Science.gov

Sample records for 1s core level

  1. O 1s core-level shifts at the anatase TiO2(101)/N3 photovoltaic interface: Signature of H-bonded supramolecular assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2011-08-01

    We here report an atomic-scale first-principles investigation of the O 1s core-level shifts at the interface between TiO2 and the dye N3 found in dye-sensitized solar cells. We first perform extensive validation of our computational setup in the case of small molecules containing carboxylic acid groups in the gas phase. Then we calculate the O 1s core-level shifts for a variety of atomistic models of the TiO2/N3 interface. We investigate in detail the effects of water contamination, dye packing density, exchange and correlation functionals, and hydrogen-bonding interactions on the calculated core-level spectra. The quantitative comparison between our calculated core-level shifts and measured photoemission spectra [Johansson , J. Phys. Chem. BJPCBFK1520-610610.1021/jp0525282 109, 22256 (2005)] leads us to propose a new atomic-scale model of the TiO2/N3 interface, where the dyes are arranged in supramolecular H-bonded assemblies. Our interface models describe dry TiO2/N3 films as in [Johansson , J. Phys. Chem. BJPCBFK1520-610610.1021/jp0525282 109, 22256 (2005)], and are of direct relevance to solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Our present work suggests that the adsorption energetics is not a reliable indicator of the quality of an interface model, and highlights the importance of combining experimental and computational spectroscopy for determining the atomic-scale structure of nanostructured solar cell interfaces.

  2. 1S core-level spectroscopy of graphite: The effects of phonons on emission and absorption and validity of the final-state rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, C. P.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Zutavern, F. J.; Aton, T.; Cafolla, T.; Carson, R. D.

    1985-04-01

    We have used both electron-induced soft x-ray emission and fast inelastic electron scattering to observe 1S core-level emission and absorption in graphite near threshold. Linear phonon coupling with partial relaxation is found to quantitatively explain the absorption linewidth, the emission broadening, and the unusually large difference between emission and absorption threshold energies (Stokes shift). Both emission and absorption line shapes quantitatively obey the final-state rule, which asserts that the best single-particle potential describing these many electron processes is the final-state potential.

  3. The C1s core line in irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giorgio; Minati, Luca; Anderle, Mariano

    2007-08-15

    Recently, plasma deposited amorphous carbon films have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at correlating their electronic, structural, and mechanical properties to growth parameters. To investigate these properties, different spectral parameters reflecting the electronic structure of carbon-based materials are proposed in literature. The effects of various electronic configurations on the carbon photoelectron spectra are analyzed here with particular attention to C1s core line with the aim to better interpret its structure. The latter is commonly fitted under the assumption that it can be described by using just two spectral components related to sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybrids. Their relative intensities are then used to estimate the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases. We show that, in the presence of an amorphous network, the C1s line shape is the result of a more complex mixture of electronic states. Ar{sup +} irradiated graphite and successive oxidation was used to identify spectral features to better describe the C1s line shape.

  4. Reverse-engineering the atomic-scale structure of the TiO2/N3 interface in dye-sensitized solar cells using O1s core-level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher; Giustino, Feliciano

    2011-03-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells employing mesoporous titania films sensitized with ruthenium-based dyes have shown consistently good performance over the past two decades. Understanding the process of charge injection in these devices requires accurate atomistic models of the interface between the light-absorbing dye and the semiconducting substrate. Despite considerable efforts devoted to the experimental and theoretical investigation of such interfaces, their atomistic nature remains controversial. In this work we pursue a novel computational approach to the study of the semiconductor/dye interface which does not rely on the calculated adsorption energies. In our approach we reverse-engineer photoemission data through the first-principles calculation of O1s core-level spectra for a number of candidate interface models. Our calculations allow us to discard some of the adsorption geometries previously proposed and point to an interface model which reconciles conflicting assignments based either on photoemission or infrared data.

  5. Core localization and {sigma}* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kivimaeki, Antti; Sorensen, Stacey L.; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO{sub 2} molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking {sigma}* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the {sigma}* valence orbital.

  6. Core localization and sigma* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Kivimäki, Antti; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo; Sorensen, Stacey L

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO(2) molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking sigma* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the sigma* valence orbital. PMID:18361575

  7. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  8. Isotope shift of the 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0}-1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0} level splitting in heavy He-like ions: Implications for atomic parity-nonconservation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Fabrizio; Artemyev, Anton; Surzhykov, Andrey; Stoehlker, Thomas

    2010-06-15

    Heavy He-like ions are considered to be promising candidates for atomic parity-nonconservation (PNC) studies, thanks to their relatively simple atomic structure and the significant mixing between the almost degenerate (for the atomic numbers Z{approx}64 and Z{approx}91) opposite-parity levels 1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0} and 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0}. A number of experiments exploiting this level mixing have been proposed, and their implementation requires a precise knowledge of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 0}-2 {sup 1}S{sub 0} energy splitting for different nuclear charges and isotopes. In this paper we performed a theoretical analysis of the level splitting, employing the relativistic many-body perturbation theory and including QED corrections for all isotopes in the intervals 54{<=}Z{<=}71 and 86{<=}Z{<=}93. Possible candidates for future experimental PNC studies are discussed.

  9. Final-state symmetry of Na 1s core-shell excitons in NaCl and NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, K.P.; Seidler, G.T.; Shirley, E.L.; Fister, T.T.; Bradley, J.A.; Brown, F.C.

    2009-08-13

    We report measurements of the Na 1s contribution to the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from NaCl and NaF. Prior x-ray absorption studies have observed two pre-edge excitons in both materials. The momentum-transfer dependence (q dependence) of the measured NRIXS cross section and of real-space full multiple scattering and Bethe-Salpeter calculations determine that the higher-energy core excitons are s type for each material. The lower-energy core excitons contribute at most weakly to the NRIXS signal and we propose that these may be surface core excitons, as have been observed in several other alkali halides. The analysis of the orbital angular momentum of these features leads to a discussion of the limited sensitivity of NRIXS measurements to d-type final states when investigating 1s initial states. In this case the s- and p-type final density of states can be characterized by measurements at a small number of momentum transfers. This is in contrast to the case of more complex initial states for which measurements at a large number of momentum transfers are needed to separate the rich admixture of accessible and contributing final-state symmetries.

  10. Final-state symmetry of Na 1s core-shell excitons in NaCl and NaF.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, K. P.; Seidler, G. T.; Shirley, E. L.; Fister, T. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Brown, F. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Washington; NIST

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the Na 1s contribution to the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from NaCl and NaF. Prior x-ray absorption studies have observed two pre-edge excitons in both materials. The momentum-transfer dependence (q dependence) of the measured NRIXS cross section and of real-space full multiple scattering and Bethe-Salpeter calculations determine that the higher-energy core excitons are s type for each material. The lower-energy core excitons contribute at most weakly to the NRIXS signal and we propose that these may be surface core excitons, as have been observed in several other alkali halides. The analysis of the orbital angular momentum of these features leads to a discussion of the limited sensitivity of NRIXS measurements to d-type final states when investigating 1s initial states. In this case the s- and p-type final density of states can be characterized by measurements at a small number of momentum transfers. This is in contrast to the case of more complex initial states for which measurements at a large number of momentum transfers are needed to separate the rich admixture of accessible and contributing final-state symmetries.

  11. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  12. Beam-foil spectroscopical study of the 1s2s2p and 1s2p 2 quartet levels of Mg 9+ and Al 10+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, H.; Träbert, E.

    1985-07-01

    Results of recent measurements of the fine structure and multiplet separation of the lowest quartet terms of doubly excited three-electron ions of Mg and Al are compared with other experiments and with theory. Preliminary results of lifetime measurements of 1s2p 24P 1/2.3/2 levels are presented. They confirm the recent calculation by Chen. Crasemann and Mark and contradict older calculations by Tunnell and Bhalla.

  13. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of photoelectron spectra: the carbon 1s core-electron binding energies of ethanol-water solutions.

    PubMed

    Löytynoja, T; Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Vahtras, O; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2014-11-20

    Using ethanol-water solutions as illustration, we demonstrate the capability of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) paradigm to simulate core photoelectron spectroscopy: the binding energies and the chemical shifts. An integrated approach with QM/MM binding energy calculations coupled to preceding molecular dynamics sampling is adopted to generate binding energies averaged over the solute-solvent configurations available at a particular temperature and pressure and thus allowing for a statistical assessment with confidence levels for the final binding energies. The results are analyzed in terms of the contributions in the molecular mechanics model-electrostatic, polarization, and van der Waals-with atom or bond granulation of the corresponding MM charge and polarizability force-fields. The role of extramolecular charge transfer screening of the core-hole and explicit hydrogen bonding is studied by extending the QM core to cover the first solvation shell. The results are compared to those obtained from pure electrostatic and polarizable continuum models. Particularly, the dependence of the carbon 1s binding energies with respect to the ethanol concentration is studied. Our results indicate that QM/MM can be used as an all-encompassing model to study photoelectron binding energies and chemical shifts in solvent environments.

  14. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn-Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone-Thrower-Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature.

  15. Chiral asymmetry in the angle-resolved O and C 1s-1 core photoemissions of the R enantiomer of glycidol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powis, Ivan; Harding, Chris J.; Barth, Silko; Joshi, Sanjeev; Ulrich, Volker; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2008-11-01

    We present measurements of a photoelectron circular dichroism in photoionization from O and C 1s core levels, of the R enantiomer of glycidol (C3H6O2) in the gas phase. This dichroism emerges from a forward-backward asymmetry in the angular distribution of electrons created on ionization with circularly polarized synchrotron radiation and is already fully present in the pure electric dipole approximation. Asymmetry factors obtained for the core levels in this study range up to a few percent, but it is likely that these values are limited by a failure to resolve photoemission from individual atomic sites. Theoretical modeling is provided to examine possible differences between these alternative atomic photoemission sites, and between different conformational structures of glycidol. The calculated chiral angular distribution parameters that support the circular dichroism display a much enhanced sensitivity to the molecular conformation compared to the conventional photoionization cross section and the β parameter. Likely conformer structures can be suggested after comparison with the experiment.

  16. Tetrapeptide unfolding dynamics followed by core-level spectroscopy: a first-principles approach.

    PubMed

    Taioli, Simone; Simonucci, Stefano; A Beccara, Silvio; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-05-01

    In this work we demonstrate that core level analysis is a powerful tool for disentangling the dynamics of a model polypeptide undergoing conformational changes in solution and disulphide bond formation. In particular, we present computer simulations within both initial and final state approximations of 1s sulphur core level shifts (S1s CLS) of the CYFC (cysteine-phenylalanine-tyrosine-cysteine) tetrapeptide for different folding configurations. Using increasing levels of accuracy, from Hartree-Fock and density functional theory to configuration interaction via a multiscale algorithm capable of reducing drastically the computational cost of electronic structure calculations, we find that distinct peptide arrangements present S1s CLS sizeably different (in excess of 0.5 eV) with respect to the reference disulfide bridge state. This approach, leading to experimentally detectable signals, may represent an alternative to other established spectroscopic techniques.

  17. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  18. Core-level excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, R.; Plenge, J.; Rühl, E.

    2006-03-01

    Inner-shell excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-excitation regime is reported. The electronic structure of the element-selectively excited radical is studied by X-ray absorption and total cation yields. A comparison of both approaches allows us to estimate the absolute photoionization cross-section and the ionization yield near the Cl 2p- and O 1s-absorption edges. The latter quantity is characteristically enhanced in core-ionization continua. We observe below both core-absorption edges intense core-to-valence-transitions. These are assigned in comparison with related work on core-excited sulfur dioxide. These results give clear evidence that the highest molecular orbital of OClO is half-filled. High-resolution spectra recorded in the Cl 2p-regime show evidence for Rydberg transitions. The extrapolation of the term values of the low-lying Rydberg states allows us to derive the Cl 2p-ionization energy of OClO. Fragmentation of core-excited OClO is reported. Photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (PEPICO) spectra are recorded, indicating that singly and doubly charged fragments are formed. Fission of the doubly and multiply charged OClO leads to singly charged fragments. These are measured by photoion-photoion-coincidence (PIPICO) spectra, where characteristic changes in intensity of the fission channels in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-continuum are observed.

  19. Decay processes of the core-excited states 1s2p3 for Be-like systems with Z=8-54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, C. C.; Sun, Y.; Hu, F.

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of a fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method, a systematic study has been carried out for the energies, radiative and non-radiative (Auger) decay processes of the core-excited states 1s2p3 for Be-like ions with Z=8-54. The energies and radiative transition rates are smoothly varying functions of Z. Auger rates do not change significantly with Z as the radiative rates do. Electron correlation effects on the energies and the radiative transition rates are investigated. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  20. Health Occupations Orientation Level Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyum, Paula G.; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in teaching a secondary-level orientation course in health occupations that is designed to prepare students for employment in all types of health care facilities and for entry into postsecondary programs. The guide is divided into two parts. The first part consists of a teacher's guide and 11 instructional units…

  1. Language Arts Core Curriculum: Secondary Core Curriculum Standards. Levels 7-12, Language Arts (Drama). Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This curriculum guide presents the core standards and objectives for level 7-12 language arts instruction in Utah. The curriculum guide begins with a statement of the elementary and secondary school program of studies and high school graduation requirements. After a brief statement on the importance of language arts and core curriculum standards…

  2. Physics of the Be(0001) surface core-level spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.; Stumpf, R. )

    1994-12-15

    First-principles calculations for slabs as many as 13 layers thick show that the three surface core-level features observed on Be(0001) correspond to core-electron ionizations in its three outermost atomic layers. The calculations also imply that the experimental peak identified with core ionization in the bulk is a composite; theoretical core-ionization potentials for the fourth and deeper layers differ by as much as 90 meV. The sign and surprisingly large magnitudes of the Be(0001) surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) are attributed to unusually large surface-state contributions to the three outer layers' local densities of states. Both initial- and final-state effects are substantial in the SCLS's, and their contributions are additive.

  3. Idaho Marketing Education Core Curriculum. Career Sustaining Level, Specialist Level, Supervisory Level, Entrepreneurial Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Linda Wise; Winn, Richard

    This document contains Idaho's marketing education (ME) core curriculum. Presented first are a list of 22 ME strategies that are aligned with the Idaho State Division of Vocational-Technical Education's strategic plan and a chart detailing the career pathways of ME in Idaho (arts and communication, business and management, health services, human…

  4. H2O2 scavenging inhibits G1/S transition by increasing nuclear levels of p27KIP1.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Irene L; Policastro, Lucía L; Tropper, Ivanna; Bracalente, Candelaria; Palmieri, Mónica A; Rojas, Paola A; Molinari, Beatriz L; Durán, Hebe

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate cell cycle regulation by scavenging H(2)O(2) in tumor cells. A significant arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle was demonstrated in CH72-T4 carcinoma cells exposed to catalase, associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in the CDK inhibitory protein p27(KIP1). Moreover, we found a differential intracellular distribution of p27(KIP1), which remained in the nucleus after catalase treatment. In vivo experiments showed an increase in nuclear levels of p27(KIP1) associated with the inhibition of tumor growth by H(2)O(2) scavenging, confirming in vitro results. To conclude, H(2)O(2) scavenging may induce cell cycle arrest through the modulation of cyclin D1 and p27(KIP1) levels and nuclear localization of p27(KIP1). To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates that the modulation of ROS alters the intracellular localization of a key regulatory protein of G1/S transition.

  5. District Level Leadership: Core Leadership Practices for Sustainable Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feagan, Roger W.; Kupka, Cynthia J.; Laubenstein, Michelle M.; Miller, Dana L.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the findings of a doctoral team project regarding core leadership practices that support sustainable academic change. The project team reviewed literature related to sustainable change, reform models, and leadership. The empirical research regarding the relationship between district level leadership practices that contribute…

  6. Delivering Core Engineering Concepts to Secondary Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Chris; Custer, Rodney L.; Daugherty, Jenny; Westrick, Martin; Zeng, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Through the efforts of National Center for Engineering and Technology Education (NCETE), three core engineering concepts within the realm of engineering design have emerged as crucial areas of need within secondary level technology education. These concepts are constraints, optimization, and predictive analysis (COPA). COPA appears to be at the…

  7. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1983-09-20

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is midified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  8. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  9. Ordering of the 0 d5 /2 and 1 s1 /2 proton levels in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, C. R.; Kay, B. P.; Schiffer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of the available single-proton data in A ≤17 nuclei was completed. These data, along with calculations using a Woods-Saxon potential, show that the ordering of the 0 d5 /2 and 1 s1 /2 proton orbitals are determined primarily by the proximity of the s -state proton energy to the Coulomb barrier. This is analogous to the dependence of the corresponding neutron orbitals in proximity to the neutron threshold, which was previously discussed.

  10. Disparity between beta-core levels in pregnancy urine and serum: implications for the origin of urinary beta-core.

    PubMed

    Wehmann, R E; Blithe, D L; Akar, A H; Nisula, B C

    1990-02-01

    We used a highly purified preparation of the naturally occurring core fragment of hCG beta (beta-core) and a new RIA for beta-core to investigate the concentrations and behavior of beta-core in serum and urine. We collected serum and 24-h urine specimens from healthy pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy. The concentrations of beta-core in serum were determined by analysis of fractions eluted from Sephadex G-100. Serum concentrations of beta-core immunoreactivity were very low (0.13-1.25 micrograms/L), while large amounts of beta-core were excreted in urine during pregnancy (as much as 4-5 mg/day). Interference with measurement by serum factors did not account for the low levels of beta-core immunoreactivity in pregnancy serum. Based on the known urinary clearance rate of beta-core in healthy nonpregnant subjects, we calculated that urinary clearance of serum beta-core accounts for only about 1% of the beta-core in pregnancy urine. We conclude that during pregnancy, the concentrations of beta-core in plasma are measurable, but extremely low, and that most of the beta-core in urine is derived by mechanisms other than urinary clearance of serum beta-core; most likely, these mechanisms involve nephrogenous production of beta-core from precursor molecules such as hCG and hCG beta.

  11. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements.

  12. Core-level binding-energy shifts for the metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Börje; Mårtensson, Nils

    1980-05-01

    chromium relative to the dns2 configuration in vanadium and manganese. When the core-level shift is referred to, the dns2 (or dn+1s) atomic configuration for all the elements in a transition series, a quite regular behavior of the shift is found. However, some structure can still be observed originating from a change of screening within the d band from a bonding to an antibonding type as one proceeds through the series. For elements beyond the coin metals the screening of a core hole is performed by p electrons, which provide a less effective screening mechanism than the d electrons for the transition metals. The coin metals are intermediate cases, partly due to a dominating s-electron screening and partly due to d-electron bonding in the initial state. The effect of the electron-density redistribution between the free atom and the solid on the core-level shift is particularly striking in the case of the rare-earth elements Pr-Sm and Tb-Tm. Here the remarkable situation is that a deep core electron is less bound in the atom than in the solid. Also for the actinides the electronic redistribution upon condensation gives rise to pronounced effects on the core-level shifts. Further, it is shown that the measured 6p32 binding energy in metallic uranium provides a clear demonstration of the occupation of the 5f level in this metal. The present treatment of the core-level shift for bulk metallic atoms can easily be generalized to surface atoms. From an empirical relation for the surface energy a simple expression for the shift of the surface core-level relative to the bulk can be derived. For the earlier transition metals, it is found that the core electrons are more bound at the surface than in the bulk, while for the heavier ones the opposite situation exists. This change of sign of the surface shift depends on the bonding-antibonding division of the d band. To illustrate how the present approach can be applied to alloy systems, a treatment of core-level shifts for rare

  13. 1s{sup 2}2pns({sup 1}P{sup 0}) autoionizing levels in Be-like Al and C ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stancalie, V.

    2005-04-15

    This work is focused on the possibility of using the R-matrix Floquet theory and codes and its extension to laser induced degenerate state to describe dielectronic recombination of Li-like into Be-like ions. The uncertainty concerning the best way to include radiative damping effect is no longer a problem when the full electron collision and radiative processes are treated simultaneously and radiation field is treated to all orders. The method accounts for the reverse process corresponding to single-photon ionization. Following this approach, the 1s{sup 2}2snl({sup 1}S{sup e}) and 1s{sup 2}2pnl({sup 1}P{sup 0}) Rydberg states, embedded in the electric dipole field of the 2s-2p core, are dressed by a laser field, assumed to be monochromatic, monomode, linearly polarized, and spatially homogeneous. As in the R-matrix Floquet theory, in the external region, since the coupling field potential vanishes, the calculation yields the complete information on the autoionizing rate and field-free positions. Comparisons with available data are presented.

  14. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  16. Visual Arts, Levels 7-12. Secondary Core Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This Utah state curriculum guide calls for one 7-8th grade course (0.5 unit) of visual arts education to fulfill the visual arts Component requirement of the core curriculum. Up to three visual arts courses may be taken at the 9-12th grades as fulfillment of the 1.5 core art units required. Core options include courses in ceramics, jewelry,…

  17. Characterization of YBa 2Cu 3O x using core- and valence-level XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundle, C. R.; Fowler, D. E.

    1993-12-01

    Hundreds of papers have been published involving the photoelectron spectroscopy of the high- Tc superconducting oxides since 1987. The early work, originally on bulk-sintered material, sputtered films, and later on "single crystals", concentrated on finding "unusual" features in valence- or core-level spectra to relate to electronic structure effects which might explain the superconducting mechanism. The majority of this work has not adequately taken into account the facts that (a) photoemission probes only the top few monolayers of material, and (b) in many cases the top few layers are completely unrepresentative of the bulk material. This is particularly true for YBa 2Cu 3O x, where the surface is extremely reactive, unstable, and prone to contaminating phases, even when prepared under UHV conditions. This has led to a flood of misinformation concerning the true characteristic spectra of this material and their interpretation. In this paper, we present core- and valence-level XPS for YBa 2Cu 3O x single-crystal, bulk-sintered, and thin-film samples, and show that, when artifacts are eliminated, the characteristic spectra are the same, to first order, and easily allow distinction of surfaces consisting of the genuine orthorhombic phase ( x > 6.4) from those with the non-superconducting tetragonal phase ( x<6.4) or contaminant or reaction-product phases. With this information, it is possible to eliminate much of the previous literature discussion and also to follow the material changes occuring, for instance, during annealing, adsorption and reaction. We then discuss some detailed interpretations, including the DOS observed at and near EF, the explanations for the ˜1.5 eV chemical shift in Ba core-level BE between orthorhombic and tetragonal forms, and the implications of the very low O(1s) BE of the orthorhombic form.

  18. Relationships Between Complex Core Level Spectra and Materials Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nelin, Constance J.; Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Chambers, Scott A.; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-01

    The XPS of many oxides are quite complex and there may be several peaks of significant intensity for each subshell. These peaks arise from many-electron effects, which normally are treated with configuration interaction (CI) wavefunctions where static correlation effects are taken into account. It is common to use semiempirical methods to determine the matrix elements of the CI Hamiltonian and there are few rigorous CI calculations where parameters are not adjusted to fit experiment. In contrast, we present, in the present work, theoretical XPS spectra obtained with rigorous CI wavefunctions for CeO2 where the XPS are especially complex; several different core levels are studied. This study uses an embedded CeO8 cluster model to represent bulk CeO2 and the relativistic CI wavefunctions are determined using four-component spinors from Dirac-Fock calculations. In particular, we examine the importance of interatomic many-body effects where there is a transfer of electrons from occupied oxygen 2p orbitals into empty cation orbitals as it is common to ascribe the complex XPS to this effect. We also contrast the importance of many-body charge-transfer effects for the isoelectronic cations of Ce4+ and La3+. The long-range goal of this work is to relate the XPS features to the nature of the chemical bonding in CeO2 and we describe our progress toward this goal.

  19. Constant-atomic-final-state filtering of dissociative states in the O1s-->sigma* core excitation in O2.

    PubMed

    Hjelte, I; Björneholm, O; Carravetta, V; Angeli, C; Cimiraglia, R; Wiesner, K; Svensson, S; Piancastelli, M N

    2005-08-01

    The below-threshold region in core-excited O2 is very complex, consisting of a multitude of exchange-split states with mixed molecular orbital-Rydberg character. We have investigated the nature of these intermediate states by resonant Auger spectroscopy. In particular, we have obtained constant-atomic-final-state yield curves for several atomic peaks in the electron decay spectra which are stemming from ultrafast dissociation. The relative intensity of Auger decay leading to atomic final states is considered a signature of the relative weight of the sigma* character. This method allows one to "filter out" intermediate states with dissociative character. Extensive calculations have been performed by multi-reference configuration interaction at different interatomic distances in order to evaluate the potential curves of the core-excited states and propose a qualitative description of the dissociative molecular dynamics. The calculations show that the core-excited states have a relevant admixture of excitations to orbitals with Rydberg character and excitations to the sigma* orbital with different spin couplings. A diabatization of the adiabatic potential curves shows that the coupling between Rydberg and sigma* diabatic states is very different at the different crossing points and ultrafast dissociation occurs more easily on the lowest sigma* diabatic potential curve. As a consequence, the observation of atomic peaks only in the lower-energy region of the absorption curve is well justified.

  20. Atomic signatures of local environment from core-level spectroscopy in β -Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Zschiesche, Hannes; Nabok, Dmitrii; Mogilatenko, Anna; Albrecht, Martin; Galazka, Zbigniew; Kirmse, Holm; Draxl, Claudia; Koch, Christoph T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study on core-level excitations from the oxygen K edge of β -Ga2O3 . A detailed analysis of the electronic structure reveals the importance of O-Ga hybridization effects in the conduction region. The spectrum from O 1 s core electrons is dominated by excitonic effects, which overall redshift the absorption onset by 0.5 eV, and significantly redistribute the intensity to lower energies. Analysis of the spectra obtained within many-body perturbation theory reveals atomic fingerprints of the inequivalent O atoms. From the comparison of energy-loss near-edge fine-structure (ELNES) spectra computed with respect to different crystal planes, with measurements recorded under the corresponding diffraction conditions, we show how the spectral contributions of specific O atoms can be enhanced while quenching others. These results suggest ELNES, combined with ab initio many-body theory, as a very powerful technique to characterize complex systems, with sensitivity to individual atomic species and to their local environment.

  1. Science, Levels 7-12. Secondary Core Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document presents the core science curriculum standards which must be completed by all students as a requisite for graduation from Utah's secondary schools. Contained within are the elementary and secondary school program of studies and high school graduation requirements. Each course entry for grades 7-12 contains: course title, unit of…

  2. Plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), TNF-α soluble receptor type 1 (sTNFR I) and IL-22 in human leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Nateghi Rostami, M; Seyyedan Jasbi, E; Khamesipour, A; Miramin Mohammadi, A

    2015-09-01

    The role of pro-inammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in human leishmaniasis is not fully understood. We analyzed the alterations in the plasma levels of TNF- α, soluble TNF receptor type 1 (sTNFR I), IL-17 and IL-22 in the volunteers with leishmaniasis. Blood samples were collected from patients with active cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), the same CL patients after standard antimonial therapy as healed CL, active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and healed VL volunteers. Levels of the cytokines were titrated on plasma samples by sandwich ELISA method. The mean level of TNF-α was significantly higher in active CL patients than healthy controls (P<0.001) and significantly reduced after treatment in the same volunteers (P<0.001). The mean level of sTNFR I was significantly higher in active CL patients than healthy controls (P<0.05). The mean level of IL-22 in plasma of the AVL patients was significantly higher than that of healthy control group (P<0.05). There is a negative correlation between the levels of TNF-α and sTNFR I and healing of CL. Measurement of cytokines in plasma samples is more feasible than cell culture in evaluation of immune response in human leishmaniasis.

  3. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  4. An investigation of core liquid level depression in small break loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Watkins, J.C. ); Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H. ); Chen, Y.S. . Div. of Systems Research)

    1991-08-01

    Core liquid level depression can result in partial core dryout and heatup early in a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) transient. Such behavior occurs when steam, trapped in the upper regions of the reactor primary system (between the loop seal and the core inventory), moves coolant out of the core region and uncovers the rod upper elevations. The net result is core liquid level depression. Core liquid level depression and subsequent core heatups are investigated using subscale data from the ROSA-IV Program's 1/48-scale Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the 1/1705-scale Semiscale facility. Both facilities are Westinghouse-type, four-loop, pressurized water reactor simulators. The depression phenomena and factors which influence the minimum core level are described and illustrated using examples from the data. Analyses of the subject experiments, conducted using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 (Version 12.7) thermal-hydraulic code, are also described and summarized. Finally, the response of a typical Westinghouse four-loop plant (RESAR-3S) was calculated to qualitatively study coal liquid level depression in a full-scale system. 31 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Effect of CSN1S1 genotype and its interaction with diet energy level on milk production and quality in Girgentana goats fed ad libitum.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Renato Italo; Pennisi, Pietro; Valenti, Bernardo; Lanza, Massimiliano; Di Trana, Adriana; Di Gregorio, Paola; De Angelis, Anna; Avondo, Marcella

    2010-05-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate how the energy level of the diet can affect milk production and quality in Girgentana lactating goats in relation to polymorphism at the alphas1-casein (CSN1S1) genotype locus. Twenty-seven goats, homogeneous for milk production (1.5+/-0.3 kg/d), days of lactation (90+/-10 d) and body weight (35.8+/-5.5 kg) were selected on the basis of their CSN1S1 genotype, as follows: nine goats homozygous for strong (AA) alleles, nine goats homozygous for weak alleles (FF) and nine goats heterozygous (AF). The goats were used in a 3x3 factorial arrangement of treatments, with three genotypes (AA, FF, AF) and three diets at different energy levels (100%, 65% and 30% of hay inclusion). The experiment consisted of three simultaneous 3x3 Latin squares for the three genotypes, with one square for each level of hay inclusion in the diet. All the animals were housed in individual pens. Each experimental period lasted 23 d and consisted of 15 d for adaptation and 8 d for data and sample collection, during which the goats received the scheduled diet ad libitum. The animals were fed three different diets designed to have the same crude protein content (about 15%) but different energy levels: a pelleted alfalfa hay (H100) and two feeds including 65% (H65) and 30% (H30) of alfalfa hay (respectively 1099, 1386 and 1590 kcal NE for lactation/kg DM). All the diets were ground and pelleted (6 mm diameter). AA goats were more productive than AF and FF goats (respectively: 1419 v. 1145 and 1014 g/d; P=0.002). Indeed the interaction energy levelxgenotype was significant (P=0.018): in fact AA goats showed their milk increase only when fed with concentrates. Differences in protein and in casein levels between the three genotypes were in line with results expected from the different allele contribution to alphas1-casein synthesis. Milk urea levels were significantly lower in AA goats compared with AF and FF genotypes (respectively 32.7 v. 40.4 and 40.4 mg/dl; P=0

  6. Core-Substituted Naphthalenediimides: LUMO Levels Revisited, in Comparison with Preylenediimides with Sulfur Redox Switches in the Core.

    PubMed

    Miros, François N; Matile, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Core-substituted naphthalenediimides (NDIs) attract increasing attention to bind, transport, and transform electrons, anions, anionic intermediates, and anionic transition states, and to shine as most colorful rainbow fluorophores. The energy level of their lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is decisive for many of these applications. Here, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurements for a consistent series of NDIs are reported to extract exact LUMO levels under identical conditions. The influence of primary and secondary substituents in the core and on the primary imides is compared with general trends for the reliable prediction of LUMO levels in functional systems. Emphasis is on sulfur redox switches in the NDI core because of their frequent use as isostructural probes for π acidity. The same sulfur redox chemistry is expanded to perylenediimides (PDIs), and LUMO engineering is discussed in a broader context, including also fullerenes, aminonaphthalimides (ANIs), and aminoperyleneimides (APIs). The result is a comprehensive reference table that graphically maps out the LUMO space covered by the leading families of electronaccepting aromatics. This graphical summary of general trends in the π-acidic space is expected to be both inspiring and quite useful in practice. PMID:27551658

  7. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  8. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  9. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  10. Effects of valence-valence, core-valence and core-core correlations on the fine-structure energy levels in Zn-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F.; Jiang, G.; Yang, J. M.; Wang, C. K.; Zhao, X. F.; Hao, L. H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on large ab initio calculation for the 4s^2- 4s4p transitions in the Zinc-like sequence, using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. Results for fine-structure energy levels, the wavelengths, transition rates and lifetimes between Z = 70 (Yb) and Z= 92 (U) are presented and compared with other theories and experiments. The calculated values including core-valence correlation are found to be similar and to compare very well with other theories and experiments values. We believe that our extensive calculated values can guide experimentalists in identifying the fine-structure levels in their future work.

  11. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    SciTech Connect

    Paggel, J.J.; Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K.

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  12. Measures for the Final Common Core of Constructs. The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes, a federal project designed to improve the measurement of child outcomes in state welfare evaluations and in other state data systems. This document provides measures for the common core of constructs that state representatives developed at the second national-level meeting of the Project's planning phase.…

  13. Increased plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) associated with disease severity in a primate model for severe human malaria: Plasmodium coatneyi-Infected Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Kawai, Satoru; Matsumoto, Jun; Aikawa, Masamichi; Matsuda, Hajime

    2003-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in seven Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) infected with Plasmodium coatneyi. Concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were significantly elevated in the severe phase; the levels were maximally increased up to six times and three times those before infection, respectively. We subsequently examined kinetic profiles of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentration in plasma obtained from two infected monkeys. Both infected monkeys had markedly increased levels of these adhesion molecules when they exhibited severe clinical signs correlated with rapid increase in parasitemia. These results suggest that the elevation of levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 is a critical step in the pathogenesis of severe malaria in vivo.

  14. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  15. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in core-level photoemission from ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Menchero, J G

    1997-05-01

    In this thesis we present a theoretical investigation of angle- and spin-resolved core-level photoemission from ferromagnetic Fe and Ni. We also consider magneto-dichroic effects due to reversal of the photon helicity or reversal of the sample magnetization direction. In chapter 1, we provide a brief outline of the history of photoemission, and show how it has played an important role in the development of modern physics. We then review the basic elements of the theory of core-level photoemission, and discuss the validity of the some of the commonly-used approximations. In chapter 2, we present a one-electron theory to calculate spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra for an arbitrary photon polarization. The Hamiltonian includes both spin-orbit and exchange interactions. As test cases for the theory, we calculate the spin polarization and magnetic dichroism for the Fe 2p core level, and find that agreement with experiment is very good.

  16. Modeling Shallow Core-Level Transitions in the Reflectance Spectra of Gallium-Containing Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoute, Nicholas; Aspnes, David

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of covalent materials is typically approached by band theory. However, shallow core level transitions may be better modeled by an atomic-scale approach. We investigate shallow d-core level reflectance spectra in terms of a local atomic-multiplet theory, a novel application of a theory typically used for higher-energy transitions on more ionic type material systems. We examine specifically structure in reflectance spectra of GaP, GaAs, GaSb, GaSe, and GaAs1-xPx due to transitions that originate from Ga3d core levels and occur in the 20 to 25 eV range. We model these spectra as a Ga^+3 closed-shell ion whose transitions are influenced by perturbations on 3d hole-4p electron final states. These are specifically spin-orbit effects on the hole and electron, and a crystal-field effect on the hole, attributed to surrounding bond charges and positive ligand anions. Empirical radial-strength parameters were obtained by least-squares fitting. General trends with respect to anion electronegativity are consistent with expectations. In addition to the spin-orbit interaction, crystal-field effects play a significant role in breaking the degeneracy of the d levels, and consequently are necessary to understand shallow 3d core level spectra.

  17. Deglacial and lake level fluctuation history recorded in cores, Beaver Lake, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Whitman, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment cores collected from the littoral and pelagic zones of Beaver Lake, Michigan record fluctuations in the water level of Lake Superior. Beaver Lake is a small 300 ha lake in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PRNL) now separated from Lake Superior by a dune-capped barrier bar. Cores were collected using a vibracorer from a lake-ice platform in February 1997. A 2.85 m long core in 10 m of water contains well-sorted sand, rhythmites, peat, interbedded sand and gyttja, and is capped with 1 m of massive gyttja. A 9480 BP AMS age from the basal sand provides a minimum deglacial date for the area. Further analysis indicates a sand-dominated depositional environment from a low lake stand at approximately 8500 BP to present. An approximate 8800 BP red to gray sediment color transition records either the cessation of meltwater input from Lake Agassiz or receding ice, while a younger similarly colored transition, 6600 BP in age, likely records sediment reworking in the coastal zone. Four AMS ages on peat range from 8520 to 7340 BP and are indicative of the Houghton low phase. Burial of the peat by stratified sand and gyttja after 7340 BP indicates a rising lake level. Peat at a higher level in the lake basin, encountered in shallow littoral cores, ranges in age from 6800 to 6420 BP, which estimates a 0.91 m rise/century in lake level to the Nipissing level by 5000 BP.

  18. Surface core-level shifts and atomic coordination at a stepped W(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Kim, B.; Erskine, J.L. ); Shinn, N.D. )

    1994-11-15

    Core-level 4[ital f][sub 7/2] photoemission spectra have been measured from a single, bifacial W crystal, which has both a flat W(110) and a vicinal, stepped W(110) [W(320)] surface. This procedure reduces uncertainties in the quantitative description of peaks in the spectra from W(320). Various analyses, including nonlinear least-squares curve fitting, show that the average surface core-level shift (SCS) for W(320) is only [similar to][minus]140 meV, compared to [minus]310 meV for W(110) and that, at a maximum, only two of five terrace rows are isoelectronic to W(110) surface atoms. The absence of a large SCS for the step-edge atoms contradicts earlier interpretations of W(320) core-level spectra and departs significantly from expectations based on atomic-coordination models or tight-binding calculations of a bulk truncated surface. We suggest that systematic errors are responsible for the differences in reported core-level shifts for W(320). Implications of possible step-edge-driven atomic rearrangements are discussed.

  19. Reader Identity and the Common Core: Agency and Identity in Leveled Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abodeeb-Gentile, Theresa; Zawilinski, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article moves beyond the common core and leveled literacy instruction to demonstrate how diverse learners in one fourth grade classroom, challenged teacher authority in an effort to position themselves as capable readers. In doing so, they implored the teachers to consider the social context of reading as an essential component to the ways in…

  20. Polymers and Cross-Linking: A CORE Experiment to Help Students Think on the Submicroscopic Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Bruce, Alice E.; Avargil, Shirly; Amar, Francois G.; Wemyss, Thomas M.; Flood, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers and Cross-Linking experiment is presented via a new three phase learning cycle: CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation), which is designed to model productive chemical inquiry and to promote a deeper understanding about the chemistry operating at the submicroscopic level. The experiment is built on two familiar…

  1. Understanding electronegative effects in core-level electron spectroscopies; application to the high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaker, David E.

    1989-12-01

    The nature of the core level reflected in x ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectrosocopy, and x ray absorption near edge structure is considered. An understanding of the effects of anion and cation electronegativity on spectra for the transition metal halides is obtained. This knowledge is applied to understand similar spectra for the high temperature superconductors.

  2. First-principles interpretation of core-level spectroscopy of photoelectrochemical materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das; Prendergast, David

    2014-03-01

    We present two case studies of first-principles theoretical methods applied in conjunction with experimental core-level spectroscopy measurements to investigate the electronic structure and dynamical processes in molecular and interfacial systems relevant to photoelectrochemical (PEC) technologies. In the first, we study the core-level and valence spectroscopies of two zinc(II)-porphyrin based Donor-pi-Acceptor (D-p-A) dyes using the occupancy-constrained excited electron and core-hole (XCH) approach and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulations. In the second, we use constrained DFT and TDDFT to interpret measured transient core-level shifts in time-resolved femtosecond x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, investigating the dynamics of the electron injection process from a N3 dye molecule chemisorbed onto a ZnO substrate. These studies illustrate the utility of first-principles methods in guiding the design of better PEC materials. This work was performed at the Molecular Foundry, LBNL, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. Reliable measurement of the Li-like {sub 22}{sup 48}Ti 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level lifetime by beam-foil and beam-two-foil experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, T.; Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A. A.; Marketos, P.

    2006-03-15

    We have determined the lifetime of the Li-like {sub 22}{sup 48}Ti 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level (210.5{+-}13.5 ps) using data from its x-ray decay channel through beam single- and two-foil experiments, coupled to a multicomponent iterative growth and decay analysis. Theoretical lifetime estimates for this zero-nuclear-spin ion lies within the uncertainty range of our experimental results, indicating that blending contributions to this level from the He-like 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o} and 1s2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} levels are eliminated within the current approach. A previously reported discrepancy between experimental and theoretical 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level lifetimes in {sub 23}{sup 51}V may, as a result, be attributed to hyperfine quenching.

