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Sample records for 1s core lines

  1. The C1s core line in irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giorgio; Minati, Luca; Anderle, Mariano

    2007-08-15

    Recently, plasma deposited amorphous carbon films have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at correlating their electronic, structural, and mechanical properties to growth parameters. To investigate these properties, different spectral parameters reflecting the electronic structure of carbon-based materials are proposed in literature. The effects of various electronic configurations on the carbon photoelectron spectra are analyzed here with particular attention to C1s core line with the aim to better interpret its structure. The latter is commonly fitted under the assumption that it can be described by using just two spectral components related to sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybrids. Their relative intensities are then used to estimate the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases. We show that, in the presence of an amorphous network, the C1s line shape is the result of a more complex mixture of electronic states. Ar{sup +} irradiated graphite and successive oxidation was used to identify spectral features to better describe the C1s line shape.

  2. Carbon 1s core-hole lifetime in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. X.; Hahne, J.; Thomas, T. D.; Sæthre, L. J.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Kukk, E.

    2000-04-01

    The carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum has been measured for CO2 at photon energies of 308, 320, and 330 eV with an instrumental resolution about half the natural linewidth. These spectra have been analyzed to obtain vibrational spacings, vibrational intensities, and the lifetime, τ, of the carbon 1s core-hole state. Theoretical calculation of the lifetime width, ħ/τ, using a one-center model, which assumes that only the valence electrons localized on the atom with the core hole can participate in Auger deexcitation of the core hole, predicts a value of 66 meV, considerably smaller than that predicted for CH4 (96 meV). Experimental measurements indicate, however, that the CO2 carbon 1s width is, in fact, much larger than expected-99+/-2 meV-and is approximately the same as that found experimentally for CH4 (95+/-2 meV). This result indicates that valence electrons on the oxygen atoms may play a role in the Auger decay the carbon 1s core hole in CO2, and, hence, that a multicenter model may be necessary to describe the Auger process.

  3. C 1s and N 1s core excitation of aniline: Experiment by electron impact and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Duflot, D.; Flament, J.-P.; Giuliani, A.; Heinesch, J.; Grogna, M.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.

    2007-05-15

    Core shell excitation spectra of aniline at the carbon and nitrogen 1s edges have been obtained by inner-shell electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded under scattering conditions where electric dipolar conditions dominate, with higher resolution than in the previous studies. They are interpreted with the aid of ab initio configuration interaction calculations. The spectrum at the C 1s edge is dominated by an intense {pi}{sup *} band. The calculated chemical shift due to the different chemical environment at the carbon 1s edge calculated is in agreement with the experimental observations within a few tenths of an eV. The transition energies of the most intense bands in the C 1s excitation spectrum are discussed at different levels of calculations. In the nitrogen 1s excitation spectrum the most intense bands are due to Rydberg-valence transitions involving the {sigma}{sup *}-type molecular orbitals, in agreement with the experiment. This assignment is different from that of extended Hueckel molecular orbital calculations. The geometries of the core excited states have been calculated and compared to their equivalent core molecules and benzene.

  4. Core localization and {sigma}* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kivimaeki, Antti; Sorensen, Stacey L.; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO{sub 2} molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking {sigma}* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the {sigma}* valence orbital.

  5. Carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum of methane: Vibrational excitation and core-hole lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. X.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Hahne, J.; Kukk, E.; Sæthre, L. J.; Thomas, T. D.

    1999-05-01

    The carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum has been measured for CH4 at photon energies of 302, 320, and 330 eV and for CD4 at 330 eV with an instrumental resolution about half the natural linewidth. These spectra have been analyzed to obtain vibrational spacings, vibrational intensities, and the lifetime of the carbon 1s core-hole state. The vibrational intensities vary with photon energy, in agreement with earlier results. At 330 eV, the observed Franck-Condon factors for both CH4 and CD4 can be understood only if anharmonic effects (consistent with the predictions of theory) are included. On the other hand, the vibrational spacings in CH4 show no evidence for anharmonicity (in contrast with theoretical predictions). In CD4 the observed anharmonicity in the vibrational energy spacings is about half of the predicted value, but the experimental and theoretical values differ only by an amount comparable to the experimental uncertainty. The measured values of the lifetime show a dependence on photon energy; this is attributed to failure of the theory of post-collision interaction to predict correctly the observed electron spectrum near threshold. At 330 eV, the measured Lorentzian lifetime, 93-95 meV, agrees with predictions of simple theory, but not with the prediction of more complete theory. It is also observed that there are systematic discrepancies between the observed line shapes and those predicted by the theory of postcollision interaction.

  6. Vibrationally resolved O 1s core-excitation spectra of CO and NO

    SciTech Connect

    Puettner, R.; Domke, M.; Kaindl, G.; Dominguez, I.; Rotenberg, E.; Warwick, T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Morgan, T.J.; Cisneros, C.; Fink, R.F.

    1999-05-01

    High-resolution photoabsorption spectra of CO and NO below the O 1s ionization threshold are presented. The vibrational fine structure of the O 1s{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {asterisk}} and O 1s{sup {minus}1} Rydberg excitations could be resolved for both molecules, allowing a determination of the vibrational energies and intramolecular distances of the core-excitation states in CO and NO from Franck-Condon analyses. {ital Ab initio} calculations are performed for the O 1s{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {asterisk}} excitation in CO to give an independent confirmation of the spectroscopic parameters derived from the Franck-Condon analysis. The spectral features of the O 1s{sup {minus}1} Rydberg region in CO are reassigned on the basis of the experimental results. The results obtained for the O 1s{sup {minus}1}3s Rydberg state in NO support the idea of a weakening of the molecular bond upon an O 1s{sup {minus}1} ionization process. thinsp thinsp {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Geometry and B(1s) core excitons of ortho-carborane

    SciTech Connect

    Green, T.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The optimized C{sub 2v} geometry of ortho-carborane, 1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}, is determined from Hartree-Fock calculations. For this geometry, a carbon atom is substituted for a boron atom at one of the 4 inequivalent boron sites and the ground-state unrestricted Hartree-Fock eigenvalues and molecular orbitals are found. One thus obtains the valence structure of the B(1s) core-excited molecule according to the Z+1 approximation. The eigenvalue of the highest occupied molecular orbital is then subtracted from the experimental B(1s) ionization energy of the same site in ortho-carborane. This determines the excitation energy of the most tightly bound exciton for that site. Three of the sites yield nearly identical excitation energies of 191.9 eV; the fourth site yields an excitation energy of 190.9 eV.

  8. Molecular Emission Line Formation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Wiebe, D.; Shustov, B.; Henning, Th.; Launhardt, R.; Semenov, D.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate general aspects of molecular line formation under conditions typical of prestellar cores. Focusing on simple linear molecules, we study the formation of their rotational lines with radiative transfer simulations. We present a thermalization diagram to show the effects of collisions and radiation on the level excitation. We construct a detailed scheme (contribution chart) to illustrate the formation of emission-line profiles. This chart can be used as an efficient tool to identify which parts of the cloud contribute to a specific line profile. We show how molecular line characteristics for uniform model clouds depend on hydrogen density, molecular column density, and kinetic temperature. The results are presented in a two-dimensional plane to illustrate mutual effects of the physical factors. We also use a core model with a nonuniform density distribution and chemical stratification to study the effects of cloud contraction and rotation on spectral line maps. We discuss the main issues that should be taken into account when dealing with interpretation and simulation of observed molecular lines.

  9. Geometry and B(1s) core excitons of ortho-carborane

    SciTech Connect

    Green, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    The optimized C{sub 2v} geometry of ortho-carborane, 1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}, is determined from Hartree-Fock calculations. For this geometry, a carbon atom is substituted for a boron atom at one of the 4 inequivalent boron sites and the ground-state unrestricted Hartree-Fock eigenvalues and molecular orbitals are found. One thus obtains the valence structure of the B(1s) core-excited molecule according to the Z + 1 approximation. The eigenvalue of the highest occupied molecular orbital is then subtracted from the experimental B(1s) ionization energy of the same site in ortho-carborane. This determines the excitation energy of the most tightly bound exciton for that site. Three of the sites yield nearly identical excitation energies of 191.9 eV; the fourth site yields an excitation energy of 190.9 eV. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Gamma-ray Bright Narrow Line Seyfert 1s: Their Host Galaxies and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Foschini, L.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years a new class of radio-loud AGN has emerged: gamma-ray bright Narrow Line Seyfert 1s (g-NLS1). The broader class of NLS1s (characterized by their narrow permitted lines) are usually radio-quiet, have small black holes, high Eddington ratios, and are hosted in spiral galaxies. While a few NLS1s are radio-loud, the evidence for relativistic jets was ambiguous until the discovery of strong gamma-ray emission from five of these. As NLS1s are hosted by spirals, this may break the paradigm that associates relativistic jets with elliptical galaxies. Of these five, only the nearest one has been imaged at high resolution, and it is the only one whose host galaxy can be seen. We present our analysis of archival HST images of 1H 0312+341. While we clearly see spiral arms, we find no evidence for a separate bulge and disk_in fact, no evidence for a disk at all. The best fit follows a de Vaucouleurs profile, characteristic of elliptical galaxies. Comparing with our studies of quasar hosts, we believe this combination may indicate a recent merger. The structure of 1H 0312+341 may also distinguish it from “normal” NLS1, which have pseudobulges and are fueling by secular processes, rather than mergers. But 1H 0323+341 may be an unusual g-NLS1. It shows strong disk emission, unlike its cohorts. With so few of these to study, an approach is to image the hosts of the more common radio-loud NLS1s these are drawn from.

  11. Investigating powerful jets in radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Larsson, J.; Finke, J.; Giroletti, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Isacsson, T.; Stoby Hoglund, J.

    2015-11-01

    We report results on multiband observations from radio to γ-rays of the two radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies PKS 2004-447 and J1548+3511. Both sources show a core-jet structure on parsec scale, while they are unresolved at the arcsecond scale. The high core dominance and the high variability brightness temperature make these NLSy1 galaxies good γ-ray source candidates. Fermi-Large Area Telescope detected γ-ray emission only from PKS 2004-447, with a γ-ray luminosity comparable to that observed in blazars. No γ-ray emission is observed for J1548+3511. Both sources are variable in X-rays. J1548+3511 shows a hardening of the spectrum during high activity states, while PKS 2004-447 has no spectral variability. A spectral steepening likely related to the soft excess is hinted below 2 keV for J1548+3511, while the X-ray spectra of PKS 2004-447 collected by XMM-Newton in 2012 are described by a single power law without significant soft excess. No additional absorption above the Galactic column density or the presence of an Fe line is detected in the X-ray spectra of both sources.

  12. Precision frequency measurement of 1S0-3P1 intercombination lines of Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Feng; Ye-Bing, Wang; Xiao, Tian; Jie, Ren; Ben-Quan, Lu; Qin-Fang, Xu; Yu-Lin, Xie; Hong, Chang

    2015-01-01

    We report on frequency measurement of the intercombination (5s2)1S0-(5s5p)3P1 transition of the four natural isotopes of strontium, including 88Sr (82.58%), 87Sr (7.0%), 86Sr (9.86%), and 84Sr (0.56%). A narrow-linewidth laser that is locked to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity with a finesse of 12000 is evaluated at a linewidth of 200 Hz with a fractional frequency drift of 2.8×10-13 at an integration time of 1 s. The fluorescence collector and detector are specially designed, based on a thermal atomic beam. Using a double-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) combined with a fiber and laser power stabilization configuration to detune the laser frequency enables high signal-to-noise ratios and precision saturated spectra to be obtained for the six transition lines, which allows us to determine the transition frequency precisely. The optical frequency is measured using an optical frequency synthesizer referenced to an H maser. Both the statistical values and the final values, including the corrections and uncertainties, are derived for a comparison with the values given in other works. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61127901) and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  13. Final-state symmetry of Na 1s core-shell excitons in NaCl and NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, K.P.; Seidler, G.T.; Shirley, E.L.; Fister, T.T.; Bradley, J.A.; Brown, F.C.

    2009-08-13

    We report measurements of the Na 1s contribution to the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from NaCl and NaF. Prior x-ray absorption studies have observed two pre-edge excitons in both materials. The momentum-transfer dependence (q dependence) of the measured NRIXS cross section and of real-space full multiple scattering and Bethe-Salpeter calculations determine that the higher-energy core excitons are s type for each material. The lower-energy core excitons contribute at most weakly to the NRIXS signal and we propose that these may be surface core excitons, as have been observed in several other alkali halides. The analysis of the orbital angular momentum of these features leads to a discussion of the limited sensitivity of NRIXS measurements to d-type final states when investigating 1s initial states. In this case the s- and p-type final density of states can be characterized by measurements at a small number of momentum transfers. This is in contrast to the case of more complex initial states for which measurements at a large number of momentum transfers are needed to separate the rich admixture of accessible and contributing final-state symmetries.

  14. Modelling of the X-ray broad absorption features in Narrow-Line Seyfert 1s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porquet, Delphine; Mouchet, Martine; Dumont Anne-Marie

    2000-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the broad absorption features detected near 1-1.4 keV in several Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies, by modelling the absorbing medium with various physical parameters, using the ionization code PEGAS. The observed properties of the X-ray absorption features can be reproduced by taking into account the peculiar soft X-ray excess which is well fitted by a blackbody plus an underlying power law. We equally stress that the emission coming from the absorbing medium (related to the covering factor) has a strong influence on the resulting X-ray spectrum, in particular on the apparent position and depth of the absorption features. A non-solar iron abundance may be required to explain the observed deep absorption. We also investigate the influence of an additional collisional ionization process ("hybrid case") on the predicted absorption features.

  15. Escape factors for Paschen 2p–1s emission lines in low-temperature Ar, Kr, and Xe plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Wen; Pu, Yi-Kang; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Radiation trapping phenomenon is often observed when investigating low-temperature plasmas. Photons emitted from the upper excited states may be reabsorbed by the lower states before they leave the plasmas. In order to account for this effect in the modelling and optical diagnostics of plasmas, either an ‘escape factor’ of a function of the optical depth or a strict solution of the radiation transfer equation can be employed. However, the former is more convenient in comparison and thus is widely adopted. Previous literatures have provided several simple expressions of the escape factor for the uniform plasmas. The emission line profiles are assumed to be dominated by the Doppler broadening, and the line splitting due to the hyperfine structure is not considered. This kind of expression is only valid for small atoms, e.g. Ar in low-pressure uniform discharges. Actually, the excited state density in many of the low-temperature plasmas is non-uniform and the emission line profile can be significantly influenced by the collisional broadening at medium and high pressures. In these cases, a new escape factor equation should be calculated. In this work, we study the escape factor equations for the often used 2p–1s transitions (Paschen’s notation) of the Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms. Possible non-uniform density profiles are considered. In addition, we include the line splitting due to the hyperfine structure for Kr and Xe. For the low-pressure plasmas, an escape factor expression mainly based on the Gaussian line profile is given and particularly verified by an experiment in a low-pressure capacitive discharge. For the high-pressure plasmas, an equation based on the Voigt line profile is also calculated. In this way, the new escape factor expression is ready for use in the modelling of the Ar, Kr, and Xe plasmas from low to atmospheric pressure.

  16. Cascade effects on the polarization of He-like Fe 1s 2l - 1s2 X-ray line emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hakel, P; Mancini, R; Harris, C; Neill, P; Beiersdorfer, P; Csanak, G; Zhang, H

    2006-12-21

    We calculate X-ray line polarization degrees for cases with axial symmetry using a collisional-radiative magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics model and the properties of multipole radiation fields. This approach is well-suited for problems where the alignment is determined by the competition between many atomic processes. We benchmark this method against polarization measurements performed at the Livermore electron beam ion trap, and we study the 3-to-2 cascade effects on the polarization of 2-to-1 lines in He-like Fe.

  17. Oscillator strengths of some Ba lines - A treatment including core-valence correlation and relativistic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Jaffe, R. L.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Mascarello, F. G.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of selected excitation energies and oscillator strengths for Ba are presented that overcome the difficulties of previous theoretical treatments. A relativistic effective-core potential treatment is used to account for the relativistic core contraction, but the outermost ten electrons are treated explicitly. Core-valence correlation can be included in this procedure in a rigorous and systematic way through a configuration-interaction calculation. Insight is gained into the importance of relativistic effects by repeating many of the calculations using an all-electron nonrelativistic treatment employing an extended Slater basis set. It is found that the intensity of the intercombination line 3P1-1S0 is accurately determined by accounting for the deviation from LS coupling through spin-orbit mixing with the 1P1 state, and that deviations from the Lande interval rule provide an accurate measure of the degree of mixing.

  18. No defect in G1/S cell cycle arrest in irradiated Li-Fraumeni lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K. J.; Heighway, J.; Birch, J. M.; Norton, J. D.; Scott, D.

    1996-01-01

    The radiation response of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-immortalised lymphoblastoid cell lines derive from Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) and LFS-like individuals was investigated. Cells from all LFS and LFS-like cases showed an accumulation of p53 protein following 137Cs gamma-irradiation, which was associated with cell cycle arrest at the G1/S border. This response was indistinguishable from that seen in cells derived from normal individuals, and occurred in cases with missense mutations in the TP53 gene at codons 175, 180, 220 and 248 and also in two LFS-like individuals with no TP53 mutation. Previous studies using lymphocytes and fibroblasts from LFS individuals have demonstrated abnormal radiation responses in these cells. This suggest cell type specificity in the contribution of a mutant p53 protein to phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8795570

  19. Polarization diagnostics for cool core cluster emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Cracraft, M.; Meyer, E. T.; Carswell, R. F.; Voit, G. M.; Donahue, M.; Hough, J. H.; Manset, N.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between low-excitation gas filaments at ∼10{sup 4} K, seen in optical line emission, and diffuse X-ray emitting coronal gas at ∼10{sup 7} K in the centers of galaxy clusters remains a puzzle. The presence of a strong, empirical correlation between the two gas phases is indicative of a fundamental relationship between them, though as yet of undetermined cause. The cooler filaments, originally thought to have condensed from the hot gas, could also arise from a merger or the disturbance of cool circumnuclear gas by nuclear activity. Here, we have searched for intrinsic line emission polarization in cool core galaxy clusters as a diagnostic of fundamental transport processes. Drawing on developments in solar astrophysics, direct energetic particle impact induced polarization holds the promise to definitively determine the role of collisional processes such as thermal conduction in the ISM physics of galaxy clusters, while providing insight into other highly anisotropic excitation mechanisms such as shocks, intense radiation fields, and suprathermal particles. Under certain physical conditions, theoretical calculations predict of the order of 10% polarization. Our observations of the filaments in four nearby cool core clusters place stringent upper limits (≲ 0.1%) on the presence of emission line polarization, requiring that if thermal conduction is operative, the thermal gradients are not in the saturated regime. This limit is consistent with theoretical models of the thermal structure of filament interfaces.

  20. Core on-line monitoring and computerized procedures systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, W.C.

    1986-04-01

    The availability of operating nuclear power plants has been affected significantly by the difficulty people have in coping with the complexity of the plants and the operating procedures. Two ways to use modern computer technology to ease the burden of coping are discussed in this paper, an on-line core monitoring system with predictive capability and a computerized procedures system using live plant data. These systems reduce human errors by presenting information rather than simply data, using the computer to manipulate the data, but leaving the decisions to the plant operator.

  1. Positive and negative ion formation in deep-core excited molecules: S 1s excitation in dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho, L. H.; Gardenghi, D. J.; Schlachter, A. S.; Souza, G. G. B. de; Stolte, W. C.

    2014-01-14

    The photo-fragmentation of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecule was studied using synchrotron radiation and a magnetic mass spectrometer. The total cationic yield spectrum was recorded in the photon energy region around the sulfur K edge. The sulfur composition of the highest occupied molecular orbital's and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital's in the DMSO molecule has been obtained using both ab initio and density functional theory methods. Partial cation and anion-yield measurements were obtained in the same energy range. An intense resonance is observed at 2475.4 eV. Sulfur atomic ions present a richer structure around this resonant feature, as compared to other fragment ions. The yield curves are similar for most of the other ionic species, which we interpret as due to cascade Auger processes leading to multiply charged species which then undergo Coulomb explosion. The anions S{sup −}, C{sup −}, and O{sup −} are observed for the first time in deep-core-level excitation of DMSO.

  2. Decay processes of the core-excited states 1s2p3 for Be-like systems with Z=8-54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, C. C.; Sun, Y.; Hu, F.

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of a fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method, a systematic study has been carried out for the energies, radiative and non-radiative (Auger) decay processes of the core-excited states 1s2p3 for Be-like ions with Z=8-54. The energies and radiative transition rates are smoothly varying functions of Z. Auger rates do not change significantly with Z as the radiative rates do. Electron correlation effects on the energies and the radiative transition rates are investigated. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  3. Resonant Auger spectroscopy study of charge transfer phenomena in N 1s core-excited acetonitrile adsorbates on Si(0 0 1)-2 × 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, J.-J.; Bournel, F.; Carniato, S.; Dufour, G.; Rochet, F.; Rangan, S.; Sirotti, F.

    2007-01-01

    Acetonitrile (CH 3CN) adsorbs on Si(0 0 1)-2 × 1 at room temperature under two forms, a cycloaddition-like adduct (Si-C dbnd N-Si) and a pendent cyano (Si-CH 2-C tbnd N) resulting from the decomposition of the molecule. Resonant Auger spectroscopy has been used to study the excited-state-dependent electron transfer from the N 1s core-excited molecular adsorbate to the silicon substrate, using the core-hole lifetime (˜6 fs) as an internal clock. It is shown that the π C dbnd N ∗ NEXAFS state lies within the silicon bandgap because of a core-excitonic effect. Therefore no charge transfer of the excited electron to the substrate is observed. On the other hand the π C tbnd N ∗ NEXAFS state is placed within the silicon conduction band. Excitation to this orbital leads to valence/Auger spectra in which both resonant and normal Auger contributions are observed. Therefore there is evidence for a charge transfer from the pendent C tbnd N to the silicon surface, on a timescale estimated to tens of femtoseconds.

  4. Correlation between N 1s core level x-ray photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, C.; Gómez-García, J.; Palomares, F. J.; Soriano, L.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the N 1s core level spectra, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), of amorphous CNx films which gives evidence of the existing correlation between the different components that constitute the respective spectra. After annealing, the contribution of XPS at 399.3 eV and the components of XAS at 399.6 and 400.8 eV are clearly enhanced. They are assigned to sp2 with two neighbors and to sp states of nitrogen. In addition, the XPS component at 401.3 eV is related to the XAS feature at 402.0 eV and has been assigned to sp2 nitrogen bonded to three carbon neighbors.

  5. Line Profiles of Cores within Clusters. I. The Anatomy of a Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Stutz, Amelia M.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-05-01

    Observations are revealing the ubiquity of filamentary structures in molecular clouds. As cores are often embedded in filaments, it is important to understand how line profiles from such systems differ from those of isolated cores. We perform radiative transfer calculations on a hydrodynamic simulation of a molecular cloud in order to model line emission from collapsing cores embedded in filaments. We model two optically thick lines, CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0), and one optically thin line, N2H+(1-0), from three embedded cores. In the hydrodynamic simulation, gas self-gravity, turbulence, and bulk flows create filamentary regions within which cores form. Though the filaments have large dispersions, the N2H+(1-0) lines indicate subsonic velocities within the cores. We find that the observed optically thick line profiles of CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0) vary drastically with viewing angle. In over 50% of viewing angles, there is no sign of a blue asymmetry, an idealized signature of infall motions in an isolated spherical collapsing core. Profiles that primarily trace the cores, with little contribution from the surrounding filament, are characterized by a systematically higher HCN(1-0) peak intensity. The N2H+(1-0) lines do not follow this trend. We demonstrate that red asymmetric profiles are also feasible in the optically thick lines, due to emission from the filament or one-sided accretion flows onto the core. We conclude that embedded cores may frequently undergo collapse without showing a blue asymmetric profile, and that observational surveys including filamentary regions may underestimate the number of collapsing cores if based solely on profile shapes of optically thick lines.

  6. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. I. THE ANATOMY OF A FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Stutz, Amelia M.

    2012-05-01

    Observations are revealing the ubiquity of filamentary structures in molecular clouds. As cores are often embedded in filaments, it is important to understand how line profiles from such systems differ from those of isolated cores. We perform radiative transfer calculations on a hydrodynamic simulation of a molecular cloud in order to model line emission from collapsing cores embedded in filaments. We model two optically thick lines, CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0), and one optically thin line, N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0), from three embedded cores. In the hydrodynamic simulation, gas self-gravity, turbulence, and bulk flows create filamentary regions within which cores form. Though the filaments have large dispersions, the N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) lines indicate subsonic velocities within the cores. We find that the observed optically thick line profiles of CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0) vary drastically with viewing angle. In over 50% of viewing angles, there is no sign of a blue asymmetry, an idealized signature of infall motions in an isolated spherical collapsing core. Profiles that primarily trace the cores, with little contribution from the surrounding filament, are characterized by a systematically higher HCN(1-0) peak intensity. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) lines do not follow this trend. We demonstrate that red asymmetric profiles are also feasible in the optically thick lines, due to emission from the filament or one-sided accretion flows onto the core. We conclude that embedded cores may frequently undergo collapse without showing a blue asymmetric profile, and that observational surveys including filamentary regions may underestimate the number of collapsing cores if based solely on profile shapes of optically thick lines.

  7. Influence of chemical environment on resonant core excitation of C(1s) in CO{sub 2}, OCS, and CS{sub 2} by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Kroin, T.; Michelin, S. E.; Falck, A. S.; Arretche, F.; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, Ione

    2003-07-01

    In this work, we report a theoretical study of the role played by chemical environment on the electron-impact resonant core excitations in OCS, CO{sub 2}, and CS{sub 2} molecules. Calculated differential and integral cross sections for the promotion of a carbon 1s electron to the lowest unfilled p{pi} orbital of these molecules, or more specifically, the ratios of these cross sections for the corresponding transitions leading to the singlet and the triplet core-excited states in the 300-800 eV incident energy range, are reported. The distorted-wave approximation was applied to these calculations. Our study revealed resonance structures in the calculated ratios for CO{sub 2}, in good agreement with the available experimental observation, which is very encouraging. On the other hand, no resonance structure is clearly seen in the calculated ratios for OCS and CS{sub 2} molecules. The possible reason for the nonappearance of resonance for these two targets is discussed.

  8. Resonant Auger decay of core-excited CO molecules in intense x-ray laser pulses: the O(1s → π*) excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demekhin, Ph V.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamics of the resonant Auger (RA) decay of the core-excited CO*(1s-1π*) molecule in intense x-ray laser pulses is studied theoretically. The present approach includes the impact of the analogue of conical intersections of the complex potential energy surfaces of the ground and ‘dressed’ resonant states induced by intense x-ray pulses. It also takes into account the decay of the resonance and the direct photoionization of the ground state, both populating the same final ionic states coherently, as well as the direct photoionization of the resonance state itself. The individual impacts of these physical processes on the total ion yield, the CO+(A 2Π) electron spectrum and the ro-vibrational distributions of the neutral molecules remaining in the ground electronic state after the laser pulse has expired are analysed and compared to those reported previously for the C*O resonance. It is also demonstrated that the RA effect of molecules by strong laser pulses of resonant carrier frequency is an efficient process to produce two-site double-core-hole-one-particle states of CO*.

  9. Photochemistry of O(1D) and O(1S) lines in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; De Keyser, Johan; Maggiolo, Romain; Gibbons, Andrew; Gronoff, Guillaume; Gunell, Herbert; Dhooghe, Frederik; Loreau, Jérôme; Vaeck, Nathalie; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bieler, Andre; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, Tamas; Haessig, Myrtha; Le Roy, Lena; Neefs, Eddy; Rubin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We present here a chemistry-emission coupled model to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1D) and O(1S) states, for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The recent discovery of O2 in significant abundance relative to water (3.80% +/- 0.85%, Bieler et al. 2015) within the coma of 67P has been taken into consideration for the first time in such models. We evaluate the effect of the presence of O2 on the green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio, which is traditionally used to assess the CO2 abundance within cometary atmospheres. Model simulations, solving the continuity equation with transport, show that not taking O2 into account leads to an underestimation of the CO2 abundance within 67P. This strongly suggests that the green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio alone is not a proper tool for determining the CO2 abundance, as previously suggested. O2 might indeed be a rather common and abundant parent species, following the re-analysis of the comet 1P/Halley data (Rubin et al. 2015). Therefore, it is likely that earlier determinations of the CO2 abundance in cometary atmospheres have to be revisited.

  10. Global Distribution of Atomic Oxygen in the Mesopause Region as Derived from SCIAMACHY O(1S) Green Line Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, M.; Zhu, Y.; Ern, M.; Ungermann, J.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    A new dataset of atomic oxygen abundance in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere is presented. The data is derived from the nighttime atomic oxygen green line limb emission measurements of the SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY) instrument on the European Environmental Satellite (Envisat). The temporal coverage is October 2002 until April 2012 and the latitudinal extent is 50S to 80N at 10pm local time. This dataset is compared to other satellite datasets, in particular to recently published data of SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and the Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (MSIS) model. SCIAMACHY atomic oxygen peak abundances are typically 3-6 1e11 mol/cm3 at the atomic oxygen maximum region, depending on latitude and season. These values are similar to previous values based on chemiluminescence measurements of the atomic oxygen three body recombination reaction, but at least 30% lower than atomic oxygen abundances obtained from SABER.

  11. Overexpression of rice OsREX1-S, encoding a putative component of the core general transcription and DNA repair factor IIH, renders plant cells tolerant to cadmium- and UV-induced damage by enhancing DNA excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Shuta; Kowata, Hikaru; Kondou, Youichi; Takahashi, Shinya; Matsui, Minami; Berberich, Thomas; Youssefian, Shohab; Hidema, Jun; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-05-01

    Screening of 40,000 Arabidopsis FOX (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressor gene hunting system) lines expressing rice full-length cDNAs brings us to identify four cadmium (Cd)-tolerant lines, one of which carried OsREX1-S as a transgene. OsREX1-S shows the highest levels of identity to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii REX1-S (referred to as CrREX1-S, in which REX denotes Required for Excision) and to yeast and human TFB5s (RNA polymerase II transcription factor B5), both of which are components of the general transcription and DNA repair factor, TFIIH. Transient expression of OsREX1-S consistently localized the protein to the nucleus of onion cells. The newly generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing OsREX1-S reproducibly displayed enhanced Cd tolerance, confirming that the Cd-tolerance of the initial identified line was conferred solely by OsREX1-S expression. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing OsREX1-S exhibited ultraviolet-B (UVB) tolerance by reducing the amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers produced by UVB radiation. Moreover, those transgenic OsREX1-S Arabidopsis plants became resistant to bleomycin (an inducer of DNA strand break) and mitomycin C (DNA intercalating activity), compared to wild type. Our results indicate that OsREX1-S renders host plants tolerant to Cd, UVB radiation, bleomycin and mitomycin C through the enhanced DNA excision repair. PMID:24563249

  12. A mapping study of massive cores with 13CO J = 1 0 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esimbek, Jarken; Wu, Yuefang; Wang, Yang

    2008-04-01

    Using 13.7 m telescope of Qinghai station of Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) at Delingha, 27 sources were observed with 12CO J = 1-0 and mapped with 13CO J = 1-0 lines. Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) images and IRAS point source catalogue (PSC) were used to identify stellar objects embedded in the detected cores. Forty-one 13CO cores were obtained. The sizes of these cores is from 0.4 pc to 7 pc. Their average excitation temperatures and masses are 23.4 K and 3.1 × 10 4M⊙, which shows that these cores are massive and relatively cold. The line widths are much wider than those of low-mass cores. The correlation between line widths and core sizes is weak. According to the radio, IRAS and MSX data, there are three kinds of cores in the entire sample: group A has 21 cores whose Tex and Δ V are 15.5 K and 3.2 km/s on the average. The cores in group A are not associated with infrared sources. Group B contains 17 cores, of which five are associated with IRAS sources, the remaining 12 are associated with MSX sources. All the 17 cores are not associated with UC HII regions. Group C contains three cores which are associated with UC HII regions. All these physical parameters indicate that there could be an evolutionary development from group A to group C. The bolometric luminosities of groups B and C are also investigated. The reason for the displacement of the cores and the infrared sources in group A was discussed.

  13. Strong sensitivity of x-ray emission lines following charge exchange between highly charged ions and H (1 s ) in weakly screened media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariatore, N. D.; Otranto, S.

    2015-11-01

    We use the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method to analyze charge exchange processes between fully stripped projectiles with H (1 s ) in a screened environment at impact energies in the range 18 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu. For Fe+26 projectiles, (n ,l )-state selective charge exchange and line emission cross sections are presented for Debye screening lengths from 15 a.u. up to the unscreened case limit. At low-impact energies, a strong dependence of the hardness ratio on the Debye screening length is found. We show that such strong dependence also evidences itself for Ne+10,P+15,Ar+18, and Kr+36 projectiles. Clear indications of this dependence are noticeable in the photonic spectra even for large screening lengths (˜100 a.u.).

  14. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  15. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-11-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, the authors developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch -diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about {minus}109 F ({minus}78 C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  16. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, we developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch-diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about -109??F (-78??C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  17. Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

  18. Scattering of emission lines in galaxy cluster cores: measuring electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedekar, S.; Churazov, E.; Sazonov, S.; Sunyaev, R.; Emsellem, E.

