses 5-fluorouracil together with a plasmid-encoded uracil phosphoribosyltransferase as counter selection method and used this technique to delete the PDC gene (GOX1081) of G. oxydans 621H. The PDC deletion mutant accumulated large amounts of pyruvate but almost no acetate during growth on D-mannitol, D-fructose or in the presence of L-lactate. This suggested that in G. oxydans acetate formation occurs by decarboxylation of pyruvate and subsequent oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. This observation and the efficiency of the markerless deletion system were confirmed by constructing deletion mutants of two acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (GOX1122 and GOX2018) and of the acetyl-CoA-synthetase (GOX0412). Acetate formation during growth of these mutants on mannitol did not differ significantly from the wild-type strain.

  14. De Novo 13q13.3-21.31 deletion involving RB1 gene in a patient with hemangioendothelioma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 (13q) are related with variable phenotypes, according to the size and the location of the deleted region. The main clinical features are moderate/severe mental and growth retardation, cranio-facial dysmorphism, variable congenital defects and increased susceptibility to tumors. Here we report a 3-year-old girl carrying a de novo 13q13.3-21.32 interstitial deletion. She showed developmental delay, growth retardation and mild dysmorphism including curly hair, high forehead, short nose, thin upper lip and long philtrum. An abnormal mass was surgically removed from her liver resulting in a hemangioendothelioma. Array analysis allowed us to define a deleted region of about 27.87 Mb, which includes the RB1 gene. This is the first report of a 13q deletion associated with infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver. PMID:24433316

  15. Interstitial Chromosome 3p14.1 Deletion due to a Maternal Insertion: Phenotype and Association with Balanced Parental Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Catherine; Wang, Jia-Chi; Mahon, Loretta W.; Martinez, Ariadna; Saitta, Sulagna C.

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of 3p14p12 are rare chromosome abnormalities. We present a patient with multiple congenital anomalies and a 15.4-Mb interstitial loss of chromosome 3p14p12 detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA). Our patient shared many phenotypic features with other reported cases involving the same region including prominent forehead, short palpebral fissures, hand and foot anomalies, genital abnormalities, and bilateral hearing loss. Given the clinical similarity of these cases with significant overlap of the deleted regions, it is likely that the phenotype is related to the deletion of specific genes within the region. Further molecular cytogenetic investigation revealed that our patient's rearrangement was derived from a cryptic insertion of a segment of chromosome 3p into chromosome 18q in the mother, which was balanced and therefore not visible on the mother's CMA. To our knowledge, this finding has not been previously reported. This case illustrates the importance of using molecular cytogenetics for structural analysis and parental studies. CMA is commonly the first-line study in patients with multiple congenital anomalies; however, it is not the appropriate modality to define a structural rearrangement that may be the cause of a deletion. The use of adjunct studies to define the mechanism of an identified copy number aberration has direct clinical application: to identify the underlying cause of the chromosomal abnormality and to define the recurrence risk. Additionally, this case adds to the current body of work regarding a recurrent phenotype that can be attributed to interstitial chromosome 3p deletions, which may help define the phenotypic implications of deletions in this region and support early clinical management. PMID:27194973

  16. Interstitial Chromosome 3p14.1 Deletion due to a Maternal Insertion: Phenotype and Association with Balanced Parental Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Catherine; Wang, Jia-Chi; Mahon, Loretta W; Martinez, Ariadna; Saitta, Sulagna C

    2016-04-01

    Interstitial deletions of 3p14p12 are rare chromosome abnormalities. We present a patient with multiple congenital anomalies and a 15.4-Mb interstitial loss of chromosome 3p14p12 detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA). Our patient shared many phenotypic features with other reported cases involving the same region including prominent forehead, short palpebral fissures, hand and foot anomalies, genital abnormalities, and bilateral hearing loss. Given the clinical similarity of these cases with significant overlap of the deleted regions, it is likely that the phenotype is related to the deletion of specific genes within the region. Further molecular cytogenetic investigation revealed that our patient's rearrangement was derived from a cryptic insertion of a segment of chromosome 3p into chromosome 18q in the mother, which was balanced and therefore not visible on the mother's CMA. To our knowledge, this finding has not been previously reported. This case illustrates the importance of using molecular cytogenetics for structural analysis and parental studies. CMA is commonly the first-line study in patients with multiple congenital anomalies; however, it is not the appropriate modality to define a structural rearrangement that may be the cause of a deletion. The use of adjunct studies to define the mechanism of an identified copy number aberration has direct clinical application: to identify the underlying cause of the chromosomal abnormality and to define the recurrence risk. Additionally, this case adds to the current body of work regarding a recurrent phenotype that can be attributed to interstitial chromosome 3p deletions, which may help define the phenotypic implications of deletions in this region and support early clinical management. PMID:27194973

  17. FLCN intragenic deletions in Chinese familial primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yibing; Zhu, Chengchu; Zou, Wei; Ma, Dehua; Min, Haiyan; Chen, Baofu; Ye, Minhua; Pan, Yanqing; Cao, Lei; Wan, Yueming; Zhang, Wenwen; Meng, Lulu; Mei, Yuna; Yang, Chi; Chen, Shilin; Gao, Qian; Yi, Long

    2015-05-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a significant clinical problem, affecting tens of thousands patients annually. Germline mutations in the FLCN gene have been implicated in etiology of familial PSP (FPSP). Most of the currently identified FLCN mutations are small indels or point mutations that detected by Sanger sequencing. The aim of this study was to determine large FLCN deletions in PSP families that having no FLCN sequence-mutations. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays and breakpoint analyses were used to detect and characterize the deletions. Three heterozygous FLCN intragenic deletions were identified in nine unrelated Chinese families including the exons 1-3 deletion in two families, the exons 9-14 deletion in five families and the exon 14 deletion in two families. All deletion breakpoints are located in Alu repeats. A 5.5 Mb disease haplotype shared in the five families with exons 9-14 deletion may date the appearance of this deletion back to approximately 16 generations ago. Evidences for founder effects of the other two deletions were also observed. This report documents the first identification of founder mutations in FLCN, as well as expands mutation spectrum of the gene. Our findings strengthen the view that MLPA analysis for intragenic deletions/duplications, as an important genetic testing complementary to DNA sequencing, should be used for clinical molecular diagnosis in FPSP.

  18. Memory in Intellectually Matched Groups of Young Participants with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Those with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravariti, Eugenia; Jacobson, Clare; Morris, Robin; Frangou, Sophia; Murray, Robin M.; Tsakanikos, Elias; Habel, Alex; Shearer, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and schizophrenia have genetic and neuropsychological similarities, but are likely to differ in memory profile. Confirming differences in memory function between the two disorders, and identifying their genetic determinants, can help to define genetic subtypes in both syndromes, identify genetic risk factors…

  19. Broad metabolic sensitivity profiling of a prototrophic yeast deletion collection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide sensitivity screens in yeast have been immensely popular following the construction of a collection of deletion mutants of non-essential genes. However, the auxotrophic markers in this collection preclude experiments on minimal growth medium, one of the most informative metabolic environments. Here we present quantitative growth analysis for mutants in all 4,772 non-essential genes from our prototrophic deletion collection across a large set of metabolic conditions. Results The complete collection was grown in environments consisting of one of four possible carbon sources paired with one of seven nitrogen sources, for a total of 28 different well-defined metabolic environments. The relative contributions to mutants' fitness of each carbon and nitrogen source were determined using multivariate statistical methods. The mutant profiling recovered known and novel genes specific to the processing of nutrients and accurately predicted functional relationships, especially for metabolic functions. A benchmark of genome-scale metabolic network modeling is also given to demonstrate the level of agreement between current in silico predictions and hitherto unavailable experimental data. Conclusions These data address a fundamental deficiency in our understanding of the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its response to the most basic of environments. While choice of carbon source has the greatest impact on cell growth, specific effects due to nitrogen source and interactions between the nutrients are frequent. We demonstrate utility in characterizing genes of unknown function and illustrate how these data can be integrated with other whole-genome screens to interpret similarities between seemingly diverse perturbation types. PMID:24721214

  20. Renal Failure Associated with APECED and Terminal 4q Deletion: Evidence of Autoimmune Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Owain, Mohammed; Kaya, Namik; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Bin Hussain, Ibrahim; Al-Manea, Hadeel; Al-Hindi, Hindi; Kennedy, Shelley; Iqbal, M. Anwar; Al-Mojalli, Hamad; Al-Bakheet, Albandary; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Al-Muhsen, Saleh

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE). Terminal 4q deletion is also a rare cytogenetic abnormality that causes a variable syndrome of dysmorphic features, mental retardation, growth retardation, and heart and limb defects. We report a 12-year-old Saudi boy with mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and adrenocortical failure consistent with APECED. In addition, he has dysmorphic facial features, growth retardation, and severe global developmental delay. Patient had late development of chronic renal failure. The blastogenesis revealed depressed lymphocytes' response to Candida albicans at 38% when compared to control. Chromosome analysis of the patient revealed 46,XY,del(4)(q33). FISH using a 4p/4q subtelomere DNA probe assay confirmed the deletion of qter subtelomere on chromosome 4. Parental chromosomes were normal. The deleted array was further defined using array CGH. AIRE full gene sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation namely 845_846insC. Renal biopsy revealed chronic interstitial nephritis with advanced fibrosis. In addition, there was mesangial deposition of C3, C1q, and IgM. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first paper showing evidence of autoimmune nephropathy by renal immunofluorescence in a patient with APECED and terminal 4q deletion. PMID:21197407

  1. A coalescence of two syndromes in a girl with terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rearrangements involving chromosome 5p often result in two syndromes, Cri-du-chat (CdC) and Trisomy 5p, caused by a deletion and duplication, respectively. The 5p15.2 has been defined as a critical region for CdC syndrome; however, genotype-phenotype studies allowed isolation of particular characteristics such as speech delay, cat-like cry and mental retardation, caused by distinct deletions of 5p. A varied clinical outcome was also observed in patients with Trisomy 5p. Duplications of 5p10-5p13.1 manifest themselves in a more severe phenotype, while trisomy of regions distal to 5p13 mainly causes mild and indistinct features. Combinations of a terminal deletion and inverted duplication of 5p are infrequent in literature. Consequences of these chromosomal rearrangements differ, depending on size of deletion and duplication in particular cases, although authors mainly describe the deletion as the cause of the observed clinical picture. Case presentation Here we present a 5-month-old Slovenian girl, with de novo terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5p. Our patient presents features of both CdC and Trisomy 5. The most prominent features observed in our patient are a cat-like cry and severe malformations of the right ear. Conclusion The cat-like cry, characteristic of CdC syndrome, is noted in our patient despite the fact that the deletion is not fully consistent with previously defined cat-like cry critical region in this syndrome. Features like dolichocephaly, macrocephaly and ear malformations, associated with duplication of the critical region of Trisomy 5p, are also present, although this region has not been rearranged in our case. Therefore, the true meaning of the described chromosomal rearrangements is discussed. PMID:24517234

  2. Analysis of chromosome 22 deletions in neurofibromatosis type 2-related tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, R K; Frazer, K A; Jackler, R K; Lanser, M J; Pitts, L H; Cox, D R

    1992-01-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene has been hypothesized to be a recessive tumor suppressor, with mutations at the same locus on chromosome 22 that lead to NF2 also leading to sporadic tumors of the types seen in NF2. Flanking markers for this gene have previously been defined as D22S1 centromeric and D22S28 telomeric. Identification of subregions of this interval that are consistently rearranged in the NF2-related tumors would aid in better defining the disease locus. To this end, we have compared tumor and constitutional DNAs, isolated from 39 unrelated patients with sporadic and NF2-associated acoustic neuromas, meningiomas, schwannomas, and ependymomas, at eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 22. Two of the tumors studied revealed loss-of-heterozygosity patterns, which is consistent with the presence of chromosome 22 terminal deletions. By using additional polymorphic markers, the terminal deletion breakpoint found in one of the tumors, an acoustic neuroma from an NF2 patient, was mapped within the previously defined NF2 region. The breakpoint occurred between the haplotyped markers D22S41/D22S46 and D22S56. This finding redefines the proximal flanking marker and localizes the NF2 gene between markers D22S41/D22S46 and D22S28. In addition, we identified a sporadic acoustic neuroma that reveals a loss-of-heterozygosity pattern consistent with mitotic recombination or deletion and reduplication, which are mechanisms not previously seen in studies of these tumors. This finding, while inconsistent with models of tumorigenesis that invoke single deletions and their gene-dosage effects, lends further support to the recessive tumor-suppressor model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1496981

  3. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  4. Method for introducing unidirectional nested deletions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-07-27

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  5. Method for introducing unidirectional nested deletions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.J.; Quesada, M.A.; Randesi, M.

    1999-07-27

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector. The cloning vector has an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe. 1 fig.

  6. Whole genome HBV deletion profiles and the accumulation of preS deletion mutant during antiviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV), because of its error-prone viral polymerase, has a high mutation rate leading to widespread substitutions, deletions, and insertions in the HBV genome. Deletions may significantly change viral biological features complicating the progression of liver diseases. However, the clinical conditions correlating to the accumulation of deleted mutants remain unclear. In this study, we explored HBV deletion patterns and their association with disease status and antiviral treatment by performing whole genome sequencing on samples from 51 hepatitis B patients and by monitoring changes in deletion variants during treatment. Clone sequencing was used to analyze preS regions in another cohort of 52 patients. Results Among the core, preS, and basic core promoter (BCP) deletion hotspots, we identified preS to have the highest frequency and the most complex deletion pattern using whole genome sequencing. Further clone sequencing analysis on preS identified 70 deletions which were classified into 4 types, the most common being preS2. Also, in contrast to the core and BCP regions, most preS deletions were in-frame. Most deletions interrupted viral surface epitopes, and are possibly involved in evading immuno-surveillance. Among various clinical factors examined, logistic regression showed that antiviral medication affected the accumulation of deletion mutants (OR = 6.81, 95% CI = 1.296 ~ 35.817, P = 0.023). In chronic carriers of the virus, and individuals with chronic hepatitis, the deletion rate was significantly higher in the antiviral treatment group (Fisher exact test, P = 0.007). Particularly, preS2 deletions were associated with the usage of nucleos(t)ide analog therapy (Fisher exact test, P = 0.023). Dynamic increases in preS1 or preS2 deletions were also observed in quasispecies from samples taken from patients before and after three months of ADV therapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that preS2 deletions alone

  7. Are there ethnic differences in deletions in the dystrophin gene?

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.; Verma, I.C.

    1997-01-20

    We studied 160 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drawn from all parts of India, using multiplex PCR of 27 exons. Of these, 103 (64.4%) showed intragenic deletions. Most (69.7%) of the deletions involved exons 45-51. The phenotype of cases with deletion of single exons did not differ significantly from those with deletion of multiple exons. The distribution of deletions in studies from different countries was variable, but this was accounted for either by the small number of cases studied, or by fewer exons analyzed. It is concluded that there is likely to be no ethnic difference with respect to deletions in the DMD gene. 38 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Defined Syllabuses in Modern Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ann; Honnor, Sylvia

    1974-01-01

    The advantages of a defined syllabus in second language teaching, especially in relation to public examinations, are discussed. The origin and development of the York defined syllabuses are described, and extracts are given from the introductory document and the French and Russian syllabuses. (RM)

  9. Clarifying and Defining Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shubert, Joseph F., Ed.; Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents articles which, in some way, help to clarify and define library services. It is hoped that this clarification in library service will serve to secure the resources libraries need to serve the people of New York. The following articles are presented: (1) Introduction: "Clarifying and Defining Library Services" (Joseph F.…

  10. Deletions of the elastin gene in Williams Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, F.; Nickerson, E.; McCaskill, C.

    1994-09-01

    To investigate deletions in the elastin gene in patients with Williams Syndrome (WS), we screened 37 patients and their parents for deletions in the elastin gene by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using cosmid cELN272 containing the 5{prime} end of the elastin gene and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer pair which amplifies intron 17 in the elastin gene, producing a polymorphic amplification product. Thirty-two patients have been investigated by both the FISH and PCR techniques, one patient was studied only by PCR, and 4 patients were studied only by FISH. Overall, 34 of 37 patients (92%) were deleted for the elastin gene. Using the PCR marker, 14 patients were informative and 12 were shown to be deleted [maternal (n=5) and paternal (n=7)]. Using cosmid cELN272, 33 of 36 patients demonstrated a deletion of chromosome 7q11.23. In one family, both the mother and daughter were deleted due to an apparently de novo deletion arising in the mother. Three patients were not deleted using the elastin cosmid; 2 of these patients have classic WS. Another non-deleted patient has the typical facial features and hypercalcemia but normal intelligence. These three patients will be important in delineating the critical region(s) responsible for the facial features, hypercalcemia, mental retardation and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). There was not an absolute correlation between deletions in elastin and SVAS, although these individuals may be at risk for other cardiovascular complications such as hypertention. Since the majority of WS patients are deleted for a portion of the elastin gene, most likely this marker will be an important diagnostic tool, although more patients will need to be studied. Those patients who are not deleted but clinically have WS will be missed using only this one marker. Expansion of the critical region to other loci and identification of additional markers will be essential for identifying all patients with WS.

  11. Enhanced Deletion Formation by Aberrant DNA Replication in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Saveson, C. J.; Lovett, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated genes and sequences are prone to genetic rearrangements including deletions. We have investigated deletion formation in Escherichia coli strains mutant for various replication functions. Deletion was selected between 787 base pair tandem repeats carried either on a ColE1-derived plasmid or on the E. coli chromosome. Only mutations in functions associated with DNA Polymerase III elevated deletion rates in our assays. Especially large increases were observed in strains mutant in dnaQ, the ε editing subunit of Pol III, and dnaB, the replication fork helicase. Mutations in several other functions also altered deletion formation: the α polymerase (dnaE), the γ clamp loader complex (holC, dnaX), and the β clamp (dnaN) subunits of Pol III and the primosomal proteins, dnaC and priA. Aberrant replication stimulated deletions through several pathways. Whereas the elevation in dnaB strains was mostly recA- and lexA-dependent, that in dnaQ strains was mostly recA- and lexA-independent. Deletion product analysis suggested that slipped mispairing, producing monomeric replicon products, may be preferentially increased in a dnaQ mutant and sister-strand exchange, producing dimeric replicon products, may be elevated in dnaE mutants. We conclude that aberrant Polymerase III replication can stimulate deletion events through several mechanisms of deletion and via both recA-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:9177997

  12. Polymorphic insertions and deletions in parabasalian enolase genes.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Patrick J

    2004-05-01

    Insertions and deletions in gene sequences have been used as characters to infer phylogenetic relationships and, like any character, the information they contain varies in utility between different levels of evolution. In one case, the absence of two otherwise highly conserved deletions in the enolase genes of parabasalian protists has been interpreted as a primitive characteristic that suggests these were among the first eukaryotes. Here, semi-environmental 3'-RACE was used to sample enolases from parabasalia in the hindgut of the termite Zootermopsis angusticolis to examine the conservation of this character within the parabasalia. Parabasalian homologues were found to be polymorphic for these deletions, and the phylogeny of parabasalian enolases shows that the deletion-possessing genes branch within deletion-lacking genes (i.e., they did not form two clearly distinct groups). Phylogenetic incongruence was detected in the carboxy-terminal third of the sequence (in the region of the deletions), but there is no unambiguous evidence for recombination. The polymorphism of this character discredits these deletions as strong evidence for the early origin of parabasalia, although the complex distribution makes it impossible to state whether parabasalian enolases were ancestrally like those of other eukaryotes. These observations stress the importance of strong corroborating evidence when considering insertion and deletion data, and raises some interesting questions about the apparent variation in degree of conservation of these deletions between different eukaryotic groups.

  13. Homozygous deletion in MICU1 presenting with fatigue and lethargy in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Smith, David; Kamer, Kimberli J.; Griffin, Helen; Childs, Anne-Marie; Pysden, Karen; Titov, Denis; Duff, Jennifer; Pyle, Angela; Taylor, Robert W.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Horvath, Rita; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To define the mechanism responsible for fatigue, lethargy, and weakness in 2 cousins who had a normal muscle biopsy. Methods: Exome sequencing, long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing to identify the pathogenic mutation. Functional analysis in the patient fibroblasts included oxygen consumption measurements, extracellular acidification studies, Western blotting, and calcium imaging, followed by overexpression of the wild-type protein. Results: Analysis of the exome sequencing depth revealed a homozygous deletion of exon 1 of MICU1 within a 2,755-base pair deletion. No MICU1 protein was detected in patient fibroblasts, which had impaired mitochondrial calcium uptake that was rescued through the overexpression of the wild-type allele. Conclusions: MICU1 mutations cause fatigue and lethargy in patients with normal mitochondrial enzyme activities in muscle. The fluctuating clinical course is likely mediated through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter, which is regulated by MICU1. PMID:27123478

  14. Uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing in trypanosome mitochondria: a complex business.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Larry; Sbicego, Sandro; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2003-03-01

    The basic mechanism of uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing in mitochondria of kinetoplastid protists has been established for some time but the molecular details remained largely unknown. Recently, there has been significant progress in defining the molecular components of the editing reaction. A number of factors have been isolated from trypanosome mitochondria, some of which have been definitely implicated in the uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing reaction and others of which have been circumstantially implicated. Several protein complexes have been isolated which exhibit some editing activities, and the macromolecular organization of these complexes is being analyzed. In addition, there have been several important technical advances in the in vitro analysis of editing. In this review we critically examine the various factors and complexes proposed to be involved in RNA editing.

  15. Deletion mapping of genetic regions associated with apomixis in Hieracium.

    PubMed

    Catanach, Andrew S; Erasmuson, Sylvia K; Podivinsky, Ellen; Jordan, Brian R; Bicknell, Ross

    2006-12-01

    Although apomixis has been quoted as a technology with the potential to deliver benefits similar in scale to those achieved with the Green Revolution, very little is currently known of the genetic mechanisms that control this trait in plants. To address this issue, we developed Hieracium, a genus of daisies native to Eurasia and North America, as a genetic model to study apomixis. In a molecular mapping study, we defined the number of genetic loci involved in apomixis, and we explored dominance and linkage relationships between these loci. To avoid difficulties often encountered with inheritance studies of apomicts, we based our mapping effort on the use of deletion mutagenesis, coupled with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) as a genomic fingerprinting tool. The results indicate that apomixis in Hieracium caespitosum is controlled at two principal loci, one of which regulates events associated with the avoidance of meiosis (apomeiosis) and the other, an unlinked locus that controls events associated with the avoidance of fertilization (parthenogenesis). AFLP bands identified as central to both loci were isolated, sequenced, and used to develop sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. The validity of the AFLP markers was verified by using a segregating population generated by hybridization. The validity of the SCAR markers was verified by their pattern of presence/absence in specific mutants. The mutants, markers, and genetic data derived from this work are now being used to isolate genes controlling apomixis in this system.