  4. Core-level shifts in fcc random alloys: A first-principles approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olovsson, W.; Göransson, C.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Johansson, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2005-08-01

    First-principles theoretical calculations of the core-level binding-energy shift (CLS) for eight binary face-centered-cubic (fcc) disordered alloys, CuPd, AgPd, CuNi, NiPd, CuAu, PdAu, CuPt, and NiPt, are carried out within density-functional theory (DFT) using the coherent potential approximation. The shifts of the Cu and Ni 2p3/2 , Ag and Pd 3d5/2 , and Pt and Au 4f7/2 core levels are calculated according to the complete screening picture, which includes both initial-state (core-electron energy eigenvalue) and final-state (core-hole screening) effects in the same scheme. The results are compared with available experimental data, and the agreement is shown to be good. The CLSs are analyzed in terms of initial- and final-state effects. We also compare the complete screening picture with the CLS obtained by the transition-state method, and find very good agreement between these two alternative approaches for the calculations within the DFT. In addition the sensitivity of the CLS to relativistic and magnetic effects is studied.

  5. Increased plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sFlt-1) in women by moderate exercise and increased plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in overweight/obese women.

    PubMed

    Makey, Kristina L; Patterson, Sharla G; Robinson, James; Loftin, Mark; Waddell, Dwight E; Miele, Lucio; Chinchar, Edmund; Huang, Min; Smith, Andrew D; Weber, Mark; Gu, Jian-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide, and this seems to be related to an increase in lifestyle risk factors, including physical inactivity and overweight/obesity. We have reported previously that exercise induced a circulating angiostatic phenotype characterized by increased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and endostatin and decreased unbound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in men. However, there are no data on women. The present study determines the following: (a) whether moderate exercise increased sFlt-1 and endostatin and decreased unbound VEGF in the circulation of adult female volunteers and (b) whether overweight/obese women have a higher plasma level of unbound VEGF than lean women. A total of 72 African American and White adult women volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 44 years were enrolled in the exercise study. All the participants walked on a treadmill for 30 min at a moderate intensity (55-59% heart rate reserve), and oxygen consumption (VO(2)) was quantified utilizing a metabolic cart. We obtained blood samples before and immediately after exercise from 63 participants. ELISA assays showed that the plasma levels of sFlt-1 were 67.8±3.7 pg/ml immediately after exercise (30 min), significantly higher than the basal levels, 54.5±3.3 pg/ml, before exercise (P<0.01; n=63). There was no significant difference in the % increase in the sFlt-1 levels after exercise between African American and White (P=0.533) women or between lean and overweight/obese women (P=0.892). There was no significant difference in the plasma levels of unbound VEGF (35.28±5.47 vs. 35.23±4.96 pg/ml; P=0.99) or endostatin (111.12±5.48 vs. 115.45±7.15 ng/ml; P=0.63) before and after exercise. The basal plasma levels of unbound VEGF in overweight/obese women were 52.26±9.6 pg/ml, significantly higher than the basal levels of unbound VEGF in lean women, 27.34±4.99 pg/ml (P<0.05). The results support our hypothesis that exercise

  6. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Leif I. Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya

    2015-11-15

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene.

  7. Interference of fluorescence x-rays and coherent excitation of core levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. |; Blume, M.

    1994-08-01

    The question of coherence in inelastic x-ray absorption and fluorescence processes among identical interacting atoms is studied using a simple diatomic model. Conditions for the coherence are discussed in terms of energy scales, such as the core hole life-time, instrument energy resolutions, and the splitting of the electronic levels. As in the classical Young double-slit experiment, the primary requirement is that it be impossible to determine which atom has undergone the excitation-decay process.

  8. Lifetime of the 1s2s 3S1 metastable level in He-like S14+ measured with an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    L?pez-Urrutia, J C; Beiersdorfer, P; Widmann, K

    2006-03-16

    A precision measurement of the lifetime of the lowest exited level of the He-like S{sup 14+} ion carried out at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap yielded a value of (703 {+-} 4) ns. Our method extends the range of lifetime measurements accessible with electron beam ion traps into the nanosecond region and improves the accuracy of currently available data for this level by an order of magnitude.

  9. Lifetime for Li-like Ti 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level using a mode of beam-two-foil experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, T.; Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A.A.

    2005-08-15

    The option of varying thickness of the fixed foil in the beam-two-foil technique has been incorporated in our experimental setup. It gives an opportunity to explore a new mode of this technique. In the current study, we have investigated the lifetime of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level in Li-like titanium using this technique. The data showed a dependence of foil thickness of the fixed foil on the interactions of levels produced in the first foil. Average lifetime obtained for the Li-like titanium 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level (200{+-}12 ps) is compared very well with the earlier theoretical and experimental values.

  10. Strongly correlated valence electrons and core-level chemical bonding of Lithium at terapascal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    As the simplest pure metal, lithium exhibits some novel properties on electrical conductivity and crystal structures under high pressure. All-electron density functional theory simulations, recently developed by using the linear combination of localized Slater atomic orbitals, revealed that the bandwidth of its valence bands remains almost unchanged within about 3.5 eV even up to a terapascal pressure range. This indicates that the development from delocalized to strongly correlated electronic systems takes place under compression, resulting in metal-semiconductor and superconductivity transitions together with a sequence of new high-pressure crystal phases, discovered experimentally. In contrast to the valence bands, the core-level bands become broadening up to about 10 eV at terapascal pressures. It means the transformation from chemical non-bonding to bonding for core electrons. Thus, dense lithium under compression can be characterized as core-level chemical bonding and a completely new class of strongly correlated materials with narrow bands filled in s-electron shells only.

  11. Gamma-thermometer-based reactor-core liquid-level detector. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1981-06-16

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  12. Quantum and classical dynamics of H + CaCl(X (2)Σ(+)) → HCl + Ca((1)S) reaction and vibrational energy levels of the HCaCl complex.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui Shan; Zhai, Huan Chen; Gao, Feng; Tong, Dianmin; Lin, Shi Ying

    2016-06-21

    We carried out accurate quantum wave packet as well as quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations for H + CaCl (νi = 0, ji = 0) reaction occurring on an adiabatic ground state using the recent ab initio potential energy surface to obtain the quantum and QCT reaction probabilities for several partial waves (J = 0, 10, and 20) as well as state resolved QCT integral and differential cross sections. The complete list of vibrational energy levels supported by the intermediate HCaCl complex is also obtained using the Lanczos algorithm. The QCT reaction probabilities show excellent agreement with the quantum ones except for the failure in reproducing the highly oscillatory resonance structure. Despite the fact that the reaction is exothermic and the existence of a barrier that is energetically lower than the bottom of the reactant valley, the reaction probability for J = 0 shows threshold-like behavior and the reactivity all through the energies is very low (<0.1). The dynamical features at two different energy regions (<0.35 eV and >0.35 eV) are found to be different drastically from each other. The analyses of these results suggest that the reaction is governed by one of the two different types of reaction mechanism, one is the direct mechanism at the high energy region and the other is the indirect mechanism at the low energy region by which the reaction proceeds through the long-lived intermediate complex followed by a statistical dissociation into asymptotic channels.

  13. Production Level CFD Code Acceleration for Hybrid Many-Core Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Austen C.; Hammond, Dana P.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a novel graphics processing unit (GPU) distributed sharing model for hybrid many-core architectures is introduced and employed in the acceleration of a production-level computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The latest generation graphics hardware allows multiple processor cores to simultaneously share a single GPU through concurrent kernel execution. This feature has allowed the NASA FUN3D code to be accelerated in parallel with up to four processor cores sharing a single GPU. For codes to scale and fully use resources on these and the next generation machines, codes will need to employ some type of GPU sharing model, as presented in this work. Findings include the effects of GPU sharing on overall performance. A discussion of the inherent challenges that parallel unstructured CFD codes face in accelerator-based computing environments is included, with considerations for future generation architectures. This work was completed by the author in August 2010, and reflects the analysis and results of the time.

  14. Quantum and classical dynamics of H + CaCl(X (2)Σ(+)) → HCl + Ca((1)S) reaction and vibrational energy levels of the HCaCl complex.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui Shan; Zhai, Huan Chen; Gao, Feng; Tong, Dianmin; Lin, Shi Ying

    2016-06-21

    We carried out accurate quantum wave packet as well as quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations for H + CaCl (νi = 0, ji = 0) reaction occurring on an adiabatic ground state using the recent ab initio potential energy surface to obtain the quantum and QCT reaction probabilities for several partial waves (J = 0, 10, and 20) as well as state resolved QCT integral and differential cross sections. The complete list of vibrational energy levels supported by the intermediate HCaCl complex is also obtained using the Lanczos algorithm. The QCT reaction probabilities show excellent agreement with the quantum ones except for the failure in reproducing the highly oscillatory resonance structure. Despite the fact that the reaction is exothermic and the existence of a barrier that is energetically lower than the bottom of the reactant valley, the reaction probability for J = 0 shows threshold-like behavior and the reactivity all through the energies is very low (<0.1). The dynamical features at two different energy regions (<0.35 eV and >0.35 eV) are found to be different drastically from each other. The analyses of these results suggest that the reaction is governed by one of the two different types of reaction mechanism, one is the direct mechanism at the high energy region and the other is the indirect mechanism at the low energy region by which the reaction proceeds through the long-lived intermediate complex followed by a statistical dissociation into asymptotic channels. PMID:27224034

  15. Photoemission core-level shifts reveal the thiolate-Au(111) interface

    SciTech Connect

    Groenbeck, Henrik; Odelius, Michael

    2010-08-15

    The nature of the thiolate/Au(111) interface is a long-standing puzzle. It has been suggested that thiolates drive surface reconstruction, however, a consensus regarding the adsorption configuration is missing. Herein, the density-functional theory is used to evaluate surface core-level shifts (SCLSs) for methyl thiolates on Au(111) assuming a representative set of different surface reconstructions. The SCLSs are found to provide sensitive fingerprints of the anchoring configuration, and it is only thiolate adsorption in the form of MeS-Au-SMe complexes that can be reconciled with experimental data.

  16. Washington State Core Competencies Model Curriculum: English as a Second Language, Level 3. Version 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Stacey, Ed.; And Others

    The Washington State Core Competencies Project is designed to implement competency-based adult education in the state's 38 adult basic education programs. A model curriculum was developed and field-tested over several years. The resulting curriculum outline of core competencies for English as a Second Language, level 3, is presented here. The…

  17. Washington State Core Competencies Model Curriculum: English as a Second Language, Level 2. Version 1.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Stacey, Ed.; And Others

    The Washington State Core Competencies Project is designed to implement competency-based adult education in the state's 38 adult basic education programs. A model curriculum was developed and field-tested over several years. The resulting curriculum outline of core competencies for English as a Second Language, level 2, is presented here. The…

  18. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  19. Core-Level Crossing and the High-Pressure Equation of State of Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, John

    2015-06-01

    The structural properties of the 5d transition metal osmium have recently been probed at static pressures up to ~ 770 GPa. In this study, anomalies in the hcp c/a ratio were found at pressures of in the vicinity of 150 GPa and 440 GPa. The anomaly at 150 GPa approximately coincides in pressure with an electron topological transition (ETT) observed in Density Functional Theory (DFT) band structure. However, no ETT is observed at higher pressures. Instead, we find that the anomaly in the c / a ratio of osmium is correlated with the crossing of the 5p3 / 2 and 4f7 / 2 ``core'' levels, which at this pressure are found to have bandwidths ~ .2-.3 Ry, in our DFT calculations. In this talk, I discuss the calculated structural properties and calculated equation of state of osmium and other heavy 5d elements at pressures less than 1 TPa and the effect of core-level crossing on the equation of state and structural properties of these elements.

  20. Angle and temperature dependence of magnetic circular dichroism in core-level photoemission from Gd(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Denecke, R.; Morais, J.; Ynzunza, R. X.; Menchero, J. G.; Liesegang, J.; Rice, M.; Kortright, J.; Hussain, Z.; Fadley, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic dichroism in core-level photoelectron emission from solids represents a promising new element-specific probe of surface and interface atomic structure and magnetic order. One way of measuring such effects is by using photoelectrons excited by circular polarized radiation, thus leading to magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) if the intensity with right-circular polarized (RCP) light is not equal to that with left-circular polarized (LCP) light. The spin-integrated photoelectron intensity in a certain emission direction also in general depends on the direction of the magnetization in a magnetic material. In fact, if the magnetization lies in a surface mirror plane, then inverting its direction can provide a second way of measuring MCD. Purely atomic theoretical models have been successful in explaining many aspects of such data. By varying the emission direction one also probes the geometric structure of the sample. But such MCD in photoelectron angular distributions (MCDAD) then has to be interpreted also in terms of photoelectron diffraction. Measuring the temperature dependence of such MCD effects also provides a useful tool for studying magnetic transition temperatures. The authors have here studied such effects in core-level emission from Gd(0001).

  1. Core level excitations—A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlein, R. Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.; Jong, M. P. de; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F. B.; Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J.

    2014-05-14

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp{sup 3}-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is revealed that the lower Si 2p binding energies and the low onset in the NEXAFS spectra as well as the occurrence of satellite features in the core level spectra are attributed to the screening by low-energy valence electrons and interband transitions between π bands, respectively. The analysis of observed Si 2p intensities related to chemically distinct Si atoms indicates the presence of at least one previously unidentified component. The presence of this component suggests that the observation of stress-related stripe domains in scanning tunnelling microscopy images is intrinsically linked to the relaxation of Si atoms away from energetically unfavourable positions.

  2. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Layout, Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Gauges, Ralph; Rost, Ursula; Sahle, Sven; Wengler, Katja; Bergmann, Frank Thomas

    2015-09-04

    Many software tools provide facilities for depicting reaction network diagrams in a visual form. Two aspects of such a visual diagram can be distinguished: the layout (i.e.: the positioning and connections) of the elements in the diagram, and the graphical form of the elements (for example, the glyphs used for symbols, the properties of the lines connecting them, and so on). For software tools that also read and write models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format, a common need is to store the network diagram together with the SBML representation of the model. This in turn raises the question of how to encode the layout and the rendering of these diagrams. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding diagrams, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The Layout package for SBML Level 3 adds the necessary features to SBML so that diagram layouts can be encoded in SBML files, and a companion package called SBML Rendering specifies how the graphical rendering of elements can be encoded. The SBML Layout package is based on the principle that reaction network diagrams should be described as representations of entities such as species and reactions (with direct links to the underlying SBML elements), and not as arbitrary drawings or graphs; for this reason, existing languages for the description of vector drawings (such as SVG) or general graphs (such as GraphML) cannot be used.

  3. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  4. Core-level x-ray photoemission: Deviations from threshold behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Frota, H. O.; Oliveira, L. N.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1985-07-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of core-level x-ray photoemission intensity in metals, with emphasis upon studying the deviations from behavior asymptotically close to threshold. For a model with a contact potential and linear conduction-electron dispersion, we have evaluated the photoemission intensity for core-hole phase shifts δ(0) between 0.05π and 0.5π. We find the following results. (i) The asymptotic regime extends out to 0.01 to 0.1 times the conduction bandwidth (D) from threshold. The range of the asymptotic regime decreases with increasing (absolute) phase shift. (ii) The linear relation between the integrated photoemission intensity and the asymptotic form holds for all phase shifts above ~0.1D. Due to our normalization procedure we cannot say whether it holds below this value. (iii) Discrepancies exist between numerical estimates of the deviations from asymptotic behavior and approximate analytic estimates. (iv) A definition of the frequency-dependent threshold singularity exponent α(ω) in terms of a moment of the photoemission intensity is stable out to the conduction-band edge and may prove useful to experimentalists attempting to extract exponents from their data.

  5. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N.

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  6. Recommendations for Training in Pediatric Psychology: Defining Core Competencies Across Training Levels

    PubMed Central

    Janicke, David M.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Mullins, Larry L.; Robins, Paul M.; Wu, Yelena P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective As a field, pediatric psychology has focused considerable efforts on the education and training of students and practitioners. Alongside a broader movement toward competency attainment in professional psychology and within the health professions, the Society of Pediatric Psychology commissioned a Task Force to establish core competencies in pediatric psychology and address the need for contemporary training recommendations. Methods The Task Force adapted the framework proposed by the Competency Benchmarks Work Group on preparing psychologists for health service practice and defined competencies applicable across training levels ranging from initial practicum training to entry into the professional workforce in pediatric psychology. Results Competencies within 6 cluster areas, including science, professionalism, interpersonal, application, education, and systems, and 1 crosscutting cluster, crosscutting knowledge competencies in pediatric psychology, are presented in this report. Conclusions Recommendations for the use of, and the further refinement of, these suggested competencies are discussed. PMID:24719239

  7. Broadband single-photon-level memory in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, M. R.; Michelberger, P. S.; Champion, T. F. M.; England, D. G.; Nunn, J.; Jin, X.-M.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2014-04-01

    Storing information encoded in light is critical for realizing optical buffers for all-optical signal processing and quantum memories for quantum information processing. These proposals require efficient interaction between atoms and a well-defined optical mode. Photonic crystal fibres can enhance light-matter interactions and have engendered a broad range of nonlinear effects; however, the storage of light has proven elusive. Here, we report the first demonstration of an optical memory in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. We store gigahertz-bandwidth light in the hyperfine coherence of caesium atoms at room temperature using a far-detuned Raman interaction. We demonstrate a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.6:1 at the single-photon level and a memory efficiency of 27 +/- 1%. Our results demonstrate the potential of a room-temperature fibre-integrated optical memory for implementing local nodes of quantum information networks.

  8. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  9. Exciton and core-level electron confinement effects in transparent ZnO thin films

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Adolfo A.; Horwat, David; Rashkovskiy, Alexandr; Kovalev, Anatoly; Miska, Patrice; Wainstein, Dmitry; Albella, Jose M.; Endrino, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    The excitonic light emission of ZnO films have been investigated by means of photoluminescence measurements in ultraviolet-visible region. Exciton confinement effects have been observed in thin ZnO coatings with thickness below 20 nm. This is enhanced by a rise of the intensity and a blue shift of the photoluminescence peak after extraction of the adsorbed species upon annealing in air. It is found experimentally that the free exciton energy (determined by the photoluminescence peak) is inversely proportional to the square of the thickness while core-level binding energy is inversely proportional to the thickness. These findings correlate very well with the theory of kinetic and potential confinements.

  10. Exploring the core level shift origin of sulfur and thiolates on Pd(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salvarezza, Roberto Carlos; Carro, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Thiol molecules on planar metal surfaces are widely used for building sensing and electronic devices and also as capping agents to protect and to control the size and shape of nanoparticles. In the case of Pd the thiol molecules exhibit a complex behavior because C-S bond scission is possible, resulting in a significant amount of co-adsorbed S. Therefore identification of these species on Pd is a key point for many applications, a task that is usually achieved by XPS. Here we show, from DFT calculations, that the core level shift (CLS) of the S 2p binding energy (BE) of thiol and sulfur on different thiol-Pd(111) surface models strongly depends on the adsorbed or subsurface state of sulfur atoms. Our results reflect the complexity of S 2p BE behavior and contribute to understanding and reanalyzing the experimental data of thiolated Pd surfaces.

  11. Characterization of tuyere-level core-drill coke samples from blast furnace operation

    SciTech Connect

    S. Dong; N. Paterson; S.G. Kazarian; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2007-12-15

    A suite of tuyere-level coke samples have been withdrawn from a working blast furnace during coal injection, using the core-drilling technique. The samples have been characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-RS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) extracts of the cokes sampled from the 'bosh', the rear of the 'bird's nest', and the 'dead man' zones were found by SEC to contain heavy soot-like materials (ca. 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} apparent mass units). In contrast, NMP extracts of cokes taken from the raceway and the front of the 'bird's nest' only contained a small amount of material of relatively lower apparent molecular mass (up to ca. 10{sup 5} u). Since the feed coke contained no materials extractable by the present method, the soot-like materials are thought to have formed during the reactions of volatile matter released from the injectant coal, probably via dehydrogenation and repolymerization of the tars. The Raman spectra of the NMP-extracted core-drilled coke samples showed variations reflecting their temperature histories. Area ratios of D-band to G-band decreased as the exposure temperature increased, while intensity ratios of D to G band and those of 2D to G bands increased with temperature. The graphitic (G), defect (D), and random (R) fractions of the carbon structure of the cokes were also derived from the Raman spectra. The R fractions decreased with increasing temperature, whereas G fractions increased, while the D fractions showed a more complex variation with temperature. These data appear to give clues regarding the graphitization mechanism of tuyere-level cokes in the blast furnace. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Layout, Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Gauges, Ralph; Rost, Ursula; Sahle, Sven; Wengler, Katja; Bergmann, Frank Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Many software tools provide facilities for depicting reaction network diagrams in a visual form. Two aspects of such a visual diagram can be distinguished: the layout (i.e.: the positioning and connections) of the elements in the diagram, and the graphical form of the elements (for example, the glyphs used for symbols, the properties of the lines connecting them, and so on). For software tools that also read and write models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format, a common need is to store the network diagram together with the SBML representation of the model. This in turn raises the question of how to encode the layout and the rendering of these diagrams. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding diagrams, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The Layout package for SBML Level 3 adds the necessary features to SBML so that diagram layouts can be encoded in SBML files, and a companion package called SBML Rendering specifies how the graphical rendering of elements can be encoded. The SBML Layout package is based on the principle that reaction network diagrams should be described as representations of entities such as species and reactions (with direct links to the underlying SBML elements), and not as arbitrary drawings or graphs; for this reason, existing languages for the description of vector drawings (such as SVG) or general graphs (such as GraphML) cannot be used. PMID:26528565

  13. Optimisation of glaciological parameters for ice core chronology by implementing counted layers between identified depth levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, L.; Lemieux-Dudon, B.; Landais, A.; Guillevic, M.; Kindler, P.; Parrenin, F.; Martinerie, P.

    2014-08-01

    A~recent coherent chronology has been built for 4 Antarctic ice cores and the NorthGRIP (NGRIP) Greenland ice core (Antarctic Ice Core Chronology 2012, AICC2012) using a bayesian approach for ice core dating (Datice). When building the AICC2012 chronology, and in order to prevent any confusion with official ice cores chronology, it has been imposed that the AICC2012 chronology for NGRIP should respect exactly the GICC05 chronology based on layer counting. However, such a strong tuning did not satisfy the hypothesis of independence of background parameters and observations for the NGRIP core as required by Datice. We present here the implementation in Datice of a new type of markers that is better suited to constraints deduced from layer counting: the markers of age-difference. Using this type of markers for NGRIP in a 5 cores dating exercise with Datice, we have performed several sensitivity tests and show that the new ice core chronologies obtained with these new markers do not differ by more than 400 years from AICC2012 for Antarctic ice cores and by more than 130 years from GICC05 for NGRIP over the last 60 000 years. With this new parameterization, the accumulation rate and lock-in depth associated with NGRIP are more coherent with independent estimates than those obtained in AICC2012. While these new chronologies should not be used yet as new ice core chronologies, the improved methodology presented here should be considered in the next coherent ice core dating exercise.

  14. Antibody to Hepatitis B Core Antigen Levels in the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Dan-Yang; Xu, Chun; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Wen; Lv, Dong-Xia; Li, Jun; Deng, Yong-Qiong; Wang, Yan; Huo, Na; Yu, Min; Xi, Hong-Li; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Yi-Xing; Wang, Gui-Qiang; Xia, Ning-Shao; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have revealed antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) levels as a predictor of treatment response in hepatitis B early antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in both interferon and nucleos(t)ide analog therapy cohorts. However, there is no information about anti-HBc levels in the natural history of CHB. This study aimed to define anti-HBc levels of different phases in the natural history of CHB. Two hundred eleven treatment-naive CHB patients were included in the study. They were classified into 4 phases: immune tolerance (IT) phase (n = 39), immune clearance (IC) phase (n = 48), low or no-replicative (LR) phase (n = 55), and HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH, n = 69). Fifty patients who were HBsAg negative and anti-HBc positive were also recruited as past HBV infection (PBI) control group. Anti-HBc levels were measured by a newly developed double-sandwich immunoassay. Correlation of anti-HBc levels with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and other HBV-related markers within each phase was performed. Serum anti-HBc levels were statistically significant between patients in different phases of CHB (P < 0.001). The median anti-HBc levels were: IT (3.17 log10 IU/mL), IC (4.39 log10 IU/mL), LR (3.29 log10 IU/mL), ENH (4.12 log10 IU/mL), and PBI (0.61 log10 IU/mL). There existed a strong correlation in IC (r = 0.489, P < 0.001), a poor correlation in ENH (r = 0.275, P = 0.042), and no correlation in patients with ALT reached 5 times upper limit of normal (r = 0.120, P = 0.616). Anti-HBc levels show significant differences during the natural course of CHB. These results may provide some potentially useful insights into hepatitis B pathogenesis and immune activation against hepatitis B virus. PMID:25546679

  15. Initial condition for efficient mapping of level set algorithms on many-core architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornai, Gábor János; Cserey, György

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of adding more small curves to the initial condition which determines the required number of iterations of a fast level set (LS) evolution. As a result, we discovered two new theorems and developed a proof on the worst case of the required number of iterations. Furthermore, we found that these kinds of initial conditions fit well to many-core architectures. To show this, we have included two case studies which are presented on different platforms. One runs on a graphical processing unit (GPU) and the other is executed on a cellular nonlinear network universal machine (CNN-UM). With the new initial conditions, the steady-state solutions of the LS are reached in less than eight iterations depending on the granularity of the initial condition. These dense iterations can be calculated very quickly on many-core platforms according to the two case studies. In the case of the proposed dense initial condition on GPU, there is a significant speedup compared to the sparse initial condition in all cases since our dense initial condition together with the algorithm utilizes the properties of the underlying architecture. Therefore, greater performance gain can be achieved (up to 18 times speedup compared to the sparse initial condition on GPU). Additionally, we have validated our concept against numerically approximated LS evolution of standard flows (mean curvature, Chan-Vese, geodesic active regions). The dice indexes between the fast LS evolutions and the evolutions of the numerically approximated partial differential equations are in the range of 0.99±0.003.

  16. Performance of the TPSS Functional on Predicting Core Level Binding Energies of Main Group Elements Containing Molecules: A Good Choice for Molecules Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pueyo Bellafont, Noèlia; Viñes, Francesc; Illas, Francesc

    2016-01-12

    Here we explored the performance of Hartree-Fock (HF), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functionals in predicting core level 1s binding energies (BEs) and BE shifts (ΔBEs) for a large set of 68 molecules containing a wide variety of functional groups for main group elements B → F and considering up to 185 core levels. A statistical analysis comparing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments shows that BEs estimations are very accurate, TPSS exhibiting the best performance. Considering ΔBEs, the three methods yield very similar and excellent results, with mean absolute deviations of ∼0.25 eV. When considering relativistic effects, BEs deviations drop approaching experimental values. So, the largest mean percentage deviation is of 0.25% only. Linear trends among experimental and estimated values have been found, gaining offsets with respect to ideality. By adding relativistic effects to offsets, HF and TPSS methods underestimate experimental values by solely 0.11 and 0.05 eV, respectively, well within XPS chemical precision. TPSS is posed as an excellent choice for the characterization, by XPS, of molecules on metal solid substrates, given its suitability in describing metal substrates bonds and atomic and/or molecular orbitals.

  17. Density Functional Theory Study of the Energetics, Electronic Structure, and Core-Level Shifts of NO Adsorption on the Pt(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. H.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Deng, H. Q.; Li, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we report a first-principles investigation of the energetics, structures, electronic properties, and core-level shifts of NO adsorption on the Pt(111) surface. Our calculations are based on density functional theory within the framework of the ultrasoft pseudopotential plane-wave and the all-electron projected augmented-wave methods. We found that at 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 monolayer, NO adsorbs preferentially in the fcc, fcc+top, and fcc+top+hcp sites, respectively. The geometric parameters, adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, and work-function changes are in good agreement with the experimental data. The interaction between NO and Pt(111) was found to follow a donation-back-donation process, in which the NO {sigma} states donate electrons to the substrate Pt d states, while the substrate Pt d states back donate to the NO {pi} states. Though there is an overall net charge transfer from the substrate to the NO adsorbate regardless of the adsorption sites and coverages, the spatial redistribution of the transferred electron is site dependent. The charge accumulation for NO in the top sites occurs closer to the surface than NO in the hollow sites, which results in the reduction of the Pt(111) surface work function for the top NO but an increase for the hollow NO. The core-level shifts of the topmost surface Pt atoms coordinated with top and hollow NO molecules at different coverages are in excellent agreement with experiments. In contrast, the N 1s core-level shifts between top and hollow NO ({approx}0.7 eV) deviated significantly from the zero shift found in experiments. Our analysis indicates that the difference may come from the thermal vibration and rotation of adsorbed NO on the Pt(111) surface.

  18. Social Studies. Levels 7-12. Revised. Secondary Core Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    The Utah 1991 revised social studies core curriculum guide specifies standards that must be completed by all students in grades 7-12 in order to meet Utah graduation standards. A review of the K-6 social studies curriculum also is included. The core curriculum is intended to represent ideas, concepts, and skills that provide a basic social studies…

  19. Elementary Core Curriculum Standards, Levels K-6, Reading/Language Arts. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This paper presents the revised Core Curriculum standards (the essential ideas, concepts, and skills) for the K-6 reading language arts required of students in Utah. It notes that the Core should be taught with respect for differences in learning styles, learning rates, and individual capabilities without losing sight of the common goals.…

  20. Raising FLAGS: Renewing Core French at the Pre-Service Teacher Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    A new program for core French teacher candidates called FLAGS (French Language and Global Studies) was established at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in 2007. The program is intended for those who are keen to teach core French and possess rudimentary proficiency in the language but may not necessarily have the same proficiency or prior…

  1. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML): Language Specification for Level 3 Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 1 of SBML Level 3 Core. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/. PMID:26528564

  2. Intellectual property protection of IP cores through high-level watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Meyer-Baese, U.; García, A.; Parrilla, L.; Lloris, A.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper a watermarking technique for Intellectual Property Protection (IPP) of FPGA-based systems is proposed. The aim is to protect the author rights of reusable IP cores by means of a digital signature that uniquely identifies both the original design and the design recipient. The proposed watermarking technique relies on a procedure that spreads the digital signature in cells of memory structures at Hardware Description Language (HDL) design level, not increasing the area of the system. This signature is preserved through synthesis, placement and routing processes. The technique includes a procedure for signature extraction requiring minimal modifications to the system. Thus, it is possible to detect the ownership rights without interfering the normal operation of the system and providing high invulnerability. To illustrate the properties of the proposed watermarking technique, both protected and unprotected design examples are compared in terms of area and performance. The analysis of the results shows that the area increase is very low while throughput penalization is almost negligible.

  3. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy on the lanthanide-induced hydrolysis of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigekawa, Hidemi; Ikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Iijima, Yoshitoki; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    1996-03-01

    The electronic structures of the complexes of diphenyl phosphate (DPP), a model compound of DNA, with lanthanide ions have been investigated to shed light on the mechanism of the cerium (IV)-induced nonenzymatic hydrolysis of DNA. Binding energies of the P 2p core level of DPP were 134.2 eV for the complexes with La(III), Eu(III), and Lu(III), and was 134.4 eV for the Ce(IV) complex, when the metal/DPP molar ratio was 1:1. When the molar ratio was increased, only Ce(IV), the most active metal ion for DNA hydrolysis, showed a chemical shift of ˜0.5 eV toward the higher binding energy region. The chemical shift of ˜0.5 eV toward the higher binding energy region. The chemical shift was due to the systematic increase in the intensity of the higher binding energy component. The observed change in the electronic structure of the DPP-Ce(IV) complex may be related to the superb ability of Ce(IV) for the hydrolysis of DNA.

  4. The effect of core level crossing on the high-pressure equation of state of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, John

    2015-03-01

    The equation of state of the 5d transition metal osmium has been studied with a combination of experiment and theory at pressures up to 500 GPa. The experimental results show a c/a ratio increasing by approximately 1 percent over this pressure range and displaying anomalies at pressures near 180 GPa and near 400 GPa. We have use all-electron fully relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the cold equation of state and structural parameters of osmium at pressures up to 500 GPa, using one LDA and two GGA functionals. The increase in the c/a ratio agrees well with experiment, and we find anomalies, although less extreme, near the experimentally observed pressures. We find that the high pressure anomaly coincides with the crossing and hybridization of the 4f(7/2) and 5p(3/2) semi-core levels. In this talk we discuss the theoretical results and methodology and the possible implication for the equations of state of the 5d transition and actinide metals.

  5. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML): Language Specification for Level 3 Version 1 Core.

    PubMed

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-09-04

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 1 of SBML Level 3 Core. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/.

  6. Intermediate Coupling For Core-Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Sassi, Michel JPC; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-15

    The origin of the complex NEXAFS features of X-Ray Absorption, XAS, spectra in transition metal complexes is analyzed and interpreted in terms of the angular momentum coupling of the open shell electrons. Especially for excited configurations where a core-electron is promoted to an open valence shell, the angular momentum coupling is intermediate between the two limits of Russell- Saunders, RS, coupling where spin-orbit splitting of the electron shells is neglected and j-j coupling where this splitting is taken as dominant. The XAS intensities can be understood in terms of two factors: (1) The dipole selection rules that give the allowed excited RS multiplets and (2) The contributions of these allowed multiplets to the wavefunctions of the intermediate coupled levels. It is shown that the origin of the complex XAS spectra is due to the distribution of the RS allowed multiplets over several different intermediate coupled excited levels. The specific case that is analyzed is the L2,3 edge XAS of an Fe3+ cation, because this cation allows a focus on the angular momentum coupling to the exclusion of other effects; e.g., chemical bonding. Arguments are made that the properties identified for this atomic case are relevant for more complex materials. The analysis is based on the properties of fully relativistic, ab initio, many-body wavefunctions for the initial and final states of the XAS process. The wavefunction properties considered include the composition of the wavefunctions in terms of RS multiplets and the occupations of the spin-orbit split open shells; the latter vividly show whether the coupling is j-j or not.

  7. Engineering task plan for upgrades to the leveling jacks on core sample trucks number 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    KOSTELNIK, A.J.

    1999-02-24

    Characterizing the waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site is accomplished by obtaining a representative core sample for analysis. Core sampling is one of the numerous techniques that have been developed for use given the environmental and field conditions at the Hanford Site. Core sampling is currently accomplished using either Push Mode Core Sample Truck No.1 or; Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks No.2, 3 or 4. Past analysis (WHC 1994) has indicated that the Core Sample Truck (CST) leveling jacks are structurally inadequate when lateral loads are applied. WHC 1994 identifies many areas where failure could occur. All these failures are based on exceeding the allowable stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) code. The mode of failure is for the outrigger attachments to the truck frame to fail resulting in dropping of the CST and possible overturning (Ref. Ziada and Hundal, 1996). Out of level deployment of the truck can exceed the code allowable stresses in the structure. Calculations have been performed to establish limits for maintaining the truck level when lifting. The calculations and the associated limits are included in appendix A. The need for future operations of the CSTS is limited. Sampling is expected to be complete in FY-2001. Since there is limited time at risk for continued use of the CSTS with the leveling controls without correcting the structural problems, there are several design changes that could give incremental improvements to the operational safety of the CSTS with limited impact on available operating time. The improvements focus on making the truck easier to control during lifting and leveling. Not all of the tasks identified in this ETP need to be performed. Each task alone can improve the safety. This engineering task plan is the management plan document for implementing the necessary additional structural analysis. Any additional changes to meet requirements of standing orders shall require a

  8. Increased plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 1 (sFlt-1) in women by moderate exercise and increased plasma levels of VEGF in overweight/obese women

    PubMed Central

    Makey, Kristina L.; Patterson, Sharla G.; Robinson, James; Loftin, Mark; Waddell, Dwight E.; Miele, Lucio; Chinchar, Edmund; Huang, Min; Smith, Andrew D.; Weber, Mark; Gu, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide, and this seems to be related to an increase in lifestyle risk factors, including physical inactivity, and overweight/obesity. We previously reported that exercise induced a circulating angiostatic phenotype characterized by increased sFlt-1 and endostatin and decreased unbound-VEGF in men. However, there is no data on women. The present study determines the following: 1) whether moderate exercise increased sFlt-1 and endostatin and decreased unbound-VEGF in the circulation of adult female volunteers; 2) whether overweight/obese women have a higher plasma level of unbound-VEGF than lean women. 72 African American and Caucasian adult women volunteers aged from 18–44 were enrolled into the exercise study. All the participants walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes at a moderate intensity (55–59% heart rate reserve), and oxygen consumption (VO2) was quantified by utilizing a metabolic cart. We had the blood samples before and immediately after exercise from 63 participants. ELISA assays (R&D Systems) showed that plasma levels of sFlt-1 were 67.8±3.7 pg/ml immediately after exercise (30 minutes), significantly higher than basal levels, 54.5±3.3 pg/ml, before exercise (P < 0.01; n=63). There was no significant difference in the % increase of sFlt-1 levels after exercise between African American and Caucasian (P=0.533) or between lean and overweight/obese women (P=0.892). There was no significant difference in plasma levels of unbound VEGF (35.28±5.47 vs. 35.23±4.96 pg/ml; P=0.99) or endostatin (111.12±5.48 vs. 115.45±7.15 ng/ml; P=0.63) before and after exercise. Basal plasma levels of unbound-VEGF in overweight/obese women were 52.26±9.6 pg/ml, significantly higher than basal levels of unbound-VEGF in lean women, 27.34±4.99 pg/ml (P < 0.05). The results support our hypothesis that exercise-induced plasma levels of sFlt-1 could be an important clinical biomarker to explore the mechanisms of exercise

  9. [The effect of triamcinolone acetonide, montelukast, nedocromil sodium, formoterol on levels levels of sICAM-1, sIL-2R in serum and clinical course of asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Iwona; Jerzyńska, Joanna; Majak, Paweł; Grzelewski, Tomasz; Górski, Paweł; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-02-01

    One of the characteristics of asthma is the variability of inflammation. Thus, it is important to monitor inflammation serially in asthma, e.g. by the use of peripheral blood markers. To evaluate the effect of treatment on allergic inflammation, we measured serum levels of sIL-2R, sICAM-1 and clinical parameters before and after 4 weeks treatment with triamcinolon, montelukast, nedocromil and formoterol. It was 8 week, placebo-controlled and randomized, double blind trial of 158 children with moderate atopic asthma. Patients were randomly allocated to received 400 micrograms triamcinolon (n = 28), 5 or 10 mg (according to age) montelukast (n = 27), 16 mg nedocromil (n = 30), 24 micrograms formoterol (n = 29) or placebo (n = 44). 140 children completed the study. After treatment with triamcinolon, montelukast and nedocromil sIL-2R and sICAM-1 serum level significantly decreased, and all clinical parameters improved; treatment with triamcinolon had the strongest effect on most parameters (except of FEV1). Mean sIL-2R before and after treatment with triamcinolon were 724.1 pg/ml and 486.1 pg/ml respectively (p < 0.001); with nedocromil were 760.2 pg/ml and 596.7 pg/ml respectively (p < 0.001); with montelukast were 617.9 pg/ml and 491.2 pg/ml respectively (p < 0.001); with formoterol were 705.4 pg/ml and 698.9 pg/ml respectively (p = 0.8). Mean sICAM-1 serum levels before and after treatment with triamcinolon were 262.4 ng/ml and 210.4 ng/ml respectively (p < 0.001); with nedocromil were 292.9 ng/ml and 258.4 ng/ml respectively (p < 0.001); with montelukast were 277.7 ng/ml and 242.9 ng/ml respectively (p < 0.001); with formoterol were 262.6 ng/ml and 260.0 ng/ml (p = 0.6). We found significant correlation between: sIL-2R and hyperresponsiveness, sICAM-1 and hyper responsiveness, FEV1 and sICAM-1, FEV1 and sIL-2R, sIL-2R and sICAM-1 after treatment. This study shows that triamcinolon, montelukast and nedocromil contribute to inhibition of allergic inflammation by

  10. Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yan; Gou Bingcong; Chen Feng

    2011-09-28

    Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon are calculated by the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included using first-order perturbation theory. Calculated Auger channel energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution Auger spectrum in the 300-keV C{sup +}{yields} CH{sub 4} collision experiment. It is found that Auger decay of these five-electron core-excited states gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 238-280 eV.

  11. Core sampling beneath low-level radioactive-waste burial trenches, West Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prudic, David E.

    1979-01-01

    A technique was developed for collecting cores for radiometric analysis from beneath a low-level radioactive-waste landfill to determine the rates of downward radionuclide migration below the trenches. A closed pipe was driven through the buried waste, and a removable point withdrawn. The hole was then advanced by alternately pushing a coring device, then driving an inner casing to the depth reached by the coring device and cleaning out cuttings from within the casing. The effectiveness of the technique was limited by inability to predict the location of impenetrable objects within the waste in some parts of the burial ground and difficulty in detecting when the end of the pipe first penetrated undisturbed material beneath the trench floor. Geophysical logs of the completed hole were used to help determine the trench-floor depth. (USGS).