    2014-06-01

    The central galaxies of some clusters can be strong emitters in the Lyα and Hα lines. This emission may arise either from the cool/warm gas located in the cool core of the cluster or from the bright AGN within the central galaxy. The luminosities of such lines can be as high as 1042-1044 erg s-1. This emission originating from the core of the cluster will get Thomson scattered by hot electrons of the intra-cluster medium with an optical depth ˜0.01 giving rise to very broad (Δλ/λ ˜ 15 per cent) features in the scattered spectrum. We discuss the possibility of measuring the electron density and temperature using information on the flux and width of the highly broadened line features.

  19. Direct potential and temperature effects on the MgHe line-core and far-wing photoabsorption profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.

    2011-03-15

    The present study deals with the collisional broadening of monatomic magnesium, evolving in a helium buffer gas, in the wavelength and temperature ranges 260-310 nm and 100-3000 K, respectively. The computed emission and absorption spectral profiles are based on the most recent potential-energy curves and transition dipole moments. The required interatomic Mg(3s{sup 2})+He(1s{sup 2}) and Mg(3s3p)+He(1s{sup 2}) potentials are constructed from two different sets. The purpose of this treatment is twofold. First, using the quantum-mechanical Baranger impact approximation, the width and shift of the line-core spectra are determined and their variation law with temperature is examined. Then, the satellite structures in the blue and red wings are analyzed quantum mechanically. The calculations show especially that the free-free transitions contribute most to the MgHe photoabsorption spectra and that a satellite structure is observable beyond the temperature 1800 K around the wavelengths 272 or 276 nm, depending on the used potential set. Weak satellites have also been investigated and, for all cases, the obtained results showed good agreement with those already published.

  20. Investigation of a negative i-line resist with the CORE-2564 laser writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenon, Brian J.; Sprout, Donna M.; Aaskov, William A.; Buck, Peter D.

    1994-12-01

    The process of record for mask fabrication on CORE pattern generators has been OCG-895i positive resist. This process has demonstrated excellent performance in a production environment, however it is recognized that having both negative and positive resist process capability would significantly improve the flexibility of most mask fabricators. The CORE exposure wavelength of 363.8 nm is close enough to i-line (365 nm) to provide the opportunity to use many of the i-line resists developed for wafer lithography. Negative acting resists sensitive at i-line are now becoming available. The most popular chemistry for this application has been acid catalyzed chemical amplification. These formulations typically contain a novolak resin, an acid generator, and a melamine crosslinking agent. The chemistry of such formulations has been previously described. An evaluation of OCG LMB-7011, an acid catalyzed chemically amplified negative i-line resist, has been conducted with the CORE-2564. This resist can be processed similarly to OCG-895i in standard mask process equipment, except that a post exposure bake is required to crosslink the exposed resist. With wet chrome etching, this resist exhibits exposure latitude similar or better than OCG-895i, benefiting from the fact that over-exposure is required to compensate for etch undercut when using a negative resist. Sub-micron resolution has been achieved with good linearity. CD control is marginal, due to a strong CD sensitivity to PEB temperature. A modified PEB process demonstrates improved CD control.

  1. In-line fiber-optic etalon formed by hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y J; Zhu, T; Yang, X C; Duan, D W

    2007-09-15

    A novel fiber-optic in-line etalon formed by splicing a section of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) in between two single-mode fibers is proposed and demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge. Such a HCPCF-based etalon acts as an excellent optical waveguide to form a Fabry-Perot interferometer and hence allows the cavity length to be as long as several centimeters with good visibility as the transmission loss of the HCPCF is much smaller than that of a hollow core fiber; this offers great potential to generate a practical dense fiber-optic sensor network with spatial frequency division-multiplexing. This novel etalon is demonstrated for strain measurement, and the experimental results show that a good visibility of 0.3 and a strain accuracy of better than +/- 5 microepsilon are achieved. PMID:17873927

  2. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  3. Comparisons of MgII core-wing data with Ground-Based Ca K-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Preminger, D.

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium_II core-wing ratio data will be compared with ground-based K-line photometry for most of cycle 22 and 23. The ground-based data is the photmetric sum computed from the composite K-line obtained from the San Fernando Observatory. We will examine several MgII core-wing composites. This work is partially supported by grants NNX11AB51G from NASA and ATM-0848518 from NSF.

  4. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantzos, E.; Papageorgiou, C.; Boucouvalas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell's equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method.

  5. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Georgantzos, E.; Boucouvalas, A. C.; Papageorgiou, C.

    2015-12-31

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell’s equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method.

  6. Selection and phenotypic characterization of a core collection of Brachypodium distachyon inbred lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The model grass Brachypodium distachyon is increasingly used to study various aspects of grass biology. A large and genotypically diverse collection of B. distachyon germplasm has been assembled by the research community. The natural variation in this collection can serve as a powerful experimental tool for many areas of inquiry, including investigating biomass traits. Results We surveyed the phenotypic diversity in a large collection of inbred lines and then selected a core collection of lines for more detailed analysis with an emphasis on traits relevant to the use of grasses as biofuel and grain crops. Phenotypic characters examined included plant height, growth habit, stem density, flowering time, and seed weight. We also surveyed differences in cell wall composition using near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP). In all cases, we observed extensive natural variation including a two-fold variation in stem density, four-fold variation in ferulic acid bound to hemicellulose, and 1.7-fold variation in seed mass. Conclusion These characterizations can provide the criteria for selecting diverse lines for future investigations of the genetic basis of the observed phenotypic variation. PMID:24423101

  7. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  8. Identifying Vortex-Core-Line using a tetrahedral satellite configuration: Field Topology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yao; Lembege, Bertrand; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Cai, DongSheng; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Identifying vortices are the key to understanding the turbulence in plasma shear layers. Here, the term 'vortex' or 'vortex core' is associated with a region of Galilean invariance [Jeong and Hussain, 1995]. Unfortunately, no single precise definition of a vortex is currently universally accepted, despite the fact that many space plasma authors claim that many observations have detected "vortices" (as Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at/around the magnetopause). By using the four satellite velocity data, and Taylor series, we expand the velocity data around the satellites, calculate its first order tensor, and linearly approximate the field. We can identify the vortex structures by using various vortex identification criteria as follows: (i) The first criterion is Q-criterion that defines vortices as regions in which the vorticity energy prevails other energies; (ii) the second criterion is the lambda2-criterion that is related to the minus of the Hessian matrix of the pressure related term; and (iii) the third criterion requires the existence of vortex-core-lines that is the Galilean invariance inside the four satellite tetrahedral region. Using these methods, we can identify and analyze more precisely the 3D vortex using tetrahedral satellite configuration.

  9. Nighttime atomic oxygen in the mesopause region retrieved from SCIAMACHY O(1S) green line measurements and its response to solar cycle variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yajun; Kaufmann, Martin; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents new data sets relating to the abundance of atomic oxygen in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, which were derived from the nighttime green line emission measurements of the SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY) instrument on the European Environmental Satellite (Envisat). These are compared to recently published data sets from the same SCIAMACHY green line measurements through the application of a different photochemical model and to data collected by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument. We find that the retrieved atomic oxygen concentration depends on the choice of the underlying photochemical model. These dependencies explain a large proportion of the differences between recently published data sets. The impact of the 11 year solar cycle on volume emission rates and atomic oxygen abundances was analyzed for various data sets, with the finding that the solar cycle effect varies with the atomic oxygen data set used. The solar cycle impact on the SCIAMACHY data increases with altitude. Above 96 km, it is significantly larger than predicted by Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere. Investigations indicate that these variations are primarily driven by total density compression/expansion variations during the solar cycle, rather than different photolysis rates.

  10. Asymmetry between absorption and photoluminescence line shapes of TPD: spectroscopic fingerprint of the twisted biphenyl core.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Reinhard; Gisslén, Linus; Himcinschi, Cameliu; Vragović, Igor; Calzado, Eva M; Louis, Enrique; San Fabián Maroto, Emilio; Díaz-García, María A

    2009-01-01

    We analyze absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and resonant Raman spectra of N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD), with the aim of providing a microscopic interpretation of a significant Stokes shift of about 0.5 eV that makes this material suitable for stimulated emission. The optical spectra were measured for TPD dissolved in toluene and chloroform, as well as for polystyrene films doped with varying amounts of TPD. In addition, we measured preresonant and resonant Raman spectra, giving direct access to the vibrational modes elongated in the relaxed excited geometry of the molecule. The experimental data are interpreted with calculations of the molecular geometry in the electronic ground state and the optically excited state using density functional theory. Several strongly elongated high-frequency modes within the carbon rings results in a vibronic progression with a calculated spacing of 158 meV, corroborated by the observation of vibrational sidebands in the PL spectra. The peculiarities of the potential energy surfaces related to a twisting around the central bond in the biphenyl core of TPD allow to quantify the asymmetry between the line shapes observed in absorption and emission. PMID:19086796

  11. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. II. SIGNATURES OF DYNAMICAL COLLAPSE DURING HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Beuther, Henrik; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of atomic or molecular lines can provide important information about the physical state of star-forming regions. In order to investigate the line profiles from dynamical collapsing massive star-forming regions (MSFRs), we model the emission from hydrodynamic simulations of a collapsing cloud in the absence of outflows. By performing radiative transfer calculations, we compute the optically thick HCO{sup +} and optically thin N{sub 2}H{sup +} line profiles from two collapsing regions at different epochs. Due to large-scale collapse, the MSFRs have large velocity gradients, reaching up to 20 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1} across the central core. The optically thin lines typically contain multiple velocity components resulting from the superposition of numerous density peaks along the line of sight. The optically thick lines are only marginally shifted to the blue side of the optically thin line profiles, and frequently do not have a central depression in their profiles due to self-absorption. As the regions evolve, the lines become brighter and the optically thick lines become broader. The lower-order HCO{sup +} (1-0) transitions are better indicators of collapse than the higher-order (4-3) transitions. We also investigate how the beam sizes affect profile shapes. Smaller beams lead to brighter and narrower lines that are more skewed to the blue in HCO{sup +} relative to the true core velocity, but show multiple components in N{sub 2}H{sup +}. High-resolution observations (e.g., with Atacama Large Millimeter Array) can test these predictions and provide insights into the nature of MSFRs.

  12. Measurement of the 1s2l3l’ Dielectronic Recombination Emission Line in Li-Like Ar and Its Contribution to the Faint X-Ray Feature Found in the Stacked Spectrum of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy Christina; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Borovik, Alexander; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigated the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of, or contributor to, the emission line. The Li-like transition 1s22l-1s2l3l’ was suggested to produce a 3.62 keV photon [1] near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV and was the primary focus of our investigation. Apart from the mentioned transitions, we have found other features that can be possible contributors to the emission in this region. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances. A Johann-type crystal spectrometer and a solid-state germanium detector were used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the electron beam. The DR cross sections were measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Corrections for different instrument and method related effects such as charge state balance, electron beam space charge, and charge exchange have been considered. Our high-resolution crystal spectra allowed the experimental separation of features that are less than 2 eV apart. We have used a collisional radiative model NOMAD [2] aided by atomic data calculations by FAC [3] to interpret our observations and account for the corrections and uncertainties. Experimental results were compared to the AtomDB theoretical emission lines used to fit the galaxy cluster spectra containing the unidentified 3.57 keV line. These data points can be added benchmarks in the database and used to accurately interpret spectra from current x-ray satellites, including Hitomi, Chandra, and XMM-Newton x-ray observatories.[1] Bulbul E. et al., 2014, ApJ, 789, 13[2] Ralchenko Yu. et al., 2014, JQSRT, 71

  13. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N.

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  14. Lining up: The Relationship between the Common Core State Standards and Five Sets of Comparison Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; Drummond, Kathryn V.; de Gonzalez, Alicia; Seburn, Mary; Stout, Odile; Rooseboom, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Offices (CCSSO) released the Common Core State Standards. The stated aim of the Common Core standards is to define the knowledge and skills students should achieve in order to graduate from high school ready to succeed in a…

  15. Star formation in Chamaeleon I and III: a molecular line study of the starless core population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitali, A. E.; Belloche, A.; Garrod, R. T.; Parise, B.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The Chamaeleon dark molecular clouds are excellent nearby targets for low-mass star formation studies. Even though they belong to the same cloud complex, Cha I and II are actively forming stars while Cha III shows no sign of ongoing star formation. Aims: We aim to determine the driving factors that have led to the very different levels of star formation activity in Cha I and III and examine the dynamical state and possible evolution of the starless cores within them. Methods: Observations were performed in various molecular transitions with the APEX and Mopra telescopes. We examine the kinematics of the starless cores in the clouds through a virial analysis, a search for contraction motions, and velocity gradients. The chemical differences in the two clouds are explored through their fractional molecular abundances, derived from a non-LTE analysis, and comparison to predictions of chemical models. Results: Five cores are gravitationally bound in Cha I and one in Cha III. The so-called infall signature indicating contraction motions is seen toward 8-17 cores in Cha I and 2-5 cores in Cha III, which leads to a range of 13-28% of the cores in Cha I and 10-25% of the cores in Cha III that are contracting and may become prestellar. There is no significant difference in the turbulence level in the two clouds. Future dynamical interactions between the cores will not be dynamically significant in either Cha I or III, but the subregion Cha I North may experience collisions between cores within ~0.7 Myr. Turbulence dissipation in the cores of both clouds is seen in the high-density tracers N2H+ 1-0 and HC3N 10-9 which have lower non-thermal velocity dispersions compared to C17O 2-1, C18O 2-1, and C34S 2-1. Evidence of depletion in the Cha I core interiors is seen in the abundance distributions of the latter three molecules. The median fractional abundance of C18O is lower in Cha III than Cha I by a factor of ~2. The median abundances of most molecules (except

  16. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K; Sung, Yixing; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Xu, Yiban; Cao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  17. C1s and O1s gas phase shake-up spectra from Mo(CO) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustad, J.; Enkvist, C.; Lunell, S.; Tillborg, H.; Nilsson, A.; Osborne, S.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Svensson, S.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental high-resolution core photoelectron C1s and O1s shake-up spectra of molybdenum hexacarbonyl, MO(CO) 6, are reported and compared with results of semiempirical INDO/CI calculations. Several hitherto unobserved peaks are identified and assigned. It is found that an intra- and inter-group classification can be used to describe the transitions. The transitions of lowest energy have Mo-CO inter-group character. Dynamical effects on the line widths of the experimental shake-up peaks are discussed. A discussion of the relevance of experimental results obtained for the MO(CO) 6 molecule for CO adsorption on metal surfaces is presented.

  18. Development of An On-Line, Core Power Distribution Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Tunc ALdemir; Don Miller; Peng Wang

    2007-10-02

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop a software package that can construct in three-dimensional core power distributions using the signals from constant temperature power sensors distributed in the reactor core. The software developed uses a mode-based state/parameter estmation technique that is particularly attractive when there are model uncertainties and/or large signal noise. The software yields the expected value of local power at the detector locations and points in between, as well as the probability distribution of the local power density

  19. Evaluation of hydrogen atom density in the plasma core region based on the Balmer-α line profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, M.; Sawada, K.; Fujii, K.; Hasuo, M.; Morita, S.

    2011-02-01

    The Balmer-α line profile is measured with high wavelength resolution for a discharge in the Large Helical Device. The line profile is regarded as a superposition of continuously varying Doppler broadened components and is expressed as the Laplace transform. Numerical Laplace inversion of the measured line profile gives the distribution function of line emissivity in terms of atom temperature. The temperature dependence of the line emissivity is interpreted as spatial dependence so that the ionization rate and atom density of neutral hydrogen are determined. The temperature range of the detected atoms extends beyond 2 keV which corresponds to a penetration depth of about 1 m in the plasma, or the location at ρ ~ 0.3, where ρ is the normalized minor radius. The atom density of approximately 1013 m-3 is derived in the plasma core region which is more than four orders smaller than that at the plasma boundary. Calculation of neutral transport with a Monte-Carlo simulation code gives satisfactory consistency with the experimental results.

  20. Optical Line Radiation from Uranium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis; [for a gaseous core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maceda, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    The radiative energy current due to line radiation is calculated in a U 235 plasma over a temperature range of 5000 K to 8000 K. Also a variation in the neutron flux of 2 x 10 to the 12th power neutrons/ (sq cm-sec) to 2 x 10 to the 16th power neutrons/(sq cm-sec) is considered. The plasma forms a cylinder with a diameter and height of one meter. To calculate the radiative-energy current, a rate equation formalism is developed to solve for the atomic state densities along with a model for the energy levels in neutral and singly ionized uranium. Because the electron states in uranium lie below 5eV, recombination is the principle excitation mechanism. At and above 6000 K, inversions were found, and at all temperatures the line radiation at line center was greater than the corresponding black-body radiation. There are negligible differences in the radiative-energy current at 6000 K for variations in the neutron flux. The average opacity, which varied from 100 to 100,000 gm/sq cm, over the frequency range of line radiation is calculated.

  1. The Title and Three Core Values from the First Three Lines of The Declaration of Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kenneth Michael

    2013-01-01

    Teaching the Declaration of Independence can be a challenge. This article presents a lesson plan based on an explication of the title and the first three lines of the Declaration intended to make the American founding era relevant to today's college students. Assuming civic education is a major goal of teaching American Government, assuming…

  2. Ambient temperature influences core body temperature response in rat lines bred for differences in sensitivity to 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Andrea C; Seiden, Lewis S

    2003-04-01

    Agonist-induced decrease in core body temperature has commonly been used as a measure of serotonin1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor sensitivity in mood disorder. The thermoregulatory basis for 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist-induced temperature responses in humans and rats remains unclear. Therefore, the influence of ambient temperature on 5-HT(1A) receptor-mediated decreases in core body temperature were measured in rat lines bred for high (HDS) or low (LDS) sensitivity to the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT). HDS and LDS rats were injected with either saline, 0.25 or 0.50 mg/kg 8-OH-DPAT at ambient temperatures of 10.5, 24, 30, or 37.5 degrees C, and core temperature was measured by radiotelemetry. For both lines, the thermic response to acute 8-OH-DPAT was greatest at 10.5 degrees C and decreased in magnitude as ambient temperature increased to 30 degrees C, consistent with hypothermia. HDS rats displayed a greater hypothermic response than LDS rats at 10.5, 24, and 30 degrees C. At 37.5 degrees C, LDS rats showed a lethal elevation of temperature in response to 0.50 mg/kg 8-OH-DPAT. All thermic responses to 8-OH-DPAT, including the lethality, were effectively blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY100635, suggesting line differences in thermoregulatory circuits that are influenced by 5-HT(1A) receptor activation. Following repeated injection of 8-OH-DPAT, the magnitude of the hypothermic response decreased in both lines at 10.5 degrees C, but increased in HDS rats treated with 0.50 mg/kg 8-OH-DPAT at 30 and 37.5 degrees C. This pattern was reversed in HDS rats following 8-OH-DPAT challenge at 24 degrees C, suggesting that a compensatory thermoregulatory response accounts for changes in the hypothermic response to chronic 8-OH-DPAT. PMID:12649391

  3. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  4. The Ice Core Data Gateway: A Multi-Agency Effort to Provide On-line Access to Ice Core Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, R.; Scharfen, G.; Scambos, T.; Eakin, M.; Anderson, D.

    2001-05-01

    The NSF-funded Antarctic Glaciological Data Center (AGDC) at the National Snow and Ice Data Center provides data management for the U.S. Antarctic Glaciological Program including ice core data from the Antarctic. The World Data Center for Paleoclimatology archives ice core data sets from many sites, globally. Recently, the AGDC, the WDC for Paleoclimatology and representatives from the International Ice Core Data Cooperative have developed a coordinated and cooperative approach to ice core data management. The Ice Core Data Gateway provides a single point of contact for access and submission for the research community to the breadth of ice core data sets. The need for a single point of contact for all ice core data was called for at the Spring 2000 Ice Core Working Group meeting in Denver. The design of the gateway allows for the continuation of valuable discipline-specific expertise and program-centric activities at the data centers, but utilizes web technology to provide a single point of entry for users. This poster describes existing and planned roles of the key ice core data management groups and technical issues such as common variable names, metadata, and quality control. We seek feedback from the ice core community regarding the Ice Core Data Gateway.

  5. O2/n2 Measurements On Polar Ice Cores With A New On-line Extraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Leuenberger, M.

    We developed a new on-line extraction and analysis technique for bubble air trapped in ice cores. The technique is based on our continuous flow analysis (CFA) melt system which has been successfully used for in situ analysis of chemical substances on several European drilling projects in Antarctica (EPICA) and Greenland (GRIP). A piece of ice (up to 1 m long, cross-section typically 2 × 2 cm) is continuously melted and the air is subsequently separated from the meltwater into a helium flux. The helium-air mixture is then analyzed in a Delta Plus XL isotope ratio mass spectrometer where the isotopic ratios of the major atmospheric gases nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2) and argon (Ar) and the elemental ratios O2/N2 and Ar/N2 can be measured. Nitrogen (15N) and oxygen (18O) isotope measurements of standard air admixed to a water flux by a bubble generator with subsequent degassing proved to be as pre- cise as conventional off-line extraction devices. First results of ice measurements are promising. 15N and 18O can be measured with a precision better than 0.05 permil and 0.1 permil respectively for a resolution of 2 - 3 cm. Therefore, we suppose that this technique has the potential to measure the ratio of oxygen to nitrogen (O2/N2). The stable isotope composition of the main air components in ice core bubbles en- compass a wealth of important information regarding abrupt temperature shifts, and variations of the global ice volume as well as marine and terrestrial biological ac- tivities. O2/N2 or 13C in combination with CO2 is used to determine oceanic and terrestrial carbon sources and sinks. Direct atmospheric O2/N2 monitoring started in the late 1980's. Recent modeling studies show that present O2/N2 measurements lead to more consistent results than today's available 13C values. However, reliable firn or archive tank data do not extend further back in time than 1977. Therefore, it is of great interest to study O2/N2 in the firn as well as in the neighboring ice. The

  6. Analysis of the OECD Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Problem Using the Refined Core Thermal-Hydraulic Nodalization Feature of the MARS/MASTER Code

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Han Gyu; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Cho, Byung-Oh; Lee, Won Jae; Zee, Sung Quun

    2003-05-15

    The refined core thermal-hydraulics (T-H) nodalization feature of the MARS/MASTER code is used to generate a high-fidelity solution to the OECD main steam line break benchmark problem and to investigate the effects of core T-H nodalization. The MARS/MASTER coupling scheme is introduced first that enables efficient refined node core T-H calculations via the COBRA-III module. The base solution is generated using a fine T-H nodalization consisting of fuel assembly-sized radial nodes. Sensitivity studies are performed on core T-H nodalization to examine the impacts on core reactivity, power distribution, and transient behavior. The results indicate that the error in the peak local power can be very large (up to 25%) with a coarse T-H nodalization because of the inability to incorporate detailed thermal feedback. A demonstrative departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) calculation shows no occurrence of DNB in this problem.

  7. Integrated Ultraviolet Spectra and Line Indices of M31 Globular Clusters and the Cores of Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponder, Jerry M.; Burstein, David; O'Connell, Robert W.; Rose, James A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Wu, Chi-Chao; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Rieke, Marcia J.; Tripicco, Michael

    1998-11-01

    We present observations of the integrated light of four M31 globular clusters (MIV, MII, K280, and K58) and of the cores of six elliptical galaxies (NGC 3605, 3608, 5018, 5831, 6127, and 7619) made with the Faint Object Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The spectra cover the range 2200-4800 Å at a resolution of 8 Å with signal-to-noise ratio of more than 20 and flux accuracy of ~5%. To these data we add from the literature IUE observations of the dwarf elliptical galaxy M32, Galactic globular clusters, and Galactic stars. The stellar populations in these systems are analyzed with the aid of mid-UV and near-UV colors and absorption line strengths. Included in the measured indices is the key NH feature at 3360 Å. We compare these line index measures with the 2600 - 3000 colors of these stars and stellar populations. We find that the M31 globular clusters, Galactic globular clusters/Galactic stars, and elliptical galaxies represent three distinct stellar populations, based on their behavior in color-line strength correlations involving Mg II, NH, CN, and several UV metallic blends. In particular, the M31 globular cluster MIV, as metal-poor as the Galactic globular M92, shows a strong NH 3360 Å feature. Other line indices, including the 3096 Å blend that is dominated by lines of Mg I and Al I, show intrinsic differences as well. We also find that the broadband line indices often employed to measure stellar population differences in faint objects, such as the 4000 Å and the Mg 2800 breaks, are disappointingly insensitive to these stellar population differences. We find that the hot (T > 20,000 K) stellar component responsible for the ``UV upturn'' at shorter wavelengths can have an important influence on the mid-UV spectral range (2400-3200 Å) as well. The hot component can contribute over 50% of the flux at 2600 Å in some cases and affects both continuum colors and line strengths. Mid-UV spectra of galaxies must be corrected for this effect before

  8. A 3.55 keV line from DM → a → γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.powell2@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  9. Analysis of cracked core spray injection line piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite content.

  10. Relations between the photospheric magnetic field and the emission from the outer atmospheres of cool stars. I - The solar Ca II K line core emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Cote, J.; Zwaan, C.; Saar, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of a solar active region complex and its surroundings are used to establish a quantitative relation between the Ca II K line core intensity and magnetic flux density. The Ca II K line core intensity is transformed to a Ca II H + K line core flux density to facilitate a comparison of solar and stellar data. A new absolute calibration for the Mount Wilson Ca II H + K fluxes for G-type dwarfs is derived. The minimum Ca II K flux, found in the centers of supergranulation cells in quiet regions on the sun, is identical to the minimum flux that is observed for solar-type stars. An expression is presented for the nonlinear trend between the Ca II H + K line core excess flux density and the absolute value of the magnetic flux density. Models that explain the nonlinearity of the mean trend and the large intrinsic scatter about it are discussed. The solar data define a relation that is similar to the relation between stellar hemisphere-average magnetic flux densities and Ca II H + K excess flux densities.

  11. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  12. Dendron to central core S1-S1 and S2-S(n) (n>1) energy transfers in artificial special pairs containing dendrimers with limited numbers of conformations.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pierre D; Brégier, Frédérique; Aly, Shawkat M; Szmytkowski, Jędrzej; Paige, Matthew F; Steer, Ronald P

    2013-03-25

    Two dendrimers consisting of a cofacial free-base bisporphyrin held by a biphenylene spacer and functionalized with 4-benzeneoxomethane (5-(4-benzene)tri-10,15,20-(4-n-octylbenzene)zinc(II)porphyrin) using either five or six of the six available meso-positions, have been synthesized and characterized as models for the antenna effect in Photosystems I and II. The presence of the short linkers, -CH2O-, and long C8H17 soluble side chains substantially reduces the number of conformers (foldamers) compared with classic dendrimers built with longer flexible chains. This simplification assists in their spectroscopic and photophysical analysis, notably with respect to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Both steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements indicate that the cofacial free bases and the flanking zinc(II)-porphyrin antennas act as energy acceptor and donor, respectively, following excitation in either the Q or Soret bands of the dendrimers. The rate constants for singlet electronic energy transfer (k(EET)) extracted from the S1 and S2 fluorescence lifetimes of the donor in the presence and absence of the acceptor are ≤ (0.1-0.3)×10(9) and ∼2×10(9)  s(-1) for S1→S1 (range from a bi-exponential decay model) and about 1.5×10(12)  s(-1) for S2→S(n) (n>1). Comparisons of these experimental data with those calculated from Förster theory using orientation factors and donor-acceptor distances extracted from computer modeling suggest that a highly restricted number of the many foldamers facilitate energy transfer. These foldamers have the lowest energy by molecular modeling and consist of one or at most two of the flanking zinc porphyrin antennas folded so they lie near the central artificial special pair core with the remaining antennas located almost parallel to and far from it. PMID:23371815

  13. Methotrexate diethyl ester-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in aqueous solution increased antineoplastic effects in resistant breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Virginia C; Oliveira, Catiuscia P; Begnini, Karine R; Schultze, Eduarda; Thurow, Helena S; Leon, Priscila M M; Dellagostin, Odir A; Campos, Vinicius F; Beck, Ruy C R; Guterres, Silvia S; Collares, Tiago; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Seixas, Fabiana K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer affecting women. Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolic drug that remains important in the treatment of breast cancer. Its efficacy is compromised by resistance in cancer cells that occurs through a variety of mechanisms. This study evaluated apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest induced by an MTX derivative (MTX diethyl ester [MTX(OEt)2]) and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in two MTX-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The formulations prepared presented adequate granulometric profile. The treatment responses were evaluated through flow cytometry. Relying on the mechanism of resistance, we observed different responses between cell lines. For MCF-7 cells, MTX(OEt)2 solution and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules presented significantly higher apoptotic rates than untreated cells and cells incubated with unloaded lipid-core nanocapsules. For MDA-MB-231 cells, MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules were significantly more efficient in inducing apoptosis than the solution of the free drug. S-phase cell cycle arrest was induced only by MTX(OEt)2 solution. The drug nanoencapsulation improved apoptosis induction for the cell line that presents MTX resistance by lack of transport receptors. PMID:24741306

  14. Methotrexate diethyl ester-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in aqueous solution increased antineoplastic effects in resistant breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yurgel, Virginia C; Oliveira, Catiuscia P; Begnini, Karine R; Schultze, Eduarda; Thurow, Helena S; Leon, Priscila MM; Dellagostin, Odir A; Campos, Vinicius F; Beck, Ruy CR; Guterres, Silvia S; Collares, Tiago; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Seixas, Fabiana K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer affecting women. Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolic drug that remains important in the treatment of breast cancer. Its efficacy is compromised by resistance in cancer cells that occurs through a variety of mechanisms. This study evaluated apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest induced by an MTX derivative (MTX diethyl ester [MTX(OEt)2]) and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in two MTX-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The formulations prepared presented adequate granulometric profile. The treatment responses were evaluated through flow cytometry. Relying on the mechanism of resistance, we observed different responses between cell lines. For MCF-7 cells, MTX(OEt)2 solution and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules presented significantly higher apoptotic rates than untreated cells and cells incubated with unloaded lipid-core nanocapsules. For MDA-MB-231 cells, MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules were significantly more efficient in inducing apoptosis than the solution of the free drug. S-phase cell cycle arrest was induced only by MTX(OEt)2 solution. The drug nanoencapsulation improved apoptosis induction for the cell line that presents MTX resistance by lack of transport receptors. PMID:24741306

  15. A Core Invasiveness Gene Signature Reflects Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition but Not Metastatic Potential in Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Marsan, Melike; Van den Eynden, Gert; Limame, Ridha; Neven, Patrick; Hauspy, Jan; Van Dam, Peter A.; Vergote, Ignace; Dirix, Luc Y.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Van Laere, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. Methods & Results We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001). When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896–1.019, P = 0.186). Discussion These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential. PMID:24586640

  16. Stable Core Symmetries and Confined Textures for a Vortex Line in a Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgh, Magnus O.; Nitta, Muneto; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-02-01

    We show how a singly quantized vortex can exhibit energetically stable defect cores with different symmetries in an atomic spin-1 polar Bose-Einstein condensate, and how a stable topologically nontrivial Skyrmion texture of lower dimensionality can be confined inside the core. The core isotropy and the stability of the confined texture are sensitive to Zeeman level shifts. The observed structures have analogies, respectively, in pressure-dependent symmetries of superfluid liquid 3He vortices and in the models of superconducting cosmic strings.

  17. Stable Core Symmetries and Confined Textures for a Vortex Line in a Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Borgh, Magnus O; Nitta, Muneto; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-02-26

    We show how a singly quantized vortex can exhibit energetically stable defect cores with different symmetries in an atomic spin-1 polar Bose-Einstein condensate, and how a stable topologically nontrivial Skyrmion texture of lower dimensionality can be confined inside the core. The core isotropy and the stability of the confined texture are sensitive to Zeeman level shifts. The observed structures have analogies, respectively, in pressure-dependent symmetries of superfluid liquid ^{3}He vortices and in the models of superconducting cosmic strings. PMID:26967422

  18. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N2O molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, L.; Tashiro, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ehara, M.; Ueda, K.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestâl, K.; Feifel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N2O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s-2) and 1179.4 eV (O1s-2). The corresponding energies obtained for N2O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s-2), 906.5 eV (central N1s-2), and 1174.1 eV (O1s-2). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N2O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s-2 as well as with the O1s-2 dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10-3 for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10-3 for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  19. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestål, K.; Feifel, R.; Tashiro, M.; Ehara, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ueda, K.

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s{sup −2}) and 1179.4 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The corresponding energies obtained for N{sub 2}O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s{sup −2}), 906.5 eV (central N1s{sup −2}), and 1174.1 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N{sub 2}O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s{sup −2} as well as with the O1s{sup −2} dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10{sup −3} for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10{sup −3} for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  20. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N2O molecules.