  16. Deletion mapping of genetic regions associated with apomixis in Hieracium.

    PubMed

    Catanach, Andrew S; Erasmuson, Sylvia K; Podivinsky, Ellen; Jordan, Brian R; Bicknell, Ross

    2006-12-01

    Although apomixis has been quoted as a technology with the potential to deliver benefits similar in scale to those achieved with the Green Revolution, very little is currently known of the genetic mechanisms that control this trait in plants. To address this issue, we developed Hieracium, a genus of daisies native to Eurasia and North America, as a genetic model to study apomixis. In a molecular mapping study, we defined the number of genetic loci involved in apomixis, and we explored dominance and linkage relationships between these loci. To avoid difficulties often encountered with inheritance studies of apomicts, we based our mapping effort on the use of deletion mutagenesis, coupled with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) as a genomic fingerprinting tool. The results indicate that apomixis in Hieracium caespitosum is controlled at two principal loci, one of which regulates events associated with the avoidance of meiosis (apomeiosis) and the other, an unlinked locus that controls events associated with the avoidance of fertilization (parthenogenesis). AFLP bands identified as central to both loci were isolated, sequenced, and used to develop sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. The validity of the AFLP markers was verified by using a segregating population generated by hybridization. The validity of the SCAR markers was verified by their pattern of presence/absence in specific mutants. The mutants, markers, and genetic data derived from this work are now being used to isolate genes controlling apomixis in this system. PMID:17047034

  17. The Problem of Defining Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubar, David

    1981-01-01

    The major philosophical issues surrounding the concept of intelligence are reviewed with respect to the problems surrounding the process of defining and developing artificial intelligence (AI) in computers. Various current definitions and problems with these definitions are presented. (MP)

  18. The genomic architecture of NLRP7 is Alu rich and predisposes to disease-associated large deletions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ramesh; Nguyen, Ngoc M P; Sarrabay, Guillaume; Rezaei, Maryam; Rivas, Mayra C G; Kavasoglu, Aysenur; Berkil, Hakan; Elshafey, Alaa; Nunez, Kristin P; Dreyfus, Hélène; Philippe, Merviel; Hadipour, Zahra; Durmaz, Asude; Eaton, Erin E; Schubert, Brittany; Ulker, Volkan; Hadipour, Fatemeh; Ahmadpour, Fatemeh; Touitou, Isabelle; Fardaei, Majid; Slim, Rima

    2016-10-01

    NLRP7 is a major gene responsible for recurrent hydatidiform moles. Here, we report 11 novel NLRP7 protein truncating variants, of which five deletions of more than 1-kb. We analyzed the transcriptional consequences of four variants. We demonstrate that one large homozygous deletion removes NLRP7 transcription start site and results in the complete absence of its transcripts in a patient in good health besides her reproductive problem. This observation strengthens existing data on the requirement of NLRP7 only for female reproduction. We show that two other variants affecting the splice acceptor of exon 6 lead to its in-frame skipping while another variant affecting the splice donor site of exon 9 leads to an in-frame insertion of 54 amino acids. Our characterization of the deletion breakpoints demonstrated that most of the breakpoints occurred within Alu repeats and the deletions were most likely mediated by microhomology events. Our data define a hotspot of Alu instability and deletions in intron 5 with six different breakpoints and rearrangements. Analysis of NLRP7 genomic sequences for repetitive elements demonstrated that Alu repeats represent 48% of its intronic sequences and these repeats seem to have been inserted into the common NLRP2/7 primate ancestor before its duplication into two genes.

  19. 78 FR 75912 - Procurement List; Addition and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... Services Administration, Fort Worth, TX Deletion On 11/1/2013 (78 FR 65618), the Committee for Purchase... is deleted from the Procurement List: Product NSN: 7930-01-367-0989--Cleaner, Water Soluble...

  20. 75 FR 43153 - Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletions AGENCY... Deletions From the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement... proposed for addition to the Procurement List. Comments on this certification are invited....

  1. 76 FR 63905 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletion AGENCY... Deletion from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a product and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind...

  2. 76 FR 2673 - Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletions AGENCY... deletions from the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement... addition to the Procurement List. Comments on this certification are invited. Commenters should...

  3. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions AGENCY... Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have...

  4. 37 CFR 2.35 - Adding, deleting, or substituting bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adding, deleting, or substituting bases. 2.35 Section 2.35 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK..., deleting, or substituting bases. (a) In an application under section 66(a) of the Act, an applicant may...

  5. 37 CFR 2.35 - Adding, deleting, or substituting bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adding, deleting, or substituting bases. 2.35 Section 2.35 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK..., deleting, or substituting bases. (a) In an application under section 66(a) of the Act, an applicant may...

  6. 37 CFR 2.35 - Adding, deleting, or substituting bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adding, deleting, or substituting bases. 2.35 Section 2.35 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK..., deleting, or substituting bases. (a) In an application under section 66(a) of the Act, an applicant may...

  7. 37 CFR 2.35 - Adding, deleting, or substituting bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adding, deleting, or substituting bases. 2.35 Section 2.35 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK..., deleting, or substituting bases. (a) In an application under section 66(a) of the Act, an applicant may...

  8. 37 CFR 2.35 - Adding, deleting, or substituting bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adding, deleting, or substituting bases. 2.35 Section 2.35 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK..., deleting, or substituting bases. (a) In an application under section 66(a) of the Act, an applicant may...

  9. 16 CFR 312.10 - Data retention and deletion requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Data retention and deletion requirements. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Data retention and deletion requirements....

  10. Multivariate Variable Deletion Methods: Don't Do Stepwise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhi, TauGamba

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains the theory and methodology behind the use of variable deletion in canonical correlational analysis (CCA). Both the Capraro and Capraro (2002) and the Cantrell (1997) data tables are evaluated and explained in order to clarify strategies utilized. Understanding of variable deletion strategies and their proper usages in a CCA…

  11. 5 CFR 2502.18 - Deletion of exempted information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production or Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552 Charges for Search and Reproduction § 2502.18 Deletion of exempted information. Where requested records... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deletion of exempted information....

  12. 42 CFR 401.118 - Deletion of identifying details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deletion of identifying details. 401.118 Section 401.118 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Deletion of identifying details. When CMS publishes or otherwise makes available an opinion or...

  13. 29 CFR 1610.20 - Deletion of exempted matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deletion of exempted matters. 1610.20 Section 1610.20 Labor... Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552 § 1610.20 Deletion of exempted matters. Where requested records contain matters which are exempted under 5 U.S.C. 552(b) but which matters are reasonably segregable...

  14. 29 CFR 1610.20 - Deletion of exempted matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deletion of exempted matters. 1610.20 Section 1610.20 Labor... Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552 § 1610.20 Deletion of exempted matters. Where requested records contain matters which are exempted under 5 U.S.C. 552(b) but which matters are reasonably segregable...

  15. Linguistic and Psychomotor Development in Children with Chromosome 14 Deletions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zampini, Laura; D'Odorico, Laura; Zanchi, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Neri, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The present study focussed on a specific type of rare genetic condition: chromosome 14 deletions. Children with this genetic condition often show developmental delays and brain and neurological problems, although the type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the deleted genetic material. The specific aim of the…

  16. 75 FR 78977 - Procurement List Proposed Addition and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Addition and Deletions AGENCY... deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement...) 603-0655, or e-mail CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov . Due to Federal holidays occurring on Friday,...

  17. 75 FR 66741 - Procurement List, Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Additions and Deletions AGENCY: Committee for... Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be... deletes products from the Procurement List previously furnished by such agencies. DATES: Effective...

  18. 76 FR 21335 - Procurement List Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions and Deletions AGENCY: Committee for... procurement list. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be... deletes products and services from the Procurement List previously furnished by such agencies....

  19. 75 FR 78976 - Procurement List Proposed Addition and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Addition and Deletions AGENCY... deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement...) 603-0655, or e-mail CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov . Due to Federal holidays occurring on Friday,...

  20. 76 FR 40342 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions AGENCY... Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind...

  1. 75 FR 56995 - Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletion AGENCY... Deletion From the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement...-0655, or e-mail: CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This notice is...

  2. 75 FR 56996 - Procurement List Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions and Deletions AGENCY: Committee for... Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds a product and a service to the Procurement List that will be... deletes products and services from the Procurement List previously furnished by such agencies....

  3. 76 FR 21336 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions AGENCY... Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have...

  4. 49 CFR 7.6 - Deletion of identifying detail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deletion of identifying detail. 7.6 Section 7.6 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Information Required To Be Made Public by DOT § 7.6 Deletion of identifying detail. Whenever it is determined to...

  5. 44 CFR 5.27 - Deletion of identifying details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deletion of identifying details. 5.27 Section 5.27 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY..., FEMA may delete identifying details when making available or publishing an opinion, statement of...

  6. Pre- and Postnatal Analysis of Chromosome 15q26.1 and 8p23.1 Deletions in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mitesh; Kadandale, Jayarama; Hegde, Sridevi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is defined as a protrusion of abdominal content into the thoracic cavity through an abnormal opening in the diaphragm present at birth. It is a common birth defect with high mortality and morbidity. Submicroscopic deletions of 15q26.1 and 8p23.1 have been reported in several cases of CDH. We studied a total of 17 cases with CDH in pre- and postnatal samples using FISH probes. Deletion 15q26.1 was seen in 1/17 prenatal samples. There was no deletion for 8p23.1 in all the samples analyzed. CDH has a genetic etiology, and deletion 15q26.1 increases the risk of CDH. Deletion 15q26.1 in a fetus with CDH is a predictor of poor prognosis. This deletion is also seen in a phenotype similar to Fryns syndrome. CDH identified pre- or postnatally should be investigated further to exclude a 15q26.1 deletion and enable appropriate parental counseling. PMID:26997946

  7. Breakpoint Associated with a novel 2.3 Mb deletion in the VCFS region of 22q11 and the role of Alu (SINE) in recurring microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Raihan K; Zhang, Yang; Siu, Victoria Mok; Fan, Yao-Shan; O'Reilly, Richard L; Rao, Jay; Singh, Shiva M

    2006-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 region is highly susceptible to rearrangement, specifically deletions that give rise to a variety of genomic disorders including velocardiofacial or DiGeorge syndrome. Individuals with this 22q11 microdeletion syndrome are at a greatly increased risk to develop schizophrenia. Methods Genotype analysis was carried out on the DNA from a patient with the 22q11 microdeletion using genetic markers and custom primer sets to define the deletion. Bioinformatic analysis was performed for molecular characterization of the deletion breakpoint sequences in this patient. Results This 22q11 deletion patient was established to have a novel 2.3 Mb deletion with a proximal breakpoint located between genetic markers RH48663 and RH48348 and a distal breakpoint between markers D22S1138 and SHGC-145314. Molecular characterization of the sequences at the breakpoints revealed a 270 bp shared sequence of the breakpoint regions (SSBR) common to both ends that share >90% sequence similarity to each other and also to short interspersed nuclear elements/Alu elements. Conclusion This Alu sequence like SSBR is commonly in the proximity of all known deletion breakpoints of 22q11 region and also in the low copy repeat regions (LCRs). This sequence may represent a preferred sequence in the breakpoint regions or LCRs for intra-chromosomal homologous recombination mechanisms resulting in common 22q11 deletion. PMID:16512914

  8. gr/gr-DAZ2-DAZ4-CDY1b deletion is a high-risk factor for male infertility in Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Myriam; Baklouti-Gargouri, Siwar; Keskes, Rim; Chakroun, Nozha; Sellami, Afifa; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Ammar-Keskes, Leila

    2016-10-30

    The azoospermia factor c (AZFc) region harbors multi-copy genes that are expressed in the testis. Deletions of this region lead to reduced copy numbers of these genes. In this present study we aimed to determine the frequency of AZFc subdeletion in infertile and fertile men from Tunisia and to identify whether deletions of DAZ and CDY1 gene copies are deleterious on spermatogenesis and on semen quality. We studied a group of 241 infertile men and 115 fertile healthy males using a sequence tagged site (STS)±method. To gain insight into the molecular basis of the heterogeneous phenotype observed in men with the deletion we defined the type of DAZ and CDY1 genes deleted. We reported in the present study and for the first time a new type of AZFc deletion (gr/gr-DAZ2-DAZ4-CDY1b) and hypothesis that this new deletion is the result of two successive events. We also demonstrated that this deletion constitutes a relative high-risk factor for male infertility in Tunisian population. PMID:27457284

  9. Attenuation of Monkeypox Virus by Deletion of Genomic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Juan G.; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an emerging pathogen from Africa that causes disease similar to smallpox. Two clades with different geographic distributions and virulence have been described. Here, we utilized bioinformatic tools to identify genomic regions in MPXV containing multiple virulence genes and explored their roles in pathogenicity; two selected regions were then deleted singularly or in combination. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that these regions play a significant role in MPXV replication, tissue spread, and mortality in mice. Interestingly, while deletion of either region led to decreased virulence in mice, one region had no effect on in vitro replication. Deletion of both regions simultaneously also reduced cell culture replication and significantly increased the attenuation in vivo over either single deletion. Attenuated MPXV with genomic deletions present a safe and efficacious tool in the study of MPX pathogenesis and in the identification of genetic factors associated with virulence. PMID:25462353

  10. Attenuation of monkeypox virus by deletion of genomic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopera, Juan G.; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an emerging pathogen from Africa that causes disease similar to smallpox. Two clades with different geographic distributions and virulence have been described. Here, we utilized bioinformatic tools to identify genomic regions in MPXV containing multiple virulence genes and explored their roles in pathogenicity; two selected regions were then deleted singularly or in combination. In vitro and in vivostudies indicated that these regions play a significant role in MPXV replication, tissue spread, and mortality in mice. Interestingly, while deletion of either region led to decreased virulence in mice, one region had no effect on in vitro replication. Deletion of both regions simultaneously also reduced cell culture replication and significantly increased the attenuation in vivo over either single deletion. Attenuated MPXV with genomic deletions present a safe and efficacious tool in the study of MPX pathogenesis and in the identification of genetic factors associated with virulence.

  11. The yeast deletion collection: a decade of functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2014-06-01

    The yeast deletion collections comprise >21,000 mutant strains that carry precise start-to-stop deletions of ∼6000 open reading frames. This collection includes heterozygous and homozygous diploids, and haploids of both MAT A: and MATα mating types. The yeast deletion collection, or yeast knockout (YKO) set, represents the first and only complete, systematically constructed deletion collection available for any organism. Conceived during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequencing project, work on the project began in 1998 and was completed in 2002. The YKO strains have been used in numerous laboratories in >1000 genome-wide screens. This landmark genome project has inspired development of numerous genome-wide technologies in organisms from yeast to man. Notable spinoff technologies include synthetic genetic array and HIPHOP chemogenomics. In this retrospective, we briefly describe the yeast deletion project and some of its most noteworthy biological contributions and the impact that these collections have had on the yeast research community and on genomics in general.

  12. Molecular mimicry and clonal deletion: A fresh look.

    PubMed

    Rose, Noel R

    2015-06-21

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous "black holes", in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease.

  13. Defining the states of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tassi, P; Muzet, A

    2001-03-01

    Consciousness remains an elusive concept due to the difficulty to define what has been regarded for many years as a subjective experience, therefore irrelevant for scientific study. Recent development in this field of research has allowed to provide some new insight to a possible way to define consciousness. Going through the extensive literature in this domain, several perspectives are proposed to define this concept. (1) Consciousness and Attention may not reflect the same process. (2) Consciousness during wake and sleep may not involve the same mechanisms. (3) Besides physiological states of consciousness, human beings can experience modified states of consciousness either by self-training (transcendental meditation, hypnosis, etc.) or by drug intake (hallucinogens, anaesthetics, etc.). Altogether, we address the question of a more precise terminology, given the theoretical weight words can convey. To this respect, we propose different definitions for concepts like consciousness, vigilance, arousal and alertness as candidates to separate functional entities.

  14. A syndromic form of Pierre Robin sequence is caused by 5q23 deletions encompassing FBN2 and PHAX.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Murray, Jennie E; Hanson, Isabel; Firth, Helen V; Mehendale, Felicity; Amiel, Jeanne; Gordon, Christopher T; Percesepe, Antonio; Mazzanti, Laura; Fryer, Alan; Ferrari, Paola; Devriendt, Koenraad; Temple, I Karen; FitzPatrick, David R

    2014-10-01

    Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is an aetiologically distinct subgroup of cleft palate. We aimed to define the critical genomic interval from five different 5q22-5q31 deletions associated with PRS or PRS-associated features and assess each gene within the region as a candidate for the PRS component of the phenotype. Clinical array-based comparative genome hybridisation (aCGH) data were used to define a 2.08 Mb minimum region of overlap among four de novo deletions and one mother-son inherited deletion associated with at least one component of PRS. Commonly associated anomalies were talipes equinovarus (TEV), finger contractures and crumpled ear helices. Expression analysis of the orthologous genes within the PRS critical region in embryonic mice showed that the strongest candidate genes were FBN2 and PHAX. Targeted aCGH of the critical region and sequencing of these genes in a cohort of 25 PRS patients revealed no plausible disease-causing mutations. In conclusion, deletion of ∼2 Mb on 5q23 region causes a clinically recognisable subtype of PRS. Haploinsufficiency for FBN2 accounts for the digital and auricular features. A possible critical region for TEV is distinct and telomeric to the PRS region. The molecular basis of PRS in these cases remains undetermined but haploinsufficiency for PHAX is a plausible mechanism.

  15. Chromosome 8p23.1 Deletions as a Cause of Complex Congenital Heart Defects and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Margaret J.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Holder, Ashley M.; Breman, Amy M.; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A.; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genome hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm. PMID:19606479

  16. Chromosome 8p23.1 deletions as a cause of complex congenital heart defects and diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Wat, Margaret J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Holder, Ashley M; Breman, Amy M; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-08-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genomic hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm.

  17. Submicroscopic deletion of chromosome 16p13.3 in patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taine, L; Goizet, C; Wen, Z Q; Petrij, F; Breuning, M H; Aymé, S; Saura, R; Arveiler, B; Lacombe, D

    1998-07-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined entity characterized by growth and mental retardation, broad thumbs and halluces, and typical face. The RTS locus was assigned to 16p13.3, and interstitial submicroscopic deletions of this region (RT1 cosmid, D16S237) were initially identified in 25% of RTS patients. The gene for the human CREB binding protein, the transcriptional coactivator CBP, is included in the RT1 cosmid, and mutations in CBP have recently been identified in nondeleted RTS patients. We investigated 30 French patients with RTS. Among these patients, 3 had the RT1 microdeletion (frequency 10%). There is no obvious phenotypic difference between the patients with and without the RT1 deletion. The RT1 probe appears useful for confirmation of the diagnosis but is of little interest as a screening tool. By pooling data including the previous series and our current series, the cumulative frequency of the 16p13.3 microdeletion is 11.9% (19 in 159). This frequency of approximately 12% deleted patients appears more accurate than the 25% previously reported. Molecular investigations of CBP are in process in our series to clarify the cause of RTS.

  18. Influence of the LILRA3 Deletion on Multiple Sclerosis Risk: Original Data and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Miguel A.; Núñez, Concepción; Ordóñez, David; Alvarez-Cermeño, José C.; Martínez-Rodriguez, José E.; Sánchez, Antonio J.; Arroyo, Rafael; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; García-Merino, Antonio; Munteis, Elvira; Alcina, Antonio; Comabella, Manuel; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over hundred polymorphisms with modest individual effects in MS susceptibility and they have confirmed the main individual effect of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. Additional risk loci with immunologically relevant genes were found significantly overrepresented. Nonetheless, it is accepted that most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined. Candidate association studies of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor LILRA3 gene in MS have been repeatedly reported with inconsistent results. Objectives In an attempt to shed some light on these controversial findings, a combined analysis was performed including the previously published datasets and three newly genotyped cohorts. Both wild-type and deleted LILRA3 alleles were discriminated in a single-tube PCR amplification and the resulting products were visualized by their different electrophoretic mobilities. Results and Conclusion Overall, this meta-analysis involved 3200 MS patients and 3069 matched healthy controls and it did not evidence significant association of the LILRA3 deletion [carriers of LILRA3 deletion: p = 0.25, OR (95% CI) = 1.07 (0.95–1.19)], even after stratification by gender and the HLA-DRB1*15:01 risk allele. PMID:26274821

  19. Defining "Folklore" in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falke, Anne

    Folklore, a body of traditional beliefs of a people conveyed orally or by means of custom, is very much alive, involves all people, and is not the study of popular culture. In studying folklore, the principal tasks of the folklorist have been defined as determining definition, classification, source (the folk), origin (who composed folklore),…

  20. Defining and Measuring Psychomotor Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autio, Ossi

    2007-01-01

    Psychomotor performance is fundamental to human existence. It is important in many real world activities and nowadays psychomotor tests are used in several fields of industry, army, and medical sciences in employee selection. This article tries to define psychomotor activity by introducing some psychomotor theories. Furthermore the…

  1. Clonal deletion of specific thymocytes by an immunoglobulin idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, B; Dembic, Z; Weiss, S

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated whether immunoglobulin can induce clonal deletion of thymocytes by employing two strains of transgenic mice. One strain is transgenic for an alpha/beta T cell receptor (TCR) which recognizes a processed idiotypic peptide of the lambda 2(315) light chain variable region, bound to the I-Ed class II major histocompatibility complex molecule. The other mouse strain is transgenic for the lambda 2(315) gene. Double transgenic offspring from a TCR-transgenic female mated with a lambda 2(315) transgenic male exhibit a pronounced clonal deletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. Analysis of neonates from the reciprocal (lambda 2(315)-transgenic female x TCR-transgenic male) cross suggests that the deletion in double transgenic offspring most likely is caused by lambda 2(315) produced within the thymus rather than by maternally derived IgG, lambda 2(315). Nevertheless, IgG, lambda 2(315) can cause deletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes when injected in large amounts intraperitoneally into either adult or neonatal TCR-transgenic mice. Deletion is evident 48 and 72 h after injection, but by day 7 the thymus has already regained its normal appearance. A serum concentration of several hundred microgram/ml is required for deletion to be observed. Therefore, the heterogeneous idiotypes of serum Ig are probably each of too low concentration to cause thymocyte deletion in normal animals. Images PMID:8428591

  2. Two 22q telomere deletions serendipitously detected by FISH.

    PubMed

    Precht, K S; Lese, C M; Spiro, R P; Huttenlocher, P R; Johnston, K M; Baker, J C; Christian, S L; Kittikamron, K; Ledbetter, D H

    1998-11-01

    Cryptic telomere deletions have been proposed to be a significant cause of idiopathic mental retardation. We present two unrelated subjects, with normal G banding analysis, in whom 22q telomere deletions were serendipitously detected at two different institutions using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Both probands presented with several of the previously described features associated with 22q deletions, including hypotonia, developmental delay, and absence of speech. Our two cases increase the total number of reported 22q telomere deletions to 19, the majority of which were identified by cytogenetic banding analysis. With the limited sensitivity of routine cytogenetic studies (approximately 2-5 Mb), these two new cases suggest that the actual prevalence of 22q telomere deletions may be higher than currently documented. Of additional interest is the phenotypic overlap with Angelman syndrome (AS) as it raises the possibility of a 22q deletion in patients in whom AS has been ruled out. The use of telomeric probes as diagnostic reagents would be useful in determining an accurate prevalence of chromosome 22q deletions and could result in a significantly higher detection rate of subtelomeric rearrangements.

  3. Do listeners recover "deleted" final /t/ in German?

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, Frank; Reetz, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Reduction and deletion processes occur regularly in conversational speech. A segment that is affected by such reduction and deletion processes in many Germanic languages (e.g., Dutch, English, German) is /t/. There are similarities concerning the factors that influence the likelihood of final /t/ to get deleted, such as segmental context. However, speakers of different languages differ with respect to the acoustic cues they leave in the speech signal when they delete final /t/. German speakers usually lengthen a preceding /s/ when they delete final /t/. This article investigates to what extent German listeners are able to reconstruct /t/ when they are presented with fragments of words where final /t/ has been deleted. It aims also at investigating whether the strategies that are used by German depend on the length of /s/, and therefore whether listeners are using language-specific cues. Results of a forced-choice segment detection task suggest that listeners are able to reconstruct deleted final /t/ in about 45% of the times. The length of /s/ plays some role in the reconstruction, however, it does not explain the behavior of German listeners completely.