  12. Direct imaging the upconversion nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level: shell thickness dependence in upconverting optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Che, Renchao; Li, Xiaomin; Yao, Chi; Yang, Jianping; Shen, Dengke; Hu, Pan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-06-13

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles have shown considerable promise in solid-state lasers, three-dimensional flat-panel displays, and solar cells and especially biological labeling and imaging. It has been demonstrated extensively that the epitaxial coating of upconversion (UC) core crystals with a lattice-matched shell can passivate the core and enhance the overall upconversion emission intensity of the materials. However, there are few papers that report a precise link between the shell thickness of core/shell nanoparticles and their optical properties. This is mainly because rare earth fluoride upconversion core/shell structures have only been inferred from indirect measurements to date. Herein, a reproducible method to grow a hexagonal NaGdF(4) shell on NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanocrystals with monolayer control thickness is demonstrated for the first time. On the basis of the cryo-transmission electron microscopy, rigorous electron energy loss spectroscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field investigations on the core/shell structure under a low operation temperature (96 K), direct imaging the NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level was realized for the first time. Furthermore, a strong linear link between the NaGdF(4) shell thickness and the optical response of the hexagonal NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) core/shell nanocrystals has been established. During the epitaxial growth of the NaGdF(4) shell layer by layer, surface defects of the nanocrystals can be gradually passivated by the homogeneous shell deposition process, which results in the obvious enhancement in overall UC emission intensity and lifetime and is more resistant to quenching by water molecules. PMID:22545710

  13. Direct imaging the upconversion nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level: shell thickness dependence in upconverting optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Che, Renchao; Li, Xiaomin; Yao, Chi; Yang, Jianping; Shen, Dengke; Hu, Pan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-06-13

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles have shown considerable promise in solid-state lasers, three-dimensional flat-panel displays, and solar cells and especially biological labeling and imaging. It has been demonstrated extensively that the epitaxial coating of upconversion (UC) core crystals with a lattice-matched shell can passivate the core and enhance the overall upconversion emission intensity of the materials. However, there are few papers that report a precise link between the shell thickness of core/shell nanoparticles and their optical properties. This is mainly because rare earth fluoride upconversion core/shell structures have only been inferred from indirect measurements to date. Herein, a reproducible method to grow a hexagonal NaGdF(4) shell on NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanocrystals with monolayer control thickness is demonstrated for the first time. On the basis of the cryo-transmission electron microscopy, rigorous electron energy loss spectroscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field investigations on the core/shell structure under a low operation temperature (96 K), direct imaging the NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level was realized for the first time. Furthermore, a strong linear link between the NaGdF(4) shell thickness and the optical response of the hexagonal NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) core/shell nanocrystals has been established. During the epitaxial growth of the NaGdF(4) shell layer by layer, surface defects of the nanocrystals can be gradually passivated by the homogeneous shell deposition process, which results in the obvious enhancement in overall UC emission intensity and lifetime and is more resistant to quenching by water molecules.

  14. Consequences of electron correlation for XPS binding energies: Representative case for C(1s) and O(1s) XPS of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Sousa, Carme; Illas, Francesc

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present a study of the signs and the magnitudes of the errors of theoretical binding energies, BE's, of the C(1s) and O(1s) core-levels compared to BE's measured in X-Ray photoemission, XPS, experiments. In particular, we explain the unexpected sign of the error of the Hartree-Fock C(1s) BE, which is larger than experiment, in terms of correlation effects due to the near degeneracy of the CO(1π) and CO(2π) levels and show how taking this correlation into account leads to rather accurate predicted BE's. We separate the initial state contributions of this near degeneracy, present for the ground state wavefunction, from the final state near degeneracy effects, present for the hole state wavefunctions. Thus, we are able to establish the importance for the core-level BE's of initial state charge redistribution due to the π near-degeneracy. While the results for CO are interesting in their own right, we also consider whether our conclusions for CO are relevant for the analysis of XPS spectra of a wider range of molecules.

  15. Grade Level and Performance on the Core Battery, 1986-87 National Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMauro, Gerald E.

    Among the three NTE Core Battery tests, Professional Knowledge purports to measure skills that are acquired only after academic experience as an education major, while Communication Skills and General Knowledge both purport to measure skills that do not require this specialized experience. The scores of education majors for the 1986-87 national…

  16. Common Core State Standards in 2014: Curriculum and Professional Development at the District Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentner, Diane Stark; Kober, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in mathematics and English language arts (ELA) outline the knowledge and skills that students are expected to learn throughout their K-12 education in order to be prepared for college and careers when they graduate. As of October 2014, 42 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the standards in both…

  17. The diagnostic significance of signal peptide-complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1-epidermal growth factor domain-containing protein-1 levels in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Dirican, Nigar; Duman, Ali; Sağlam, Gülcan; Arslan, Akif; Ozturk, Onder; Atalay, Sule; Bircan, Ahmet; Akkaya, Ahmet; Cakir, Munire

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially life-threatening disorder. Patients with PE often have nonspecific symptoms, and the diagnosis is often delayed. AIM: The aim of our study was to investigate the role of signal peptide-complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1-epidermal growth factor domain-containing protein 1 (SCUBE1) used in the diagnosis of PE. METHODS: The study was designed prospectively. A total of 57 patients who were admitted to emergency service with clinically suspected PE were included in the study. The patients diagnosed with PE were defined as PE group (n = 32), and the patients with undetectable embolism on computerized tomographic pulmonary angiography were defined as non-PE group (n = 25). Twenty-five age- and sex-matched healthy cases were chosen for the study. Routine biochemical analysis, complete blood count, D-dimer, SCUBE1, and arterial blood gas analysis were performed early after admission. RESULTS: Mean SCUBE1 levels were higher in the PE group (0.90 ng/mL) than in the non-PE (0.38 ng/mL) and control groups (0.47 ng/mL) (P < 0.01). A cutoff point of 0.49 ng/mL for SCUBE1 indicated 100% sensitivity and 64% specificity in patients with PE. Mean D-dimer levels were not different between PE and non-PE groups (P = 0.591). A multivariable logistic regression analysis (with dichotomous PE groups as the response variable; age, gender, chest pain, syncope, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, D-dimer, neutrophil-lymphocytes ratio, and SCUBE1 variables as predictors) showed that the significant and independent predictors of PE diagnosis were SCUBE1 and chest pain. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that serum SCUBE1 measurement might be used as a diagnostic biomarker in PE. PMID:27803754

  18. Microstructure-dependent mechanical properties of electrospun core-shell scaffolds at multi-scale levels.

    PubMed

    Horner, Christopher B; Ico, Gerardo; Johnson, Jed; Zhao, Yi; Nam, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical factors among many physiochemical properties of scaffolds for stem cell-based tissue engineering significantly affect tissue morphogenesis by controlling stem cell behaviors including proliferation and phenotype-specific differentiation. Core-shell electrospinning provides a unique opportunity to control mechanical properties of scaffolds independent of surface chemistry, rendering a greater freedom to tailor design for specific applications. In this study, we synthesized electrospun core-shell scaffolds having different core composition and/or core-to-shell dimensional ratios. Two independent biocompatible polymer systems, polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) and gelatin as the core materials while maintaining the shell polymer with polycaprolactone (PCL), were utilized. The mechanics of such scaffolds was analyzed at the microscale and macroscales to determine the potential implications it may hold for cell-material and tissue-material interactions. The mechanical properties of individual core-shell fibers were controlled by core-shell composition and structure. The individual fiber modulus correlated with the increase in percent core size ranging from 0.55±0.10GPa to 1.74±0.22GPa and 0.48±0.12GPa to 1.53±0.12GPa for the PEKK-PCL and gelatin-PCL fibers, respectively. More importantly, it was demonstrated that mechanical properties of the scaffolds at the macroscale were dominantly determined by porosity under compression. The increase of scaffold porosity from 70.2%±1.0% to 93.2%±0.5% by increasing the core size in the PEKK-PCL scaffold resulted in the decrease of the compressive elastic modulus from 227.67±20.39kPa to 14.55±1.43kPa while a greater changes in the porosity of gelatin-PCL scaffold from 54.5%±4.2% to 89.6%±0.4% resulted in the compressive elastic modulus change from 484.01±30.18kPa to 17.57±1.40kPa. On the other hand, the biphasic behaviors under tensile mechanical loading result in a range from a minimum of 5.42±1.05MPa to a maximum

  19. Microstructure-dependent mechanical properties of electrospun core-shell scaffolds at multi-scale levels.

    PubMed

    Horner, Christopher B; Ico, Gerardo; Johnson, Jed; Zhao, Yi; Nam, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical factors among many physiochemical properties of scaffolds for stem cell-based tissue engineering significantly affect tissue morphogenesis by controlling stem cell behaviors including proliferation and phenotype-specific differentiation. Core-shell electrospinning provides a unique opportunity to control mechanical properties of scaffolds independent of surface chemistry, rendering a greater freedom to tailor design for specific applications. In this study, we synthesized electrospun core-shell scaffolds having different core composition and/or core-to-shell dimensional ratios. Two independent biocompatible polymer systems, polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) and gelatin as the core materials while maintaining the shell polymer with polycaprolactone (PCL), were utilized. The mechanics of such scaffolds was analyzed at the microscale and macroscales to determine the potential implications it may hold for cell-material and tissue-material interactions. The mechanical properties of individual core-shell fibers were controlled by core-shell composition and structure. The individual fiber modulus correlated with the increase in percent core size ranging from 0.55±0.10GPa to 1.74±0.22GPa and 0.48±0.12GPa to 1.53±0.12GPa for the PEKK-PCL and gelatin-PCL fibers, respectively. More importantly, it was demonstrated that mechanical properties of the scaffolds at the macroscale were dominantly determined by porosity under compression. The increase of scaffold porosity from 70.2%±1.0% to 93.2%±0.5% by increasing the core size in the PEKK-PCL scaffold resulted in the decrease of the compressive elastic modulus from 227.67±20.39kPa to 14.55±1.43kPa while a greater changes in the porosity of gelatin-PCL scaffold from 54.5%±4.2% to 89.6%±0.4% resulted in the compressive elastic modulus change from 484.01±30.18kPa to 17.57±1.40kPa. On the other hand, the biphasic behaviors under tensile mechanical loading result in a range from a minimum of 5.42±1.05MPa to a maximum

  20. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestål, K.; Feifel, R.; Tashiro, M.; Ehara, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ueda, K.

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s{sup −2}) and 1179.4 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The corresponding energies obtained for N{sub 2}O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s{sup −2}), 906.5 eV (central N1s{sup −2}), and 1174.1 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N{sub 2}O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s{sup −2} as well as with the O1s{sup −2} dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10{sup −3} for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10{sup −3} for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  1. Species-level core oral bacteriome identified by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing in a healthy young Arab population

    PubMed Central

    Al-hebshi, Nezar Noor; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Albarrag, Ahmed; Basode, Vinod Kumar; Chen, Tsute

    2016-01-01

    Background Reports on the composition of oral bacteriome in Arabs are lacking. In addition, the majority of previous studies on other ethnic groups have been limited by low-resolution taxonomic assignment of next-generation sequencing reads. Furthermore, there has been a conflict about the existence of a ‘core’ bacteriome. Objective The objective of this study was to characterize the healthy core oral bacteriome in a young Arab population at the species level. Methods Oral rinse DNA samples obtained from 12 stringently selected healthy young subjects of Arab origin were pyrosequenced (454's FLX chemistry) for the bacterial 16S V1–V3 hypervariable region at an average depth of 11,500 reads. High-quality, non-chimeric reads ≥380 bp were classified to the species level using the recently described, prioritized, multistage assignment algorithm. A core bacteriome was defined as taxa present in at least 11 samples. The Chao2, abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE), and Shannon indices were computed to assess species richness and diversity. Results Overall, 557 species-level taxa (211±42 per subject) were identified, representing 122 genera and 13 phyla. The core bacteriome comprised 55 species-level taxa belonging to 30 genera and 7 phyla, namely Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Saccharibacteria, and SR1. The core species constituted between 67 and 87% of the individual bacteriomes. However, the abundances differed by up to three orders of magnitude among the study subjects. On average, Streptococcus mitis, Rothia mucilaginosa, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Neisseria flavescence/subflava group, Prevotella melaninogenica, and Veillonella parvula group were the most abundant. Streptococcus sp. C300, a taxon never reported in the oral cavity, was identified as a core species. Species richness was estimated at 586 (Chao2) and 614 (ACE) species, whereas diversity (Shannon index) averaged at 3.99. Conclusions A species-level

  2. Levels of metals and semimetals in sedimentary cores in Bertioga Channel, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoretto, J. R.; Salaroli, A.; Figueira, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    The Baixada Santista is one of the most exploited and populated regions of São Paulo state. During the last decades, due to intense industrialization the Baixada Santista has passed through a strong process of environmental degradation. Metals in sediments are persistent, present toxicity in varied concentrations and may be deposited reaching biota habitats. In this context, high concentrations of metals represent environmental concern to costal management. Bertioga Channel is part of this complex system and is known mainly by a wide adjacent mangrove area. The channel is 25 km long, connecting the upstream region of Santos estuary to the adjacent ocean through an inlet located at the city of Bertioga. Urban development generates the concern of potential waste influx from surrounding streams, generating deposits and contaminating surface sediments along the channel, which may lead to adjacent coastal issues. The objective of this study was to characterize the concentration of the following metals at Bertioga Channel sediments: Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sc, V and Zn. Five sediment cores were sampled along the channel and analyzed. Determination of metals concentration was based on methods SW 846 US EPA 3050B and EPA 7471. High As concentrations were observed at all cores, with considerable concentration similarity between the first and second sampling points. Analytical results showed that cores Bertioga 4 and Bertioga 5 have accumulated high quantity of metals and semimetals, mainly As, Cd and Cr. Normalization of concentration values showed low contamination at the cores. Nevertheless, As and Hg values indicated moderate to significant contamination at a few sampling points. Despite of the low probability of contamination demonstrated by the normalized values, increasing at the sediment surface of Enrichment Factor (ER), Pollution Load Index (PLI) and Sediment Pollution Index (SPI) parameters were observed. Results indicate that industrialization

  3. Theoretical predictions of the impact of nuclear dynamics and environment on core-level spectra of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Schwartz, Craig; Uejio, Janel; Saykally, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Core-level spectroscopy provides an element-specific probe of local electronic structure and bonding, but linking details of atomic structure to measured spectra relies heavily on accurate theoretical interpretation. We present first principles simulations of the x-ray absorption of a range of organic molecules both in isolation and aqueous solvation, highlighting the spectral impact of internal nuclear motion as well as solvent interactions. Our approach uses density functional theory with explicit inclusion of the core-level excited state within a plane-wave supercell framework. Nuclear degrees of freedom are sampled using various molecular dynamics techniques. We indicate specific cases for molecules in their vibrational ground state at experimental conditions, where nuclear quantum effects must be included. Prepared by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Site-specific fragmentation caused by core-level photoionization: Effect of chemisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mase, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Arinobu; Nagao, Masashi; Yoshinobu, Jun; Tanaka, Shin-ichiro

    2002-08-01

    We used the energy-selected-photoelectron photoion coincidence (ESPEPICO) method to study site-specific fragmentation caused by C:1s photoionization of 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanol-d1 [CF3)CD(OHCH3, TFIP-d1] on a Si(100) surface. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that TFIP-d1 is dissociatively chemisorbed like (CF3)(CH3))CDO-Si(100, and different chemical shifts at the three carbon sites were observed by photoelectron spectroscopy. The site-specific fragmentation evident in the ESPEPICO spectra of the sub-monolayer at room temperature indicates that the TFIP-d1 there has an O-Si bond oriented in the trans position with respect to the C-CF3 bond. Here we discuss the fragmentation processes in light of the results obtained with the ESPEPICO method and the Auger-electron photoion coincidence method.

  5. The electronic characterization of biphenylene—Experimental and theoretical insights from core and valence level spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lüder, Johann; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Puglia, Carla; Simone, Monica de; Totani, Roberta; Coreno, Marcello; Grazioli, Cesare

    2015-02-21

    In this paper, we provide detailed insights into the electronic structure of the gas phase biphenylene molecule through core and valence spectroscopy. By comparing results of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements with ΔSCF core-hole calculations in the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT), we could decompose the characteristic contributions to the total spectra and assign them to non-equivalent carbon atoms. As a difference with similar molecules like biphenyl and naphthalene, an influence of the localized orbitals on the relative XPS shifts was found. The valence spectrum probed by photoelectron spectroscopy at a photon energy of 50 eV in conjunction with hybrid DFT calculations revealed the effects of the localization on the electronic states. Using the transition potential approach to simulate the X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements, similar contributions from the non-equivalent carbon atoms were determined from the total spectrum, for which the slightly shifted individual components can explain the observed asymmetric features.

  6. Molecular Spectroscopy in Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber at the 10 kHz Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenchen; Knabe, Kevin; Wu, Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Tillman, Karl; Washburn, Brian; Corwin, Kristan; Wheeler, Natalie; Couny, Francois; Benabid, Fetah

    2010-03-01

    High-accuracy spectroscopy in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) is desirable for many applications, including frequency references and trace gas analysis. We demonstrate the narrowest sub-Doppler linewidths attained in HC-PCF using large-core kagome structured fiber. Such fibers can yield highly accurate frequency measurements that are about two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported. A fiber laser is locked to the ^12C2H2 ν1+ν3 P(13) transition inside kagome fiber, and compared with two optical frequency combs referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator. The absolute frequency of the measured line center agrees with those measured in power build-up cavities to within 9.3 kHz (1 σ error). Approaches to further narrow the linewidths and improve systematic errors are investigated. The present system thus combines accuracy approaching that of power build-up cavities with the potential to be compact, robust, and integrated into an all-fiber system for a portable near-infrared frequency reference. Supported by AFOSR FA9950-05-1-0304 and NSF ECS-0449295.

  7. Yes we can! Eliminating health disparities as part of the core business of nursing on a global level.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    Nurses in the 21st century are being called to rise to new levels of practice, including a more influential leadership at senior levels of policy development. Decades of research, good will, and a revolutionary civil rights movement have not resolved the world's staggering health outcome disparities. Nursing has a solution: Many of the most troubling disparities are amenable to effective intervention by the world's nurses through their clinical and policy work. The author challenges nurses to imagine the impact on global health if the elimination of disparities is the core goal of nursing for the 21st century. Moving from individuals and communities to systems levels, nurses must be versed in a range of system-level vital signs that affect policy development including economics, demographics, and access to care. Setting our sights on the elimination of health disparities offers a rallying point around which nursing can coalesce and set human health on a new and more equitable course.

  8. Yes we can! Eliminating health disparities as part of the core business of nursing on a global level.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    Nurses in the 21st century are being called to rise to new levels of practice, including a more influential leadership at senior levels of policy development. Decades of research, good will, and a revolutionary civil rights movement have not resolved the world's staggering health outcome disparities. Nursing has a solution: Many of the most troubling disparities are amenable to effective intervention by the world's nurses through their clinical and policy work. The author challenges nurses to imagine the impact on global health if the elimination of disparities is the core goal of nursing for the 21st century. Moving from individuals and communities to systems levels, nurses must be versed in a range of system-level vital signs that affect policy development including economics, demographics, and access to care. Setting our sights on the elimination of health disparities offers a rallying point around which nursing can coalesce and set human health on a new and more equitable course. PMID:19074199

  9. The influence of oxygen adsorption on the NEXAFS and core-level XPS spectra of the C{sub 60} derivative PCBM

    SciTech Connect

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Ericsson, Leif; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen

    2015-02-07

    Fullerenes have been a main focus of scientific research since their discovery due to the interesting possible applications in various fields like organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, the derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 60}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is currently one of the most popular choices due to its higher solubility in organic solvents compared to unsubstituted C{sub 60}. One of the central issues in the field of OPVs is device stability, since modules undergo deterioration (losses in efficiency, open circuit voltage, and short circuit current) during operation. In the case of fullerenes, several possibilities have been proposed, including dimerization, oxidation, and impurity related deterioration. We have studied by means of density functional theory the possibility of oxygen adsorption on the C{sub 60} molecular moiety of PCBM. The aim is to provide guidelines for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements which can probe the presence of atomic or molecular oxygen on the fullerene cage. By analysing several configurations of PCBM with one or more adsorbed oxygen atoms, we show that a joint core level XPS and O1s NEXAFS investigation could be effectively used not only to confirm oxygen adsorption but also to pinpoint the bonding configuration and the nature of the adsorbate.

  10. Study of muons near shower cores at sea level using the E594 neutrino detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, J. A.; Gupta, S. C.; Freudenreich, H.; Sivaprasad, K.; Tonwar, S. C.; Yodh, G. B.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Goodman, M. C.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.

    1985-01-01

    The E594 neutrino detector has been used to study the lateral distribution of muons of energy 3 GeV near shower cores. The detector consists of a 340 ton fine grain calorimeter with 400,000 cells of flash chamber and dimensions of 3.7 m x 20 m x 3.7 m (height). The average density in the calorimeter is 1.4 gm/sq cm, and the average Z is 21. The detector was triggered by four 0.6 sq m scintillators placed immediately on the top of the calorimeter. The trigger required at least two of these four counters. The accompanying extensive air showers (EAS) was sampled by 14 scintillation counters located up to 15 m from the calorimeter. Several off line cuts have been applied to the data. Demanding five particles in at least two of the trigger detectors, a total of 20 particles in all of them together, and an arrival angle for the shower 450 deg reduced the data sample to 11053 events. Of these in 4869 cases, a computer algorithm found at least three muons in the calorimeter.

  11. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001).

    PubMed

    Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule-surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C-C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes.

  12. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Summary By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes. PMID:26734516

  13. [VIEW Level, Special Education Core Curriculum Manual.] I.E.P. Development Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen County Region III, Demerest, NJ. Div. of Special Education.

    The Individualized Educational Program development guide is intended for handicapped students at the VIEW level (Vocational Instruction and Experience Workshop). Goals, objectives, and activities are specified for each of seven categories (sample subsections in parentheses): (1) assembly skills (collating, sorting, filing, folding); (2)…

  14. The Special Education Core Curriculum Manual: Competency Level -- Communication Skills, Mathematics, Life Skills, and Study Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Leonard; And Others

    The manual is intended to provide basic objectives and teaching strategies for teachers of handicapped children at the upper elementary and secondary level in the areas of communication, mathematics, life skills, and study skills. Each subject area is divided into sub-sections under which learning objectives and associated teaching activities are…

  15. Time-related dynamics of variation in core clock gene expression levels in tissues relevant to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Sothern, R B; Greco, A; Pazienza, V; Vinciguerra, M; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    Immune parameters show rhythmic changes with a 24-h periodicity driven by an internal circadian timing system that relies on clock genes (CGs). CGs form interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops to generate and maintain 24-h mRNA and protein oscillations. In this study we evaluate and compare the profiles and the dynamics of variation of CG expression in peripheral blood, and two lymphoid tissues of mice. Expression levels of seven recognized key CGs (mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1, mCry2, and Rev-erbalpha) were evaluated by quantitative RT- PCR in spleen, thymus and peripheral blood of C57BL/6 male mice housed on a 12-h light (L)-dark (D) cycle and sacrificed every 4 h for 24 h (3-4 mice/time point). We found a statistically significant time-effect in spleen (S), thymus (T) and blood (B) for the original values of expression level of mBmal1 (S), mClock (T, B), mPer1 (S, B), mPer2 (S), mCry1 (S), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S, T, B) and for the fractional variation calculated between single time-point expression value of mBmal1 (B), mPer2 (T), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S). A significant 24-h rhythm was validated for five CGs in blood (mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry2, mRev-Erbalpha), for four CGs in the spleen (mBmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha), and for three CGs in the thymus (mClock, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha). The original values of acrophases for mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2 were very similar for spleen and thymus and advanced by several hours for peripheral blood compared to the lymphoid tissues, whereas the phases of mRev-Erbalpha were coincident for all three tissues. In conclusion, central and peripheral lymphoid tissues in the mouse show different sequences of activation of clock gene expression compared to peripheral blood. These differences may underlie the compartmental pattern of web functioning in the immune system.

  16. Time-related dynamics of variation in core clock gene expression levels in tissues relevant to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Sothern, R B; Greco, A; Pazienza, V; Vinciguerra, M; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    Immune parameters show rhythmic changes with a 24-h periodicity driven by an internal circadian timing system that relies on clock genes (CGs). CGs form interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops to generate and maintain 24-h mRNA and protein oscillations. In this study we evaluate and compare the profiles and the dynamics of variation of CG expression in peripheral blood, and two lymphoid tissues of mice. Expression levels of seven recognized key CGs (mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1, mCry2, and Rev-erbalpha) were evaluated by quantitative RT- PCR in spleen, thymus and peripheral blood of C57BL/6 male mice housed on a 12-h light (L)-dark (D) cycle and sacrificed every 4 h for 24 h (3-4 mice/time point). We found a statistically significant time-effect in spleen (S), thymus (T) and blood (B) for the original values of expression level of mBmal1 (S), mClock (T, B), mPer1 (S, B), mPer2 (S), mCry1 (S), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S, T, B) and for the fractional variation calculated between single time-point expression value of mBmal1 (B), mPer2 (T), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S). A significant 24-h rhythm was validated for five CGs in blood (mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry2, mRev-Erbalpha), for four CGs in the spleen (mBmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha), and for three CGs in the thymus (mClock, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha). The original values of acrophases for mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2 were very similar for spleen and thymus and advanced by several hours for peripheral blood compared to the lymphoid tissues, whereas the phases of mRev-Erbalpha were coincident for all three tissues. In conclusion, central and peripheral lymphoid tissues in the mouse show different sequences of activation of clock gene expression compared to peripheral blood. These differences may underlie the compartmental pattern of web functioning in the immune system. PMID:22230394

  17. An ambipolar organic field-effect transistor based on an AIE-active single crystal with a high mobility level of 2.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian; Xu, Yuanxiang; Liu, Liqun; Feng, Cunfang; Tang, Jia; Gao, Yu; Wang, Yan; Yang, Bing; Lu, Ping; Yang, Wensheng; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-02-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) material were fabricated using a calcium-gold asymmetric electrode system. The devices showed very high and balanced mobility, reaching 2.50 and 2.10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively, for electron and hole. Strong green electroluminescence from the single-crystal side edge was observed from all the devices. This work demonstrates that AIE active materials could not only achieve high luminescence, but also be used in light emitting transistors and achieve very high mobility. PMID:26730680

  18. Surface effects on core-level binding energies and valence in thulium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaindl, G.; Laubschat, C.; Reihl, B.; Pollak, R. A.; Mårtensson, N.; Holtzberg, F.; Eastman, D. E.

    1982-08-01

    Vacuum-cleaved (100) surfaces of mixed-valent TmSe, divalent TmTe, and trivalent TmS were studied by high-resolution, angle-integrated photoelectron spectroscopy with the use of synchrotron radiation in the energy range 30<=hν<=110 eV. In the topmost surface layers of TmSe and TmTe the 4f levels are found to be shifted to higher binding energies by 0.32+/-0.04 and 0.41+/-0.05 eV, respectively. In both TmSe and TmS the topmost surface layers are divalent. In the case of TmSe a separation of the Tm2+ 4f12 spectral feature into surface and bulk contributions allows a determination of the bulk mean valence v¯=2.55+/-0.05. While a shift of the Se 3d levels to lower binding energy is observed for Se atoms in the topmost surface layer of TmSe, no such shift can be resolved for the Te 4d levels of TmTe. The surface-derived divalent spectral features can be quenched completely in all three cases by exposure of the surfaces to submonolayer amounts of oxygen, resulting in the formation of trivalent surface oxides. Values for the electron mean free path l are derived from the observed surface- and bulk-spectral intensities, with l decreasing with decreasing electron kinetic energy down to ≅45 eV. Smaller singularity indices α of the Doniach-Sunjić line shapes as well as smaller extrinsic losses are observed for photoemission from the divalent surface layers as compared to the bulk.

  19. The core and conserved role of MAL is homeostatic regulation of actin levels.

    PubMed

    Salvany, Lara; Muller, Julius; Guccione, Ernesto; Rørth, Pernille

    2014-05-15

    The transcription cofactor MAL is regulated by free actin levels and thus by actin dynamics. MAL, together with its DNA-binding partner, SRF, is required for invasive cell migration and in experimental metastasis. Although MAL/SRF has many targets, we provide genetic evidence in both Drosophila and human cellular models that actin is the key target that must be regulated by MAL/SRF for invasive cell migration. By regulating MAL/SRF activity, actin protein feeds back on production of actin mRNA to ensure sufficient supply of actin. This constitutes a dedicated homeostatic feedback system that provides a foundation for cellular actin dynamics.

  20. A Search for Invisible Decays of the Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-17

    We search for invisible decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B Factory. We select events containing the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable {Upsilon}(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} invisible) < 3.0 x 10{sup ?4} at the 90% confidence level.

  1. Search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-18

    We search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Upsilon(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Upsilon(1S) --> invisible) < 3.0 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:20366249

  2. Search for Invisible Decays of the Υ(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    We search for invisible decays of the Υ(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4×106 Υ(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Υ(3S)→π+π-Υ(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Υ(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→invisible)<3.0×10-4 at the 90% confidence level.

  3. Search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-18

    We search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Upsilon(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Upsilon(1S) --> invisible) < 3.0 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level.

  4. Core level regulatory network of osteoblast as molecular mechanism for osteoporosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaomei; Li, Jun; Liang, Yuhong; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhang, Bingbing; Tan, Shuang; Guo, Huajie; Guan, Shuguang; Ao, Ping; Zhou, Guangqian

    2016-01-01

    To develop and evaluate the long-term prophylactic treatment for chronic diseases such as osteoporosis requires a clear view of mechanism at the molecular and systems level. While molecular signaling pathway studies for osteoporosis are extensive, a unifying mechanism is missing. In this work, we provide experimental and systems-biology evidences that a tightly connected top-level regulatory network may exist, which governs the normal and osteoporotic phenotypes of osteoblast. Specifically, we constructed a hub-like interaction network from well-documented cross-talks among estrogens, glucocorticoids, retinoic acids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, vitamin D receptor and calcium-signaling pathways. The network was verified with transmission electron microscopy and gene expression profiling for bone tissues of ovariectomized (OVX) rats before and after strontium gluconate (GluSr) treatment. Based on both the network structure and the experimental data, the dynamical modeling predicts calcium and glucocorticoids signaling pathways as targets for GluSr treatment. Modeling results further reveal that in the context of missing estrogen signaling, the GluSr treated state may be an outcome that is closest to the healthy state. PMID:26783964

  5. Core level regulatory network of osteoblast as molecular mechanism for osteoporosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruoshi; Ma, Shengfei; Zhu, Xiaomei; Li, Jun; Liang, Yuhong; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhang, Bingbing; Tan, Shuang; Guo, Huajie; Guan, Shuguang; Ao, Ping; Zhou, Guangqian

    2016-01-26

    To develop and evaluate the long-term prophylactic treatment for chronic diseases such as osteoporosis requires a clear view of mechanism at the molecular and systems level. While molecular signaling pathway studies for osteoporosis are extensive, a unifying mechanism is missing. In this work, we provide experimental and systems-biology evidences that a tightly connected top-level regulatory network may exist, which governs the normal and osteoporotic phenotypes of osteoblast. Specifically, we constructed a hub-like interaction network from well-documented cross-talks among estrogens, glucocorticoids, retinoic acids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, vitamin D receptor and calcium-signaling pathways. The network was verified with transmission electron microscopy and gene expression profiling for bone tissues of ovariectomized (OVX) rats before and after strontium gluconate (GluSr) treatment. Based on both the network structure and the experimental data, the dynamical modeling predicts calcium and glucocorticoids signaling pathways as targets for GluSr treatment. Modeling results further reveal that in the context of missing estrogen signaling, the GluSr treated state may be an outcome that is closest to the healthy state. PMID:26783964

  6. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  7. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A. E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  8. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvatić, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of π∗ -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the π⊥∗(C=C-C≡N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized π∥∗(C≡N) produces C≡N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C≡N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  9. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 1s core correlation on properties and energy separations are analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be1S - 1P, the C 3P - 5S,m and CH(+) 1Sigma(+) - 1Pi separations, and CH(+) spectroscopic constants, dipole moment, and 1Sigma(+) - 1Pi transition dipole moment have been studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods.

  10. Adsorption and dissociation of acidic trace gases on ice surfaces - caught in the act with core level spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Ammann, Markus; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Peter, Thomas; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Chemistry and physical processes in Earth's ice and snow cover can change the composition of the atmosphere and the contaminant content of the cryosphere. They have thus direct impacts on geochemical cycles and the climate system. Our ability to predict the fate of chemicals in snow or air masses in exchange with the cryosphere on a regional scale or to model those in snow chemistry models is currently hampered by our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms on a molecular level. So far, direct experimental observations under environmentally relevant conditions of the ice surface and of the adsorption of trace gases to it are very limited. The unique approach of this study is to combine two surface sensitive spectroscopic methods to directly probe the hydrogen-bonding network at the ice surface ( ~1 nm depth) and the concentration, depth profile (~1 to 10 nm), and dissociation degree of the dopant. We present first core-electron photoemission (XPS) and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (NEXAFS) measurements of formic acid adsorbed to ice at 240 K. The analysis of oxygen NEXAFS spectra reveals information on changes in the hydrogen-bonding network of the ice surface upon adsorption of formic acid. Depth profiles based on XPS measurements indicate that the adsorbed acid stays at the ice surface. Furthermore we obtained a preliminary estimation of the degree of formic acid dissociation at the ice surface. Results are compared to earlier core-electron studies of several trace gases adsorbed to ice at 240 K and compared to results from more traditional method to and snow to reveal fundamental aspects of the ice surface and how it interacts with dopants. Even with the focus on adsorption of acidic trace gases to ice, results of this study will thus be of high relevance also for other chemical processes in ice and snow. This is of interest not only in environmental science but also in material science, cryobiology, and astrophysics.

  11. In-fiber liquid-level probe based on Michelson interferometer via dual-mode elliptical multilayer-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Ren, Guobin; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Wei, Huai; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-07-01

    An in-fiber liquid-level probe fabricated from homemade dual-mode elliptical multilayer-core fiber (EMCF) was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed sensor simply consists of a segment of the EMCF with one end coated with silver film, and a Michelson interferometer is roughly established when light from single-mode fiber incident from the other end. The detected interference patterns, rather clean due to the few-mode property, shift as the liquid level due to strong interaction between high-order modes and measurands through evanescent waves. Both the propagation characteristics and operation principle of such a sensor were demonstrated in detail, and sensitivities of 33.48, 43.35, and 48.93 pm/mm corresponding to liquid indices of 1.333, 1.353, and 1.373 were successfully achieved with a 50-mm EMCF probe, respectively. Moreover, the proposed sensor had the potential to discriminate measurand index after proper calibration.

  12. Core-level attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of laser-dressed solid films of Si and Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seres, Enikoe; Seres, Jozsef; Serrat, Carles; Namba, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    We investigated experimentally as well as theoretically the ultrafast response of the wave function of the conduction band (CB) of Si and Zr to a near-infrared laser field using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption spectroscopy in the spectral range of 80-220 eV. The measured dynamics of the XUV transmission demonstrates that the wave function of the CB follows the electric field of the dressing laser pulse. In these terms, laser dressing was earlier mainly studied on gases. Measurements with two-femtosecond and 200-attosecond temporal steps were performed in the vicinity of the Si L2 ,3 edge near 100 eV, the Si L1 edge near 150 eV, and the Zr M4 ,5 edge near 180 eV. The observed changes were dependent on the core states being excited by the XUV probe pulse. At the 2 p to CB transitions of Si, the XUV transmission increased via the effect of the dressing laser pulse, while at the 2 s to CB transition of Si and the 3 d to CB transition of Zr, the XUV transmission decreased. Furthermore, beats between the transition from 2 p1 /2 and 2 p3 /2 levels of Si and from 3 d3 /2 and 3 d5 /2 levels of Zr were observed with 20.7 fs and 3.6 fs periods.

  13. Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck grapple hoist box level wind system

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-12

    This Engineering Task Plan is to design, generate fabrication drawings, fabricate, test, and install the grapple hoist level wind system for Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) 3 and 4. Deliverables will include generating fabrication drawings, fabrication of one level wind system, updating fabrication drawings as required, and installation of level wind systems on RMCST 3 or 4. The installation of the level wind systems will be done during a preventive maintenance outage.

  14. Occupied and unoccupied orbitals of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} probed with C 1s emission and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the orbital structure of the fullerenes, and to pursue its evolution from a cluster to the infinite solid. For obtaining a complete picture of the electronic structure the authors compare a variety of experimental techniques, i.e. photoemission and core level emission for occupied orbitals and inverse photoemission and core level absorption for unoccupied orbitals. Their experimental results focus on optical probes involving the C 1s core level, i.e. absorption via transitions from the C 1s level into unoccupied {pi}* and {sigma}* orbitals and emission involving transitions from occupied orbitals into a C 1s hole. Due to the simplicity of the C 1s level there exist clear selection rules. For example, only transitions to and from orbitals with p-character are dipole-allowed. These results on the p-projected density of states are compared with inverse photoemission and photoemission results, where the selection rules are less definitive. In addition, a first-principles quasiparticle calculation of the density of states is used to assign the orbital features. The spectra from C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} are still far from their infinite analog, i.e., graphite, which is also measured with the same techniques. In order to determine the effect of electron transfer onto C{sub 60}, as in superconducting alkali fullerides, the authors are studying resonant emission of C{sub 60}. An electron is placed in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) by optical absorption from the C 1s level and the C 1s emission detected in the presence of this spectator electron.

  15. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  16. Search for Invisible Decay of the {upsilon}(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, O.; Hazumi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Uehara, S.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Limosani, A.; Nakamura, I.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.

    2007-03-30

    We report results of a search for the invisible decay of the {upsilon}(1S) via the {upsilon}(3S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{upsilon}(1S) transition using a data sample of 2.9 fb{sup -1} at the {upsilon}(3S) resonance. The data were collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. No signal is found, and an upper limit for the branching fraction at the 90% confidence level is determined to be B({upsilon}(1S){yields}invisible)<2.5x10{sup -3}.

  17. O- and H-induced surface core level shifts on Ru(0001): prevalence of the additivity rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizzit, S.; Zhang, Y.; Kostov, K. L.; Petaccia, L.; Baraldi, A.; Menzel, D.; Reuter, K.

    2009-04-01

    In previous work on adsorbate-induced surface core level shifts (SCLSs), the effects caused by O atom adsorption on Rh(111) and Ru(0001) were found to be additive: the measured shifts for first-layer Ru atoms depended linearly on the number of directly coordinated O atoms. Density-functional theory calculations quantitatively reproduced this effect, allowed separation of initial- and final-state contributions, and provided an explanation in terms of a roughly constant charge transfer per O atom. We have now conducted similar measurements and calculations for three well-defined adsorbate and coadsorbate layers containing O and H atoms: (1 × 1)-H, (2 × 2)-(O+H) and (2 × 2)-(O+3H) on Ru(0001). As H is stabilized in fcc sites in the prior two structures and in hcp sites in the latter, this enables us to not only study coverage and coadsorption effects on the adsorbate-induced SCLSs, but also the sensitivity to similar adsorption sites. Remarkably good agreement is obtained between experiment and calculations for the energies and geometries of the layers, as well as for all aspects of the SCLS values. The additivity of the next-neighbor adsorbate-induced SCLSs is found to prevail even for the coadsorbate structures. While this confirms the suggested use of SCLSs as fingerprints of the adsorbate configuration, their sensitivity is further demonstrated by the slightly different shifts unambiguously determined for H adsorption in either fcc or hcp hollow sites.

  18. Ce Core-Level Spectroscopy, and Magnetic and Electrical Transport Properties of Lightly Ce-Doped YCoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Koike, Tsuyoshi; Okawa, Mario; Takayanagi, Ryohei; Takei, Shohei; Minohara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Masaki; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira; Ikenaga, Eiji; Saitoh, Tomohiko; Asai, Kichizo

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the Ce and Co core level spectroscopy, and the magnetic and electrical transport properties of lightly Ce-doped YCoO3. We have successfully synthesized single-phase Y1-xCexCoO3 for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1 by the sol-gel method. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments reveal that the introduced Ce ions are tetravalent, which is considered to be the first case of electron doping into bulk trivalent Co oxides with perovskite RECoO3 (RE: rare-earth element or Y) caused by RE site substitution. The magnitude of the effective magnetic moment peff obtained from the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility χ(T) at higher temperatures is close to that for high-spin Co2+ introduced by the Ce doping, implying that the electrons doped into the Co site induce Co2+ with a high-spin state. For x = 0.1, ferromagnetic ordering is observed below about 7 K. Electrical transport properties such as resistivity and thermoelectric power show that negative electron-like carriers are introduced by Ce substitution.