    PubMed

    Hedin, L; Tashiro, M; Linusson, P; Eland, J H D; Ehara, M; Ueda, K; Zhaunerchyk, V; Karlsson, L; Pernestål, K; Feifel, R

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N2O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s(-2)) and 1179.4 eV (O1s(-2)). The corresponding energies obtained for N2O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s(-2)), 906.5 eV (central N1s(-2)), and 1174.1 eV (O1s(-2)). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N2O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s(-2) as well as with the O1s(-2) dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10(-3) for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10(-3) for oxygen at 1300 eV. PMID:25669525

  1. The preparation of core/shell structured microsphere of multi first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs and evaluation of biological safety

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Pang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Zhengquan; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Penghui; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng; Luo, Chengke; Wang, Xiyang; Nie, Hemin

    2015-01-01

    To introduce a modified method, namely coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization for the fabrication of distinct core/shell structured microspheres of four first-line ant-tuberculosis drugs with different characteristics in hydrophilic properties in one single step. In group B, we prepared microspheres in which the core and the shell contain hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, respectively. In contrast, in group C, the opposite is prepared. The detection of encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release test were performed to confirm the feasibility of the drug-loaded core/shell structured microspheres. Moreover, cell culture experiments and animal experiments have been carried out to evaluate the biological safety of different microspheres in cell growth, cell viability, osteogenesis and migration of BMSCs in vitro and the bone fusion in a bone deficits model in SD rat. Meanwhile, the distribution of drugs and liver and kidney toxicity were monitored. The release patterns of the two groups are significantly different. The release of drugs from Group B microspheres is rather sequential, whereas group C microspheres release drugs in a parallel (co-release) manner. And various concentrations of carrier materials produces core/shell structured microspheres with different appearance. Moreover, the biological safety of core/shell structured microspheres was testified to be satisfactory. These findings present the advantages and possible application of this kind of multi-drug release system in treating skeletal tuberculosis. Moreover, the characteristic sequential release of multi-drugs can be controlled and adjusted based on treatment need and used in treating other disorders. PMID:26309493

  2. New method for the determination of carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides in water samples using on-line SPE fused core column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ramos, C; Satínský, D; Solich, P

    2014-11-01

    A new HPLC column-switching method using large volume sample injection and fused-core columns for on-line solid phase extraction have been developed for the determination of the following carbamates and pyrethroids: aldicarb, carbaryl, pirimicarb, carbofuran, kadethrin, flumethrin, fenpropathrin, fenoxycarb, tau-fluvalinate and fenvalerate, in surface water samples. Sudan I was used as internal standard. The proposed method was performed using 100 µl sample injection followed by an on-line solid phase extraction procedure and finally the compounds were identified and quantified by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The separation was carried out on C-18 reversed phase column based on fused-core particle technology. The influence of the injected sample volume, the variables affecting to SPE process and the conditions for the separation on an analytical column, were studied and optimized. The limits of detection ranged from 5.5 to 8.9 µg L(-1), and limits of quantification from 18.4 to 29.7 µg L(-1), while inter- and intra-day variability was under 15%. This new analytical procedure was satisfactorily applied for the determination of these organic pollutants in surface water samples located in Czech Republic. Concentration levels were found for some of these pollutants up to 26.11 µg L(-1) in the river Elbe and up to 34.53 µg L(-1) in the closed lakes samples. PMID:25127636

  3. Optical emission line nebulae in galaxy cluster cores 1: the morphological, kinematic and spectral properties of the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, S. L.; Edge, A. C.; Swinbank, A. M.; Wilman, R. J.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Crawford, C. S.; Russell, H. R.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    We present an Integral Field Unit survey of 73 galaxy clusters and groups with the VIsible Multi Object Spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. We exploit the data to determine the H α gas dynamics on kpc scales to study the feedback processes occurring within the dense cluster cores. We determine the kinematic state of the ionized gas and show that the majority of systems (˜2/3) have relatively ordered velocity fields on kpc scales that are similar to the kinematics of rotating discs and are decoupled from the stellar kinematics of the brightest cluster galaxy. The majority of the H α flux (>50 per cent) is typically associated with these ordered kinematics and most systems show relatively simple morphologies suggesting they have not been disturbed by a recent merger or interaction. Approximately 20 per cent of the sample (13/73) have disturbed morphologies which can typically be attributed to active galactic nuclei activity disrupting the gas. Only one system shows any evidence of an interaction with another cluster member. A spectral analysis of the gas suggests that the ionization of the gas within cluster cores is dominated by non-stellar processes, possibly originating from the intracluster medium itself.

  4. Optical Emission Line Nebulae in Galaxy Cluster Cores 1: The Morphological, Kinematic and Spectral Properties of the Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, S. L.; Edge, A. C.; Swinbank, A. M.; Wilman, R. J.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Crawford, C. S.; Russell, H. R.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McNamara, B.; Bremer, M. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present an Integral Field Unit survey of 73 galaxy clusters and groups with the VIsible Multi Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on VLT. We exploit the data to determine the Hα gas dynamics on kpc-scales to study the feedback processes occurring within the dense cluster cores. We determine the kinematic state of the ionised gas and show that the majority of systems (˜ 2/3) have relatively ordered velocity fields on kpc scales that are similar to the kinematics of rotating discs and are decoupled from the stellar kinematics of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy. The majority of the Hα flux (> 50 %) is typically associated with these ordered kinematics and most systems show relatively simple morphologies suggesting they have not been disturbed by a recent merger or interaction. Approximately 20 % of the sample (13/73) have disturbed morphologies which can typically be attributed to AGN activity disrupting the gas. Only one system shows any evidence of an interaction with another cluster member. A spectral analysis of the gas suggests that the ionisation of the gas within cluster cores is dominated by non stellar processes, possibly originating from the intracluster medium itself.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of two distinct cDNA-encoding heparan sulfate proteoglycan core proteins from a rat endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kojima, T; Shworak, N W; Rosenberg, R D

    1992-03-01

    The cloned rat fat pad endothelial cell (RFP-EC) line synthesizes anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGact) and anticoagulantly inactive heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGinact), both of which exhibit 25-, 30-, and 50-kDa core proteins of extremely similar structure. The primary sequences of internal peptides obtained from HSPGinact core proteins and the NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the 25-kDa component from the HSPGinact core proteins demonstrate that the 30-kDa component is a previously unidentified species, designated as ryudocan, with the 25-kDa component representing a proteolytic degradation product, while the 50-kDa component is the rat homolog of syndecan (Saunders, S. Jalkanen, M., O'Farrell, S., and Bernfield, M. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 108, 1547-1556). Specific oligonucleotide probes were obtained for ryudocan and syndecan by polymerase chain reaction, and the corresponding cDNAs were isolated from a RFP-EC library. The cDNAs encode type I integral membrane proteins of 202 and 313 amino acids, respectively, which have homologous transmembrane and intracellular domains but very distinct extracellular regions. In particular, ryudocan exhibits only three potential glycosaminoglycan attachment sites within the extracellular region while syndecan has five glycosaminoglycan attachment sites within the same domain. Both species are expressed in RFP-EC lines, primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells and primary rat skin fibroblast cells. The levels of ryudocan and syndecan mRNA were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in primary microvascular endothelial cells and closely associated non-endothelial cells isolated by cell sorting. Ryudocan and syndecan mRNAs were abundantly expressed in both populations representing about 0.1-0.5% of mRNA. PMID:1537865

  6. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchiani, M.; Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M.

    1995-09-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l` Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l` Energia e l` Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test {open_quotes}2{close_quotes} Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line break{close_quotes} are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2.

  7. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. On-line SPE-UHPLC method using fused core columns for extraction and separation of nine illegal dyes in chilli-containing spices.

    PubMed

    Khalikova, Maria A; Satínský, Dalibor; Smidrkalová, Tereza; Solich, Petr

    2014-12-01

    The presented work describes the development of a simple, fast and effective on-line SPE-UHPLC-UV/vis method using fused core particle columns for extraction, separation and quantitative analysis of the nine illegal dyes, most frequently found in chilli-containing spices. The red dyes Sudan I-IV, Sudan Red 7B, Sudan Red G, Sudan Orange G, Para Red, and Methyl Red were separated and analyzed in less than 9 min without labor-consuming pretreatment procedure. The chromatographic separation was performed on Ascentis Express RP-Amide column with gradient elution using mixture of acetonitrile and water, as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) and 55°C of temperature. As SPE sorbent for cleanup and pre-concentration of illegal dyes short guard fused core column Ascentis Express F5 was used. The applicability of proposed method was proven for three different chilli-containing commercial samples. Recoveries for all compounds were between 90% and 108% and relative standard deviation ranged from 1% to 4% for within- and from 2% to 6% for between-day. Limits of detection showed lower values than required by European Union regulations and were in the range of 3.3-10.3 µg L(-1) for standard solutions, 5.6-235.6 µg kg(-1) for chilli-containing spices. PMID:25159432

  9. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvatić, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of π∗ -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the π⊥∗(C=C-C≡N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized π∥∗(C≡N) produces C≡N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C≡N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  10. Water-rock interactions in the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, SW Japan revealed by core sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Tanaka, N.; Shigematsu, N.

    2012-12-01

    Alteration minerals along the fault zone of the Median Tectonic Line (MTL), the Japan's largest onshore fault, are characterized to understand the crustal faulting at various depth conditions by describing a borehole penetrating the MTL. The borehole was drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan, AIST (GSJ, AIST) to predict the forthcoming Nankai-Tonankai Earthquake at Matsusaka-Iitaka (ITA), SW Japan. The drilling length is 600m. It penetrates the MTL at the depth of 473.9m. The fault plane has an almost E-W strike and dips at 56° to the north. Hangingwall of the MTL consists of Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite and footwall of the MTL consists of fractured rocks derived from Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks. Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite in the hangingwall suffered more or less later cataclastic deformations. X-ray diffraction patterns of powdered samples derived from ITA borehole were obtained to identify alteration mineral assemblages and estimate alteration conditions. Chlorite, laumontite, white-mica, prehnite and calcite are main alteration minerals in the Ryoke belt above 400m depth, while analcine and stilbite occur as zeolite minerals instead of laumontite between 400m and 473.9m depth. Laumontite is preferentially occurred in the cataclastically deformed zones and calcite often fills fractures and cavities. The fault plane and fractures in the fault zone provide fluid conduit. The presence of laumontite and prehnite indicates that the alteration temperature was more than 200°C, while analcime and stilbite formed at lower temperature than laumontite. These suggest that the zone of hydrothermal alteration less than 200°C was restricted below 400m depth in the ITA borehole. We also applied chlorite geothermometry (Inoue et al., 2009), which yeileds temperatures of about 300°C for mylonitic rocks and those of about 200°C for cataclastic rocks. Immediately beneath the MTL, approximately 40m thick fractured rocks form the major strand of the MTL fault zone

  11. Excitation and abundance of C3 in star forming cores. Herschel/HIFI observations of the sight-lines to W31C and W49N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Giesen, T.; Stutzki, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Luca, M.; Bell, T. A.; Gupta, H.; Gerin, M.; Persson, C. M.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Makai, Z.; Black, J.; Boulanger, F.; Coutens, A.; Dartois, E.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Geballe, T.; Godard, B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gry, C.; Hennebelle, P.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Joblin, C.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Kołos, R.; Krełowski, J.; Lis, D. C.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Menten, K. M.; Monje, R.; Pearson, J. C.; Perault, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Teyssier, D.; Vastel, C.; Yu, S.; Dieleman, P.; Güsten, R.; Honingh, C. E.; Morris, P.; Roelfsema, P.; Schieder, R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2010-10-01

    We present spectrally resolved observations of triatomic carbon (C3) in several ro-vibrational transitions between the vibrational ground state and the low-energy ν2 bending mode at frequencies between 1654-1897 GHz along the sight-lines to the submillimeter continuum sources W31C and W49N, using Herschel's HIFI instrument. We detect C3 in absorption arising from the warm envelope surrounding the hot core, as indicated by the velocity peak position and shape of the line profile. The sensitivity does not allow to detect C3 absorption due to diffuse foreground clouds. From the column densities of the rotational levels in the vibrational ground state probed by the absorption we derive a rotation temperature (Trot) of ~50-70 K, which is a good measure of the kinetic temperature of the absorbing gas, as radiative transitions within the vibrational ground state are forbidden. It is also in good agreement with the dust temperatures for W31C and W49N. Applying the partition function correction based on the derived Trot, we get column densities N(C3) ~ 7-9 × 1014 cm-2 and abundance x(C3) ~ 10-8 with respect to H2. For W31C, using a radiative transfer model including far-infrared pumping by the dust continuum and a temperature gradient within the source along the line of sight we find that a model with x(C3) = 10-8, Tkin = 30-50 K, N(C3) = 1.5 × 1015 cm-2 fits the observations reasonably well and provides parameters in very good agreement with the simple excitation analysis. Appendix A (page 5) is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgHerschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  13. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  14. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV. PMID:24788809

  15. Analytic cross sections for 1 1S, to 1 1S to 2 1S, 1 1S to 2 1P transitions in helium by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukumar, C. V.; Faisal, F. H. M.

    1971-01-01

    The 1 1s yields 1 1s elastic and 1 1s yields 2 1s and 1 1s yields 2 excitation cross sections of Helium atoms by collision with a charged particle are obtained as analytic functions of incident velocity. The first order time dependent scattering theory is used. Numerical values of electron -He cross sections are obtained for incident energies in the range 30 eV to 800 eV and compared with earlier Born approximation calculations and with available experimental data. It is found that at 100 eV and above, the present results are in good agreement with the experimental results. They are also closer to the experimental results than the corresponding Born calculations.

  16. Protective effects of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a pulmonary cell line.

    PubMed

    Charão, Mariele F; Baierle, Marília; Gauer, Bruna; Goethel, Gabriela; Fracasso, Rafael; Paese, Karina; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Bubols, Guilherme B; Dias, Bruna B; Matte, Ursula S; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange C

    2015-06-01

    Many acute poisonings lack effective and specific antidotes. Due to both intentional and accidental exposures, paraquat (PQ) causes thousands of deaths annually, especially by pulmonary fibrosis. Melatonin (Mel), when incorporated into lipid-core nanocapsules (Mel-LNC), has enhanced antioxidant properties. The effects of such a formulation have not yet been studied with respect to mitigation of PQ- induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Here, we have tested whether Mel-LNC can ameliorate PQ-induced toxicity in the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. Physicochemical characterization of the formulations was performed. Cellular uptake was measured using nanocapsules marked with rhodamine B. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. The enzyme-modified comet assay with endonuclease III (Endo III) and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) were used to investigate oxidative DNA damage. Incubation with culture medium for 24h did not alter the granulometric profile of Mel-LNC formulations. Following treatment (3 and 24h), red fluorescence was detected around the cell nucleus, indicating internalization of the formulation. Melatonin solution (Mel), Mel-LNC, and LNC did not have significant effects on cell viability or DNA damage. Pre-treatment with Mel-LNC enhanced cell viability and showed a remarkable reduction in % DNA in tail compared to the PQ group; this was not observed in cells pre-treated with Mel. PQ induces oxidative DNA damage detected with the enzyme-modified comet assay. Mel-LNC reduced this damage more effectively than did Mel. In summary, Mel-LNC is better than Mel at protecting A549 cells from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PQ. PMID:26046970

  17. Bottom-Line Mentality as an Antecedent of Social Undermining and the Moderating Roles of Core Self-Evaluations and Conscientiousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbaum, Rebecca L.; Mawritz, Mary Bardes; Eissa, Gabi

    2012-01-01

    We propose that an employee's bottom-line mentality may have an important effect on social undermining behavior in organizations. Bottom-line mentality is defined as 1-dimensional thinking that revolves around securing bottom-line outcomes to the neglect of competing priorities. Across a series of studies, we establish an initial nomological…

  18. CRAY-1S integer vector utility library

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1982-06-01

    This report describes thirty-five integer or packed vector utility routines, and documents their testing. These routines perform various vector searches, linear algebra functions, memory resets, and vector boolean operations. They are written in CAL, the assembly language on the CRAY-1S computer. By utilizing the vector processing features of that machine, they are optimized in terms of run time. Each routine has been extensively tested.

  19. Manifestation of auger processes in C1 s-satellite spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Pesin, L. A.; Morilova, V. M.; Baitinger, E. M.

    2012-09-01

    Using the equipment of the Russian-German beamline of the synchrotron radiation at the BESSY II electron storage ring, satellite spectra accompanying the C1 s core lines in the cases of single-walled carbon nanotubes and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite have been measured with a high energy resolution. The Auger spectra corresponding to shaking of the valence system of carbon by the core vacancy have been found and investigated. The Auger spectra of the studied single-walled carbon nanotubes and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite are caused by annihilation of the excited π* electron with a hole in the π subband. It has been established that the electron states in the conduction band have 3π* (gT, K, M) symmetry; i.e., they correspond to flat 3π* subband, which is localized by 12-13 eV above the Fermi level. It has been revealed that the general regularities of the distribution of electron states in the valence system insignificantly change during its shake-up by the excited core.

  20. A silicon-on-glass single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) switching circuit integrated with a silicon-core metal-coated transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Liu, A. Q.; Oberhammer, J.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents a novel low-loss single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) switching circuit which integrates a silicon-core metal-coated coplanar waveguide (CPW) and two laterally moving switches in parallel. The circuit structure consists of single-crystal silicon as the core material and a thin layer of metal coated on the core surface to propagate the RF signal. The influences of the material property and the process variation on the RF performance of the silicon-core metal-coated CPW is analyzed in detail, including the silicon-core resistivity, the spreading metal on the substrate and the recess etching depth. Based on this analysis, the low-loss SPDT switching circuit is designed and fabricated using high-resistivity silicon (HRSi) as the core material and Pyrex 7740 glass as the substrate. The pull-in voltage of the laterally moving switch is 12.35 V. The insertion loss of the laterally moving switch is less than 1 dB up to 40 GHz. Both the return loss and the isolation are higher than 22 dB up to 40 GHz. The SPDT switching circuit has an insertion loss of less than 1 dB up to 22 GHz. The return loss is 17 dB and the isolation is 25 dB at 25 GHz. A silicon-on-glass (SOG)-based substrate-transfer micromachining process is developed for the SPDT switching circuit fabrication, which has the advantages of single mask, high design flexibility and low signal propagation losses.

  1. Photoionization of atomic chlorine above the 1S threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabi, Siamak; Starace, Anthony F.; Chang, T. N.

    1984-10-01

    The total photoionization cross section of the 3p subshell of atomic chlorine is presented with use of the recently developed open-shell transition-matrix method of Starace and Shahabi. The role of electron correlations is studied by comparison with Hartree-Fock and close-coupling calculations. In contrast to 3p-subshell photoionization of argon, it is shown that, in chlorine, final-state interchannel interactions are very strong while virtual pair excitations have a weak effect on the shape of the cross section, serving mainly to reduce the discrepancy between length and velocity results. Our results are compared in detail with other theoretical results above the 1S threshold as well as with experimental relative-intensity measurements at 584 Å. While our results are lower than the others at the 1S threshold (ℏω=0.6 a.u.), at photon energies ℏω>1 a.u., our geometric mean cross section is in essentially exact agreement with unrelaxed ionic core results of Brown, Carter, and Kelly and of Fielder and Armstrong.

  2. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  3. Isolation and characterization of ryudocan and syndecan heparan sulfate proteoglycans, core proteins, and cDNAs from a rat endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Shworak, N W; Kojima, T; Rosenberg, R D

    1993-03-01

    We have isolated heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) from cloned rat microvascular endothelial cells using a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, affinity fractionation with antithrombin III (AT III), and gel filtration in denaturing solvents. The anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGact) which bind tightly to AT III bear mainly anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate (HSact) whereas the anticoagulantly inactive heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGinact) possess mainly anticoagulantly inactive heparan sulfate (HSinact). The core proteins of HSPGact and HSPGinact were isolated by treatment with Flavobacterium heparitinase and purification by ion-exchange chromatography. SDS-PAGE showed that both sets of core proteins exhibited three major components with M(r) of 25-, 30-, and 50-kD, respectively. Peptide mapping revealed that HSPGact and HSPGinact possess extremely similar core proteins. The primary sequences of internal peptides obtained from HSPGinact core proteins and the NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the 25-kD component from the HSPGinact core proteins demonstrate that the 30-kD component is a previously unidentified species--designated as ryudocan--with the 25-kD component representing a proteolytic degradation product; while the 50-kD component is the rat homolog of syndecan [Saunders S, Jalkanen M, O'Farrell S, Bernfield M: J Cell Biol 1989; 108:1547-1556]. Specific oligonucleotide probes were obtained for ryudocan and syndecan by PCR, and the corresponding cDNAs were isolated from a RFP-EC library. The cDNAs encode type I integral membrane proteins of 202 and 313 amino acids, respectively, which have homologous transmembrane and intracellular domains but very distinct extracellular regions. In particular, ryudocan exhibits only 3 potential glycosaminoglycan (GAG) attachment sites within the extracellular region while syndecan has 5 GAG attachment sites within the same domain. The levels of ryudocan and syndecan mRNA were

  4. Ammonia in the hot core W 51-IRS2: 11 new maser lines and a maser component with a velocity drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Asiri, H.; Mauersberger, R.

    2013-01-01

    With the 100-m telescope at Effelsberg, 19 ammonia (NH3) maser lines have been detected toward the prominent massive star forming region W51-IRS2. Eleven of these inversion lines, the (J, K) = (6, 2), (5, 3), (7, 4), (8, 5), (7, 6), (7, 7), (9, 7), (10, 7), (9, 9), (10, 9), and (12, 12) transitions, are classified as masers for the first time in outer space. All detected masers are related to highly excited inversion doublets. The (5, 4) maser originates from an inversion doublet ~340 K above the ground state, while the (12, 12) transition, at ~1450 K, is the most highly excited NH3 maser line so far known. Strong variability is seen not only in ortho- but also in para-NH3 transitions. Bright narrow emission features are observed, for the first time, in (mostly) ortho-ammonia transitions, at VLSR ~ 45 km s-1, well separated from the quasi-thermal emission near 60 km s-1. These features were absent ~25 years ago and show a velocity drift of about +0.2 km s-1 yr-1. The component is likely related to the SiO maser source in W51-IRS2 and a possible scenario explaining the velocity drift is outlined. The 57 km s-1 component of the (9, 6) maser line is found to be strongly linearly polarised. Maser emission in the (J, K) to (J + 1, K) inversion doublets is strictly forbidden by selection rules for electric dipole transitions in the ground vibrational state. However, such pairs (and even triplets with (J + 2, K)) are common toward W51-IRS2. Similarities in line widths and velocities indicate that such groups of maser lines arise from the same regions, which can be explained by pumping through vibrational excitation. The large number of NH3 maser lines in W51-IRS2 is most likely related to the exceptionally high kinetic temperature and NH3 column density of this young massive star forming region.

  5. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  6. The Deuteration Clock for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, S.; Tan, J. C.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.

    2016-05-01

    To understand massive star formation requires study of its initial conditions. Two massive starless core candidates, C1-N & C1-S, have been detected in IRDC G028.37+00.07 in N2D+(3-2) with ALMA. From their line widths, either the cores are subvirial and are thus young structures on the verge of near free-fall collapse, or they are threaded by ˜1 mG B-fields that help support them in near virial equilibrium and potentially have older ages. We modeled the deuteration rate of N2H+ to constrain collapse rates of the cores. First, to measure their current deuterium fraction, D≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+], we observed multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ with CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m and IRAM 30 m, to complement the ALMA data. For both cores we derived D ˜ 0.3, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. We then carried out chemodynamical modeling, exploring how collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff, affects the level of D that is achieved from a given initial condition. To reach the observed D, most models require slow collapse with αff˜0.1, i.e., ˜1/10th of free-fall. This makes it more likely that the cores have been able to reach a near virial equilibrium state and we predict that strong B-fields will eventually be detected. The methods developed here will be useful for measurement of the pre-stellar core mass function.

  7. 1300 micron continuum and C18O line mapping of giant molecular cloud cores. II. W3, NGC 2264, NGC 6334I, RHO Ophiuchi and S140.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, P R; Snell, R L; Schloerb, F P

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present nearly simultaneous 1300 microns continuum and J = 2-1 C18O maps of the cores of five molecular clouds, W3, NGC 2264, NGC 6334I, rho Oph, and S140. The purpose of this experiment was to compare these two column density tracers. We find that dust continuum and C18O emission are equally effective tracers of column density in molecular cloud cores and give a good indication of cloud structure. When the maps are analyzed in terms of the quantity q = Q/[a rho RX(C18O)], we find that q does not vary by much more than an order of magnitude either within objects or from object to object, implying that nominal dust parameters of absorption efficiency, radius, and gas-to-dust ratio and CO abundance are on average correct in a variety of sources. We did detect source-to-source variations in q. This variation could be either in the dust-to-CO number density ratio or in grain parameters. These variations are not well correlated with total source luminosity, average or typical temperature, or total column density. The best example of this variation appears to be rho Oph where q is about a factor of 7 lower than is typically found. Our approach is analogous to the study of the A nu to CO ratio and is probably equivalent to extending this study to large A nu if the same grains are responsible for both optical opacity and far-infrared to millimeter-wave emission. There is no fundamental reason to expect A nu/NCO or q to be constant and, in fact, we have found that it is not constant in even a small source sample. PMID:11538349

  8. Solar UV flux measurements from the SBUV2 monitor on the NOAA9 satellite. Part 1: MG II H and K line core-to-wing ratios for 1986-1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Puga, L. C.; Barrett, J.; Bouwer, S. D.; Pap, J.; Stevens, D. E.; Tobiska, W. K.

    1994-12-01

    Analyses of the discrete-wavelength mode of observations of the solar full-disk MG 2 h and k line spectral irradiance measured by the Solar Backscatter UV Monitor (SBUV2) on the NOAA9 satellite are presented. Relative photometry techniques were used to derive a core-to-wing. This ratio has been modified, relative to that used by Heath and Schlesinger's (1986) classical MG 2 ratio derived for solar UV measurements made by their SBUV experiment aboard the Nimbus-7 satellite, to avoid inter-range instrumentation drifts encountered in the NOAA9 SBUV2 monitor. Prior research of the solar MG 2 h and k lines is reviewed. The raw measurements and observational parameters, such as the angle of the Sun as seen at the SBUV2 monitor are discussed. Temporal interpolations among the sets of discrete-mode measurements are used to account for most of the Sun-angle dependence and to reduce the sensitivity of the results to any errors in the Sun angles. Wavelength 'jitter' and long-term drift are studied, and intensity linearity and inter-range drift are analyzed. The NOAA9 results are compared with same-day Nimbus-7 data, the Kitt Peak Ca K1 angstrom index, the Canadian 10.7 cm solar radio flux, and observations of the solar H Lyman alpha line.

  9. The C 1s and N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of five azabenzenes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Vall-llosera, G; Gao, B; Kivimäki, A; Coreno, M; Alvarez Ruiz, J; de Simone, M; Agren, H; Rachlew, E

    2008-01-28

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been measured and interpreted by means of density functional theory for five different azabenzenes (pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine) in the gas phase. The experimental and theoretical spectra at the N 1s and C 1s edges show a strong resonance assigned to the transition of the 1s electron in the respective N or C atoms to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with pi(*) symmetry. As opposed to the N 1s edge, at the C 1s edge this resonance is split due to the different environments of the core hole atom in the molecule. The shift in atomic core-level energy due to a specific chemical environment is explained with the higher electronegativity of the N atom compared to the C atom. The remaining resonances below the ionization potential (IP) are assigned to sigma or pi [corrected] orbitals with mixed valence/Rydberg [corrected] character. Upon N addition, a reduction of intensity is observed in the Rydberg region at both edges as compared to the intensity in the continuum. Above the IP one or more resonances are seen and ascribed here to transitions to sigma(*) orbitals. Calculating the experimental and theoretical Delta(pi) term values at both edges, we observe that they are almost the same within +/-1 eV as expected for isoelectronic bonded pairs. The term values of the pi(*) and sigma(*) resonances are discussed in terms of the total Z number of the atoms participating in the bond. PMID:18247958

  10. Measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in helium-like silicon.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, M; Myers, E G

    2002-01-14

    Using Doppler-tuned fast-beam laser spectroscopy the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ has been measured to be 7230.5(2) cm(-1). The experiment made use of a single-frequency Nd:YAG (1.319 microm) laser and a high-finesse optical buildup cavity. The result provides a precision test of modern relativistic and QED atomic theory. PMID:11801009

  11. On helium-like 1s2l-1snl prime transitions in solar flare spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Neupert, W. M.; Swartz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Expected wavelengths and intensities are computed for 1s2l-1snl prime transitions in helium-like ions of the abundant elements from oxygen to iron under coronal conditions. Probable observations of some of these lines in the spectra of solar flares are discussed, and attention is called to a possible reversal of singlet and triplet intensities as compared to laboratory observations.

  12. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  13. A fully automated and fast method using direct sample injection combined with fused-core column on-line SPE-HPLC for determination of ochratoxin A and citrinin in lager beers.

    PubMed

    Lhotská, Ivona; Šatínský, Dalibor; Havlíková, Lucie; Solich, Petr

    2016-05-01

    A new fast and sensitive method based on on-line solid-phase extraction on a fused-core precolumn coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection has been developed for ochratoxin A (OTA) and citrinin (CIT) determination in lager beer samples. Direct injection of 100 μL filtered beer samples into an on-line SPE-HPLC system enabled fast and effective sample extraction including separation in less than 6 min. Preconcentration of OTA and CIT from beer samples was performed on an Ascentis Express RP C18 guard column (5 × 4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 μm, with a mobile phase of methanol/0.5% aqueous acetic acid pH 2.8 (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1). The flow switch from extraction column to analytical column in back-flush mode was set at 2.0 min and the separation was performed on the fused-core column Ascentis Express Phenyl-Hexyl (100 × 4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 μm, with a mobile phase acetonitrile/0.5% aqueous acetic acid pH 2.8 in a gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) and temperature of 50 °C. Fluorescence excitation/emission detection wavelengths were set at 335/497 nm. The accuracy of the method, defined as the mean recoveries of OTA and CIT from light and dark beer samples, was in the range 98.3-102.1%. The method showed high sensitivity owing to on-line preconcentration; LOQ values were found to be 10 and 20 ng L(-1) for OTA and CIT, respectively. The found values of OTA and CIT in all tested light, dark and wheat beer samples were significantly below the maximum tolerable limits (3.0 μg kg(-1) for OTA and 2000 μg kg(-1) for CIT) set by the European Union. PMID:26993307

  14. Satellite structure in the Argon 1s photoelectron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    Atomic inner-shell photoelectron spectra typically display several relatively weak {open_quotes}satellite peaks{close_quotes} at higher ionization energy than the primary peak. Such satellite peaks are associated with final-state configurations corresponding to ionization of an inner-shell electron and excitation or ionization of one or more valence electrons. The observation of satellite peaks demonstrates that the independent-electron picture is inadequate to describe atomic structure and the photoionization process. The measured energies and intensities of photoelectron satellites provide sensitive tests of many-electron theoretical models. We recorded the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum on beam line X-24A at an X-ray energy of 3628 eV. The primary peak at 3206 eV ionization energy was recorded at an observed resolution of 1.8 eV (FWHM). The satellite structure shows remarkable similarity to that recorded in the suprathreshold region of the Ar K photoabsorption cross section, demonstrating the manner in which these techniques complement each other. Surprisingly, while the region just above the K threshold in Ar was the subject of several theoretical studies using multi-configuration calculations, we find good agreement between our results and those of Dyall and collaborators using a shake model.

  15. Excitation and Ionization in H(1s)-H(1s) Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Merle E.; Ritchie, A. Burke

    1999-07-15

    Hydrogen atom - hydrogen atom scattering is a prototype for many of the fundamental principles of atomic collisions. In this work we present an approximation to the H+H system for scattering in the intermediate energy regime of 1 to 100 keV. The approximation ignores electron exchange and two-electron excitation by assuming that one of the atoms is frozen in the 1s state. We allow for the evolution of the active electron by numerically solving the 3D Schroedinger equation. The results capture many features of the problem and are in harmony with recent theoretical studies. Excitation and ionization cross sections are computed and compared to other theory and experiment. New insight into the mechanism of excitation and ionization is inferred from the solutions.

  16. Improved measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 interval in heliumlike silicon.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Thomas R; Crosby, David N; Myers, Edmund G

    2008-06-20

    Using colinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy with copropagating and counter-propagating beams we have measured the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ with the result 7230.585(6) cm{-1}. The experiment made use of a dual-wavelength, high-finesse, power build-up cavity excited by single-frequency lasers at 1319 and 1450 nm. The result will provide a precision test of ab initio relativistic many-body atomic theory at moderate Z. PMID:18643579

  17. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  18. PRESTELLAR CORES IN THE COALSACK

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, M.; Cunningham, M.; Rathborne, J.; Walsh, W.; Butner, H. M. E-mail: mariac@phys.unsw.edu.au E-mail: wwalsh@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-09-10

    We present high spectral resolution millimeter mapped observations of seven prestellar cores in the Coalsack, including imaging in five optically thin molecular species of the kinematic structure of two of the densest cores, C2 and C4. Various collapse-critical indices are calculated; critical masses needed for collapse are consistently greater than those observed, the latter ranging from 0.4 to 2.4 M{sub sun}. The molecular emission in several of the cores shows line profiles with infall characteristics as well as elongated areas of increased line widths and reversals of center velocity gradients, implying that accretion disks may be forming.

  19. A Search for Invisible Decays of the Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-17

    We search for invisible decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B Factory. We select events containing the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable {Upsilon}(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} invisible) < 3.0 x 10{sup ?4} at the 90% confidence level.

  20. Search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-18

    We search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Upsilon(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Upsilon(1S) --> invisible) < 3.0 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:20366249

  1. Search for Invisible Decays of the Υ(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    We search for invisible decays of the Υ(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4×106 Υ(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Υ(3S)→π+π-Υ(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Υ(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→invisible)<3.0×10-4 at the 90% confidence level.