  4. Impact of partial DAZ1/2 deletion and partial DAZ3/4 deletion on male infertility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuening; Li, Muyan; Xiao, Feifan; Teng, Ruobing; Zhang, Chengdong; Lan, Aihua; Gu, Kailong; Li, Jiatong; Wang, Di; Li, Hongtao; Jiang, Li; Zeng, Siping; He, Min; Huang, Yi; Guo, Peifen; Zhang, Xinhua; Yang, Xiaoli

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of the partial DAZ1/2 deletion and partial DAZ3/4 deletion on male infertility through a comprehensive literature search. All case-control studies related to partial DAZ1/2 and DAZ3/4 deletions and male infertility risk were included in our study. Odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association and its precision, respectively. Eleven partial DAZ1/2 deletion and nine partial DAZ3/4 deletion studies were included. Partial DAZ1/2 deletion was significantly associated with male infertility risk in the overall analysis (ORs=2.58, 95%CI: 1.60-4.18, I(2)=62.1%). Moreover, in the subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, partial DAZ1/2 deletion was significantly associated with male infertility risk in the East Asian populations under the random effect model (ORs=2.96, 95%CI: 1.87-4.71, I(2)=51.3%). Meanwhile, the analysis suggested that partial DAZ3/4 deletion was not associated with male infertility risk in East-Asian ethnicity (ORs=1.02, 95%CI: 0.54-1.92, I(2)=71.3%), but not in Non-East Asian under the random effect model (ORs=3.56, 95%CI: 1.13-11.23, I(2)=0.0%,). More interestingly, partial DAZ1/2 deletion was associated with azoospermia (ORs=2.63, 95%CI: 1.19-5.81, I(2)=64.7%) and oligozoospermia (ORs=2.53, 95%CI: 1.40-4.57, I(2)=51.8%), but partial DAZ3/4 deletion was not associated with azoospermia (ORs=0.71, 95%CI: 0.23-2.22, I(2)=71.7%,) and oligozoospermia (ORs=1.21, 95%CI: 0.65-2.24, I(2)=55.5%). In our meta-analysis, partial DAZ1/2 deletion is a risk factor for male infertility and different ethnicities have different influences, whereas partial DAZ3/4 deletion has no effect on fertility but partial DAZ3/4 deletion might have an impact on Non-East Asian male.

  5. Ectrodactyly and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletion 7q

    SciTech Connect

    McElveen, C.; Carvajal, M.V.; Moscatello, D.

    1995-03-13

    We report on an individual with severe mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, unusual face, scoliosis, and cleft feet and cleft right hand. The chromosomal study showed a proximal interstitial deletion 7q (q11.23q22). From our review of the literature, 11 patients have been reported with ectrodactyly (split hand/split foot malformation) and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletions or rearrangements of 7q. The critical segment for ectrodactyly seems to be located between 7q21.2 and 7q22.1. This malformation is present in 41% of the patients whose deletion involves the critical segment. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Detection of genomic deletions in rice using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Myron; Hess, Ann; Bai, Jianfa; Mauleon, Ramil; Diaz, M Genaleen; Sugiyama, Nobuko; Bordeos, Alicia; Wang, Guo-Liang; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E

    2009-01-01

    Background The induction of genomic deletions by physical- or chemical- agents is an easy and inexpensive means to generate a genome-saturating collection of mutations. Different mutagens can be selected to ensure a mutant collection with a range of deletion sizes. This would allow identification of mutations in single genes or, alternatively, a deleted group of genes that might collectively govern a trait (e.g., quantitative trait loci, QTL). However, deletion mutants have not been widely used in functional genomics, because the mutated genes are not tagged and therefore, difficult to identify. Here, we present a microarray-based approach to identify deleted genomic regions in rice mutants selected from a large collection generated by gamma ray or fast neutron treatment. Our study focuses not only on the utility of this method for forward genetics, but also its potential as a reverse genetics tool through accumulation of hybridization data for a collection of deletion mutants harboring multiple genetic lesions. Results We demonstrate that hybridization of labeled genomic DNA directly onto the Affymetrix Rice GeneChip® allows rapid localization of deleted regions in rice mutants. Deletions ranged in size from one gene model to ~500 kb and were predicted on all 12 rice chromosomes. The utility of the technique as a tool in forward genetics was demonstrated in combination with an allelic series of mutants to rapidly narrow the genomic region, and eventually identify a candidate gene responsible for a lesion mimic phenotype. Finally, the positions of mutations in 14 mutants were aligned onto the rice pseudomolecules in a user-friendly genome browser to allow for rapid identification of untagged mutations . Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of oligonucleotide arrays to discover deleted genes in rice. The density and distribution of deletions suggests the feasibility of a database saturated with deletions across the rice genome. This community resource can continue

  7. Deletions at the SOX10 Gene Locus Cause Waardenburg Syndrome Types 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bondurand, Nadege ; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence ; Stanchina, Laure ; Collot, Nathalie ; Baral, Viviane ; Marlin, Sandrine ; Attie-Bitach, Tania ; Giurgea, Irina ; Skopinski, Laurent ; Reardon, William ; Toutain, Annick ; Sarda, Pierre ; Echaieb, Anis ; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn ; Touraine, Renaud ; Amiel, Jeanne ; Goossens, Michel ; Pingault, Veronique 

    2007-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1–WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also called “Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.” Mutations within the genes MITF and SNAI2 have been identified in WS2, whereas mutations of EDN3, EDNRB, and SOX10 have been observed in patients with WS4. However, not all cases are explained at the molecular level, which raises the possibility that other genes are involved or that some mutations within the known genes are not detected by commonly used genotyping methods. We used a combination of semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization to search for SOX10 heterozygous deletions. We describe the first characterization of SOX10 deletions in patients presenting with WS4. We also found SOX10 deletions in WS2 cases, making SOX10 a new gene of WS2. Interestingly, neurological phenotypes reminiscent of that observed in WS4 (PCWH syndrome [peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, WS, and Hirschsprung disease]) were observed in some WS2-affected patients with SOX10 deletions. This study further characterizes the molecular complexity and the close relationship that links the different subtypes of WS. PMID:17999358

  8. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness — all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  9. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  10. The Prevention of Repeat-Associated Deletions in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae by Mismatch Repair Depends on Size and Origin of Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Tran, H. T.; Gordenin, D. A.; Resnick, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of mismatch repair on 1- to 61-bp deletions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deletions are likely to involve unpaired loop intermediates resulting from DNA polymerase slippage. The mutator effects of mutations in the DNA polymerase δ (POL3) gene and the recombinational repair RAD52 gene were studied in combination with mismatch repair defects. The pol3-t mutation increased up to 1000-fold the rate of extended (7-61 bp) but not of 1-bp deletions. In a rad52 null mutant only the 1-bp deletions were increased (12-fold). The mismatch repair mutations pms1, msh2 and msh3 did not affect 31- and 61-bp deletions in the pol3-t but increased the rates of 7- and 1-bp deletions. We propose that loops less than or equal to seven bases generated during replication are subject to mismatch repair by the PMS1, MSH2, MSH3 system and that it cannot act on loops >=31 bases. In contrast to the pol3-t, the enhancement of 1-bp deletions in a rad52 mutant is not altered by a pms1 mutation. Thus, mismatch repair appears to be specific to errors of DNA synthesis generated during semiconservative replication. PMID:8844147

  11. How do people define moderation?

    PubMed

    vanDellen, Michelle R; Isherwood, Jennifer C; Delose, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    Eating in moderation is considered to be sound and practical advice for weight maintenance or prevention of weight gain. However, the concept of moderation is ambiguous, and the effect of moderation messages on consumption has yet to be empirically examined. The present manuscript examines how people define moderate consumption. We expected that people would define moderate consumption in ways that justified their current or desired consumption rather than view moderation as an objective standard. In Studies 1 and 2, moderate consumption was perceived to involve greater quantities of an unhealthy food (chocolate chip cookies, gummy candies) than perceptions of how much one should consume. In Study 3, participants generally perceived themselves to eat in moderation and defined moderate consumption as greater than their personal consumption. Furthermore, definitions of moderate consumption were related to personal consumption behaviors. Results suggest that the endorsement of moderation messages allows for a wide range of interpretations of moderate consumption. Thus, we conclude that moderation messages are unlikely to be effective messages for helping people maintain or lose weight. PMID:26964691

  12. How do people define moderation?

    PubMed

    vanDellen, Michelle R; Isherwood, Jennifer C; Delose, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    Eating in moderation is considered to be sound and practical advice for weight maintenance or prevention of weight gain. However, the concept of moderation is ambiguous, and the effect of moderation messages on consumption has yet to be empirically examined. The present manuscript examines how people define moderate consumption. We expected that people would define moderate consumption in ways that justified their current or desired consumption rather than view moderation as an objective standard. In Studies 1 and 2, moderate consumption was perceived to involve greater quantities of an unhealthy food (chocolate chip cookies, gummy candies) than perceptions of how much one should consume. In Study 3, participants generally perceived themselves to eat in moderation and defined moderate consumption as greater than their personal consumption. Furthermore, definitions of moderate consumption were related to personal consumption behaviors. Results suggest that the endorsement of moderation messages allows for a wide range of interpretations of moderate consumption. Thus, we conclude that moderation messages are unlikely to be effective messages for helping people maintain or lose weight.

  13. Deletion of Drosophila Nopp140 induces subcellular ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; James, Allison; Raje, Himanshu; Ghaffari, Helya; DiMario, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The nucleolar and Cajal body phosphoprotein of 140 kDa (Nopp140) is considered a ribosome assembly factor, but its precise functions remain unknown. To approach this problem, we deleted the Nopp140 gene in Drosophila using FLP-FRT recombination. Genomic PCR, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the loss of Nopp140, its messenger RNA (mRNA), and protein products from all tissues examined. Nopp140-/- larvae arrested in the second instar stage and most died within 8 days. While nucleoli appeared intact in Nopp140-/- cells, the C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) methyltransferase, fibrillarin, redistributed to the nucleoplasm in variable amounts depending on the cell type; RT-PCRs showed that 2'-O-methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in Nopp140-/- cells was reduced at select sites within both the 18S and 28S rRNAs. Ultrastructural analysis showed that Nopp140-/- cells were deficient in cytoplasmic ribosomes, but instead contained abnormal electron-dense cytoplasmic granules. Immunoblot analysis showed a loss of RpL34, and metabolic labeling showed a significant drop in protein translation, supporting the loss of functional ribosomes. Northern blots showed that pre-RNA cleavage pathways were generally unaffected by the loss of Nopp140, but that R2 retrotransposons that naturally reside within the 28S region of normally silent heterochromatic Drosophila ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were selectively expressed in Nopp140-/- larvae. Unlike copia elements and the related R1 retrotransposon, R2 expression appeared to be preferentially dependent on the loss of Nopp140 and not on environmental stresses. We believe the phenotypes described here define novel intracellular ribosomopathies resulting from the loss of Nopp140.

  14. Deletion of Drosophila Nopp140 induces subcellular ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; James, Allison; Raje, Himanshu; Ghaffari, Helya; DiMario, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The nucleolar and Cajal body phosphoprotein of 140 kDa (Nopp140) is considered a ribosome assembly factor, but its precise functions remain unknown. To approach this problem, we deleted the Nopp140 gene in Drosophila using FLP-FRT recombination. Genomic PCR, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the loss of Nopp140, its messenger RNA (mRNA), and protein products from all tissues examined. Nopp140-/- larvae arrested in the second instar stage and most died within 8 days. While nucleoli appeared intact in Nopp140-/- cells, the C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) methyltransferase, fibrillarin, redistributed to the nucleoplasm in variable amounts depending on the cell type; RT-PCRs showed that 2'-O-methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in Nopp140-/- cells was reduced at select sites within both the 18S and 28S rRNAs. Ultrastructural analysis showed that Nopp140-/- cells were deficient in cytoplasmic ribosomes, but instead contained abnormal electron-dense cytoplasmic granules. Immunoblot analysis showed a loss of RpL34, and metabolic labeling showed a significant drop in protein translation, supporting the loss of functional ribosomes. Northern blots showed that pre-RNA cleavage pathways were generally unaffected by the loss of Nopp140, but that R2 retrotransposons that naturally reside within the 28S region of normally silent heterochromatic Drosophila ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were selectively expressed in Nopp140-/- larvae. Unlike copia elements and the related R1 retrotransposon, R2 expression appeared to be preferentially dependent on the loss of Nopp140 and not on environmental stresses. We believe the phenotypes described here define novel intracellular ribosomopathies resulting from the loss of Nopp140. PMID:25384888

  15. Genetics Home Reference: 19p13.13 deletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources (1 link) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities Educational Resources (5 links) MalaCards: chromosome 19p13.13 deletion syndrome March of Dimes: Chromosomal ...

  16. 78 FR 57844 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... Activity: DEPT OF COMMERCE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, BOULDER, CO. Deletions The... listed: Service Service Type/Location: Janitorial/Custodial Service, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service Office, Except Communication & Electrical Room, 500 Airport Blvd.,...

  17. 76 FR 13362 - Procurement List Proposed Additions and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ..., Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Virginia 22202-3259. For Further... service is proposed for deletion from the Procurement List: Service Service Type/Location:...

  18. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  19. 78 FR 63967 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...: Social Vocational Services, Inc.--Deleted, San Jose, CA Contracting Activity: DEPT OF THE ARMY, W40M NATL... Sustainment Systems, Natick, MA NPA: ReadyOne Industries (ROI), Inc., El Paso, TX Contracting Activity:...

  20. Bilateral hand amyotrophy with PMP-22 gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Gochard, A; Guennoc, A M; Praline, J; Malinge, M C; de Toffol, B; Corcia, P

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) phenotypes are heterogeneous. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman without medical history, who complained of bilateral hand weakness suggestive first of a motor neuron disorder. The presence of a diffuse predominant distal demyelinating neuropathy suggested a deletion of PMP-22 gene, which was confirmed by genetic analysis. This case report underlines a novel phenotype related to the deletion of PMP-22 gene.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p < 0.01). Long time chronic suppurative otitis media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media.

  2. Behavioral Features of Williams Beuren Syndrome Compared to Fragile X Syndrome and Subjects with Intellectual Disability without Defined Etiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Garcia, D.; Granero, R.; Gallastegui, F.; Perez-Jurado, L. A.; Brun-Gasca, C.

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a heterozygous deletion of 26-28 genes on chromosome band 7q11.23. During the past few years, researchers and clinicians have significantly contributed to define the phenotype of the syndrome, including its cognitive and behavioral aspects. However, it…

  3. Xp22. 3 deletions in isolated familial Kallmann's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hardelin, J.P.; Levilliers, J.; Legouis, R.; Petit, C. ); Young, J.; Pholsena, M.; Schaison, G. ); Kirk, J.; Bouloux, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Several familial cases of Kallmann's syndrome (KS) have been reported, among which the X-chromosome-linked mode of inheritance is the most frequent. The gene responsible for the X-linked KS has been localized to the terminal part of the X-chromosome short arm (Xp22.3 region), immediately proximal to the steroid sulfatase gene responsible for X-linked ichthyosis. Large deletions of this region have been previously shown in patients affected with both X-linked ichthyosis and KS. The authors report here the search for Xp22.3 deletions in 20 unrelated males affected with isolated X-linked KS. Only 2 deletions were found using Southern blot analysis, indicating that large deletions are uncommon in patients affected with KS alone. Both deletions were shown to include the entire KAL gene responsible for X-linked KS. The patients carrying these deletions exhibit additional clinical anomalies, which are discussed: unilateral renal aplasia, unilateral absence of vas deferens, mirror movements, and sensory neural hearing loss. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Clinical and cytogenetic aspects of X-chromosome deletions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, B; Polani, P E; Daker, M G; Angell, R R

    1982-01-01

    Karyotype/phenotype correlations in six non-mosaic patients with dysgenetic ovaries and partial deletions of the X-chromosome (three patients with short arm, and three with long arm deletions) are presented and the pertinent literature is analysed. It would appear that functioning ovarian tissue is present more often in patients with a short arm deletion than in those with a deleted long arm. This may represent a difference in the strength of two sets of controlling factors, but it can also be related to break point position. This in turn may be misinterpreted due to the difficulty in distinguishing between terminal and interstitial deletions in the long arm. Stature may be a heterochromatic effect, but if specific genetic factors influencing stature exist, then they would appear to be situated mostly on the short arm of the X-chromosome, although some 'statural determinants' occur also on the long arm and could be located rather close to the centromere. Deletions of the short arm of the X-chromosome were almost always associated with some features of the Turner phenotype, and could possibly be related to a gene dosage effect.

  5. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  6. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  7. Megabase deletions of gene deserts result in viable mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Zhu, Yiwen; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal,Veena; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-05-01

    The functional importance of the approximately 98 percent of mammalian genomes not corresponding to protein coding sequences remain largely un-scrutinized 1. To test experimentally whether some extensive regions of non-coding DNA, referred to as gene deserts 2-4, contain critical functions essential for the viability of the organism, we deleted two large non-coding intervals, 1,511 kb and 845 kb in length, from the mouse genome. Viable mice homozygous for the deletions were generated and were indistinguishable from wild-type litter mates with regards to morphology, reproductive fitness, growth, longevity and a variety of parameters assaying general homeostasis. Further in-depth analysis of the expression of genes bracketing the deletions revealed similar expression characteristics in homozygous deletion and wild-type mice. Together, the two deleted segments harbour 1,243 non-coding sequences conserved between humans and rodents (>100bp, 70 percent identity). These studies demonstrate that some large-scale deletions of non-coding DNA can be well tolerated by an organism, bringing into question the role of many human-mouse conserved sequences 5,6, and further supports the existence of potentially ''disposable DNAi'' in the genomes of mammals.

  8. Interstitial deletion of 13q associated with polymicrogyria.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Jillene M; Egelhoff, John C; Saal, Howard M

    2008-04-01

    Interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 13 is a rare condition characterized by multiple clinical findings. We report a male dizygotic twin with an interstitial deletion of 13q and failure to thrive, hypotonia, polymicrogyria, bilateral foci of retinoblastoma, hearing loss, bilateral inguinal hernias, submucous cleft palate, and dysmorphic features including a triangular shaped face, broad forehead, small chin, prominent eyes, downslanting palpebral fissures, and a downturned mouth. Chromosome analysis showed an interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis to include the Rb locus, but spare the 13q subtelomeric region. The karyotype was 46,XY,del(13)(q14.1q31.2).ish del(13)(RB1-,D13S327+) de novo. Breakpoints were further characterized by SNP-based microarray. Retinoblastoma tumors are a well-known complication of deletion of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, located at chromosome 13q14.2. Growth retardation is another common feature that has been described in other patients with a deletion of 13q. Additionally, this patient had brain findings on MRI consistent with bilateral polymicrogyria with predominance of the frontal lobes, as well as prominent infratentorial and supratentorial vasculature. There are a variety of polymicrogyria syndromes that are distinguished by the cortical location of the abnormal folding. Several of the subtypes have known genetic loci associated with them. To our knowledge, this is the only report of polymicrogyria in association with a deletion of chromosome 13.

  9. Evaluating the laws defining blindness.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, E

    1992-06-01

    The law defining legal blindness was written in 1935, and has not been updated since. A historical view of the background in the development of this law and a comparison to laws used in other countries helps to point out some problems with the current definition. As the population gets older, the prevalence of visual impairment will be increasing. To administer programs, distribute funding, and ensure adequate care, the problems inherent in the definition of legal blindness must be addressed, and the law must be revised. PMID:1634739

  10. Fine mapping of chromosome 10q deletions in mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome: identification of two discrete regions of deletion at 10q23.33-24.1 and 10q24.33-25.1.

    PubMed

    Wain, E Mary; Mitchell, Tracey J; Russell-Jones, Robin; Whittaker, Sean J

    2005-02-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies in mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary syndrome (SS) have identified a large and poorly defined area of chromosomal deletion on chromosome 10q. We report an extensive fine-mapping allelotyping study using 19 microsatellite markers in the region 10q22.3-10q26.13. Allelic loss was identified by loss of heterozygosity analysis in 26 of 60 (43%) cases: 15 of 45 (33%) with MF and 11 of 15 (73%) with SS. MF and SS samples showed similar patterns of allelic loss with the identification of two discrete regions of deletion which were mutually exclusive in all but two cases. Within the first region of deletion at 10q23.33-10q24.1, around microsatellite marker D10S185 (2.77 Mb), 23 genes were identified, including three (KIF11, HHEX, and HELLS) with functions that, if dysregulated, could be critical in MF and SS. The second region of deletion, 10q24.33-10q25.1, around microsatellite marker D10S530 (3.92 Mb), encodes 11 genes, the majority of which have poorly identified functions. This extensive allelotyping study provides the basis for future highly selective candidate gene analyses.

  11. Identification of single gene deletions at 15q13.3: further evidence that CHRNA7 causes the 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hoppman-Chaney, N; Wain, K; Seger, P R; Superneau, D W; Hodge, J C

    2013-04-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #612001) is characterized by a wide range of phenotypic features, including intellectual disability, seizures, autism, and psychiatric conditions. This deletion is inherited in approximately 75% of cases and has been found in mildly affected and normal parents, consistent with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The common deletion is approximately 2 Mb and contains several genes; however, the gene(s) responsible for the resulting clinical features have not been clearly defined. Recently, four probands were reported with small deletions including only the CHRNA7 gene. These patients showed a wide range of phenotypic features similar to those associated with the larger 15q13.3 microdeletion. To further correlate genotype and phenotype, we queried our database of >15,000 patients tested in the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics Laboratory from 2008 to 2011 and identified 19 individuals (10 probands and 9 family members) with isolated heterozygous CHRNA7 gene deletions. All but two infants displayed multiple features consistent with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. We also identified the first de novo deletion confined to CHRNA7 as well as the second known case with homozygous deletion of CHRNA7 only. These results provide further evidence implicating CHRNA7 as the gene responsible for the clinical findings associated with 15q13.3 microdeletion.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations are concomitant with ragged red regions of individual, aged muscle fibers: analysis by laser-capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengjin; Wanagat, Jonathan; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2001-01-01

    Laser-capture microdissection was coupled with PCR to define the mitochondrial genotype of aged muscle fibers exhibiting mitochondrial enzymatic abnormalities. These electron transport system (ETS) abnormalities accumulate with age, are localized segmentally along muscle fibers, are associated with fiber atrophy and may contribute to age-related fiber loss. DNA extracted from single, 10 µm thick, ETS abnormal muscle fibers, as well as sections from normal fibers, served as templates for PCR-based deletion analysis. Large mitochondrial (mt) DNA deletion mutations (4.4–9.7 kb) were detected in all 29 ETS abnormal fibers analyzed. Deleted mtDNA genomes were detected only in the regions of the fibers with ETS abnormalities; adjacent phenotypically normal portions of the same fiber contained wild-type mtDNA. In addition, identical mtDNA deletion mutations were found within different sections of the same abnormal region. These findings demonstrate that large deletion mutations are associated with ETS abnormalities in aged rat muscle and that, within a fiber, deletion mutations are clonal. The displacement of wild-type mtDNAs with mutant mtDNAs results in concomitant mitochondrial enzymatic abnormalities, fiber atrophy and fiber breakage. PMID:11691938

  13. Characterization of a 5.8-Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 3p in a girl with 46,XX,inv(7)dn karyotype and phenotypic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Morales, C; Mademont-Soler, I; Armengol, L; Milà, M; Badenas, C; Andrés, S; Soler, A; Sánchez, A

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 3 are rare, and a specific clinical phenotype has not been defined. We report the first isolated cryptic proximal interstitial 3p deletion, del(3)(p12.3p13), assessed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in a girl with an inversion of chromosome 7, whose phenotype includes neurodevelopmental delay, growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, hypophysis hypoplasia, gastroesophageal reflux, clinodactyly, preauricular appendix, and myopia. Her features are similar to those observed in the previously reported cases of proximal 3p deletions overlapping with our imbalance, indicating that her clinical manifestations are likely to be due to the deletion. As our patient's imbalance is the first non-cytogenetically visible proximal interstitial 3p deletion uncomplicated by other imbalances, its characterization has allowed us to narrow the minimal deletion interval associated with growth retardation and neurodevelopmental delay to the 3p12.3-p13 region. Among the genes found in this region, ROBO1, ROBO2, PDZRN3 and CNTN3 might play a role in the neurodevelopmental delay of the patient. This study provides additional evidence that cryptic imbalances anywhere along the genome can be found in patients with phenotypic abnormalities and a balanced chromosome rearrangement.

  14. Molecular analysis of 24 Alagille syndrome families identifies a single submicroscopic deletion and further localizes the Alagille region within 20p12

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, E.B.; Piccoli, D.A.; Spinner, N.B.