  19. Skin-depth lattice strain, core-level trap depression and valence charge polarization of Al surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Bo, Maolin; Liu, Yonghui; Guo, Yongling; Wang, Haibin; Yue, Jian; Huang, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the origin for surface core-level shift (SCLS) and gaining quantitative information regarding the coordination-resolved local strain, binding energy (BE) shift and cohesive energy change have been a challenge. Here, we show that a combination of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) premise, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of aluminum (Al) 2p3/2 energy shift of Al surfaces has enabled us to derive such information, namely, (i) the 2p3/2 energy of an isolated Al atom (72.146 ± 0.003eV) and its bulk shift (0.499 eV); (ii) the skin lattice contracts by up to 12.5% and the BE density increases by 70%; and (iii) the cohesive energy drops up to 38%. It is affirmed that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms provide a perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence lead to the local strain, quantum entrapment and valence charge polarization. Findings should help in understanding the phenomena of surface pre-melting and skin-high elasticity, in general.

  20. Analytic cross sections for 1 1S, to 1 1S to 2 1S, 1 1S to 2 1P transitions in helium by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukumar, C. V.; Faisal, F. H. M.

    1971-01-01

    The 1 1s yields 1 1s elastic and 1 1s yields 2 1s and 1 1s yields 2 excitation cross sections of Helium atoms by collision with a charged particle are obtained as analytic functions of incident velocity. The first order time dependent scattering theory is used. Numerical values of electron -He cross sections are obtained for incident energies in the range 30 eV to 800 eV and compared with earlier Born approximation calculations and with available experimental data. It is found that at 100 eV and above, the present results are in good agreement with the experimental results. They are also closer to the experimental results than the corresponding Born calculations.

  1. Core-level positive-ion and negative-ion fragmentation of gaseous and condensed HCCl3 using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. T.; Chen, J. M.; Lee, J. M.; Haw, S. C.; Liang, Y. C.; Deng, M. J.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the dissociation dynamics of positive-ion and negative-ion fragments of gaseous and condensed HCCl3 following photoexcitation of Cl 2p electrons to various resonances. Based on ab initio calculations at levels HF/cc-pVTZ and QCISD/6-311G*, the first doublet structures in Cl L-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of HCCl3 are assigned to transitions from the Cl (2P3/2,1/2) initial states to the 10a1* orbitals. The Cl 2p → 10a1* excitation of HCCl3 induces a significant enhancement of the Cl+ desorption yield in the condensed phase and a small increase in the HCCl+ yield in the gaseous phase. Based on the resonant photoemission of condensed HCCl3, excitations of Cl 2p electrons to valence orbitals decay predominantly via spectator Auger transitions. The kinetic energy distributions of Cl+ ion via the Cl 2p → 10a1* excitation are shifted to higher energy ˜0.2 eV and ˜0.1 eV relative to those via the Cl 2p → 10e* excitation and Cl 2p → shape resonance excitation, respectively. The enhancement of the yields of ionic fragments at specific core-excited resonance states is assisted by a strongly repulsive surface that is directly related to the spectator electrons localized in the antibonding orbitals. The Cl- anion is significantly reinforced in the vicinity of Cl 2p ionization threshold of gaseous HCCl3, mediated by photoelectron recapture through post-collision interaction.

  2. Chemical bonding and charge redistribution - Valence band and core level correlations for the Ni/Si, Pd/Si, and Pt/Si systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Madhukar, A.

    1982-01-01

    Via a systematic study of the correlation between the core and valence level X-ray photoemission spectra, the nature of the chemical bonding and charge redistribution for bulk transition metal silicides has been examined. Particular emphasis is placed on Pt2Si and PtSi. It is observed that the strength of the metal (d)-silicon (p) interaction increases in the order Ni2Si, Pd2Si, Pt2Si. It is also observed that both the metal and silicon core lines shift to higher binding energy as the silicides are formed. The notion of charge redistribution for metallic bonds is invoked to explain these data.

  3. High Level Analysis, Design and Validation of Distributed Mobile Systems with CoreASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, R.; Glässer, U.; Jackson, P. J.; Vajihollahi, M.

    System design is a creative activity calling for abstract models that facilitate reasoning about the key system attributes (desired requirements and resulting properties) so as to ensure these attributes are properly established prior to actually building a system. We explore here the practical side of using the abstract state machine (ASM) formalism in combination with the CoreASM open source tool environment for high-level design and experimental validation of complex distributed systems. Emphasizing the early phases of the design process, a guiding principle is to support freedom of experimentation by minimizing the need for encoding. CoreASM has been developed and tested building on a broad scope of applications, spanning computational criminology, maritime surveillance and situation analysis. We critically reexamine here the CoreASM project in light of three different application scenarios.

  4. Preservice Secondary Teachers Perceptions of College-Level Mathematics Content Connections with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Travis A.

    2016-01-01

    Preservice Secondary Mathematics Teachers (PSMTs) were surveyed to identify if they could connect early-secondary mathematics content (Grades 7-9) in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) with mathematics content studied in content courses for certification in secondary teacher preparation programs. Respondents were asked to…

  5. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  6. Comparison of two fluid warming devices for maintaining body core temperature during living donor liver transplantation: Level 1 H-1000 vs. Fluid Management System 2000

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Choi, Junghee; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Gwak, Misook; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid fluid warming has been a cardinal measure to maintain normothermia during fluid resuscitation of hypovolemic patients. A previous laboratory simulation study with different fluid infusion rates showed that a fluid warmer using magnetic induction is superior to a warmer using countercurrent heat exchange. We tested whether the simulation-based result is translated into the clinical liver transplantation. Methods Two hundred twenty recipients who underwent living donor liver transplantation between April 2009 and October 2011 were initially screened. Seventeen recipients given a magnetic induction warmer (FMS2000) were matched 1 : 1 with those given a countercurrent heat exchange warmer (Level-1 H-1000) based on propensity score. Matched variables included age, gender, body mass index, model for end-stage liver disease score, graft size and time under anesthesia. Core temperatures were taken at predetermined time points. Results Level-1 and FMS groups had comparable core temperature throughout the surgery from skin incision, the beginning/end of the anhepatic phase to skin closure. (P = 0.165, repeated measures ANOVA). The degree of core temperature changes within the dissection, anhepatic and postreperfusion phase were also comparable between the two groups. The minimum intraoperative core temperature was also comparable (Level 1, 35.6℃ vs. FMS, 35.4℃, P = 0.122). Conclusions A countercurrent heat exchange warmer and magnetic induction warmer displayed comparable function regarding the maintenance of core temperature and prevention of hypothermia during living donor liver transplantation. The applicability of the two devices in liver transplantation needs to be evaluated in various populations and clinical settings. PMID:25368785

  7. Spin-Orbit Effects in Spin-Resolved L2,3 Core Level Photoemission of 3d Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; Yu, S W; Butterfield, M; Tobin, J G

    2007-10-02

    We present spin-resolved 2p core level photoemission for the 3d transition metal films of Fe and Co grown on Cu(100). We observe clear spin asymmetry in the main 2p core level photoemission peaks of Fe and Co films consistent with trends in the bulk magnetic moments. The spin polarization can be strongly enhanced, by variation of the experimental geometry, when the photoemission is undertaken with circularly polarized light, indicating that spin-orbit interaction can have a profound in spin polarized photoemission. Further spin polarized photoemission studies using variable circularly polarized light at high photon energies, high flux are indicated, underscoring the value of synchrotron measurements at facilities with increased beam stability.

  8. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  9. High-resolution core-level photoemission measurements on the pentacene single crystal surface assisted by photoconduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yasuo; Uragami, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yonezawa, Keiichirou; Mase, Kazuhiko; Kera, Satoshi; Ishii, Hisao; Ueno, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Upon charge carrier transport behaviors of high-mobility organic field effect transistors of pentacene single crystal, effects of ambient gases and resultant probable ‘impurities’ at the crystal surface have been controversial. Definite knowledge on the surface stoichiometry and chemical composites is indispensable to solve this question. In the present study, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on the pentacene single crystal samples successfully demonstrated a presence of a few atomic-percent of (photo-)oxidized species at the first molecular layer of the crystal surface through accurate analyses of the excitation energy (i.e. probing depth) dependence of the C1s peak profiles. Particular methodologies to conduct XPS on organic single crystal samples, without any charging nor damage of the sample in spite of its electric insulating character and fragility against x-ray irradiation, is also described in detail.

  10. Circadian regulation of chloroplast transcription in Chlamydomonas is accompanied by little or no fluctuation in RPOD levels or core RNAP activity.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Ryo; Mahan, Kristina M; Venghaus, Brad E; Carter, Matthew L; Herrin, David L

    2012-12-01

    In Chlamydomonas growing under 24 h light-dark cycles, chloroplast transcription is under circadian clock control, and peaks early in the morning. The peak (but not trough) requires ongoing cytoplasmic translation, as it is sensitive to cycloheximide (CH). The chloroplast transcriptional apparatus in Chlamydomonas is simpler than in land plants, with only one type of RNA polymerase (RNAP, bacterial) and apparently only one sigma factor (RPOD). Core RNAP can be assayed in vitro with a non-sigma factor dependent template, and is sensitive to rifampicin. We developed a membrane-based assay for RNAP activity, and used it to determine that core activity is only weakly affected by pre-treating cells with CH. Moreover, core chloroplast RNAP activity was steady during a 24 h light-dark cycle. Levels of the sigma factor (RPOD) were examined using western blots, and found to fluctuate less than 25 % during light-dark cycles. These data indicate that circadian regulation of chloroplast transcription is distinct from regulation by sulfur availability, which involves significant changes in RPOD levels. The implications of this data for hypotheses that purport to explain the circadian control mechanism are discussed.

  11. Drug release from film-coated chlorpheniramine maleate nonpareil beads: effect of water-soluble polymer, coating level, and soluble core material.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Schwartz, J B; Porter, S C; Schnaare, R L; Wigent, R J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to use a new drug release model to study the effects of formulation parameters on drug release from a film-coated chlorpheniramine (CPM) nonpareil system. The film-coated CPM nonpareils were prepared by using a fluid bed apparatus. A hydroxylpropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) solution was blended with an aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion (Surelease) to adjust the permeability of the film. The apparent permeability of samples was obtained from dissolution data using a previously reported drug release equation. The apparent permeability was plotted versus the film coating level or the HPMC concentration in the film. When the natural logarithm of the apparent permeability versus coating level was graphed, a biphasic plot was observed in the group without HPMC in the film, showing the occurrence of a critical coating level. It was suggested that a mechanically formed porous film (due to an incomplete coating) could change to a nonporous film after the bead was completely coated. However, in the group that contained 12% HPMC in the film, the critical coating level was not observed. A porous film, formed by the leaching out of the water-soluble polymer, would not change to a nonporous film even after the bead is completely coated. Through a mathematical derivation, the decrease of apparent permeability versus coating level was related to the reduction of the total hole area. The apparent permeability was found to increase with the HPMC concentration. After a critical concentration was reached, the further addition of HPMC into the film caused a rapid increase in apparent permeability. The critical HPMC concentration was related to a minimum domain formation concentration (MDFC). A rapid increase of the drug release was observed when the dissolution profile of a sample made from a regular sugar nonpareil core (soluble) was compared with the sample made from a precoated nonpareil core (insoluble), which suggests that the drug release can be

  12. Levels and ages of selenium and metals in sedimentary cores of Ise Bay as determined by 210-Pb dating technique

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.; Chikuma, M.; Tanaka, H.

    1987-08-01

    Ise Bay is connected with estuaries of Nagoya harbor which is one of the most active industrial areas in Japan. Nagoya harbor estuaries are recipient of a large quantity of municipal and industrial discharge. The land boundaries of estuaries are sites of the manufacturing industries and they are utilized by oil tankers and cargo vessels. Accumulation of various kinds of metal such as selenium, mercury, zinc, copper, lead, and chromium have occurred in sediments for many years. The authors have carried out an extensive investigation on the selenium pollution of sea water and sediments of Nagoya harbor estuaries. The input of selenium to Ise Bay has occurred ever since the industrial activity was established in Nagoya city. Investigators have reported the sedimentary record of metals of Tokyo Bay, Osaka Bay and Seto Inland Sea. Some investigators reported the pollution caused by polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon in sediments of Ise Bay, but did not mention metals. The authors determined metals including selenium in sedimentary core samples. The ages of those samples were already estimated by 210-Pb dating technique.

  13. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Wilson, Bryan; Natal, Brenda; Nagurka, Roxanne; Anana, Michael; Sule, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of students rank Emergency Medicine (EM) as a top specialty choice, requiring medical schools to provide adequate exposure to EM. The Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges combined with the Milestone Project for EM residency training has attempted to standardize the undergraduate and graduate medical education goals. However, it remains unclear as to how the EPAs correlate to the milestones, and who owns the process of ensuring that an entering EM resident has competency at a certain minimum level. Recent trends establishing specialty-specific boot camps prepare students for residency and address the variability of skills of students coming from different medical schools. Objective Our project’s goal was therefore to perform a needs assessment to inform the design of an EM boot camp curriculum. Toward this goal, we 1) mapped the core EPAs for graduating medical students to the EM residency Level 1 milestones in order to identify the possible gaps/needs and 2) conducted a pilot procedure workshop that was designed to address some of the identified gaps/needs in procedural skills. Methods In order to inform the curriculum of an EM boot camp, we used a systematic approach to 1) identify gaps between the EPAs and EM milestones (Level 1) and 2) determine what essential and supplemental competencies/skills an incoming EM resident should ideally possess. We then piloted a 1-day, three-station advanced ABCs procedure workshop based on the identified needs. A pre-workshop test and survey assessed knowledge, preparedness, confidence, and perceived competence. A post-workshop survey evaluated the program, and a posttest combined with psychomotor skills test using three simulation cases assessed students’ skills. Results Students (n=9) reported increased confidence in the following procedures: intubation (1.5–2.1), thoracostomy (1.1–1.9), and central venous

  14. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P.; Denlinger, J.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  15. [Vertical distribution and relationship between 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrients in sediment cores of two different eutrophication level lakes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Hao; Gu, Zhu-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Li

    2014-07-01

    The 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrient (TOC, TN and TP) contents in sediment cores of Fuxian Lake and Dianchi Lake were measured by traditional methods, as well as their vertical distribution and relationship were also comparatively analyzed in this paper. The study results indicated that the vertical distributions of 210Pb(ex) and nutrients were significantly different between Fuxian Lake and Dianchi Lake. The variation amplitude of 210Pb(ex) activities in Dianchi Lake was higher than that in Fuxian Lake. The disordered distribution characteristics of 210Pb(ex) in Dianchi Lake surface sediments were closely related to physicochemical migration of lead caused by human activities. The variation trends of nutrients in sediment cores were corresponded to local natural evolution and human activities in different historical periods. Relationship between 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrients were mainly affected by the nutrition level of lakes. The greater the lake eutrophication level was, the stronger the correlation was found. To the individual nutrient indicators, similar characteristics were shown in the two lakes, and the order was TOC > TP > TN.

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure of the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R. |; Chen, Y.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Hussain, Z.; Huang, Z.Q.; Zheng, Y.; Shirley, D.A.

    1997-07-01

    We report a non-s initial-state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine-structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial-state data, the p initial-state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a recently developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Holocene lake level changes at a lowland lake in northeastern Germany inferred from acoustic sub-bottom profiling and a transect of sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Elisabeth; Zawiska, Izabela; Słowiński, Michał; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Holocene lake level changes were studied at Lake Fürstenseer See, a typical lake with complex basin morphology in northeastern German sandur area. An acoustic sub-bottom profile and a transect of four long sediment cores in the deepest lake sub-basin were analyzed. The cores were dated with AMS-14C and correlated with multiple proxies (sediment facies, μ-XRF, macrofossils, subfossil Cladocera, carbonate isotopes). At sites in 10 and 15 m water depth, shifts in the sand-mud boundary, i.e. sediment limit sensu Digerfeldt (1986), allowed quantitative estimates of the absolute amplitude of lake level changes. At sites in 20 and 23 m water depth, the negative correlation of Ca and Ti reflect lake level changes qualitatively. During high lake stands massive organic muds were deposited. Lower lake levels isolated the lake sub-basins which reduced the overall water circulation and lead to the deposition of Ti-poor carbonate muds. Furthermore, macrofossil and subfossil Cladocera analyses were used as proxies for the intense reworking at the slope and for the trophic state of the lake, respectively. Lake levels were up to 4 m higher, e.g. around 5000 cal. yrs BP and during the Medieval time period (see also Kaiser et al., 2014). During the early to mid-Holocene (between 9400 and 6400 cal. yrs BP), Lake Fürstenseer See fluctuated at an at least 3-m lower level. Further water level changes can be related to known climatic events and regional human impact. Digerfeldt, G., 1986. Studies on past lake-level fluctuations. In Berglund, B. (ed.), Handbook of Holocene Palaeoecology and Palaeohydrology: 127-144. John Wiley & Sons, New York. Kaiser, K., Küster, M., Fülling, A., Theuerkauf, M., Dietze, E., Graventein, H., Koch, P.J., Bens, O., Brauer, A., 2014. Littoral landforms and pedosedimentary sequences indicating late Holocene lake-level changes in northern central Europe ' A case study from northeastern Germany. Geomorphology 216, 58-78.

  18. Effect of metallothionein core promoter region polymorphism on cadmium, zinc and copper levels in autopsy kidney tissues from a Turkish population

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaalti, Zeliha; Mergen, Goerkem; Soeylemezoglu, Tuelin

    2010-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-binding, low molecular weight proteins and are involved in pathophysiological processes like metabolism of essential metals, metal ion homeostasis and detoxification of heavy metals. Metallothionein expression is induced by various heavy metals especially cadmium, mercury and zinc; MTs suppress toxicity of heavy metals by binding themselves to these metals. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the - 5 A/G metallothionein 2A (MT2A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in the renal cortex from autopsy cases. MT2A core promoter region - 5 A/G SNP was analyzed by PCR-RFLP method using 114 autopsy kidney tissues and the genotype frequencies of this polymorphism were found as 87.7% homozygote typical (AA), 11.4% heterozygote (AG) and 0.9% homozygote atypical (GG). In order to assess the Cd, Zn and Cu levels in the same autopsy kidney tissues, a dual atomic absorption spectrophotometer system was used and the average levels of Cd, Zn and Cu were measured as 95.54 {+-} 65.58 {mu}g/g, 181.20 {+-} 87.72 {mu}g/g and 17.14 {+-} 16.28 {mu}g/g, respectively. As a result, no statistical association was found between the - 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene and the Zn and Cu levels in the renal cortex (p > 0.05), but considerably high accumulation of Cd was monitored for individuals having AG (151.24 {+-} 60.21 {mu}g/g) and GG genotypes (153.09 {mu}g/g) compared with individuals having AA genotype (87.72 {+-} 62.98 {mu}g/g) (p < 0.05). These results show that the core promoter region polymorphism of metallothionein 2A increases the accumulation of Cd in human renal cortex.

  19. The Physics and Chemistry of Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Goodson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Better characterization of the initial conditions is crucial to understanding massive star formation. Whether or not high-mass stars form in a similar way as low-mass stars can be tested by massive starless cores (MSCs), which are invoked as the initial condition in the Core Accretion model, but not in the Competitive Accretion model. We first searched for MSC candidates in the densest regions of Infrared Dark Clouds with the deuterated species N2D+, which has been found to be one of the best tracers of the cold, dense conditions of low-mass pre-stellar cores. Two candidates (C1-N & S) were revealed by our ALMA Cycle 0 observation. In particular, C1-S has ~ 60 M⊙. Our dynamical study found that ~mG magnetic fields need to be present if the cores are virialized. Next we developed astrochemical modeling to understand how high levels of deuteration arise in these cores, especially tracking the deuteration fraction DfracN2H+(≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+]), which can rise by several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Our models show that high levels of DfracN2H+ ≥ 0.1 generally require at least several local free-fall times to be established under typical core conditions and this is the basis of a "deuteration clock" that can measure the chemical age and thus collapse rates of MSCs. We have begun work to implement the astrochemical network into full (M)HD simulations of these structures. A detailed observational study to measure [N2D+], [N2H+] and thus DfracN2H+ in the C1-N and C1-S cores have been carried out, utilizing multi-transition data observed with ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, IRAM 30m and NRO 45m telescopes. We find high levels of DfracN2H+ ≈ 0.2 - 0.7. Comparing with the theoretical chemodynamical models indicates that C1-N and C1-S have been contracting at rates ~10 times slower than free-fall, which may be consistent with the presence of strong magnetic fields in the cores. Using ALMA, we have also extended our search for more MSCs, using N2D+(3

  20. Systems-level response to point mutations in a core metabolic enzyme modulates genotype-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Budnik, Bogdan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-04-28

    Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT) protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship.

  1. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

    2003-06-28

    Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium, in particular in environmental conditions, is often complicated by plutonium's complex redox chemistry. Because plutonium possesses four oxidation states, all of which can coexist in solution, a reliable method for the identification of these oxidation states is needed. The identification of plutonium oxidation states at low levels in aqueous solution is often accomplished through an indirect determination using series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures using oxidation state specific reagents such as HDEHP and TTA. While these methods, coupled with radioactive counting techniques provide superior limits of detection they may influence the plutonium redox equilibrium, are time consuming, waste intensive and costly. Other analytical methods such as mass spectrometry and radioactive counting as stand alone methods provide excellent detection limits but lack the ability to discriminate between the oxidation states of the plutonium ions in solution.

  2. Rapid measurement of perchlorate in polar ice cores down to sub-ng L(-1) levels without pre-concentration.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kari; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Brandis, Derek; Cox, Thomas; Splett, Scott

    2015-10-01

    An ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed for rapid and accurate measurement of perchlorate in polar snow and ice core samples in which perchlorate concentrations are expected to be as low as 0.1 ng L(-1). Separation of perchlorate from major inorganic species in snow is achieved with an ion chromatography system interfaced to an AB SCIEX triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and lower limit of quantification without pre-concentration have been determined to be 0.1 and 0.3 ng L(-1), respectively, with a linear dynamic range of 0.3-10.0 ng L(-1) in routine measurement. These represent improvements over previously reported methods using similar analytical techniques. The improved method allows fast, accurate, and reproducible perchlorate quantification down to the sub-ng L(-1) level and will facilitate perchlorate measurement in the study of natural perchlorate production with polar ice cores in which perchlorate concentrations are anticipated to vary in the low and sub-ng L(-1) range. Initial measurements of perchlorate in ice core samples from central Greenland show that typical perchlorate concentrations in snow dated prior to the Industrial Revolution are about 0.8 ng L(-1), while perchlorate concentrations are significantly higher in recent (post-1980) snow, suggesting that anthropogenic sources are a significant contributor to perchlorate in the current environment.

  3. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  4. Warm Core Structure and Mid-Level Intrusion in Hurricane Bonnie (1998) During Landfalling on 26 August 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Halverson, J.

    2004-01-01

    On 26 August 1998 during CAMEX-3, Hurricane Bonnie was overflown by the NASA ER-2 aircraft instrumented with the EDOP X-Band radar and other instrumentation. Bonnie was an asymmetric storm on this day with several prominent features during its brush with the East coast. One of these features was strong intrusion of dry air on the west side of the storm. During the interaction of this westerly shear with the storm, the precipitation band rotates cyclonically from northwest to the south of the storm center. In this paper, we examine the structure of this dry intrusion and its effect on the storm. The EDOP observations are analyzed along with dropsondes, flight-level observations (NASA DC-8 and NOAA P3), and satellite data. The most apparent feature of the EDOP observations are the strong shears in the interface between the western eyewall updraft, and the dry intrusion. Mammatus are formed along this interface reminiscent of convective rear inflows, and suggestive of intense drying of the air through subsidence. This observation as well as other aspects of the analysis are related to recent numerical simulations of Hurricane Bonnie.

  5. Systems-level response to point mutations in a core metabolic enzyme modulates genotype-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Budnik, Bogdan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-04-28

    Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT) protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship. PMID:25892240

  6. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001): A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie D. W.; Neal, James R.; Shen, Tiehan H.; Morton, Simon A.; Tobin, James G.; Dan Waddill, G.; Matthew, Jim A. D.; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-15

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 A results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  7. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001):A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Shen, Tiehan; Morton, Simon; Tobin, James; Waddill, George Dan; Matthew, Jim; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-14

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 Angstrom results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  8. Determining polarity and dislocation core structures at atomic level for epitaxial AlN/(0001)6H-SiC from a single image in HRTEM.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y X; Wang, Y M; Wen, C; Ge, B H; Li, F H; Chen, Y; Chen, H

    2013-03-01

    The polarity of epitaxial AlN film grown on (0001)6H-SiC and dislocation core structures in the film have been studied using a 200 kV LaB6 high-resolution transmission electron microscope of point resolution about 0.2 nm. A posterior image processing technique, the image deconvolution, was utilized to transform a single [21¯1¯0] image that does not intuitively represent the structure into the projected structure map. The adjacent Al and N projected atomic columns with the interatomic distance 0.109 nm can be distinguished from each other by analyzing the image contrast change with the sample thickness based on the pseudo-weak phase object approximation. This makes possible to derive the polarity and core structures of partial dislocations in the epitaxial AlN film at atomic level from a single image without relying on any other additional structure information. The atomic configurations for two partial dislocations containing a 10-atom ring and a 12-atom ring, respectively, have been attained. The method is available for II-VI and other III-V compounds. Its principle and procedure are briefly introduced.

  9. The Evolution of Ga and As Core Levels in the Formation of Fe/GaAs(001): A High Resolution Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J W; Neal, J R; Shen, T H; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Waddill, G D; Matthew, J D; Greig, D; Hopkinson, M

    2006-12-08

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 {angstrom} results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two new As environments of metallic character; one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in-situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three new environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface-resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical make-up of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  10. Study of Y(3S, 2S)-> eta Y(1S) and Y(3S, 2S) -> pi pi- Y(1S) Hadronic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-03-27

    We study the {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) transitions with 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and 100 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We measure {Beta}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (2.39 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.14(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (1.35 {+-} 0.17(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We find no evidence for {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and obtain {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 1.0 x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 2.3 x 10{sup -3} as upper limits at the 90% confidence level. We also provide improved measurements of the {Upsilon}(2S)-{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S)-{Upsilon}(1S) mass differences, 562.170 {+-} 0.007(stat.) {+-} 0.088(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} and 893.813 {+-} 0.015(stat.) {+-} 0.107(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  11. 3s- and 3p-core level excitations in 3d-transition metal oxides from electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, P.; Zimmermann, R.; Reinert, F.; Engel, Th.; Hüfner, S.

    1995-03-01

    3s- and 3p-core level excitations for a large number of 3d-transition metal oxides, with a formal 3d occupation from 3d0 to 3d10, have been measured by electron energy loss spectroscopy in reflection geometry (REELS) with primary energies 200 eV≤ E 0≤1600 eV. Their intensities decrease systematically with the formal 3d-count, classifying them as transitions to empty 3d-states. The structure of the 3s excitations is analysed in detail and is compared to the 3s-XPS photoemission spectra of the samples. This 3s-REELS structure and its change with the 3d occupation can be explained by the assumption that the excitation arises mainly from a 3s23dn→3s13dn+1 quadrupole transition.

  12. The Current Status of the Space Station Biological Research Project: a Core Facility Enabling Multi-Generational Studies under Slectable Gravity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, O.

    2002-01-01

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) has developed a new plan which greatly reduces the development costs required to complete the facility. This new plan retains core capabilities while allowing for future growth. The most important piece of equipment required for quality biological research, the 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge capable of accommodating research specimen habitats at simulated gravity levels ranging from microgravity to 2.0 g, is being developed by NASDA, the Japanese space agency, for the SSBRP. This is scheduled for flight to the ISS in 2007. The project is also developing a multi-purpose incubator, an automated cell culture unit, and two microgravity habitat holding racks, currently scheduled for launch in 2005. In addition the Canadian Space Agency is developing for the project an insect habitat, which houses Drosophila melanogaster, and provides an internal centrifuge for 1 g controls. NASDA is also developing for the project a glovebox for the contained manipulation and analysis of biological specimens, scheduled for launch in 2006. This core facility will allow for experimentation on small plants (Arabidopsis species), nematode worms (C. elegans), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and a variety of microorganisms, bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells. We propose a plan for early utilization which focuses on surveys of changes in gene expression and protein structure due to the space flight environment. In the future, the project is looking to continue development of a rodent habitat and a plant habitat that can be accommodated on the 2.5 meter centrifuge. By utilizing the early phases of the ISS to broadly answer what changes occur at the genetic and protein level of cells and organisms exposed to the ISS low earth orbit environment, we can generate interest for future experiments when the ISS capabilities allow for direct manipulation and intervention of experiments. The ISS continues to hold promise for high quality, long

  13. Determination of lead isotopes in a new Greenland deep ice core at the sub-picogram per gram level by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using an improved decontamination method.

    PubMed

    Han, Changhee; Burn-Nunes, Laurie J; Lee, Khanghyun; Chang, Chaewon; Kang, Jung-Ho; Han, Yeongcheol; Hur, Soon Do; Hong, Sungmin

    2015-08-01

    An improved decontamination method and ultraclean analytical procedures have been developed to minimize Pb contamination of processed glacial ice cores and to achieve reliable determination of Pb isotopes in North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) deep ice core sections with concentrations at the sub-picogram per gram level. A PL-7 (Fuso Chemical) silica-gel activator has replaced the previously used colloidal silica activator produced by Merck and has been shown to provide sufficiently enhanced ion beam intensity for Pb isotope analysis for a few tens of picograms of Pb. Considering the quantities of Pb contained in the NEEM Greenland ice core and a sample weight of 10 g used for the analysis, the blank contribution from the sample treatment was observed to be negligible. The decontamination and analysis of the artificial ice cores and selected NEEM Greenland ice core sections confirmed the cleanliness and effectiveness of the overall analytical process.

  14. Millstone-1's senior QC technician

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.M.

    1986-05-01

    Joseph R. Impellizeri, in charge of quality control at the Millstone-1 reactor finds his work requires interpersonal skills as well as technical expertise. The author notes the difference between quality control, which involves the first level of inspection of workmanship and materials for compliance with requirements and the first level review of documents, and quality assurance, which reviews the quality system to see that there are proper procedures and paperwork. Quality control (QC) at Millstone covers inspections, corrective maintenance, and system design changes. Rapport with personnel is essential. Impellizeri must also have level III certification to perform mechanical and electrical installations in order to perform during outages. His activities also include planning for inspections and outages.

  15. Tretinoin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules decrease reactive oxygen species levels and improve bovine embryonic development during in vitro oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Caroline Gomes; Remião, Mariana Härter; Komninou, Eliza Rossi; Domingues, William Borges; Haas, Cristina; Leon, Priscila Marques Moura de; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Ourique, Aline; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Basso, Andrea Cristina; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Collares, Tiago

    2015-12-01

    In vitro oocyte maturation (IVM) protocols can be improved by adding chemical supplements to the culture media. Tretinoin is considered an important retinoid in embryonic development and its association with lipid-core nanocapsules (TTN-LNC) represents an innovative way of improving its solubility, and chemical stability, and reducing its toxicity. The effects of supplementing IVM medium with TTN-LNC was evaluated by analyzing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), S36-phosphorilated-p66Shc levels and caspase activity in early embryonic development, and expression of apoptosis and pluripotency genes in blastocysts. The lowest concentration tested (0.25μM) of TTN-LNC generated higher blastocyst rate, lower ROS production and S36-p66Shc amount. Additionally, expression of BAX and SHC1 were lower in both non-encapsulated tretinoin (TTN) and TTN-LNC-treated groups. Nanoencapsulation allowed the use of smaller concentrations of tretinoin to supplement IVM medium thus reducing toxic effects related with its use, decreasing ROS levels and apoptose frequency, and improving the blastocyst rates.

  16. The ρ(1S, 2S), ψ(1S, 2S), Υ(1S, 2S) and ψ t (1S, 2S) Mesons in a Double Pole QCD Sum Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maior de Sousa, M. S.; da Silva, R. Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    We use the method of double pole QCD sum rule, which is basically a fit with two exponentials of the correlation function, where we can extract the masses and decay constants of mesons as a function of the Borel mass. We apply this method to study the mesons: ρ(1S,2S), ψ(1S,2S), Υ(1S,2S), and ψ t (1S,2S). We also present predictions for the toponiuns masses ψ t (1S,2S) of m(1S)=357 GeV and m(2S)=374 GeV.

  17. Disentangling Holocene lake level changes with a transect of lake sediment cores - a case study from Lake Fürstenseer See, northeastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Elisabeth; Slowinski, Michal; Kienel, Ulrike; Zawiska, Izabela; Brauer, Achim

    2014-05-01

    Deciphering the main processes contributing to lake and landscape evolution in the northern central European lowlands on different temporal scales is one of the main targets of the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis (ICLEA) of the Helmholtz Association. In the context of future climatic changes especially the hydrological system is a vulnerable landscape component that showed considerably large changes in the recent past. The analysis of lake sediment archives can help to infer long-term dynamics of regional lake and groundwater levels, although available proxy information needs to be studied carefully, as water level changes are only one trigger. Lake Fürstenseer See (53°19'N, 13°12'E, lake level in 2009: 63.3 m a.s.l.) formed after the retreat of the Weichselian ice sheet in a subglacial channel in the direct forefront of the Pommerian ice margin. The ~2 km2 large lake (zmax = 24.5 m) has a (sub-) surficial catchment area of ~(20) 40 km2 including other smaller lakes and peatlands. In the past, the lake system was artificially dammed for the operation of water mills. Located within the well-drained sandur substrate, the lake levels vary with groundwater levels in response to hydrological and catchment-related groundwater recharge. Detrital matter input from fluvial activity can be excluded. Lake sediment cores at four sites along a transect down to 23 m water depth show distinct sediment facies patterns. Stratigraphic descriptions and non-destructive continuous micro-XRF scanning allowed the differentiation of the main sediment facies, which were microscopically described using thin sections. Quantification of total organic and inorganic matter (TOC, TIC, C/N-composition) and discontinuous macrorest, diatom and Cladocera analysis helped to approach the sedimentation history. Stable isotopes of (delta-180, delta-13C) were used for characterization of carbonates. A high amount of non-reworked terrestrial plant remains from

  18. Centrosomal AKAP350 modulates the G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Mattaloni, Stella M; Ferretti, Anabela C; Tonucci, Facundo M; Favre, Cristián; Goldenring, James R; Larocca, M Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    AKAP350 (AKAP450/AKAP9/CG-NAP) is an A-kinase anchoring protein, which recruits multiple signaling proteins to the Golgi apparatus and the centrosomes. Several proteins recruited to the centrosomes by this scaffold participate in the regulation of the cell cycle. Previous studies indicated that AKAP350 participates in centrosome duplication. In the present study we specifically assessed the role of AKAP350 in the progression of the cell cycle. Our results showed that interference with AKAP350 expression inhibits G1/S transition, decreasing the initiation of both DNA synthesis and centrosome duplication. We identified an AKAP350 carboxyl-terminal domain (AKAP350CTD), which contained the centrosomal targeting domain of AKAP350 and induced the initiation of DNA synthesis. Nevertheless, AKAP350CTD expression did not induce centrosomal duplication. AKAP350CTD partially delocalized endogenous AKAP350 from the centrosomes, but increased the centrosomal levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2). Accordingly, the expression of this AKAP350 domain increased the endogenous phosphorylation of nucleophosmin by Cdk2, which occurs at the G1/S transition and is a marker of the centrosomal activity of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex. Cdk2 recruitment to the centrosomes is a necessary event for the development of the G1/S transition. Altogether, our results indicate that AKAP350 facilitates the initiation of DNA synthesis by scaffolding Cdk2 to the centrosomes, and enabling its specific activity at this organelle. Although this mechanism could also be involved in AKAP350-dependent modulation of centrosomal duplication, it is not sufficient to account for this process. PMID:24475373

  19. A Quantitative Content Analysis of the Common Core State Standards Compared to Missouri's Grade-Level Expectations Using the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallia, Toni

    2012-01-01

    With the pressure in education to develop a 21st century learner with higher-level thinking skills, many educators connected previous state curriculum to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Missouri's Department of Education experts paired the previous state's curriculum known as the Missouri Grade Level Expectations (MO GLEs) with a…

  20. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair.

  1. Quantitative hepatitis B core antibody level is associated with inflammatory activity in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Ran; Lu, Jian-Hua; Ye, Li-Hong; Sun, Xing-Li; Zheng, Yan-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Hai-Cong; Liu, Yun-Yan; Lv, Ying; Huang, Yan; Dai, Er-Hei

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) levels vary during different phases of disease in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and can be used as a predictor of both interferon-α and nucleoside analogue therapy response. However, there is no information on the association between the quantitative serum anti-HBc (qAnti-HBc) level and liver inflammation in CHB patients. Therefore, we investigated these relationships in a large cohort of treatment-naïve CHB patients. A total of 624 treatment-naïve CHB patients were included in the study. The serum qAnti-HBc level was moderately correlated with ALT and AST levels (P < 0.001) in both hepatitis B e antigen-positive (HBeAg [+]) and HBeAg-negative (HBeAg [-]) CHB patients. CHB patients with no to mild inflammation (G0-1) had significantly lower serum qAnti-HBc levels than patients with moderate to severe inflammation (G2-4) (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis suggested that a serum qAnti-HBc cut-off value of 4.36 log10 IU/mL provided a sensitivity of 71.68%, specificity of 73.81%, positive predictive value of 78.43%, and negative predictive value of 66.24% in HBeAg (+) CHB patients with moderate to severe inflammation (G≥2). A cut-off value of 4.62 log10 IU/mL provided a sensitivity of 54.29%, specificity of 90.00%, positive predictive value of 95.00%, and negative predictive value of 36.00% in HBeAg (-) CHB patients with moderate to severe inflammation (G≥2). Serum qAnti-HBc levels were positively associated with liver inflammation grade. Furthermore, we identified optimal serum qAnti-HBc cut-off values for the prediction of inflammation activity in both HBeAg (+) and HBeAg (-) treatment-naïve CHB patients. PMID:27559949

  2. Double photoionization of helium from the 1s2p {}^{3}{\\rm{P}} excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pindzola, M. S.; Colgan, J.

    2016-10-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) calculations are carried out for the double photoionization of Helium in the 1{{s}}2{{p}}{}3{{P}} excited state. TDCC {l}1{l}2L results are presented for the total and energy differential cross sections for the 1{{s}}2{{p}}{}3{{P}} term. TDCC {l}1{j}1{l}2{j}2J results are presented for the total and energy differential cross sections for the 1{{s}}2{{p}}{}3{{{P}}}{0,1,2} levels. Differences found between the level resolved double photoionization cross sections are due to varying degrees of continuum correlation found in the outgoing two electrons.

  3. Information Orientation, Information Technology Governance, and Information Technology Service Management: A Multi-Level Approach for Teaching the MBA Core Information Systems Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachboard, John; Aytes, Kregg

    2011-01-01

    Core MBA IT courses have tended to be survey courses that cover important topics but often do not sufficiently engage students. The result is that many top-ranked MBA programs have not found such courses useful enough to include in their core MBA requirements. In this paper, we present a design of an MBA course emphasizing information technology…

  4. First-principle calculation of core level binding energies of Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z} solid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Guille, Émilie; Vallverdu, Germain Baraille, Isabelle

    2014-12-28

    We present first-principle calculations of core-level binding energies for the study of insulating, bulk phase, compounds, based on the Slater-Janak transition state model. Those calculations were performed in order to find a reliable model of the amorphous Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z} solid electrolyte which is able to reproduce its electronic properties gathered from X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) experiments. As a starting point, Li{sub 2}PO{sub 2}N models were investigated. These models, proposed by Du et al. on the basis of thermodynamics and vibrational properties, were the first structural models of Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z}. Thanks to chemical and structural modifications applied to Li{sub 2}PO{sub 2}N structures, which allow to demonstrate the relevance of our computational approach, we raise an issue concerning the possibility of encountering a non-bridging kind of nitrogen atoms (=N{sup −}) in Li{sub x}PO{sub y}N{sub z} compounds.