  2. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements. PMID:27294978

  3. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  4. Carbon 1s photoelectron spectroscopy of CF4 and CO: Search for chemical effects on the carbon 1s hole-state lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Thomas X.; Borve, Knut J.; Saethre, Leif J.; Bozek, John D.; Kukk, Edwin; Hahne, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, T. Darrah

    2002-06-01

    Carbon 1s photoelectron spectra for CF4 and CO have been measured at several photon energies near the carbon 1s threshold. The spectra have been analyzed in terms of the vibrational structure and the natural linewidth. For CO the vibrational structure shows evidence for anharmonicity in both the energy spacing and the intensity. Analysis of the results using an anharmonic model gives an equilibrium bond length for core-ionized CO that is 4.85 pm shorter than that of neutral CO. For CF4, the vibrational structure is very weak, and the analysis shows that the change in equilibrium CF bond length upon ionization is no more than 0.54 pm. Ab initio theoretical calculations give results in accord with these bond-length changes. The unusually small bond-length contraction in CF4 can be understood in terms of nonbonded fluorine-fluorine repulsion. The natural linewidth for core-ionized CO, 95plus-or-minus5 meV, is essentially the same as that of CH4. This result is in contrast with expectations based on the one-center model of Auger decay and earlier predictions based on semiempirical molecular orbital theory. More recent calculations indicate, however, that there is only a small difference between CO and CH4, in agreement with the observed result. For CF4, the natural linewidth is 77plus-or-minus6 meV. This value differs from that for CH4 in the direction expected from the electronegativities of hydrogen and fluorine, but is greater than the prediction based on semiempirical theory. The natural linewidth for CO with a carbon 1s electron excited to the 2pi resonance is 83 meV, which is significantly less than is found for core-ionized CO. Although this difference is supported by theoretical calculations, the direction of the difference is counterintuitive. An overview is presented of the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge on carbon 1s linewidths.

  5. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  6. Evaluation of two sub-2 μm stationary phases, core-shell and totally porous monodisperse, in the second dimension of on-line comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography, a case study: separation of milk peptides after expiration date.

    PubMed

    Sommella, Eduardo; Pepe, Giacomo; Ventre, Giovanni; Pagano, Francesco; Manfra, Michele; Pierri, Giuseppe; Ismail, Omar; Ciogli, Alessia; Campiglia, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Milk is a rich source of bioactive peptides of great interest for their healthy properties. These peptides are usually encrypted in the sequences of proteins and are released after time dependent proteolysis as very complex hydrolysates. In order to separate and identify the bioactive sequences, we developed an on-line comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography approach using the high performance combined with the ultra high performance conditions. A microbore reversed phase (C18 silica, 5 μm) column was employed in first dimension, while, in second dimension, two different UHPLC columns, packed with C18 silica, were tested: a new column based on monodisperse sub-2 μm fully porous particles with high surface area (50 mm × 3.0 mm, 1.9 μm d.p., from Supelco), and a column based on sub-2 μm core-shell particles (50 mm × 3.0 mm, 1.7μm d.p, from Phenomenex(®)). Both set-ups were compared, showing high peak capacity values with respect to a high efficiency monodimensional method, maintaining the same analysis time. Satisfactory selectivity was obtained through the use of different pH between the two dimension, while a very fast continuous shifted gradient in second dimension ensured a good employment of the 2D separation space. PMID:25498555

  7. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Long-range properties of 1 S bottomonium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Nora; Krein, Gastão; Tarrús Castellà, Jaume; Vairo, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of weakly coupled potential nonrelativistic QCD, we derive, first, an analytical expression for the chromopolarizability of 1 S bottomonium states in agreement with previous determinations. Then we use the QCD trace anomaly to obtain the two-pion production amplitude for the chromopolarizability operator and match the result to a chiral effective field theory with 1 S bottomonium states and pions as degrees of freedom. In this chiral effective field theory we compute some long-range properties of the 1 S bottomonium generated by the pion coupling such as the leading chiral logarithm to the 1 S bottomonium mass and the van der Waals potential between two 1 S bottomonium states. Both results improve on previously known expressions.

  9. Precision measurement of the (3 p-1 s) X-ray transition in muonic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotta, D.; Covita, D. S.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gorke, H.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Nekipelov, M.; Pomerantsev, V.; Popov, M.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schmid, Ph.; Simons, L. M.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-01-01

    The (3 p — 1 s) X-ray transition to the muonic hydrogen ground state was measured with a highresolution crystal spectrometer. The assumption of a statistical population of the hyperfine levels of the muonic hydrogen ground state was directly confirmed by the experiment and measured values for the hyperfine splitting can be reported. The measurement supplements studies on line broadening effects induced by Coulomb de-excitation hindering the direct extraction of the pion-nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium X-ray lines.

  10. Study of defects in insulators by the hybrid method with floating 1-s Gaussian basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. S.; Emery, L.; Brunet, G.; Leung, C. H.

    1984-02-01

    A hybrid method is developed for the study of electronic states of localized defects in insulators. In this method, the inner shells of an atom (or ion) are represented by the first few orders of the ion size terms, while the outmost s and p shells are treated exactly as in the extended ion model. By the use of floating 1-s Gaussians as basis functions for the defect states, it is shown that the various terms (Coulomb, exchange and overlap) for the outermost s and p shells can be accurately represented by simple interpolation forms. This hybrid method retains the essential features of the extended ion model, but is much more efficient to apply. The method is first applied to study the electronic structure of the atomic-type self-trapped excitons in solid Ne. The results are in good agreement with experiment. The stability of the electron-bubble state in solid Ne is examined by the same method. Electronic states of F-centers in alkali halides are also studied. In this case, the effect of core wavefunctions on the defect states is examined by employing two different sets of core wavefunctions in the calculation: (1) free ion core wavefunctions and (2) core wavefunctions of ions in the crystal. The latter set of core wavefunctions is found to give energies in better agreement with experiment. A preliminary study of the self-trapped excitons in alkali halides is also reported.

  11. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  12. ILC1s in Tissue Inflammation and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are innate immune cells that provide an early source of cytokines to initiate and tailor the immune response to the type of the encountered pathogen or insult. The group 1 ILCs are comprised of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and subsets of “unconventional NK cells,” termed ILC1s. Although cNK cells and ILC1s share many features, such as certain phenotypic markers and the ability to produce IFN-γ upon activation, it is now becoming apparent that these two subsets develop from different progenitors and show unique tissue distribution and functional characteristics. Recent studies have aimed at elucidating the individual contributions of cNK cells and ILC1s during protective host responses as well as during chronic inflammation. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the developmental origins as well as of the phenotypic and functional characteristics of ILC1s. PMID:27047491

  13. 1. S. Lucas, Photographer, 1934. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY. WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. S. Lucas, Photographer, 1934. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY. WEST SIDE JUDGE WILSON HOUSE, ANN ARBOR, MICH. - Judge R. S. Wilson House, East Ann & North Division Streets, Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, MI

  14. Calculation of the Cross-Section for the 1S-->2P Transition of an Electron Bubble in Helium II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2006-09-01

    In a recent paper, we have calculated the effect of thermal and zero-point fluctuations on the 1S to 1P optical transition of the electron bubble in superfluid helium. We obtained a line shape that was in good agreement with the experimental results of Grimes and Adams (Phys. Rev. 45, 2305 (1992)). Here we extend these calculations to consider the line shape for the 1S to 2P transition and compare the results with the data of Zipfel and Sanders.

  15. Analysis of magnesium XI line profiles from solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.; Cowan, R. D.; Felthauser, H.; Fenimore, E. E.; Hockaday, M. P.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Faucher, P.; Steenman-Clark, L.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution solar spectra of the Mg XI 1s2 1S0-1s2p 1P1 resonance line at 9.169 A and the associated nearby satellite lines obtained from two rocket-borne crystal spectrometer measurements are presented. Comparisons with two independent sets of theoretical calculations for the 1s2nl-1s2pnl dielectronic satellite lines with n = 3-7 indicate electron temperatures of 4-4.5 million K. Measured line widths indicate either that the ion temperature exceeds the electron temperature by about a million K or that about 28 km/s of turbulence is present.

  16. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  17. Lifetime of the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} Excited Level in Fe{sup 24+}

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Graf, A; Harris, C L; Hwang, D Q; Neill, P A

    2002-07-02

    Measurements of the spectrum of Fe{sup 24+} in the 1.845 {angstrom} to 1.885 {angstrom} range obtained on the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were used for determining the radiative lifetime of the ls2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} excited state. The spectrum contains electric dipole forbidden transitions at 1.855{angstrom} (''x'') and 1.868{angstrom} (''z'') whose lineshape is well represented by a Gaussian line profile and is assumed to be due primarily to Doppler and instrumental broadening. The Gaussian contribution is assumed to be the same for all lines in the spectrum. This assumption simplifies the problem when considering a more complex combination of broadening mechanisms. For allowed transitions such as 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} {yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}, ''w'', at 1.850 {angstrom} we assume a Voigt profile. In the simplest case this combines both natural (Lorentzian) and Doppler (Gaussian) broadening effects which contribute to the width of the spectral line. With the Gaussian contribution determined from lines ''x'' and ''z'', deconvolving the Gaussian from the Voigt profile gives the natural line width. This then is directly related to the radiative lifetime of the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} excited level.

  18. Molecular Orbital Simulations of Metal 1s2p Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Källman, Erik; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-07-28

    For first-row transition metals, high-resolution 3d electronic structure information can be obtained using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). In the hard X-ray region, a K pre-edge (1s→3d) excitation can be followed by monitoring the dipole-allowed Kα (2p→1s) or Kβ (3p→1s) emission, processes labeled 1s2p or 1s3p RIXS. Here the restricted active space (RAS) approach, which is a molecular orbital method, is used for the first time to study hard X-ray RIXS processes. This is achieved by including the two sets of core orbitals in different partitions of the active space. Transition intensities are calculated using both first- and second-order expansions of the wave vector, including, but not limited to, electric dipoles and quadrupoles. The accuracy of the approach is tested for 1s2p RIXS of iron hexacyanides [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. RAS simulations accurately describe the multiplet structures and the role of 2p and 3d spin-orbit coupling on energies and selection rules. Compared to experiment, relative energies of the two [Fe(CN)6](3-) resonances deviate by 0.2 eV in both incident energy and energy transfer directions, and multiplet splittings in [Fe(CN)6](4-) are reproduced within 0.1 eV. These values are similar to what can be expected for valence excitations. The development opens the modeling of hard X-ray scattering processes for both solution catalysts and enzymatic systems. PMID:27398775

  19. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  20. A Unique Role of GATA1s in Down Syndrome Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia Biology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Balci, Tugce B.; Berman, Jason N.; Dellaire, Graham; Xie, Chengzhi; Buck, Steven A.; Matherly, Larry H.; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) in Down syndrome (DS) children is uniformly associated with somatic GATA1 mutations, which result in the synthesis of a shorter protein (GATA1s) with altered transactivation activity compared to the wild-type GATA1. It is not fully established whether leukemogenesis and therapeutic responses in DS AMkL patients are due to loss of the wild-type GATA1 or due to a unique function of GATA1s. Methodology Stable clones of CMK cells with decreased GATA1s or Bcl-2 levels were generated by using GATA1- or BCL-2-specific lentivirus shRNAs. In vitro ara-C, daunorubicin, and VP-16 cytotoxicities of the shRNA stable clones were determined by using the Cell Titer-blue reagent. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Changes in gene transcript levels were determined by gene expression microarray and/or real-time RT-PCR. Changes in protein levels were measured by Western blotting. In vivo binding of GATA1s to IL1A promoter was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Results Lentivirus shRNA knockdown of the GATA1 gene in the DS AMkL cell line, CMK (harbors a mutated GATA1 gene and only expresses GATA1s), resulting in lower GATA1s protein levels, promoted cell differentiation towards the megakaryocytic lineage and repressed cell proliferation. Increased basal apoptosis and sensitivities to ara-C, daunorubicin, and VP-16 accompanied by down-regulated Bcl-2 were also detected in the CMK GATA1 shRNA knockdown clones. Essentially the same results were obtained when Bcl-2 was knocked down with lentivirus shRNA in CMK cells. Besides Bcl-2, down-regulation of GATA1s also resulted in altered expression of genes (e.g., IL1A, PF4, and TUBB1) related to cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest that GATA1s may facilitate leukemogenesis and potentially impact therapeutic responses in DS AMkL by promoting proliferation and survival, and by repressing

  1. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  5. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn-Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone-Thrower-Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature. PMID:24605278

  6. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    Summary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn–Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone–Thrower–Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature. PMID:24605278

  7. KILOPARSEC-SCALE RADIO STRUCTURES IN NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Kino, Motoki; Nagira, Hiroshi; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Asada, Keiichi

    2012-11-20

    We report the finding of kiloparsec (kpc)-scale radio structures in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters of the Very Large Array, which increases the number of known radio-loud NLS1s with kpc-scale structures to six, including two {gamma}-ray-emitting NLS1s (PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The detection rate of extended radio emissions in NLS1s is lower than that in broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a statistical significance. We found both core-dominated (blazar-like) and lobe-dominated (radio-galaxy-like) radio structures in these six NLS1s, which can be understood in the framework of the unified scheme of radio-loud AGNs that considers radio galaxies as non-beamed parent populations of blazars. Five of the six NLS1s have (1) extended radio luminosities suggesting jet kinetic powers of {approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}, which is sufficient to make jets escape from hosts' dense environments; (2) black holes of {approx}> 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }, which can generate the necessary jet powers from near-Eddington mass accretion; and (3) two-sided radio structures at kpc scales, requiring expansion rates of {approx}0.01c-0.3c and kinematic ages of {approx}> 10{sup 7} years. On the other hand, most typical NLS1s would be driven by black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun} in a limited lifetime of {approx}10{sup 7} years. Hence, the kpc-scale radio structures may originate in a small window of opportunity during the final stage of the NLS1 phase just before growing into broad-line AGNs.

  8. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  9. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  10. Molecular-Frame Angular Distributions of Resonant CO:C(1s) Auger Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rolles, D.; Pesic, Z. D.; Dumitriu, I.; Pruemper, G.; Fukuzawa, H.; Liu, X.-J.; Ueda, K.; Fink, R. F.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Berrah, N.

    2008-12-31

    The molecular-frame angular distributions of resonantly excited CO:C(1s){yields}{pi}* Auger electrons were determined using angle-resolved electron-ion coincidence spectroscopy in combination with a novel transformation procedure. Our new methodology yields full three-dimensional electron angular distributions with high energy resolution from the measurement of electrons at only two angles. The experimentally determined distributions are well reproduced by calculations performed in a simple one-center approximation, allowing an unambiguous identification of several overlapping Auger lines.

  11. Observation of $\\Upsilon(4S) decays to$\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-19

    The authors present the first measurement of {Upsilon}(4S) decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(2S) based on a sample of 230 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. They measure the product branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (2.23 {+-} 0.25{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (1.69 {+-} 0.26{sub stat} {+-} 0.20{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6}, from which they derive the partial widths {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) = (1.8 {+-} 0.4) keV and {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) = (2.7 {+-} 0.8) keV.

  12. Infrared and Submilllimeter Studies of Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.

    2014-07-01

    Dense Cores are the birthplace of stars, and so understanding their structure and evolution is key to understanding star formation. Information on the density, temperature, and motions within cores are needed to describe these properties, and are obtained through continuum and line observations at far infrared and submm/mm wavelengths. Recent observations of dust emission with Herschel and molecular line observations with single-dish telescopes and interferometers provide the wavelength coverage and resolution to finally map core properties without appealing to spherical simplifications. Although large scale Herschel observations reveal numerous filaments in molecular clouds which are well described by cylindrical geometries, cores are still modeled as spherical entities. A few examples of other core geometries exist in the literature, and the wealth of new data on cloud filaments demand that non-spherical models receive more attention in future studies. This talk will examine the evidence for non-spherical cores and their connection to the filaments from which they form.

  13. Expression of the Novel Hepatitis C Virus Core+1/ARF Protein in the Context of JFH1-Based Replicons

    PubMed Central

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Vassilaki, Niki; Sakellariou, Panagiotis; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus contains a second open reading frame within the core gene, designated core+1/ARF. Here we demonstrate for the first time expression of core+1/ARF protein in the context of a bicistronic JFH1-based replicon and report the production of two isoforms, core+1/L (long) and core+1/S (short), with different kinetics. PMID:25694591

  14. O1s photoionization dynamics in oriented NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stener, Mauro; Decleva, Piero; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yagishita, Akira

    2011-05-01

    We have performed extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations, partial cross sections, dipole prepared continuum orbitals, dipole amplitudes and phase shifts, asymmetry parameters β, and molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions, to elucidate the O1s photoionization dynamics of NO2 molecule with emphasis on the shape resonances in the O1s ionization continuum. In the shape resonance region, the β parameters and photoelectron angular distributions have been compared with our experimental results. Fairly good agreement between the theory and experiment has confirmed that the DFT level calculations can well describe the photoionization dynamics of the simple molecule such as NO2. Interference due to equivalent atom photoionization is theoretically considered, and the possibility of detection of the effect in the two degenerate channels with different combinations of light polarization and photoemission direction is discussed.

  15. An emerging model for BAP1's role in regulating cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Eletr, Ziad M; Wilkinson, Keith D

    2011-06-01

    BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) is a 729 residue, nuclear-localized deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that displays tumor suppressor properties in the BAP1-null NCI-H226 lung carcinoma cell line. Studies that have altered BAP1 cellular levels or enzymatic activity have reported defects in cell cycle progression, notably at the G1/S transition. Recently BAP1 was shown to associate with the transcriptional regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1). The BAP1/HCF-1 interaction is mediated by the HCF-1 Kelch domain and an HCF-1 binding motif (HBM) within BAP1. HCF-1 is modified with ubiquitin in vivo, and ectopic studies suggest BAP1 deubiquitinates HCF-1. HCF-1 is a chromatin-associated protein thought to both activate and repress transcription by linking appropriate histone-modifying enzymes to a subset of transcription factors. One known role of HCF-1 is to promote cell cycle progression at the G1/S boundary by recruiting H3K4 histone methyltransferases to the E2F1 transcription factor so that genes required for S-phase can be transcribed. Given the robust associations between BAP1/HCF-1 and HCF-1/E2Fs, it is reasonable to speculate that BAP1 influences cell proliferation at G1/S by co-regulating transcription from HCF-1/E2F-governed promoters. PMID:21484256

  16. MicroRNA-224 Induces G1/S Checkpoint Release in Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Fangmei; Olaru, Alexandru V.; Mezey, Esteban; Xie, Qing; Li, Ling; Piontek, Klaus B.; Selaru, Florin M.

    2015-01-01

    Profound changes in microRNA (miR) expression levels are frequently found in liver cancers compared to the normal liver. In this study, we evaluate the expression of miR-224 in human HCC and CCA, as well as its downstream targets and affected pathways. We show that miR-224 is upregulated in a large cohort of human CCA, similar to its upregulation in human HCC. For the purpose of studying the roles of miR-224 in HCC and CCA, we enforced miR-224 expression in cells. mRNA arrays followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA)-identified putative molecules and pathways downstream of miR-224. Phenotypically, we report that enforced expression of miR-224 increases the growth rate of normal cholangiocytes, CCA cell lines, and HCC cell lines. In addition, we identified, in an unbiased fashion, that one of the major biologic processes affected by miR-224 is Gap1 (G1) to Synthesis (S) transition checkpoint release. We next identified p21, p15, and CCNE1 as downstream targets of miR-224 and confirmed the coordinated downregulation results in the increased phosphorylation of Retinoblastoma (Rb) with resulting G1/S checkpoint release. Our data suggest that miR-224 is a master regulator of cell cycle progression, and that its overexpression results in G1/S checkpoint release followed by accelerated cell growth. PMID:26343737

  17. POPDC1(S201F) causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Roland F R; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain-containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane-localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1(S201F) displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1(S201F) and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1(S201F) in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1(S191F)) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  18. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1S201F displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1S201F and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1S201F in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1S191F) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  19. Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cherbas, Lucy; Gong, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We review the properties and uses of cell lines in Drosophila research, emphasizing the variety of lines, the large body of genomic and transcriptional data available for many of the lines, and the variety of ways the lines have been used to provide tools for and insights into the developmental, molecular, and cell biology of Drosophila and mammals. PMID:24434506

  20. Metallic nanoshells with semiconductor cores: optical characteristics modified by core medium properties.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Rizia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Ali, Tamer; Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-26

    It is well-known that the geometry of a nanoshell controls the resonance frequencies of its plasmon modes; however, the properties of the core material also strongly influence its optical properties. Here we report the synthesis of Au nanoshells with semiconductor cores of cuprous oxide and examine their optical characteristics. This material system allows us to systematically examine the role of core material on nanoshell optical properties, comparing Cu(2)O core nanoshells (ε(c) ∼ 7) to lower core dielectric constant SiO(2) core nanoshells (ε(c) = 2) and higher dielectric constant mixed valency iron oxide nanoshells (ε(c) = 12). Increasing the core dielectric constant increases nanoparticle absorption efficiency, reduces plasmon line width, and modifies plasmon energies. Modifying the core medium provides an additional means of tailoring both the near- and far-field optical properties in this unique nanoparticle system. PMID:20860401

  1. Photoexcitation and Auger decay of the Renner-Teller split C 1s{sup -1} {pi}{sub u}{sup *} state in CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Bozek, J. D.; Berrah, N.

    2000-09-01

    The broad ({approx_equal}700 meV) C 1s{yields}{pi}{sub u}{sup *} resonance in the absorption spectrum of CO{sub 2} has been decomposed into contributions from two Renner-Teller split core-excited states with bent and linear equilibrium geometries using resonant Auger spectroscopy. The C 1s{sup -1} {pi}{sup *} excited state was found to decay primarily via participator Auger transitions to the A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u} state of CO{sub 2}{sup +}. Analysis of the vibrational structure in the high-resolution Auger spectra, measured at several photon energies across the broad C 1s{yields}{pi}{sub u}{sup *} resonance, was accomplished using calculated Franck-Condon factors for the electronic excitation and de-excitation processes. Estimations of the geometries of the Renner-Teller split core-excited states were obtained from a comparison of the calculations with the resonant Auger spectra. Transitions to the bent core-excited state were found to contribute to the absorption profile exclusively at the photon energies below the maximum of the C 1s{yields}{pi}{sub u}{sup *} resonance, whereas the linear core-excited state becomes accessible at higher photon energies. The symmetric stretch vibrational progression of the linear core-excited state was identified and assigned. The minimum of the potential energy surface of the C 1s{sup -1}{pi}{sup *} core-excited state at its linear configuration was estimated to be 290.4 eV above the ground vibrational level of the ground electronic state of CO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Upregulation of fractalkine contributes to the proliferative response of prostate cancer cells to hypoxia via promoting the G1/S phase transition

    PubMed Central

    TANG, JIEBING; CHEN, YUANYUAN; CUI, RONGJUN; LI, DONG; XIAO, LIJIE; LIN, PING; DU, YANDAN; SUN, HUI; YU, XIAOGUANG; ZHENG, XIULAN

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common phenomenon in prostate cancer, which leads to cell proliferation and tumor growth. Fractalkine (FKN) is a membrane-bound chemokine, which is implicated in the progression of human prostate cancer and skeletal metastasis. However, the association between FKN and hypoxia-induced prostate cancer cell proliferation remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that hypoxia induced the expression and secretion of FKN in the DU145 prostate cancer cell line. Furthermore, inhibiting the activity of FKN with the anti-FKN FKN-specific antibody markedly inhibited hypoxia-induced DU145 cell proliferation. Under normoxic conditions, DU145 cell proliferation markedly increased following exogenous administration of human recombinant FKN protein, and the increase was significantly alleviated by anti-FKN, indicating the importance of FKN in DU145 cell proliferation. In addition, subsequent determination of cell cycle distribution and expression levels of two core cell cycle regulators, cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, suggested that FKN promoted the G1/S phase transition by upregulating the expression levels of cyclin E and CDK2. The results of the present study demonstrated that hypoxia led to the upregulation of the secretion and expression of FKN, which enhanced cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle progression in the prostate cancer cells. These findings provide evidence of a novel function for FKN, and suggest that FKN may serve as a potential target for treating androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:26496926

  3. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters. PMID:27464191

  4. New insights into the functions of intersectin-1s

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Bardita, Cristina; Predescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein known as a scaffold and regulator of the general endocytic machinery as well as a critical integrator of cellular signaling pathways. We showed recently that ITSN deficiency triggers a transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Alk5 signaling switch, from the canonical Smad 2/3 to the Erk1/2 MAPK pathway; moreover, endocytic impairment induced by ITSN deficiency enhances Alk5 ubiquitination and degradation and elicits TGFβ-paracrine effects mediated by circulating microparticles, leading to endothelial cell survival and increased proliferation. The studies expand our understanding of how ITSN facilitates cross-regulation of signaling pathways and provide insights into the involvement of ITSN deficiency in human disease. PMID:26479042

  5. New insights into the functions of intersectin-1s.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda; Bardita, Cristina; Predescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein known as a scaffold and regulator of the general endocytic machinery as well as a critical integrator of cellular signaling pathways. We showed recently that ITSN deficiency triggers a transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Alk5 signaling switch, from the canonical Smad 2/3 to the Erk1/2 MAPK pathway; moreover, endocytic impairment induced by ITSN deficiency enhances Alk5 ubiquitination and degradation and elicits TGFβ-paracrine effects mediated by circulating microparticles, leading to endothelial cell survival and increased proliferation. The studies expand our understanding of how ITSN facilitates cross-regulation of signaling pathways and provide insights into the involvement of ITSN deficiency in human disease. PMID:26479042

  6. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P. E. G.; Barr, J. R. M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M. G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G. H.; Ferguson, A. I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V. W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B. E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; Putlitz, G. zu; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P. G. H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W. T.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}S1/2-2{sup 2}S1/2 frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P.E.G.; Barr, J.R.M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M.G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G.H.; Ferguson, A.I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V.W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B.E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; zu Putlitz, G.; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P.G.H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W.T.; Towrie, M.; Willmann, L.; Woodle, K.A.; Woodman, G.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2}{minus}2{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2} frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  8. Degenerative Sacrolisthesis of S1-S2: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, Thakre Kunwar; Issac, Thomas; Swamy, B Mallikarjuna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is usually seen at L4-L5 level and less frequently at L5-S1 level. This is a rare case report of spondylolisthesis of S1 over S2 with lumbarization of S1. Lumbarization of S1 is seen in just 1-2% of the population and to have spondylolisthesis in this segment is even rarer. The purpose is to report a rare case of DS at S1-S2 level. Case Report: This is a single case report of a 66-year-old gentleman who presented with complains of lower backache for 2 years and acute retention of urine to the emergency department. Detailed clinical and radiological evaluation of the spine was done which revealed lumbarization of S1 with spondylolisthesis at S1-S2 and facetal hypertrophy at L5, S1, and S2. He underwent decompression and stabilization at L5, S1, and S2 along with placement of autologous bone graft. The bladder symptoms disappeared after 3 weeks. At 1-year follow-up, patient’s clinical symptoms were relieved, and he improved clinically. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is probably the first case of DS of sacral vertebrae to be reported in English literature. The prevalence of complete lumbarization is around 1.8% and to get spondylolisthesis in this segment is even rarer, hence the lack of literature in this regard. Since this is the first of its kind of case, further case series or longitudinal studies of such cases may help understand better the pathomechanics related to spondylolisthesis at this level. PMID:27299082

  9. Dislocation core fields and forces in FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2004-04-01

    Atomistic models were used to obtain dislocation core fields for edge, screw, and mixed dislocations in Al and Cu using EAM. Core fields are analyzed using a line force dipole representation, with dilatant and dipole terms. The core field contribution to the force between dislocations is shown to be significant for interactions within 50b.

  10. Measure Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissman, Sally

    2011-01-01

    One tool for enhancing students' work with data in the science classroom is the measure line. As a coteacher and curriculum developer for The Inquiry Project, the author has seen how measure lines--a number line in which the numbers refer to units of measure--help students not only represent data but also analyze it in ways that generate…

  11. Production of O/1S/ from photodissociation of carbon dioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    The production efficiency was measured with the aid of a method based on the detection of the OI (5577 A) 'green' line. A sodium salicylate screen was used to monitor the intensity of the photons. Measurements at each of several individual wavelengths are conducted. The relative production efficiencies are shown in a graph. The absolute scale for the efficiency was determined in essentially the same way as in the Cameron band work reported by Lawrence (1972).

  12. Core-size-dependent catalytic properties of bimetallic Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Kundu, Simanta; Patra, Amitava

    2014-12-24

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials because of their potential applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate and photonics etc. Here, we have synthesized Au/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles with varying the core diameter. The red-shifting of the both plasmonic peaks of Ag and Au confirms the core-shell structure of the nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, line scan EDS measurement and UV-vis study confirm the formation of core-shell nanoparticles. We have examined the catalytic activity of these core-shell nanostructures in the reaction between 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and NaBH4 to form 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and the efficiency of the catalytic reaction is found to be increased with increasing the core size of Au/Ag core-shell nanocrystals. The catalytic efficiency varies from 41.8 to 96.5% with varying core size from 10 to 100 nm of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, and the Au100/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticle is found to be 12-fold more active than that of the pure Au nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter. Thus, the catalytic properties of the metal nanoparticles are significantly enhanced because of the Au/Ag core-shell structure, and the rate is dependent on the size of the core of the nanoparticles. PMID:25456348

  13. Ionization energies and term energies of the ground states 1s22s of lithium-like systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    We extend the Hamiltonian method of the full-core plus correlation (FCPC) by minimizing the expectation value to calculate the non-relativistic energies and the wave functions of 1s22s states for the lithium-like systems from Z = 41 to 50. The mass-polarization and the relativistic corrections including the kinetic-energy correction, the Darwin term, the electron—electron contact term, and the orbit—orbit interaction are calculated perturbatively as first-order correction. The contribution from quantum electrodynamic (QED) is also explored by using the effective nuclear charge formula. The ionization potential and term energies of the ground states 1s22s are derived and compared with other theoretical calculation results. It is shown that the FCPC methods are also effective for theoretical calculation of the ionic structure for high nuclear ion of lithium-like systems.

  14. Inflow Models of Nearby Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz, David; De Vries, C. H.; Arce, H. G.

    2012-01-01

    We obtained observations of nearby (d < 300 pc) isolated pre-stellar and Class 0 cores from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The optically thick HCO+ J=3-2 rotational transition was observed in order to detect the blue-asymmetric infall signature often seen in pre-stellar cores. The asymmetric spectral line profiles were analyzed by using a 1-D radiative transfer model that assumes a uniform infall velocity and a realistic radial excitation profile. The model is able to reproduce the asymmetric line profile in most cases by varying only 5 physical cloud parameters. The analysis was used to obtain a reliable estimate of the infall rate. The sources presented here and observed in the HCO+ J=3-2 rotational transition were B228, CB130 SMM2, OPH MM 126, and RCRA SMM1A. Analysis of these spectra yielded some unexpected results. Our analysis did a good job at fitting the spectral lines in some sources while it performed poorly for others. We observed infall velocities ranging from -1.1, indicating expansion, to 0.4 km/s in these sources and found line center optical depths ranging from 0.03 to 520. The peak excitation temperature for the HCO+ J=3-2 transition was found to range from 3 to 57 K.

  15. Geometrical information on core-excited states obtained from interference quenching of vibrational states in resonant x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Baev, A.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Aagren, H.; Feifel, R.; Baessler, M.; Miron, C.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Karlsson, L.; Svensson, S.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Sorensen, S.L.; Naves de Brito, A.

    2003-02-01

    An interference quenching of the m=1 final state vibrational line in the resonant Auger decay of N 1s{yields}{pi}{sup *} core-excited N{sub 2} is observed and analyzed. The intensity ratio between the m=1 and m=0 vibrational levels of the X {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} final state shows a surprising nonmonotonic variation as a function of frequency detuning, going through a minimum with a complete suppression of m=1. We have developed a simple model which indicates a linear relation between the value of the detuning frequency for this minimum and the equilibrium bond distance of the core-excited state. This implies the possibility of determining the equilibrium bond distances for core-excited states to a high degree of accuracy. Simultaneously with the simple model we present a strict theory of the studied effect. This strict theory allows us to explore the accuracy of determining the bond length of the core-excited state from resonant Auger spectra. We obtain a weak influence of the core-hole lifetime on the determined bond length, whereas the number of intermediate vibrational states accounted for in the numerical simulations seems to be quite important.

  16. Calculation of the Cross-Section for the 1S{yields}2P Transition of an Electron Bubble in Helium II

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2006-09-07

    In a recent paper, we have calculated the effect of thermal and zero-point fluctuations on the 1S to 1P optical transition of the electron bubble in superfluid helium. We obtained a line shape that was in good agreement with the experimental results of Grimes and Adams (Phys. Rev. 45, 2305 (1992)). Here we extend these calculations to consider the line shape for the 1S to 2P transition and compare the results with the data of Zipfel and Sanders.

  17. Single site double core level ionisation of OCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, L.; Tashiro, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ehara, M.; Ueda, K.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.