    1995-11-01

    Alagille syndrome (AGS) is a clinically defined disorder characterized by cholestatic liver disease with bile duct paucity, peculiar facies, structural heart defects, vertebral anomalies, and ocular abnormalities. Multiple patients with various cytogenetic abnormalities involving 20p12 have been identified, allowing the assignment of AGS to this region. The presence of interstitial deletions of varying size led to the hypothesis that AGS is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. This molecular analysis of cytogenetically normal AGS patients was performed in order to test this hypothesis and to refine the localization of the known AGS region. Investigation of inheritance of simple tandem repeat polymorphism alleles in 67 members of 24 cytogenetically normal Alagille families led to the identification of a single submicroscopic deletion. The deletion included loci D20S61, D20S41, D20S186, and D20S188 and presumably intervening uninformative loci D20S189 and D20S27. The six deleted loci are contained in a single YAC of 1.9 Mb. The additional finding of multiple unrelated probands who are heterozygous at each locus demonstrates that microdeletions at known loci within the AGS region are rare in cytogenetically normal patients with this disorder. This suggests that the majority of cases of AGS may be the result of a single gene defect rather than a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Defining Life: The Virus Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism—the virus—producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  16. Defining life: the virus viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Are viruses alive? Until very recently, answering this question was often negative and viruses were not considered in discussions on the origin and definition of life. This situation is rapidly changing, following several discoveries that have modified our vision of viruses. It has been recognized that viruses have played (and still play) a major innovative role in the evolution of cellular organisms. New definitions of viruses have been proposed and their position in the universal tree of life is actively discussed. Viruses are no more confused with their virions, but can be viewed as complex living entities that transform the infected cell into a novel organism-the virus-producing virions. I suggest here to define life (an historical process) as the mode of existence of ribosome encoding organisms (cells) and capsid encoding organisms (viruses) and their ancestors. I propose to define an organism as an ensemble of integrated organs (molecular or cellular) producing individuals evolving through natural selection. The origin of life on our planet would correspond to the establishment of the first organism corresponding to this definition.

  17. Deletion of the trichodiene synthase gene of Fusarium venenatum: two systems for repeated gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Royer, J C; Christianson, L M; Yoder, W T; Gambetta, G A; Klotz, A V; Morris, C L; Brody, H; Otani, S

    1999-10-01

    The trichodiene synthase (tri5) gene of Fusarium venenatum was cloned from a genomic library. Vectors were created in which the tri5 coding sequence was replaced with the Neurospora crassa nitrate reductase (nit3) gene and with the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase (amdS) gene flanked by direct repeats. The first vector was utilized to transform a nitrate reductase (niaD) mutant of F. venenatum to prototrophy, and the second vector was utilized to confer acetamide utilization to the wild-type strain. Several of the transformants lost the capacity to produce the trichothecene diacetoxyscirpenol and were shown by hybridization analysis to have gene replacements at the tri5 locus. The nit3 gene was removed by retransformation with a tri5 deletion fragment and selection on chlorate. The amdS gene was shown to excise spontaneously via the flanking direct repeats when spores were plated onto fluoroacetamide. PMID:10512673

  18. Frequent and sex-biased deletion of SLX4IP by illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Barbara; Bartram, Thies; Eckert, Cornelia; Trka, Jan; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Hermanova, Ivana; Ellinghaus, Eva; Franke, Andre; Möricke, Anja; Schrauder, André; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Dörge, Petra; von Stackelberg, Arend; Basso, Giuseppe; Bartram, Claus R; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Bornhäuser, Beat; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Hauer, Julia; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Izraeli, Shai; Zaliova, Marketa; Cario, Gunnar; Zimmermann, Martin; Avigad, Smadar; Sokalska-Duhme, Magdalena; Metzler, Markus; Schrappe, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Stanulla, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for ∼25% of pediatric malignancies. Of interest, the incidence of ALL is observed ∼20% higher in males relative to females. The mechanism behind the phenomenon of sex-specific differences is presently not understood. Employing genome-wide genetic aberration screening in 19 ALL samples, one of the most recurrent lesions identified was monoallelic deletion of the 5' region of SLX4IP. We characterized this deletion by conventional molecular genetic techniques and analyzed its interrelationships with biological and clinical characteristics using specimens and data from 993 pediatric patients enrolled into trial AIEOP-BFM ALL 2000. Deletion of SLX4IP was detected in ∼30% of patients. Breakpoints within SLX4IP were defined to recurrent positions and revealed junctions with typical characteristics of illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination. In initial and validation analyses, SLX4IP deletions were significantly associated with male gender and ETV6/RUNX1-rearranged ALL (both overall P < 0.0001). For mechanistic validation, a second recurrent deletion affecting TAL1 and caused by the same molecular mechanism was analyzed in 1149 T-cell ALL patients. Validating a differential role by sex of illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination at the TAL1 locus, 128 out of 1149 T-cell ALL samples bore a deletion and males were significantly more often affected (P = 0.002). The repeatedly detected association of SLX4IP deletion with male sex and the extension of the sex bias to deletion of the TAL1 locus suggest that differential illegitimate V(D)J-mediated recombination events at specific loci may contribute to the consistent observation of higher incidence rates of childhood ALL in boys compared with girls. PMID:24045615

  19. Defining Life: Synthesis and Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. §1 defends that the recognition of “life” has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. §2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. §3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about “life”. The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (§4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. §5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers to two conditions

  20. Defining life: synthesis and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Gayon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    The first part of the paper offers philosophical landmarks on the general issue of defining life. Section 1 defends that the recognition of "life" has always been and remains primarily an intuitive process, for the scientist as for the layperson. However we should not expect, then, to be able to draw a definition from this original experience, because our cognitive apparatus has not been primarily designed for this. Section 2 is about definitions in general. Two kinds of definition should be carefully distinguished: lexical definitions (based upon current uses of a word), and stipulative or legislative definitions, which deliberately assign a meaning to a word, for the purpose of clarifying scientific or philosophical arguments. The present volume provides examples of these two kinds of definitions. Section 3 examines three traditional philosophical definitions of life, all of which have been elaborated prior to the emergence of biology as a specific scientific discipline: life as animation (Aristotle), life as mechanism, and life as organization (Kant). All three concepts constitute a common heritage that structures in depth a good deal of our cultural intuitions and vocabulary any time we try to think about "life". The present volume offers examples of these three concepts in contemporary scientific discourse. The second part of the paper proposes a synthesis of the major debates developed in this volume. Three major questions have been discussed. A first issue (Section 4) is whether we should define life or not, and why. Most authors are skeptical about the possibility of defining life in a strong way, although all admit that criteria are useful in contexts such as exobiology, artificial life and the origins of life. Section 5 examines the possible kinds of definitions of life presented in the volume. Those authors who have explicitly defended that a definition of life is needed, can be classified into two categories. The first category (or standard view) refers

  1. Defining groundwater age: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  2. Defining biocultural approaches to conservation.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Michael C; McCarter, Joe; Mead, Aroha; Berkes, Fikret; Stepp, John Richard; Peterson, Debora; Tang, Ruifei

    2015-03-01

    We contend that biocultural approaches to conservation can achieve effective and just conservation outcomes while addressing erosion of both cultural and biological diversity. Here, we propose a set of guidelines for the adoption of biocultural approaches to conservation. First, we draw lessons from work on biocultural diversity and heritage, social-ecological systems theory, integrated conservation and development, co-management, and community-based conservation to define biocultural approaches to conservation. Second, we describe eight principles that characterize such approaches. Third, we discuss reasons for adopting biocultural approaches and challenges. If used well, biocultural approaches to conservation can be a powerful tool for reducing the global loss of both biological and cultural diversity.

  3. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  4. The phenotype associated with a large deletion on MECP2

    PubMed Central

    Bebbington, Ami; Downs, Jenny; Percy, Alan; Pineda, Mercé; Zeev, Bruria Ben; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Leonard, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Multiplex ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) has become available for the detection of a large deletion on the MECP2 gene allowing genetic confirmation of previously unconfirmed cases of clinical Rett syndrome. This study describes the phenotype of those with a large deletion and compares with those with other pathogenic MECP2 mutations. Individuals were ascertained from the Australian Rett Syndrome and InterRett databases with data sourced from family and clinician questionnaires, and two case studies were constructed from the longitudinal Australian data. Regression and survival analysis were used to compare severity and age of onset of symptoms in those with and without a large deletion. Data were available for 974 individuals including 51 with a large deletion and ages ranged from 1 year 4 months to 49 years (median 9 years). Those with a large deletion were more severely affected than those with other mutation types. Specifically, individuals with large deletions were less likely to have learned to walk (OR 0.42, 95% CI: 0.22–0.79, P=0.007) and to be currently walking (OR 0.53, 95% CI: 0.26–1.10, P=0.089), and were at higher odds of being in the most severe category of gross motor function (OR 1.84, 95% CI: 0.98–3.48, P=0.057) and epilepsy (OR 2.72, 95% CI: 1.38–5.37, P=0.004). They also developed epilepsy, scoliosis, hand stereotypies and abnormal breathing patterns at an earlier age. We have described the disorder profile associated with a large deletion from the largest sample to date and have found that the phenotype is severe with motor skills particularly affected. PMID:22473088

  5. Genomic variability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage based on large sequence deletions and 15-locus MIRU-VNTR polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rindi, Laura; Medici, Chiara; Bimbi, Nicola; Buzzigoli, Andrea; Lari, Nicoletta; Garzelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 260 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains assigned to the Euro-American family was studied to identify phylogenetically informative genomic regions of difference (RD). Mutually exclusive deletions of regions RD115, RD122, RD174, RD182, RD183, RD193, RD219, RD726 and RD761 were found in 202 strains; the RD(Rio) deletion was detected exclusively among the RD174-deleted strains. Although certain deletions were found more frequently in certain spoligotype families (i.e., deletion RD115 in T and LAM, RD174 in LAM, RD182 in Haarlem, RD219 in T and RD726 in the "Cameroon" family), the RD-defined sublineages did not specifically match with spoligotype-defined families, thus arguing against the use of spoligotyping for establishing exact phylogenetic relationships between strains. Notably, when tested for katG463/gyrA95 polymorphism, all the RD-defined sublineages belonged to Principal Genotypic Group (PGG) 2, except sublineage RD219 exclusively belonging to PGG3; the 58 Euro-American strains with no deletion were of either PGG2 or 3. A representative sample of 197 isolates was then analyzed by standard 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing, a suitable approach to independently assess genetic relationships among the strains. Analysis of the MIRU-VNTR typing results by using a minimum spanning tree (MST) and a classical dendrogram showed groupings that were largely concordant with those obtained by RD-based analysis. Isolates of a given RD profile show, in addition to closely related MIRU-VNTR profiles, related spoligotype profiles that can serve as a basis for better spoligotype-based classification.

  6. Functional Genomics Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Deletion Collections.

    PubMed

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-01-01

    Constructed by a consortium of 16 laboratories, the Saccharomyces genome-wide deletion collections have, for the past decade, provided a powerful, rapid, and inexpensive approach for functional profiling of the yeast genome. Loss-of-function deletion mutants were systematically created using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gene deletion strategy to generate a start-to-stop codon replacement of each open reading frame by homologous recombination. Each strain carries two molecular barcodes that serve as unique strain identifiers, enabling their growth to be analyzed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays or through the use of next-generation sequencing technologies. Functional profiling of the deletion collections, using either strain-by-strain or parallel assays, provides an unbiased approach to systematically survey the yeast genome. The Saccharomyces yeast deletion collections have proved immensely powerful in contributing to the understanding of gene function, including functional relationships between genes and genetic pathways in response to diverse genetic and environmental perturbations. PMID:27587784

  7. Functional Profiling Using the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project Collections.

    PubMed

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-01-01

    The ability to measure and quantify the fitness of an entire organism requires considerably more complex approaches than simply using traditional "omic" methods that examine, for example, the abundance of RNA transcripts, proteins, or metabolites. The yeast deletion collections represent the only systematic, comprehensive set of null alleles for any organism in which such fitness measurements can be assayed. Generated by the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project, these collections allow the systematic and parallel analysis of gene functions using any measurable phenotype. The unique 20-bp molecular barcodes engineered into the genome of each deletion strain facilitate the massively parallel analysis of individual fitness. Here, we present functional genomic protocols for use with the yeast deletion collections. We describe how to maintain, propagate, and store the deletion collections and how to perform growth fitness assays on single and parallel screening platforms. Phenotypic fitness analyses of the yeast mutants, described in brief here, provide important insights into biological functions, mechanisms of drug action, and response to environmental stresses. It is important to bear in mind that the specific assays described in this protocol represent some of the many ways in which these collections can be assayed, and in this description particular attention is paid to maximizing throughput using growth as the phenotypic measure. PMID:27587776

  8. The yeast deletion collection: a decade of functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2014-06-01

    The yeast deletion collections comprise >21,000 mutant strains that carry precise start-to-stop deletions of ∼6000 open reading frames. This collection includes heterozygous and homozygous diploids, and haploids of both MAT A: and MATα mating types. The yeast deletion collection, or yeast knockout (YKO) set, represents the first and only complete, systematically constructed deletion collection available for any organism. Conceived during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequencing project, work on the project began in 1998 and was completed in 2002. The YKO strains have been used in numerous laboratories in >1000 genome-wide screens. This landmark genome project has inspired development of numerous genome-wide technologies in organisms from yeast to man. Notable spinoff technologies include synthetic genetic array and HIPHOP chemogenomics. In this retrospective, we briefly describe the yeast deletion project and some of its most noteworthy biological contributions and the impact that these collections have had on the yeast research community and on genomics in general. PMID:24939991

  9. The Yeast Deletion Collection: A Decade of Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2014-01-01

    The yeast deletion collections comprise >21,000 mutant strains that carry precise start-to-stop deletions of ∼6000 open reading frames. This collection includes heterozygous and homozygous diploids, and haploids of both MATa and MATα mating types. The yeast deletion collection, or yeast knockout (YKO) set, represents the first and only complete, systematically constructed deletion collection available for any organism. Conceived during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequencing project, work on the project began in 1998 and was completed in 2002. The YKO strains have been used in numerous laboratories in >1000 genome-wide screens. This landmark genome project has inspired development of numerous genome-wide technologies in organisms from yeast to man. Notable spinoff technologies include synthetic genetic array and HIPHOP chemogenomics. In this retrospective, we briefly describe the yeast deletion project and some of its most noteworthy biological contributions and the impact that these collections have had on the yeast research community and on genomics in general. PMID:24939991

  10. Deletion 2q37 syndrome: Cognitive-behavioral trajectories and autistic features related to breakpoint and deletion size.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Gene S; Falk, Rena E; Carey, John C; Imitola, Jaime; Sederberg, Maria; Caravalho, Karen S; South, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Subtelomeric deletions have been reported in ∼2.5% of individuals with developmental disabilities. Subtelomeric deletion 2q37 has been detected in many individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previously, genotype-phenotype correspondences were examined for their relationship to breakpoints 37.1, 37.2, or 37.3. Our purpose was to ascertain whether there were phenotypic differences at these breakpoints, elucidate the cognitive-behavioral phenotype in del2q37, and examine the genotype-phenotype association in the deletion with respect to cognitive-behavioral profiles and ASD. We administered a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral battery to nine children diagnosed with del 2q37, ages 3.9-17.75 years. ID for five tested with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition) (SBFE) ranged from severe to mild [IQ Range: 36-59]. Adaptive behavior scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) were much below adequate levels (DQ Range: floor value ["19"] to 55). Autism scores from the Child Autism Rating Scale (CARS) ranged from 22 [non-autistic] to 56 [extremely autistic]; 5/8 [63%] children received scores on the autism spectrum. Participants with the largest deletions, 10.1 and 9.5 Mb, attained the highest IQ and DQ scores while those with the smallest deletions, 7.9 and 6.6 Mb, made the lowest IQ and DQ scores. No association between deletion breakpoint and phenotype were found. Assessment of the various deleted regions suggested histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) was a likely candidate gene for ASD in our sample. However, two earlier reports found no association between HDAC4 haploinsufficiency and ASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27282419

  11. Deletion 2q37 syndrome: Cognitive-behavioral trajectories and autistic features related to breakpoint and deletion size.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Gene S; Falk, Rena E; Carey, John C; Imitola, Jaime; Sederberg, Maria; Caravalho, Karen S; South, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Subtelomeric deletions have been reported in ∼2.5% of individuals with developmental disabilities. Subtelomeric deletion 2q37 has been detected in many individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previously, genotype-phenotype correspondences were examined for their relationship to breakpoints 37.1, 37.2, or 37.3. Our purpose was to ascertain whether there were phenotypic differences at these breakpoints, elucidate the cognitive-behavioral phenotype in del2q37, and examine the genotype-phenotype association in the deletion with respect to cognitive-behavioral profiles and ASD. We administered a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral battery to nine children diagnosed with del 2q37, ages 3.9-17.75 years. ID for five tested with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition) (SBFE) ranged from severe to mild [IQ Range: 36-59]. Adaptive behavior scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) were much below adequate levels (DQ Range: floor value ["19"] to 55). Autism scores from the Child Autism Rating Scale (CARS) ranged from 22 [non-autistic] to 56 [extremely autistic]; 5/8 [63%] children received scores on the autism spectrum. Participants with the largest deletions, 10.1 and 9.5 Mb, attained the highest IQ and DQ scores while those with the smallest deletions, 7.9 and 6.6 Mb, made the lowest IQ and DQ scores. No association between deletion breakpoint and phenotype were found. Assessment of the various deleted regions suggested histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) was a likely candidate gene for ASD in our sample. However, two earlier reports found no association between HDAC4 haploinsufficiency and ASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Defining the Stimulus - A Memoir

    PubMed Central

    Terrace, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The eminent psychophysicist, S. S. Stevens, once remarked that, “the basic problem of psychology was the definition of the stimulus” (Stevens, 1951, p. 46). By expanding the traditional definition of the stimulus, the study of animal learning has metamorphosed into animal cognition. The main impetus for that change was the recognition that it is often necessary to postulate a representation between the traditional S and R of learning theory. Representations allow a subject to re-present a stimulus it learned previously that is currently absent. Thus, in delayed-matching-to-sample, one has to assume that a subject responds to a representation of the sample during test if it responds correctly. Other examples, to name but a few, include concept formation, spatial memory, serial memory, learning a numerical rule, imitation and metacognition. Whereas a representation used to be regarded as a mentalistic phenomenon that was unworthy of scientific inquiry, it can now be operationally defined. To accommodate representations, the traditional discriminative stimulus has to be expanded to allow for the role of representations. The resulting composite can account for a significantly larger portion of the variance of performance measures than the exteroceptive stimulus could by itself. PMID:19969047

  13. Defining, Navigating, and Negotiating Success

    PubMed Central

    Kalet, Adina L; Fletcher, Kathlyn E; Ferdman, Dina J; Bickell, Nina A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND We studied female graduates of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program (CSP, Class of 1984 to 1989) to explore and describe the complexity of creating balance in the life of mid-career academic woman physicians. METHODS We conducted and qualitatively analyzed (κ 0.35 to 1.0 for theme identification among rater pairs) data from a semi-structured survey of 21 women and obtained their curricula vitae to quantify publications and grant support, measures of academic productivity. RESULTS Sixteen of 21 (76%) women completed the survey. Mean age was 48 (range: 45 to 56). Three were full professors, 10 were associate professors, and 3 had left academic medicine. Eleven women had had children (mean 2.4; range: 1 to 3) and 3 worked part-time. From these data, the conceptual model expands on 3 key themes: (1) defining, navigating, and negotiating success, (2) making life work, and (3) making work work. The women who described themselves as satisfied with their careers (10/16) had clarity of values and goals and a sense of control over their time. Those less satisfied with their careers (6/16) emphasized the personal and professional costs of the struggle to balance their lives and described explicit institutional barriers to fulfillment of their potential. CONCLUSION For this group of fellowship-prepared academic women physicians satisfaction is achieving professional and personal balance. PMID:16918735

  14. GENOME-WIDE SCAN FOR SERUM GHRELIN DETECTS LINKAGE ON CHROMOSOME 1P36 IN HISPANIC CHILDREN: RESULTS FROM THE VIVA LA FAMILIA STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate genetic influence on serum ghrelin and its relationship with adiposity-related phenotypes in Hispanic children (n = 1030) from the Viva La Familia study (VFS). Anthropometric measurements and levels of serum ghrelin were estimated and genetic analyses conducte...

  15. Genome-wide scan for plasma ghrelin detects linkage on chromosome 1p36 in Hispanic children: Results from the Viva La Familia study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disorders in energy homeostasis are believed to be among the key contributing factors in the development of obesity. The rapid increase in the prevalence of obesity, particularly in children, is a major public health issue. Ghrelin is a brain-gut peptide with an important role in the regulation of e...