  5. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  6. New Enzyme Immunoassay for Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Core Antigen (HBcAg) and Relation between Levels of HBcAg and HBV DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Maki, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    A new enzyme immunoassay specific for hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen (HBcAg) was developed. In order to detect HBcAg, specimens were pretreated with detergents to release HBcAg from the HBV virion and disassemble it to dimers, and simultaneously, the treatment inactivated anti-HBc antibodies. HBcAg detected by the assay peaked with HBV DNA in density gradient fractions of HBV-positive sera. The assay showed a wide detection range from 2 to 100,000 pg/ml. We observed no interference from anti-HBc antibody or blood components, but the assay was inhibited by very high concentrations (>1 μg/ml; corresponding to 80 signal/cutoff) of HBeAg. When the cutoff value was tentatively set at 4 pg/ml, all healthy control (HBsAg and HBV DNA negative, n = 160) and anti-hepatitis C virus-positive (n = 55) sera were identified as negative. HBcAg concentrations correlated very closely with HBV DNA (r = 0.946, n = 145) in 216 samples from 72 hepatitis B patients. In seroconversion panels, HBcAg concentrations changed in parallel with HBV DNA levels. The assay, therefore, offers a simple method for monitoring hepatitis B patients. With a series of sera during lamivudine therapy, HBV DNA levels fell sharply and the HBcAg concentration also decreased, but the change in HBcAg was smaller and more gradual. The supposed mechanism of these changes and their clinical significance are discussed. PMID:12734224

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of plasmids in strains of Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 reveals a high level of identity among isolates with closely related core genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Adam D; Porcella, Stephen F; Martens, Craig; Whitney, Adeline R; Braughton, Kevin R; Chen, Liang; Craig, Carly T; Tenover, Fred C; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Musser, James M; DeLeo, Frank R

    2010-12-01

    A community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain known as pulsed-field type USA300 (USA300) is epidemic in the United States. Previous comparative whole-genome sequencing studies demonstrated that there has been recent clonal emergence of a subset of USA300 isolates, which comprise the epidemic clone. Although the core genomes of these isolates are closely related, the level of diversity among USA300 plasmids was not resolved. Inasmuch as these plasmids might contribute to significant gene diversity among otherwise closely related USA300 isolates, we performed de novo sequencing of endogenous plasmids from 10 previously characterized USA300 clinical isolates obtained from different geographic locations in the United States. All isolates tested contained small (2- to 3-kb) and/or large (27- to 30-kb) plasmids. The large plasmids encoded heavy metal and/or antimicrobial resistance elements, including those that confer resistance to cadmium, bacitracin, macrolides, penicillin, kanamycin, and streptothricin, although all isolates were sensitive to minocycline, doxycycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, teicoplanin, and linezolid. One of the USA300 isolates contained an archaic plasmid that encoded staphylococcal enterotoxins R, J, and P. Notably, the large plasmids (27 to 28 kb) from 8 USA300 isolates--those that comprise the epidemic USA300 clone--were virtually identical (99% identity) and similar to a large plasmid from strain USA300_TCH1516 (a previously sequenced USA300 strain from Houston, TX). These plasmids are largely divergent from the 37-kb plasmid of FPR3757, the first sequenced USA300 strain. The high level of plasmid sequence identity among the majority of closely related USA300 isolates is consistent with the recent clonal emergence hypothesis for USA300.

  8. The Deuteration Clock for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, S.; Tan, J. C.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.

    2016-05-01

    To understand massive star formation requires study of its initial conditions. Two massive starless core candidates, C1-N & C1-S, have been detected in IRDC G028.37+00.07 in N2D+(3-2) with ALMA. From their line widths, either the cores are subvirial and are thus young structures on the verge of near free-fall collapse, or they are threaded by ˜1 mG B-fields that help support them in near virial equilibrium and potentially have older ages. We modeled the deuteration rate of N2H+ to constrain collapse rates of the cores. First, to measure their current deuterium fraction, D≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+], we observed multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ with CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m and IRAM 30 m, to complement the ALMA data. For both cores we derived D ˜ 0.3, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. We then carried out chemodynamical modeling, exploring how collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff, affects the level of D that is achieved from a given initial condition. To reach the observed D, most models require slow collapse with αff˜0.1, i.e., ˜1/10th of free-fall. This makes it more likely that the cores have been able to reach a near virial equilibrium state and we predict that strong B-fields will eventually be detected. The methods developed here will be useful for measurement of the pre-stellar core mass function.

  9. Excitation and Ionization in H(1s)-H(1s) Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Merle E.; Ritchie, A. Burke

    1999-07-15

    Hydrogen atom - hydrogen atom scattering is a prototype for many of the fundamental principles of atomic collisions. In this work we present an approximation to the H+H system for scattering in the intermediate energy regime of 1 to 100 keV. The approximation ignores electron exchange and two-electron excitation by assuming that one of the atoms is frozen in the 1s state. We allow for the evolution of the active electron by numerically solving the 3D Schroedinger equation. The results capture many features of the problem and are in harmony with recent theoretical studies. Excitation and ionization cross sections are computed and compared to other theory and experiment. New insight into the mechanism of excitation and ionization is inferred from the solutions.

  10. Weak- and hyperfine-interaction-induced 1s2s 1S0 → 1s2 1S0 E1 transition rates of He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laima, Radžiūtė; Erikas, Gaidamauskas; Gediminas, Gaigalas; Li, Ji-Guang; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Jönsson, Per

    2015-04-01

    Weak- and hyperfine-interaction-induced 1s2s 1S0 → 1s2 1S0 E1 transition rates for the isoelectronic sequence of He-like ions have been calculated using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) and relativistic configuration interaction methods. The results should be helpful for the future experimental investigations of parity non-conservation effects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274254, 11147108, 10979007, U1331122, and U1332206) and in part by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200).

  11. Ligand field splittings in core level transitions for transition metal (TM) oxides: Tanabe-Sugano diagrams and (TM) dangling bonds in vacated O-atom defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerry; Wu, Kun; Pappas, Brian; Whitten, Jerry

    2013-04-01

    Defect states in the forbidden band-gap below the conduction band edge are active as electron traps in nano-grain high-) transition metal (TM) oxides with thickness >0.3 nm, e.g., ZrO2 and HfO2. These oxides have received considerable attention as gate-dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, and more recently are emerging as candidates for charge storage and memory devices. To provide a theoretical basis for device functionality, ab-initio many-electron theory is combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study O K edge and TM core level transitions. These studies identify ligand field splittings (ΔLF) for defect state features,. When compared with those obtained from O-atom and TM-atom core spectroscopic transitions, this provides direct information about defect state sun-nm bonding arrangements. comparisons are made for (i) elemental TiO2 and Ti2O3 with different formal ionic charges, Ti4+ and Ti3+ and for (ii) Magneli Phase alloys, TinO2n-1, n is an integer 9>=n>3, and (TiO2)x(HfO2)1-x alloys. The alloys display multi-valent behavior from (i) different ionic-charge states, (ii} local bond-strain, and (iii) metallic hopping transport. The intrinsic bonding defects in TM oxides are identified as pairs of singly occupied dangling bonds. For 6-fold coordinated Ti-oxides defect excited states in 2nd derivative O K pre-edge spectra are essentially the same as single Ti-atom d2 transitions in Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams. O-vacated site defects in 8-fold coordinated ZrO2 and HfO2 are described by d8 T-S diagrams. T-S defect state ordering and splittings are functions of the coordination and symmetry of vacated site bordering TM atoms. ΔLF values from the analysis of T-S diagrams indicate medium range order (MRO) extending to 3rd and 4th nearest-neighbor (NN) TM-atoms. Values are different for 6-fold Ti, and 8-fold ZrO2 and HfO2, and scale inversely with differences in respective formal ionic radii. O-vacated site bonding

  12. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk.

  14. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk. PMID:26762727

  15. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair. PMID:26919559

  16. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  17. Recoil excitation of vibrational structure in the carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum of CF4.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T Darrah; Kukk, Edwin; Sankari, Rami; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Prümper, Georg; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Püttner, Ralph; Harries, James; Tamenori, Yusuke; Tanaka, Takahiro; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2008-04-14

    The carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum of CF4 measured at photon energies from 330 to 1500 eV shows significant contributions from nonsymmetric vibrational modes. These increase linearly as the photon energy increases. The excitation of these modes, which is not predicted in the usual Franck-Condon point of view, arises from the recoil momentum imparted to the carbon atom in the ionization process. A theory is presented for quantitative prediction of the recoil effect; the predictions of this theory are in agreement to the measurements. The experiments also yield the vibrational frequencies of the symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes in core-ionized CF4, the change in CF bond length upon ionization, -0.61 pm, and the Lorentzian linewidth of the carbon 1s hole, 67 meV.

  18. Notes on Operations. The Core Record: A New Bibliographic Standard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromwell, Willy

    1994-01-01

    Describes a proposed core-level bibliographic standard that combines the cost effectiveness of minimal-level cataloging with full-level cataloging's utility for library cooperation. The process of developing core-level standards, a definition of a core record, comparisons of core records with minimal- and full-level records, and implementation…

  19. Isotopic and hydrologic responses of small, closed lakes to climate variability: Comparison of measured and modeled lake level and sediment core oxygen isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, Byron A.; Abbott, Mark B.; Nelson, Daniel B.; Stansell, Nathan D.; Finney, Bruce P.; Bain, Daniel J.; Rosenmeier, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    Simulations conducted using a coupled lake-catchment isotope mass balance model forced with continuous precipitation, temperature, and relative humidity data successfully reproduce (within uncertainty limits) long-term (i.e., multidecadal) trends in reconstructed lake surface elevations and sediment core oxygen isotope (δ18O) values at Castor Lake and Scanlon Lake, north-central Washington. Error inherent in sediment core dating methods and uncertainty in climate data contribute to differences in model reconstructed and measured short-term (i.e., sub-decadal) sediment (i.e., endogenic and/or biogenic carbonate) δ18O values, suggesting that model isotopic performance over sub-decadal time periods cannot be successfully investigated without better constrained climate data and sediment core chronologies. Model reconstructions of past lake surface elevations are consistent with estimates obtained from aerial photography. Simulation results suggest that precipitation is the strongest control on lake isotopic and hydrologic dynamics, with secondary influence by temperature and relative humidity. This model validation exercise demonstrates that lake-catchment oxygen isotope mass balance models forced with instrumental climate data can reproduce lake hydrologic and isotopic variability over multidecadal (or longer) timescales, and therefore, that such models could potentially be used for quantitative investigations of paleo-lake responses to hydroclimatic change.

  20. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  1. Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) levels in the natural history of hepatitis B virus infection in a large European cohort predominantly infected with genotypes A and D.

    PubMed

    Maasoumy, B; Wiegand, S B; Jaroszewicz, J; Bremer, B; Lehmann, P; Deterding, K; Taranta, A; Manns, M P; Wedemeyer, H; Glebe, D; Cornberg, M

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) has been suggested as an additional marker of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HBcrAg combines the antigenic reactivity resulting from denatured hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), HBV core antigen and an artificial core-related protein (p22cr). In Asian patients, high levels of HBcrAg have been suggested to be an independent risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma, while low levels could guide safe cessation of treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues. We here studied HBcrAg levels in different phases of HBV infection in a large European cohort predominantly infected with genotypes A and D: HBeAg-positive immune tolerance (n = 30), HBeAg-positive immune clearance (IC) (n = 60), HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH) (n = 50), HBeAg-negative inactive/quiescent carrier phase (c) (n = 109) and acute hepatitis B (n = 8). Median HBcrAg levels were high in the immune tolerance and immune clearance phases (8.41 and 8.11 log U/mL, respectively), lower in ENH subjects (4.82 log U/mL) but only 2.00 log U/mL in ENQ subjects. Correlation between HBcrAg and HBV DNA varied among the different phases of HBV infection, while HBcrAg moderately correlated with hepatitis B surface antigen in all phases. ENQ patients had HBcrAg levels <3 log U/mL in 79%, in contrast to only 12% in the ENH group. HBcrAg levels vary significantly during the different phases of HBV infection. HBcrAg may serve as valuable marker for virus replication and reflect the transcriptional activity of intrahepatic cccDNA. In HBeAg-negative patients, HBcrAg may help to distinguish between inactive carriers (ENQ) and those with active disease (ENH).

  2. Molecular Orbital Simulations of Metal 1s2p Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Källman, Erik; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-07-28

    For first-row transition metals, high-resolution 3d electronic structure information can be obtained using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). In the hard X-ray region, a K pre-edge (1s→3d) excitation can be followed by monitoring the dipole-allowed Kα (2p→1s) or Kβ (3p→1s) emission, processes labeled 1s2p or 1s3p RIXS. Here the restricted active space (RAS) approach, which is a molecular orbital method, is used for the first time to study hard X-ray RIXS processes. This is achieved by including the two sets of core orbitals in different partitions of the active space. Transition intensities are calculated using both first- and second-order expansions of the wave vector, including, but not limited to, electric dipoles and quadrupoles. The accuracy of the approach is tested for 1s2p RIXS of iron hexacyanides [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. RAS simulations accurately describe the multiplet structures and the role of 2p and 3d spin-orbit coupling on energies and selection rules. Compared to experiment, relative energies of the two [Fe(CN)6](3-) resonances deviate by 0.2 eV in both incident energy and energy transfer directions, and multiplet splittings in [Fe(CN)6](4-) are reproduced within 0.1 eV. These values are similar to what can be expected for valence excitations. The development opens the modeling of hard X-ray scattering processes for both solution catalysts and enzymatic systems. PMID:27398775

  3. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  4. Sea-level and provenance controlled clay mineral assemblage since the last 19 ka in the southern South China Sea: records of Core MD05-2894 off the Sunda Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Liu, Z.; Colin, C.; Sathiamurthy, E.; Hantoro, W. S.; Zhao, Y.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution clay mineral assemblage at Core MD05-2894 (7°2.25'N, 111°33.11'E, water depth 1982 m) in the southern South China Sea is used to investigate the provenance and transport process of fine-grained sediments since the last 19 ka. In order to perform the source analysis, clay minerals in surface sediments of various potential source areas are also analyzed, including the Mekong River, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo, and the Sunda Shelf. Clay mineralogical results at Core MD05-2894 indicate the sea level rise as the principal factor to drive provenance changes. During the late glacial stage, the Sunda Shelf was exposed. High values of smectite (average 32%) and kaolinite (27%) at the core suggest a large contribution of fine-grained sediments transported by the potential Sunda paleo-drainage system from Malaysia Peninsula and Sumatra, where kaolinite and smectite are rich. During the deglaciation when the sea level rises, illite and chlorite contents increased with a similar pattern, whereas kaolinite and smectite contents decreased, suggesting more sediment contribution from the Mekong River and Northwest Borneo. During the Holocene, variations in four clay mineral contents keep relatively stable with more illite and chlorite contents than those of the deglaciation and last glacial stage, indicating a mixture of various provenances.

  5. Characterization of equine CSN1S2 variants considering genetics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Pawlak, Piotr; Wodas, Lukasz; Borowska, Alicja; Stachowiak, Anna; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Mackowski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Currently, research interest is increasing in horse milk composition and its effect on human health. Despite previously published studies describing the presence of intra- and interbreed variability of equine milk components, no investigations have focused on the genetic background of this variation. Among horse caseins and the genes encoding them, least is known about the structure and expression of the α-S2 casein gene, CSN1S2. Herein, based on direct sequencing of the equine CSN1S2 coding sequence, we describe the presence of 51-bp insertion-deletion (in/del) polymorphism, which significantly changes the protein sequence (lack or presence of 17-amino acid serine-rich peptide). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the observed in/del polymorphism spanned exactly 2 exons; therefore, we hypothesized that we were observing different CSN1S2 splicing isoforms. However, further investigation indicated that the detected sequence variation was caused by a large (1.3-kb) deletion in the genomic DNA. We found that the polymorphic forms (A, longer; B, shorter; KP658381 and KP658382 GenBank records, respectively) were unevenly distributed among different horse breeds (the highest frequency of variant B was observed in coldblood horses and Haflingers). We propose that the analyzed polymorphism is associated with CSN1S2 expression level (the highest expression was recorded for individuals carrying the BB genotype), which was much more pronounced for milk CSN1S2 protein content than for relative transcript abundance (measured in milk somatic cells). Our results provide insight into the equine CSN1S2 structure and lay a foundation for further functional analyses regarding, for example, allergenicity or physiochemical properties of the observed CSN1S2 variants.

  6. Characterization of equine CSN1S2 variants considering genetics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Pawlak, Piotr; Wodas, Lukasz; Borowska, Alicja; Stachowiak, Anna; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Mackowski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Currently, research interest is increasing in horse milk composition and its effect on human health. Despite previously published studies describing the presence of intra- and interbreed variability of equine milk components, no investigations have focused on the genetic background of this variation. Among horse caseins and the genes encoding them, least is known about the structure and expression of the α-S2 casein gene, CSN1S2. Herein, based on direct sequencing of the equine CSN1S2 coding sequence, we describe the presence of 51-bp insertion-deletion (in/del) polymorphism, which significantly changes the protein sequence (lack or presence of 17-amino acid serine-rich peptide). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the observed in/del polymorphism spanned exactly 2 exons; therefore, we hypothesized that we were observing different CSN1S2 splicing isoforms. However, further investigation indicated that the detected sequence variation was caused by a large (1.3-kb) deletion in the genomic DNA. We found that the polymorphic forms (A, longer; B, shorter; KP658381 and KP658382 GenBank records, respectively) were unevenly distributed among different horse breeds (the highest frequency of variant B was observed in coldblood horses and Haflingers). We propose that the analyzed polymorphism is associated with CSN1S2 expression level (the highest expression was recorded for individuals carrying the BB genotype), which was much more pronounced for milk CSN1S2 protein content than for relative transcript abundance (measured in milk somatic cells). Our results provide insight into the equine CSN1S2 structure and lay a foundation for further functional analyses regarding, for example, allergenicity or physiochemical properties of the observed CSN1S2 variants. PMID:26709185

  7. The Common Core Takes Hold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A survey administered in the spring of 2013 by the Center on Education Policy (CEP) inquired into the implementation of Common Core State Standards at that time. Based on self-reports by state officials, the survey found that curricula aligned to the common core were already being taught in at least some districts or grade levels. All states…

  8. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  9. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  10. Role of nuclear dynamics in the Asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s photoejection from CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Shungo; Haxton, Dan; Rescigno, Tom; McCurdy, Bill

    2010-11-30

    We report the results of semiclassical calculations of the asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s ionization of CO{sub 2} measured with respect to the CO{sup +} and O{sup +} ions produced by subsequent Auger decay, and show how the decay event can be used to probe ultrafast molecular dynamics of the transient cation. The fixed-nuclei photoionization amplitudes were constructed using variationally obtained electron-molecular ion scattering wave functions. The amplitudes are then used in a semiclassical manner to investigate their dependence on the nuclear dynamics of the cation. The method introduced here can be used to study other core-level ionization events.

  11. Mercury's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the location of Cassini state 1 is crucial. Convincing radar evidence indicates that the mantle rests on a liquid layer (Margot et al. 2005), but there are no empirical constraints on the moment of inertia C/MR2, which constraints must wait for the determination of the gravitational coefficients J2 and C22 from the MESSENGER orbiting spacecraft, and an accurate determination of the obliquity of the Cassini state. Tidal and core-mantle dissipation drive the spin to the Cassini state with a time scale O(105) years, so the spin should occupy the Cassini state and thereby define its obliquity---unless there has been a recent excitation of a free precession of the spin. Another way the spin might be displaced from the Cassini state is if the variations in the orbital elements, which change the position of the Cassini state, cause the spin axis to lag behind as it attempts to follow the state. Fortunately, the solid angle the spin axis encloses as it precesses around the Cassini state is an adiabatic invariant, and it is conserved if the orbital element variations are slow compared to the precession rate. As the precession period is O(1000) years, and the time scales of orbital parameter variations are O(105) years, the spin axis should remain very close to the Cassini state if it were ever close. But how close is close? The increasing precision of the radar and eventual spacecraft measurements warrants a check on the likely proximity of the spin axis to the Cassini state. By numerically following the positions of the spin axis and Cassini state with orbital parameters varying with time scales and amplitudes comparable to the real variations, we show that the spin should remain within 1″ of the Cassini state once dissipative torques bring it there. The current spin axis position should thus define the Cassini state sufficiently to put reasonably tight constraints on the core structure

  12. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  13. Hepatitis B Virus Core Promoter Double Mutations (A1762T, G1764A) Are Associated with Lower Levels of Serum Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Qin-Yan; Harrison, Tim J.; Li, Guo-Jian; Wang, Xue-Yan; Li, Hai; Hu, Li-Ping; Li, Kai-Wen; Yang, Qing-Li; Tan, Chao; Fang, Zhong-Liao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify serum proteins with differential concentrations between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and HBsAg asymptomatic carriers among individuals infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) with basal core promoter (BCP) double mutations (A1762T, G1764A). Methods iTRAQ and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify differentially expressed protein, and an ELISA test was used for the validation test. Results The total number of proteins identified was 1,125, of which 239 showed statistically significant differences in their expression. The relative concentrations of serum dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD), which showed the most significant correlation with liver diseases and infection, were significantly lower in HCC patients than asymptomatic HBsAg carriers and individuals negative for HBsAg. However, only the difference between HCC patients with BCP double mutations and HBsAg-negative individuals could be confirmed by ELISA. Meanwhile, we found that the concentrations of serum DLD in those infected with HBV with BCP double mutations were significantly lower than in individuals with the wild-type BCP. However, the difference in the concentrations of serum DLD between individuals with wild-type BCP and those negative for HBsAg was not significant. Conclusions HBV with BCP double mutations are associated with lower concentrations of serum DLD. PMID:27303803

  14. Influence of growth conditions on RNA levels in relation to activity of core metabolic enzymes in the parasitic protists Trypanosoma brucei and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    ter Kuile, B H; Bonilla, Y

    1999-03-01

    Levels of mRNAs encoding metabolic enzymes and their cellular activities were measured on continuous culture samples of the parasitic protists Trypanosoma brucei and Trichomonas vaginalis. The organisms were grown in chemostats at varying growth rates under glucose limitation or in the presence of excess glucose (EG), resulting in extensive adaptation of the cellular activities of glycolytic enzymes. rRNA and mRNA for beta-tubulin were monitored as controls. In Trypanosoma brucei levels of all RNAs showed a biphasic dependence on growth rate (= dilution rate D), with a sharp increase at higher D values. Cellular RNA levels of Trichomonas vaginalis rate-limited by glucose decreased slightly with increasing D. In EG-grown cells the opposite trend was observed. Equal levels for both carbon regimes were observed at intermediate D values. In both species the ratio between rRNA and mRNA encoding beta-tubulin was constant, independent of the carbon regime. mRNA encoding metabolic enzymes showed varying degrees of correlation with rRNA and beta-tubulin mRNA. In contrast, there was little to no correlation between mRNA levels and the activities of the enzymes they encode, even though only one of these is allosterically regulated. The data indicate that RNA levels in Trypanosoma brucei and Trichomonas vaginalis are determined by growth rate and in the latter species by the availability of the carbon and energy source. Rates of synthesis of metabolic enzymes are most likely regulated at the post-transcriptional level.

  15. Magic Wavelength for the Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2016-05-01

    The state of the art precision measurement of the transition frequencies of neutral atoms is performed with atoms trapped by the magic wavelength optical lattice that cancels the ac Stark shift of the transitions. Trapping with magic wavelength lattice is also expected to improve the precision of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency, which so far has been measured only with the atomic beam. In this talk, I discuss the magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition, and the possibility of implementing the optical lattice trapping for hydrogen. Optical trapping of hydrogen also opens the way to perform magnetic field free spectroscopy of antihydrogen for the test of CPT theorem.

  16. Effect of nitrogen addition on the band gap, core level shift, surface energy, and the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, H. J.; Chen, X. F.; Pan, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Sun, Chang Q.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of nitrogen (N) doping on the behavior of field emission, surface energy and the band structure of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) thin films coated on silicon tip arrays has been examined in detail. Measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, water contact angle and field emission testing revealed that the optimal 50%-nitrogen partial pressure (PN) could improve substantially the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 films accompanied with narrowed band gap, lowered surface energy and work function and a negative energy shift of the N 1s level from 404 to 396 eV. Results evidence consistently the presence of the nonbonding lone pairs and the lone pair induced antibonding dipoles upon tetrahedron formation which is responsible for the observations. At PN below and above the optimal value physisorption and hydrogen bond likes formation like to occur.

  17. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition.

    PubMed

    Barr, Alexis R; Heldt, Frank S; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-27

    The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  18. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  19. Core Journal Lists: Classic Tool, New Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paynter, Robin A.; Jackson, Rose M.; Mullen, Laura Bowering

    2010-01-01

    Reviews the historical context of core journal lists, current uses in collection assessment, and existing methodologies for creating lists. Outlines two next generation core list projects developing new methodologies and integrating novel information/data sources to improve precision: a national-level core psychology list and the other a local…

  20. Estimation of turbulence characteristics of the low-level eyewall and outer-core regions in intense Hurricanes Allen (1980) and Hugo (1989)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. A.; Marks, F. D.; Montgomery, M.; Lorsolo, S.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulent transport processes in the atmospheric boundary layer play an important role in the intensification and maintenance of a hurricane vortex. However, direct measurement of turbulence in the hurricane boundary layer has been scarce. This study analyzes the flight-level data collected by research aircraft that penetrated the eyewalls of Category 5 Hurricane Hugo (1989) and Category 4 Hurricane Allen (1980) between 1 km and the sea surface. Momentum flux, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and vertical eddy diffusivity are estimated before and during the eyewall penetrations. Spatial scales of turbulent eddies are determined through spectral analysis. The turbulence parameters estimated for the eyewall penetration leg are found to be nearly an order of magnitude larger than those for the leg outside the eyewall at similar altitudes. In the low-level intense eyewall region, the horizontal length scale of dominant turbulent eddies is found to be between 500 - 3000 m and the corresponding vertical length scale is approximately 100 - 200 m. The results suggest also that it is unwise to include the eyewall vorticity maximum (EVM) in the turbulence parameter estimation, since the EVMs are likely to be quasi two-dimensional vortex structures that are embedded within the three dimensional turbulence on the inside edge of the eyewall.

  1. F-GUTs with Mordell-Weil U (1)'s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Leontaris, G. K.

    2014-07-01

    In this note we study the constraints on F-theory GUTs with extra U (1)'s in the context of elliptic fibrations with rational sections. We consider the simplest case of one abelian factor (Mordell-Weil rank one) and investigate the conditions that are induced on the coefficients of its Tate form. Converting the equation representing the generic hypersurface P112 to this Tate's form we find that the presence of a U (1), already in this local description, is consistent with the exceptional E6 and E7 non-abelian singularities. We briefly comment on a viable E6 × U (1) effective F-theory model.

  2. Boron 1s photoelectron spectrum of 11BF3: vibrational structure and linewidth.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T Darrah; Püttner, Ralph; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Prümper, Georg; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Kukk, Edwin; Sankari, Rami; Harries, James; Tamenori, Yusuke; Tanaka, Takahiro; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2007-12-28

    The boron 1s photoelectron spectrum of (11)BF(3) has been measured at a photon energy of 400 eV and a resolution of about 55 meV. The pronounced vibrational structure seen in the spectrum has been analyzed to give the harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies of the symmetric stretching mode, 128.1 and 0.15 meV, as well as the change in equilibrium BF bond length upon ionization, -5.83 pm. A similar change in bond length has been observed for PF(3) and SiF(4), but a much smaller change for CF(4). Theoretical calculations for BF(3) that include the effects of electron correlation give results that are in reasonable accord with the experimental values. The Lorentzian (lifetime) width of the boron 1s core hole in BF(3) is found to be 72 meV, comparable to the value of 77 meV that has been reported for CF(4).

  3. Critical CRBR core pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, F.D.

    1980-06-01

    The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

  4. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  5. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  6. Cadmium Telluride, Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide Core/Shell, and Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide/Zinc Sulfide Core/Shell/Shell Quantum Dots Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yueran

    aqueous phase can quench CdTe/CdS QDs. Additionally, the stability of the different ligands capped CdTe/CdS QDs was tested by dialysis measurement, the hydrodynamic diameters of CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were measured by dynamic light scattering, and dissolving issue was found when CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were diluted in CHCl3. We have characterized the CdTe core and the CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and ICP-OES measurements. We have found that the CdTe core was of a zincblende structure, and the shell was a wurtzite structure. And the CdTe/CdS QDs were core/shell QDs instead of alloying QDs. We have also analyzed the photophysical properties of CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed the emission decay lifetimes in the tens of nanoseconds. Additionally, ultrafast charge carrier relaxation dynamics of the CdTe core and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were studied by the femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The transient absorption spectra of CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs showed multiple bleaches, which have been assigned to the 1S3/2(h)-1S(e), 2S3/2(h)-1S(e), and 1P3/2(h)-1P(e) transitions. The spectral shifts of these bleaches after shell deposition have been analyzed in the context of a quasi-type-II carrier distribution in the core/shell samples, and interestingly the red shift was only contributed from the conduction band energy levels shifting to lower energy. In addition, the ultrafast evolution of these bleach features has been examined to extract electron cooling rates in these samples. A fast decay component in the 1S3/2(h)-1S(e) transition of the small CdTe QDs was discovered due to the hole being trapped by the defects on the surface of QD. Further, we have studied the PL quenching process of the air exposed CdTe QDs via the PL decay and transient absorption measurements. Oxygen

  7. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in photoemission from core and valence states in localized magnetic systems. IV. Core-hole polarization in resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Gerrit; Thole, B. T.

    1995-12-01

    A simple theory is presented for core-hole polarization probed by resonant photoemission in a two-steps approximation. After excitation from a core level to the valence shell, the core hole decays into two shallower core holes under emission of an electron. The nonspherical core hole and the final state selected cause a specific angle and spin distribution of the emitted electron. The experiment is characterized by the ground-state moments, the polarization of the light, and the spin and angular distribution of the emitted electron. The intensity is a sum over ground-state expectation values of tensor operators times the probability to create a polarized core hole using polarized light, times the probability for decay of such a core hole into the final state. We give general expressions for the angle- and spin-dependent intensities in various regimes of Coulomb and spin-orbit interaction: LS, LSJ, and jjJ coupling. The core-polarization analysis, which generalizes the use of sum rules in x-ray absorption spectroscopy where the integrated peak intensities give ground-state expectation values of the spin and orbital moment operators, makes it possible to measure different linear combinations of these operators. As an application the 2p3/23p3p decay in ferromagnetic nickel is calculated using Hartree-Fock values for the radial matrix elements and phase factors, and compared with experiment, the dichroism is smaller in the 3P final state but stronger in the 1D, 1S peak.

  8. The Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One) Buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image shows the Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One), the Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss, for the International Space Station (ISS) undergoing final construction in the Space Station manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. Delivered and installed by the STS-112 mission, the S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing.

  9. Amplified slow light beam splitter and 1 s optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shuo; Xu, Xiwei; Xiao, Yanhong

    2014-10-01

    Using atomic motion to coherently spread light information stored in atoms provides a means to manipulate atom-light interactions. We demonstrate light splitting with moving atoms in a paraffin-coated vapor cell by using phase-sensitive degenerate four-wave mixing, or self-rotation. This scheme amplifies the slow light beam splitter signal, and, in the meantime, maintains the phase coherence between the beam-splitter channels. Light storage efficiency in the beam-splitting channel can also be enhanced. Furthermore, we demonstrate an optical memory exceeding 1 s, taking advantage of the gain from self-rotation and an atomic coherence composed of a fast-decaying part and a slow-decaying part. These results should find applications in optical memory, optical routers, and atomic coherence control.

  10. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  11. WEAVE core processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, James R.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Benn, Chris R.; Abrams, Don Carlos; Picó, Sergio; Middleton, Kevin; Lodi, Marcello; Bonifacio, Piercarlo

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is an approved massive wide field multi-object optical spectrograph (MOS) currently entering its build phase, destined for use on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). It will be commissioned and begin survey operations in 2017. This paper describes the core processing system (CPS) system being developed to process the bulk data flow from WEAVE. We describe the processes and techniques to be used in producing the scientifically validated 'Level 1' data products from the WEAVE data. CPS outputs will include calibrated one-d spectra and initial estimates of basic parameters such as radial velocities (for stars) and redshifts (for galaxies).

  12. The Deuterium Fraction in Massive Starless Cores and Dynamical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Pillai, Thushara; Butler, Michael J.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    We study deuterium fractionation in two massive starless/early-stage cores, C1-N and C1-S, in Infrared Dark Cloud G028.37+00.07, which was first identified by Tan et al. with ALMA. Line emission from multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ were observed with the ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m, and IRAM 30 m telescopes. By simultaneously fitting the spectra, we estimate the excitation conditions and deuterium fraction, {D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+} \\equiv \\quad [{{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+]/[{{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+], with values of {D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+} ≃ 0.2-0.7, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Additional observations of o-H2D+ are also presented that help constrain the ortho-to-para ratio of H2, which is a key quantity affecting the degree of deuteration. We then present chemodynamical modeling of the two cores, especially exploring the implications for the collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff. In order to reach the high level of observed deuteration of {{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+, we find that the most likely evolutionary history of the cores involves collapse at a relatively slow rate, ≲ one-tenth of free-fall.

  13. Core and Off-Core Processes in Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian; Forsberg, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    An emerging methodology of organizing systems-engineering plans is based on a concept of core and off-core processes or activities. This concept has emerged as a result of recognition of a risk in the traditional representation of systems-engineering plans by a Vee model alone, according to which a large system is decomposed into levels of smaller subsystems, then integrated through levels of increasing scope until the full system is constructed. Actual systems-engineering activity is more complicated, raising the possibility that the staff will become confused in the absence of plans which explain the nature and ordering of work beyond the traditional Vee model.

  14. Protein engineering studies on C1r and C1s.

    PubMed

    Závodszky, P; Gál, P; Cseh, S; Schumaker, V N

    1993-12-01

    1. C1r and C1s cDNAs were placed downstream the strong polyhedrin promoter in the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and the recombinant proteins were expressed in insect cells, in biologically active form. The yield of expression is high enough to get recombinant components for chemical and functional studies (5 micrograms/ml cell culture supernatant). 2. The biological activity and the post-translational modifications of the recombinant subcomponents were checked. The rC1r and rC1s proved to be biologically active in the hemolytic assay, although their glycosylations were different compared to that of the serum proteins. The insect cells are able to beta-hydroxylate the Asn residue of the EGF domain in the C1r but with a low efficiency. It is clear now, that this post-translational modification does not play a role in the Ca2+ dependent C1r-C1s interaction. 3. Two deletion mutants of C1r cDNA were constructed in order to clarify the role of domain I and II. The results show that both, domain I, and II are absolutely necessary for the tetramer formation and both have a regulatory role in the autoactivation. The autoactivation of the mutants is accelerated significantly. 4. Hybrid cDNA constructions were also made, and one of them was expressed. In the C1s alpha R hybrid the C1s alpha part cannot dimerize in presence of Ca2+, but it can form a tetramer with C1r2, that can bind to C1q. This observation indicates that the function of the C1s alpha part in the hybrid is modulated by the C1r part (gamma B) of the molecule. 5. In order to control the autoactivation process point mutant cDNAs were constructed through altering the Arg-Ile bond in the catalytic domain of the C1r. The Gln-Ile construction is a stable zymogen while the Arg-Phe mutant has a lower rate of autoactivation. These results do justify our approach of using domain-domain interchange, domain deletion and point mutations in combination, to reveal the structural background of C1 function

  15. Charge transfer in collisions of H+ with Li (1s22s, 2pz): TD-MADNESS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. J.; Krstić, P. S.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we carry out a study of the single-electron charge transfer process for H+ collisions with atomic neutral lithium, in its ground and first excited state, at 1-25 keV amu-1. For this, we solve numerically the time dependent Schrödinger equation to the defined accuracy by using a multi-resolution adaptive approach, thus removing the uncertainties connected to a basis size and spatial and temporal numeric mesh size. We approximate the atomic lithium target by a single electron model in a frozen-core pseudo-potential while the projectile follows a straight line trajectory. Within these approximations we report new benchmark data for charge transfer cross sections to n = 2, and 3 states of hydrogen from 1s22s and 1s22pz of Li. Available theoretical and experimental data in the literature are in reasonable agreement with our results.

  16. Satellite structure in the Argon 1s photoelectron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    Atomic inner-shell photoelectron spectra typically display several relatively weak {open_quotes}satellite peaks{close_quotes} at higher ionization energy than the primary peak. Such satellite peaks are associated with final-state configurations corresponding to ionization of an inner-shell electron and excitation or ionization of one or more valence electrons. The observation of satellite peaks demonstrates that the independent-electron picture is inadequate to describe atomic structure and the photoionization process. The measured energies and intensities of photoelectron satellites provide sensitive tests of many-electron theoretical models. We recorded the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum on beam line X-24A at an X-ray energy of 3628 eV. The primary peak at 3206 eV ionization energy was recorded at an observed resolution of 1.8 eV (FWHM). The satellite structure shows remarkable similarity to that recorded in the suprathreshold region of the Ar K photoabsorption cross section, demonstrating the manner in which these techniques complement each other. Surprisingly, while the region just above the K threshold in Ar was the subject of several theoretical studies using multi-configuration calculations, we find good agreement between our results and those of Dyall and collaborators using a shake model.

  17. The -5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Starska, Katarzyna; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Olszewski, Jurek; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina; Aleksandrowicz, Paweł; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; Bryś, Magdalena

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the -5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region -5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the -5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that -5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer.

  18. The response of oxygen(1S) and hydroxyl emission brightness to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiling

    2001-11-01

    The middle atmosphere exhibits a wide range of dynamical and photochemical phenomena. It is also a region where gravity waves play a dominant role in atmospheric dynamics, such as energy and momentum transfer, temperature and wind fluctuation, and constituent structure. A complete understanding of gravity waves is therefore essential due to their effects and influences on the phenomena in the atmosphere. The Airborne Lidar and Observations of Hawaiian Airglow (ALOHA) Campaign was conducted in 1993 to explore the nature of gravity wave activities and the roles they play. Among many observations, one of the most exciting wave events, known as ``wall event'', was observed on October 10, 1993, when a wave structure with a sharp front covering significant parts of the sky was observed to move with a phase velocity of 76 m/s at a period of 4-5 min; and meanwhile, MF radar measurements indicated that the average winds in the direction of the wave motion were at about 17m/s at OH heights, and less than 10m/s above. Remarkably, simultaneous observations of the Green line O(1S) and OH emission brightness showed an approximate and persistent 180° phase difference. In this thesis, we propose the presence of a fully guided gravity wave is responsible for the observed 180° phase reversal between O( 1S) and OH emission. Since one can show that a fully horizontally guided gravity wave mode can occur [Munasinghe et al, 1998] at the height levels of O(1S) and OH peaks, with its wave parameters very close to those observed on October 10, 1993 during the ALOHA Campaign, we compute this gravity wave mode in presence of the observed background winds. We then compute the integrated airglow response of O(1S) and OH to this fully guided gravity wave mode. Our results showed a 191° phase difference between the O(1S) and OH emission brightness, which is consistent with the observed phase reversal. We also investigated the reasons for this behavior. Finally we conclude that the presence of

  19. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  20. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aid core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile, akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core; (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core relative to the mantle is calculated to be at most 1.5 deg./yr.

  1. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  2. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5’- and 3’-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species. PMID:25923814

  3. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species.

  4. Selective population of the [1s2s] {sup 1}S{sub 0} and [1s2s] {sup 3}S{sub 1} states of He-like uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Rzadkiewicz, J.; Stoehlker, Th.; Gumberidze, A.; Reuschl, R.; Spillmann, U.; Tashenov, S.; Trotsenko, S.; Banas, D.; Beyer, H. F.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Ionescu, D. C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Nandi, T.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.; Gojska, A.; Hagmann, S.; Sierpowski, D.

    2006-07-15

    The formation of the [1s2s] S states in heliumlike uranium (U{sup 90+}) has been studied in relativistic collisions of initially lithiumlike uranium (U{sup 89+}) ions with N{sub 2} target molecules. By measuring projectile x-ray emission in coincidence with projectile ionization, a strong selectivity for the formation of the [1s2s] S states in heliumlike uranium is observed. This selectivity is found to be unaffected by the subsequent rearrangement of the atomic orbitals involved. By measuring the photon emission associated with the decay of the [1s2s] {sup 1}S{sub 0} and the [1s2s] {sup 3}S{sub 1} substates, we obtain for their relative population probabilities a ratio of close to 1. This finding deviates considerably from the assumption of a statistical distribution 2J+1.

  5. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starska, Katarzyna; Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina; Aleksandrowicz, Paweł; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  6. Effect of electrical steel grade on transformer core audible noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkovic, Z.

    1994-05-01

    The effect of different core material grades (M4, MOH and ZDKH) on noise level was investigated experimentally on single-phase dry-type transformer models. Two types of core design were used (conventional mitred overlapping and step-lap overlapping). The models with MOH and ZDKH material have roughly the same noise levels. The models with M4 grade material have higher noise levels than those with MOH or ZDKH, but the difference depends on core induction and core design.