    2014-08-01

    Single site O1s, C1s and S2p double ionisation of the OCS molecule has been investigated using a magnetic bottle multi-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer. Photon energies of 1300, 750 and 520 eV, respectively, were used for the ionisation, and spectra were obtained from which the double core ionisation energies could be determined. The energies measured for 1s double ionisation are 1172 eV (O1s-2) and 659 eV (C1s-2). For the S2p double ionisation three dicationic states are expected, 3P, 1D and 1S. The ionisation energies obtained for these states are 373 eV (3P), 380 eV (1D) and 388 eV (1S). The ratio between the double and single core ionisation energies are in all cases equal or close to 2.20. Auger spectra of OCS, associated with the O1s-2, C1s-2 and S2p-2 dicationic states, were also recorded incorporating both electrons emitted as a result of the filling of the two core vacancies. As for other small molecules, the spectra show an atomic-like character with Auger bands located in the range 480-560 eV for oxygen, 235-295 eV for carbon and 100-160 eV for sulphur. The interpretation of the spectra is supported by CASSCF and CASCI calculations. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 3.7 × 10-4 for oxygen at 1300 eV, 3.7 × 10-4 for carbon at 750 eV and as 2.2 × 10-3 for sulphur at 520 eV.

  18. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Lee, Chang Won; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-06-01

    We present results of our study of eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3–160 μm) imaging observations with the AKARI telescope and molecular line (HCN and N2H+) mapping observations with the KVN telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to millimeter continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosities of ∼0.3–4.4 L ⊙. The other six cores are found to remain starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3–6 K toward the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an overdominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory motion, probably due to the external heating. Most of the starless cores show a coreshine effect due to the scattering of light by the micron-sized dust grains. This may imply that the age of the cores is of the order of ∼105 years, which is consistent with the timescale required for the cores to evolve into an oscillatory stage due to external perturbation. Our observational results support the idea that the external feedback from nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields may play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the cores.

  19. Counterrotating core in IC 1459

    SciTech Connect

    Franx, M.; Illingworth, G.D.

    1988-04-01

    The radio elliptical IC 1459 is shown to have a massive rapidly counterrotating stellar core. Along the major axis a strong peak in the rotational velocity is observed at a distance of 2 arcsec (0.3 kpc) from the center. The velocity reaches 170 + or - 20 km/s. The rotational velocity in the outer parts rises to 45 + or - 8 km/s, but in the opposite sense to the rotation of the center. Along the minor axis, no significant rotation is measured, neither in the center nor in the outer parts. Line profiles derived from cross-correlated spectra along the major axis in the core show a clear asymmetry. Ionized gas rotates around the minor axis in the same sense as the outer part of the galaxy. The other properties are typical of normal ellipticals. The galaxy has a regular color gradient and line strength gradient. The mass of the counterrotating component is estimated to be about 10 to the 10th solar masses. It is postulated that such a core could form, following the merger of two galaxies, either by the tidal disruption of the victim or through a starburst-like event. 27 references.

  20. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  1. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-10

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed {approx}10{sup 3} yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  2. Fast Fossil Rotation of Neutron Star Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed ~103 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  3. Occupied and unoccupied orbitals of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} probed with C 1s emission and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the orbital structure of the fullerenes, and to pursue its evolution from a cluster to the infinite solid. For obtaining a complete picture of the electronic structure the authors compare a variety of experimental techniques, i.e. photoemission and core level emission for occupied orbitals and inverse photoemission and core level absorption for unoccupied orbitals. Their experimental results focus on optical probes involving the C 1s core level, i.e. absorption via transitions from the C 1s level into unoccupied {pi}* and {sigma}* orbitals and emission involving transitions from occupied orbitals into a C 1s hole. Due to the simplicity of the C 1s level there exist clear selection rules. For example, only transitions to and from orbitals with p-character are dipole-allowed. These results on the p-projected density of states are compared with inverse photoemission and photoemission results, where the selection rules are less definitive. In addition, a first-principles quasiparticle calculation of the density of states is used to assign the orbital features. The spectra from C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} are still far from their infinite analog, i.e., graphite, which is also measured with the same techniques. In order to determine the effect of electron transfer onto C{sub 60}, as in superconducting alkali fullerides, the authors are studying resonant emission of C{sub 60}. An electron is placed in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) by optical absorption from the C 1s level and the C 1s emission detected in the presence of this spectator electron.

  4. Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J-W.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Anderson, J. K.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2007-08-15

    The emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam is investigated in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 1991]. Predicted He I line intensities and line ratios from a recently developed collisional-radiative model are compared with experiment. The intensity of singlet lines comes mostly (>95%) from the contribution of the ground state population and is very weakly dependent on the initial metastable fraction at the observation point in the plasma core. On the other hand, the intensity of triplet lines is strongly affected by the local metastable state (2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S) populations and the initial metastable fraction plays an important role in determining line intensities. The fraction of local metastable states can only be estimated by making use of electron temperature (T{sub e}), electron density (n{sub e}), and effective ion charge (Z{sub eff}) profiles as inputs to the population balance equations. This leads triplet lines to be unusable for the investigation of their local plasma parameter dependence. The ratio of singlet lines at 667.8 nm and 492.2 nm (I{sub 667}/I{sub 492}) as well as the ratio of 667.8 nm and 501.6 nm lines (I{sub 667}/I{sub 501}) has been investigated for the dependence on T{sub e} and n{sub e} both theoretically and experimentally. I{sub 667}/I{sub 492} shows strong dependence on n{sub e} with weak sensitivity to T{sub e}. Measurements and predictions agree quantitatively within a factor of 2. There has been no ratio of singlet lines identified to have strong enough T{sub e} dependence yet. The ratios are expected to be reasonably insensitive to the variation of Z{sub eff}.

  5. Chemical Evolution of Infrared Dark Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Susanna C.; Jackson, J. M.; Chambers, E. T.; Rathborne, J. M.; Simon, R.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are molecular clouds seen as extinction features against the mid-infrared Galactic background. Studies of IRDCs have shown them to be cold (< 25 K), dense (> 10^5 cm^-3), and have very high column densities ( 10^23-10^25 cm^-2, e.g., Egan et al. 1998; Carey et al. 1998, 2000). IRDCs host the earliest stages of high-mass star and cluster formation (Rathborne et al. 2005, 2006, 2007). We have mapped 59 IRDC protostellar cores in the fourth Galactic quadrant using the ATNF Mopra telescope simultaneously in HCN (1-0), HC3N (10-9), HCO+ (1-0), HNC (1-0), N2H+ (1-0), and SiO (2-1). We found that the ratios of intensities of the different molecular tracers vary greatly from cloud to cloud, and from core to core within clouds. These different line ratios probably correspond to chemical differences which arise in different evolutionary sequences. We show that specific line ratios distinguish cold pre-stellar cores from warm star-forming cores. N2H+ was found to be a good tracer of active star-forming cores, correlating well with cores containing "green fuzzies,” i.e., extended 4.5 micron emission due to shocked gas (Chambers et al., in press). This work was funded by NSF grant AST-0808001.

  6. Core hysteresis in nematic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2002-08-01

    We study field-induced transformations in the biaxial core of a nematic disclination with strength m=1, employing the Landau-de Gennes order tensor parameter Q. We first consider the transition from the defectless escaped radial structure into the structure hosting a line defect with a negative uniaxial order parameter along the axis of a cylinder of radius R. The critical field of the transition monotonically increases with R and asymptotically approaches a value corresponding to ξb/ξf~0.3, where the correlation lengths ξb and ξf are related to the biaxial order and the external field, respectively. Then, in the same geometry, we focus on the line defect structure with a positive uniaxial ordering along the axis, surrounded by the uniaxial sheath, the uniaxial cylinder of radius ξu with negative order parameter and director in the transverse direction. We study the hysteresis in the position of the uniaxial sheath upon increasing and decreasing the field strength. In general, two qualitatively different solutions exist, corresponding to the uniaxial sheath located close to the defect symmetry axis or close to the cylinder wall. This latter solution exists only for strong enough anchorings. The uniaxial sheath is for a line defect what the uniaxial ring is for a point defect: by resorting to an approximate analytic estimate, we show that essentially the same hysteresis exhibited by the uniaxial sheath is expected to occur at the uniaxial ring in the core structure of a point defect.

  7. Identification and physical localization of useful genes and markers to a major gene-rich region on wheat group 1S chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, D; Champoux, J A; Bondareva, S N; Gill, K S

    2001-01-01

    The short arm of Triticeae homeologous group 1 chromosomes is known to contain many agronomically important genes. The objectives of this study were to physically localize gene-containing regions of the group 1 short arm, enrich these regions with markers, and study the distribution of genes and recombination. We focused on the major gene-rich region ("1S0.8 region") and identified 75 useful genes along with 93 RFLP markers by comparing 35 different maps of Poaceae species. The RFLP markers were tested by gel blot DNA analysis of wheat group 1 nullisomic-tetrasomic lines, ditelosomic lines, and four single-break deletion lines for chromosome arm 1BS. Seventy-three of the 93 markers mapped to group 1 and detected 91 loci on chromosome 1B. Fifty-one of these markers mapped to two major gene-rich regions physically encompassing 14% of the short arm. Forty-one marker loci mapped to the 1S0.8 region and 10 to 1S0.5 region. Two cDNA markers mapped in the centromeric region and the remaining 24 loci were on the long arm. About 82% of short arm recombination was observed in the 1S0.8 region and 17% in the 1S0.5 region. Less than 1% recombination was observed for the remaining 85% of the physical arm length. PMID:11290727

  8. Recognition and use of induced fractures and other features in core produced by the coring process

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    There are several distinctive types of coring-induced fractures that can be recognized in core on the basis of morphology, assisted by certain characteristics such as edge effects and surface ornamentation. The shape and orientation of many of these induced fractures offer information on the in-situ stress conditions and the coring process. Petal, petal-centerline, scribe-knife, disc, and torque-related fractures may all be caused by coring in vertical wells. Saddle fractures, (related to petal fractures) are unique to horizontal core, as is the polishing of fracture surfaces during coring. other features such as scribe-line rotation, hammer marks, and rotary-bit patterns are important in making correct interpretations of the in situ stress and reservoir permeability, and in making the maximum use of the evidence bearing on reservoir fracture-system permeability provided by both induced and natural fractures.

  9. Electrical transmission line diametrical retainer

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2004-12-14

    The invention is a mechanism for retaining an electrical transmission line. In one embodiment of the invention it is a system for retaining an electrical transmission line within down hole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second end of a drill pipe, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The invention allows the electrical transmission line to with stand the tension and compression of drill pipe during routine drilling cycles.

  10. Study of Y(3S, 2S)-> eta Y(1S) and Y(3S, 2S) -> pi pi- Y(1S) Hadronic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-03-27

    We study the {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) transitions with 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and 100 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We measure {Beta}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (2.39 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.14(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (1.35 {+-} 0.17(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We find no evidence for {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and obtain {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 1.0 x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 2.3 x 10{sup -3} as upper limits at the 90% confidence level. We also provide improved measurements of the {Upsilon}(2S)-{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S)-{Upsilon}(1S) mass differences, 562.170 {+-} 0.007(stat.) {+-} 0.088(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} and 893.813 {+-} 0.015(stat.) {+-} 0.107(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  11. Microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S) bridges autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria to affect autophagosomal biogenesis and degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Nguyen, Susan; McKeehan, Kerstin; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Liu, Leyuan

    2011-03-25

    The ubiquitously distributed MAP1S is a homologue of the exclusively neuronal distributed microtubule-associated protein 1A and 1B (MAP1A/B). They give rise to multiple isoforms through similar post-translational modification. Isoforms of MAP1S have been implicated in microtubule dynamics and mitotic abnormalities and mitotic cell death. Here we show that ablation of the Map1s gene in mice caused reduction in the B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 or xL (Bcl-2/xL) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (P27) protein levels, accumulation of defective mitochondria, and severe defects in response to nutritive stress, suggesting defects in autophagosomal biogenesis and clearance. Furthermore, MAP1S isoforms interacted with the autophagosome-associated light chain 3 of MAP1A/B (LC3), a homologue of yeast autophagy-related gene 8 (ATG8), and recruited it to stable microtubules in a MAP1S and LC3 isoform-dependent mode. In addition, MAP1S interacted with mitochondrion-associated leucine-rich PPR-motif containing protein (LRPPRC) that interacts with the mitophagy initiator and Parkinson disease-related protein Parkin. The three-way interactions of MAP1S isoforms with LC3 and microtubules as well as the interaction of MAP1S with LRPPRC suggest that MAP1S isoforms may play positive roles in integration of autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria in both autophagosomal biogenesis and degradation. For the first time, our results clarify roles of MAP1S in bridging microtubules and mitochondria with autophagic and mitophagic initiation, maturation, trafficking, and lysosomal clearance. Defects in the MAP1S-regulated autophagy may impact heart disease, cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and a wide range of other diseases. PMID:21262964

  12. City Core - detecting the anthropocene in urban lake cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjaer, K. H.; Ilsøe, P.; Andresen, C. S.; Rasmussen, P.; Andersen, T. J.; Frei, R.; Schreiber, N.; Odgaard, B.; Funder, S.; Holm, J. M.; Andersen, K.

    2011-12-01

    Here, we presents the preliminary results from lake cores taken in ditches associated with the historical fortifications enclosing the oldest - central Copenhagen to achieve new knowledge from sediment deposits related to anthropogenic activities. We have examined sediment cores with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers to correlate element patterns from urban and industrial emissions. Thus, we aim to track these patterns back in time - long before regular routines of recording of atmospheric environment began around 1978. Furthermore, we compare our data to alternative sources of information in order to constrain and expand the temporal dating limits (approximately 1890) achieved from 210Pb activity. From custom reports and statistic sources, information on imported volumes from coal, metal and oil was obtained and related contaminants from these substances to the sediment archives. Intriguingly, we find a steep increase in import of coal and metals matching the exponential increase of lead and zinc counts from XRF-recordings of the sediment cores. In this finding, we claim to have constrain the initiation of urban industrialization. In order to confirm the age resolution of the lake cores, DNA was extracted from sediments, sedaDNA. Thus we attempt to trace plantation of well documented exotic plants to, for instance, the Botanical Garden. Through extraction and sampling of sedaDNA from these floral and arboreal specimens we intend to locate their strataigraphic horizons in the sediment core. These findings may correlate data back to 1872, when the garden was established on the area of the former fortification. In this line of research, we hope to achieve important supplementary knowledge of sedaDNA-leaching frequencies within freshwater sediments.

  13. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  14. The Core Skills Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    A British initiative that aims to identify, develop, and assess core skills in post-16 courses and qualifications is summarized in this bulletin. The first section discusses expectations regarding what core skills can achieve. The following section focuses on other purposes to which core skills could contribute, such as broadening the post-16…

  15. Core Competence and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  16. Core Design Applications

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  17. Theoretical analysis of spectral lines of one- and two-electron ions in hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.; Einwohner, T.

    1982-07-28

    We discuss the line shapes for the 1s-2p, 1s-3p and (ls)/sup 2/ - 1s2p, (1s)/sup 2/ - 1s3p absorption lines in hot plasmas. In our model calculations the perturbing ions are considered quasi-static and widths due to collisions with electrons are calculated in the impact approximation. The collective effect of the plasma electrons is accounted for by a self-consistent model or by a simple Debye-Hueckel screening. These models in general predict different line shapes. We present calculations for the HeII, SiXIV and SiXIII ions.

  18. KILOPARSEC-SCALE JETS IN THREE RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Joseph L.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2015-02-10

    We have discovered kiloparsec-scale extended radio emission in three narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) in sub-arcsecond resolution 9 GHz images from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We find all sources show two-sided, mildly core-dominated jet structures with diffuse lobes dominated by termination hotspots. These span 20–70 kpc with morphologies reminiscent of FR II radio galaxies, while the extended radio luminosities are intermediate between FR I and FR II sources. In two cases the structure is linear, while a 45° bend is apparent in the third. Very Long Baseline Array images at 7.6 GHz reveal parsec-scale jet structures, in two cases with extended structure aligned with the inner regions of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Based on this alignment, the ratio of the radio core–luminosity to the optical luminosity, the jet/counter-jet intensity and extension length ratios, and moderate core brightness temperatures (≲10{sup 10} K), we conclude these jets are mildly relativistic (β≲0.3, δ∼1−1.5) and aligned at moderately small angles to the line of sight (10–15°). The derived kinematic ages of ∼10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} yr are much younger than radio galaxies but comparable to other NLS1s. Our results increase the number of radio-loud NLS1s with known kiloparsec-scale extensions from 7 to 10 and suggest that such extended emission may be common, at least among the brightest of these sources.

  19. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  20. "Snowing" Core in Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Cormier, V.; Gao, L.; Gubbins, D.; Kharlamova, S. A.; He, K.; Yang, H.

    2008-12-01

    As a planet cools, an initially molten core gradually solidifies. Solidification occurs at shallow depths in the form of "snow", if the liquidus temperature gradient of the core composition is smaller than the adiabatic temperature gradient in the core. Experimental data on the melting behavior of iron-sulfur binary system suggest that the cores of Mercury and Ganymede are probably snowing at the present time. The Martian core is predicted to snow in the future, provided that the sulfur content falls into the range of 10 to 14 weight percent. Is the Earth's core snowing? If so, what are the surface manifestations? If the Earth's core snowed in the past, how did it affect the formation of the solid inner core and the geodynamo? Here, we evaluate the likelihood and consequences of a snowing core throughout the Earth's history, on the basis of mineral physics data describing the melting behavior, equation-of-state, and thermodynamic properties of iron-rich alloys at high pressures. We discuss if snowing in the present-day Earth can reproduce the shallow gradients of compressional wave velocity above the inner-core boundary, and whether or not snowing in the early Earth may reconcile the apparent young age of the solid inner core with a long-lived geodynamo.

  1. Why the Common Core Changes Math Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Valerie N.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core math standards promote several important differences in how math concepts are taught and should be talked about. These changes will make it easier for younger students to comprehend and adapt to more complex concepts in the later grades. This guide should help elementary teachers make changes and adaptations that are in line the…

  2. Continuous coring drill bit

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, G.A.

    1987-09-22

    A continuous coring drill bit is described comprising: (a) body means defining a vertical axis and adapted for connection to drill pipe and forming an internal body cavity disposed in eccentric relation with the vertical axis and a generally circular throat in communication with the body cavity for conducting drilling fluid. The throat defining a throat axis coincident with the vertical axis and being of a configuration permitting passage of a formation core into the body cavity; (b) a generally cylindrical tubular core breaker being rotatably mounted within the body cavity and defining a vertical axis of rotation of generally parallel and offset relation with the vertical axis of the body means; and (c) a buttress element extending inwardly from the core breaker and adapted to contact the formation core. Upon each rotation of the drill bit the buttress element applying transverse force to the core for fracturing of the core into sections sufficiently small for transport by the drilling fluid.

  3. F2 region response to geomagnetic disturbances across Indian latitudes: O(1S) dayglow emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhayaya, A. K.; Gupta, Sumedha; Brahmanandam, P. S.

    2016-03-01

    The morphology of ionospheric storms has been investigated across equatorial and low latitudes of Indian region. The deviation in F2 region characteristic parameters (foF2 and h'F) along with modeled green line dayglow emission intensities is examined at equatorial station Thiruvananthapuram (8.5°N, 76.8°E, 0.63°S geomagnetic latitude) and low-latitude station Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E,19.2°N geomagnetic latitude) during five geomagnetic storm events. Both positive and negative phases have been noticed in this study. The positive storm phase over equatorial station is found to be more frequent, while the drop in ionization in most of the cases was observed at low-latitude station. It is concluded that the reaction as seen at different ionospheric stations may be quite different during the same storm depending on both the geographic and geomagnetic coordinates of the station, storm intensity, and the storm onset time. Modulation in the F2 layer critical frequency at low and equatorial stations during geomagnetic disturbance of 20-23 November 2003 was caused by the storm-induced changes in O/N2. It is also found that International Reference Ionosphere 2012 model predicts the F2 layer characteristic (foF2 and h'F) parameters at both the low and equatorial stations during disturbed days quite reasonably. A simulative approach in GLOW model developed by Solomon is further used to estimate the changes in the volume emission rate of green line dayglow emission under quiet and strong geomagnetic conditions. It is found that the O(1S) dayglow thermospheric emission peak responds to varying geomagnetic conditions.

  4. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  5. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  6. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  8. Climatology of the O(1S) and O(1D) emission rates from WINDII/UARS global measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Shepherd, S.

    The Wind Imaging Interferometer WINDII on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite UARS has provided a large number of O 1S green line 557 7 nm and O 1D red line 630 0 nm emission rate profiles during 1991-1997 of unprecedented high quality The daytime airglow emission is produced mainly by solar energy deposition and vary according to changes of the solar zenith angle and solar irradiance The nighttime airglow emission rates show strong latitudinal and local time dependences Using both daytime and nighttime measurements the directly solar excited daytime emission rates can be removed and the indirectly excited component is revealed This study presents the seasonal and latitudinal variations of the indirect component of the two airglow emission rates which may be due to tides geomagnetic effects and other physical and photochemical processes

  9. Lunar core: occam's razor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Whether or not the earth's moon has a core is a much bandied question. Like many notions about the properties of the moon, ideas of a lunar core changed drastically after the Apollo studies. A review of the development of these ideas was given a scholarly treatment by S.K. Runcorn recently (Nature, 304, 589-596, 1983). In contrast, L.L. Hood, C.P. Sonett, and L.J. Srnka have questioned the concept in serious detail (Nature, 307, 661-662, 1984).Whether or not the moon actually has or has had a fluid metallic core is of great consequence for a number of geophysical theories about the solar system. Most investigators concede that the possible existence of a lunar core remains one of the major unanswered, and yet most critical, questions about the moon. A lot rides on the answer: Can a lunar-sized body have a core? Is the core metallic? How is the core related to lunar magnetism and its paleomagnetism? Is or was a lunar core related to lunar volcanism? If the moon can have a core, is planetary core formation in the solar system a simple matter of gravitationally segregating metallic fragments that were formed elsewhere? Implications of the questions are without limit. There is, perhaps, no more valid issue about the moon to explore scientifically.

  10. AP1S3 mutations are associated with pustular psoriasis and impaired Toll-like receptor 3 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Setta-Kaffetzi, Niovi; Simpson, Michael A; Navarini, Alexander A; Patel, Varsha M; Lu, Hui-Chun; Allen, Michael H; Duckworth, Michael; Bachelez, Hervé; Burden, A David; Choon, Siew-Eng; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Kirby, Brian; Kolios, Antonios; Seyger, Marieke M B; Prins, Christa; Smahi, Asma; Trembath, Richard C; Fraternali, Franca; Smith, Catherine H; Barker, Jonathan N; Capon, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) is an evolutionary conserved heterotetramer that promotes vesicular trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the endosomes. The knockout of most murine AP-1 complex subunits is embryonically lethal, so the identification of human disease-associated alleles has the unique potential to deliver insights into gene function. Here, we report two founder mutations (c.11T>G [p.Phe4Cys] and c.97C>T [p.Arg33Trp]) in AP1S3, the gene encoding AP-1 complex subunit σ1C, in 15 unrelated individuals with a severe autoinflammatory skin disorder known as pustular psoriasis. Because the variants are predicted to destabilize the 3D structure of the AP-1 complex, we generated AP1S3-knockdown cell lines to investigate the consequences of AP-1 deficiency in skin keratinocytes. We found that AP1S3 silencing disrupted the endosomal translocation of the innate pattern-recognition receptor TLR-3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and resulted in a marked inhibition of downstream signaling. These findings identify pustular psoriasis as an autoinflammatory phenotype caused by defects in vesicular trafficking and demonstrate a requirement of AP-1 for Toll-like receptor homeostasis. PMID:24791904

  11. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  12. Complete cDNA sequence of human complement C1s and close physical linkage of the homologous genes C1s and C1r

    SciTech Connect

    Tosi, M.; Duponchel, C.; Meo, T.; Julier, C.

    1987-12-29

    Overlapping molecular clones encoding the complement subcomponent C1s were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence reconstructed from these clones spans about 85% of the length of the liver C1s messenger RNAs, which occur in three distinct size classes around 3 kilobases in length. Comparisons with the sequence of C1r, the other enzymatic subcomponent of C1, reveal 40% amino acid identity and conservation of all the cysteine residues. Beside the serine protease domain, the following sequence motifs, previously described in C1r, were also found in C1s: (a) two repeats of the type found in the Ba fragment of complement factor B and in several other complement but also noncomplement proteins, (b) a cysteine-rich segment homologous to the repeats of epidermal growth factor precursor, and (c) a duplicated segment found only in C1r and C1s. Differences in each of these structural motifs provide significant clues for the interpretation of the functional divergence of these interacting serine protease zymogens. Hybridizations of C1r and C1s probes to restriction endonuclease fragments of genomic DNA demonstrate close physical linkage of the corresponding genes. The implications of this finding are discussed with respect to the evolution of C1r and C1s after their origin by tandem gene duplication and to the previously observed combined hereditary deficiencies of Clr and Cls.

  13. Full Core Multiphysics Simulation with Offline Mesh Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, R.; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    In this report, building on previous reports issued in FY13 we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core. The focus of the present report is a full core simulation with off-line mesh deformation.

  14. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  15. AN Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, Andrea; Tomatis, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several alternative approximations of neutron transport have been proposed in years to move around the known limitations imposed by neutron diffusion in the modeling of nuclear cores. However, only a few complied with the industrial requirements of fast numerical computation, concentrating more on physical accuracy. In this work, the AN transport methodology is discussed with particular interest in core performance calculations. The implementation of the methodology in full core codes is discussed with particular attention to numerical issues and to the integration within the entire simulation process. Finally, first results from core studies in AN transport are analyzed in detail and compared to standard results of neutron diffusion.

  16. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-07-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  17. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  18. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  19. Radioisotope Characterization of HB Line Low Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.J.

    1999-08-05

    The purpose of this document is to provide a physical, chemical, hazardous and radiological characterization of Low-Level Waste (LLW) generated in HB-Line as required by the 1S Manual, Savannah River Site Waste Acceptance Criteria Manual.

  20. Observation of the Inclusive D^{* -} Production in the Decay of Y(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J.Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-17

    The authors present a study of the inclusive D*{sup {+-}} production in the decay of {Upsilon}(1S) using (98.6 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance. Using the decay chain {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S), {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X, where X is unobserved, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X] = (2.52 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.15(syst))% and the D*{sup {+-}} momentum distribution in the rest frame of the {Upsilon}(1S). They find evidence for an excess of D*{sup {+-}} production over the expected rate from the virtual photon annihilation process {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {gamma}* {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sup {+-}} X.

  1. The ϒ(1S)→Bcρ decay with perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling; Li, Qingxia; Lu, Gongru; Huang, Jinshu; Chang, Qin

    2016-08-01

    With the potential prospects of the ϒ (1 S) data samples at the running LHC and upcoming SuperKEKB, the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ weak decay is studied with the pQCD approach. It is found that (1) the lion's share of branching ratio comes from the longitudinal polarization helicity amplitudes; (2) branching ratio for the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ decay can reach up to O (10-9), which might be hopefully measurable.

  2. Progress in Spectroscopy of the 1S-3S Transition in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sandrine; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Thomas, Simon; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François; Nez, François

    2015-09-01

    We report the latest advances in the Doppler-free spectroscopy of the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen. A new continuous ultra-violet source has been developed and delivers a power level of 15 mW. With this setup, the statistical uncertainty on the 1S-3S transition frequency measurement is 2.2 kHz. Combined with the 1S-2S frequency, absolute accuracy at that level would significantly enlighten the proton radius puzzle.

  3. Transforming Growth Factor TGFβ Increases Levels of Microtubule-Associated Protein MAP1S and Autophagy Flux in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kun; Hu, Wei; Yue, Fei; Zou, Jing; Li, Wenjiao; Chen, Qi; Yao, Qizhi; Sun, Weijia; Liu, Leyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Autophagy is a cellular process to regulate the turnover of misfolded/aggregated proteins or dysfunctional organelles such as damaged mitochondria. Microtubule-associated protein MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5) is a widely-distributed homologue of neuronal-specific MAP1A and MAP1B with which autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3) was originally co-purified. MAP1S bridges autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria through LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux from autophagosomal biogenesis to degradation. The MAP1S-mediated autophagy suppresses tumorigenesis as suggested in a mouse liver cancer model and in prostate cancer patients. The TGFβ signaling pathway plays a central role in pancreatic tumorigenesis, and high levels of TGFβ suggest a tumor suppressive function and predict a better survival for some patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In this study, we try to understand the relationship between TGFβ and MAP1S-mediated autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Methods We collected the tumor and its adjacent normal tissues from 33 randomly selected patients of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas to test the association between TGFβ and autophagy markers MAP1S and LC3. Then we tested the cause and effect relation between TGFβ and autophagy markers in cultured pancreatic cancer cell lines. Results Here we show that levels of TGFβ and autophagy markers MAP1S and LC3 are dramatically elevated in tumor tissues from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. TGFβ increases levels of MAP1S protein and enhances autophagy flux. Conclusion TGFβ may suppress the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas by enhancing MAP1S-mediated autophagy. PMID:26571030

  4. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  5. Reconceptualising Core Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Roy

    2007-01-01

    The paper provides an analysis of Core Skill policy and practice in the UK. The author presents a conceptual basis for re-thinking generic Core Skills within educational approaches in teaching and learning. The discussion looks at whether universal notions of generic skills are appropriate when considering post-compulsory pedagogic approaches to…

  6. The Common Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    Current curricula in institutions of higher education are criticized in this speech for their lack of a common core of education. Several possibilities for developing such a common core include education centered around our common heritage and the challenges of the present. It is suggested that all students must be introduced to the events,…

  7. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  8. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  9. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  10. Core Skills in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin provides an update on current developments in core skills in further education. Section 1 contains information about the Further Education Unit's (FEU's) Core Skills Post-16 project, in which colleges are testing principles that underpin all good quality learning programs. Important findings and examples are outlined under the five…

  11. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  12. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  13. Defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy turnover of fibronectin cause renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongzhong; Li, Xun; Zhao, Haibo; Su, Zhengming; Jiang, Xianhan; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in renal tissues causes renal fibrosis and renal function failure. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles. MAP1S is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and predicts a better prognosis in patients suffering from clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, we have characterized that MAP1S enhances the turnover of fibronectin, and mice overexpressing LC3 but with MAP1S deleted accumulate fibronectin and develop liver fibrosis because of the synergistic impact of LC3-induced over-synthesis of fibronectin and MAP1S depletion-caused impairment of fibronectin degradation. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells caused an impairment of autophagy clearance of fibronectin and an activation of pyroptosis. Depletion of MAP1S in mice leads to an accumulation of fibrosis-related proteins and the development of renal fibrosis in aged mice. The levels of MAP1S were dramatically reduced and levels of fibronectin were greatly elevated in renal fibrotic tissues from patients diagnosed as renal atrophy and renal failure. Therefore, MAP1S deficiency may cause the accumulation of fibronectin and the development of renal fibrosis. PMID:27236336

  14. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  15. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  16. Attosecond photoionization dynamics with stimulated core-valence transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jhih-An; Rohringer, Nina; Dahlström, Jan Marcus

    2016-03-01

    We investigate ionization of neon atoms by an isolated attosecond pump pulse in the presence of two coherent extreme ultraviolet or x-ray probe fields. The probe fields are tuned to a core-valence transition in the residual ion and induce spectral shearing of the photoelectron distributions. We show that the photoelectron-ion coincidence signal contains an interference pattern that depends on the temporal structure of the attosecond pump pulse and the stimulated core-valence transition. Many-body perturbation theory is used to compute "atomic response times" for the processes and we find strikingly different behavior for stimulation to the outer-core hole (2 p ↔2 s ) and stimulation to the inner-core hole (2 p ↔1 s ). The response time of the inner-core transition is found to be comparable to that of state-of-the-art laser-based characterization techniques for attosecond pulses.

  17. A spectrophotometric atlas of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.; Gonçalves, A. C.

    2001-06-01

    We have compiled a list of 83 objects classified as Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) or known to have a broad Balmer component narrower than 2 000 km s-1. Of these, 19 turned out to have been spectroscopically misidentified in previous studies; only 64 of the selected objects are genuine NLS1s. We have spectroscopically observed 59 of them and tried to characterize their Narrow and Broad-Line Regions (NLR and BLR) by fitting the emission-lines with Gaussian and/or Lorentzian profiles. In most cases, the broad Balmer components are well fitted by a single Lorentzian profile, confirming previous claims that Lorentzian rather than Gaussian profiles are better suited to reproduce the shape of the NLS1s broad emission lines. This has consequences concerning their FWHMs and line ratios: when the broad Balmer components are fitted with a Lorentzian, most narrow line regions have line ratios typical of Seyfert 2s while, when a Gaussian profile is used for fitting the broad Balmer components, the line ratios are widely scattered in the usual diagnostic diagrams (Veilleux & Osterbrock \\cite{vei87}); moreover, the FWHM of the best fitting Lorentzian is systematically smaller than the FWHM of the Gaussian. We find that, in general, the [O III] lines have a relatively narrow Gaussian profile ( ~ 200-500 km s-1 FWHM) with often, in addition, a second broad ( ~ 500-1 800 km s-1 FWHM), blueshifted Gaussian component. We do not confirm that the [O III] lines are weak in NLS1s. As previously suggested, there is a continuous transition of all properties between NLS1s and classical Broad-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies (BLS1s) and the limit of 2000 km s-1 used to separate the two species is arbitrary; R4570, the ratio of the Fe II to the Hβ fluxes, could be a physically more meaningful parameter to distinguish them.