  16. Spontaneous Hepatocellular Carcinoma after the Combined Deletion of Akt Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Yu, Wan-Ni; Chen, Xinyu; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Jeon, Sang-Min; Birnbaum, Morris J; Guzman, Grace; Hay, Nissim

    2016-04-11

    Akt is frequently hyperactivated in human cancers and is targeted for cancer therapy. However, the physiological consequences of systemic Akt isoform inhibition were not fully explored. We showed that while combined Akt1 and Akt3 deletion in adult mice is tolerated, combined Akt1 and Akt2 deletion induced rapid mortality. Akt2(-/-) mice survived hepatic Akt1 deletion but all developed spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is associated with FoxO-dependent liver injury and inflammation. The gene expression signature of HCC-bearing livers is similar to aggressive human HCC. Consistently, neither Akt1(-/-) nor Akt2(-/-) mice are resistant to diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and Akt2(-/-) mice display a high incidence of lung metastasis. Thus, in contrast to other cancers, hepatic Akt inhibition induces liver injury that could promote HCC. PMID:26996309

  17. Analysis of Terminal Deletions using a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a model that can simulate different types of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations (CA's) and can provide predictions on the frequency and size of chromosomes with terminal deletions. Chromosomes with terminal deletions lack telomeres and this can elicit sister chromatid unions and the prolonged breakage/fusion/bridge (B/F/B) cycles that have been observed in mammalian tumors. The loss of a single telomere has been shown to cause extensive genomic instability through the B/F/B cycle process. Our model uses a stochastic process of DNA broken end joining, in which a realistic spectrum of CA's is created from improperly joined DNA free ends formed by DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The distribution of the DNA free ends is given by a mechanistic model that takes into account the chromatin structure and track structure for high-LET radiation. The model allows for DSB clustering from high-LET radiation and simulates the formation of CA's in stages that correspond to the actual time after radiation exposure. The time scale for CA formation is derived from experimental data on DSB repair kinetics. At any given time a nucleus may have intact chromosomes, CA's, and/or unrepaired fragments, some of which are defined as terminal deletions, if they are capped by one telomere. The model produces a spectrum of terminal deletions with their corresponding probabilities and size distributions for different heavy ions exposures for the first division after exposure. This data provides valuable information because there is limited experimental data available in the literature on the on the actual size of terminal deletions. We compare our model output to the available experimental data and make a reasonable extrapolation on the number of chromosomes lacking telomeres in human lymphocytes exposed to heavy ions. This model generates data which may lead to predictions on the rate of genomic instability in cells after exposure to high charge and energy nuclei

  18. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  19. Internal deletion mutants of Xenopus transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Hanas, J S; Littell, R M; Gaskins, C J; Zebrowski, R

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) or TFIIIA mutants with internal deletions were expressed in E. coli utilizing a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase system. TFIIIA or deletion mutant TFIIIAs, isolated from E.coli cell extracts, were identified by SDS PAGE and immunoblotting with rabbit antiserum against native TFIIIA purified from Xenopus immature oocytes. Specific DNA binding of intact or internally deleted TFIIIA was compared by analyzing their abilities to protect the internal control gene (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene from DNase I digestion. Intact protein, synthesized from a full-length TFIIIA cDNA, bound specifically to the entire ICR (+96 to +43) and promoted 5S RNA gene transcription in vitro. One TFIIIA deletion mutant, expressed from cDNA lacking the coding sequence for the putative fourth zinc finger (designated from the N-terminus, amino acids 103-132) protected the ICR from DNase I digestion from nucleotide positions +96 to +78. A second TFIIIA mutant resulting from fusion of putative zinc fingers 7 and 8 (deletion of amino acids 200-224) protected the 5S gene ICR from positions +96 to +63. The DNase I protection patterns of these mutant proteins are consistent with the formation of strong ICR contacts by those regions of the protein on the N-terminal side of the mutation but not by those regions on the C-terminal side of the mutation. The regions of the protein comprising the N-terminal 3 fingers and N-terminal six fingers appear to be in contact with approximately 18 and 33 bp of DNA respectively on the 3' side of the 5S gene ICR. These internal deletion mutants promoted 5S RNA synthesis in vitro and DNA renaturation. Images PMID:2690011

  20. Targeted Deletion of Tsc1 Causes Fatal Cardiomyocyte Hyperplasia Independently of Afterload

    PubMed Central

    Kayyali, Usamah S.; Larsen, Christopher G.; Bashiruddin, Sarah; Lewandowski, Sara L.; Trivedi, Chinmay M.; Warburton, Rod R.; Parkhitko, Andrey A.; Morrison, Tasha A.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Finlay, Geraldine A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite high expression levels, the role of Tsc1 in cardiovascular tissue is ill defined. We launched this study to examine the role of Tsc1 in cardiac physiology and pathology. Mice in which Tsc1 was deleted in cardiac tissue and vascular smooth muscle (Tsc1c/cSM22cre+/−), developed progressive cardiomegaly, hypertension and died early. Hearts of Tsc1c/cSM22cre+/− mice displayed a progressive increase in cardiomyocyte number, and to a lesser extent, size between the ages of 1 and 6 weeks. In addition, compared to control hearts, proliferation markers (phospho-histone 3 and PCNA) were elevated in Tsc1c/cSM22cre+/− cardiomyocytes at 0–4 weeks, suggesting that cardiomyocyte proliferation was the predominant mechanism underlying cardiomegaly in Tsc1c/cSM22cre+/− mice. To examine the contribution of Tsc1 deletion in peripheral vascular smooth muscle to the cardiac phenotype, Tsc1c/cSM22cre+/− mice were treated with the antihypertensive, hydralazine. Prevention of hypertension had no effect on survival, cardiac size or cardiomyocyte number in these mice. We furthermore generated mice in which Tsc1 was deleted only in vascular smooth muscle but not in cardiac tissue (Tsc1c/cSMAcre-ERT2+/−). The Tsc1c/cSMAcre-ERT2+/− mice also developed hypertension. However, their survival was normal and no cardiac abnormalities were observed. Our results suggest that loss of Tsc1 in the heart causes cardiomegaly, which is driven by increased cardiomyocyte proliferation that also appears to confer relative resistance to afterload reduction. These findings support a critical role for the Tsc1 gene as gatekeeper in the protection against uncontrolled cardiac growth. PMID:25434723

  1. Interstitial deletion of long arm of chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, A; Frias, S; Alcantar, R

    1984-01-01

    The case is presented of a patient with the karyotype 46,XX,del(13q)(pter----q22::q32----qter) confirmed by densitometry and a phenotype of mental and growth deficiency, hypotonia, hypertelorism, ptosis, broad nasal bridge, protruding upper incisors, short neck, dislocation of the hip, hypoplasia of the thumbs, fusion of fourth and fifth metacarpal bones and syndactyly of toes. The findings are compared with those of well documented cases with a similar deleted segment of the long arm of chromosome 13. Although it seems obvious that a clinical syndrome for the distal deletion 13q appears to exist more studies with banded chromosomes are needed. PMID:6609673

  2. Serine Racemase Deletion Protects Against Cerebral Ischemia And Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Zeynalov, Emil; Gazi, Sadia K.; Sikka, Gautam; Ehmsen, Jeffrey T.; Barrow, Roxanne K.; Coyle, Joseph T.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Doré, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    D-serine, formed from L-serine by serine racemase (SR), is a physiologic co-agonist at NMDA receptors. Using mice with targeted deletion of SR, we demonstrate a role for D-serine in NMDA receptor mediated neurotoxicity and stroke. Brain cultures of SR deleted mice display markedly diminished nitric oxide (NO) formation and neurotoxicity. In intact SR knockout mice NO formation and nitrosylation of NO targets are substantially reduced. Infarct volume following middle cerebral artery occlusion is dramatically diminished in several regions of the brains of SR mutant mice despite evidence of increased NMDA receptor number and sensitivity. PMID:20107067

  3. A large TAT deletion in a tyrosinaemia type II patient.

    PubMed

    Legarda, Maria; Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Lage, Sergio; Andrade, Fernando; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Bausch, Elke; Scherer, Gerd; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis Jose

    2011-11-01

    A girl, born to unrelated Spanish parents, presented at 6 months of age with photophobia, keratitis, palmar hyperkeratosis and high plasma tyrosine levels, indicative of tyrosinaemia type II. Analysis of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene revealed a paternally inherited frameshift mutation c.1213delCinsAG at codon 405 causing a premature stop codon, and a maternally inherited deletion of 193kb encompassing the complete TAT gene and three neighbouring genes. This is the first complete TAT deletion in tyrosinaemia type II described so far.

  4. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  5. A deletion and a duplication in distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome region. Clinical implications and review

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Luis; Nevado, Julián; Santos, Fernando; Heine-Suñer, Damià; Martinez-Glez, Victor; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Palomo, Rebeca; Delicado, Alicia; Pajares, Isidora López; Palomares, María; García-Guereta, Luis; Valverde, Eva; Hawkins, Federico; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals affected with DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial syndromes present with both phenotypic diversity and variable expressivity. The most frequent clinical features include conotruncal congenital heart defects, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hypocalcemia and a characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. The etiology in most patients is a 3 Mb recurrent deletion in region 22q11.2. However, cases of infrequent deletions and duplications with different sizes and locations have also been reported, generally with a milder, slightly different phenotype for duplications but with no clear genotype-phenotype correlation to date. Methods We present a 7 month-old male patient with surgically corrected ASD and multiple VSDs, and dysmorphic facial features not clearly suggestive of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and a newborn male infant with cleft lip and palate and upslanting palpebral fissures. Karyotype, FISH, MLPA, microsatellite markers segregation studies and SNP genotyping by array-CGH were performed in both patients and parents. Results Karyotype and FISH with probe N25 were normal for both patients. MLPA analysis detected a partial de novo 1.1 Mb deletion in one patient and a novel partial familial 0.4 Mb duplication in the other. Both of these alterations were located at a distal position within the commonly deleted region in 22q11.2. These rearrangements were confirmed and accurately characterized by microsatellite marker segregation studies and SNP array genotyping. Conclusion The phenotypic diversity found for deletions and duplications supports a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in the vicinity of the LCRC-LCRD interval of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region, whereas the high presence of duplications in normal individuals supports their role as polymorphisms. We suggest that any hypothetical correlation between the clinical phenotype and the size and location of these alterations may be masked by other genetic and/or epigenetic modifying factors. PMID

  6. Dopamine dysfunction in 22q11 deletion syndrome: possible cause of motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Casarelli, Livia; Minnei, Maurizio; Pitzianti, Mariabernarda; Armando, Marco; Pontillo, Maria; Vicari, Stefano; Pasini, Augusto

    2016-10-01

    22q11 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic disorder, resulting from a hemizygous microdeletion on the long arm of chromosome 22. In 22q11DS, the phenotypic expression is highly variable. Approximately one-third of all individuals with 22q11DS develop schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder. Among the genes in the deleted region, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) has a particular relevance for psychiatric disorders: lower COMT enzymatic activity decreases the clearance of dopamine (DA), yielding higher levels of catecholamines in the central nervous system. Deficits in myelinogenesis and dysfunctions in the DA system could justify the white matter abnormalities in motor/premotor circuits described in 22q11DS. The alterations in DA could determine the high incidence of psychiatric disorders and the presence of neurological soft signs in 22q11DS. Neurological soft signs are defined as non-normative performance on an examination of motor and sensory tasks without focal neurological deficits. COMT haploinsufficiency, DA dysfunction, and white matter abnormalities may contribute toward the presence of neurological soft signs in 22q11DS. PMID:27548835

  7. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by submicroscopic deletions within 16p13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Breuning, M.H.; Dauwerse, H.G.; Fugazza, G.; Saris, J.J.; Spruit, L.; Winjnen, H.; Beverstock, G.C.; Ommen, G.J.B. van ); Tommerup, N. Avd. for Medisinsk Genetikk, Oslo ); Hagen, C.B. van der ); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu ); Boogaard, M.J. van den; Pater, J.M. de; Hennekam, R.C.M. ); Mariman, E.C.M.; Hamel, B.C.J. ); Himmelbauer, H.; Frischauf, A.M. ); Stallings, R.L. )

    1993-02-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined complex of congenital malformations characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and big toes, and mental retardation. The breakpoint of two distinct reciprocal translocations occurring in patients with a clinical diagnosis of RTS was located to the same interval on chromosome 16, between the cosmids N2 and RT1, in band 16p13.3. By using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, the signal from RT1 was found to be missing from one chromosome 16 in 6 of 24 patients with RTS. The parents of five of these patients did not show a deletion of RT1, indicating a de novo rearrangement. RTS is caused by submicroscopic interstitial deletions within 16p13.3 in approximately 25% of the patients. The detection of microdeletions will allow the objective confirmation of the clinical diagnosis in new patients and provides an excellent tool for the isolation of the gene causally related to the syndrome. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Genomic anatomy of the Tyrp1 (brown) deletion complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsicker, Patricia R; Johnson, Dabney K

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome deletions in the mouse have proven invaluable in the dissection of gene function. The brown deletion complex comprises >28 independent genome rearrangements, which have been used to identify several functional loci on chromosome 4 required for normal embryonic and postnatal development. We have constructed a 172-bacterial artificial chromosome contig that spans this 22- egabase (Mb) interval and have produced a contiguous, finished, and manually annotated sequence from these clones. The deletion complex is strikingly gene- oor, containing only 52 protein-coding genes (of which only 39 are supported by human homologues) and has several further notable genomic features, including several segments of >1 Mb, apparently devoid of a coding sequence. We have used sequence polymorphisms to finely map the deletion breakpoints and identify strong candidate genes for the known phenotypes that map to this region, including three lethal loci (l4Rn1, l4Rn2, and l4Rn3) and the fitness mutant brown-associated fitness (baf). We have also characterized misexpression of the basonuclin homologue, Bnc2, associated with the inversion-ediated coat color mutant white-based brown (Bw). This study provides a molecular insight into the basis of several characterized mouse mutants, which will allow further dissection of this region by targeted or chemical mutagenesis.

  9. 23 CFR 658.11 - Additions, deletions, exceptions, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.11 Additions, deletions, exceptions, and restrictions. To ensure that the National Network remains... National Network as well as requests for the imposition of certain restrictions. FHWA approval...

  10. 23 CFR 658.11 - Additions, deletions, exceptions, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.11 Additions, deletions, exceptions, and restrictions. To ensure that the National Network remains... National Network as well as requests for the imposition of certain restrictions. FHWA approval...

  11. 76 FR 51954 - Procurement List Additions And Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  12. 75 FR 38468 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions and Deletions AGENCY: Committee for... Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds to the Procurement List services to be furnished by nonprofit... Procurement List products and services previously furnished by such agencies. DATES: Effective Date:...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions and Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds to the Procurement List products and services to be furnished by nonprofit...

  15. Schizophrenia in an Adult With 6p25 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caluseriu, O.; Mirza, G.; Ragoussis, J.; Chow, E.W.C.; MacCrimmon, D.; Bassett, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions at 6p25-p24 are rare findings in patients with developmental delay. There is limited information about the adult phenotype. We present a 36-year-old patient with schizophrenia, mild mental retardation, progressive hearing deficits, and characteristic facial features. Ocular (Axenfeld–Rieger anomaly) abnormalities were diagnosed in infancy; vision, however, has remained unimpaired. There were no other major congenital anomalies. Brain imaging showed only minor changes. There was no family history of intellectual deficits or psychosis. Karyotyping revealed a 6p25 deletion, and detailed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses using 23 probes confirmed a 6.7 Mb 6p25-pter deletion. The breakpoint is near a possible 6p25-p24 locus for schizophrenia. Psychotic illness may be part of the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and long-term outcome of patients with 6p terminal deletions. Other similarly affected patients likely remain to be diagnosed in adult populations of schizophrenia and/or mental retardation. PMID:16642507

  16. 75 FR 18164 - Procurement List: Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  1. Multigene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1996-06-01

    K-ras codon 12 point mutations mRb and p53 gene deletions were examined in tissues from 120 normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were Formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago. The results showed that 12 of 60 (20%) lung adenocarcinomas had mRb deletions. All lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found bearing deleted mRb had p53 deletions (15 of 15; 100%). A significantly higher mutation frequency for K-ras codon 12 point mutations was also found in the lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 24 once-weekly neutron irradiation (10 of 10; 100%) compared with those exposed to 24 or 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses (5 of 10; 50%). The data suggested that p53 and K-ras gene alterations were two contributory factors responsible for the increased incidence of lung adenocarcinoma in B6CF{sub 1} male mice exposed to protracted neutron radiation.

  2. 76 FR 27999 - Procurement List; Addition and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 3/11/2011 (76 FR 13362-13363), the Committee for Purchase From People Who.... ] Deletion On 3/11/2011 (76 FR 13362-13363), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... business the opportunity to compete for these projects in the future. The Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act and...

  3. 76 FR 3880 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 9/10/2010 (75 FR 55309-55310); 11/15/2010 (75 FR 69639-69640); and 11/19/2010 (75 FR 70909-70910), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... Interior, National Park Service, Midwest Region, Omaha, NE. Deletions On 10/22/2010 (FR 65305) and...

  4. 75 FR 76960 - Procurement List; Additions And Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 10/15/2010 (75 FR 63446-63447), the Committee for..., LA. Deletions On 10/15/2010 (75 FR 63446-63447), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind...-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 46- 48c) in connection with the product and service proposed for addition...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 5/20/2011 (76 FR 29210-29211) and 6/17/2011 (76 FR 35415-35417), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published...: Department of Veterans Affairs, VISN 11, Indianapolis, IN Deletions On 4/8/2011 (76 FR 19750-19751),...

  7. Remarks on Causative Verbs and Object Deletion in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onozuka, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    Rappaport Hovav and Levin [Rappaport Hovav, M., Levin, B., 1998. "Building verb meanings." In: Butt, M., Geuder, W. (Eds.), "The Projection of Arguments: Lexical and Compositional Factors." CSLI Publications, Stanford, pp. 97-134] contend that result verbs disallow object deletion because of their lexical semantic properties. Their point is that…

  8. 36 CFR 1275.58 - Deletion of restricted portions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deletion of restricted portions. 1275.58 Section 1275.58 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE...

  9. 36 CFR 1275.58 - Deletion of restricted portions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deletion of restricted portions. 1275.58 Section 1275.58 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE...

  10. 36 CFR 1275.58 - Deletion of restricted portions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Deletion of restricted portions. 1275.58 Section 1275.58 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE...

  11. 36 CFR 1275.58 - Deletion of restricted portions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deletion of restricted portions. 1275.58 Section 1275.58 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE...

  12. 36 CFR 1275.58 - Deletion of restricted portions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deletion of restricted portions. 1275.58 Section 1275.58 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON PRESIDENTIAL MATERIALS PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE...

  13. 78 FR 20620 - Procurement List; Additions to and Deletions

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  17. Deletion Mutations Keep Kinase Inhibitors in the Loop

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Daniel M.; Park, Jin H.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Effective clinical application of conformationally selective kinase inhibitors requires tailoring drug choice to the tumor's activating mutation(s). In this issue of Cancer Cell, Foster et al. (2016) describe how activating deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 cause primary resistance to common inhibitors, suggesting strategies for improved inhibitor selection. PMID:27070691

  18. 76 FR 6452 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 9/24/2010 (75 FR 58367); 10/22/2010 (75 FR 65305); and 12/10/ 2010 (75 FR 76961-76962), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely.... Deletions On 12/10/2010 (75 FR 76961-76962), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind...

  19. Genetic Counseling for the 22q11.2 Deletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.

    2008-01-01

    Because of advances in palliative medical care, children with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome are surviving into adulthood. An increase in reproductive fitness will likely follow necessitating enhanced access to genetic counseling for these patients and their families. Primary care physicians/obstetric practitioners are in a unique position to…

  20. 75 FR 13262 - Procurement List Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 1/11/2010 (75 FR 1354-1355) and 1/15/2010 (75 FR 2510), the Committee.... Deletions On 1/11/2010 (75 FR 1354-1355), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... Logistics Agency, DLA Support Services--DSS, Fort Belvoir, VA. Patricia Briscoe, Deputy Director,...

  1. Automatic Element Addition and Deletion in Lens Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun; Sasian, Jose

    2003-03-01

    A mechanism is established for the automatic addition and deletion of optical elements during the course of lens optimization. Two lens-form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical-power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as criteria in this automatic procedure. Design examples are provided that demonstrate the practicability of the scheme.

  2. On Making a Distinguished Vertex Minimum Degree by Vertex Deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Nadja; Bredereck, Robert; Niedermeier, Rolf; Uhlmann, Johannes

    For directed and undirected graphs, we study the problem to make a distinguished vertex the unique minimum-(in)degree vertex through deletion of a minimum number of vertices. The corresponding NP-hard optimization problems are motivated by applications concerning control in elections and social network analysis. Continuing previous work for the directed case, we show that the problem is W[2]-hard when parameterized by the graph's feedback arc set number, whereas it becomes fixed-parameter tractable when combining the parameters "feedback vertex set number" and "number of vertices to delete". For the so far unstudied undirected case, we show that the problem is NP-hard and W[1]-hard when parameterized by the "number of vertices to delete". On the positive side, we show fixed-parameter tractability for several parameterizations measuring tree-likeness, including a vertex-linear problem kernel with respect to the parameter "feedback edge set number". On the contrary, we show a non-existence result concerning polynomial-size problem kernels for the combined parameter "vertex cover number and number of vertices to delete", implying corresponding nonexistence results when replacing vertex cover number by treewidth or feedback vertex set number.

  3. Deletion and Interallelic Complementation Analysis of Steel Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, M. A.; Cleveland, L. S.; O'Sullivan, T. N.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    Mutations at the Steel (St) locus produce pleiotropic effects on viability as well as hematopoiesis, pigmentation and fertility. Several homozygous viable Sl alleles have previously been shown to contain either structural alterations in mast cell growth factor (Mgf) or regulatory mutations that affect expression of the Mgf gene. More severe Sl alleles cause lethality to homozygous embryos and all lethal Sl alleles examined to data contain deletions that remove the entire Mgf coding region. As the timing of the lethality varies from early to late in gestation, it is possible that some deletions may affect other closely linked genes in addition to Mgf. We have analyzed the extent of deleted sequences in seven homozygous lethal Sl alleles. The results of this analysis suggest that late gestation lethality represents the Sl null phenotype and that peri-implantation lethality results from the deletion of at least one essential gene that maps proximal to Sl. We have also examined gene dosage effects of Sl by comparing the phenotypes of mice homozygous and hemizygous for each of four viable Sl alleles. Lastly, we show that certain combinations of the viable Sl alleles exhibit interallelic complementation. Possible mechanisms by which such complementation could occur are discussed. PMID:8849899

  4. 78 FR 54870 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Vendor, Supply Chain Management Service(inventory control, obsolescence identification, engineering...: Additions On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953) and 7/19/2013 (78 FR 43180), the Committee for Purchase From...: Dept of the Navy, NSWC Crane, Crane, IN Deletions On 7/26/2013 (78 FR45183) and 8/2/2013 (78 FR...

  5. Minimum prevalence of chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.I.; Cross, I.E.; Burn, J.

    1994-09-01

    Submicroscopic deletions from within chromosome 22q11 are associated with DiGeorge (DGS), velocardiofacial (VCFS) and conotruncal anomaly syndromes and isolated congenital heart defects. In 1993 our pediatric cardiologists clinically referred all children in whom a chromosome 22q11 deletion was suspected for fluorescent in situ hybridization studies using probes from the DGS critical region. 10 affected individuals have been identified to date from the children born in 1993 in the Northern Region served exclusively by our center. A further case, the subsequent pregnancy in one of these families was affected and terminated on the basis of a major heart malformation. In the years 1988-92, for which we have complete ascertainment, there were 1009 heart defects among 191,700 births (mean 202 per annum). Thus we estimate that chromosome 22q11 deletions were the cause of at least 5% of congenital heart disease. As not all children with chromosome 22q11 deletions have a heart defect, this gives an estimated minimum prevalence of 1/4000 live births.

  6. 75 FR 44940 - Procurement List Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769), the Committee for... Administration, Hdqtrs-- Office of Acquisition & Grants, Baltimore, MD. Deletions On 5/21/2010 (75 FR 28589-28590); 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769); and 6/11/2010 (75 FR 33270-33271), the Committee for Purchase...

  7. 42 CFR 401.118 - Deletion of identifying details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Deletion of identifying details. 401.118 Section 401.118 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., statement of policy, or other record which relates to a private party or parties, the name or names or...

  8. [Multiplex PCR for detecting genotypes of deletional alpha-thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie-Ying; Liao, Can; Li, Jian; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2004-08-01

    To investigate the clinical application of multiplex PCR in detecting genotypes of deletional alpha-thalassemia in South China and observe the distribution frequency of alpha-globin gene deletion, 145 patients with silent carrier, alpha thalassemia trait or HbH were identified by M-PCR and 1.2% agarose gel electrophoresis. There are 1.3, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 kb bands which indicate --(SEA), -alpha(4.2), alphaalpha and -alpha(3.7), respectively. The results showed that among 145 patients, 100 patients with --(SEA)/alphaalpha (68.9%), 15 with -alpha(3.7)/alphaalpha (10.3%), 8 with -alpha(4.2)/alphaalpha (5.52%), 2 with -alpha(3.7)/-alpha(4.2) (1.38%), 1 with -alpha(3.7)/-alpha(3.7) (0.69%), 1 with -alpha(4.2)/-alpha(4.2) (0.69%), 14 with --(SEA)/-alpha(3.7) (9.65%), 2 with --(SEA)/-alpha(4.2) (1.38%) were found. Two patients prenatal diagnosed were confirmed with Bart's hydrops fetuses. In conclusion, M-PCR analysis is a simple, rapid and accurate method for detection of alpha-thalassemia gene deletion. This technique is helpful in screening, carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis of deletional alpha-thalassemia.

  9. 77 FR 40344 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... Resource Center, Alexandria, VA (CONUS). Contracting Activity: Defense Human Resource Center, Alexandria... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletion AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to...

  10. Influence of radiation quality on mouse chromosome 2 deletions in radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Natalie; Finnon, Rosemary; Manning, Grainne; Bouffler, Simon; Badie, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Leukaemia is the prevailing neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic system. Epidemiological analyses of the survivors of the Japanese atomic bombings show that exposure to ionising radiation (IR) can cause leukaemia. Although a clear association between radiation exposure and leukaemia development is acknowledged, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A hemizygous deletion on mouse chromosome 2 (del2) is a common feature in several mouse strains susceptible to radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). The deletion is an early event detectable 24h after exposure in bone marrow cells. Ultimately, 15-25% of exposed animals develop AML with 80-90% of cases carrying del2. Molecular mapping of leukaemic cell genomes identified a minimal deleted region (MDR) on chromosome 2 (chr2) in which a tumour suppressor gene, Sfpi1 is located, encoding the transcription factor PU.1, essential in haematopoiesis. The remaining copy of Sfpi1 has a point mutation in the coding sequence for the DNA-binding domain of the protein in 70% of rAML, which alters a single CpG sequence in the codon for arginine residue R235. In order to identify chr2 deletions and Sfpi.1/PU.1 loss, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on a unique panel of 79rAMLs. Using a custom made CGH array specifically designed for mouse chr2, we analysed at unprecedentedly high resolution (1.4M array- 148bp resolution) the size of the MDR in low LET and high-LET induced rAMLs (32 X-ray- and 47 neutron-induced). Sequencing of Sfpi1/PU.1DNA binding domain identified the presence of R235 point mutations, showing no influence of radiation quality on R235 type or frequency. We identified for the first time rAML cases with complex del2 in a subset of neutron-induced AMLs. This study allowed us to re-define the MDR to a much smaller 5.5Mb region (still including Sfpi1/PU.1), identical regardless of radiation quality.