  7. Core to College Evaluation: Exploring the Use of Multiple Measures for Placement into College-Level Courses. Seeking Alternatives or Improvements to the Use of a Single Standardized Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracco, Kathy Reeves; Dadgar, Mina; Austin, Kim; Klarin, Becca; Broek, Marie; Finkelstein, Neal; Mundry, Susan; Bugler, Dan

    2014-01-01

    "Core to College: Preparing Students for College Readiness and Success" is a three-year initiative. The initiative's mission is to "facilitate greater coordination between K-12 and postsecondary education systems around implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and aligned assessments." Its aim is to foster…

  8. Radiationless S 1 → S 0 phenyl deactivation pathway: an investigation of iodine-marked bi-phenyl on a silicon surface by means of time resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelswirth, Martin; Dachraoui, Hatem; Mattay, Jochen; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    The S 1 → S 0 radiationless deactivation of iodine terminated bi-phenyl immobilized on a silicon surface was probed by analysing the I4d signature (BE: 45.6 eV, 47.3 eV) by means of High Harmonic Generation (HHG) based photoelectron spectroscopy. Modifications of the 4d5/2,3/2 spectroscopic contents spanning about 0.2 ps after UV activation (266 nm) were verified as showing a transient molecular response character. A localization to the terminated phenyl substructure in the complex structural environment on the surface was ensured according to the core-level nature of the recorded I4d. The activation of the bi-phenyl achieved by UV irradiation, corresponding to the UV absorption band-edge, was verified as being dominated by a Bπ → Bπ* phenyl excitation. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) modellings were therefore performed. They were matched to Configuration Interaction semi-empirical calculations (CI-MNDO) verifying the Rustagi-Ducuing relation. The simulated singlet-singlet excitation spectrum was referenced to the spectra of an iodine terminated monomer and a linear oligophenyl chain (N = 8). Thus the deactivation response studied was assigned to a conical intersection promoted ? reaction pathway.

  9. Sex Steroids Regulate Expression of Genes Containing Long Interspersed Elements-1s in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwatanakul, Saichon; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Tongsima, Sissades; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed elements-1s (LINE-1s) are dispersed all over the human genome. There is evidence that hypomethylation of LINE-1s and levels of sex steroids regulate gene expression leading to cancer development. Here, we compared mRNA levels of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 in breast cancer cells treated with various sex steroids from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with the gene expression database using chi-square analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo). We evaluated whether sex steroids influence expression of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1. Three sex steroids at various concentrations, 1 and 10 nM estradiol (E2), 10 nM progesterone (PG) and 10 nM androgen (AN), were assessed. In breast cancer cells treated with 1 or 10 nM E2, a significant percentage of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were down-regulated. A highly significant percentage of E2-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was down-regulated in cells treated with 1 nM E2 for 3 hours (<3.70E-25; OR=1.91; 95% CI=2.16-1.69). Similarly, high percentages of PG or AN- regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were also down-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM PG or 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=9.53E-06; OR=1.65; 95% CI=2.06-1.32 and p=3.81E-14; OR=2.01; 95% CI=2.42-1.67). Interestingly, a significant percentage of AN-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was up-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=4.03E-02; OR=1.40; 95% CI=1.95-1.01). These findings suggest that intragenic LINE-1s may play roles in sex steroid mediated gene expression in breast cancer cells, which could have significant implications for the development and progression of sex steroid-dependent cancers. PMID:27644652

  10. Symmetry-dependent vibrational excitation in N 1s photoionization of N2: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Ehara, M; Nakatsuji, H; Matsumoto, M; Hatamoto, T; Liu, X-J; Lischke, T; Prümper, G; Tanaka, T; Makochekanwa, C; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Harries, J R; Tamenori, Y; Ueda, K

    2006-03-28

    We have measured the vibrational structures of the N 1s photoelectron mainline and satellites of the gaseous N2 molecule with the resolution better than 75 meV. The gerade and ungerade symmetries of the core-ionized (mainline) states are resolved energetically, and symmetry-dependent angular distributions for the satellite emission allow us to resolve the Sigma and Pi symmetries of the shake-up (satellite) states. Symmetry-adapted cluster-expansion configuration-interaction calculations of the potential energy curves for the mainline and satellite states along with a Franck-Condon analysis well reproduce the observed vibrational excitation of the bands, illustrating that the theoretical calculations well predict the symmetry-dependent geometry relaxation effects. The energies of both mainline states and satellite states, as well as the splitting between the mainline gerade and ungerade states, are also well reproduced by the calculation: the splitting between the satellite gerade and ungerade states is calculated to be smaller than the experimental detection limit.

  11. Human genes for complement components C1r and C1s in a close tail-to-tail arrangement.

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, H; Hirosawa, S; Salier, J P; Hagen, F S; Kurachi, K

    1988-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for human C1s were isolated from cDNA libraries that were prepared with poly(A)+ RNAs of human liver and HepG2 cells. A clone with the largest cDNA insert of 2664 base pairs (bp) was analyzed for its complete nucleotide sequence. It contained 202 bp of a 5' untranslated region, 45 bp of coding for a signal peptide (15 amino acid residues), 2019 bp for complement component C1s zymogen (673 amino acid residues), 378 bp for a 3' untranslated region, a stop codon, and 17 bp of a poly(A) tail. The amino acid sequence of C1s was 40.5% identical to that of C1r, with excellent matches of tentative disulfide bond locations conserving the overall domain structure of C1r. DNA blotting and sequencing analyses of genomic DNA and of an isolated genomic DNA clone clearly showed that the human genes for C1r and C1s are closely located in a "tail-to-tail" arrangement at a distance of about 9.5 kilobases. Furthermore, RNA blot analyses showed that both C1r and C1s genes are primarily expressed in liver, whereas most other tissues expressed both C1r and C1s genes at much lower levels (less than 10% of that in liver). Multiple molecular sizes of specific mRNAs were observed in the RNA blot analyses for both C1r and C1s, indicating that alternative RNA processing(s), likely an alternative polyadenylylation, might take place for both genes. Images PMID:2459702

  12. Prevalence of Serologic Hepatitis B Markers in Blood Donors From Puebla, Mexico: The Association of Relatively High Levels of Anti-Core Antibodies With the Detection of Surface Antigen and Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Hilda Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Guzman-Flores, Belinda; Perez Zempoaltecalt, Cintia; Patricia Sanchez Torres, Ana; Ramirez Rosete, Leticia; Bernal-Soto, Maribel; Marquez-Dominguez, Luis; Melendez-Mena, Daniel; Angel Mendoza Torres, Miguel; Teresa Lopez Delgado, Maria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Santos-Lopez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surface antigen (HBsAg) detection is a definitive test that can confirm HBV infection, while the presence of antibodies against the core protein (anti-HBc) suggests either a previous or ongoing infection or occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HBc and HBsAg in blood donors. Further, the study aimed to estimate the anti-HBc level at which HBV DNA is detected in putative OBI cases, as well as to search for mutations in the “a” determinant associated with the non-detection of HBsAg in serum. Patients and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from 2003–2009. The study included 120,552 blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico. Different commercial systems based on microparticles (enzymatic (MEIA) or chemiluminescent (CMIA)) were used to determine the HBsAg and anti-HBc levels. For the detection of HBV DNA, a nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) was used and the genotypes were determined using Sanger sequencing. Results Of the 120,552 blood donors, 1437 (1.19%, 95% CI: 1.12 - 1.26) were reactive to anti-HBc, while 82 (0.066%, 95% CI: 0.053 - 0.079) were reactive to HBsAg. Some 156 plasma samples collected in 2009 from anti-HBc-positive/HBsAg-negative blood donors were submitted for HBV DNA detection in a search for probable OBI. Viral DNA was detected in 27/156 (17.3%, 95% CI: 11.5 - 23.1). Our results show an association between HBV DNA or HBsAg and anti-HBc S/CO levels ≥ 4.0. All DNA samples were identified as genotype H and some “a” determinant mutations were identified, although none corresponded to mutations previously reported to hinder the detection of HBsAg by commercial immunoassays. Conclusions We observed that as the anti-HBc levels increase, there is a higher prevalence of the viral protein HBsAg in blood donors. Samples testing positive

  13. Prevalence of Serologic Hepatitis B Markers in Blood Donors From Puebla, Mexico: The Association of Relatively High Levels of Anti-Core Antibodies With the Detection of Surface Antigen and Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Hilda Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Guzman-Flores, Belinda; Perez Zempoaltecalt, Cintia; Patricia Sanchez Torres, Ana; Ramirez Rosete, Leticia; Bernal-Soto, Maribel; Marquez-Dominguez, Luis; Melendez-Mena, Daniel; Angel Mendoza Torres, Miguel; Teresa Lopez Delgado, Maria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Santos-Lopez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surface antigen (HBsAg) detection is a definitive test that can confirm HBV infection, while the presence of antibodies against the core protein (anti-HBc) suggests either a previous or ongoing infection or occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HBc and HBsAg in blood donors. Further, the study aimed to estimate the anti-HBc level at which HBV DNA is detected in putative OBI cases, as well as to search for mutations in the “a” determinant associated with the non-detection of HBsAg in serum. Patients and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from 2003–2009. The study included 120,552 blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico. Different commercial systems based on microparticles (enzymatic (MEIA) or chemiluminescent (CMIA)) were used to determine the HBsAg and anti-HBc levels. For the detection of HBV DNA, a nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) was used and the genotypes were determined using Sanger sequencing. Results Of the 120,552 blood donors, 1437 (1.19%, 95% CI: 1.12 - 1.26) were reactive to anti-HBc, while 82 (0.066%, 95% CI: 0.053 - 0.079) were reactive to HBsAg. Some 156 plasma samples collected in 2009 from anti-HBc-positive/HBsAg-negative blood donors were submitted for HBV DNA detection in a search for probable OBI. Viral DNA was detected in 27/156 (17.3%, 95% CI: 11.5 - 23.1). Our results show an association between HBV DNA or HBsAg and anti-HBc S/CO levels ≥ 4.0. All DNA samples were identified as genotype H and some “a” determinant mutations were identified, although none corresponded to mutations previously reported to hinder the detection of HBsAg by commercial immunoassays. Conclusions We observed that as the anti-HBc levels increase, there is a higher prevalence of the viral protein HBsAg in blood donors. Samples testing positive

  14. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  15. Search for a light Higgs resonance in radiative decays of the ϒ (1 S ) with a charm tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A search is presented for the decay ϒ (1 S )→γ A0 , A0→c c ¯, where A0 is a candidate for the C P -odd Higgs boson of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The search is based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the ϒ (2 S ) resonance. A sample of ϒ (1 S ) mesons is selected via the decay ϒ (2 S )→π+π-ϒ (1 S ) . The A0→c c ¯ decay is identified through the reconstruction of hadronic D0, D+, and D*(2010 )+ meson decays. No significant signal is observed. The measured 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B (ϒ (1 S )→γ A0)×B (A0→c c ¯ ) range from 7.4 ×10-5 to 2.4 ×10-3 for A0 masses from 4.00 to 8.95 GeV /c2 and 9.10 to 9.25 GeV /c2 , where the region between 8.95 and 9.10 GeV /c2 is excluded because of background from ϒ (2 S )→γ χb J(1 P ) , χb J(1 P )→γ ϒ (1 S ) decays.

  16. Branching ratio deviations from statistical behavior in core photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Tommaso, Devis; Decleva, Piero

    2005-08-01

    Accurate calculations of carbon 1s photoionization cross sections have been performed at the density functional level with the B-spline linear combination of atomic orbitals approach. The molecules considered are FCCH, FCCCH3, FCCCN, F2CCH2, CF3COOCH2CH3, and C3H5O. The variation of the branching ratios relative to inequivalent C 1s ionizations have been evaluated from threshold to about 100 eV photoelectron kinetic energy. Large deviations from the statistical ratios are observed at low energies, which remain often significant several tens of eV above threshold. The importance of taking into account core branching ratios for peak deconvolution and quantitative analysis, as well as an additional tool for structural information, is pointed out. Strong shape resonant effects are found to largely cancel in branching ratios. Their nature and variation along the series is analyzed in the framework of excitations into σ* valence orbitals.

  17. Core Design Applications

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  18. Studies of singlet Rydberg series of LiH derived from Li(nl) + H(1s), with n ≤ 6 and l ≤ 4

    SciTech Connect

    Gim, Yeongrok; Lee, Chun-Woo

    2014-10-14

    The 50 singlet states of LiH composed of 49 Rydberg states and one non-Rydberg ionic state derivable from Li(nl) + H(1s), with n ≤ 6 and l ≤ 4, are studied using the multi-reference configuration interaction method combined with the Stuttgart/Köln group's effective core potential/core polarization potential method. Basis functions that can yield energy levels up to the 6g orbital of Li have been developed, and they are used with a huge number of universal Kaufmann basis functions for Rydberg states. The systematics and regularities of the physical properties such as potential energies, quantum defects, permanent dipole moments, transition dipole moments, and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements of the Rydberg series are studied. The behaviors of potential energy curves and quantum defect curves are explained using the Fermi approximation. The permanent dipole moments of the Rydberg series reveal that they are determined by the sizes of the Rydberg orbitals, which are proportional to n{sup 2}. Interesting mirror relationships of the dipole moments are observed between l-mixed Rydberg series, with the rule Δl = ±1, except for s–d mixing, which is also accompanied by n-mixing. The members of the l-mixed Rydberg series have dipole moments with opposite directions. The first derivatives of the dipole moment curves, which show the charge-transfer component, clearly show not only mirror relationships in terms of direction but also oscillations. The transition dipole moment matrix elements of the Rydberg series are determined by the small-r region, with two consequences. One is that the transition dipole moment matrix elements show n{sup −3/2} dependence. The other is that the magnitudes of the transition dipole moment matrix elements decrease rapidly as l increases.

  19. Rearrangements of mycoreovirus 1 S1, S2 and S3 induced by the multifunctional protein p29 encoded by the prototypic hypovirus Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 strain EP713.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toru; Sun, Liying; Tsutani, Kouhei; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Mycoreovirus 1 (MyRV1), a member of the family Reoviridae possessing a genome consisting of 11 dsRNA segments (S1-S11), infects the chestnut blight fungus and reduces its virulence (hypovirulence). Studies have previously demonstrated reproducible induction of intragenic rearrangements of MyRV1 S6 (S6L: almost full-length duplication) and S10 (S10ss: internal deletion of three-quarters of the ORF), mediated by the multifunctional protein p29 encoded by the prototype hypovirus, Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1) strain EP713, of the family Hypoviridae with ssRNA genomes. The current study showed that CHV1 p29 also induced rearrangements of the three largest MyRV1 segments, S1, S2 and S3, which encode structural proteins. These rearranged segments involved in-frame extensions of almost two-thirds of the ORFs (S1L, S2L and S3L, respectively), which is rare for a reovirus rearrangement. MyRV1 variants carrying S1L, S2L or S3L always contained S10ss (MyRV1/S1L+S10ss2, MyRV1/S2L+S10ss2 or MyRV1/S3L+S10ss2). Levels of mRNAs for the rearranged and co-existing unaltered genome segments in fungal colonies infected with each of the MyRV1 variants appeared to be comparable to those for the corresponding normal segments in wild-type MyRV1-infected colonies, suggesting that the rearranged segments were fully competent for packaging and transcription. Protein products of the rearranged segments were detectable in fungal colonies infected with S2L MyRV1/S2L+S10ss2 and S3L MyRV1/S3L+S10ss2, whilst S1L-encoded protein remained undetectable. S1L, S2L and S3L were associated with enhancement of the aerial hyphae growth rate. This study has provided additional examples of MyRV1 intragenic rearrangements induced by p29, and suggests that normal S1, S2 and S3 are required for the symptoms caused by MyRV1.

  20. Benefits of a High School Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2006

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of "A Nation at Risk", ACT has recommended that students take a core curriculum in high school in order to be prepared for college-level work. ACT's recommended core curriculum consists of four years of English and three years each of mathematics, science, and social studies. The benefits to students of taking the right…

  1. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  2. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  3. MicroRNA-224 Induces G1/S Checkpoint Release in Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Fangmei; Olaru, Alexandru V.; Mezey, Esteban; Xie, Qing; Li, Ling; Piontek, Klaus B.; Selaru, Florin M.

    2015-01-01

    Profound changes in microRNA (miR) expression levels are frequently found in liver cancers compared to the normal liver. In this study, we evaluate the expression of miR-224 in human HCC and CCA, as well as its downstream targets and affected pathways. We show that miR-224 is upregulated in a large cohort of human CCA, similar to its upregulation in human HCC. For the purpose of studying the roles of miR-224 in HCC and CCA, we enforced miR-224 expression in cells. mRNA arrays followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA)-identified putative molecules and pathways downstream of miR-224. Phenotypically, we report that enforced expression of miR-224 increases the growth rate of normal cholangiocytes, CCA cell lines, and HCC cell lines. In addition, we identified, in an unbiased fashion, that one of the major biologic processes affected by miR-224 is Gap1 (G1) to Synthesis (S) transition checkpoint release. We next identified p21, p15, and CCNE1 as downstream targets of miR-224 and confirmed the coordinated downregulation results in the increased phosphorylation of Retinoblastoma (Rb) with resulting G1/S checkpoint release. Our data suggest that miR-224 is a master regulator of cell cycle progression, and that its overexpression results in G1/S checkpoint release followed by accelerated cell growth. PMID:26343737

  4. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  5. Hidden relationship between the electrical conductivity and the Mn 2p core-level photoemission spectra in La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Hishida, T.; Ohbayashi, K.; Saitoh, T.

    2013-01-28

    Core-level electronic structure of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} has been studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). We first report, by the conventional XPS, the well-screened shoulder structure in Mn 2p{sub 3/2} peak, which had been observed only by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy so far. Multiple-peak analysis revealed that the Mn{sup 4+} spectral weight was not proportional to the nominal hole concentration x, indicating that a simple Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} intensity ratio analysis may result in a wrong quantitative elemental analysis. Considerable weight of the shoulder at x = 0.0 and the fact that the shoulder weight was even slightly going down from x = 0.2 to 0.4 were not compatible with the idea that this weight simply represents the metallic behavior. Further analysis found that the whole Mn 2p{sub 3/2} peak can be decomposed into four portions, the Mn{sup 4+}, the (nominal) Mn{sup 3+}, the shoulder, and the other spectral weight located almost at the Mn{sup 3+} location. We concluded that this weight represents the well-screened final state at Mn{sup 4+} sites, whereas the shoulder is known as that of the Mn{sup 3+} states. We found that the sum of these two spectral weight has an empirical relationship to the conductivity evolution with x.

  6. Patient and Community-Level Socio-Demographic Characteristics Associated with Emergency Department Visits for Childhood Injury; A Retrospective Analysis of Data from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Core Data Project 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Macy, Michelle L.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Funai, Tomohiko; Goldstick, Jason; Stanley, Rachel M.; Chamberlain, James M.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Lipton, Robert; Alpern, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine pediatric emergency department (ED) visits over 5 years, trends in injury severity, and associations between injury-related ED visit outcome and patient and community-level socio-demographic characteristics. Study design Retrospective analysis of administrative data provided to the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Core Data Project, 2004–2008. Home addresses were geocoded to determine census block group and associated socio-demographic characteristics. Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale severity and Severity Classification System scores were calculated. Generalized estimating equations were used to test for associations between socio-demographic characteristics and admission or transfer among injury-related ED visits. Results Overall ED visits and injury-related visits increased from 2004 to 2008 at study sites. Of 2,833,676 successfully geocoded visits, 700,821 (24.7%) were injury-related. The proportion of higher severity injury-related visits remained consistent. Nearly 10% of injury-related visits resulted in admission or transfer each year. After adjusting for age, sex, payer, and injury severity, odds of admission or transfer were lower among minority children and children from areas with moderate and high prevalence of poverty. Conclusions Pediatric injury-related ED visits to included sites increased over the study period while injury severity, anticipated resource utilization, and visit outcomes remained stable, with low rates of admission or transfer. Socio-demographic differences in injury-related visits and ED disposition were apparent. ED-based injury surveillance is essential to understand disparities, inform targets for prevention programs, and reduce the overall burden of childhood injuries. PMID:26141551

  7. Deduction of the chemical state and the electronic structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core-level and valence-band spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Lanting E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Sun, Limin E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Hirano, Shinichi

    2014-10-28

    Characterization of chemical state and electronic structure of the technologically important Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is attractive for understanding the physical nature of its excellent magnetic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of such rare-earth compound is important and also challenging due to the easy oxidation of surface and small photoelectron cross-sections of rare-earth 4f electrons and B 2p electrons, etc. Here, we reported an investigation based on XPS spectra of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound as a function of Ar ion sputtering time. The chemical state of Fe and that of B in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound can be clearly determined to be 0 and −3, respectively. The Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is found to have the chemical state of close to +3 instead of +3 as compared with the Nd in Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, by comparing the valence-band spectrum of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound to that of the pure Fe, the contributions from Nd, Fe, and B to the valence-band structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is made more clear. The B 2p states and B 2s states are identified to be at ∼11.2 eV and ∼24.6 eV, respectively, which is reported for the first time. The contribution from Nd 4f states can be identified both in XPS core-level spectrum and XPS valence-band spectrum. Although Nd 4f states partially hybridize with Fe 3d states, Nd 4f states are mainly localized in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound.

  8. Social capital and core network ties: a validation study of individual-level social capital measures and their association with extra- and intra-neighborhood ties, and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Moore, Spencer; Bockenholt, Ulf; Daniel, Mark; Frohlich, Katherine; Kestens, Yan; Richard, Lucie

    2011-03-01

    Research on social capital and health has assumed that measures of trust, participation, and perceived cohesion capture aspects of people's neighborhood social connections. This study uses data on the personal networks of 2707 Montreal adults in 300 different neighborhoods to examine the association of socio-demographic and social capital variables with the likelihood of having core ties, core neighborhood ties, and high self-rated health (SRH). Persons with higher household income were more likely to have core ties, but less likely to have core neighborhood ties. Persons with greater diversity in extra-neighborhood network capital were more likely to have core ties, and persons with greater diversity in intra-neighborhood network capital were more likely to have core neighborhood ties. Generalized trust, perceived neighborhood cohesion, and extra-neighborhood network diversity were shown associated with high SRH. Conventional measures of social capital may not capture network mechanisms. Findings suggest a critical appraisal of the mechanisms linking social capital and health, and the further delineation of network and psychosocial mechanisms in understanding these links.

  9. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  10. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  12. O 1s excitation and ionization processes in the CO2 molecule studied via detection of low-energy fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivimäki, A.; Alvarez-Ruiz, J.; Wasowicz, T. J.; Callegari, C.; de Simone, M.; Alagia, M.; Richter, R.; Coreno, M.

    2011-08-01

    Oxygen 1s excitation and ionization processes in the CO2 molecule have been studied with dispersed and non-dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy as well as with the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon-photoion coincidence technique. The intensity of the neutral O emission line at 845 nm shows particular sensitivity to core-to-Rydberg excitations and core-valence double excitations, while shape resonances are suppressed. In contrast, the partial fluorescence yield in the wavelength window 300-650 nm and the excitation functions of selected O+ and C+ emission lines in the wavelength range 400-500 nm display all of the absorption features. The relative intensity of ionic emission in the visible range increases towards higher photon energies, which is attributed to O 1s shake-off photoionization. VUV photon-photoion coincidence spectra reveal major contributions from the C+ and O+ ions and a minor contribution from C2 +. No conclusive changes in the intensity ratios among the different ions are observed above the O 1s threshold. The line shape of the VUV-O+ coincidence peak in the mass spectrum carries some information on the initial core excitation.

  13. Identifying ELIXIR Core Data Resources

    PubMed Central

    Durinx, Christine; McEntyre, Jo; Appel, Ron; Apweiler, Rolf; Barlow, Mary; Blomberg, Niklas; Cook, Chuck; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stockinger, Heinz; Teixeira, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The core mission of ELIXIR is to build a stable and sustainable infrastructure for biological information across Europe. At the heart of this are the data resources, tools and services that ELIXIR offers to the life-sciences community, providing stable and sustainable access to biological data. ELIXIR aims to ensure that these resources are available long-term and that the life-cycles of these resources are managed such that they support the scientific needs of the life-sciences, including biological research. ELIXIR Core Data Resources are defined as a set of European data resources that are of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data. They are complete collections of generic value to life-science, are considered an authority in their field with respect to one or more characteristics, and show high levels of scientific quality and service. Thus, ELIXIR Core Data Resources are of wide applicability and usage. This paper describes the structures, governance and processes that support the identification and evaluation of ELIXIR Core Data Resources. It identifies key indicators which reflect the essence of the definition of an ELIXIR Core Data Resource and support the promotion of excellence in resource development and operation. It describes the specific indicators in more detail and explains their application within ELIXIR’s sustainability strategy and science policy actions, and in capacity building, life-cycle management and technical actions. Establishing the portfolio of ELIXIR Core Data Resources and ELIXIR Services is a key priority for ELIXIR and publicly marks the transition towards a cohesive infrastructure. PMID:27803796

  14. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  15. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  16. Identification of multiple dmrt1s in catfish: localization, dimorphic expression pattern, changes during testicular cycle and after methyltestosterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Raghuveer, K; Senthilkumaran, B

    2009-05-01

    The double sex and mab-3 related (DM) transcription factor 1 (dmrt1) plays an important role in testicular differentiation. Here, we report cloning of multiple dmrt1s, a full-length and two alternative spliced forms from adult catfish (Clarias gariepinus) testis, which encode predicted proteins of 287 (dmrt1a), 253 (dmrt1b) and 233 (dmrt1c) amino acid residues respectively. Interestingly, dmrt1c lacks the majority of the DM domain. Multiple dmrt1s (dmrt1a and dmrt1c) were obtained from Clarias batrachus as well. Tissue distribution (transcript and protein) of catfish dmrt1 revealed exclusive expression in testis. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed the presence of multiple dmrt1s with high levels of dmrt1a in adult testis but not in ovary. Real-time RT-PCR analysis during testicular cycle showed higher levels of dmrt1 transcripts in preparatory and pre-spawning when compared with spawning and post-spawning phases. Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence localization revealed the presence of catfish Dmrt1 protein in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, which indicates plausible role in spermatogenesis. Histological analysis indicated initiation of gonadal sex differentiation in catfish around 40-50 days after hatching. The potential role for dmrt1 in testicular differentiation is evident from its stage-dependent elevated expression in developing testis. Furthermore, dimorphic expressions of dmrt1s were evident at different stages of gonadal development or recrudescence in catfish. Treatment of methyl testosterone (MT) during early stages of gonadal sex differentiation resulted in adult males. Interestingly, we also obtained MT-treated fishes having ova-testis gonads. Analysis of dmrt1, sox9a, foxl2 and cyp19a1 expression patterns in MT-treated gonads revealed tissue-specific pattern. These results together suggest that multiple dmrt1s are testis-specific markers in catfish.

  17. AN Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, Andrea; Tomatis, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several alternative approximations of neutron transport have been proposed in years to move around the known limitations imposed by neutron diffusion in the modeling of nuclear cores. However, only a few complied with the industrial requirements of fast numerical computation, concentrating more on physical accuracy. In this work, the AN transport methodology is discussed with particular interest in core performance calculations. The implementation of the methodology in full core codes is discussed with particular attention to numerical issues and to the integration within the entire simulation process. Finally, first results from core studies in AN transport are analyzed in detail and compared to standard results of neutron diffusion.

  18. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  19. Investigating the relationship between k-core and s-core network decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2016-05-01

    Network decomposition methods, such as the much used k-core analysis, are able to identify globally central regions of networks. The decomposition approaches are hierarchical and identify nested sets of nodes with increasing centrality properties. While most studies have been concerned with unweighted networks, i.e. k-core analysis, recent works have introduced network decomposition methods that apply to weighted networks. Here, we investigate the relationship between k-core decomposition for unweighted networks and s-core decomposition for weighted networks by systematically employing a link-weight scheme that gradually discretizes the link weights. We applied this approach to the Erdős-Rényi model and the scale-free configuration model for five different weight distributions, and two empirical networks, the US air traffic network and a Facebook network. We find that (1) both uniformly random and positively correlated link-weight distributions give rise to highly stable s-core decompositions with respect to discretization levels. (2) For negatively correlated link-weight distributions, the resulting s-core decomposition has no similarity to the k-cores. Since several combinations of network topology and link-weight distributions give rise to a core-structure that is highly similar to the full s-core for a large range of link-discretization levels, it is possible to significantly speed up the numerical s-core analysis for these situations.

  20. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  1. The fluffy core of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, James H.

    2015-09-01

    Enceladus is well known for its young south polar terrain, observed by Cassini to emit several GW of heat as well as plumes of vapor and ice. The source of this energy is believed to be tidal dissipation. However, the observed south polar heat flux cannot be sustained over the age of the Solar System. Furthermore, thermal evolution models suggest that any global subsurface ocean should freeze on a timescale of tens to hundreds of My, sharply reducing future tidal heating, unless large amounts of antifreeze are present in the ocean. Here I propose an alternative internal structure for Enceladus, in which the silicate core is fragmented, and that the tidal deformation of the core may be partially controlled by interstitial ice. I find that fragmentation of the core increases tidal dissipation by a factor of 20, consistent with the long-term dynamically sustainable level, even when the interior is completely frozen, but only if the interior starts out warm and tidal heating is strong from the beginning. If this is not the case, radioactive heating will be insufficient to prevent the interior from cooling. Although an ocean need not be present in order for the interior to experience significant tidal heating, all models that dissipate enough heat to prevent runaway cooling are also warm enough to have an ocean. Tidal dissipation in the weak core provides an additional source of heat that may prevent a global subsurface ocean from freezing.

  2. Observation of the Inclusive D^{* -} Production in the Decay of Y(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J.Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-17

    The authors present a study of the inclusive D*{sup {+-}} production in the decay of {Upsilon}(1S) using (98.6 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance. Using the decay chain {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S), {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X, where X is unobserved, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X] = (2.52 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.15(syst))% and the D*{sup {+-}} momentum distribution in the rest frame of the {Upsilon}(1S). They find evidence for an excess of D*{sup {+-}} production over the expected rate from the virtual photon annihilation process {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {gamma}* {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sup {+-}} X.

  3. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  4. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  5. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  6. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  7. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  8. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  9. Monochromatic soft-x-ray-induced reactions of CF2Cl2 adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near the F(1s) edge.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-K; Tsai, W-C; Chou, L-C; Hsieh, Y-C; Chen, K-H; He, T-M; Feng, K-S; Wen, C-R

    2011-11-01

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was used to investigate the monochromatic soft x-ray photoreactions of CF(2)Cl(2) adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F(+) PSD spectra were observed as a function of photon exposure at the CF(2)Cl(2)-covered surface (dose = 2.0 × 10(14) molecules cm(-2), ∼0.75 monolayer). The F(+) PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of solid CF(2)Cl(2) near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F(+) PSD and TEY spectra depict three features in the energy range of 687-695 eV, and are assigned to the excitations of F(1s) to (13a(1) + 9b(2))[(C-Cl)(∗)], (7b(1) + 14a(1))[(C-F)∗] antibonding and 5p Rydberg orbitals, respectively. Following the Auger decay process, two holes are created in the C-F bonding orbitals producing the 2h1e final state which results in the F(+) desorption. This PSD mechanism, responsible for the F(+) PSD of solid CF(2)Cl(2), is used to explain the first F(+) PSD spectrum in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra. The variation of spectral shapes in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra shows the consumption of adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules and the production of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. The photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is deduced from the sequential F(+) PSD spectra and found to be ∼6.0 × 10(-18) cm(2). PMID:21996577

  10. Monochromatic soft-x-ray-induced reactions of CF2Cl2 adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near the F(1s) edge.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-K; Tsai, W-C; Chou, L-C; Hsieh, Y-C; Chen, K-H; He, T-M; Feng, K-S; Wen, C-R

    2011-11-01

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was used to investigate the monochromatic soft x-ray photoreactions of CF(2)Cl(2) adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F(+) PSD spectra were observed as a function of photon exposure at the CF(2)Cl(2)-covered surface (dose = 2.0 × 10(14) molecules cm(-2), ∼0.75 monolayer). The F(+) PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of solid CF(2)Cl(2) near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F(+) PSD and TEY spectra depict three features in the energy range of 687-695 eV, and are assigned to the excitations of F(1s) to (13a(1) + 9b(2))[(C-Cl)(∗)], (7b(1) + 14a(1))[(C-F)∗] antibonding and 5p Rydberg orbitals, respectively. Following the Auger decay process, two holes are created in the C-F bonding orbitals producing the 2h1e final state which results in the F(+) desorption. This PSD mechanism, responsible for the F(+) PSD of solid CF(2)Cl(2), is used to explain the first F(+) PSD spectrum in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra. The variation of spectral shapes in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra shows the consumption of adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules and the production of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. The photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is deduced from the sequential F(+) PSD spectra and found to be ∼6.0 × 10(-18) cm(2).

  11. The ϒ(1S)→Bcρ decay with perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling; Li, Qingxia; Lu, Gongru; Huang, Jinshu; Chang, Qin

    2016-08-01

    With the potential prospects of the ϒ (1 S) data samples at the running LHC and upcoming SuperKEKB, the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ weak decay is studied with the pQCD approach. It is found that (1) the lion's share of branching ratio comes from the longitudinal polarization helicity amplitudes; (2) branching ratio for the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ decay can reach up to O (10-9), which might be hopefully measurable.

  12. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  13. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  14. Mars' core and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  15. Advocacy: Emphasizing the Uncommon about the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2014-01-01

    The author describes key issues and uncommon concerns about the Common Core State Standards that fit within two categories: philosophical and pedagogical. Philosophically, Common Core State K-12 Standards should not be expected to be mastered at a specific grade level but based on developmental readiness. Pedagogically, Common Core State Standards…

  16. Attosecond photoionization dynamics with stimulated core-valence transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jhih-An; Rohringer, Nina; Dahlström, Jan Marcus

    2016-03-01

    We investigate ionization of neon atoms by an isolated attosecond pump pulse in the presence of two coherent extreme ultraviolet or x-ray probe fields. The probe fields are tuned to a core-valence transition in the residual ion and induce spectral shearing of the photoelectron distributions. We show that the photoelectron-ion coincidence signal contains an interference pattern that depends on the temporal structure of the attosecond pump pulse and the stimulated core-valence transition. Many-body perturbation theory is used to compute "atomic response times" for the processes and we find strikingly different behavior for stimulation to the outer-core hole (2 p ↔2 s ) and stimulation to the inner-core hole (2 p ↔1 s ). The response time of the inner-core transition is found to be comparable to that of state-of-the-art laser-based characterization techniques for attosecond pulses.

  17. Single and double core-hole ion emission spectroscopy of transient neon plasmas produced by ultraintense x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Single core-hole (SCH) and double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon gas in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the laser-produced highly transient plasmas. The plasma density effects on level populations are demonstrated with an x-ray photon energy of 2000 eV. For laser photon energy in the range of 937 - 1360 eV, resonant absorptions (RA) of 1s-np (n> = 2) transitions play important roles in time evolution of the population and DCH emission spectroscopy. For x-ray photon energy larger than 1360 eV, no RA exist and transient plasmas show different features in the DCH spectroscopy.

  18. ATF6 upregulates XBP1S and inhibits ER stress-mediated apoptosis in osteoarthritis cartilage.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng-Jin; Xiong, Zhangyuan; Lu, Xiaojie; Ye, Mengliang; Han, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Rong

    2014-02-01

    As we previously reported, transcription factor XBP1S enhances BMP2-induced chondrocyte differentiation and acts as a positive mediator of chondrocyte hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to determine (1) whether XBP1S influences ER stress-mediated apoptosis in osteoarthritis (OA); (2) whether ATF6 regulates IRE1/XBP1 signal pathway in OA cartilage; (3) what are the associated molecules affecting apoptosis in osteoarthritis and the molecular events underlying this process. Herein, we examined and found that ER stress-associated molecules were activated in OA patients, specifically XBP1S splice and expression were increased markedly by TNF-α and IL-1β treatments. Transcription factor ATF6 can specifically bind to the promoter of XBP1 gene and enhance the expression of XBP1S spliced by IRE1α in osteoarthritis cartilage. Furthermore, siXBP1S can enhance ER stress-mediated apoptosis and main matrix degradation in osteoarthritis. Whereas AdXBP1S can inhibit ER stress-mediated apoptosis and TNFα induced nitrite production in OA cartilage. In a word, our observations demonstrate the importance of XBP1S in osteoarthritis. ATF6 and IRE1α can regulate endogenous XBP1S gene expression synergistically in OA cartilage. More significantly, XBP1S was a negative regulator of apoptosis in osteoarthritis by affecting caspase 3, caspase 9, caspase 12, p-JNK1, and CHOP.

  19. Search for a light Higgs resonance in radiative decays of the Y(1S) with a charm tag

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, a search is presented for the decay Υ(1S)→γA0, A0 → cc¯, where A0 is a candidate for the CP-odd Higgs boson of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The search is based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the Υ(2S) resonance. A sample of Υ(1S) mesons is selected via the decay Υ(2S) → π+π Υ(1S). The A0 → cc¯ decay is identified through the reconstruction of hadronic D0, D+, and D*(2010)+ meson decays. No significant signal is observed. The measured 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S) → γA0)×B(A0 → cc¯) range from 7.4×10–5 to 2.4×10–3 for A0 masses from 4.00 to 8.95 GeV/c2 and 9.10 to 9.25 GeV/c2, where the region between 8.95 and 9.10 GeV/c2 is excluded because of background from Υ(2S) → γχbJ(1P), χbJ(1P) → γΥ(1S) decays.

  20. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  1. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  3. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    DOEpatents

    Gorholt, Wilhelm; Luci, Raymond K.

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  4. (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-Mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines and their incorporation into hormaomycin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhushkov, Sergei I; Yufit, Dmitrii S; Grosse, Christian; Kaiser, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Efficient and scalable syntheses of enantiomerically pure (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines 9a–c, as well as allo-D-threonine (4) and (2S,3R)-β-methylphenylalanine (3), using the Belokon' approach with (S)- and (R)-2-[(N-benzylprolyl)amino]benzophenone [(S)- and (R)-10] as reusable chiral auxiliaries have been developed. Three new fluoromethyl analogues of the naturally occurring octadepsipeptide hormaomycin (1) with (fluoromethylcyclopropyl)alanine moieties have been synthesized and subjected to preliminary tests of their antibiotic activity. PMID:25550751

  5. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  6. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  7. Aeronomical determinations of the quantum yields of O (1S) and O (1D) from dissociative recombination of O2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Abreu, Vincent J.; Colwell, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Data from the visible-airglow experiment on the Atmosphere Explorer-E satellite have been used to determine the quantum yields of O (1S) and O (1D) from the dissociative recombination of O2(+) based on a constant total recombination rate from each vibrational level. A range of values between 0.05 and 0.18 has been obtained for the quantum yield of O (1S) and shows a positive correlation with the extent of the vibrational excitation of O2(+). The quantum yield of O (1D) has been measured to be 0.9 + or - 0.2, with no apparent dependence on the vibrational distribution of O2(+).

  8. {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) decay

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bingan

    2009-12-01

    Decay {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) is studied by an approach in which the tensor meson, f{sub 2}(1270), is strongly coupled to gluons. Besides the strong suppression of the amplitude {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}gg, gg{yields}f{sub 2} by the mass of the b-quark, d-wave dominance in {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) is revealed from this approach, which provides a large enhancement. The combination of these two factors leads to larger B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270)). The decay rate of {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) and the ratios of the helicity amplitudes are obtained and they are in agreement with the data.

  9. Search for X Y Z states in ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Ban, Y.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, S. D.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The branching fractions of the ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays into final states with a J /ψ or a ψ (2 S ) are measured with improved precision to be B (ϒ (1 S )→J /ψ +anything)=(5.25 ±0.13 (stat )±0.25 (syst ))×10-4 and B (ϒ (1 S )→ψ (2 S )+anything)=(1.23 ±0.17 (stat )±0.11 (syst ))×10-4 . The first search for ϒ (1 S ) decays into X Y Z states that decay into a J /ψ or a ψ (2 S ) plus one or two charged tracks yields no significant signals for X Y Z states in any of the examined decay modes, and upper limits on their production rates in ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays are determined.

  10. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  11. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    This report summarizes activities for this quarter in one table. Industrial users of this repository viewed and/or checked out 163 boxes of drill cores and cuttings samples from 18 wells during the quarter.

  12. Core helium flash

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.W.; Deupree, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of convection in the core helium flash is simulated by two-dimensional eddies interacting with the thermonuclear runaway. These eddies are followed by the explicit solution of the 2D conservation laws with a 2D finite difference hydrodynamics code. Thus, no phenomenological theory of convection such as the local mixing length theory is required. The core helium flash is violent, producing a deflagration wave. This differs from the detonation wave (and subsequent disruption of the entire star) produced in previous spherically symmetric violent core helium flashes as the second dimension provides a degree of relief which allows the expansion wave to decouple itself from the burning front. Our results predict that a considerable amount of helium in the core will be burned before the horizontal branch is reached and that some envelope mass loss is likely.