  18. Finescale Upper Ocean Structure Along 95W Between 10N and 1S During EPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, D. L.; Wijesekera, H. W.; Paulson, C. A.; Pegau, W. S.

    2002-12-01

    During 2-9 October 2001 intensive measurements of upper ocean finestructure were made using a SeaSoar equipped with sensors to measure temperature, salinity, pressure, fluorescence, and optical transmission, and a shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. On a tow south along 95W between 10N and 1S, SeaSoar was flown in a sawtooth pattern from the surface to 250 m yielding resolution of order 1 m in the vertical and 1 km in the horizontal. While towing back northward along the same line, SeaSoar was flown on constant pressure surfaces in the mixed layer to get horizontal resolution as fine as 4 m. A realization of the equatorial front was obtained showing remarkable sharpness of this component of the general circulation. The horizontal change in temperature across the front was approximately 2C in 100 m. The corresponding change in salinity was about 0.2 psu. The density change was significant as the front was cold and salty on one side and warm and fresh on the other. It is hypothesized that frontal sharpness is related to its anomalously southward location at 0.5S and variation in wind stress across the front caused by the strong sea surface temperature gradient. Associated with the front were signs of enhanced biological activity as fluorescence and optical attenuation increased, presumably due to vertical fluxes of nutrients. A second region of high phytoplankton concentration was found near a weaker density front at 8N. In summary, his region of importance to global climate is characterized by energetic oceanic finestructure.

  19. Metal-ion Complexation Effects in C 1s-NEXAFS Spectra of Carboxylic Acids—Evidence by Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Armbruster, M.; Schimmelpfennig, B; Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Denecke, M; Klenze, R

    2009-01-01

    Previous systematic C 1s-NEXAFS studies carried out for humic acid (HA) loaded with polyvalent metal cations (Mn+) reveal spectral features which were postulated to result from metal ion complexation: a strong decrease of the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition intensity and the appearance of a new absorption feature at slightly lower energy adjacent to the carboxyl resonance. Although spectroscopic results for the Mn+-PAA (polyacrylic acid) system (selected as model for structurally ill-defined HA) reveal the same spectral features, evidence by an independent approach for interpretation of these features is desirable. It is well established that quantum chemical calculations are capable of reproducing transition features in C 1s core excitation spectra of small organic molecules, e.g., acetate, which is chosen here as a fragment containing the complexing group to model the macromolecular HA and PAA systems. In this study, the RI-ADC(2) approach, as implemented in the TURBOMOLE program package, is applied to calculate vertical core excitation spectra of various metal acetates and the acetate anion. An energy shift (?f) between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition of the acetate anion and various metal cation acetates is established. Calculated shifts are very similar to the experimentally observed values for the energy difference between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO peak and the absorption feature appearing after metal ion complexation in Mn+-PAA/PAA. According to our computations, structural changes of the acetate complexes (e.g., the O-CeO bond angle) compared to the free acetate anion are predominantly responsible for the spectral changes observed upon metal ion complexation.

  20. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-Mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines and their incorporation into hormaomycin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhushkov, Sergei I; Yufit, Dmitrii S; Grosse, Christian; Kaiser, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Efficient and scalable syntheses of enantiomerically pure (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines 9a–c, as well as allo-D-threonine (4) and (2S,3R)-β-methylphenylalanine (3), using the Belokon' approach with (S)- and (R)-2-[(N-benzylprolyl)amino]benzophenone [(S)- and (R)-10] as reusable chiral auxiliaries have been developed. Three new fluoromethyl analogues of the naturally occurring octadepsipeptide hormaomycin (1) with (fluoromethylcyclopropyl)alanine moieties have been synthesized and subjected to preliminary tests of their antibiotic activity. PMID:25550751

  2. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The main focus was the study of star-forming regions through high spectral- and spatial resolution observations of mm-wavelength lines, and through models of the observations. The main accomplishments were a) demonstration that more than 15 starless cores show substantial evidence of extended inward motion at about half the sound speed; b) observations of infall asymmetry in several cores, in lines of N2H(+) and DCO(+), low- depletion tracers of the "inner core"; c) observation of "infall asymmetry" of spectral lines over approx. 0.5 pc in the NGC1333 cluster-forming region; d) observations indicating that cores are nearly at rest with respect to their envelopes; and e) development of analytic, power-series solutions to the equations of motions for condensing 1-D systems (layers, cylinders and spheres).

  3. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  4. Imaging dislocation cores – the way forward

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John; Kolar, H.R.; Hembree, G; Humphreys, C.J.; Barnard, J.; Datta, R.; Koch, C.; Ross, F.M.; Justo, J.F.

    2006-10-11

    Although the sub-angstrom resolution of the modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) has made major contributions to defect structure analysis in many fields (such as oxides, interfaces, nanoparticles and superconductors) it has yielded little direct information on the core structure of dislocations. We suggest that ‘‘forbidden reflection’’ lattice images recorded in an ultra-high vacuum TEM in projections normal to the dislocation line could provide interpretable images of cores at atomic resolution. These could answer crucial questions, such as the nature of kinks, core reconstruction and periodicity, the nature of obstacles, and help distinguish obstacle theories of kink motion from the secondary Peierls–valley Hirth–Lothe theory. We give experimental forbidden reflection images and a new image obtained from silicon under UHV conditions with atomically smooth surfaces, whose preparation did not anneal out all dislocations. We also show experimental coherent nanodiffraction patterns and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images recorded with the beam parallel to the core, so that core reconstruction can be expected to introduce a ‘‘half-order’’ Laue zone ring. We discuss the contribution that energy-loss spectroscopy from dislocation cores can be expected to make if a nanoprobe beam is used.

  5. Blocking the association of HDAC4 with MAP1S accelerates autophagy clearance of mutant Huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Fei; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Xu, Guibin; Huang, Hai; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Sheng; Gallinari, Paola; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L.; Liu, Leyuan

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy controls and executes the turnover of abnormally aggregated proteins. MAP1S interacts with the autophagy marker LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux. HDAC4 associates with the aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) that causes Huntington's disease, and colocalizes with it in cytosolic inclusions. It was suggested HDAC4 interacts with MAP1S in a yeast two-hybrid screening. Here, we found that MAP1S interacts with HDAC4 via a HDAC4-binding domain (HBD). HDAC4 destabilizes MAP1S, suppresses autophagy flux and promotes the accumulation of mHTT aggregates. This occurs by an increase in the deacetylation of the acetylated MAP1S. Either suppression of HDAC4 with siRNA or overexpression of the MAP1S HBD leads to stabilization of MAP1S, activation of autophagy flux and clearance of mHTT aggregates. Therefore, specific interruption of the HDAC4-MAP1S interaction with short peptides or small molecules to enhance autophagy flux may relieve the toxicity of mHTT associated with Huntington's disease and improve symptoms of HD patients. PMID:26540094

  6. Boson core compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorramzadeh, Y.; Lin, Fei; Scarola, V. W.

    2012-04-01

    Strongly interacting atoms trapped in optical lattices can be used to explore phase diagrams of Hubbard models. Spatial inhomogeneity due to trapping typically obscures distinguishing observables. We propose that measures using boson double occupancy avoid trapping effects to reveal two key correlation functions. We define a boson core compressibility and core superfluid stiffness in terms of double occupancy. We use quantum Monte Carlo on the Bose-Hubbard model to empirically show that these quantities intrinsically eliminate edge effects to reveal correlations near the trap center. The boson core compressibility offers a generally applicable tool that can be used to experimentally map out phase transitions between compressible and incompressible states.

  7. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  8. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  9. Investigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    A detailed investigation of the atomic structure and radiative parameters involving the lowest states within the 6p4, 6p36d, 6p37s, 6p37p and 6p37d configurations of neutral polonium is reported in the present paper. Using different physical models based on the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock approach, the influence of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation on the atomic parameters is discussed in detail. This work allowed us to fix the spectroscopic designation of some experimental level energy values and to provide for the first time a set of reliable oscillator strengths corresponding to 31 Po I spectral lines in the wavelength region from 175 to 987 nm.

  10. Search for X Y Z states in ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Ban, Y.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, S. D.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The branching fractions of the ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays into final states with a J /ψ or a ψ (2 S ) are measured with improved precision to be B (ϒ (1 S )→J /ψ +anything)=(5.25 ±0.13 (stat )±0.25 (syst ))×10-4 and B (ϒ (1 S )→ψ (2 S )+anything)=(1.23 ±0.17 (stat )±0.11 (syst ))×10-4 . The first search for ϒ (1 S ) decays into X Y Z states that decay into a J /ψ or a ψ (2 S ) plus one or two charged tracks yields no significant signals for X Y Z states in any of the examined decay modes, and upper limits on their production rates in ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays are determined.

  11. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  12. The novel function of JADE1S in cytokinesis of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Nirodhini S; Meyer, Rosana D; Panchenko, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    JADE1 belongs to a small family of PHD zinc finger proteins that interacts with histone acetyl transferase (HAT) HBO1 and is associated with chromatin. We recently reported JADE1 chromatin shuttling and phosphorylation during G2/M to G1 transition, which was sensitive to Aurora A inhibition. In the current study we examined mechanisms of the cell cycle regulation by the small isoform of JADE1 protein, JADE1S, and report data showing that JADE1S has a novel function in the regulation of cytokinesis. Using FACS assays, we show that, JADE1S depletion facilitated rates of G1-cells accumulation in synchronously dividing HeLa cell cultures. Depletion of JADE1S protein in asynchronously dividing cells decreased the proportion of cytokinetic cells, and increased the proportion of multi-nuclear cells, indicative of premature and failed cytokinesis. In contrast, moderate overexpression of JADE1S increased the number of cytokinetic cells in time- and dose- dependent manner, indicating cytokinetic delay. Pharmacological inhibition of Aurora B kinase resulted in the release of JADE1S-mediated cytokinetic delay and allowed progression of abscission in cells over-expressing JADE1S. Finally, we show that JADE1S protein localized to centrosomes in interphase and mitotic cells, while during cytokinesis JADE1S localized to the midbody. Neither JADE1L nor partner of JADE1, HAT HBO1 was localized to the centrosomes or midbodies. Our study identifies the novel role for JADE1S in regulation of cytokinesis and suggests function in Aurora B kinase-mediated cytokinesis checkpoint. PMID:26151225

  13. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  14. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  15. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  16. Geophysics: Earth's core problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, David

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the electrical resistance and thermal conductivity of iron at extreme pressures and temperatures cast fresh light on controversial numerical simulations of the properties of Earth's outer core. See Letters p.95 & 99

  17. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  18. Imaging the inner core under Africa and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J. C. E.

    2016-05-01

    The inner core under Africa is thought to be a region where the nature of inner core texture changes: from the strongly anisotropic 'western' part of the inner core to the weakly anisotropic, or isotropic 'eastern' part of the inner core. Additionally, observations of a difference in isotropic velocity between the two hemispheres have been made. A very large new dataset of simultaneous PKPdf and PKPbc observations, on which differential travel times have been measured, is used to examine the upper 360 km of the inner core under Europe, Africa and the surrounding oceans. Inversion of the differential travel time data for laterally varying inner core anisotropy reveals that inner core anisotropy is stronger under central Africa and the Atlantic Ocean than under the western Indian Ocean. No hemispherical pattern is present in Voigt isotropic velocities, indicating that the variation in anisotropy is due to differing degrees of crystal alignment in the inner core, not material differences. When anisotropy is permitted to change with depth, the upper east-most part of the study region shows weaker anisotropy than the central and western regions. When depth dependence in the inner core is neglected the hemisphere boundary is better represented as a line at 40°E than one at 10°E, however, it is apparent that the variation of anisotropy as a function of depth means that one line of longitude cannot truly separate the more and less anisotropic regions of the inner core. The anisotropy observed in the part of the inner core under Africa which lies in the 'western' hemisphere is much weaker than that under central America, showing that the western hemisphere is not uniformly anisotropic. As the region of low anisotropy spans a significant depth extent, it is likely that heterogeneous heat fluxes in the core, which may cause variations in inner core anisotropy, have persisted for several hundred million years.

  19. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  20. Contribution of the 1s2l3l' Dielectronic Recombination in Li-Like Ar to the Hypothesized Dark Matter Related Faint Feature in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-05-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigate the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of or contributor to the emission line. We are particularly interested in the Li-like transition 1 s22l-1s2l3l', which produces a 3.62 keV photon near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, set to a current of 60 mA, was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances, including the resonance peak of interest. A solid-state germanium detector was used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the trap region. The DR cross section was measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Our measurements are compared to the AtomDB emission lines used to fit the spectra containing the unidentified line, and conclusions are presented.

  1. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  2. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  3. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Formation of Magnetized Prestellar Cores in Turbulent Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C.; Classy Team

    2015-01-01

    In GMCs, shocks in the turbulent flow create high-density regions, in which filaments grow and then fragment gravitationally into prestellar cores. This process is influenced by the cloud's magnetic field, which is also amplified during the shock. We showed in three-dimensional simulations that in typical GMC environments, the turbulence-compressed regions are strongly-magnetized sheet-like layers. Within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form via gathering material along the magnetic field lines. As a result of the preferred-direction mass collection, velocity gradients perpendicular to the filament major axis are a common feature seen in our simulations, which is in good agreement with the most recent results from CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). From our simulations, we identified hundreds of self-gravitating cores with masses, sizes, and mass-to-magnetic flux ratios comparable to observations. We found that core masses and sizes do not depend on the coupling strength between neutrals and ions, and ambipolar diffusion is not necessary to form low-mass supercritical cores. This is a result of anisotropic contraction along field lines, which can explain the fact that magnetically supercritical cores are commonly observed even in a strongly magnetized medium. We then confirmed the anisotropic core formation model by extending the parameter space of the three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations, and quantified how the scalings of median core properties depend on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength.

  5. Live imaging-based model selection reveals periodic regulation of the stochastic G1/S phase transition in vertebrate axial development.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mayu; Saitou, Takashi; Kurokawa, Hiroshi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Imamura, Takeshi; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2014-12-01

    In multicellular organism development, a stochastic cellular response is observed, even when a population of cells is exposed to the same environmental conditions. Retrieving the spatiotemporal regulatory mode hidden in the heterogeneous cellular behavior is a challenging task. The G1/S transition observed in cell cycle progression is a highly stochastic process. By taking advantage of a fluorescence cell cycle indicator, Fucci technology, we aimed to unveil a hidden regulatory mode of cell cycle progression in developing zebrafish. Fluorescence live imaging of Cecyil, a zebrafish line genetically expressing Fucci, demonstrated that newly formed notochordal cells from the posterior tip of the embryonic mesoderm exhibited the red (G1) fluorescence signal in the developing notochord. Prior to their initial vacuolation, these cells showed a fluorescence color switch from red to green, indicating G1/S transitions. This G1/S transition did not occur in a synchronous manner, but rather exhibited a stochastic process, since a mixed population of red and green cells was always inserted between newly formed red (G1) notochordal cells and vacuolating green cells. We termed this mixed population of notochordal cells, the G1/S transition window. We first performed quantitative analyses of live imaging data and a numerical estimation of the probability of the G1/S transition, which demonstrated the existence of a posteriorly traveling regulatory wave of the G1/S transition window. To obtain a better understanding of this regulatory mode, we constructed a mathematical model and performed a model selection by comparing the results obtained from the models with those from the experimental data. Our analyses demonstrated that the stochastic G1/S transition window in the notochord travels posteriorly in a periodic fashion, with doubled the periodicity of the neighboring paraxial mesoderm segmentation. This approach may have implications for the characterization of the

  6. Fast clearance of lipid droplets through MAP1S-activated autophagy suppresses clear cell renal cell carcinomas and promotes patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-De; Yue, Fei; Li, Wenjiao; Li, Xun; He, Yongzhong; Jiang, Xianhan; Huang, Hai; Chen, Qi; Jonasch, Eric; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is composed of cells whose cytoplasm filled with lipid droplets, subcellular organelles coated with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADFP) for the storage of triacylglycerol converted from excess free fatty acids. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles such as lipid droplets. MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5) is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and promoted the survival of patients with prostate adenocarcinomas by increasing the degradation of aggregated proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells causes an impairment of autophagic clearance of lipid droplets. In contrast, an overexpression of MAP1S causes an activation of autophagy flux and a reduction of lipid droplets so less DNA double strand breakage is induced. The levels of MAP1S in normal renal cells are dramatically higher than those in the ccRCC tissues and cell lines derived from renal cell carcinomas. High levels of MAP1S are associated with a reduced malignancy and metastasis of ccRCC and predict a better survival of ccRCC patients. Therefore, autophagy defects in the degradation of lipid droplets triggered by the MAP1S deficiency may enhance the initiation and development of ccRCC and reduce the survival of ccRCC patients. PMID:26701856

  7. Dislocation core in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Washburn, Jack; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-02-20

    Light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes grown on GaN have been demonstrated despite six orders of magnitude higher dislocation density than that for III-V arsenide and phosphide diodes. Understanding and determination of dislocation cores in GaN is crucial since both theoretical and experimental work are somewhat contradictory. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been applied to study the layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) (under Ga rich conditions) in plan-view and cross-section samples. This study suggests that despite the fact that voids are formed along the dislocation line in HVPE material, the dislocations have closed cores. Similar results of closed core are obtained for the screw dislocation in the MBE material, confirming earlier studies.

  8. Ammonia observations of cold cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungerechts, H.; Winnewisser, G.; Walmsley, C. M.

    1982-07-01

    The NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) lines have been observed towards the cores of seven dark dust clouds, mostly in the Taurus region. From these measurements the gas kinetic temperature is estimated to be close to 10 K. The cloud cores have sizes of about 0.05-0.3 pc, and densities of about 10,000-100,000/cu cm. No evidence is found for local heating by embedded protostellar objects. These cloud cores may be close to a stable state of hydrostatic equilibrium in which the gravitational forces are balanced by thermal pressure. In three cases, however, prima facie evidence is found for rotation, and the centrifugal force may be of importance for the dynamics.

  9. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  10. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  11. Contraction Signatures toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δv, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δv and collapse model results, we find that δv is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s-1) to supersonic (0.4 km s-1), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/MJ > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/MJ, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  12. Mutation analysis of CACNA1S and SCN4A in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Ren, Bing-Wen; Yong, Zeng-Hua; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Qiu-Xia; Yao, He-Bin

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in CACNA1S (calcium channel, voltage‑dependent, L type, alpha 1S subunit) and SCN4A (sodium channel, voltage‑gated, type IV, alpha subunit) are associated with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). The aim of the current study was to investigate CACNA1S and SCN4A mutations in patients with HPP. Mutations in CACNA1S and SCN4A were detected in three familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (FHPP) pedigrees and in two thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) pedigrees using polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and sequence alignment with GenBank data. A single base mutation from cytosine to guanine at site 1582 was identified in exon 11 of CACNA1S in one FHPP pedigree, resulting in an arginine to glycine (R528G) substitution. A single base mutation from thymine to cytosine at site 2012 was identified in exon 12 of SCN4A in one THPP pedigree, resulting in a phenylalanine to serine (F671S) substitution. No mutations in CACNA1S or SCN4A were identified in the remaining three pedigrees. The present study indicated that CACNA1S and SCN4A mutations are relatively rare in patients with HPP, and further studies are required to determine whether these mutation‑associated substitutions are representative of patients with HPP. PMID:26252573

  13. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-04-17

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair. PMID:26919559

  14. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  15. Ghrelin-induced food intake and adiposity depend on central mTORC1/S6K1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Darko; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Müller-Lühlhoff, Sabrina; Brandt, Elisabeth; Abplanalp, William; Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Liehl, Beate; Wiedmer, Petra; Janjetovic, Kristina; Starcevic, Vesna; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Tschöp, Matthias H; Castañeda, Tamara R

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and its effectors the S6-kinases (S6K) in the hypothalamus is thought to be involved in nutrient sensing and control of food intake. Given the anatomical proximity of this pathway to circuits for the hormone ghrelin, we investigated the potential role of the mTORC1/S6K pathway in mediating the metabolic effects of ghrelin. We found that ghrelin promoted phosphorylation of S6K1 in the mouse hypothalamic cell line N-41 and in the rat hypothalamus after intracerebroventricular administration. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, suppressed ghrelin-induced phosphorylation of hypothalamic S6K1 and increased food intake and insulin in rats. Chronic peripheral administration of ghrelin induced a significant increase in body weight, fat mass and food efficiency in wild-type and S6K2-knockout but not in S6K1-knockout mice. We therefore propose that ghrelin-induced hyperphagia, adiposity and insulin secretion are controlled by a central nervous system involving the mTORC1/S6K1 pathway. PMID:23994018

  16. Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium bacteriophage SPN1S.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hakdong; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Lim, Jeong-A; Kim, Hyeryen; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    To understand the interaction between the host of pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and its bacteriophage, we isolated the bacteriophage SPN1S. It is a lysogenic phage in the Podoviridae family and uses the O-antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a host receptor. Comparative genomic analysis of phage SPN1S and the S. enterica serovar Anatum-specific phage ε15 revealed different host specificities, probably due to the low homology of host specificity-related genes. Here we report the complete circular genome sequence of S. Typhimurium-specific bacteriophage SPN1S and show the results of our analysis. PMID:22205721

  17. Theoretical analysis of the He_2 line at 585 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, N. F.; Gadéa, F. X.; Monari, A.; Deguilhem, B.

    2011-12-01

    Pressure broadening by molecular hydrogen and helium is one of the major broadening mechanism in the atmosphere of brown dwarfs. He(1 ^1S)-He(2 ^1P) collisional line profiles are determined in a unified theory of spectral line broadening using very recent ab initio potential energies. Results are reported for the conditions prevailing in brown dwarf atmospheres.

  18. The Physics and Chemistry of Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Goodson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Better characterization of the initial conditions is crucial to understanding massive star formation. Whether or not high-mass stars form in a similar way as low-mass stars can be tested by massive starless cores (MSCs), which are invoked as the initial condition in the Core Accretion model, but not in the Competitive Accretion model. We first searched for MSC candidates in the densest regions of Infrared Dark Clouds with the deuterated species N2D+, which has been found to be one of the best tracers of the cold, dense conditions of low-mass pre-stellar cores. Two candidates (C1-N & S) were revealed by our ALMA Cycle 0 observation. In particular, C1-S has ~ 60 M⊙. Our dynamical study found that ~mG magnetic fields need to be present if the cores are virialized. Next we developed astrochemical modeling to understand how high levels of deuteration arise in these cores, especially tracking the deuteration fraction DfracN2H+(≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+]), which can rise by several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Our models show that high levels of DfracN2H+ ≥ 0.1 generally require at least several local free-fall times to be established under typical core conditions and this is the basis of a "deuteration clock" that can measure the chemical age and thus collapse rates of MSCs. We have begun work to implement the astrochemical network into full (M)HD simulations of these structures. A detailed observational study to measure [N2D+], [N2H+] and thus DfracN2H+ in the C1-N and C1-S cores have been carried out, utilizing multi-transition data observed with ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, IRAM 30m and NRO 45m telescopes. We find high levels of DfracN2H+ ≈ 0.2 - 0.7. Comparing with the theoretical chemodynamical models indicates that C1-N and C1-S have been contracting at rates ~10 times slower than free-fall, which may be consistent with the presence of strong magnetic fields in the cores. Using ALMA, we have also extended our search for more MSCs, using N2D+(3

  19. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  20. Disruption of the p53-mediated G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint results in elevated rates of spontaneous genetic recombination in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Strasfeld, L.; Brainerd, E.; Meyn, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    A key feature of the cancer-prone inherited disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is genetic instability. We recently demonstrated that one aspect of genetic instability in A-T is a marked elevation in the spontaneous rates of intrachromosomal mitotic recombination. We have proposed a model for A-T that attributes these high recombination rates to a lack of DNA damage-sensitive cell cycle checkpoints. One prediction of this model is that disrupting p53 function in normal cells should increase their spontaneous rates of recombination by interfering with their p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. To test this prediction, we transfected control and A-T fibroblast lines that each harbor a single integrated copy of lacZ-based recombination vector (pLrec) with derivatives of a eukaryotic expression vector (pRep5) that contain either a dominant-negative p53 mutant (143{sup val{yields}ala}) or a human papilloma virus E6 gene (HPV18 E6). Expression of either of these genes results in loss of p53 function and abolition of the G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. Four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the control line showed 25-80 fold elevations in spontaneous recombination rates when compared to their parent cell line. Elevations in spontaneous recombination rates were also detected following transfection with the HPV18 E6 gene. In contrast, four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the A-T cell line showed no significant changes in their already high spontaneous recombination rates. We are now extending these observations to additional normal human fibroblast lines and carrying out molecular analyses of the products of these recombinational events. Our results support our hypothesis that the lack of a p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint contributes to the hyperrecombination seen in A-T.

  1. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  2. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  3. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  4. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  5. 7. JOB NO. 1347G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. JOB NO. 1347-G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD MOTOR COMPANY; PLANS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Oil House, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 1s2s2p2 5p3 5S transition in B ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannervik, S.; Cederquist, H.; Martinson, I.; Brage, T.; Froese Fischer, C.

    1987-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been made of the 1s2s2p2 5P-1s2p3 5S transition in B ii. The experimental wavelength and lifetime (1323.92+/-0.07 Å and 0.65+/-0.01 ns), determined by beam-foil spectroscopy, are more than five times more accurate than previous experimental results. Our theoretical data, from multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, 1311.6 Å and 0.601 ns, are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical predictions of Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 61A, 227 (1977)]. We have also observed the 1s2p3 5S-1s2p23s 5P transition, at 857.7+/-0.2 Å, in accord with the theoretical value 859.1 Å.

  7. Lepton Universality Test in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Elisa; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

    2012-04-10

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we measure the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} = BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -})/BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); the measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a possible search for a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson in Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenarios. Such a boson could appear in a deviation of the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} from the Standard Model expectation, that is 1, except for small lepton mass corrections. The analysis exploits the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = {mu},{tau}.

  8. Measurement of the branching ratio of UPSILON(2S). --> pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/+UPSILON(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.J.; Potter, D.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Stone, R.; Brody, A.; Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kooy, H.; Lariccia, P.; Moneti, G.C.; Bridges, D.L.; Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Hicks, R.; Panvini, R.S.; Poucher, J.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cabenda, P.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Gentile, T.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Kreinick, D.L.; Mistry, N.B.; Nordberg, E.; Perchonok, R.; Plunkett, R.; Shinsky, K.A.; Siemann, R.H.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Talman, R.; Thonemann, H.G.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Izen, J.M.; Longuemare, C.; Loomis, W.A.; Mackay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Tanenbaum, W.; Wilson, R.; Chadwick, K.; Ganci, P.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.

    1981-05-04

    We have observed the decay of the UPSILON(2S) into the UPSILON(1S), obtaining a branching ratio of 19.1 +- 3.1 +- 2.9% for the mode UPSILON(2S)..--> pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/UPSILON(1S). The di-pion mass spectrum peaks at large invariant mass, and the angular distribution of the di-pion system is consistent with s-wave production.

  9. Leptonic decay of the ϒ(1S) meson at third order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Beneke, Martin; Kiyo, Yuichiro; Marquard, Peter; Penin, Alexander; Piclum, Jan; Seidel, Dirk; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2014-04-18

    We present the complete next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order short-distance and bound-state QCD correction to the leptonic decay rate Γ(ϒ(1S)→ℓ+ℓ-) of the lowest-lying spin-1 bottomonium state. The perturbative QCD prediction is compared to the measurement Γ(ϒ(1S)→e+e-)=1.340(18)  keV. PMID:24785029

  10. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE RADIO EMISSIONS IN NEARBY RADIO-QUIET NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2013-03-01

    We conducted Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of seven nearby narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) with milliarcsecond resolution. This is the first systematic very long baseline interferometry study focusing on the central parsec-scale regions of radio-quiet NLS1s. Five of the seven were detected at a brightness temperature of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and contain radio cores with high brightness temperatures of >6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, indicating a nonthermal process driven by jet-producing central engines as in radio-loud NLS1s and other active galactic nucleus classes. VLBA images of MRK 1239, MRK 705, and MRK 766 exhibit parsec-scale jets with clear linear structures. A large portion of the radio power comes from diffuse emission components that are distributed within the nuclear regions ({approx}< 300 pc), which is a common characteristic throughout the observed NLS1s. Jet kinetic powers limited by the Eddington limit may be insufficient to allow the jets to escape to kiloparsec scales for these radio-quiet NLS1s with low-mass black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }.

  11. Test of Lepton Universality in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /more authors..

    2010-06-07

    The ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))={Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}}/{Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}} is measured using a sample of (121.8 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6}{Upsilon}(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where l = {mu}, {tau}. The result, R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))=1.005 {+-} 0.013(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements.

  12. Intersectin-1s regulates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda A; Predescu, Dan N; Knezevic, Ivana; Klein, Irene K; Malik, Asrar B

    2007-06-01

    Intersectins (ITSNs) are multidomain adaptor proteins implicated in endocytosis, regulation of actin polymerization, and Ras/MAPK signaling. We have previously shown that ITSN-1s is required for caveolae fission and internalization in endothelial cells (ECs). In the present study, using small interfering RNA to knock down ITSN-1s protein expression, we demonstrate a novel role of ITSN-1s as a key antiapoptotic protein. Knockdown of ITSN-1s in ECs activated the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis as determined by genomic DNA fragmentation, extensive mitochondrial fission, activation of the proapoptotic proteins BAK and BAX, and cytochrome c efflux from mitochondria. ITSN-1 knockdown acts as a proapoptotic signal that causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and generation of reactive oxygen species. These effects were secondary to decreased activation of Erk1/2 and its direct activator MEK. Bcl-X(L) overexpression prevented BAX activation and the apoptotic ECs death induced by suppression of ITSN-1s. Our findings demonstrate a novel role of ITSN-1s as a negative regulator of the mitochondrial pathway-dependent apoptosis secondary to activation of the Erk1/2 survival signaling pathway. PMID:17405881

  13. Test of lepton universality in Υ(1S) decays at BABAR.

    PubMed

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-05-14

    The ratio R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=Γ(Υ(1S)→τ+ τ-)/Γ(Υ(1S)→μ+ μ-) is measured using a sample of (121.8±1.2)×10(6)Υ(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays Υ(3S)→Υ(1S)π+ π-, Υ(1S)→l+ l-, where l=μ, τ. The result, R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=1.005±0.013(stat)±0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements. PMID:20866959

  14. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling. PMID:26565030

  15. G1/S Cell Cycle Arrest Provides Anoikis Resistance through Erk-Mediated Bim Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicole L.; Reginato, Maurico J.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Proper attachment to the extracellular matrix is essential for cell survival. Detachment from the extracellular matrix results in an apoptotic process termed anoikis. Anoikis induction in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells is due not only to loss of survival signals following integrin disengagement, but also to consequent downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and loss of EGFR-induced survival signals. Here we demonstrate that G1/S arrest by overexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a, p21Cip1, or p27Kip1 or by treatment with mimosine or aphidicolin confers anoikis resistance in MCF-10A cells. G1/S arrest-mediated anoikis resistance involves suppression of the BH3-only protein Bim. Furthermore, in G1/S-arrested cells, Erk phosphorylation is maintained in suspension and is necessary for Bim suppression. Following G1/S arrest, known proteins upstream of Erk, including Raf and Mek, are not activated. However, retained Erk activation under conditions in which Raf and Mek activation is lost is observed, suggesting that G1/S arrest acts at the level of Erk dephosphorylation. Thus, anoikis resistance by G1/S arrest is mediated by a mechanism involving Bim suppression through maintenance of Erk activation. These results provide a novel link between cell cycle arrest and survival, and this mechanism could contribute to the survival of nonreplicating, dormant tumor cells that avert apoptosis during early stages of metastasis. PMID:15923641

  16. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  17. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  18. Gas Hydrate Research Coring and Downhole Logging Operational Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Riedel, M.; Malone, M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent gas hydrate deep coring and downhole logging projects, including ODP Leg 204, IODP Expedition 311, and the India NGHP-01 effort have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate. These projects have also built on the relatively sparse history of gas hydrate drilling experience to collectively develop a unique operational protocol to examine and sample gas hydrate in nature. The ideal gas hydrate research drill site in recent history, consists of at least three drill holes, with the first hole dedicated to LWD/MWD downhole logging in order to identify intervals to be pressurized cored and to collect critical petrophysical data. The second hole is usually dedicated for continuous coring operations. The third hole is used for special downhole tool measurements such as pressure coring and wire line logging. There is a strong scientific need to obtain LWD/MWD data prior to coring. The coring operations are complemented by frequent deployment of the PCS/HYACINTH pressure core systems. It is essential to know what the gas hydrate concentrations and vertical distribution are before deploying the available pressure core systems in order to choose the optimum depths for pressure coring operations. The coring operations are also complemented by frequent sampling for interstitial water, headspace gas, and microbiological analyses. Although those samples will be taken at relatively regular depths, the sampling frequency can be adjusted if gas hydrate concentrations and distribution can be forward predicted through the analysis of the LWD/MWD pre-core logging surveys. After completing the LWD/MWD logging program, usually as a dedicated drilling leg, field efforts will switch to conventional and pressure-controlled coring operations at each of the sites drilled during the LWD/MWD campaign. The standard continuous core hole will usually include APC coring to an expected refusal depth of ~100 mbsf; each hole is usually

  19. Analysis of the solar magnesium lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heasley, J. N.; Allen, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    The observed quiet-sun profiles for a number of Mg I and II lines are compared with theoretical spectra computed for two upper-photosphere lower-chromosphere models published by Ayres and Linsky (1976). Both the Mg I and the Mg II resonance line wings, observed with the University of Hawaii Echelle Rocket Spectrographs, favor a model with a higher temperature in the upper photosphere than required to match the visible region lines 4571 and 5172. Neither model atmosphere reproduces the observed shapes in the cores of the strong lines or the limb darkening of the 4571 A intercombination line. The wings of the ultraviolet lines in plages can be reproduced either with a mean one-component atmosphere or by a two-component model with an ad hoc filling factor.