  11. Further delineation of the chromosome 14q terminal deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Quik, Safira; Sluijter, Sigrid; Hulsbeek, Miriam M F; Hoovers, Jan M N; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2002-06-01

    A patient with hypotonia, blepharophimosis, ptosis, a bulbous nose, a long philtrum, upturned corners of the mouth, and mild developmental delay was found to have a small subtelomeric deletion of the long arm of chromosome 14 (q32.31-qter). In comparing her phenotype with previously reported patients with similar 14q deletions, due to either a linear deletion or to a ring chromosome 14, a clinically recognizable terminal 14q microdeletion syndrome was evident. Due to the limited number of cases reported, it was not possible to assign specific features to specific regions of terminal 14q. The comparison of features in cases with a linear deletion of 14qter (n = 19) to those in cases with a deletion due to a ring chromosome 14 (n = 23), both with the same breakpoint in 14q, showed that seizures and retinitis pigmentosa have been found only in patients with ring chromosomes. Several hypotheses are put forward to explain this difference: mitotic instability of ring chromosomes; a telomere position effect in ring chromosomes in which the 14p telomere silences nearby gene(s) on the q-arm; and dose-dependent gene(s) involved in seizures and retinitis pigmentosa located on the short arm of chromosome 14. In our opinion, only seizures may be explained by the mitotic instability of ring chromosomes, while both seizures and retinitis pigmentosa may be explained by silencing of gene(s) on 14q by the 14p telomere; the third hypothesis seems unlikely to explain either symptom.

  12. Deletion affecting band 7q36 not associated with holoprosencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, S.A.D.; Krivchenia, E.; Mohamed, A.N.

    1994-09-01

    Although the appearance of 7q36 aberrations have been postulated to be responsible for holoprosencephaly (HPE), the presence of a de novo 7q36 deletion in fetus without HPE has not been reported. We report the first case of a fetus with 7q36 deletion but lacking HPE. Ultrasound examination of a 25-year-old G3P1 Caucasian female showed small head circumference with microcephaly at 28 weeks. Decreased amniotic fluid volume, bilateral renal dilatation and abnormal facial features were also noted. Chromosome analysis after cordocentesis showed an abnormal female karyotype with a deletion involving the chromosome band 7q36, 46,XX,del(7)(q36). Chromosome studies on the biological parents were normal. In view of the chromosome finding and after extensive counseling, the couple elected to terminate the pregnancy. The chromosome findings were confirmed by fetal blood chromosome analysis at termination. Post-mortem examination confirmed dysmorphic features including a depressed nasal bridge and large flat ears with no lobules, but no cleft lip or palate was noted. Internal abnormalities included a bicuspid pulmonary valve and abnormally located lungs. The brain weighed 190g (249 {plus_minus} 64g expected) and had symmetric cerebral hemispheres without evidence of HPE or other gross or microscopic malformation, except focal cerebellar cortical dysplasia. In summary, our patient showed a deletion of the same chromosomal band implicated in HPE but lacked HPE. This finding indicates that 7q36 deletion may be seen in the absence of HPE and suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be responsible for HPE in this setting.

  13. Rare Copy Number Deletions Predict Individual Variation in Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Ronald A.; Gangestad, Steven W.; Liu, Jingyu; Calhoun, Vince D.; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in human intellectual functioning shows substantial heritability, as demonstrated by a long history of behavior genetic studies. Many recent molecular genetic studies have attempted to uncover specific genetic variations responsible for this heritability, but identified effects capture little variance and have proven difficult to replicate. The present study, motivated an interest in “mutation load” emerging from evolutionary perspectives, examined the importance of the number of rare (or infrequent) copy number variations (CNVs), and the total number of base pairs included in such deletions, for psychometric intelligence. Genetic data was collected using the Illumina 1MDuoBeadChip Array from a sample of 202 adult individuals with alcohol dependence, and a subset of these (N = 77) had been administered the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI). After removing CNV outliers, the impact of rare genetic deletions on psychometric intelligence was investigated in 74 individuals. The total length of the rare deletions significantly and negatively predicted intelligence (r = −.30, p = .01). As prior studies have indicated greater heritability in individuals with relatively higher parental socioeconomic status (SES), we also examined the impact of ethnicity (Anglo/White vs. Other), as a proxy measure of SES; these groups did not differ on any genetic variable. This categorical variable significantly moderated the effect of length of deletions on intelligence, with larger effects being noted in the Anglo/White group. Overall, these results suggest that rare deletions (between 5% and 1% population frequency or less) adversely affect intellectual functioning, and that pleotropic effects might partly account for the association of intelligence with health and mental health status. Significant limitations of this research, including issues of generalizability and CNV measurement, are discussed. PMID:21298096

  14. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Epipolythiodioxopiperazine Acetylaranotin in Aspergillus terreus Revealed by Genome-based Deletion Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Sanchez, James F.; Chang, ShuLin; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-04-15

    Abstract Epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) are a class of fungal secondary metabolites derived from cyclic peptides. Acetylaranotin belongs to one structural subgroup of ETPs characterized by the presence of a seven-membered dihydrooxepine ring. Defining the genes involved in acetylaranotin biosynthesis should provide a means to increase production of these compounds and facilitate the engineering of second-generation molecules. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus produces acetylaranotin and related natural products. Using targeted gene deletions, we have identified a cluster of 9 genes including one nonribosomal peptide synthase gene, ataP, that is required for acetylaranotin biosynthesis. Chemical analysis of the wild type and mutant strains enabled us to isolate seventeen natural products that are either intermediates in the normal biosynthetic pathway or shunt products that are produced when the pathway is interrupted through mutation. Nine of the compounds identified in this study are novel natural products. Our data allow us to propose a complete biosynthetic pathway for acetylaranotin and related natural products.

  15. Deletion of glucose oxidase changes the pattern of organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has potential as a cell factory for the production of different organic acids. At pH 5.5, A.carbonarius accumulates high amounts of gluconic acid when it grows on glucose based medium whereas at low pH, it produces citric acid. The conversion of glucose to gluconic acid is carried out by secretion of the enzyme, glucose oxidase. In this work, the gene encoding glucose oxidase was identified and deleted from A. carbonarius with the aim of changing the carbon flux towards other organic acids. The effect of genetic engineering was examined by testing glucose oxidase deficient (Δgox) mutants for the production of different organic acids in a defined production medium. The results obtained showed that the gluconic acid accumulation was completely inhibited and increased amounts of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid were observed in the Δgox mutants.

  16. SNP-based Microdeletion and Aneuploidy RegisTry (SMART)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    22q11 Deletion Syndrome; DiGeorge Syndrome; Trisomy 21; Trisomy 18; Trisomy 13; Monosomy X; Sex Chromosome Abnormalities; Cri-du-Chat Syndrome; Angelman Syndrome; Prader-Willi Syndrome; 1p36 Deletion Syndrome

  17. Lysis Delay and Burst Shrinkage of Coliphage T7 by Deletion of Terminator Tφ Reversed by Deletion of Early Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong Minh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophage T7 terminator Tφ is a class I intrinsic terminator coding for an RNA hairpin structure immediately followed by oligo(U), which has been extensively studied in terms of its transcription termination mechanism, but little is known about its physiological or regulatory functions. In this study, using a T7 mutant phage, where a 31-bp segment of Tφ was deleted from the genome, we discovered that deletion of Tφ from T7 reduces the phage burst size but delays lysis timing, both of which are disadvantageous for the phage. The burst downsizing could directly result from Tφ deletion-caused upregulation of gene 17.5, coding for holin, among other Tφ downstream genes, because infection of gp17.5-overproducing Escherichia coli by wild-type T7 phage showed similar burst downsizing. However, the lysis delay was not associated with cellular levels of holin or lysozyme or with rates of phage adsorption. Instead, when allowed to evolve spontaneously in five independent adaptation experiments, the Tφ-lacking mutant phage, after 27 or 29 passages, recovered both burst size and lysis time reproducibly by deleting early genes 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 of class I, among other mutations. Deletion of genes 0.5 to 0.7 from the Tφ-lacking mutant phage decreased expression of several Tφ downstream genes to levels similar to that of the wild-type phage. Accordingly, phage T7 lysis timing is associated with cellular levels of Tφ downstream gene products. This suggests the involvement of unknown factor(s) besides the known lysis proteins, lysozyme and holin, and that Tφ plays a role of optimizing burst size and lysis time during T7 infection. IMPORTANCE E. coli PMID:24335287

  18. Transmitted deletions of medial 5p and learning difficulties; does the cadherin cluster only become penetrant when flanking genes are deleted?

    PubMed

    Barber, John C K; Huang, Shuwen; Bateman, Mark S; Collins, Amanda L

    2011-11-01

    The central portion of the short arm of chromosome 5 is unusual in that large, cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions segregate in families with and without phenotypic consequences. Here we present a family in which a transmitted interstitial deletion of 5p13.3 to 5p14.3 co-segregated with learning and/or behavioral difficulties in six family members. Facial dysmorphism was not striking but a father and daughter both had lacrimal fistulae. The deletion was 12.23 Mb in size (chr5:20,352,535-32,825,775) and contained fifteen known protein coding genes. Five of these (GOLPH3; MTMR12; ZFR; SUB1; and NPR3) and an ultra-conserved microRNA (hsa-miR-579) were present in an 883 kb candidate gene region in 5p13.3 that was deleted in the present family but not in previously reported overlapping benign deletions. Members of the cadherin precursor gene cluster, with brain specific expression, were deleted in both affected and benign deletion families. The candidate genes in 5p13.3 may be sufficient to account for the consistent presence or absence of phenotype in medial 5p deletions. However, we consider the possibility of position effects in which CDH6, and/or other cadherin genes, become penetrant when adjacent genes, or modifiers of gene expression, are also deleted. This could account for the absence of intellectual disability in benign deletions of the cadherin cluster, the cognitive phenotype in medial 5p deletion syndrome and the greater severity of intellectual disability in patients with cri-du-chat syndrome and deletions of 5p15 that extend into the region deleted in the present family. PMID:21965044

  19. 7 CFR 1215.100 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1215.100 Section 1215.100 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Definitions § 1215.100 Terms defined. Unless otherwise defined in this subpart, the definitions of terms used in this subpart shall have the same meaning as...

  20. 7 CFR 1206.200 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1206.200 Section 1206.200 Agriculture... INFORMATION Rules and Regulations § 1206.200 Terms defined. Unless otherwise defined in this subpart, the definitions of terms used in this subpart shall have the same meaning as the definitions of such terms...

  1. 7 CFR 1210.500 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1210.500 Section 1210.500 Agriculture... PLAN Rules and Regulations Definitions § 1210.500 Terms defined. Unless otherwise defined in this subpart, definitions of terms used in this subpart shall have the same meaning as the definitions of...

  2. Defined contribution: a part of our future.

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Reginald F.

    2003-01-01

    Rising employer health care costs and consumer backlash against managed care are trends fostering the development of defined contribution plans. Defined contribution plans limit employer responsibility to a fixed financial contribution rather than a benefit program and dramatically increase consumer responsibility for health care decision making. Possible outcomes of widespread adoption of defined contribution plans are presented. PMID:12934869

  3. Development of TaqMan allelic discrimination based genotyping of large DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Fedick, Anastasia; Su, Jing; Treff, Nathan R

    2012-03-01

    The high prevalence of genetic diseases resulting from gross deletions has highlighted a need for a quick, simple, and reliable method of genotyping these mutations. Here, we developed a novel strategy for applying TaqMan allelic discrimination to accurately genotype 3 different large deletions in a high-throughput manner. Allelic discrimination has previously been used to genotype frame shift and point mutations, and small insertions or deletions six base pairs in length, but not large deletions. The assays designed here recognize a 2502 base pair deletion in the Nebulin (NEB) gene that results in Nemaline Myopathy, a 308,769 base pair deletion in the Gap Junction Protein, beta 6 (GJB6) gene that causes Hearing Loss, and a 6433 base pair deletion in the Mucolipin 1 (MCOLN1) gene responsible for causing Mucolipidosis IV Disease. This methodology may also be successfully applied to high throughput genotyping of other large deletions. PMID:22281206

  4. Restoration of half the normal dystrophin sequence in a double-deletion Duchenne muscular dystrophy family

    SciTech Connect

    Hoop, R.C.; Schwartz, L.S.; Hoffman, E.P.; Russo, L.S.; Riconda, D.L.

    1994-02-01

    Two male cousins with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were found to have different maternal dystrophin gene haplotypes and different deletion mutations. One propositus showed two noncontiguous deletions-one in the 5{prime}, proximal deletional hotspot region, and the other in the 3{prime}, more distal deletional hotspot region. The second propositus showed only the 5{prime} deletion. Using multiple fluorescent exon dosage and fluorescent multiplex CA repeat linkage analyses, the authors show that the mother of each propositus carries both deletions on the same grandmaternal X chromosome. This paradox is explained by a single recombinational event between the 2 deleted regions of one of the carrier`s dystrophin genes, giving rise to a son with a partially {open_quotes}repaired{close_quotes} gene retaining only the 5{prime} deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Short, direct repeats at the breakpoints of deletions of the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Canning, S.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors found deletions involving the retinoblastoma gene in 12 of 49 tumors from patients with retinoblastoma or osteosarcoma. After mapping the deletion breakpoints, they found that no two breakpoints coincided. Thus, the data do not support the conclusions of others regarding the existence of a hotspot for deletion breakpoints in this gene. In 4 of the tumors, they sequenced 200 base pairs surrounding each deletion breakpoint. Three deletions had termini within pairs of short, direct repeats ranging in size from 4 to 7 base pairs. These results indicate that the slipped mispairing mechanism may predominate in the generation of deletions at this locus. The review of deletion breakpoints at other genetic loci reveals that the nature of the sequences present at deletion breakpoints (short, direct repeats versus middle repetitive elements) varies according to the genetic locus under study.

  6. Neuropathology of 16p13.11 Deletion in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joan Y. W.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Martinian, Lillian; Thom, Maria; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2012-01-01

    16p13.11 genomic copy number variants are implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, autism, mental retardation, ADHD and epilepsy. The mechanisms leading to the diverse clinical manifestations of deletions and duplications at this locus are unknown. Most studies favour NDE1 as the leading disease-causing candidate gene at 16p13.11. In epilepsy at least, the deletion does not appear to unmask recessive-acting mutations in NDE1, with haploinsufficiency and genetic modifiers being prime candidate disease mechanisms. NDE1 encodes a protein critical to cell positioning during cortical development. As a first step, it is important to determine whether 16p13.11 copy number change translates to detectable brain structural alteration. We undertook detailed neuropathology on surgically resected brain tissue of two patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), who had the same heterozygous NDE1-containing 800 kb 16p13.11 deletion, using routine histological stains and immunohistochemical markers against a range of layer-specific, white matter, neural precursor and migratory cell proteins, and NDE1 itself. Surgical temporal lobectomy samples from a MTLE case known not to have a deletion in NDE1 and three non-epilepsy cases were included as disease controls. We found that apart from a 3 mm hamartia in the temporal cortex of one MTLE case with NDE1 deletion and known hippocampal sclerosis in the other case, cortical lamination and cytoarchitecture were normal, with no differences between cases with deletion and disease controls. How 16p13.11 copy changes lead to a variety of brain diseases remains unclear, but at least in epilepsy, it would not seem to be through structural abnormality or dyslamination as judged by microscopy or immunohistochemistry. The need to integrate additional data with genetic findings to determine their significance will become more pressing as genetic technologies generate increasingly rich datasets

  7. Functional analysis of a chromosomal deletion associated with myelodysplastic syndromes using isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kotini, Andriana G; Chang, Chan-Jung; Boussaad, Ibrahim; Delrow, Jeffrey J; Dolezal, Emily K; Nagulapally, Abhinav B; Perna, Fabiana; Fishbein, Gregory A; Klimek, Virginia M; Hawkins, R David; Huangfu, Danwei; Murry, Charles E; Graubert, Timothy; Nimer, Stephen D; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions associated with human diseases, such as cancer are common, but synteny issues complicate modeling of these deletions in mice. We use cellular reprogramming and genome engineering to functionally dissect the loss of chromosome 7q [del(7q)], a somatic cytogenetic abnormality present in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We derive del(7q)- and isogenic karyotypically normal induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from hematopoietic cells of MDS patients and show that the del(7q) iPSCs recapitulate disease-associated phenotypes, including impaired hematopoietic differentiation. These disease phenotypes are rescued by spontaneous dosage correction and can be reproduced in karyotypically normal cells by engineering hemizygosity of defined chr7q segments, in a 20 Mb region. We use a phenotype-rescue screen to identify candidate haploinsufficient genes that might mediate the del(7q)- hematopoietic defect. Our approach highlights the utility of human iPSCs both for functional mapping of disease-associated large-scale chromosomal deletions and for discovery of haploinsufficient genes. PMID:25798938

  8. RIP2-mediated LKB1 deletion causes axon degeneration in the spinal cord and hind-limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gao; Reynolds, Richard; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A

    2011-03-01

    Axon degeneration is observed in neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinflammatory disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. The molecular basis of this process remains largely unknown. Here, we show that mice deleted for the tumour suppressor LKB1 (also called STK11) in the spinal cord, some parts of the brain and in the endocrine pancreas (βLKB1KO mice) develop hind-limb dysfunction and axon degeneration at about 7 weeks. Demyelination and macrophage infiltration are observed in the white matter of these mice, predominantly in the bilateral and anterior funiculi of the thoracic segment of the spinal cord, suggesting damage to the ascending sensory signalling pathway owing to LKB1 deletion in the brain. Microtubule structures were also affected in the degenerated foci, with diminished neurofilament and tubulin expression. Deletion of both PRKAA1 genes, whose products AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 are also downstream targets of LKB1, with the same strategy was without effect. We thus define LKB1 as an intrinsic suppressor of axon degeneration and a possible target for strategies that can reverse this process. PMID:21135058

  9. Loss of src, topoisomerase 1 and phospholipase C genes in 20q deletions in myeloid leukemia by FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.N.; Hayworth, R.; Carroll, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    Deletion of 20q is one of the more consistent abnormalities in myeloid leukemia (ML). This has led to the suggestion of a loss of(a) tumor-suppressor gene(s) that could provide a proliferative advantage to myeloid cells. Using in situ hybridization mapping, the deleted region was determined to be between 20q11.2 to q12, flanked proximally by ribophorin and distally by D20S17. We have been constructing a genetic map of the 20q12-q13.1 region and the MODY locus. We further defined the del(20q) by studying 5 patients with ML and cytogenetically identifiable deletions of 20q, using multicolor FISH, and scored for the presence or absence of the following probes: oncogenes hck and src, phospholipase C (plc1), adenosine deaminase (ada), DNA topoisomerase 1 (top1), D20S17, and D20S16. hck mapped to proximal 20q11.2 and was present in the normal and deleted chromosome 20. D20S16 was observed in all but one patient suggesting that it is also not part of the critical region of deletion. src, ada, top1, plc1, and 20S17 were deleted in all patients. The loss of plc1 and top1 in ML is reported for the first time and is important given their function in cell growth and replication. top1 relaxes supercoiled DNA and is important for RNA transcription, DNA replication and repair. A lack of DNA repair caused by the inactivation of top1 may lead to genomic instability and thus neoplasia and apoptosis. plc1 catalyzes inositol phospholipids to second messenger molecules diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate which directly affect cell division and growth. If there is a loss or alteration of plc1, it is speculated that the leukemic cells instead of undergoing apoptosis, may follow an alternative pathway that provides proliferative signals causing the progression to an aggressive acute myeloid leukemia. Further studies regarding the role of plc1 in apoptosis and ML may lead to promising results.

  10. Sequence Homology at the Breakpoint and Clinical Phenotype of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K.; Craigen, William J.; Schmitt, Eric S.; Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old) showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (<6 years old) carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and

  11. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J.; Pasztor, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  12. 47 CFR 1.229 - Motions to enlarge, change, or delete issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions to enlarge, change, or delete issues. 1.229 Section 1.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Participants and Issues § 1.229 Motions to enlarge, change, or delete issues. (a) A motion to enlarge, change or delete...

  13. 5p deletions: Current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Joanne M; Qualmann, Krista J; Okashah, Rebecca; Reilly, AmySue; Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Campbell, Dennis J

    2015-09-01

    Disorders resulting from 5p deletions (5p-) were first recognized by Lejeune et al. in 1963 [Lejeune et al. (1963); C R Hebd Seances Acad Sci 257:3098-3102]. 5p- is caused by partial or total deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The most recognizable phenotype is characterized by a high-pitched cry, dysmorphic features, poor growth, and developmental delay. This report reviews 5p- disorders and their molecular basis. Hemizygosity for genes located within this region have been implicated in contributing to the phenotype. A review of the genes on 5p which may be dosage sensitive is summarized. Because of the growing knowledge of these specific genes, future directions to explore potential targeted therapies for individuals with 5p- are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235846

  14. Bayesian Case-deletion Model Complexity and Information Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Chen, Qingxia

    2015-01-01

    We establish a connection between Bayesian case influence measures for assessing the influence of individual observations and Bayesian predictive methods for evaluating the predictive performance of a model and comparing different models fitted to the same dataset. Based on such a connection, we formally propose a new set of Bayesian case-deletion model complexity (BCMC) measures for quantifying the effective number of parameters in a given statistical model. Its properties in linear models are explored. Adding some functions of BCMC to a conditional deviance function leads to a Bayesian case-deletion information criterion (BCIC) for comparing models. We systematically investigate some properties of BCIC and its connection with other information criteria, such as the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC). We illustrate the proposed methodology on linear mixed models with simulations and a real data example. PMID:26180578

  15. 5p Deletions: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Joanne M.; Qualmann, Krista J.; Okashah, Rebecca; Reilly, Amysue; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Campbell, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders resulting from 5p deletions (5p–) were first recognized by Lejeune et al. in 1963 [Lejeune et al. (1963); C R Hebd Seances Acad Sci 257:3098-3102]. 5p– is caused by partial or total deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The most recognizable phenotype is characterized by a high-pitched cry, dysmorphic features, poor growth, and developmental delay. This report reviews 5p– disorders and their molecular basis. Hemizygosity for genes located within this region have been implicated in contributing to the phenotype. A review of the genes on 5p which may be dosage sensitive is summarized. Because of the growing knowledge of these specific genes, future directions to explore potential targeted therapies for individuals with 5p– are discussed. PMID:26235846

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  17. Learning About Gene Regulatory Networks From Gene Deletion Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Brazma, Alvis

    2002-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are a major focus of interest in molecular biology. A crucial question is how complex regulatory systems are encoded and controlled by the genome. Three recent publications have raised the question of what can be learned about gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments on gene deletion mutants. Using this indirect approach, topological features such as connectivity and modularity have been studied. PMID:18629255

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  1. Deletion (11)(q14.1q21)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; Lazarus, K.H.; Ritchie, E.J.L.; Bell, A.M.