  13. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  14. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  15. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss̄ in the radiative decays of Υ(1S)

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; et al

    2013-08-06

    We search for the decay Υ(1S)→γA⁰, A⁰→gg or ss̄, where A⁰ is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10⁶ Υ(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e⁺e⁻→Υ(2S)→π⁺π⁻Υ(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→γA⁰)·B(A⁰→gg or ss̄) ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10⁻² for A⁰ masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  16. The novel function of JADE1S in cytokinesis of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Nirodhini S; Meyer, Rosana D; Panchenko, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    JADE1 belongs to a small family of PHD zinc finger proteins that interacts with histone acetyl transferase (HAT) HBO1 and is associated with chromatin. We recently reported JADE1 chromatin shuttling and phosphorylation during G2/M to G1 transition, which was sensitive to Aurora A inhibition. In the current study we examined mechanisms of the cell cycle regulation by the small isoform of JADE1 protein, JADE1S, and report data showing that JADE1S has a novel function in the regulation of cytokinesis. Using FACS assays, we show that, JADE1S depletion facilitated rates of G1-cells accumulation in synchronously dividing HeLa cell cultures. Depletion of JADE1S protein in asynchronously dividing cells decreased the proportion of cytokinetic cells, and increased the proportion of multi-nuclear cells, indicative of premature and failed cytokinesis. In contrast, moderate overexpression of JADE1S increased the number of cytokinetic cells in time- and dose- dependent manner, indicating cytokinetic delay. Pharmacological inhibition of Aurora B kinase resulted in the release of JADE1S-mediated cytokinetic delay and allowed progression of abscission in cells over-expressing JADE1S. Finally, we show that JADE1S protein localized to centrosomes in interphase and mitotic cells, while during cytokinesis JADE1S localized to the midbody. Neither JADE1L nor partner of JADE1, HAT HBO1 was localized to the centrosomes or midbodies. Our study identifies the novel role for JADE1S in regulation of cytokinesis and suggests function in Aurora B kinase-mediated cytokinesis checkpoint. PMID:26151225

  17. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  18. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  19. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  20. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  1. Rheology of Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Orman, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Here I use mineral physics constraints to evaluate the viscosity and creep mechanisms of iron at the conditions of the inner core. At low to intermediate stresses and temperatures near the melting point solid materials may deform by any of three mechanisms: power law creep, diffusion creep and Harper-Dorn creep. Both power law and Harper-Dorn creep are dislocation processes, and the transition between the two occurs at a stress level on the order of the Peierls stress, with power law creep dominating at higher stresses. The transition stress is predicted to be ~3 MPa for hcp-Fe at inner core conditions, which is far higher than the stresses of ~102 to 103 Pa expected from magnetic or gravitational forces. Harper-Dorn creep dominates diffusion creep above a certain grain size, which is predicted to be ~200 microns for hcp-Fe. At the high temperatures and low stresses of the inner core the grain size is expected to be several orders of magnitude larger than the transition value. Harper-Dorn creep is therefore predicted to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the inner core. Harper-Dorn creep is accomplished by the motion of dislocations and can lead to strong lattice preferred orientation. The viscosity in this regime is Newtonian and is given by μ = (kT)/(ADb) where k is Boltzmann's constant, T is temperature, D is the self-diffusion coefficient, b is the Burgers vector and A is a dimensionless constant predicted to have a value of ~1.7 x 1011 for hcp-Fe. No diffusion data exist for hcp-Fe, but metals with similar structure all have nearly the same self-diffusion coefficient at the same homologous temperature. Assuming an inner core temperature of 5700 K and melting temperature for pure iron of 6200 K, the diffusivity is predicted to be ~4 × 10-13 m2 s-1 and the viscosity ~6 × 1013 Pa s. The corresponding strain rate for a shear stress of 100 Pa is ~2 × 10-12 s-1, implying that large strains are possible on timescales less than 100,000 years. It is therefore

  2. Mutation analysis of CACNA1S and SCN4A in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Ren, Bing-Wen; Yong, Zeng-Hua; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Qiu-Xia; Yao, He-Bin

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in CACNA1S (calcium channel, voltage‑dependent, L type, alpha 1S subunit) and SCN4A (sodium channel, voltage‑gated, type IV, alpha subunit) are associated with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). The aim of the current study was to investigate CACNA1S and SCN4A mutations in patients with HPP. Mutations in CACNA1S and SCN4A were detected in three familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (FHPP) pedigrees and in two thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) pedigrees using polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and sequence alignment with GenBank data. A single base mutation from cytosine to guanine at site 1582 was identified in exon 11 of CACNA1S in one FHPP pedigree, resulting in an arginine to glycine (R528G) substitution. A single base mutation from thymine to cytosine at site 2012 was identified in exon 12 of SCN4A in one THPP pedigree, resulting in a phenylalanine to serine (F671S) substitution. No mutations in CACNA1S or SCN4A were identified in the remaining three pedigrees. The present study indicated that CACNA1S and SCN4A mutations are relatively rare in patients with HPP, and further studies are required to determine whether these mutation‑associated substitutions are representative of patients with HPP. PMID:26252573

  3. Doxazosin inhibits retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and G(1)-->S transition in human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kintscher, U; Wakino, S; Kim, S; Jackson, S M; Fleck, E; Hsueh, W A; Law, R E

    2000-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin (Dox) inhibits multiple mitogenic signaling pathways in human vascular smooth muscle cells. This broad antiproliferative activity of Dox occurs through a novel mechanism unrelated to its blocking the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor. Flow cytometry demonstrated that Dox prevents mitogen-induced G(1)-->S progression of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs) in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal reduction of S-phase transition by 88+/-10.5% in 20 ng/mL platelet-derived growth factor and 1 micromol/L insulin (P+I)-stimulated cells (P<0.01 for 10 micromol/L Dox versus P+I alone) and 52+/-18.7% for 10% FBS-induced mitogenesis (P<0.05 for 10 micromol/L Dox versus 10% FBS alone). Inhibition of G(1) exit by Dox was accompanied by a significant blockade of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation. Hypophosphorylated Rb sequesters the E2F transcription factor, leading to G(1) arrest. Adenoviral overexpression of E2F-1 stimulated quiescent CASMCs to progress through G(1) and enter the S phase. E2F-mediated G(1) exit was not affected by Dox, suggesting that it targets events upstream from Rb hyperphosphorylation. Downregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory protein p27 is important for maximal activation of G(1) cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase holoenzymes to overcome the cell cycle inhibitory activity of Rb. In Western blot analysis, p27 levels decreased after mitogenic stimulation (after P+I, 43+/-1.8% of quiescent cells [P<0.01 versus quiescent cells]; after 10% FBS, 55+/-7.7% of quiescent cells [P<0. 05 versus quiescent cells]), whereas the addition of Dox (10 micromol/L) markedly attenuated its downregulation (after P+I, 90+/-8.3% of quiescent cells [P<0.05 versus P+I alone]; after 10% FBS, 78+/-8.3% of quiescent cells [P<0.05 versus 10% FBS alone]). Furthermore, Dox inhibited cyclin A expression, an E2F regulated gene that is essential for cell cycle

  4. Downregulation of FOXP1 Inhibits Cell Proliferation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inducing G1/S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Ji; Cui, Meiling; Zhao, Fangyu; Ge, Chao; Chen, Taoyang; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) belongs to a family of winged-helix transcription factors that are involved in the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and longevity. FOXP1 can affect cell proliferation and migratory ability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanism of FOXP1 in the proliferation of HCC cells. This study aimed to further explore the function of FOXP1 on the proliferation of HCC cells as well as the relevant mechanism involved. Western blot analysis, tumor xenograft models, and flow cytometry analysis were performed to elucidate the function of FOXP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in human HCC. We observed that silencing FOXP1 significantly suppressed the growth ability of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, knockdown of FOXP1 induced G1/S phase arrest, and the expression of total and phosphorylated Rb (active type) as well as the levels of E2F1 were markedly decreased at 24 h; however, other proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and cyclin D1 did not show noticeable changes. In conclusion, downregulation of FOXP1 inhibits cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing G1/S phase cell cycle arrest, and the decrease in phosphorylated Rb is the main contributor to this G1/S phase arrest. PMID:27618020

  5. Downregulation of FOXP1 Inhibits Cell Proliferation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inducing G1/S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Ji; Cui, Meiling; Zhao, Fangyu; Ge, Chao; Chen, Taoyang; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) belongs to a family of winged-helix transcription factors that are involved in the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and longevity. FOXP1 can affect cell proliferation and migratory ability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanism of FOXP1 in the proliferation of HCC cells. This study aimed to further explore the function of FOXP1 on the proliferation of HCC cells as well as the relevant mechanism involved. Western blot analysis, tumor xenograft models, and flow cytometry analysis were performed to elucidate the function of FOXP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in human HCC. We observed that silencing FOXP1 significantly suppressed the growth ability of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, knockdown of FOXP1 induced G1/S phase arrest, and the expression of total and phosphorylated Rb (active type) as well as the levels of E2F1 were markedly decreased at 24 h; however, other proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and cyclin D1 did not show noticeable changes. In conclusion, downregulation of FOXP1 inhibits cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing G1/S phase cell cycle arrest, and the decrease in phosphorylated Rb is the main contributor to this G1/S phase arrest. PMID:27618020

  6. XBP1s Links the Unfolded Protein Response to the Molecular Architecture of Mature N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Dewal, Mahender B; DiChiara, Andrew S; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Taylor, Rebecca J; Harmon, Chyleigh J; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Shoulders, Matthew D

    2015-10-22

    The molecular architecture of the mature N-glycome is dynamic, with consequences for both normal and pathologic processes. Elucidating cellular mechanisms that modulate the N-linked glycome is, therefore, crucial. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is classically responsible for maintaining proteostasis in the secretory pathway by defining levels of chaperones and quality control proteins. Here, we employ chemical biology methods for UPR regulation to show that stress-independent activation of the UPR's XBP1s transcription factor also induces a panel of N-glycan maturation-related enzymes. The downstream consequence is a distinctive shift toward specific hybrid and complex N-glycans on N-glycoproteins produced from XBP1s-activated cells, which we characterize by mass spectrometry. Pulse-chase studies attribute this shift specifically to altered N-glycan processing, rather than to changes in degradation or secretion rates. Our findings implicate XBP1s in a new role for N-glycoprotein biosynthesis, unveiling an important link between intracellular stress responses and the molecular architecture of extracellular N-glycoproteins. PMID:26496683

  7. Helium in Earth's Early Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jephcoat, A. P.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Heber, V.; Kelley, S. P.

    2006-12-01

    of incorporation is determined at the atomic scale by the detailed composition and structure of silicate liquids that act as an important control of the level of incompatibility of noble gases under pressure. The time evolution of this core source of helium through to the present is yet another factor to be considered in making sense of 3He/4He ratios for the Earth, together with partitioning trends to higher pressure. Similar studies with other rare gases (and ultimately other isotopic systems) will help assess the level of consistency for the core as an active, present-day source of trace elements in the Earth, and the magnitudes of core- mantle chemical exchange.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium bacteriophage SPN1S.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hakdong; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Lim, Jeong-A; Kim, Hyeryen; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    To understand the interaction between the host of pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and its bacteriophage, we isolated the bacteriophage SPN1S. It is a lysogenic phage in the Podoviridae family and uses the O-antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a host receptor. Comparative genomic analysis of phage SPN1S and the S. enterica serovar Anatum-specific phage ε15 revealed different host specificities, probably due to the low homology of host specificity-related genes. Here we report the complete circular genome sequence of S. Typhimurium-specific bacteriophage SPN1S and show the results of our analysis. PMID:22205721

  9. Allele frequency distributions of D1S80 in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Ciesielka, M; Kozioł, P; Krajka, A

    1996-08-15

    The polymorphism of the D1S80 locus has been analyzed in a population sample of 208 unrelated individuals in the Southeast Poland and 103 mother/child pairs. PCR amplified alleles were separated by a vertical discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system. Nineteen different alleles and 52 phenotypes could be distinguished. The alleles 18 (f = 0.267) and 24 (f = 0.300) were most common in Poland. D1S80 genotype frequencies of Poland population do not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. All mother/child pairs shared at least one D1S80 allele.

  10. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  11. Search for Di-Muon Decays of a Light Scalar Higgs Boson in Radiative Upsilon(1S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vindhyawasini

    2013-08-01

    We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A0) in the fully reconstructed decay chain of Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ), Υ(1S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ+. The A0 is predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model (SM), including the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). NMSSM introduces a CP-odd light Higgs boson whose mass could be less than 10 GeV/c2. The data samples used in this analysis contain 92.8 × 106 Υ(2S ) and 116.8 × 106 Υ(3S ) events collected by the BABAR detector. The Υ(1S ) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ) transitions. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S ) → γA0) × B(A0 → μ+μ-) in the range of (0.28 - 9.7) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.20 GeV/c2. We also combine our results with previous BABAR results of Υ(2S, 3S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ- to set limits on the effective coupling ( fΥ) of the b-quark to the A0, f 2 Υ × B(A0 → μ+μ-), at the level of (0.29- 40) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.2 GeV/c2.

  12. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  13. Isotope shifts of the three lowest 1S states of the B+ ion calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and with relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-03-21

    We present very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the three lowest S-states [1s(2)2s(2)((1)S(0)), 1s(2)2p(2)((1)S(0)), and 1s(2)2s3s((1)S(0))] of the two stable isotopes of the boron ion, (10)B(+) and (11)B(+). At the nonrelativistic level the calculations have been performed with the Hamiltonian that explicitly includes the finite mass of the nucleus as it was obtained by a rigorous separation of the center-of-mass motion from the laboratory frame Hamiltonian. The spatial part of the nonrelativistic wave function for each state was expanded in terms of 10,000 all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians were variationally optimized using a procedure involving the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to the nonlinear parameters. The nonrelativistic wave functions of the three states were subsequently used to calculate the leading alpha(2) relativistic corrections (alpha is the fine structure constant; alpha=1/c, where c is the speed of light) and the alpha(3) quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction. We also estimated the alpha(4) QED correction by calculating its dominant component. A comparison of the experimental transition frequencies with the frequencies obtained based on the energies calculated in this work shows an excellent agreement. The discrepancy is smaller than 0.4 cm(-1).

  14. Lepton Universality Test in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Elisa; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

    2012-04-10

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we measure the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} = BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -})/BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); the measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a possible search for a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson in Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenarios. Such a boson could appear in a deviation of the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} from the Standard Model expectation, that is 1, except for small lepton mass corrections. The analysis exploits the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = {mu},{tau}.

  15. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 7. JOB NO. 1347G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. JOB NO. 1347-G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD MOTOR COMPANY; PLANS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Oil House, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  18. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  19. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Competencies

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Berven, B.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.; Hartman, F.C.; Honea, R.B.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Moon, R.M. Jr.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shelton, R.B.

    1994-12-01

    A core competency is a distinguishing integration of capabilities which enables an organization to deliver mission results. Core competencies represent the collective learning of an organization and provide the capacity to perform present and future missions. Core competencies are distinguishing characteristics which offer comparative advantage and are difficult to reproduce. They exhibit customer focus, mission relevance, and vertical integration from research through applications. They are demonstrable by metrics such as level of investment, uniqueness of facilities and expertise, and national impact. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has identified four core competencies which satisfy the above criteria. Each core competency represents an annual investment of at least $100M and is characterized by an integration of Laboratory technical foundations in physical, chemical, and materials sciences; biological, environmental, and social sciences; engineering sciences; and computational sciences and informatics. The ability to integrate broad technical foundations to develop and sustain core competencies in support of national R&D goals is a distinguishing strength of the national laboratories. The ORNL core competencies are: 9 Energy Production and End-Use Technologies o Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technology o Advanced Materials Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization & Neutron-Based Science and Technology. The distinguishing characteristics of each ORNL core competency are described. In addition, written material is provided for two emerging competencies: Manufacturing Technologies and Computational Science and Advanced Computing. Distinguishing institutional competencies in the Development and Operation of National Research Facilities, R&D Integration and Partnerships, Technology Transfer, and Science Education are also described. Finally, financial data for the ORNL core competencies are summarized in the appendices.

  1. From Superatomic Au25(SR)18- to Superatomic M@Au24(SR)18q Core-shell Clusters.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Dai, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} belongs to a new type of superatom that features an icosahedral Au{sub 13} core-shell structure and a protective layer of six RS(Au-SR){sub 2} motifs. This superatom has a magic number of 8 free electrons that fully fill the 1s and 1p levels of the electron-shell model. By applying this superatom concept to the core-substitution chemistry of Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -}, we first scanned the periodic table for the potential core atom M by applying a simple rule derived from the 8-electron count and then optimized the selected candidates by density functional theory calculations to create many series of M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} core-shell nanoclusters. We found that 16 elements from groups 1, 2, and 10-14 of the periodic table can maintain both electronic and geometric structures of the original Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} magic cluster, indicating that the electron-counting rule based on the superatom concept is powerful in predicting viable M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} clusters. Our work opens up a promising area for experimental exploration.

  2. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  3. Test of lepton universality in Υ(1S) decays at BABAR.

    PubMed

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-05-14

    The ratio R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=Γ(Υ(1S)→τ+ τ-)/Γ(Υ(1S)→μ+ μ-) is measured using a sample of (121.8±1.2)×10(6)Υ(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays Υ(3S)→Υ(1S)π+ π-, Υ(1S)→l+ l-, where l=μ, τ. The result, R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=1.005±0.013(stat)±0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements. PMID:20866959

  4. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

  5. Test of Lepton Universality in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /more authors..

    2010-06-07

    The ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))={Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}}/{Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}} is measured using a sample of (121.8 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6}{Upsilon}(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where l = {mu}, {tau}. The result, R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))=1.005 {+-} 0.013(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements.

  6. Auger and radiative deexcitation of the 1s2l3l-prime configurations of lithium-like neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray energies, Auger and radiative decay rates, and fluorescence yields have been computed in intermediate coupling for the various states of the 1s2s3s, 1s2s3p, 1s2p3p, 1s2p3s, and 1s2p3d configurations of Ne-10(7+). The results supplement recent experimental work on these transitions.

  7. Downregulation of CREB Promotes Cell Proliferation by Mediating G1/S Phase Transition in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fangjin; Zheng, Ying; Donkor, Paul Owusu; Zou, Peng; Mu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-known nuclear transcription factor, has been shown to play an essential role in many cellular processes, including differentiation, cell survival, and cell proliferation, by regulating the expression of downstream genes. Recently, increased expression of CREB was frequently found in various tumors, indicating that CREB is implicated in the process of tumorigenesis. However, the effects of CREB on Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remain unknown. To clarify the role of CREB in HL, we performed knockdown experiments in HL. We found that downregulation of CREB by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in enhancement of cell proliferation and promotion of G1/S phase transition, and these effects can be rescued by expression of shRNA-resistant CREB. Meanwhile, the expression level of cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin D1, cyclin E1, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and CDK4, was elevated in response to depletion of CREB. Furthermore, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and confirmed that CREB directly bound to the promoter regions of these genes, which consequently contributed to the regulation of cell cycle. Consistent with our results, a clinical database showed that high expression of CREB correlates with favorable prognosis in B-cell lymphoma patients, which is totally different from the function of CREB in other cancers such as colorectal cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, and some endocrine cancers. Taken together, all of these features of CREB in HL strongly support its role as a tumor suppressor gene that can decelerate cell proliferation by inhibiting the expression of several cell cycle-related genes. Our results provide new evidence for prognosis prediction of HL and a promising therapeutic strategy for HL patients. PMID:27458098

  8. Massive Magnetic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The massive magnetic core of the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory's Synchrocyclotron at NASA's Langley Research Center. The 3000 ton (6 million pound), 36' x 21'x 19.5' assembly of forged steel serves as the heart of the 600 million electron volt, high energy proton accelerator.

  9. Looking for Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  10. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  11. The Uncommon Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will find scant mention of the words…

  12. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  13. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which the…

  14. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  15. Languages for Dublin Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on languages for the Dublin Core, examines the experience of some related ways to seek semantic interoperability through simplicity: planned languages, interlingua constructs, and pidgins. Also defines the conceptual and organizational problem of maintaining a metadata standard in multiple languages. (AEF)

  16. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  17. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  19. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  20. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  1. Resolving Supercritical Orion Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Chapman, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Velusamy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical framework for high mass star formation (HMSF) is unclear. Observations reveal a seeming dichotomy between high- and low-mass star formation, with HMSF occurring only in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), mostly in clusters, and with higher star formation efficiencies than low-mass star formation. One crucial constraint to any theoretical model is the dynamical state of massive cores, in particular, whether a massive core is in supercritical collapse. Based on the mass-size relation of dust emission, we select likely unstable targets from a sample of massive cores (Li et al. 2007 ApJ 655, 351) in the nearest GMC, Orion. We have obtained N2H+ (1-0) maps using CARMA with resolution ( 2.5", 0.006 pc) significantly better than existing observations. We present observational and modeling results for ORI22. By revealing the dynamic structure down to Jeans scale, CARMA data confirms the dominance of gravity over turbulence in this cores. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Why a Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Sadly, amidst a vast profusion of knowledge, universities abrogate responsibility for showing young learners what is essential. Left to select for themselves, most students arrive late, if at all, to an awareness of what they want and need out of college. Thus, according to James Bernard Murphy, a well-constructed core of courses, presented in the…

  3. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  4. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  5. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  6. Ionic bonding of lanthanides, as influenced by d- and f-atomic orbitals, by core-shells and by relativity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2015-03-15

    Lanthanide trihalide molecules LnX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) were quantum chemically investigated, in particular detail for Ln = Lu (lutetium). We applied density functional theory (DFT) at the nonrelativistic and scalar and SO-coupled relativistic levels, and also the ab initio coupled cluster approach. The chemically active electron shells of the lanthanide atoms comprise the 5d and 6s (and 6p) valence atomic orbitals (AO) and also the filled inner 4f semivalence and outer 5p semicore shells. Four different frozen-core approximations for Lu were compared: the (1s(2) -4d(10) ) [Pd] medium core, the [Pd+5s(2) 5p(6) = Xe] and [Pd+4f(14) ] large cores, and the [Pd+4f(14) +5s(2) 5p(6) ] very large core. The errors of LuX bonding are more serious on freezing the 5p(6) shell than the 4f(14) shell, more serious upon core-freezing than on the effective-core-potential approximation. The LnX distances correlate linearly with the AO radii of the ionic outer shells, Ln(3+) -5p(6) and X(-) -np(6) , characteristic for dominantly ionic Ln(3+) -X(-) binding. The heavier halogen atoms also bind covalently with the Ln-5d shell. Scalar relativistic effects contract and destabilize the LuX bonds, spin orbit coupling hardly affects the geometries but the bond energies, owing to SO effects in the free atoms. The relativistic changes of bond energy BE, bond length Re , bond force k, and bond stretching frequency vs do not follow the simple rules of Badger and Gordy (Re ∼BE∼k∼vs ). The so-called degeneracy-driven covalence, meaning strong mixing of accidentally near-degenerate, nearly nonoverlapping AOs without BE contribution is critically discussed.

  7. Ionic bonding of lanthanides, as influenced by d- and f-atomic orbitals, by core-shells and by relativity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2015-03-15

    Lanthanide trihalide molecules LnX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) were quantum chemically investigated, in particular detail for Ln = Lu (lutetium). We applied density functional theory (DFT) at the nonrelativistic and scalar and SO-coupled relativistic levels, and also the ab initio coupled cluster approach. The chemically active electron shells of the lanthanide atoms comprise the 5d and 6s (and 6p) valence atomic orbitals (AO) and also the filled inner 4f semivalence and outer 5p semicore shells. Four different frozen-core approximations for Lu were compared: the (1s(2) -4d(10) ) [Pd] medium core, the [Pd+5s(2) 5p(6) = Xe] and [Pd+4f(14) ] large cores, and the [Pd+4f(14) +5s(2) 5p(6) ] very large core. The errors of LuX bonding are more serious on freezing the 5p(6) shell than the 4f(14) shell, more serious upon core-freezing than on the effective-core-potential approximation. The LnX distances correlate linearly with the AO radii of the ionic outer shells, Ln(3+) -5p(6) and X(-) -np(6) , characteristic for dominantly ionic Ln(3+) -X(-) binding. The heavier halogen atoms also bind covalently with the Ln-5d shell. Scalar relativistic effects contract and destabilize the LuX bonds, spin orbit coupling hardly affects the geometries but the bond energies, owing to SO effects in the free atoms. The relativistic changes of bond energy BE, bond length Re , bond force k, and bond stretching frequency vs do not follow the simple rules of Badger and Gordy (Re ∼BE∼k∼vs ). The so-called degeneracy-driven covalence, meaning strong mixing of accidentally near-degenerate, nearly nonoverlapping AOs without BE contribution is critically discussed. PMID:25565146

  8. Photon upconversion in core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Denfeng; Ju, Qiang; Wang, Feng

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion generally results from a series of successive electronic transitions within complex energy levels of lanthanide ions that are embedded in the lattice of a crystalline solid. In conventional lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles, the dopant ions homogeneously distributed in the host lattice are readily accessible to surface quenchers and lose their excitation energy, giving rise to weak and susceptible emissions. Therefore, present studies on upconversion are mainly focused on core-shell nanoparticles comprising spatially confined dopant ions. By doping upconverting lanthanide ions in the interior of a core-shell nanoparticle, the upconversion emission can be substantially enhanced, and the optical integrity of the nanoparticles can be largely preserved. Optically active shells are also frequently employed to impart multiple functionalities to upconversion nanoparticles. Intriguingly, the core-shell design introduces the possibility of constructing novel upconversion nanoparticles by exploiting the energy exchange interactions across the core-shell interface. In this tutorial review, we highlight recent advances in the development of upconversion core-shell nanoparticles, with particular emphasis on the emerging strategies for regulating the interplay of dopant interactions through core-shell nanostructural engineering that leads to unprecedented upconversion properties. The improved control over photon energy conversion will open up new opportunities for biological and energy applications. PMID:25058157

  9. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst).

  10. Evidence for the ηb(1S) Meson in Radiative Υ(2S) Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-10-01

    We have performed a search for the ηb(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Υ(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6×106 Υ(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Eγ=609.3-4.5+4.6(stat)±1.9(syst)MeV, corresponding to an ηb(1S) mass of 9394.2-4.9+4.8(stat)±2.0(syst)MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Υ(2S)→γηb(1S) is determined to be [3.9±1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]×10-4. We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Υ(2S)→γηb(1S)]/B[Υ(3S)→γηb(1S)]=0.82±0.24(stat)-0.19+0.20(syst).

  11. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst). PMID:19905689

  12. Thermal Evolution of Earht's Core during Accretion: a Preliminary Solid Inner Core at the End of Accrfetion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of an inner core has conventionally been related to core cooling blow the liquidus of iron. It is however possible that the core of the proto-Earth solidifies upon pressure increase during accretion. The lithostatic pressure in the proto-Earth increases immediately after merging each impactor, and the pressure-dependent liquidus of iron may supersede the temperature near the center resulting in a solid inner core. Assuming that Earth is formed by accreting a few dozen Moon to Mars size planetary embryos, the thermal evolution of the proto-Earth's core is investigated during accretion. The collision of an embryo heats the Earth differentially and the rotating low-viscosity, differentially heated core stratifies, creating a spherically symmetric stable and radially increasing temperature distribution. Convection occurs in the outer core while heat transfers by conduction in deeper parts. It is assumed that the iron core of an embryo pools at the bottom of partially molten mantle and thermally equilibrates with surroundings. It then descends as an iron diapir in the solid silicate mantle, while releasing its gravitational energy. Depending on its temperature when arrives at the core mantle boundary, it may spread on the core creating a hot layer or plunge into the core and descend to a neutrally buoyant level while further releasing its gravitational energy. A few dozen thermal evolution models of the core are investigates to examine effects of major parameters such as: total number of impacting embryos; partitioning of the gravitational energy released during the descent of the diaper in the mantle (between the silicate mantle and the iron diaper), and in the core (between the proto-Earth's core and that of the embryo); and gravitational energy and latent heat released due to the core solidification. All of the models predict a large solid inner core, about 1500 to 2000 km in radius, at the end of accretion.

  13. Hepatitis B core-related antigen levels are associated with response to entecavir and peginterferon add-on therapy in hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    van Campenhout, M J H; Brouwer, W P; van Oord, G W; Xie, Q; Zhang, Q; Zhang, N; Guo, S; Tabak, F; Streinu-Cercel, A; Wang, J; Pas, S D; Sonneveld, M J; de Knegt, R J; Boonstra, A; Hansen, B E; Janssen, H L A

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), a new serum marker, may be useful in monitoring chronic hepatitis B infection. HBcrAg was measured in 175 hepatitis B e antigen-positive patients treated with entecavir (ETV) with or without peginterferon (PEG-IFN) add-on therapy. Decline in HBcrAg was stronger in patients with vs. without combined response (ETV: -3.22 vs. -1.71 log U/mL, p <0.001; PEG-IFN add-on: -3.16 vs. -1.83 IU/mL, p <0.001) and in patients with vs. without hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) response (ETV: -2.60 vs. -1.74 log U/mL, p <0.001; PEG-IFN add-on: -2.38 vs. -2.15 log U/mL, p = 0.31). HBcrAg was associated with combined response (adjusted odds ratio 0.3, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.5, p <0.001), but was not superior to quantitative HBsAg (qHBsAg).

  14. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power.

  15. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power. PMID:25831302

  16. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  17. Complement components C1r/C1s, bone morphogenic protein 1 and Xenopus laevis developmentally regulated protein UVS.2 share common repeats.

    PubMed

    Bork, P

    1991-04-22

    Property patterns were constructed, based on an alignment of related domains in human complement subcomponents C1r and C1s as well as in the sea urchin protein uEGF. This kind of consensus pattern was able to identify similar domains in a human bone morphogenic protein, in a Xenopus laevis embryonal protein involved in dorsoanterior development and in a calcium-dependent serine protease secreted from malignant hamster embryo fibroblast cells. Because of the high level of overall sequence homology this protease may be the hamsters' equivalent of the human complement subcomponent C1s. The resulting multiple alignment of all studied domains suggests functionally and structurally important regions.

  18. Social Studies Core Curriculum, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This guide outlines the core social studies course standards for Utah elementary schools. Using a graphic format, the guide delineates each course--beginning with Kindergarten and concluding with Level 6. It describes the course; lists column headings for time, people, and places; cites the appropriate standard; and educational objectives to be…

  19. Using "Core Reflection" in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Judy; Power, Kerith

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a self-study by two teacher educators who used Korthagen and Vasalos' (2005) core reflection model. This model extends Korthagen's earlier ALACT model of reflection for teachers, to include deeper levels of personal reflection, tapping into the emotional dimensions of practice (for example, beliefs, identity and mission). The…

  20. Health Care Assistant Core. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feilner, Veronica; Robling, Jeannine

    This document contains the core curriculum for a basic high school course for health care assistants. It is designed as a 1-semester course of study, after which students can take a course in an emphasis area, such as veterinary, nursing, pharmacology, or physical therapy, in which they learn skills for specific entry-level jobs. The curriculum…

  1. Core Skills Assessment to Improve Mathematical Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat

    2013-01-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these…

  2. Excitation of {sup 1}S and {sup 3}S Metastable Helium Atoms to Doubly Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Alagia, M.; Coreno, M.; Farrokhpour, H.; Omidyan, R.; Tabrizchi, M.; Franceschi, P.; Mihelic, A.; Zitnik, M.; Moise, A.; Prince, K. C.; Richter, R.; Soederstroem, J.; Stranges, S.

    2009-04-17

    We present spectra of triplet and singlet metastable helium atoms resonantly photoexcited to doubly excited states. The first members of three dipole-allowed {sup 1,3}P{sup o} series have been observed and their relative photoionization cross sections determined, both in the triplet (from 1s2s {sup 3}S{sup e}) and singlet (from 1s2s {sup 1}S{sup e}) manifolds. The intensity ratios are drastically different with respect to transitions from the ground state. When radiation damping is included the results for the singlets are in agreement with theory, while for triplets spin-orbit interaction must also be taken into account.

  3. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  4. Invariant-mass distribution of cc in {upsilon}(1S){yields}cc+X

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hee Sok; Kim, Taewon; Lee, Jungil

    2008-12-01

    We calculate the invariant-mass distribution for the cc pair produced in the inclusive {upsilon}(1S) decay based on the color-singlet mechanism of the nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics factorization approach at leading order in the bottom-quark velocity v{sub b} in the meson rest frame. As the short-distance processes, we consider bb{yields}g*gg followed by g*{yields}cc and bb{yields}{gamma}*{yields}cc at leading order in the strong coupling. The invariant-mass distribution of the bb{yields}ccgg contribution has a sharp peak just above the threshold and that of the bb{yields}{gamma}*{yields}cc channel is concentrated at the maximally allowed kinematic end point. We predict that {gamma}[{upsilon}(1S){yields}cc+X]/{gamma}[{upsilon}(1S){yields}light hadrons]=(0.065{+-}0.048){alpha}{sub s}, which is in agreement with a previous result within errors.

  5. Search for production of invisible final states in single-photon decays of Υ(1S).

    PubMed

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Brown, D N; Chistiakova, M V; Jensen, F; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Zhao, M; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sun, S; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lindsay, C; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2011-07-01

    We search for single-photon decays of the Υ(1S) resonance, Υ → γ + invisible, where the invisible state is either a particle of definite mass, such as a light Higgs boson A⁰, or a pair of dark matter particles, χχ. Both A⁰ and χ are assumed to have zero spin. We tag Υ(1S) decays with a dipion transition Υ(2S) → π⁺π⁻Υ(1S) and look for events with a single energetic photon and significant missing energy. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range m(A⁰) ≤ 9.2 GeV and m(χ) ≤ 4.5 GeV in the sample of 98 × 10⁶ Υ(2S) decays collected with the BABAR detector and set stringent limits on new physics models that contain light dark matter states. PMID:21797597

  6. Measurement of the Direct Photon Spectrum in Upsilon (1S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Colin P.

    2003-05-16

    Using data taken with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, the authors have determined the ratio of branching fractions: R{sub {gamma}} {triple_bond} {Gamma}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {gamma}gg)/{Gamma}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} ggg) = (2.75 {+-} 0.04(stat.) {+-} 0.15(syst.))%. From this ratio, the authors have determined the QCD scale parameter {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}} (defined in the modified minimal subtraction scheme) to be {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}} = 233 {+-} 11 {+-} 59 MeV, from which they determine a value for the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}) = 0.163 {+-} 0.002 {+-} 0.014, or {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) = 0.110 {+-} 0.001 {+-} 0.007.

  7. Dynamics of core accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2013-02-01

    We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the `Piecewise Parabolic Method' with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either `locally isothermal' or `locally isentropic') and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as defined by locally isothermal or

  8. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  9. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  10. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  11. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  12. Structural interactions between lipids, water and S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J

    2012-11-01

    Membrane proteins serve crucial signaling and transport functions, yet relatively little is known about their structures in membrane environments or how lipids interact with these proteins. For voltage-activated ion channels, X-ray structures suggest that the mobile voltage-sensing S4 helix would be exposed to the membrane, and functional studies reveal that lipid modification can profoundly alter channel activity. Here, we use solid-state NMR to investigate structural interactions of lipids and water with S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains and to explore whether lipids influence the structure of the protein. Our results demonstrate that S1-S4 domains exhibit extensive interactions with lipids and that these domains are heavily hydrated when embedded in a membrane. We also find evidence for preferential interactions of anionic lipids with S1-S4 domains and that these interactions have lifetimes on the timescale of ≤ 10(-3)s. Arg residues within S1-S4 domains are well hydrated and are positioned in close proximity to lipids, exhibiting local interactions with both lipid headgroups and acyl chains. Comparative studies with a positively charged lipid lacking a phosphodiester group reveal that this lipid modification has only modest effects on the structure and hydration of S1-S4 domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Arg residues in S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains reside in close proximity to the hydrophobic interior of the membrane yet are well hydrated, a requirement for carrying charge and driving protein motions in response to changes in membrane voltage.

  13. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  15. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  18. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  19. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  20. Cross Cell Sandwich Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich core comprises two faceplates separated by a plurality of cells. The cells are comprised of walls positioned at oblique angles relative to a perpendicular axis extending through the faceplates. The walls preferably form open cells and are constructed from open cells and are constructed from rows of ribbons. The walls may be obliquely angled relative to more than one plane extending through the perpendicular axis.

  1. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  2. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  3. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  4. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  5. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  6. GEOS-CORE

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  7. Silicon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of functionalized silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A.; Cao, W.; Dasog, M.; Purkait, T. K.; Senger, C.; Hu, Y. F.; Xiao, Q. F.; Veinot, J. G. C.; Urquhart, S. G.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of silicon nanocrystals have been examined as a function of nanocrystal size (3-100 nm), varying surface functionalization (hydrogen or 1-pentyl termination), or embedded in oxide. The NEXAFS spectra are characterized as a function of nanocrystal size and surface functionalization. Clear spectroscopic evidence for long range order is observed silicon nanocrystals that are 5-8 nm in diameter or larger. Energy shifts in the silicon 1s NEXAFS spectra of covalently functionalized silicon nanocrystals with changing size are attributed to surface chemical shifts and not to quantum confinement effects.

  8. Measurement of the decay UPSILON(2S). -->. pi. /sup 0/. pi. /sup 0/UPSILON(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Gelphman, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    The hadronic transitions UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi..UPSILON(1S) ..-->.. ..gamma gamma gamma gamma..l/sup +/l/sup -/ (l = ..mu.. or e) are investigated using the Crystal Ball detector. The analysis is based on 193,000 UPSILON(2S) events produced at the DORIS II e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring from November 1982 to February 1984. We observe 44 events with a muon pair and 46 events with an electron pair in the final state. The signals in both channels are relatively background free. Assuming lepton universality, we average the results for the two channels and obtain the product branching ratio B(UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/UPSILON(1S)) x B/sub ll/(UPSILON(1S)) = (2.3 +- 0.3 +- 0.3) x 10/sup -3/ where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Using the present world average value of B/sub ll/(UPSILON(1S)) = (2.9 +- 0.3)% we derive a branching ratio B(UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/UPSILON(1S)) = (8.0 +- 1.5)% where the statistical and systematic errors have been added in quadrature. This result is compared with previous results for the charged pion transitions UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/UPSILON(1S) and with the expectation from theory. We have also investigated the mass spectrum M/sub ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0// resulting from these decays and find a peaking toward high masses not accounted for the phase space alone. Fits to the ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ mass spectrum are in quantitative agreement with previous results for the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ transitions. Angular distribution for the ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ system and its decay products are presented in reference frames appropriate for analyzing the spin of the ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ system, even if the initial UPSILON(1S) and the di-pion system are emitted in a relative S-wave. We find the decay distributions to be consistent with those expected for a spin zero di-pion system emitted in a relative S-wave with the

  9. Energies, radiative rates, and Auger widths of the doubly-excited 1s23l3l‧ states of the Be isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaikai; Zhuo, Lin; Gou, Bingcong

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic energies, radiative and Auger rates of the high-lying doubly-excited 1s23l3l‧1,3L states of the Be isoelectronic sequence are studied using the saddle-point variational method with complex rotation. The relativistic and mass polarization corrections are calculated using the first-order perturbation theory. Autoionizing levels and widths above the 1s22s and 1s22p thresholds are considered and their contributions are analysed. The regular change of the radiative and Auger rates along the Be isoelectronic sequence is discussed in this work. The results are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data in the literature.

  10. 1s2s2p{sup 2}3s {sup 6}P-1s2p{sup 3}3s {sup 6}S{sup o} Transitions in O IV

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Bin; Berry, H. Gordon; Shibata, Tomohiro; Livingston, A. Eugene; Savukov, Igor; Garnir, Henri-Pierre; Bastin, Thierry; Desesquelles, J.

    2003-06-01

    The energies and lifetimes of doubly excited sextet states of boron-like O IV, F V, and Ne VI are calculated with the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach, including QED and higher-order corrections, and also with the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock GRASP code. The wavelengths and transition rates of electric-dipole transitions from the inner-shell excited terms 1s2s2p{sup 2}3s {sup 6}P-1s2p{sup 3}3s {sup 6}S{sup o} are investigated by beam-foil spectroscopy in the XUV spectral region. The predicted transition wavelengths agree with the experiment. The higher-order corrections, fine structures, and spectrum with high wavelength resolution are found to be critically important in these comparisons. Nine new lines have been identified. The ground sextet states of boronlike atoms are metastable and well above several ionization levels. These are possible candidates for XUV and soft x-ray lasers.

  11. Precision measurement of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2} transitions in heliumlike beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, T.J.; Cameron, R.E.; Rosner, S.D.