  20. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  1. Auger and radiative deexcitation of the 1s2l3l-prime configurations of lithium-like neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray energies, Auger and radiative decay rates, and fluorescence yields have been computed in intermediate coupling for the various states of the 1s2s3s, 1s2s3p, 1s2p3p, 1s2p3s, and 1s2p3d configurations of Ne-10(7+). The results supplement recent experimental work on these transitions.

  2. Flute stabilization by a cold line-tied blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, D.; Wickham, M.; Rynn, N.

    1982-09-01

    The curvature-driven flute instability in an axisymmetric mirror was stabilized by an annular line-tied plasma blanket. A significant temperature difference was maintained between core and blanket. Theoretical calculations support the experimental observations.

  3. Characterization of equine CSN1S2 variants considering genetics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Pawlak, Piotr; Wodas, Lukasz; Borowska, Alicja; Stachowiak, Anna; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Mackowski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Currently, research interest is increasing in horse milk composition and its effect on human health. Despite previously published studies describing the presence of intra- and interbreed variability of equine milk components, no investigations have focused on the genetic background of this variation. Among horse caseins and the genes encoding them, least is known about the structure and expression of the α-S2 casein gene, CSN1S2. Herein, based on direct sequencing of the equine CSN1S2 coding sequence, we describe the presence of 51-bp insertion-deletion (in/del) polymorphism, which significantly changes the protein sequence (lack or presence of 17-amino acid serine-rich peptide). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the observed in/del polymorphism spanned exactly 2 exons; therefore, we hypothesized that we were observing different CSN1S2 splicing isoforms. However, further investigation indicated that the detected sequence variation was caused by a large (1.3-kb) deletion in the genomic DNA. We found that the polymorphic forms (A, longer; B, shorter; KP658381 and KP658382 GenBank records, respectively) were unevenly distributed among different horse breeds (the highest frequency of variant B was observed in coldblood horses and Haflingers). We propose that the analyzed polymorphism is associated with CSN1S2 expression level (the highest expression was recorded for individuals carrying the BB genotype), which was much more pronounced for milk CSN1S2 protein content than for relative transcript abundance (measured in milk somatic cells). Our results provide insight into the equine CSN1S2 structure and lay a foundation for further functional analyses regarding, for example, allergenicity or physiochemical properties of the observed CSN1S2 variants. PMID:26709185

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  5. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  6. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  7. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  8. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  9. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which the…

  10. A Multidisciplinary Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Trace

    2002-01-01

    Describes New York University's commitment to general mathematics and science education for undergraduate students, embodied in the College of Arts and Science's core curriculum, the Morse Academic Plan, which includes a three-course sequence, Foundations of Scientific Inquiry, specifically designed for non-majors. (EV)

  11. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  12. The Uncommon Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will find scant mention of the words…

  13. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FACILITY CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Assessment Facility Core will continue to collect environmental measures including personal and indoor air monitoring and repeat collection of dust samples from the home and biologic measures including urine and blood samples collected from the mother during pregn...

  14. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  15. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  16. Looking for Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  17. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  18. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  19. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  20. Resolving Supercritical Orion Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Chapman, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Velusamy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical framework for high mass star formation (HMSF) is unclear. Observations reveal a seeming dichotomy between high- and low-mass star formation, with HMSF occurring only in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), mostly in clusters, and with higher star formation efficiencies than low-mass star formation. One crucial constraint to any theoretical model is the dynamical state of massive cores, in particular, whether a massive core is in supercritical collapse. Based on the mass-size relation of dust emission, we select likely unstable targets from a sample of massive cores (Li et al. 2007 ApJ 655, 351) in the nearest GMC, Orion. We have obtained N2H+ (1-0) maps using CARMA with resolution ( 2.5", 0.006 pc) significantly better than existing observations. We present observational and modeling results for ORI22. By revealing the dynamic structure down to Jeans scale, CARMA data confirms the dominance of gravity over turbulence in this cores. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  2. Renewing the Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2007-01-01

    The core curriculum accompanied the development of the academic discipline with multiple names such as Kinesiology, Exercise and Sport Science, and Health and Human Performance. It provides commonalties for undergraduate majors. It is timely to renew this curriculum. Renewal involves strategic reappraisals. It may stimulate change or reaffirm the…

  3. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  4. Core Competencies. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Beth, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to investigate the status of core competencies (i.e., the skills, knowledge, abilities, and attributes that employees across an organization are expected to have to contribute successfully…

  5. The ADNI PET Core

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Foster, Norman L.; Landau, Susan M.; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Koeppe, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This is a progress report of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) PET Core. Methods The Core has supervised the acquisition, quality control, and analysis of longitudinal [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) data in approximately half of the ADNI cohort. In an “add on” study, approximately 100 subjects also underwent scanning with [11C]PIB-PET for amyloid imaging. The Core developed quality control procedures and standardized image acquisition by developing an imaging protocol that has been widely adopted in academic and pharmaceutical industry studies. Data processing provides users with scans that have identical orientation and resolution characteristics despite acquisition on multiple scanner models. The Core labs have used a number of different approaches to characterize differences between subject groups (AD, MCI, controls), to examine longitudinal change over time in glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition, and to assess the use of FDG-PET as a potential outcome measure in clinical trials. Results ADNI data indicate that FDG-PET increases statistical power over traditional cognitive measures, might aid subject selection, and could substantially reduce the sample size in a clinical trial. PIB-PET data showed expected group differences, and identified subjects with significant annual increases in amyloid load across the subject groups. The next activities of the PET core in ADNI will entail developing standardized protocols for amyloid imaging using the [18F]-labeled amyloid imaging agent AV45, which can be delivered to virtually all ADNI sites. Conclusions ADNI has demonstrated the feasibility and utility of multicenter PET studies and is helping to clarify the role of biomarkers in the study of aging and dementia. PMID:20451870

  6. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  7. Gamma line radiation from supernovae. [nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent calculations of core collapse or massive stars result in explosive ejection of the mantle by a reflected shock. These hydrodynamic results are important for predictions of explosive nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission from supernovae. Previous estimates, based on simple parameterized models or the nucleosynthesis in an average supernova, are compared with these latest results.

  8. Suspended core photonic microcells for sensing and device applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ying; Ho, Hoi Lut; Shi, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In-line fiber-optic microcells are fabricated by postprocessing NKT LMA10 photonic crystal fibers. The cells are suspended core (SC) elements created by locally inflating some of the air holes while the core is being tapered. Based on a SC microcell with six air holes, a cantilever beam accelerometer is demonstrated. The microcells could also be used as gain and absorption cells for amplifier and spectroscopy applications. PMID:23722776

  9. Precise determination of the 1s Lamb Shift in hydrogen-like heavy ions at the ESR storage ring using microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kiselev, O.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.; Meier, J. P.; Scholz, P.

    2015-11-01

    The precise determination of the energy of the Lyman α1 and α2 lines in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields. To improve the precision of such experiments, the new detector concept of microcalorimeters, which detect the temperature change of an absorber after an incoming particle or photon has deposited its energy as heat, is now exploited. The microcalorimeters for x-rays used in these experiments consist of arrays of silicon thermometers and x-ray absorbers made of high-Z material. With such detectors, a relative energy resolution of about 1 per mille is obtained in the energy regime of 50-100 keV. Two successful measurement campaigns to determine the 1s Lamb Shift in Pb81+ and Au78+ have been completed: a prototype array has been applied successfully for the determination of the 1s Lamb Shift of Pb81+ at the ESR storage ring at GSI in a first test experiment. Based on the results of this test, a full array with 32 pixels has been equipped and has recently been applied to determine the 1s Lamb Shift in Au78+ ions. The energy of the Lyman-α1 line agrees within error bars well with theoretical predictions. The obtained accuracy is already comparable to the best accuracy obtained with conventional germanium detectors for hydrogen-like uranium.

  10. Human Pancreatic β-Cell G1/S Molecule Cell Cycle Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W.; Salim, Fatimah G.; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E.; Takane, Karen K.; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic β-cells is a key goal of diabetes research, yet induction of adult human β-cell replication has proven frustratingly difficult. In part, this reflects a lack of understanding of cell cycle control in the human β-cell. Here, we provide a comprehensive immunocytochemical “atlas” of G1/S control molecules in the human β-cell. This atlas reveals that the majority of these molecules, previously known to be present in islets, are actually present in the β-cell. More importantly, and in contrast to anticipated results, the human β-cell G1/S atlas reveals that almost all of the critical G1/S cell cycle control molecules are located in the cytoplasm of the quiescent human β-cell. Indeed, the only nuclear G1/S molecules are the cell cycle inhibitors, pRb, p57, and variably, p21: none of the cyclins or cdks necessary to drive human β-cell proliferation are present in the nuclear compartment. This observation may provide an explanation for the refractoriness of human β-cells to proliferation. Thus, in addition to known obstacles to human β-cell proliferation, restriction of G1/S molecules to the cytoplasm of the human β-cell represents an unanticipated obstacle to therapeutic human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493570

  11. AP1S3 is required for hepatitis C virus infection by stabilizing E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Chi, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuying; Yang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 130 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The interactions between viral elements and host factors play critical role on HCV invade, replication and release. Here, we identified adaptor protein complex 1 sigma 3 subunit (AP1S3) as a dependency factor for the efficient HCV infection in hepatoma cells. AP1S3 silencing in cultivated Huh7.5.1 cells significantly reduced the production of HCV progeny particles. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that AP1S3 interacted with the HCV E2 protein. With this interaction, AP1S3 could protect HCV E2 from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Using in vivo ubiquitylation assay, we identified that E6-Associated Protein (E6AP) was associated with HCV E2. In addition, treatment with synthetic peptide that contains the AP1S3-recognized motif inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells. Our data reveal AP1 as a novel host network that is required by viruses during infection and provides a potential target for developing broad-spectrum anti-virus strategies. PMID:27079945

  12. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst). PMID:19905689

  13. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  14. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  15. Computational identification of a transiently open L1/S3 pocket for reactivation of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Wassman, Christopher D.; Baronio, Roberta; Demir, Özlem; Wallentine, Brad D.; Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Hall, Linda V.; Salehi, Faezeh; Lin, Da-Wei; Chung, Benjamin P.; Wesley Hatfield, G.; Richard Chamberlin, A.; Luecke, Hartmut; Lathrop, Richard H.; Kaiser, Peter; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2013-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Reactivation of mutant p53 by small molecules is an exciting potential cancer therapy. Although several compounds restore wild-type function to mutant p53, their binding sites and mechanisms of action are elusive. Here computational methods identify a transiently open binding pocket between loop L1 and sheet S3 of the p53 core domain. Mutation of residue Cys124, located at the centre of the pocket, abolishes p53 reactivation of mutant R175H by PRIMA-1, a known reactivation compound. Ensemble-based virtual screening against this newly revealed pocket selects stictic acid as a potential p53 reactivation compound. In human osteosarcoma cells, stictic acid exhibits dose-dependent reactivation of p21 expression for mutant R175H more strongly than does PRIMA-1. These results indicate the L1/S3 pocket as a target for pharmaceutical reactivation of p53 mutants. PMID:23360998

  16. Pro-inflammatory endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with intersectin-1s down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The response of lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is central to the pathogenesis of lung injury. It is dual in nature, with one facet that is pro-inflammatory and another that is cyto-protective. In previous work, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL rescued ECs from apoptosis triggered by siRNA knockdown of intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a pro-survival protein crucial for ECs function. Here we further characterized the cyto-protective EC response to LPS and pro-inflammatory dysfunction. Methods and Results Electron microscopy (EM) analyses of LPS-exposed ECs revealed an activated/dysfunctional phenotype, while a biotin assay for caveolae internalization followed by biochemical quantification indicated that LPS causes a 40% inhibition in biotin uptake compared to controls. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression, respectively, for several regulatory proteins of intrinsic apoptosis, including ITSN-1s. The decrease in ITSN-1s mRNA and protein expression were countered by Bcl-XL and survivin upregulation, as well as Bim downregulation, events thought to protect ECs from impending apoptosis. Absence of apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL and lack of cytochrome c (cyt c) efflux from mitochondria. Moreover, LPS exposure caused induction and activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and a mitochondrial variant (mtNOS), as well as augmented mitochondrial NO production as measured by an oxidation oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) assay applied on mitochondrial-enriched fractions prepared from LPS-exposed ECs. Interestingly, expression of myc-ITSN-1s rescued caveolae endocytosis and reversed induction of iNOS expression. Conclusion Our results suggest that ITSN-1s deficiency is relevant for the pro-inflammatory ECs dysfunction induced by LPS. PMID:21486462

  17. Double Photoionization into Double Core-Hole States in Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Hikosaka, Y.; Kaneyasu, T.; Shigemasa, E.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Eland, J. H. D.; Aoto, T.; Ito, K.

    2007-05-04

    Double photoionization (DPI) leading to double core-hole states of Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} has been studied using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The assignments of the Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} states are confirmed by the Auger lines extracted from fourfold coincidences including two photoelectrons and two Auger electrons. It is estimated that the core-core DPI into Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} at a photon energy of 301.6 eV has a favored cross section of about 0.3 MB. The intense core-core DPI is due to mixing of the 4d{sup -2} continuum with the 4p single photoionization, which is manifested in the relative intensities of the Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} components.

  18. Double photoionization into double core-hole states in Xe.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Y; Lablanquie, P; Penent, F; Kaneyasu, T; Shigemasa, E; Eland, J H D; Aoto, T; Ito, K

    2007-05-01

    Double photoionization (DPI) leading to double core-hole states of Xe2+ 4d(-2) has been studied using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The assignments of the Xe2+ 4d(-2) states are confirmed by the Auger lines extracted from fourfold coincidences including two photoelectrons and two Auger electrons. It is estimated that the core-core DPI into Xe2+ 4d(-2) at a photon energy of 301.6 eV has a favored cross section of about 0.3 MB. The intense core-core DPI is due to mixing of the 4d(-2) continuum with the 4p single photoionization, which is manifested in the relative intensities of the Xe2+ 4d(-2) components. PMID:17501570

  19. Cooling history of Earth's core with high thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal evolution models of Earth's core constrain the power available to the geodynamo process that generates the geomagnetic field, the evolution of the solid inner core and the thermal history of the overlying mantle. Recent upward revision of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron mixtures by a factor of 2-3 has drastically reduced the estimated power available to generate the present-day geomagnetic field. Moreover, this high conductivity increases the amount of heat that is conducted out of the core down the adiabatic gradient, bringing it into line with the highest estimates of present-day core-mantle boundary heat flow. These issues raise problems with the standard scenario of core cooling in which the core has remained completely well-mixed and relatively cool for the past 3.5 Ga. This paper presents cooling histories for Earth's core spanning the last 3.5 Ga to constrain the thermodynamic conditions corresponding to marginal dynamo evolution, i.e. where the ohmic dissipation remains just positive over time. The radial variation of core properties is represented by polynomials, which gives good agreement with radial profiles derived from seismological and mineralogical data and allows the governing energy and entropy equations to be solved analytically. Time-dependent evolution of liquid and solid light element concentrations, the melting curve, and gravitational energy are calculated for an Fe-O-S-Si model of core chemistry. A suite of cooling histories are presented by varying the inner core boundary density jump, thermal conductivity and amount of radiogenic heat production in the core. All models where the core remains superadiabatic predict an inner core age of ≲ 600Myr , about two times younger than estimates based on old (lower) thermal conductivity estimates, and core temperatures that exceed present estimates of the lower mantle solidus prior to the last 0.5-1.5 Ga. Allowing the top of the core to become strongly subadiabatic in recent times

  20. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: yshen@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  1. Experimental and theoretical study of s 2p and c 1s spectroscopyin cs2

    SciTech Connect

    Eustatiu, I.G.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cooper, G.; Hitchcock, Adam; Turci, C.C.; Rocha, A.B.; Barbatti, M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.

    2006-12-01

    The generalized oscillator strength profiles in the momentumtransfer range (K) of (2 a.u.- 21s transitions of carbon disulfide (CS2) arepresented. Optical oscillator strengths and generalized oscillatorstrength profiles have been calculated for vertical excitation from theground X1SIGMAg+ electronic state to several C(1s) and S(2p) inner-shellelectronic excited states of CS2, using high level ab initio (HF-CI)calculations. The experimental and computed GOS profiles of CS2 arecompared and found to be generally in reasonable agreement.

  2. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  3. Silica aerogel core waveguide.

    PubMed

    Grogan, M D W; Leon-Saval, S G; England, R; Birks, T A

    2010-10-11

    We have selectively filled the core of hollow photonic crystal fibre with silica aerogel. Light is guided in the aerogel core, with a measured attenuation of 0.2 dB/cm at 1540 nm comparable to that of bulk aerogel. The structure guides light by different mechanisms depending on the wavelength. At long wavelengths the effective index of the microstructured cladding is below the aerogel index of 1.045 and guidance is by total internal reflection. At short wavelengths, where the effective cladding index exceeds 1.045, a photonic bandgap can guide the light instead. There is a small region of crossover, where both index- and bandgap-guided modes were simultaneously observed. PMID:20941148

  4. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  5. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  6. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  7. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  8. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  9. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  10. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  11. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  12. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  13. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  14. Is there a connection between broad absorption line quasars and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies?

    SciTech Connect

    Grupe, Dirk; Nousek, John A.

    2015-02-01

    We consider whether broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are similar, as suggested by Brandt and Gallagher and Boroson. For this purpose, we constructed a sample of 11 BAL QSOs from existing Chandra and Swift observations. We found that BAL QSOs and NLS1s both operate at high Eddington ratios L/L{sub Edd}, although BAL QSOs have slightly lower L/L{sub Edd}. BAL QSOs and NLS1s in general have high Fe ii/Hβ and low [O iii]/Hβ ratios following the classic “Boroson and Green” eigenvector 1 relation. We also found that the mass accretion rates M-dot of BAL QSOs and NLS1s are more similar than previously thought, although some BAL QSOs exhibit extreme mass accretion rates of more than 10 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These extreme mass accretion rates may suggest that the black holes in BAL QSOs are relativistically spinning. Black hole masses in BAL QSOs are a factor of 100 larger than NLS1s. From their location on a M−σ plot, we find that BAL QSOs contain fully developed black holes. Applying a principal component analysis to our sample, we find eigenvector 1 to correspond to the Eddington ratio L/L{sub Edd}, and eigenvector 2 to black hole mass.

  15. Is There a Connection between Broad Absorption Line Quasars and Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk; Nousek, John. A.

    2015-02-01

    We consider whether broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are similar, as suggested by Brandt & Gallagher and Boroson. For this purpose, we constructed a sample of 11 BAL QSOs from existing Chandra and Swift observations. We found that BAL QSOs and NLS1s both operate at high Eddington ratios L/{{L}Edd}, although BAL QSOs have slightly lower L/{{L}Edd}. BAL QSOs and NLS1s in general have high Fe ii/Hβ and low [O iii]/Hβ ratios following the classic “Boroson & Green” eigenvector 1 relation. We also found that the mass accretion rates \\dot{M} of BAL QSOs and NLS1s are more similar than previously thought, although some BAL QSOs exhibit extreme mass accretion rates of more than 10 {{M}⊙ } yr-1. These extreme mass accretion rates may suggest that the black holes in BAL QSOs are relativistically spinning. Black hole masses in BAL QSOs are a factor of 100 larger than NLS1s. From their location on a M-σ plot, we find that BAL QSOs contain fully developed black holes. Applying a principal component analysis to our sample, we find eigenvector 1 to correspond to the Eddington ratio L/{{L}Edd}, and eigenvector 2 to black hole mass.

  16. GEOS-CORE

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  17. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  18. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  19. Starless Cores as Fundamental Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignano, Arturo; Molaro, Paolo; Levshakov, Sergei; Centurión, Miriam; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Lapinov, Alexander

    We present high resolution observations in the starless dense molecular core L1512 performed with the Medicina 32m radio telescope. The resolved hfs components of HC3N and NH3 show no kinematic sub-structure and consist of an apparently symmetric peak profile without broadened line wings or self-absorption features suggesting that they sample the same material. The velocity dispersion is 101( ± 1) m s - 1for NH3 and 85( ± 2) m s - 1 for HC3N. The kinetic temperature of the cloud is estimated at 9.2 ( ± 1.2) K and the turbulence is of 76 m s - 1in a subsonic regime. This places L1512 among the most quiescent dark cores and makes it an ideal laboratory to study variations of the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ = {m}e/{m}p by means of observations of inversion lines of NH3 combined with rotational lines of other molecular species.

  20. Interference effects in Auger resonant Raman spectra of CO via selective vibrational excitations across the O 1s{yields}2{pi} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shindo, H.; Kitajima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Makochekanwa, C.; De Fanis, A.; Tamenori, Y.; Okada, K.; Feifel, R.; Sorensen, S.; Kukk, E.; Ueda, K.

    2005-08-15

    The Auger resonant Raman spectra of CO, arising from the transitions to the X and A final electronic states of CO{sup +}, have been recorded at photon energies corresponding to the vibrational excitations v{sup '}=3,5, and 8 in the O 1s{yields}2{pi} resonance. The spectra are simulated within the model that takes into account both the lifetime-vibrational interference (LVI) and interference with the nonresonant photoemission. The spectroscopic parameters, {omega}{sub e}, {omega}{sub e}x{sub e}, {gamma} and r{sub e}, of the O 1s{sup -1}2{pi} core-excited state, necessary for the simulation, have been derived by fitting the Franck-Condon simulation to the total ion yield spectrum, assuming a Morse potential for the O 1s{sup -1}2{pi} state. Not only the LVI but also the interference with the nonresonant photoemission turn out to be significant.

  1. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  2. Narrow line photoassociation in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Zelevinsky, T; Boyd, M M; Ludlow, A D; Ido, T; Ye, J; Ciuryło, R; Naidon, P; Julienne, P S

    2006-05-26

    With ultracold 88Sr in a 1D magic wavelength optical lattice, we performed narrow-line photoassociation spectroscopy near the 1S0 - 3P1 intercombination transition. Nine least-bound vibrational molecular levels associated with the long-range 0u and 1u potential energy surfaces were measured and identified. A simple theoretical model accurately describes the level positions and treats the effects of the lattice confinement on the line shapes. The measured resonance strengths show that optical tuning of the ground state scattering length should be possible without significant atom loss. PMID:16803171

  3. Cell-host, LINE and environment

    PubMed Central

    Del Re, Brunella; Giorgi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements -1 (LINEs, L1s) are retroelements occupying almost 17% of the human genome. L1 retrotransposition can cause deleterious effects on the host-cell and it is generally inhibited by suppressive mechanisms, but it can occur in some specific cells during early development as well as in some tumor cells and in the presence of several environmental factors. In a recent publication we reported that extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field can affect L1 retrotransposition in neuroblastoma cells. In this commentary we discuss the interaction between environment and L1 activity in the light of the new emerging paradigm of host-LINE relationship. PMID:23734298

  4. Nutrient Composition of the "Core of the Core" Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples from the Core Collection designated as the Core of the Core Collection were analyzed from the 2005 crop year. Samples were analyzed for individual amino acids, folic acid and total oil content. Oil mechanically expressed from the seed was analyzed for individual tocopherols and fatty acids...

  5. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Nutrient Composition of the Peanut Core of the Core Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanuts from the Core Collection designated as the Core of the Core Collection were grown in Tifton, GA in 2005. Amino acids, folic acid and total oil content were determined on the whole seed. Amino acid concentrations were generally close to commonly reported values. Folic acid concentration var...

  7. LINE-1 Retrotransposition Activity in Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christine R.; Collier, Pamela; Macfarlane, Catriona; Malig, Maika; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Eichler, Evan E.; Badge, Richard M.; Moran, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) sequences comprise the bulk of retrotransposition activity in the human genome; however, the abundance of highly active or ‘hot’ L1s in the human population remains largely unexplored. Here, we used a fosmid-based, paired-end DNA sequencing strategy to identify 68 full-length L1s which are differentially present among individuals but are absent from the human genome reference sequence. The majority of these L1s were highly active in a cultured cell retrotransposition assay. Genotyping 26 elements revealed that two L1s are only found in Africa and that two more are absent from the H952 subset of the Human Genome Diversity Panel. Therefore, these results suggest that ‘hot’ L1s are more abundant in the human population than previously appreciated, and that ongoing L1 retrotransposition continues to be a major source of inter-individual genetic variation. PMID:20602998

  8. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Identification of transitions from the 1s2l2l'3l'' autoionizing levels of the Be-like Mg IX ion in a plasma heated by a picosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Clark, R. E.; Bryunetkin, B. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnurer, M.; Pikuz, S. A.

    1993-12-01

    The x-ray emission spectrum of a magnesium plasma produced by a picosecond laser has been studied. Dielectronic satellites of the resonance line of the He-like Mg XI ion have been identified for the first time. These satellites result from radiative transitions from 1s2l2l'3l'' autoionizing levels of the Be-like Mg IX ion.

  9. Line-by-line spectroscopic simulations on graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collange, Sylvain; Daumas, Marc; Defour, David

    2008-01-01

    We report here on software that performs line-by-line spectroscopic simulations on gases. Elaborate models (such as narrow band and correlated-K) are accurate and efficient for bands where various components are not simultaneously and significantly active. Line-by-line is probably the most accurate model in the infrared for blends of gases that contain high proportions of H 2O and CO 2 as this was the case for our prototype simulation. Our implementation on graphics processing units sustains a speedup close to 330 on computation-intensive tasks and 12 on memory intensive tasks compared to implementations on one core of high-end processors. This speedup is due to data parallelism, efficient memory access for specific patterns and some dedicated hardware operators only available in graphics processing units. It is obtained leaving most of processor resources available and it would scale linearly with the number of graphics processing units in parallel machines. Line-by-line simulation coupled with simulation of fluid dynamics was long believed to be economically intractable but our work shows that it could be done with some affordable additional resources compared to what is necessary to perform simulations on fluid dynamics alone. Program summaryProgram title: GPU4RE Catalogue identifier: ADZY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 62 776 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 513 247 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: x86 PC Operating system: Linux, Microsoft Windows. Compilation requires either gcc/g++ under Linux or Visual C++ 2003/2005 and Cygwin under Windows. It has been tested using gcc 4.1.2 under Ubuntu Linux 7.04 and using Visual C

  10. Isotope shifts of the 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) {yields} 1s{sup 2}2p{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) transition in the doubly ionized carbon ion C{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-05-15

    Highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations are performed for the 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) {yields} 1s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) transition energy in the isotopomers of C{sup 2+} ion to determine the isotope shifts. Explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and a variational approach that explicitly includes the nuclear motion are employed in the calculations. The leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the transition energy are also calculated using the perturbation theory with the nonrelativistic wave function as the zero-order approximation. It is determined that the {sup 12}C{sup 2+} transitions energy, which is obtained from the calculations to be 182 519.031 cm{sup -1} (vs the experimental value of 182 519.88 cm{sup -1}, an excellent sub-wave-number agreement) up-shifts by 1.755 cm{sup -1} for {sup 13}C{sup 2+} and by additional 1.498 cm{sup -1} for {sup 14}C{sup 2+}. Those shifts are sufficiently large to be measured experimentally.

  11. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment. PMID:25573299

  12. Methods of using (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Richard B; Dewey, Stephen L; Miller, Steven

    2015-03-03

    (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid also known as CPP-115 or its pharmaceutically acceptable salts can be used to treat addiction and neurological disorders such as epilepsy without side effects such as visual field defects caused by vigabatrin (Sabril).

  13. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1.

    PubMed

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  14. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1

    PubMed Central

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  15. Recognition of disturbances with specified morphology in time series: Part 2. Spikes on 1-s magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Agayan, S. M.; Gvishiani, A. D.; Bogoutdinov, Sh. R.; Chulliat, A.

    2012-05-01

    Preliminary magnetograms contain different types of temporal anthropogenic disturbances: spikes, baseline jumps, drifts, etc. These disturbances should be identified and filtered out during the preprocessing of the preliminary records for the definitive data. As of now, at the geomagnetic observatories, such filtering is carried out manually. Most of the disturbances in the records sampled every second are spikes, which are much more abundant than those on the magnetograms sampled every minute. Another important feature of the 1-s magnetograms is the presence of a plenty of specific disturbances caused by short-period geomagnetic pulsations, which must be retained in the definitive records. Thus, creating an instrument for formalized and unified recognition of spikes on the preliminary 1-s magnetograms would largely solve the problem of labor-consuming manual preprocessing of the magnetic records. In the context of this idea, in the present paper, we focus on recognition of the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms as a key point of the problem. We describe here the new algorithm of pattern recognition, SPs, which is capable of automatically identifying the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms with a low probability of missed events and false alarms. The algorithm was verified on the real magnetic data recorded at the French observatory located on Easter Island in the Pacific.

  16. Xbp1s in Pomc neurons connects ER stress with energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal leptin and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show that induction ofthe unfolded protein response transcription factor spliced X-box binding protein 1(Xbp1s) in pro-opio-melanocortin (Pomc) neurons alone is sufficient to pr...

  17. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  18. DHPR alpha1S subunit controls skeletal muscle mass and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Piétri-Rouxel, France; Gentil, Christel; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Baas, Dominique; Mouisel, Etienne; Ferry, Arnaud; Vignaud, Alban; Hourdé, Christophe; Marty, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis

    2010-02-01

    The alpha1S subunit has a dual function in skeletal muscle: it forms the L-type Ca(2+) channel in T-tubules and is the voltage sensor of excitation-contraction coupling at the level of triads. It has been proposed that L-type Ca(2+) channels might also be voltage-gated sensors linked to transcriptional activity controlling differentiation. By using the U7-exon skipping strategy, we have achieved long-lasting downregulation of alpha1S in adult skeletal muscle. Treated muscles underwent massive atrophy while still displaying significant amounts of alpha1S in the tubular system and being not paralysed. This atrophy implicated the autophagy pathway, which was triggered by neuronal nitric oxide synthase redistribution, activation of FoxO3A, upregulation of autophagy-related genes and autophagosome formation. Subcellular investigations showed that this atrophy was correlated with the disappearance of a minor fraction of alpha1S located throughout the sarcolemma. Our results reveal for the first time that this sarcolemmal fraction could have a role in a signalling pathway determining muscle anabolic or catabolic state and might act as a molecular sensor of muscle activity. PMID:20033060

  19. Structure of the S1S2 Glutamate Binding Domain of GluR3

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Wang, Qi; Sondermann, Holger; Oswald, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are the most prevalent excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the vertebrate central nervous system. Determining the structural differences between the binding sites of different subtypes is crucial to our understanding of neuronal circuits and to the development of subtype specific drugs. The structures of the binding domain (S1S2) of the GluR3 (flip) AMPA receptor subunit bound to glutamate and AMPA and the GluR2 (flop) subunit bound to glutamate were determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.9, 2.1, and 1.55 Å, respectively. Overall, the structure of GluR3 (flip) S1S2 is very similar to GluR2 (flop) S1S2 (backbone RMSD of 0.30 ± 0.05 for glutamate-bound and 0.26 ± 0.01 for AMPA-bound). The differences in the flip and flop isoforms are subtle and largely arise from one hydrogen bond across the dimer interface and associated water molecules. Comparison of the binding affinity for various agonists and partial agonists suggest that the S1S2 domains of GluR2 and GluR3 show only small differences in affinity, unlike what is found for the intact receptors (with the exception of one ligand, Cl-HIBO, which has a ten-fold difference in affinity for GluR2 vs GluR3). PMID:19003990

  20. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING ENE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  1. 3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING S. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  2. Studies of Upsilon(1S) bottomonium state production at the Tevatron Collider Experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jundong

    2004-11-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium in hadronic collisions provides an ideal testing ground for our understanding of the production mechanisms for heavy quarks and the non-perturbative QCD effects that bind the quark pairs into quarkonium. In this analysis, the inclusive production cross section of the {Upsilon}(1S) bottomonium state is measured using the {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay mode. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 159.1 {+-} 10.3 pb{sup -1}. We determine differential cross sections as functions of the {Upsilon}(1S) transverse momentum, p{sub T}{sup {Upsilon}}, for three ranges of the {Upsilon}(1S) rapidity: 0 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.6,0.6 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 1.2 and 1.2 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 1.8. The shapes of d{sigma}/d{sub p{sub T}} cross sections show little variation with rapidity and are consistent with the published Run I CDF measurement over the rapidity range |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.4.