    1994-02-01

    The authors report on a 4-year-old girl with moderate development delay, horseshoe kidney, bilateral duplication of the ureters with right upper pole obstruction, hydronephrosis and nonfunction, and subsequent Wilms tumor of the right lower pole. She had an interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 involving the region 11(q14.1q21). 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

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  11. A 600 kb deletion syndrome at 16p11.2 leads to energy imbalance and neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Flore; Sherr, Elliott H; Beckmann, Noam D; Hanson, Ellen; Maillard, Anne M; Hippolyte, Loyse; Macé, Aurélien; Ferrari, Carina; Kutalik, Zoltán; Andrieux, Joris; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Mandy; Bernier, Raphael; Bouquillon, Sonia; Conus, Philippe; Delobel, Bruno; Faucett, W Andrew; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Grant, Ellen; Harewood, Louise; Hunter, Jill V; Lebon, Sébastien; Ledbetter, David H; Martin, Christa Lese; Männik, Katrin; Martinet, Danielle; Mukherjee, Pratik; Ramocki, Melissa B; Spence, Sarah J; Steinman, Kyle J; Tjernagel, Jennifer; Spiro, John E; Reymond, Alexandre; Beckmann, Jacques S; Chung, Wendy K; Jacquemont, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Background The recurrent ∼600 kb 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 deletion is among the most frequent known genetic aetiologies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and related neurodevelopmental disorders. Objective To define the medical, neuropsychological, and behavioural phenotypes in carriers of this deletion. Methods We collected clinical data on 285 deletion carriers and performed detailed evaluations on 72 carriers and 68 intrafamilial non-carrier controls. Results When compared to intrafamilial controls, full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) is two standard deviations lower in carriers, and there is no difference between carriers referred for neurodevelopmental disorders and carriers identified through cascade family testing. Verbal IQ (mean 74) is lower than non-verbal IQ (mean 83) and a majority of carriers require speech therapy. Over 80% of individuals exhibit psychiatric disorders including ASD, which is present in 15% of the paediatric carriers. Increase in head circumference (HC) during infancy is similar to the HC and brain growth patterns observed in idiopathic ASD. Obesity, a major comorbidity present in 50% of the carriers by the age of 7 years, does not correlate with FSIQ or any behavioural trait. Seizures are present in 24% of carriers and occur independently of other symptoms. Malformations are infrequently found, confirming only a few of the previously reported associations. Conclusions The 16p11.2 deletion impacts in a quantitative and independent manner FSIQ, behaviour and body mass index, possibly through direct influences on neural circuitry. Although non-specific, these features are clinically significant and reproducible. Lastly, this study demonstrates the necessity of studying large patient cohorts ascertained through multiple methods to characterise the clinical consequences of rare variants involved in common diseases. PMID:23054248

  12. Naturally Occurring Deletions of Hunchback Binding Sites in the Even-Skipped Stripe 3+7 Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Palsson, Arnar; Wesolowska, Natalia; Reynisdóttir, Sigrún; Ludwig, Michael Z.; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Changes in regulatory DNA contribute to phenotypic differences within and between taxa. Comparative studies show that many transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are conserved between species whereas functional studies reveal that some mutations segregating within species alter TFBS function. Consistently, in this analysis of 13 regulatory elements in Drosophila melanogaster populations, single base and insertion/deletion polymorphism are rare in characterized regulatory elements. Experimentally defined TFBS are nearly devoid of segregating mutations and, as has been shown before, are quite conserved. For instance 8 of 11 Hunchback binding sites in the stripe 3+7 enhancer of even-skipped are conserved between D. melanogaster and Drosophila virilis. Oddly, we found a 72 bp deletion that removes one of these binding sites (Hb8), segregating within D. melanogaster. Furthermore, a 45 bp deletion polymorphism in the spacer between the stripe 3+7 and stripe 2 enhancers, removes another predicted Hunchback site. These two deletions are separated by ∼250 bp, sit on distinct haplotypes, and segregate at appreciable frequency. The Hb8Δ is at 5 to 35% frequency in the new world, but also shows cosmopolitan distribution. There is depletion of sequence variation on the Hb8Δ-carrying haplotype. Quantitative genetic tests indicate that Hb8Δ affects developmental time, but not viability of offspring. The Eve expression pattern differs between inbred lines, but the stripe 3 and 7 boundaries seem unaffected by Hb8Δ. The data reveal segregating variation in regulatory elements, which may reflect evolutionary turnover of characterized TFBS due to drift or co-evolution. PMID:24786295

  13. Distinct phenotype of PHF6 deletions in females.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, N; Isidor, B; Lopez Cazaux, S; Le Caignec, C; Klink, B; Kraus, C; Schrock, E; Hackmann, K

    2014-02-01

    We report on two female patients carrying small overlapping Xq26.2 deletions of 100 kb and 270 kb involving the PHF6 gene. Mutations in PHF6 have been reported in individuals with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome, a condition present almost exclusively in males. Two very recent papers revealed de novo PHF6 defects in seven female patients with intellectual disability and a phenotype resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome (sparse hair, bitemporal narrowing, arched eyebrows, synophrys, high nasal root, bulbous nasal tip, marked clinodactyly with the hypoplastic terminal phalanges of the fifth fingers and cutaneous syndactyly of the toes, Blaschkoid linear skin hyperpigmentation, dental anomalies and occasional major malformations). The clinical presentation of these patients overlaps completely with our first patient, who carries a germline deletion involving PHF6. The second patient has a mosaic deletion and presented with a very mild phenotype of PHF6 loss in females. Our report confirms that PHF6 loss in females results in a recognizable phenotype overlapping with Coffin-Siris syndrome and distinct from Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome. We expand the clinical spectrum and provide the first summary of the recommended medical evaluation.

  14. Targeted deletion of Vegfa in adult mice induces vision loss.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Toshihide; Westenskow, Peter D; Bravo, Stephen; Aguilar, Edith; Friedlander, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Current therapies directed at controlling vascular abnormalities in cancers and neovascular eye diseases target VEGF and can slow the progression of these diseases. While the critical role of VEGF in development has been well described, the function of locally synthesized VEGF in the adult eye is incompletely understood. Here, we show that conditionally knocking out Vegfa in adult mouse retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, which regulate retinal homeostasis, rapidly leads to vision loss and ablation of the choriocapillaris, the major blood supply for the outer retina and photoreceptor cells. This deletion also caused rapid dysfunction of cone photoreceptors, the cells responsible for fine visual acuity and color vision. Furthermore, Vegfa deletion showed significant downregulation of multiple angiogenic genes in both physiological and pathological states, whereas the deletion of the upstream regulatory transcriptional factors HIFs did not affect the physiological expressions of angiogenic genes. These results suggest that endogenous VEGF provides critical trophic support necessary for retinal function. Targeting factors upstream of VEGF, such as HIFs, may be therapeutically advantageous compared with more potent and selective VEGF antagonists, which may have more off-target inhibitory trophic effects. PMID:23093773

  15. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  16. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Smith, Claire E L; Parry, David A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-10-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid.

  17. Insertion and deletion mutagenesis of the human cytomegalovirus genome

    SciTech Connect

    Spaete, R.R.; Mocarski, E.S.

    1987-10-01

    Studies on human cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been limited by a paucity of molecular genetic techniques available for manipulating the viral genome. The authors have developed methods for site-specific insertion and deletion mutagenesis of CMV utilizing a modified Escherichia coli lacZ gene as a genetic marker. The lacZ gene was placed under the control of the major ..beta.. gene regulatory signals and inserted into the viral genome by homologous recombination, disrupting one of two copies of this ..beta.. gene within the L-component repeats of CMV DNA. They observed high-level expression of ..beta..-galactosidase by the recombinant in a temporally authentic manner, with levels of this enzyme approaching 1% of total protein in infected cells. Thus, CMV is an efficient vector for high-level expression of foreign gene products in human cells. Using back selection of lacZ-deficient virus in the presence of the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl ..beta..-D-galactoside, they generated random endpoint deletion mutants. Analysis of these mutant revealed that CMV DNA sequences flanking the insert had been removed, thereby establishing this approach as a means of determining whether sequences flanking a lacZ insertion are dispensable for viral growth. In an initial test of the methods, they have shown that 7800 base pairs of one copy of L-component repeat sequences can be deleted without affecting viral growth in human fibroblasts.

  18. Deletion of Prepl Causes Growth Impairment and Hypotonia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Anna Mari; Leidl, Mathias; McFedries, Amanda K.; Horner, James W.; Creemers, John; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies of rare diseases can identify genes of unknown function that strongly impact human physiology. Prolyl endopeptidase-like (PREPL) is an uncharacterized member of the prolyl peptidase family that was discovered because of its deletion in humans with hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome (HCS). HCS is characterized by a number of physiological changes including diminished growth and neonatal hypotonia or low muscle tone. HCS patients have deletions in other genes as well, making it difficult to tease apart the specific role of PREPL. Here, we develop a PREPL null (PREPL−/−) mouse model to address the physiological role of this enzyme. Deletion of exon 11 from the Prepl gene, which encodes key catalytic amino acids, leads to a loss of PREPL protein as well as lower Prepl mRNA levels. PREPL−/− mice have a pronounced growth phenotype, being significantly shorter and lighter than their wild type (PREPL+/+) counterparts. A righting assay revealed that PREPL−/− pups took significantly longer than PREPL+/+ pups to right themselves when placed on their backs. This deficit indicates that PREPL−/− mice suffer from neonatal hypotonia. According to these results, PREPL regulates growth and neonatal hypotonia in mice, which supports the idea that PREPL causes diminished growth and neonatal hypotonia in humans with HCS. These animals provide a valuable asset in deciphering the underlying biochemical, cellular and physiological pathways that link PREPL to HCS, and this may eventually lead to new insights in the treatment of this disease. PMID:24586561

  19. Interstitial deletion 5p accompanied by dicentric ring formation of the deleted segment resulting in trisomy 5p13-cen

    SciTech Connect

    Schuffenhauer, S.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Murken, J.

    1996-10-02

    Karyotypes with an interstitial deletion and a marker chromosome formed from the deleted segment are rare. We identified such a rearrangement in a newborn infant, who presented with macrocephaly, asymmetric square skull, minor facial anomalies, omphalocele, inguinal hernias, hypospadias, and club feet. The karyotype 46,XY,del(5)(pter{r_arrow}p13::cen{r_arrow}qter)/47,XY,+dicr(5)(:p13{r_arrow}cen::p13{r_arrow}cen),del(5)(pter{r_arrow}p13::cen{r_arrow}qter) was identified by banding studies and FISH analysis in the peripheral lymphocytes. One breakpoint on the del(5) maps distal to GDNF, and FISH analysis using an {alpha}-satellite probe suggests that the proximal breakpoint maps within the centromere. The dicentric r(5) consists of two copies of the segment deleted in the del(5), resulting in trisomy of proximal 5p (5p13-cen). The phenotype of the propositus is compared with other trisomy 5p cases and possible mechanisms for the generation of this unique chromosomal rearrangement are discussed. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E.

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A 54 Mb 11qter duplication and 0.9 Mb 1q44 deletion in a child with laryngomalacia and agenesis of corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Partial Trisomy 11q syndrome (or Duplication 11q) has defined clinical features and is documented as a rare syndrome by National Organization of Rare Disorders (NORD). Deletion 1q44 (or Monosomy 1q44) is a well-defined syndrome, but there is controversy about the genes lying in 1q44 region, responsible for agenesis of the corpus callosum. We report a female child with the rare Partial Trisomy 11q syndrome and Deletion 1q44 syndrome. The genomic imbalance in the proband was used for molecular characterization of the critical genes in 1q44 region for agenesis of corpus callosum. Some genes in 11q14q25 may be responsible for laryngomalacia. Results We report a female child with dysmorphic features, microcephaly, growth retardation, seizures, acyanotic heart disease, and hand and foot deformities. She had agenesis of corpus callosum, laryngomalacia, anterior ectopic anus, esophageal reflux and respiratory distress. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1. Her karyotype was 46,XX,der(1)t(1;11)(q44;q14)pat. The mother had a normal karyotype and the karyotype of the father was 46,XY,t(1;11)(q44;q14). SNP array analysis showed that the proband had a 54 Mb duplication of 11q14q25 and a 0.9 Mb deletion of the submicroscopic subtelomeric 1q44 region. Fluorescence Insitu Hybridisation confirmed the duplication of 11qter and deletion of 1qter. Conclusion Laryngomalacia or obstruction of the upper airway is the outcome of increased dosage of some genes due to Partial Trisomy 11q Syndrome. In association with other phenotypic features, agenesis of corpus callosum appears to be a landmark phenotype for Deletion 1q44 syndrome, the critical genes lying proximal to SMYD3 in 1q44 region. PMID:21936942

  2. Overlapping deletions spanning the proximal two-thirds of the mouse t complex

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, David E.; Bergstrom, Rebecca A.; Munroe, Robert J.; Lee, Barbara K.; Browning, Victoria L.; You, Yun; Eicher, Eva M.; Schimenti, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome deletion complexes in model organisms serve as valuable genetic tools for the functional and physical annotation of complex genomes. Among their many roles, deletions can serve as mapping tools for simple or quantitative trait loci (QTLs), genetic reagents for regional mutagenesis experiments, and, in the case of mice, models of human contiguous gene deletion syndromes. Deletions also are uniquely suited for identifying regions of the genome containing haploinsufficient or imprinted loci. Here we describe the creation of new deletions at the proximal end of mouse Chromosome (Chr) 17 by using the technique of ES cell irradiation and the extensive molecular characterization of these and previously isolated deletions that, in total, cover much of the mouse t complex. The deletions are arranged in five overlapping complexes that collectively span about 25 Mbp. Furthermore, we have integrated each of the deletion complexes with physical data from public and private mouse genome sequences, and our own genetic data, to resolve some discrepancies. These deletions will be useful for characterizing several phenomena related to the t complex and t haplotypes, including transmission ratio distortion, male infertility, and the collection of t haplotype embryonic lethal mutations. The deletions will also be useful for mapping other loci of interest on proximal Chr 17, including T-associated sex reversal (Tas) and head-tilt (het). The new deletions have thus far been used to localize the recently identified t haplolethal (Thl1) locus to an approximately 1.3-Mbp interval. PMID:14724736

  3. Deletion of chromosomal region 13q14.3 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cavé, H; Avet-Loiseau, H; Devaux, I; Rondeau, G; Boutard, P; Lebrun, E; Méchinaud, F; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    2001-03-01

    Deletion of the 13q14 chromosomal region is frequent in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and is believed to inactivate a tumor supressor gene (TSG) next to RB1. We studied microsatellite markers spanning the 13q14 chromosomal region in 138 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Allelic loss was demonstrated in six cases (4.3%). Deletion did not include RB1 in two cases. In five patients, the deleted region overlapped that described in B-CLL. A sixth patient harbored a smaller deletion, slightly more telomeric than minimal deleted regions reported in B-CLL. Apparent differences in the delineation of the minimal deleted region could be due to the fact that the putative TSG is a very large gene, with some deletions affecting only a part of it. Our present findings suggest that at least some of its exons lie within a region of less than 100 kb more telomeric that previously thought.

  4. Deletion pattern in the dystrophin gene in Turks and a comparison with Europeans and Indians.

    PubMed

    Onengüt, S; Kavaslar, G N; Battaloğlu, E; Serdaroğlu, P; Deymeer, F; Ozdemir, C; Calafell, F; Tolun, A

    2000-01-01

    Patterns of dystrophin gene deletions in DMD/BMD patients were compared in four populations: Turks (n = 146 deletions), Europeans (n = 838), North Indians (n = 89), and Indians from all over India (n = 103). Statistical tests revealed that there are differences in the proportions of small deletions. In contrast, the distribution of deletion breakpoints and the frequencies of specific deletions commonly observed in the four populations are not significantly different. The variations strongly suggest that sequence differences exist in the introns, and the differences are in agreement with genetic distances among populations. The similarities suggest that some intronic sequences have been conserved and that those will trigger recurrent deletions, since it is unlikely that gene flow would disperse the deleted chromosomes, which vanish from the gene pool in a few generations.

  5. Intragenic MBD5 familial deletion variant does not negatively impact MBD5 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Elsea, Sarah H

    2014-01-01

    2q23.1 deletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, speech impairment, seizures, disturbed sleep pattern, behavioral problems, and hypotonia. Core features of this syndrome are due to haploinsufficiency of MBD5. Deletions that include coding and noncoding exons show reduced MBD5 mRNA expression. We report a patient with a neurological and behavioral phenotype similar to 2q23.1 deletion syndrome with an inherited intronic deletion in the 5-prime untranslated region of MBD5. Our data show that this patient has normal MBD5 mRNA expression; therefore, this deletion is likely not causative for 2q23.1 deletion syndrome. Overall, it is important to validate intronic deletions for pathogenicity.

  6. Modeling a model: Mouse genetics, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, and disorders of cortical circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Alejandra; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Rothblat, Lawrence A.; LaMantia, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the developmental etiology of autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia remains a major challenge for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to these common, difficult-to-treat diseases that compromise neural circuits in the cerebral cortex. One aspect of this challenge is the breadth and overlap of ASD, ADHD, and SCZ deficits; another is the complexity of mutations associated with each, and a third is the difficulty of analyzing disrupted development in at-risk or affected human fetuses. The identification of distinct genetic syndromes that include behavioral deficits similar to those in ASD, ADHC and SCZ provides a critical starting point for meeting this challenge. We summarize clinical and behavioral impairments in children and adults with one such genetic syndrome, the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome, routinely called 22q11DS, caused by micro-deletions of between 1.5 and 3.0 MB on human chromosome 22. Among many syndromic features, including cardiovascular and craniofacial anomalies, 22q11DS patients have a high incidence of brain structural, functional, and behavioral deficits that reflect cerebral cortical dysfunction and fall within the spectrum that defines ASD, ADHD, and SCZ. We show that developmental pathogenesis underlying this apparent genetic “model” syndrome in patients can be defined and analyzed mechanistically using genomically accurate mouse models of the deletion that causes 22q11DS. We conclude that “modeling a model”, in this case 22q11DS as a model for idiopathic ASD, ADHD and SCZ, as well as other behavioral disorders like anxiety frequently seen in 22q11DS patients, in genetically engineered mice provides a foundation for understanding the causes and improving diagnosis and therapy for these disorders of cortical circuit development. PMID:25866365

  7. Deletional and regulatory mechanisms coalesce to drive transplantation tolerance through mixed chimerism.

    PubMed

    Hock, Karin; Mahr, Benedikt; Schwarz, Christoph; Wekerle, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Establishing donor-specific immunological tolerance could improve long-term outcome by obviating the need for immunosuppressive drug therapy, which is currently required to control alloreactivity after organ transplantation. Mixed chimerism is defined as the engraftment of donor hematopoietic stem cells in the recipient, leading to viable coexistence of both donor and recipient leukocytes. In numerous experimental models, cotransplantation of donor bone marrow (BM) into preconditioned (e.g., through irradiation or cytotoxic drugs) recipients leads to transplantation tolerance through (mixed) chimerism. Mixed chimerism offers immunological advantages for clinical translation; pilot trials have established proof of concept by deliberately inducing tolerance in humans. Widespread clinical application is prevented, however, by the harsh preconditioning currently necessary for permitting BM engraftment. Recently, the immunological mechanisms inducing and maintaining tolerance in experimental mixed chimerism have been defined, revealing a more prominent role for regulation than historically assumed. The evidence from murine models suggests that both deletional and regulatory mechanisms are critical in promoting complete tolerance, encompassing also the minor histocompatibility antigens. Here, we review the current understanding of tolerance through mixed chimerism and provide an outlook on how to realize widespread clinical translation based on mechanistic insights gained from chimerism protocols, including cell therapy with polyclonal regulatory T cells.

  8. Genomic deletion of CNGB3 is identical by descent in multiple canine breeds and causes achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the loss of cone photoreceptor function that results in day-blindness, total colorblindness, and decreased central visual acuity. The most common causes for the disease are mutations in the CNGB3 gene, coding for the beta subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in cones. CNGB3-achromatopsia, or cone degeneration (cd), is also known to occur in two canine breeds, the Alaskan malamute (AM) and the German shorthaired pointer. Results Here we report an in-depth characterization of the achromatopsia phenotype in a new canine breed, the miniature Australian shepherd (MAS). Genotyping revealed that the dog was homozygous for a complete genomic deletion of the CNGB3 gene, as has been previously observed in the AM. Identical breakpoints on chromosome 29 were identified in both the affected AM and MAS with a resulting deletion of 404,820 bp. Pooled DNA samples of unrelated purebred Australian shepherd, MAS, Siberian husky, Samoyed and Alaskan sled dogs were screened for the presence of the affected allele; one Siberian husky and three Alaskan sled dogs were identified as carriers. The affected chromosomes from the AM, MAS, and Siberian husky were genotyped for 147 SNPs in a 3.93 Mb interval within the cd locus. An identical shared affected haplotype, 0.5 Mb long, was observed in all three breeds and defined the minimal linkage disequilibrium (LD) across breeds. This supports the idea that the mutated allele was identical by descent (IBD). Conclusion We report the occurrence of CNGB3-achromatopsia in a new canine breed, the MAS. The CNGB3-deletion allele previously described in the AM was also observed in a homozygous state in the affected MAS, as well as in a heterozygous carrier state in a Siberian husky and Alaskan sled dogs. All affected alleles were shown to be IBD, strongly suggesting an affected founder effect. Since the MAS is not known to be genetically related to the AM, other

  9. 16 CFR 502.2 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 502.2 Section 502.2... FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING ACT Definitions § 502.2 Terms defined. As used in this part, unless the context otherwise specifically requires: (a) The terms Act, regulation or regulations, consumer...

  10. 16 CFR 304.1 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 304.1 Section 304.1... REGULATIONS UNDER THE HOBBY PROTECTION ACT § 304.1 Terms defined. (a) Act means the Hobby Protection Act... same meanings as such term has under the Federal Trade Commission Act. (c) Commission means the...

  11. 7 CFR 1230.100 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1230.100 Section 1230.100 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Definitions § 1230.100 Terms defined. As used throughout this subpart, unless the context otherwise requires, terms shall have the same meaning as the definition...

  12. 7 CFR 29.9201 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 29.9201 Section 29.9201 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Tobacco Produced and Marketed in a Quota Area Definitions § 29.9201 Terms defined. As used in this...

  13. 7 CFR 1280.401 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1280.401 Section 1280.401 Agriculture... INFORMATION ORDER Rules and Regulations § 1280.401 Terms defined. As used throughout this subpart, unless the context otherwise requires, terms shall have the same meaning as the definition of such terms in subpart...

  14. 16 CFR 1608.1 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1608.1 Section 1608.1... REGULATIONS UNDER THE FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT § 1608.1 Terms defined. As used in the rules and regulations in this subchapter D, unless the context otherwise specifically requires: (a) The term act means...

  15. 7 CFR 1280.601 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1280.601 Section 1280.601 Agriculture... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.601 Terms defined. As used throughout this subpart, unless the context otherwise requires, terms shall have the same meaning as...

  16. 7 CFR 29.12 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 29.12 Section 29.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.12 Terms defined. As used in this subpart and in all...

  17. 16 CFR 300.1 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 300.1 Section 300.1... REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Definitions § 300.1 Terms defined. (a) The term Act... terms rule, rules, regulations and rules and regulations mean the rules and regulations prescribed...

  18. 7 CFR 1260.301 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 1260.301 Section 1260.301 Agriculture... and Regulations § 1260.301 Terms defined. As used throughout this subpart, unless the context otherwise requires, terms shall have the same meaning as the definition of such terms as appears in...

  19. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  20. 47 CFR 54.401 - Lifeline defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifeline defined. 54.401 Section 54.401 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Low-Income Consumers § 54.401 Lifeline defined. (a) As used in this subpart, Lifeline means...

  1. 16 CFR 304.1 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Terms defined. 304.1 Section 304.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE HOBBY PROTECTION ACT § 304.1 Terms defined. (a) Act means the Hobby Protection Act (approved November 29, 1973; Pub. L. 93-167, 87...

  2. 9 CFR 592.2 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms defined. 592.2 Section 592.2 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF EGG PRODUCTS Definitions § 592.2 Terms defined. For the purpose of...