    1993-05-01

    We have applied fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy to observe the 1s2s{sup 3}S {yields} 1s2p{sup 3}P transitions in Be III with complete resolution of the fine and hyperfine structure (I = 3/2). Using intracavity cw frequency-doubling in a Ti:Sapph laser, we produced {approximately}50 mW at {approximately}372.5 nm, continuously tunable over 60 GHz. A re-designed high-temperature ion source gave {approximately}50 nA of {sup 9}Be{sup 2+} at 16 keV, an order of magnitude improvement over an earlier version. Although the {approximately}10 nA laser-induced-fluorescence signals could be observed directly despite {approximately}45 nA due to scattered laser light, lock-in detection was used to obtain zero average background. The absolute wavelength reference was the Aime Cotton I{sub 2} Atlas, using linear absorption of the fundamental (745 nm). Results will be compared with theory and discussed with reference to systematic discrepancies of the 3P{sub 0} level which have been observed over a wide range of Z.

  12. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. D-558-2 being mounted to P2B-1S launch aircraft in hangar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    This 1954 photograph shows a Douglas D-558-2 under the P2B-1S (Navy designation for a B-29) launch aircraft. The P2B-1S has been lifted on mechanical jacks in the hangar for a possible 'fit check' or the attachment of the Skyrocket for a flight. The P2B-1S had the nickname 'Fertile Myrtle.' On the side of its fuselage is a series of images indicating 41 launches by the mothership of D-558-2 #2 (NACA 144) and 44 by D-558-2 #3 (NACA 145). The Douglas D-558-2 'Skyrockets' were among the early transonic research airplanes like the X-1, X-4, X-5, and XF-92A. Three of the single-seat, swept-wing aircraft flew from 1948 to 1956 in a joint program involving the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), with its flight research done at the NACA's Muroc Flight Test Unit in Calif., redesignated in 1949 the High-Speed Flight Research Station (HSFRS); the Navy-Marine Corps; and the Douglas Aircraft Co. The HSFRS became the High-Speed Flight Station in 1954 and is now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Skyrocket made aviation history when it became the first airplane to fly twice the speed of sound. The 2 in the aircraft's designation referred to the fact that the Skyrocket was the phase-two version of what had originally been conceived as a three-phase program, with the phase-one aircraft having straight wings. The third phase, which never came to fruition, would have involved constructing a mock-up of a combat-type aircraft embodying the results from the testing of the phase one and two aircraft. Douglas pilot John F. Martin made the first flight at Muroc Army Airfield (later renamed Edwards Air Force Base) in Calif. on February 4, 1948. The goals of the program were to investigate the characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds with particular attention to pitch-up (uncommanded rotation of the nose of the airplane upwards)--a problem prevalent in high-speed service aircraft of that era, particularly at low speeds

  14. D-558-2 being mounted to P2B-1S launch aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    This 1953 NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station photograph shows the Douglas D-558-2 #2 Skyrocket (NACA 144), prior to flight, being towed under the P2B-1S launch vehicle (NACA 137) for attachment. The photograph also shows the large hydraulic jacks used to elevate the P2B-1S launch vehicle. Once the D-558-2 was in position, the P2B-1S would be lowered and the attachment made. The Douglas D-558-2 'Skyrockets' were among the early transonic research airplanes like the X-1, X-4, X-5, and X-92A. Three of the single-seat, swept-wing aircraft flew from 1948 to 1956 in a joint program involving the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), with its flight research done at the NACA's Muroc Flight Test Unit in Calif., redesignated in 1949 the High-Speed Flight Research Station (HSFRS); the Navy-Marine Corps; and the Douglas Aircraft Co. The HSFRS became the High-Speed Flight Station in 1954 and is now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Skyrocket made aviation history when it became the first airplane to fly twice the speed of sound. The 2 in the aircraft's designation referred to the fact that the Skyrocket was the phase-two version of what had originally been conceived as a three-phase program, with the phase-one aircraft having straight wings. The third phase, which never came to fruition, would have involved constructing a mock-up of a combat-type aircraft embodying the results from the testing of the phase one and two aircraft. Douglas pilot John F. Martin made the first flight at Muroc Army Airfield (later renamed Edwards Air Force Base) in Calif. on February 4, 1948. The goals of the program were to investigate the characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds with particular attention to pitch-up (uncommanded rotation of the nose of the airplane upwards)--a problem prevalent in high-speed service aircraft of that era, particularly at low speeds during take-off and landing and in tight turns. The three

  15. D-558-2 being mounted to P2B-1S launch aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    This 1953 NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station photograph shows the Douglas D-558-2 #2 Skyrocket (NACA 144), prior to flight, being towed under the P2B-1S (Navy designation for the Air Force B-29) launch vehicle (NACA 137) for attachment. In this view the tail of the Skyrocket is almost aligned with the opening cut to fit in the bottom of the P2B-1S. The photograph also shows the large hydraulic jacks used to elevate the P2B-1S launch vehicle. The Douglas D-558-2 'Skyrockets' were among the early transonic research airplanes like the X-1, X-4, X-5, and X-92A. Three of the single-seat, swept-wing aircraft flew from 1948 to 1956 in a joint program involving the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), with its flight research done at the NACA's Muroc Flight Test Unit in Calif., redesignated in 1949 the High-Speed Flight Research Station (HSFRS). Also partners in the flight research were the Navy-Marine Corps and the Douglas Aircraft Co. The HSFRS became the High-Speed Flight Station in 1954 and is now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Skyrocket made aviation history when it became the first airplane to fly twice the speed of sound. The 2 in the aircraft's designation referred to the fact that the Skyrocket was the phase-two version of what had originally been conceived as a three-phase program, with the phase-one aircraft having straight wings. The third phase, which never came to fruition, would have involved constructing a mock-up of a combat-type aircraft embodying the results from the testing of the phase one and two aircraft. Douglas pilot John F. Martin made the first flight at Muroc Army Airfield (later renamed Edwards Air Force Base) in Calif. on February 4, 1948. The goals of the program were to investigate the characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds with particular attention to pitch-up (uncommanded rotation of the nose of the airplane upwards)--a problem prevalent in high-speed service

  16. Education and Certification Qualifications of Departmentalized Public High School-Level Teachers of Core Subjects: Evidence from the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2011-317

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jason G.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the postsecondary majors and teaching certifications of public high school-level teachers of departmentalized classes in a selection of subject areas by using data from the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), a sample survey of elementary and secondary schools in the United States. SASS collects data on American…

  17. Investigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    A detailed investigation of the atomic structure and radiative parameters involving the lowest states within the 6p4, 6p36d, 6p37s, 6p37p and 6p37d configurations of neutral polonium is reported in the present paper. Using different physical models based on the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock approach, the influence of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation on the atomic parameters is discussed in detail. This work allowed us to fix the spectroscopic designation of some experimental level energy values and to provide for the first time a set of reliable oscillator strengths corresponding to 31 Po I spectral lines in the wavelength region from 175 to 987 nm.

  18. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  19. Renormalization group improved pQCD prediction for Υ(1 S) leptonic decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Hong-Hao; Bi, Huan-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Quan

    2015-06-01

    The complete next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order short-distance and bound-state QCD corrections to Υ(1 S) leptonic decay rate Γ(Υ(1 S) → ℓ+ℓ-) has been finished by Beneke et al. [8]. Based on those improvements, we present a renormalization group (RG) improved pQCD prediction for Γ(Υ(1 S) → ℓ+ℓ-) by applying the principle of maximum conformality (PMC). The PMC is based on RG-invariance and is designed to solve the pQCD renormalization scheme and scale ambiguities. After applying the PMC, all known-type of β-terms at all orders, which are controlled by the RG-equation, are resummed to determine optimal renormalization scale for its strong running coupling at each order. We then achieve a more convergent pQCD series, a scheme- independent and more accurate pQCD prediction for Υ(1 S) leptonic decay, i.e. keV, where the uncertainty is the squared average of the mentioned pQCD errors. This RG-improved pQCD prediction agrees with the experimental measurement within errors.

  20. Xbp1s in Pomc neurons connects ER stress with energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal leptin and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show that induction ofthe unfolded protein response transcription factor spliced X-box binding protein 1(Xbp1s) in pro-opio-melanocortin (Pomc) neurons alone is sufficient to pr...

  1. Superconductivity of Double Chalcogenides: Lix Ti1.1S2.

    PubMed

    Barz, H E; Cooper, A S; Corenzwit, E; Marezio, M; Matthias, B T; Schmidt, P H

    1972-02-25

    Lithium titanium sulfides, Li(x)Ti(1.1)S(2)(0.1 x

  2. Methods of using (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Richard B; Dewey, Stephen L; Miller, Steven

    2015-03-03

    (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid also known as CPP-115 or its pharmaceutically acceptable salts can be used to treat addiction and neurological disorders such as epilepsy without side effects such as visual field defects caused by vigabatrin (Sabril).

  3. Studies of Υ(1S) bottomonium state production at the Tevatron Collider Experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jundong

    2004-11-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium in hadronic collisions provides an ideal testing ground for our understanding of the production mechanisms for heavy quarks and the non-perturbative QCD effects that bind the quark pairs into quarkonium. In this analysis, the inclusive production cross section of the Υ(1S) bottomonium state is measured using the Υ(1S) → μ+μ- decay mode. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 159.1 ± 10.3 pb-1. We determine differential cross sections as functions of the Υ(1S) transverse momentum, pTΥ, for three ranges of the Υ(1S) rapidity: 0 < |yΥ| < 0.6,0.6 < |yΥ| < 1.2 and 1.2 < |yΥ| < 1.8. The shapes of dσ/dpT cross sections show little variation with rapidity and are consistent with the published Run I CDF measurement over the rapidity range |yΥ| < 0.4.

  4. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING ENE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  5. 3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING S. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  6. Isotope shifts of the 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) {yields} 1s{sup 2}2p{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) transition in the doubly ionized carbon ion C{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-05-15

    Highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations are performed for the 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) {yields} 1s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) transition energy in the isotopomers of C{sup 2+} ion to determine the isotope shifts. Explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and a variational approach that explicitly includes the nuclear motion are employed in the calculations. The leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the transition energy are also calculated using the perturbation theory with the nonrelativistic wave function as the zero-order approximation. It is determined that the {sup 12}C{sup 2+} transitions energy, which is obtained from the calculations to be 182 519.031 cm{sup -1} (vs the experimental value of 182 519.88 cm{sup -1}, an excellent sub-wave-number agreement) up-shifts by 1.755 cm{sup -1} for {sup 13}C{sup 2+} and by additional 1.498 cm{sup -1} for {sup 14}C{sup 2+}. Those shifts are sufficiently large to be measured experimentally.

  7. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment.

  8. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  9. Comparison of predicted engine core noise with current and proposed aircraft noise certification requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    Predicted engine core noise levels are compared with measured total aircraft noise levels and with current and proposed federal noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made at the FAR-36 measuring stations and include consideration of both full- and cutback-power operation at takeoff. In general, core noise provides a barrier to achieving proposed EPA stage 5 noise levels for all types of aircraft. More specifically, core noise levels will limit further reductions in aircraft noise levels for current widebody commercial aircraft.

  10. Soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFLT1) induces non-apoptotic death in ovarian and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Tatsuya; Kumasawa, Keiichi; Sato, Noriko; Takiuchi, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Hitomi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 (sVEGFR1/sFLT1) is an angiogenesis inhibitor that competes with angiogenic factors such as VEGF and Placental Growth Factor (PlGF). Imbalances of VEGF and sFLT1 levels can cause pathological conditions such as tumour growth or preeclampsia. We observed direct damage caused by sFLT1 in tumour cells. We exposed several kinds of cells derived from ovarian and colorectal cancers as well as HEK293T cells to sFLT1 in two ways, transfection and exogenous application. The cell morphology and an LDH assay revealed cytotoxicity. Additional experiments were performed to clarify how sFLT1 injured cells. In this study, non-apoptotic cell damage was found to be induced by sFLT1. Moreover, sFLT1 showed an anti-tumour effect in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. Our results suggest that sFLT1 has potential as a cancer therapeutic candidate. PMID:27103202

  11. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  12. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  13. Curriculum Diversity through a Core Approach to Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englehardt, Elaine Eliason

    In 1987, a sophomore level interdisciplinary Ethics and Values (EV) core course was implemented at Utah Valley Community College in Orem, serving as the humanities core among the liberal education requirements, a requirement for business students, a vital force in the nursing program, and a means to enrich the trade and technology courses. The…

  14. Comparing Written Competency in Core French and French Immersion Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin-Fortin, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have compared the written competency of French immersion students and their core French peers, and research on these learners at a postsecondary level is even scarcer. My corpus consists of writing samples from 255 students from both backgrounds beginning a university course in French language. The writing proficiency of core French…

  15. Hollow-core fiber Fabry-Perot photothermal gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Tan, Yanzhen; Jin, Wei; Lin, Yuechuan; Qi, Yun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2016-07-01

    A highly sensitive, compact, and low-cost trace gas sensor based on photothermal effect in a hollow-core fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is described. The Fabry-Perot sensor is fabricated by splicing a piece of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) to single-mode fiber pigtails at both ends. The absorption of a pump beam in the hollow core results in phase modulation of probe beam, which is detected by the FPI. Experiments with a 2 cm long HC-PBF with femtosecond laser drilled side-holes demonstrated a response time of less than 19 s and noise equivalent concentration (NEC) of 440 parts-per-billion (ppb) using a 1 s lock-in time constant, and the NEC goes down to 117 ppb (2.7×10-7 in absorbance) by using 77 s averaging time.

  16. Hollow-core fiber Fabry-Perot photothermal gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Tan, Yanzhen; Jin, Wei; Lin, Yuechuan; Qi, Yun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2016-07-01

    A highly sensitive, compact, and low-cost trace gas sensor based on photothermal effect in a hollow-core fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is described. The Fabry-Perot sensor is fabricated by splicing a piece of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) to single-mode fiber pigtails at both ends. The absorption of a pump beam in the hollow core results in phase modulation of probe beam, which is detected by the FPI. Experiments with a 2 cm long HC-PBF with femtosecond laser drilled side-holes demonstrated a response time of less than 19 s and noise equivalent concentration (NEC) of 440 parts-per-billion (ppb) using a 1 s lock-in time constant, and the NEC goes down to 117 ppb (2.7×10-7 in absorbance) by using 77 s averaging time. PMID:27367092

  17. Coring Methane Hydrate by using Hybrid Pressure Coring System of D/V Chikyu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Y.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Inagaki, F.; Eguchi, N.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pressure coring is a technique to keep in-situ conditions in recovering sub-seafloor sediment samples, which are potentially rich in soluble or hydrated gas. In regular core sampling, gas fractions are easily lost through the changes in the pressure and temperature during core recovery, and it has significant impact on the chemical components of the sample. Rapid degassing may also cause critical damages of original structures. To study original characteristics of gaseous sub-seafloor sediment, a new Hybrid Pressure Coring System (Hybrid PCS) was developed for the D/V Chikyu operation by adapting some of the existing pressure sampling technologies. Hybrid PCS is composed of three main parts: top section for the wireline operation, middle section for the accumulator and pressure controlling system, and the bottom section for the autoclave chamber. The design concept is based on that of Pressure Core Sampler used in Ocean Drilling Program, and of Pressure Temperature Core Sampler (PTCS) and Non-cooled PTCS of Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC). Several modifications were made including that on the ball valve, which operates to close the autoclave after coring. The core samples are 51 mm in diameter and up to 3.5 m in length. The system is combined with the Extented Shoe Coring System on the Chikyu and best suited for coring of semi-consolidated formation up to about 3400 m from the sea level. Sample autoclave is compatible with Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System (PCATS) of Geotek Ltd for sub-sampling and analysis under in-situ pressure. The analysis in PCATS includes X-ray CT scan and core logging with P-wave velocity and gamma density. Depressurization provides accurate volume of gas and its sub-sampling. Hybrid PCS was first tested during the Chikyu Exp. 906 at a submarine mud-volcano in the Nankai Trough. A 0.9 m of hydrate rich material was recovered from the summit (water depth: 2000 m) and the intact hydrate structure was observed

  18. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of genome segments S1, S2, S3 and S6 of Mal de Río Cuarto virus, a newly accepted Fijivirus species.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ana J; Conci, Luis R; Muñoz Hidalgo, Marianne; Guzmán, Fabiana A; Hopp, Horacio E; del Vas, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    Mal de Río Cuarto virus (MRCV) is a newly described species of the genus Fijivirus, family Reoviridae. The nucleotide sequence of four MRCV genome segments was determined. MRCV S1, S2, S3 and S6 were predicted to encode proteins of 168.4, 134.4, 141.7 and 90 kDa, respectively. MRCV S1 encodes a basic protein that contains conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motifs, and is homologous to Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), Fiji disease virus (FDV) and Nilaparvata lugens reovirus (NLRV) polymerases as well as to corresponding proteins of members of other genera of the Reoviridae. MRCV S2 codes for a protein with intermediate homology to the ones coded by RBSDV S4 and FDV S3 'B' spike, which is presumably the B-spike protein. MRCV S3 most probably encodes the major core protein and is highly homologous to corresponding proteins of RBSDV S2 and FDV S3. MRCV S6-encoded protein has low homology to the proteins of unknown function coded by RBSDV S6 and FDV S6. The identity levels between all analyzed MRCV coded proteins and their RBSDV counterparts varied between 84.5 and 44.8%. The analysis of the reported sequences allowed a phylogenetic comparison of MRCV with other reovirus and supported its taxonomic status within the genus.

  19. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  20. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  1. Measurements of ethane in Antarctic ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Fosse, E. K.; Aydin, K. M.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    Ethane is one of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere. The major ethane sources are fossil fuel production and use, biofuel combustion, and biomass-burning emissions and the primary loss pathway is via reaction with OH. A paleoatmospheric ethane record would be useful as a tracer of biomass-burning emissions, providing a constraint on past changes in atmospheric methane and methane isotopes. An independent biomass-burning tracer would improve our understanding of the relationship between biomass burning and climate. The mean annual atmospheric ethane level at high southern latitudes is about 230 parts per trillion (ppt), and Antarctic firn air measurements suggest that atmospheric ethane levels in the early 20th century were considerably lower (Aydin et al., 2011). In this study, we present preliminary measurements of ethane (C2H6) in Antarctic ice core samples with gas ages ranging from 0-1900 C.E. Samples were obtained from dry-drilled ice cores from South Pole and Vostok in East Antarctica, and from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WAIS-D). Gases were extracted from the ice by melting under vacuum in a glass vessel sealed by indium wire and were analyzed using high resolution GC/MS with isotope dilution. Ethane levels measured in ice core samples were in the range 100-220 ppt, with a mean of 157 ± 45 ppt (n=12). System blanks contribute roughly half the amount of ethane extracted from a 300 g ice core sample. These preliminary data exhibit a temporal trend, with higher ethane levels from 0-900 C.E., followed by a decline, reaching a minimum between 1600-1700 C.E. These trends are consistent with variations in ice core methane isotopes and carbon monoxide isotopes (Ferretti et al., 2005, Wang et al., 2010), which indicate changes in biomass burning emissions over this time period. These preliminary data suggest that Antarctic ice core bubbles contain paleoatmospheric ethane levels. With further improvement of laboratory techniques it appears

  2. Scattering loss analysis and structure optimization of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingming; Wu, Rong; Sun, Kang; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    Effects of core structure in 7 cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) on scattering loss are analyzed by means of investigating normalized interface field intensity. Fibers with different core wall thickness, core radius and rounding corner of air hole are simulated. Results show that with thick core wall and expanded core radius, scattering loss could be greatly reduced. The scattering loss of the HC-PBGFs in the wavelength range of 1.5-1.56 μm could be decreased by about 50 % of the present level with optimized core structure design.

  3. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Mary E.; Farish, Thomas J.

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be

  5. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  7. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data. PMID:17839632

  8. Core-tube data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

  9. Core fluctuations test. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, W.S.

    1987-06-01

    Fluctuations were first encountered in the Fort St. Vrain reactor early in cycle 1 operation, during the initial rise from 40% to 70% power. Subsequent in-core tests and operation throughout cycles 1 and 2 demonstrated that fluctuations were repeatable, occurring at core pressure drops of between 2.5 psi and 4.0 psi, and that in each instance their characteristics were very similar. Subsequently, tests and analysis were done to understand the core fluctuation phenomenon. These efforts also lead to a design fix which stopped these fluctuations in the FSV reactor core. This fix required that keys be used in addition to the keys in the core support floor which already existed. This report outlines a test plan to validate that core fluctuations will not occur in the MHTGR core. 2 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Photoassociation spectroscopy of 174 Yb Bose-Einstein Condensate using the 1 S0<-->3 P1 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jongchul; Lee, Jeongwon; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Min-Seok; Shin, Yong-Il

    2016-05-01

    We studied the photoassociation spectrum of 174 Yb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) using an optical Feshbach resonance near the intercombination transition (1 S0 -3 P1, 578 nm). The optical length lopt, which characterize the interaction strength of optical Feshbach resonances, of four least-bound molecular levels (ν' = - 1 ~ - 4) were precisely determined by measuring the two-body loss rate at various optical powers. We also found the parameter η =Γspon /Γmol , which characterizes the enhancement of molecular loss, to be > 1 as in the previous studies. Our BEC apparatus and experimental scheme are also introduced in this presentation. This work was supported by KRISS creative research initiative.

  11. Dielectron Widths of the {upsilon}(1S,2S,3S) Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J.L.; Adam, N.E.; Alexander, J.P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R.S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C.D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Kuznetsov, V.E.

    2006-03-10

    We determine the dielectron widths of the {upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(3S) resonances with better than 2% precision by integrating the cross section of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{upsilon} over the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy. Using e{sup +}e{sup -} energy scans of the {upsilon} resonances at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring and measuring {upsilon} production with the CLEO detector, we find dielectron widths of 1.252{+-}0.004({sigma}{sub stat}){+-}0.019({sigma}{sub syst}) keV, 0.581{+-}0.004{+-}0.009 keV, and 0.413{+-}0.004{+-}0.006 keV for the {upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(3S), respectively.

  12. MBF1s regulate ABA-dependent germination of Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, María Florencia; Iglesias, María José; Arce, Débora Pamela; Valle, Estela Marta; Arnold, Roberto Benech; Tsuda, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Ken-ichi; Casalongué, Claudia Anahí; Godoy, Andrea Verónica

    2012-02-01

    Transcriptional co-activators of the multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1) controls gene expression by connecting transcription factors and the basal transcription machinery. In Arabidopsis thaliana functions of MBF1 genes have been related to stress tolerance and developmental alterations. Endogenous ABA plays a major role in the regulation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy and germination. Seed dormancy and ABA sensitivity are enhanced in ethylene insensitive mutants suggesting that ethylene signal transduction pathway is necessary to fully develop ABA-dependent germination. In this report we showed that a triple knock-down mutant for Arabidopsis MBF1 genes (abc-) has enhanced seed dormancy and displays hypersensitivity to exogenous ABA. In addition, higher ABA contents were detected in abc- seeds after imbibition. These evidences suggest a negative role of MBF1s genes in ABA-dependent inhibition of germination. The participation of MBF1s in ethylene signal transduction pathway is also discussed.

  13. Method for estimating ionicities of oxides using O1s photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L. Q.; Li, Y. C.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Xue, L. C.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2015-09-01

    The average valence, ValO, of the oxygen anions in the perovskite oxide BaTiO3, was found using O1s photoelectron spectra to be -1.55. This experimental result is close to the theoretical value for BaTiO3 (-1.63) calculated by Cohen [Nature 358, 136 (1992)] using density functional theory. Using the same approach, we obtained values of ValO for several monoxides, and investigated the dependence of ValO and the ionicity on the second ionization energy, V(M2+), of the metal cation. We found that the dependence of the ionicity on V(M2+) in this work is close to that reported by Phillips [Rev. Mod. Phys. 42, 317 (1970)]. We therefore suggest that O1s photoelectron spectrum measurements should be accepted as a general experimental method for estimating the ionicity and average valence of oxygen anions.

  14. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  15. Studies of Yb ^1S0 -- ^3P0 clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao

    2005-05-01

    We are exploring two quite different methods for observing the ultra-sharp 6s^2 ^1S0 -- 6s6p ^3P0 optical interval in atomic Yb, which is considered a primary candidate for future optical frequency standards [1].In the first method, we observe the 578 nm single photon transition allowed in the odd isotopes through internal hyperfine coupling of the nuclear spin.† We shine a 578 nm laser beam on cold Yb atoms held in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and detect a decrease in MOT fluorescence when the laser is resonant with the clock transition.† Our second approach is to use the even Yb isotopes, connecting the ^1S0 and ^3P0 states† by† a multi- photon transition [2]. Sharp electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption (EITA) resonance features appear when the photon frequencies combine to equal† the ^1S0 -- ^3P0 clock interval.† We will describe our initial studies of† 2 and 3 photon resonances in Yb, including Doppler-free 3 photon EITA. [1]S. G.† Porsev, A. Derevianko, E. N. Fortson, Phys. Rev. A 69, 021403(R)† (2004); H. Katori, in Proc. 6th Symposium Frequency Standards and Metrology, edited by P. Gill (World Scienti.c, Singapore, 2002), pp. 323-330 [2]Tao Hong, Claire Cramer, Warren Nagourney, E. N. Fortson, physics/0409051 and to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett.; Robin Santra, Ennio Arimondo, Tetsuya Ido, Crhis H. Greene, Jun Ye, physics/0411197

  16. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1S201F displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1S201F and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1S201F in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1S191F) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  17. D-558-2 being mounted to P2B-1S launch aircraft in hangar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    This 1954 photograph shows a Douglas D-558-2 under the P2B-1S (Navy designation for a B-29) launch aircraft. The P2B-1S has been lifted on mechanical jacks in the hangar for a possible 'fit check' or the attachment of the Skyrocket for a flight. The P2B-1S had the nickname 'Fertile Myrtle.' On the side of its fuselage is a series of images indicating 41 launches by the mothership of D-558-2 #2 (NACA 144) and 44 by D-558-2 #3 (NACA 145). The Douglas D-558-2 'Skyrockets' were among the early transonic research airplanes like the X-1, X-4, X-5, and XF-92A. Three of the single-seat, swept-wing aircraft flew from 1948 to 1956 in a joint program involving the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), with its flight research done at the NACA's Muroc Flight Test Unit in Calif., redesignated in 1949 the High-Speed Flight Research Station (HSFRS); the Navy-Marine Corps; and the Douglas Aircraft Co. The HSFRS became the High-Speed Flight Station in 1954 and is now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Skyrocket made aviation history when it became the first airplane to fly twice the speed of sound. The 2 in the aircraft's designation referred to the fact that the Skyrocket was the phase-two version of what had originally been conceived as a three-phase program, with the phase-one aircraft having straight wings. The third phase, which never came to fruition, would have involved constructing a mock-up of a combat-type aircraft embodying the results from the testing of the phase one and two aircraft. Douglas pilot John F. Martin made the first flight at Muroc Army Airfield (later renamed Edwards Air Force Base) in Calif. on February 4, 1948. The goals of the program were to investigate the characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds with particular attention to pitch-up (uncommanded rotation of the nose of the airplane upwards)--a problem prevalent in high-speed service aircraft of that era, particularly at low speeds

  18. Effects of CSN1S2 Genotypes on Economic Traits in Chinese Dairy Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yue, X. P.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Mao, C. C.; Lan, X. Y.; Chen, H.; Lei, C. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate allele frequencies at the CSN1S2 locus in two Chinese dairy goat breeds and the effects of its variation on dairy goat economic traits. Seven hundred and eight goats from Xinong Saanen (XS, n = 268) and Guanzhong (GZ, N = 440) breeds were selected. The milk samples of 268 XS goats were collected during the middle of lactation, body size parameters (708 goats) and daily milk yield (202 goats) were registered. The RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) and SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) were used to detect the polymorphisms in CSN1S2. The Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium and the associations between body size, milk yield and composition and the genotypes were calculated. The results revealed that only A and F CSN1S2 alleles were found in the two Chinese dairy goat breeds. Allelic frequencies of A and F were 0.795, 0.205 and 0.739, 0.261 in Xinong Saanen and Guanzhong population respectively. Xinong Saanen breed was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while Guanzhong breed deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.05). The association of polymorphism with economic traits indicated that the goats with FF genotype have higher milk fat and total solid concentration than those with AA and AF genotypes (p<0.05). PMID:25049867

  19. Measurement of the direct photon spectrum in {Upsilon}(1S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    CLEO Collaboration

    1997-05-01

    Using data taken with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have determined the ratio of branching fractions: R{sub {gamma}}{equivalent_to}{Gamma}{bold (}{Upsilon}(1S){r_arrow}{gamma}gg{bold )}/{Gamma}{bold (}{Upsilon}(1S){r_arrow}ggg{bold )}=[2.75{plus_minus}0.04(stat){plus_minus}0.15(syst)]{percent}. From this ratio, we have determined the QCD scale parameter {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}} (defined in the modified minimal subtraction scheme) to be {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}}=233{plus_minus}11{plus_minus}59 MeV, from which we determine a value for the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)})=0.163{plus_minus}0.002{plus_minus}0.014, or {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.110{plus_minus}0.001{plus_minus}0.007. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Thermal stability of the HfO2/SiO2 interface for sub-0.1 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor gate oxide stacks: A valence band and quantitative core-level study by soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, N.; Renault, O.; Damlencourt, J.-F.; Martin, F.

    2004-12-01

    Synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the valence-band structure and the core-level photoemission spectra of HfO2 ultrathin films grown onto SiO2/Si substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We determine the band offsets (valence and conduction) of HfO2 to Si as a function of postdeposition annealing treatments (under an inert N2 atmosphere or in situ in ultrahigh vacuum) and find a significant evolution, the conduction-band offset remaining larger than 1.5eV. The Si2p and the Hf4f core-level spectra give detailed information on the composition and the spatial extent of the interfacial Hf silicate layer formed between the SiO2 bottom oxide and the HfO2 ALD thin film. By a quantitative treatment of the Si2p core-level intensities, we examine the thermal stability of the interface silicate after postdeposition annealing under N2 and in situ annealing in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), both at 800°C. The as-deposited layer gives rise to a HfO2/Hf0.35Si0.65O2/SiO2 stack with corresponding thicknesses of 0.74/0.51/0.73nm. After postdeposition annealing at 800°C in a N2 atmosphere, this becomes a HfO2/Hf0.31Si0.69O2/SiO2 stack with corresponding thicknesses of 0.71:0.58:0.91nm. In situ annealing in UHV, on the other hand, gives a HfO2/Hf0.35Si0.65O2/SiO2 stack with corresponding thicknesses of 0.65:0.70:0.76nm. The former favors an extension of both the silicate and the SiO2 interface layers, whereas the latter develops only the silicate layer.

  1. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    PubMed

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  3. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  4. Advances in core drilling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, G.

    Some notable technical advances in drill design were reported at the meeting, held in Canada August 30-September 1, 1982, at the University of Calgary. Chief amongst these was a battery powered, computer assisted electromechanical core drill which has recently been used by the Danes in Greenland to continuously core to the base of the ice sheet at 2038 m. This is the deepest coring operation so far on the Greenland ice sheet. (The record for deep glacier drilling is held by the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory for the continuous coring through 2164 m of ice to bedrock at Byrd Station, Antarctica, in 1968). In early 1982, a current Soviet core drilling operation was reported to be at a depth of 2000 m at Vostok station, Antarctica, where the total ice thickness is about 4000 m; the goal of core drilling the entire ice thickness there could be achieved before the end of 1983.

  5. A Cofacially Stacked Electron-Deficient Small Molecule with a High Electron Mobility of over 10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in Air.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jin-Hu; Zheng, Yu-Qing; Yao, Ze-Fan; Lei, Ting; Shen, Xingxing; Luo, Xu-Yi; Yu, Zhi-Ao; Zhang, Shi-Ding; Han, Guangchao; Wang, Zhi; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian

    2015-12-22

    A strong, electron-deficient small molecule, F4 -BDOPV, has a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level down to -4.44 eV and exhibits cofacial packing in single crystals. These features provide F4 -BDOPV with good ambient stability and large charge-transfer integrals for electrons, leading to a high electron mobility of up to 12.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in air.

  6. Inhibition of Rac1 activity induces G1/S phase arrest through the GSK3/cyclin D1 pathway in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linna; Zhang, Hongmei; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Wenjuan; Yuan, Juanli; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhipeng

    2014-10-01

    Rac1 has been shown to regulate the cell cycle in cancer cells. Yet, the related mechanism remains unclear. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism involved in the regulation of G1/S phase transition by Rac1 in cancer cells. Inhibition of Rac1 by inhibitor NSC23766 induced G1/S phase arrest and inhibited the proliferation of A431, SW480 and U2-OS cells. Suppression of GSK3 by shRNA partially rescued G1/S phase arrest and inhibition of proliferation. Incubation of cells with NSC23766 reduced p-AKT and inactivated p-GSK3α and p-GSK3β, increased p-cyclin D1 expression and decreased the level of cyclin D1 protein. Consequently, cyclin D1 targeting transcriptional factor E2F1 expression, which promotes G1 to S phase transition, was also reduced. In contrast, constitutive active Rac1 resulted in increased p-AKT and inactivated p-GSK3α and p-GSK3β, decreased p-cyclin D1 expression and enhanced levels of cyclin D1 and E2F1 expression. Moreover, suppression of GSK3 did not alter p-AKT or Rac1 activity, but decreased p-cyclin D1 and increased total cyclin D1 protein. However, neither Rac1 nor GSK3 inhibition altered cyclin D1 at the RNA level. Moreover, after inhibition of Rac1 or GSK3 following proteasome inhibitor MG132 treatment, cyclin D1 expression at the protein level remained constant, indicating that Rac1 and GSK3 may regulate cyclin D1 turnover through phosphorylation and degradation. Therefore, our findings suggest that inhibition of Rac1 induces cell cycle G1/S arrest in cancer cells by regulation of the GSK3/cyclin D1 pathway.

  7. The Core Six: Essential Strategies for Achieving Excellence with the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Harvey F.; Perini, Matthew J.; Dewing, R. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    If you already have a strong grasp on the Common Core and are eager to do something about it, this book's research-based strategies will help you respond to the demands of the new standards, particularly the English language arts standards that affect every subject area and grade level. Drawing from the research on which classroom strategies are…

  8. Electron-ion-ion triple-coincidence spectroscopic study of site-specific fragmentation caused by Si:2p core-level photoionization of F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, S.; Hino, M.; Takemoto, M.; Pruemper, G.; Fukuzawa, H.; Liu, X.-J.; Lischke, T.; Ueda, K.; Tamenori, Y.; Harries, J.; Suzuki, I. H.; Takahashi, O.; Okada, K.; Tabayashi, K.

    2007-02-15

    Site-specific fragmentation caused by Si:2p core-level photoionization of F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} vapor was studied by means of high-resolution energy-selected-electron photoion-photoion triple-coincidence spectroscopy. The ab initio molecular orbital method was used for the theoretical description. F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}{sup +}-Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup +} ion pairs were produced by the 2p photoionization of the Si atoms bonded to the three methyl groups, and SiF{sup +}-containing ion pairs were produced by the 2p photoionization of the Si atoms bonded to the three F atoms.

  9. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  10. Microsatellite-based fine mapping of the Van der Woude syndrome locus to an interval of 4.1 cM between D1S245 and D1S414

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, A.; Schmelzle, R.; Murray, J.C.; Scherpbier-Heddema, T.; Buetow, K.H.; Weissenbach, J.; Ludwig, K.; Zingg, M.

    1995-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder characterized by lip pits, clefting of the primary or secondary palate, and hypodontia. The gene has been localized, by RFLP-based linkage studies, to region 1q32-41 between D1S65-REN and D1S65-TGFB2. In this study we report the linkage analysis of 15 VWS families, using 18 microsatellite markers. Multipoint linkage analysis places the gene, with significant odds of 2,344:1, in a 4.1-cM interval flanked by D1S245 and D1S414. Two-point linkage analysis demonstrates close linkage of VWS with D1S205 (lod score [Z] = 24.41 at {theta} = .00) and with D1S491 (Z = 21.23 at {theta} = .00). The results revise the previous assignment of the VWS locus and show in an integrated map of the region 1q32-42 that the VWS gene resides more distally than previously suggested. When information about heterozygosity of the closely linked marker D1S491 in the affected members of the VWS family with a microdeletion is taken into account, the VWS critical region can be further narrowed, to the 3.6-cM interval between D1S491 and D1S414. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  12. Downregulated miR-45 Inhibits the G1-S Phase Transition by Targeting Bmi-1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Jun-Ling; Yu, Liang; Liu, Xiang-Xia; Wu, Hong-Mei; Lei, Fang-Yong; Wu, Shu; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bmi-1 (B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1) is upregulated in breast cancer and was involved in many malignant progressions of breast cells, including cell proliferation, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer initiation. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of Bmi-1 in breast cancer remains unclear. After analysis of the ArrayExpress dataset GSE45666, we comparatively detected the expression levels of miR-495 in 9 examined breast cancer cell lines, normal breast epithelial cells and 8 pairs of fresh clinical tumor samples. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of miR-495 on the progression of breast cancer, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were transduced to stably overexpress miR-495. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, colony formation assays, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine labeling and immunofluorescence, anchorage-independent growth ability assay, flow cytometry analysis, and luciferase assays were used to test the effect of miR-495 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Xenografted tumor model was also used to evaluate the effect of miR-495 in breast cancer. Herein, we found that miR-495, a predicted regulator of Bmi-1, was frequently downregulated in malignant cells and tissues of breast. Upregulation of miR-495 significantly suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity via G1-S arrest. Further analysis revealed that miR-495 targeted Bmi-1 through its 3′ untranslated region. Moreover, Bmi-1 could neutralize the suppressive effect of miR-495 on cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of breast cancer in vivo. These data suggested that miR-495 could inhibit the G1-S phase transition that leads to proliferation and tumorigenicity inhibition by targeting and suppressing Bmi-1 in breast cancer. PMID:26020378

  13. Sterol-Dependent Nuclear Import of ORP1S Promotes LXR Regulated Trans-Activation of APOE

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G. W.; Michaely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. PMID:22728266

  14. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  15. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  16. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, Paul D.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    Over 40 years of ground and spacecraft plasmaspheric measurements have resulted in many statistical descriptions of plasmaspheric properties. In some cases, these properties have been represented as analytical descriptions that are valid for specific regions or conditions. For the most part, what has not been done is to extend regional empirical descriptions or models to the plasmasphere as a whole. In contrast, many related investigations depend on the use of representative plasmaspheric conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Wave propagation, involving the transport of energy through the magnetosphere, is strongly affected by thermal plasma density and its composition. Ring current collisional and wave particle losses also strongly depend on these quantities. Plasmaspheric also plays a secondary role in influencing radio signals from the Global Positioning System satellites. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is an attempt to assimilate previous empirical evidence and regional models for plasmaspheric density into a continuous, smooth model of thermal plasma density in the inner magnetosphere. In that spirit, the International Reference Ionosphere is currently used to complete the low altitude description of density and composition in the model. The models and measurements on which the GCPM is currently based and its relationship to IRI will be discussed.

  17. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Ignisphaera aggregans type strain (AQ1.S1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Spring, Stefan; Yasawong, Montri; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Tapia, Roxanne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ignisphaera aggregans Niederberger et al. 2006 is the type and sole species of genus Ignisphaera. This archaeal species is characterized by a cocci-shaped, strictly anaerobic, moderately acidophilic, heterotrophic hyperthermophile and fermentative phenotype. The type strain AQ1.S1T was isolated from a near neutral, boiling spring in Kuirau Park, Rotorua, New Zealand. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Ignisphaera and the fifth genome (fourth type strain) sequence in the family Desulfurococcaceae. The 1,875,953 bp long genome with its 2,061 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. EM experiments for computational model validation for AH-1S Cobra Helicopter

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.

    1997-04-06

    The effort described here describes a set of outdoor experiments performed on the AH-1S Cobra helicopter in order to validate and compare to the computational electromagnetic models of the bulk structure of the airframe in the frequency bands up to 4 GHz. Also included in this were coupling measurements to wires and cables inside of the airframe and various cavity to HPM pulse in this frequency range as part of other activities. Additionally, the low power modeling compression will be completed in this time frame.

  20. Experimental considerations for testing antimatter antigravity using positronium 1S-2S spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D. A.; Friedreich, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution to the WAG 2013 workshop we report on the status of our measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency of positronium. The aim of this experiment is to reach a precision of 0.5 ppb in order to cross check the QED calculations. After reviewing the current available sources of Ps, we consider laser cooling as a route to push the precision in the measurement down to 0.1 ppb. If such an uncertainty could be achieved, this would be sensitive to the gravitational redshift and therefore be able to assess the sign of gravity for antimatter.