  3. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  4. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  5. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  6. Consistent SMARCB1 Homozygous Deletions in Epithelioid Sarcoma and in a Subset of Myoepithelial Carcinomas can be Reliably Detected by FISH in Archival Material

    PubMed Central

    Le Loarer, Francois; Zhang, Lei; Fletcher, Christopher D; Ribeiro, Agnes; Singer, Samuel; Italiano, Antoine; Neuville, Agnes; Houlier, Aurélie; Chibon, Frederic; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid sarcomas (ES) are mesenchymal neoplasms subclassified into distal and proximal subtypes based on their distinct clinical presentations and histologic features. Consistent loss of SMARCB1 nuclear expression has been considered as the hallmark abnormality for both subtypes, a feature shared with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of infancy (ATRT). While virtually all ATRTs harbor underlying SMARCB1 somatic or germline alterations, mechanisms of SMARCB1 inactivation in ES are less well defined. To further define mechanisms of SMARCB1 inactivation a detailed molecular analysis was performed on 40 ES (25 proximal and 15 distal ES, with classic morphology and negative SMARCB1 expression) for their genomic status of SMARCB1 and related genes encoding the SWI/SNF subunits (PBRM1, BRG1, BRM, SMARCC1/2 and ARID1A) by FISH using custom BAC probes. An additional control group was included spanning a variety of 41 soft tissue neoplasms with either rhabdoid/epithelioid features or selected histotypes previously shown to lack SMARCB1 by IHC. Furthermore, 12 ES were studied by array CGH (aCGH) and an independent TMA containing 50 additional ES cases was screened for Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) and cyclin D1 immunoexpression. Homozygous SMARCB1 deletions were found by FISH in 36/40 ES (21/25 proximal-type). One of the distal-type ES displayed homozygous SMARCB1 deletion in the tumor cells, along with a heterozygous deletion within normal tissue, finding confirmed by array CGH. None of the proximal ES lacking homozygous SMARCB1 deletions displayed alterations in other SWI/SNF subunits gene members. Among controls, only the SMARCB1-immunonegative myoepithelial carcinomas displayed SMARCB1 homozygous deletions in 3/5 cases, while no gene specific abnormalities were seen among all other histologic subtypes of sarcomas tested regardless of the SMARCB1 protein status. There was no consistent pattern of AURKA and Cyclin D1 expression. The array CGH was successful in 9/12 ES

  7. Ped gene deletion polymorphism frequency in wild mice.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Judith A; Sacher, Frank; Jones, Gwilym S; Warner, Carol M

    2002-07-01

    The Ped gene influences the rate of cleavage of preimplantation embryos and their subsequent survival. Embryos that express the product of the Ped gene, Qa-2 protein, cleave at a faster rate than embryos with an absence of Qa-2 protein. In addition, the Ped gene has pleiotropic effects on reproduction. Thus, there is a reproductive advantage to those mouse strains that are Qa-2 positive. The presence or absence of Qa-2 is reflected at the DNA level by the presence or absence (deletion polymorphism) of the gene(s) encoding Qa-2 protein. Many inbred and wild-derived mouse strains have been characterized as Qa-2 positive or negative, but no previous studies have looked at the distribution of the Ped gene in a population of free-living wild mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the Ped gene deletion polymorphism frequency in a sample of free-living wild mice. Twenty-nine mice were collected and identified as Mus musculus. Genomic DNA extraction was performed on tail tips, and PCR was used to amplify a region from the Ped gene. Known Qa-2 positive and negative mice were used as controls. Results showed that all 29 wild mice were positive for the Ped gene. Since the Ped gene is dominant and provides a reproductive advantage, it is not surprising that all of the wild mice were Qa-2 positive. However, our assay could not distinguish homozygous from heterozygous mice. It is possible that the Qa-2 deletion polymorphism is segregating in the population, and a larger sample size would identify some Qa-2 negative mice. PMID:12115912

  8. Partial deletion of stem-loop 2 in the 3' untranslated region of foot-and-mouth disease virus identifies a region that is dispensable for virus replication.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-08-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome plays an essential role in virus replication, but the properties of the 3' UTR are not completely defined. In order to determine the role of different regions of the 3' UTR in FMDV replication, we conducted site-directed mutagenesis of the 3' UTR of FMDV serotype O IND R2/1975 using a cDNA clone. Through independent serial deletions in various regions of the 3' UTR, we demonstrated that deletion of nucleotides between the stem-loop (SL) structures and in the beginning and the end regions of the SL2 structure could be lethal for FMDV replication. However, a block deletion of 20 nucleotides (nt 60 to 79) in the middle of SL2 did not affect the viability of FMDV in cultured cells. Characterisation of the deletion mutant virus (O(R2/1975-Δ3'UTR 60-79)) revealed no significant difference in growth kinetics or RNA replication ability compared to the parental virus. However, the mutant virus produced slightly larger plaques when compared to the parental virus. This is the first description of a dispensable 20-nucleotide region in SL2 of the FMDV 3' UTR. PMID:27233801

  9. A Hunter Patient with a Severe Phenotype Reveals Two Large Deletions and Two Duplications Extending 1.2 Mb Distally to IDS Locus.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Alessandra; Tomanin, Rosella; Rampazzo, Angelica; Rigon, Chiara; Gasparotto, Nicoletta; Cassina, Matteo; Clementi, Maurizio; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome, MPS II) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficit of iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme involved in the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) degradation. We here report the case of a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with an extremely severe form of MPS II at 10 months of age. Sequencing of the IDS gene revealed the deletion of exons 1-7, extending distally and removing the entire pseudogene IDSP1. The difficulty to define the boundaries of the deletion and the particular severity of the patient phenotype suggested to verify the presence of pathological copy number variations (CNVs) in the genome, by the array CGH (aCGH) technology. The examination revealed the presence of two deletions alternate with two duplications, overall affecting a region of about 1.2 Mb distally to IDS gene. This is the first complex rearrangement involving IDS and extending to a large region located distally to it described in a severe Hunter patient, as evidenced by the CNVs databases interrogated. The analysis of the genes involved in the rearrangement and of the disorders correlated with them did not help to clarify the phenotype observed in our patient, except for the deletion of the IDS gene, which explains per se the Hunter phenotype. However, this cannot exclude a potential "contiguous gene syndrome" as well as the future rising of additional pathological symptoms associated with the other extra genes involved in the identified rearrangement.

  10. Successful fertilization, embryo development, and pregnancy in human in vitro fertilization (IVF) using a chemically defined culture medium containing no protein.

    PubMed

    Caro, C M; Trounson, A

    1986-08-01

    A randomized control trial involving the fertilization and culture of human embryos in culture medium (T6) containing either 10% maternal serum or no protein or amino acid supplement was carried out to assess the effect of deletion from culture of all fixed nitrogen on fertilization, embryo development, and embryo viability. There was no difference in fertilization rates (68 vs 69%), development of apparently normal embryos (96 vs 97%), pregnancy rate (18 vs 14%), or birth rate (13 vs 11%) between protein-containing and protein-free media. Deletion of protein from the culture medium may enable the constitution of more appropriate and defined culture media for human in vitro fertilization (IVF).

  11. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder.

  12. Radial aplasia and chromosome 22q11 deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Marino, B; Guadagni, A M; Orzalesi, M; Dallapiccola, B

    1997-01-01

    We report on a neonate with deletion 22q11 (del22q11) presenting with facial dysmorphism, ocular coloboma, congenital heart defect, urogenital malformations, and unilateral radial aplasia. This malformation complex includes features frequently occurring in velocardiofacial syndrome as well as findings described in the CHARGE and VACTERL associations. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of radial aplasia in del22q11. This observation further supports and extends the clinical variability of del22q11. Images PMID:9391893

  13. Levodopa response in Parkinsonism with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Robert A; Churchyard, Andrew; Dahl, Henrik H; Hutchison, Wendy M; Kirby, Denise M; Thyagarajan, Dominic

    2007-05-15

    We report a patient with an autosomal dominant chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia phenotype associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle from a family in which linkage analysis excluded mutations in DNA polymerase gamma (POLG), adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT-1) or C10orf2 (Twinkle). She presented with prominent Parkinsonism characterized by prolonged benefit from levodopa (L-dopa) and the later development of L-dopa induced dyskinesias and motor fluctuations. Thus L-dopa responsiveness, L-dopa induced dyskinesias and motor fluctuations may also occur in atypical Parkinsonism of mitochondrial disease, just as they may in multiple system atrophy. PMID:17357142

  14. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  15. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  16. Geometric figure-ground cues override standard depth from accretion-deletion.

    PubMed

    Tanrikulu, Ömer Daglar; Froyen, Vicky; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Accretion-deletion is widely considered a decisive cue to surface depth ordering, with the accreting or deleting surface interpreted as behind an adjoining surface. However, Froyen, Feldman, and Singh (2013) have shown that when accretion-deletion occurs on both sides of a contour, accreting-deleting regions can also be perceived as in front and as self-occluding due to rotation in three dimensions. In this study we ask whether geometric figure-ground cues can override the traditional "depth from accretion-deletion" interpretation even when accretion-deletion takes place only on one side of a contour. We used two tasks: a relative-depth task (front/back), and a motion-classification task (translation/rotation). We conducted two experiments, in which texture in only one set of alternating regions was moving; the other set was static. Contrary to the traditional interpretation of accretion-deletion, the moving convex and symmetric regions were perceived as figural and rotating in three dimensions in roughly half of the trials. In the second experiment, giving different motion directions to the moving regions (thereby weakening motion-based grouping) further weakened the traditional accretion-deletion interpretation. Our results show that the standard "depth from accretion-deletion" interpretation is overridden by static geometric cues to figure-ground. Overall, the results demonstrate a rich interaction between accretion-deletion, figure-ground, and structure from motion that is not captured by existing models of depth from motion.

  17. Intragenic ERG Deletions Do Not Explain the Biology of ERG-Related Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Potuckova, Eliska; Zuna, Jan; Hovorkova, Lenka; Starkova, Julia; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan; Zaliova, Marketa

    2016-01-01

    Intragenic ERG deletions occur in 3–5% of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, specifically in B-other subtype lacking the classifying genetic lesions. They represent the only genetic lesion described so far present in the majority of cases clustering into a subgroup of B-other subtype characterized by a unique gene expression profile, probably sharing a common, however, not yet fully described, biological background. We aimed to elucidate whether ERG deletions could drive the specific biology of this ERG-related leukemia subgroup through expression of aberrant or decreased expression of wild type ERG isoforms. We showed that leukemic cells with endogenous ERG deletion express an aberrant transcript translated into two proteins in transfected cell lines and that one of these proteins colocalizes with wild type ERG. However, we did not confirm expression of the proteins in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with endogenous ERG deletion. ERG deletions resulted in significantly lower expression of wild type ERG transcripts compared to B-other cases without ERG deletion. However, cases with subclonal ERG deletion, clustering to the same ERG deletion associated subgroup, presented similar levels of wild type ERG as cases without ERG deletion. In conclusion, our data suggest that neither the expression of aberrant proteins from internally deleted allele nor the reduced expression of wild type ERG seem to provide a plausible explanation of the specific biology of ERG -related leukemia subgroup. PMID:27494621

  18. Novel large-range mitochondrial DNA deletions and fatal multisystemic disorder with prominent hepatopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Marzia; Rizza, Teresa; Verrigni, Daniela; Martinelli, Diego; Tozzi, Giulia; Torraco, Alessandra; Piemonte, Fiorella; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Nobili, Valerio; Francalanci, Paola; Boldrini, Renata; Callea, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; and others

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expanded array of mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pearson syndrome with prominent hepatopathy associated with single mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of deletions in fibroblasts and blood avoids muscle and liver biopsy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Look for mtDNA deletions before to study nuclear genes related to mtDNA depletion. -- Abstract: Hepatic involvement in mitochondrial cytopathies rarely manifests in adulthood, but is a common feature in children. Multiple OXPHOS enzyme defects in children with liver involvement are often associated with dramatically reduced amounts of mtDNA. We investigated two novel large scale deletions in two infants with a multisystem disorder and prominent hepatopathy. Amount of mtDNA deletions and protein content were measured in different post-mortem tissues. The highest levels of deleted mtDNA were in liver, kidney, pancreas of both patients. Moreover, mtDNA deletions were detected in cultured skin fibroblasts in both patients and in blood of one during life. Biochemical analysis showed impairment of mainly complex I enzyme activity. Patients manifesting multisystem disorders in childhood may harbour rare mtDNA deletions in multiple tissues. For these patients, less invasive blood specimens or cultured fibroblasts can be used for molecular diagnosis. Our data further expand the array of deletions in the mitochondrial genomes in association with liver failure. Thus analysis of mtDNA should be considered in the diagnosis of childhood-onset hepatopathies.

  19. De novo proximal interstitial deletions of 14q: Cytogenetic and molecular investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, S.K.; Anderson, K.L.; Orr-Urtregar, A.; Craigen, W.J.; Lupski, J.R.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    We report on 2 unrelated patients who had chromosome analysis performed because of psychomotor delay, failure to thrive, and minor anomalies. Each patient had a novel proximal 14q deletion (q11.2 to q21.1 in patient 737 and q12 to q22 in patient 777). Polymorphic (C-A){sub n} microsatellite markers distributed along the length of chromosome 14q were examined in both patients and their parents in order to determine which marker loci were deleted. The deletion in patient 737 was found to be paternal in origin, based on the analysis of 2 marker loci (D14S54 and D14S70), thus assigning these loci to the deleted interval q11.2 q21.1. Furthermore, 3 loci were not deleted (TCRD, D14S50, and D14S80), suggesting that they are within or proximal to 14q11.2. In the other family (patient 777), none of the markers were fully informative, but the deleted chromosome was determined to be paternally derived based on cytogenetic heteromorphisms. Despite having overlapping proximal 14q deletions, these 2 patients shared few phenotypic similarities except for failure to thrive, micrognathia, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Therefore, a distinct proximal 14q deletion syndrome is not yet apparent. However, the molecular analyses facilitated the localization of several 14q DNA markers to the deletion regions in these 2 patients, while excluding other markers from each deletion. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  20. 16 CFR 1611.31 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations § 1611.31 Terms defined. As used in this part, unless... pile, nap, or tufting. (i) The term film means any nonrigid, unsupported plastic, rubber or...

  1. Defining of the BDX930 Assembly Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R. S.; Moore, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A definition of the BDX930 assembly language is presented. Various definition problems and suggested solutions are included. A class of defined recognizers based on boolean valued nowrecursive functions is employed in preprocessing.

  2. Application-Defined Decentralized Access Control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Dunn, Alan M; Hofmann, Owen S; Lee, Michael Z; Mehdi, Syed Akbar; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    DCAC is a practical OS-level access control system that supports application-defined principals. It allows normal users to perform administrative operations within their privilege, enabling isolation and privilege separation for applications. It does not require centralized policy specification or management, giving applications freedom to manage their principals while the policies are still enforced by the OS. DCAC uses hierarchically-named attributes as a generic framework for user-defined policies such as groups defined by normal users. For both local and networked file systems, its execution time overhead is between 0%-9% on file system microbenchmarks, and under 1% on applications. This paper shows the design and implementation of DCAC, as well as several real-world use cases, including sandboxing applications, enforcing server applications' security policies, supporting NFS, and authenticating user-defined sub-principals in SSH, all with minimal code changes.

  3. 7 CFR 28.950 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Fiber and Processing Tests Definitions § 28.950 Terms defined. As used... Division to whom authority has been delegated to act for the Director. (f) Laboratories. Laboratories...

  4. 7 CFR 28.950 - Terms defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Fiber and Processing Tests Definitions § 28.950 Terms defined. As used... Division to whom authority has been delegated to act for the Director. (f) Laboratories. Laboratories...

  5. 20 CFR 725.703 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... scope of their practices as defined by State law. No treatment or medical services performed by any other practitioner of the healing arts is authorized by this part, unless such treatment or service...

  6. Behaviourally Defined Objectives: A Critique. Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    This is the concluding part of an article published in the August 1983 edition. A number of arguments are developed to demonstrate the inadequacy of behaviorally defined objectives as a basis for curriculum planning. (SSH)

  7. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  8. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  9. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  10. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  11. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  12. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Defining Dimensions and Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder associated with the presence of social-communication deficits and restricted and repetitive behaviors. In the latest conceptualization of ASD, these two behavioral dimensions represent the core defining features of ASD, whereas associated dimensions, such as intellectual and language ability, provide a means for describing the ASD heterogeneity. In addition, the characterization of ASD subgroups, defined by the presence of known medical, genetic, or other psychiatric disorders, furthers our understanding of ASD heterogeneity. This paper reviews the history of autism, describes its core defining features, and provides an overview of the clinically and etiologically relevant subgroups that add to the complexity of this condition. PMID:25072016

  13. Application-Defined Decentralized Access Control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Dunn, Alan M.; Hofmann, Owen S.; Lee, Michael Z.; Mehdi, Syed Akbar; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    DCAC is a practical OS-level access control system that supports application-defined principals. It allows normal users to perform administrative operations within their privilege, enabling isolation and privilege separation for applications. It does not require centralized policy specification or management, giving applications freedom to manage their principals while the policies are still enforced by the OS. DCAC uses hierarchically-named attributes as a generic framework for user-defined policies such as groups defined by normal users. For both local and networked file systems, its execution time overhead is between 0%–9% on file system microbenchmarks, and under 1% on applications. This paper shows the design and implementation of DCAC, as well as several real-world use cases, including sandboxing applications, enforcing server applications’ security policies, supporting NFS, and authenticating user-defined sub-principals in SSH, all with minimal code changes. PMID:25426493

  14. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M.

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Association between Genetic Subgroups of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Defined by High Density 500 K SNP-Arrays and Tumor Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Laura; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luís; Abad, María del Mar; Bengoechea, Oscar; González-González, María

    2011-01-01

    The specific genes and genetic pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are still largely unknown partially due to the low resolution of the techniques applied so far to their study. Here we used high-density 500 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays to define those chromosomal regions which most commonly harbour copy number (CN) alterations and loss of heterozygozity (LOH) in a series of 20 PDAC tumors and we correlated the corresponding genetic profiles with the most relevant clinical and histopathological features of the disease. Overall our results showed that primary PDAC frequently display (>70%) extensive gains of chromosomes 1q, 7q, 8q and 20q, together with losses of chromosomes 1p, 9p, 12q, 17p and 18q, such chromosomal regions harboring multiple cancer- and PDAC-associated genes. Interestingly, these alterations clustered into two distinct genetic profiles characterized by gains of the 2q14.2, 3q22.1, 5q32, 10q26.13, 10q26.3, 11q13.1, 11q13.3, 11q13.4, 16q24.1, 16q24.3, 22q13.1, 22q13.31 and 22q13.32 chromosomal regions (group 1; n = 9) versus gains at 1q21.1 and losses of the 1p36.11, 6q25.2, 9p22.1, 9p24.3, 17p13.3 and Xp22.33 chromosomal regions (group 2; n = 11). From the clinical and histopathological point of view, group 1 cases were associated with smaller and well/moderately-differentiated grade I/II PDAC tumors, whereas and group 2 PDAC displayed a larger size and they mainly consisted of poorly-differentiated grade III carcinomas. These findings confirm the cytogenetic complexity and heterogenity of PDAC and provide evidence for the association between tumor cytogenetics and its histopathological features. In addition, we also show that the altered regions identified harbor multiple cancer associate genes that deserve further investigation to determine their relevance in the pathogenesis of PDAC. PMID:21811587

  16. 22q11 Deletion Syndrome: A Genetic Subtype of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Chow, Eva W.C.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is likely to be caused by several susceptibility genes and may have environmental factors that interact with susceptibility genes and/or nongenetic causes. Recent evidence supports the likelihood that 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22qDS) represents an identifiable genetic subtype of schizophrenia. 22qDS is an under-recognized genetic syndrome associated with microdeletions on chromosome 22 and a variable expression that often includes mild congenital dysmorphic features, hypernasal speech, and learning difficulties. Initial evidence indicates that a minority of patients with schizophrenia (~2%) may have 22qDS and that prevalence may be somewhat higher in subpopulations with developmental delay. This paper proposes clinical criteria (including facial features, learning disabilities, hypernasal speech, congenital heart defects and other congenital anomalies) to aid in identifying patients with schizophrenia who may have this subtype and outlines features that may increase the index of suspicion for this syndrome. Although no specific causal gene or genes have yet been identified in the deletion region, 22qDS may represent a more homogeneous subtype of schizophrenia. This subtype may serve as a model for neurodevelopmental origins of schizophrenia that could aid in delineating etiologic and pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:10509171

  17. Systematic discovery of complex insertions and deletions in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Wang, Jiayin; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; McMichael, Joshua F; Ning, Jie; McLellan, Michael D; Xie, Mingchao; Cao, Song; Yellapantula, Venkata; Huang, Kuan-lin; Scott, Adam; Foltz, Steven; Niu, Beifang; Johnson, Kimberly J; Moed, Matthijs; Slagboom, P Eline; Chen, Feng; Wendl, Michael C; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    Complex insertions and deletions (indels) are formed by simultaneously deleting and inserting DNA fragments of different sizes at a common genomic location. Here we present a systematic analysis of somatic complex indels in the coding sequences of samples from over 8,000 cancer cases using Pindel-C. We discovered 285 complex indels in cancer-associated genes (such as PIK3R1, TP53, ARID1A, GATA3 and KMT2D) in approximately 3.5% of cases analyzed; nearly all instances of complex indels were overlooked (81.1%) or misannotated (17.6%) in previous reports of 2,199 samples. In-frame complex indels are enriched in PIK3R1 and EGFR, whereas frameshifts are prevalent in VHL, GATA3, TP53, ARID1A, PTEN and ATRX. Furthermore, complex indels display strong tissue specificity (such as VHL in kidney cancer samples and GATA3 in breast cancer samples). Finally, structural analyses support findings of previously missed, but potentially druggable, mutations in the EGFR, MET and KIT oncogenes. This study indicates the critical importance of improving complex indel discovery and interpretation in medical research. PMID:26657142

  18. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. ); Shokeir, M. )

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  19. AML1 deletion in adult mice causes splenomegaly and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Putz, G; Rosner, A; Nuesslein, I; Schmitz, N; Buchholz, F

    2006-02-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) encodes a DNA-binding subunit of the CBF transcription factor family and is required for the establishment of definitive hematopoiesis. AML1 is one of the most frequently mutated genes associated with human acute leukemia, suggesting that genetic alterations of the gene contribute to leukemogenesis. Here, we report the analysis of mice carrying conditional AML1 knockout alleles that were inactivated using the Cre/loxP system. AML1 was deleted in adult mice by inducing Cre activity to replicate AML1 deletions found in human MDS, familial platelet disorder and rare de novo human AML. At a latency of 2 months after induction, the thymus was reduced in size and frequently populated by immature double negative thymocytes, indicating defective T-lymphocyte maturation, resulting in lymphatic diseases with 50% penetrance, including atypical hyperplasia and thymic lymphoma. Metastatic lymphomas to the liver and the meninges were observed. Mice also developed splenomegaly with an expansion of the myeloid compartment. Increased Howell-Jolly body counts indicated splenic hypofunction. Thrombocytopenia occurred due to immaturity of mini-megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. Together with mild lymphocytopenia in the peripheral blood and increased fractions of immature cells in the bone marrow, AML1 deficient mice display features of a myelodysplastic syndrome, suggesting a preleukemic state.

  20. Activation Mechanism of Oncogenic Deletion Mutations in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2.

    PubMed

    Foster, Scott A; Whalen, Daniel M; Özen, Ayşegül; Wongchenko, Matthew J; Yin, JianPing; Yen, Ivana; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mayfield, John D; Chmielecki, Juliann; Stephens, Philip J; Albacker, Lee A; Yan, Yibing; Song, Kyung; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Eigenbrot, Charles; Yu, Christine; Shaw, Andrey S; Manning, Gerard; Skelton, Nicholas J; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Malek, Shiva

    2016-04-11

    Activating mutations in protein kinases drive many cancers. While how recurring point mutations affect kinase activity has been described, the effect of in-frame deletions is not well understood. We show that oncogenic deletions within the β3-αC loop of HER2 and BRAF are analogous to the recurrent EGFR exon 19 deletions. We identify pancreatic carcinomas with BRAF deletions mutually exclusive with KRAS mutations. Crystal structures of BRAF deletions reveal the truncated loop restrains αC in an active "in" conformation, imparting resistance to inhibitors like vemurafenib that bind the αC "out" conformation. Characterization of loop length explains the prevalence of five amino acid deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 and highlights the importance of this region for kinase activity and inhibitor efficacy. PMID:26996308