  3. Cutting of bent vortex lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenleithner, P.

    1982-07-01

    One of the major problems in the application of type II superconductors is the appearance of resistivity in case where a current-carrying specimen is in a longitudinal magnetic field. This is explained by the onset of flux-line cutting events, followed by cross-joining of the line parts. The calculation given here shows the amount of repulsive force and energy between two curved vortex lines and examines the general stability of the vortex-vortex system. First, the actual interaction potential between curved vortices is computed. It includes all electromagnetic and core overlap terms of interactions and self-interaction, and allows computation of the system energy under all curved vortex-line configurations. A computer program is used to find the form of lowest free energy. To do this, special trial functions are established to describe the three-dimensional form of the vortex-vortex system. In these functions parameters determine the qualitative and quantitative form. The asymptotic boundary conditions are built into the nature of the trial functions. The computer program now minimizes the free energy with respect to these parameters. The resulting repulsive energy and force are more than ten times less than the known results for straight flux lines, especially for small asymptotic cutting angles. There is no sharp maximum in the plot of repulsive force versus flux-line separation. A remarkable results is the loss of general stability below a separation distance of several London penetration depths, depending on the cutting angle and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter. The explanation lies in the local attraction of central sections of the vortices as a result of configurational adaption. This explains the onset of resistance at small currents and small magnetic fields.

  4. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5’- and 3’-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species. PMID:25923814

  5. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species. PMID:25923814

  6. Secretion of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1/sFlt1) requires Arf1, Arf6, and Rab11 GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Joon; Tiwari, Ajit; Inamdar, Shivangi M; Thomas, Christie P; Goel, Apollina; Choudhury, Amit

    2012-01-01

    The soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR-1/sFlt1) is generated by alternative splicing of the FLT1 gene. Secretion of sFlt1 from endothelial cells plays an important role in blood vessel sprouting and morphogenesis. However, excess sFlt1 secretion is associated with diseases such as preeclampsia and chronic kidney disease. To date, the secretory transport process involved in the secretion of sFlt1 is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the itinerary of sFlt1 trafficking along the secretory pathway. To understand the timecourse of sFlt1 secretion, endothelial cells stably expressing sFlt1 were metabolically radiolabeled with [(35)S]-methionine and cysteine. Our results indicate that after initial synthesis the levels of secreted [(35)S]-sFlt1 in the extracellular medium peaks at 8 hours. Treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), a drug which blocks trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex, inhibited extracellular release of sFlt1 suggesting that ER to Golgi and intra-Golgi trafficking of sFlt1 are essential for its secretion. Furthermore, we show that ectopic expression of dominant-negative mutant forms of Arf1, Arf6, and Rab11 as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of these GTPases block secretion of sFlt1 during normoxic and hypoxic conditions suggesting role for these small GTPases. This work is the first to report role of regulatory proteins involved in sFlt1 trafficking along the secretory pathway and may provide insights and new molecular targets for the modulation of sFlt-1 release during physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22962618

  7. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  8. SMA millimeter observations of hot molecular cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Hernández, Vicente; Zapata, Luis; Kurtz, Stan; Garay, Guido

    2014-05-01

    We present Submillimeter Array observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and the CH{sub 3}CN (12 {sub K}-11 {sub K}) line of 17 hot molecular cores associated with young high-mass stars. The angular resolution of the observations ranges from 1.''0 to 4.''0. The continuum observations reveal large (>3500 AU) dusty structures with gas masses from 7 to 375 M {sub ☉}, which probably surround multiple young stars. The CH{sub 3}CN line emission is detected toward all the molecular cores at least up to the K = 6 component and is mostly associated with the emission peaks of the dusty objects. We used the multiple K-components of the CH{sub 3}CN and both the rotational diagram method and a simultaneous synthetic local thermodynamic equilibrium model with the XCLASS program to estimate the temperatures and column densities of the cores. For all sources, we obtained reasonable fits from XCLASS by using a model that combines two components: an extended and warm envelope and a compact hot core of molecular gas, suggesting internal heating by recently formed massive stars. The rotational temperatures lie in the range of 40-132 K and 122-485 K for the extended and compact components, respectively. From the continuum and CH{sub 3}CN results, we infer fractional abundances from 10{sup –9} to 10{sup –7} toward the compact inner components, which increase with the rotational temperature. Our results agree with a chemical scenario in which the CH{sub 3}CN molecule is efficiently formed in the gas phase above 100-300 K, and its abundance increases with temperature.

  9. Optimizing performance by improving core stability and core strength.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, Angela E; Thompson, Kevin G; French, Duncan; Wrigley, Allan; Spears, Iain

    2008-01-01

    Core stability and core strength have been subject to research since the early 1980s. Research has highlighted benefits of training these processes for people with back pain and for carrying out everyday activities. However, less research has been performed on the benefits of core training for elite athletes and how this training should be carried out to optimize sporting performance. Many elite athletes undertake core stability and core strength training as part of their training programme, despite contradictory findings and conclusions as to their efficacy. This is mainly due to the lack of a gold standard method for measuring core stability and strength when performing everyday tasks and sporting movements. A further confounding factor is that because of the differing demands on the core musculature during everyday activities (low load, slow movements) and sporting activities (high load, resisted, dynamic movements), research performed in the rehabilitation sector cannot be applied to the sporting environment and, subsequently, data regarding core training programmes and their effectiveness on sporting performance are lacking. There are many articles in the literature that promote core training programmes and exercises for performance enhancement without providing a strong scientific rationale of their effectiveness, especially in the sporting sector. In the rehabilitation sector, improvements in lower back injuries have been reported by improving core stability. Few studies have observed any performance enhancement in sporting activities despite observing improvements in core stability and core strength following a core training programme. A clearer understanding of the roles that specific muscles have during core stability and core strength exercises would enable more functional training programmes to be implemented, which may result in a more effective transfer of these skills to actual sporting activities. PMID:19026017

  10. Electric Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, E.; Gallardo, C.; Molina, M.; Sanjosé, V.

    We present the computer program called LINES which is able to calculate and visualize the electric field lines due to seven different discrete configurations of electric point charges. Also we show two examples of the graphic screens generated by LINES.

  11. [O III] line properties in two samples of radio-emitting narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, M.; Foschini, L.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; La Mura, G.; Di Mille, F.; Rafanelli, P.

    2016-06-01

    The [O III] λλ 4959, 5007 lines are a useful proxy to test the kinematic of the narrow-line region (NLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN). In AGN, and particularly in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) these lines often show few peculiar features, such as blue wings, often interpreted as outflowing component, and a shift - typically toward lower wavelengths - of the whole spectroscopic feature in some exceptional sources, the so-called blue outliers, which are often associated to strong winds. We investigated the incidence of these peculiarities in two samples of radio-emitting NLS1s, one radio-loud and one radio-quiet. We also studied a few correlations between the observational properties of the [O III] lines and those of the AGN. Our aim was to understand the difference between radio-quiet and radio-loud NLS1s, which may in turn provide useful information on the jet formation mechanism. We find that the NLR gas is much more perturbed in radio-loud than in radio-quiet NLS1s. In particular the NLR dynamics in γ-ray emitting NLS1s appears to be highly disturbed, and this might be a consequence of interaction with the relativistic jet. The less frequently perturbed NLR in radio-quiet NLS1s suggests instead that these sources likely do not harbor a fully developed relativistic jet. Nonetheless blue-outliers in radio-quiet NLS1s are observed, and we interpret them as a product of strong winds.

  12. Core Geometry in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Moira R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they…

  13. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  14. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  15. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  16. 76 FR 63316 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1) and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1) and derivatives thereof and their Use In Therapeutic Applications AGENCY... exclusive license relates to a protein designated secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1). sFRP-1, also known as SARP-2 (Secreted Apoptosis Related Protein-2). The IP covers various sFRP-1 compositions...

  17. Hollow-core fiber Fabry-Perot photothermal gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Tan, Yanzhen; Jin, Wei; Lin, Yuechuan; Qi, Yun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2016-07-01

    A highly sensitive, compact, and low-cost trace gas sensor based on photothermal effect in a hollow-core fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is described. The Fabry-Perot sensor is fabricated by splicing a piece of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) to single-mode fiber pigtails at both ends. The absorption of a pump beam in the hollow core results in phase modulation of probe beam, which is detected by the FPI. Experiments with a 2 cm long HC-PBF with femtosecond laser drilled side-holes demonstrated a response time of less than 19 s and noise equivalent concentration (NEC) of 440 parts-per-billion (ppb) using a 1 s lock-in time constant, and the NEC goes down to 117 ppb (2.7×10-7 in absorbance) by using 77 s averaging time. PMID:27367092

  18. On the response of the O(1S) dayglow emission rate to the Sun's energy input: An empirical model deduced from WINDII/UARS global measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengpan P.; Shepherd, Gordon G.

    2005-03-01

    More than 520,000 emission rate profiles of the O(1S) dayglow (557.7 nm, the atomic oxygen green line) were measured by the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) during 1991-1997, providing an unprecedented and unique resource for studying the O(1S) emission layer, its related physics and chemistry, and the response of the mesosphere and thermosphere to the solar input. The daytime O(1S) emission is one of the most remarkable and persistent phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere between 80 and 280 km. The emission has two components, peaking at 140-180 km and 94-104 km. WINDII measurements show that both components are sensitively correlated with the Sun in the sense that (1) for a given day, the peak emission rates in both the F-region and the E-region increase with increasing cosine of the solar zenith angle, the height of the peak emission rate in the F-region decreases with increasing peak emission rate but that in the E-region does not have a clear relationship with the peak emission rate; (2) both the peak emission rate and its height in the F-region as well in the E-region increase with increasing solar irradiance, i.e., they follow the solar cycle. For the first time an empirical model of the green line emission rate and height of the peak emission are derived from WINDII global measurements over six years as functions of the solar zenith angle and the solar irradiance using the daily solar F10.7 cm flux as a proxy. This model provides a baseline for the unperturbed daytime green line emission for any time and any location. Owing to the direct effect of the solar zenith angle, the emission rate is symmetrical with respect to local noon; and globally, it is symmetrical with respect to the equator at equinox, and is much larger in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere at solstice. As a result, for a constant solar irradiance, the emission rate has an annual oscillation at mid and high latitudes, and

  19. Combustion and core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, J. Robert; Karchmer, Allen

    1991-08-01

    Two types of aircraft power plant are considered: the gas turbine and the reciprocating engine. The engine types considered are: the reciprocating engine, the turbojet engine, the turboprop engine, and the turbofan engine. Combustion noise in gas turbine engines is discussed, and reciprocating-engine combustion noise is also briefly described. The following subject areas are covered: configuration variables, operational variables, characteristics of combustion and core noise, sources of combustion noise, combustion noise theory and comparison with experiment, available prediction methods, diagnostic techniques, measurement techniques, data interpretation, and example applications.

  20. CANOPEN Controller IP Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramia, Maurizio; Montagna, Mario; Furano, Gianluca; Winton, Alistair

    2010-08-01

    This paper will describe the activities performed by Thales Alenia Space Italia supported by the European Space Agency in the definition of a CAN bus interface to be used on Exomars. The final goal of this activity is the development of an IP core, to be used in a slave node, able to manage both the CAN bus Data Link and Application Layer totally in hardware. The activity has been focused on the needs of the EXOMARS mission where devices with different computational performances are all managed by the onboard computer through the CAN bus.

  1. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  2. Dense cores in dark clouds. 10: Ammonia emission in the Perseus molecular cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, E. F.; Myers, P. C.; Goodman, A. A.

    1994-09-01

    We present a survey for dense material around young IRAS sources in the Perseus molecular cloud complex in the NH3 (J, K)=(1,1) line at 1.3 cm. NH3 emission was detected in eight, and mapped in seven, out of 10 positions chosen for study. The dense cores found typically have lower masses and narrower line widths than cores previously studied in Perseus and are located near sources of lower luminosity. NH3 cores are found throughout the Perseus complex; however, much of the detected dense gas is concentrated into two filamentary 'ridges' located in the western part. As a group, NH3 cores in Perseus have a mean line width of 0.6 km/s, mean radius of 0.12 pc, mean kinetic temperature of 13 K, and mean mass of 9 solar mass. These mean values are larger than the mean values for NH3 cores with associated stars in Taurus, but smaller than the mean values for cores associated with stars in Orion A. Some of the cores in Perseus are 'thermally dominated', with thermal and nonthermal line widths similar to most Taurus cores, while others are 'nonthermally dominated' and are more similar to the cores in Orion A. We conclude that the Perseus complex is intermediate in its star-forming potential between the predominantly low-mass star-producing regions like Taurus and the regions capable of the producing high-mass stars such as Orion A.

  3. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Double Auger Decay and Two-Step Shake-Off Resulting from the Relaxation of Core Excited Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. P.; Schoffler, M.; Jahnke, T.; Kreidi, K.; Titze, J.; Dorner, R.; Stuck, C.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th.; Landers, A. L.

    2011-05-01

    We have conducted a COLTRIMS experiment at the ALS-LBNL to investigate the core excitation of neon: Ne + γ --> Ne(1s2s2 2p6 3 p) . The subsequent electronic relaxation produced among others, the Ne2+ charge state. An analysis of this channel revealed mechanisms that include Double Auger (DA) decay as well as a two-step shake-off process involving the 3 p electron. In addition, we have studied the energy sharing and angular correlation that takes place between the continuum electrons. These detailed measurements further our understanding of the sequential nature of PCI and the characterization of the DA process. Lastly, we will demonstrate how the series of line energies associated with the shake process can be exploited to produce an extremely sensitive method for calibrating a COLTRIMS spectrometer. We have conducted a COLTRIMS experiment at the ALS-LBNL to investigate the core excitation of neon: Ne + γ --> Ne(1s2s2 2p6 3 p) . The subsequent electronic relaxation produced among others, the Ne2+ charge state. An analysis of this channel revealed mechanisms that include Double Auger (DA) decay as well as a two-step shake-off process involving the 3 p electron. In addition, we have studied the energy sharing and angular correlation that takes place between the continuum electrons. These detailed measurements further our understanding of the sequential nature of PCI and the characterization of the DA process. Lastly, we will demonstrate how the series of line energies associated with the shake process can be exploited to produce an extremely sensitive method for calibrating a COLTRIMS spectrometer. Supported by AMOS Program, Office of BES, Division of Chemical Sciences, U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  5. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2015-09-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed cs in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with a Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for Pext. Our results correspond to Mcore=1.2cs4 (G3ρ0v02)-1/2 and Rcore=0.34 cs2 (Gρ0v02)-1/2 for ρ0 and v0 the large-scale mean density and velocity. For our parameter range, the median Mcore 0.1-1M⊙, but a very high pressure cloud could have lower characteristic core mass. We find cores and filaments form simultaneously, and filament column densities are a factor of 2 greater than the surrounding cloud when cores first collapse. We also show that cores identified in our simulations have physical properties comparable to those observed in the Perseus cloud. Superthermal cores in our models are generally also magnetically supercritical, suggesting that the same may be true in observed clouds.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  7. The SCORPIO core surveillance system - operational experience and new methods development

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, T.; Berg, O.; Hval, S.

    1995-12-31

    The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators that can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety because undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Second, a more flexible and efficient operation of the plant is made possible. The improvement in surveillance is obtained partly by better surveillance of core instrumentation and by running detailed core simulators on-line. The complete system has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode.

  8. IRAS16293E revisited: a new understanding of a prestellar core in interaction with an outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, L.; Lefèvre, C.; Belloche, A.; Menten, K.; Parise, B.; Güsten, R.

    2016-05-01

    The study of prestellar cores starts with establishing their density and temperature structures. To explore the densest part, deu-terated species, N-bearing molecules, or dust are usually considered. Among prestellar cores, IRAS16293E is a rare case of a core being perturbed by the outflow of a nearby protostar (IRAS16293-2422 A/B). A part of the outflow hits the core and heats it, introducing a temperature gradient that makes the analysis difficult. It is only after having gathered observations from Spitzer, Herschel, SCUBA, MAMBO, and of various molecular lines from CSO, APEX, JCMT and IRAM that a clearer picture of this core has finally arisen.

  9. Core Curriculum Analysis: A Tool for Educational Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levander, Lena M.; Mikkola, Minna

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the outcome of a dimensional core curriculum analysis. The analysis process was an integral part of an educational development project, which aimed to compact and clarify the curricula of the degree programmes. The task was also in line with the harmonising of the degree structures as part of the Bologna process within higher…

  10. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data. PMID:17839632

  11. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  12. The AP2-type transcription factors DORNRÖSCHEN and DORNRÖSCHEN-LIKE promote G1/S transition.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Ingo; Frerichs, Anneke; Glowa, Dorothea; Velo, Laura; Comelli, Petra; Chandler, John W; Werr, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The paralogous genes DORNRÖSCHEN (DRN) and DORNRÖSCHEN-LIKE (DRNL) encode AP2-type transcription factors that are expressed and act cell-autonomously in the central stem-cell zone or lateral organ founder cells (LOFCs) in the peripheral zone of the Arabidopsis shoot meristem (SAM), but their molecular contribution is unknown. Here, we show using the Arabidopsis thaliana MERISTEM LAYER 1 promoter that DRN and DRNL share a common function in cell cycle progression and potentially provide local competence for G1-S transitions in the SAM. Analysis of double transgenic DRN::erGFP and DRNL::erCERULEAN promoter fusion lines suggests that the trajectory of this cellular competence starts with DRN activity in the central stem-cell zone and extends locally via DRNL activity into groups of founder cells at the IM or FM periphery. Our data support the scenario that after gene duplication, DRN and DRNL acquired different transcription domains within the shoot meristem, but retained protein function that affects cell cycle progression, either centrally in stem cells or peripherally in primordial founder cells, a finding that is of general relevance for meristem function. PMID:27277595

  13. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  14. Method for estimating ionicities of oxides using O1s photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L. Q.; Li, Y. C.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Xue, L. C.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2015-09-01

    The average valence, ValO, of the oxygen anions in the perovskite oxide BaTiO3, was found using O1s photoelectron spectra to be -1.55. This experimental result is close to the theoretical value for BaTiO3 (-1.63) calculated by Cohen [Nature 358, 136 (1992)] using density functional theory. Using the same approach, we obtained values of ValO for several monoxides, and investigated the dependence of ValO and the ionicity on the second ionization energy, V(M2+), of the metal cation. We found that the dependence of the ionicity on V(M2+) in this work is close to that reported by Phillips [Rev. Mod. Phys. 42, 317 (1970)]. We therefore suggest that O1s photoelectron spectrum measurements should be accepted as a general experimental method for estimating the ionicity and average valence of oxygen anions.

  15. Glauber calculations of polarization of Lyman-alpha resulting from e/-/-H/1s/ collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Thomas, B. K.; Sheorey, V. B.

    1972-01-01

    We have calculated the polarization fraction of the Lyman-alpha radiation emitted in e/-/-H/1s/ collisions using the Glauber, Born, and various Vainshtein approximations, and have compared these predictions with observation. We find that the Born, Glauber and all forms of the Vainshtein yield results which are very close to each other and to the data in the energy range from 30 to 700 eV. The comparatively small differences between the various approximations are detailed in the text; also, the reason for the close agreement of the predicted polarization fractions - although the computed 1s-2p total and differential cross sections are not so close - is explained. With respect to the Glauber approximation, the importance of computing the phase integral along a direction perpendicular to the momentum transfer q at each value of q, is stressed.

  16. Dielectron Widths of the {upsilon}(1S,2S,3S) Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J.L.; Adam, N.E.; Alexander, J.P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R.S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C.D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Kuznetsov, V.E.

    2006-03-10

    We determine the dielectron widths of the {upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(3S) resonances with better than 2% precision by integrating the cross section of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{upsilon} over the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy. Using e{sup +}e{sup -} energy scans of the {upsilon} resonances at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring and measuring {upsilon} production with the CLEO detector, we find dielectron widths of 1.252{+-}0.004({sigma}{sub stat}){+-}0.019({sigma}{sub syst}) keV, 0.581{+-}0.004{+-}0.009 keV, and 0.413{+-}0.004{+-}0.006 keV for the {upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(3S), respectively.

  17. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M-Σ technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey team

    2016-04-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M–Σ technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  19. The search for a CP-odd light Higgs boson in upsilon 1S data at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorie, Jamal Tildon

    We conduct a search for a CP-odd light Higgs, A0, in a sample of (102 +/- 2) x106 Upsilon(1 S) by looking for Upsilon(1S) → gamma A0 radiative decays with A0 → tau+tau--. No significant evidence of such decays is found. We set an 90% confidence level upper limit on BR(Upsilon(1S) → gamma A0) x BR(A0 → tau+tau-- ) between 4.0 x10-6 to 4.5 x 10 -5 foA0 masses ranging from 3.6 GeV to 9.3 GeV. This represents a twofold improvement on current world limits for using Upsilon(1S) from e+e -- →Upsilon(1S) production and is in agreement with recent limits using Upsilon(1S) from Upsilon(3 S) → pipiUpsilon(1S) decays.

  20. OT2_rvisser_2: Hot water in hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.

    2011-09-01

    As matter flows from the ice-cold envelope onto a forming protostar, it heats up from temperatures of 10 K to more than 100 K. The region where the temperature exceeds 100 K (the hot core or hot corino) is where the molecular envelope connects with both the seedling circumstellar disk and the bipolar outflow. As the envelope contracts from larger scales, a lot of material passes through the hot core before accreting onto the disk. The hot core is therefore a crucial step in establishing the physical and chemical properties of planetary building blocks. However, little is yet known about hot cores. How large and how massive are they? How hot are they? Are they exposed to strong UV or X-ray fluxes? We propose the rotationally excited 3(12)-3(03) line of H2-18O at 1095.6 GHz (E_up = 249 K) as a novel probe into the properties of hot cores. This line was detected as a narrow emission feature (FWHM ~4 km/s) in a deep integration (5 hr) in the Class 0 protostar NGC1333 IRAS2A. Comparing the line intensity to radiative transfer models, we find a tentative H2-16O hot core abundance of 4x10^-6. This is a factor of 50 lower than one would expect from simple evaporation of water ice above 100 K. Why is the hot core of IRAS2A so much "drier" than expected? Is most of the water destroyed by UV photons and/or X-rays? We propose to measure the water abundance in the hot cores of a sample of five additional Class 0 and I protostars by obtaining deep integrations of the 3(12)-3(03) lines of H2-16O and H2-18O. This mini-survey will reveal whether NGC1333 IRAS2A is unique in having a "dry" hot core, or whether "dry" hot cores are a common feature of low-mass embedded protostars. If they are a common feature, it means they are a more hostile environment than previously thought, with high fluxes of destructive UV photons and X-rays.

  1. Abstract Line Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevinskas, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a unit on the exploration of line. The unit was composed of two individual line lessons. In the first lesson, students were introduced to line as an element of design. They were asked to describe different types of lines, and look for them in art reproductions. The second lesson in the unit involved painting…

  2. The Language of Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breig-Allen, Cheryl; Hill, Janet; Geismar-Ryan, Lori; Cadwell, Louise Boyd

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project about lines in the environment used with 2- and 3-year olds and based on the Reggio Emilia approach. Activities included making tracks with riding toys, drawing lines on papers, seeing cloud lines, and making lines with yarn and Cuisenaire rods. Shows how young children's observations and ongoing discoveries can uncover their…

  3. Studies of Yb ^1S0 -- ^3P0 clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao

    2005-05-01

    We are exploring two quite different methods for observing the ultra-sharp 6s^2 ^1S0 -- 6s6p ^3P0 optical interval in atomic Yb, which is considered a primary candidate for future optical frequency standards [1].In the first method, we observe the 578 nm single photon transition allowed in the odd isotopes through internal hyperfine coupling of the nuclear spin.† We shine a 578 nm laser beam on cold Yb atoms held in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and detect a decrease in MOT fluorescence when the laser is resonant with the clock transition.† Our second approach is to use the even Yb isotopes, connecting the ^1S0 and ^3P0 states† by† a multi- photon transition [2]. Sharp electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption (EITA) resonance features appear when the photon frequencies combine to equal† the ^1S0 -- ^3P0 clock interval.† We will describe our initial studies of† 2 and 3 photon resonances in Yb, including Doppler-free 3 photon EITA. [1]S. G.† Porsev, A. Derevianko, E. N. Fortson, Phys. Rev. A 69, 021403(R)† (2004); H. Katori, in Proc. 6th Symposium Frequency Standards and Metrology, edited by P. Gill (World Scienti.c, Singapore, 2002), pp. 323-330 [2]Tao Hong, Claire Cramer, Warren Nagourney, E. N. Fortson, physics/0409051 and to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett.; Robin Santra, Ennio Arimondo, Tetsuya Ido, Crhis H. Greene, Jun Ye, physics/0411197

  4. Kondo effect of trivalent Tm in Y 0.9Tm 0.1S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haen, P.; Lapierre, F.; Mignot, J. M.; Flouquet, J.; Holtzberg, F.; Penney, T.

    1983-02-01

    The existence of a Kondo effect in a trivalent alloy Y 0.9Tm 0.1 S is shown by the Curie-Weiss behavior of the susceptibility and by a ln T decrease of Δϱ = ϱ alloy - ϱ YS above ˜ 12 K comparable with that observed in TmS. Comparisons are made with the Kondo dilute alloys of the intermediate valent system (Y,Tm)Se.

  5. Intersectin-1s: an important regulator of cellular and molecular pathways in lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Dan N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are severe syndromes resulting from the diffuse damage of the pulmonary parenchyma. ALI and ARDS are induced by a plethora of local or systemic insults, leading to the activation of multiple pathways responsible for injury, resolution, and repair or scarring of the lungs. Despite the large efforts aimed at exploring the roles of different pathways in humans and animal models and the great strides made in understanding the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS, the only viable treatment options are still dependent on ventilator and cardiovascular support. Investigation of the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for initiation and resolution or advancement toward lung scarring in ALI/ARDS animal models led to a better understanding of the disease’s complexity and helped in elucidating the links between ALI and systemic multiorgan failure. Although animal models of ALI/ARDS have pointed out a variety of new ideas for study, there are still limited data regarding the initiating factors, the critical steps in the progression of the disease, and the central mechanisms dictating its resolution or progression to lung scarring. Recent studies link deficiency of intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a prosurvival protein of lung endothelial cells, to endothelial barrier dysfunction and pulmonary edema as well as to the repair/recovery from ALI. This review discusses the effects of ITSN-1s deficiency on pulmonary endothelium and its significance in the pathology of ALI/ARDS. PMID:24618535

  6. Intersectin-1s: an important regulator of cellular and molecular pathways in lung injury.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Dan N; Bardita, Cristina; Tandon, Rajive; Predescu, Sanda A

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are severe syndromes resulting from the diffuse damage of the pulmonary parenchyma. ALI and ARDS are induced by a plethora of local or systemic insults, leading to the activation of multiple pathways responsible for injury, resolution, and repair or scarring of the lungs. Despite the large efforts aimed at exploring the roles of different pathways in humans and animal models and the great strides made in understanding the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS, the only viable treatment options are still dependent on ventilator and cardiovascular support. Investigation of the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for initiation and resolution or advancement toward lung scarring in ALI/ARDS animal models led to a better understanding of the disease's complexity and helped in elucidating the links between ALI and systemic multiorgan failure. Although animal models of ALI/ARDS have pointed out a variety of new ideas for study, there are still limited data regarding the initiating factors, the critical steps in the progression of the disease, and the central mechanisms dictating its resolution or progression to lung scarring. Recent studies link deficiency of intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a prosurvival protein of lung endothelial cells, to endothelial barrier dysfunction and pulmonary edema as well as to the repair/recovery from ALI. This review discusses the effects of ITSN-1s deficiency on pulmonary endothelium and its significance in the pathology of ALI/ARDS. PMID:24618535

  7. Search for Production of Invisible Final States in Single-Photon Decays of Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Chistiakova, M.V.; Jensen, F.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We search for single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) resonance, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma} + invisible, where the invisible state is either a particle of definite mass, such as a light Higgs boson A{sup 0}, or a pair of dark matter particles, {chi}{bar {chi}}. Both A{sup 0} and {chi} are assumed to have zero spin. We tag {Upsilon}(1S) decays with a dipion transition {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) and look for events with a single energetic photon and significant missing energy. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range m{sub A{sup o}} {le} 9.2GeV and m{sub {chi}} {le} 4.5GeV in the sample of 98 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays collected with the BABAR detector and set stringent limits on new physics models that contain light dark matter states.

  8. Determination of the auroral O/1S/ production sources from coordinated rocket and satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Torr, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines the auroral excitation mechanisms using data collected in a satellite/rocket/aurora coordination. Past theories considered that variation with altitude of the emission from the O(1S) state is the same as that from the N2(+) first negative band system. Actually, the source function for O(1S) does not covary with N2(+) but has a smaller scale height. The covariation is due to quenching of the source function by O(3P). The steadiness of the aurora in a flight of the Michigan Airglow Payload allows the profile to be differentiated for direct comparison with theory. It is concluded that when most of the relevant variables for production of the O(1S) state are simultaneously measured in aurora, the major source functions are dissociative recombination of O2(+) above 210 km to apogee at 250 km, and below 180 km the energy transfer from N2(A3sigma) in the oxygen atom quenching reaction.

  9. Effects of CSN1S2 Genotypes on Economic Traits in Chinese Dairy Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yue, X. P.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Mao, C. C.; Lan, X. Y.; Chen, H.; Lei, C. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate allele frequencies at the CSN1S2 locus in two Chinese dairy goat breeds and the effects of its variation on dairy goat economic traits. Seven hundred and eight goats from Xinong Saanen (XS, n = 268) and Guanzhong (GZ, N = 440) breeds were selected. The milk samples of 268 XS goats were collected during the middle of lactation, body size parameters (708 goats) and daily milk yield (202 goats) were registered. The RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) and SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) were used to detect the polymorphisms in CSN1S2. The Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium and the associations between body size, milk yield and composition and the genotypes were calculated. The results revealed that only A and F CSN1S2 alleles were found in the two Chinese dairy goat breeds. Allelic frequencies of A and F were 0.795, 0.205 and 0.739, 0.261 in Xinong Saanen and Guanzhong population respectively. Xinong Saanen breed was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while Guanzhong breed deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.05). The association of polymorphism with economic traits indicated that the goats with FF genotype have higher milk fat and total solid concentration than those with AA and AF genotypes (p<0.05). PMID:25049867

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  11. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  12. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    PubMed

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized. PMID:19038373

  13. Electrical Transmission Line Diametrical Retention Mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2006-01-03

    The invention is a mechanism for retaining an electrical transmission line. In one embodiment of the invention it is a system for retaining an electrical transmission line within downhole components. The invention allows a transmission line to be attached to the internal diameter of drilling components that have a substantially uniform drilling diameter. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second end of a drill pipe, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The invention allows the electrical transmission line to withstand the tension and compression of drill pipe during routine drilling cycles.

  14. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully. PMID:14712545

  15. Core/corona modeling of diode-imploded annular loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, R. E.; Guillory, J. U.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of a tenuous exterior plasma corona with anomalous resistivity on the compression and heating of a hollow, collisional aluminum z-pinch plasma are predicted by a one-dimensional code. As the interior ("core") plasma is imploded by its axial current, the energy exchange between core and corona determines the current partition. Under the conditions of rapid core heating and compression, the increase in coronal current provides a trade-off between radial acceleration and compression, which reduces the implosion forces and softens the pitch. Combined with a heuristic account of energy and momentum transport in the strongly coupled core plasma and an approximate radiative loss calculation including Al line, recombination and Bremsstrahlung emission, the current model can provide a reasonably accurate description of imploding annular plasma loads that remain azimuthally symmetric. The implications for optimization of generator load coupling are examined.

  16. Deep Extinction Mapping in Molecular Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Klaus; Urban, Laurie; Rieke, Marcia

    2014-12-01

    This proposal is for preparatory observations of the targets selected for a future James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) guaranteed time project, as well as for a more general preparation for the science of this project. Our JWST project with NIRCam, NIRSpec, and MIRI is aimed at obtaining the deepest, and therefore best sampled, extinction maps of a sample of molecular cores, selected to contain quiescent, collapsing, and star-forming cores. We will also obtain spectroscopy of suitable, selected background stars for a detailed study of both the continuum extinction law and the ice feature absorption. The proposed Spitzer IRAC observations are aimed at identifying specific background stars for these future spectroscopic observations with JWST NIRSpec or NIRCam (grism), and with MIRI. For detailed planning of the JWST observations, we need to know how many suitable background stars are available, how many NIRSpec multi-slit pointing will be required, or whether slitless NIRCam grism spectroscopy is feasible. In addition to their role in preparing future JWST observations, the proposed Spitzer observations will immediately be used, together with UKIRT data we have already obtained and together with archival imaging data from other ground-based telescopes, to compute column density maps of the target objects and compare those with JCMT continuum and CO line emission maps to study the temperature distribution and gas freeze-out effects in those dense molecular cores. This work will form the main part of L. Urban's Ph.D. thesis project.

  17. Detectability of deuterated water in prestellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, D.; Taquet, V.; Vastel, C.; Caselli, P.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Water is an important molecule in the chemical and thermal balance of dense molecular gas, but knowing its history throughout the various stages of the star formation is a fundamental problem. Its molecular deuteration provides us with a crucial clue to its formation history. H2O has recently been detected for the first time towards the prestellar core L1544 with the Herschel Space Observatory with a high spectral resolution (HIFI instrument). Aims: Prestellar cores provide the original reservoir of material from which future planetary systems are built, but few observational constraints exist on the formation of water and none on its deuteration before the collapse starts and a protostar forms at the centre. We report on new APEX observations of the ground state 10,1-00,0 HDO transition at 464 GHz towards the prestellar core L1544. The line is undetected, and we present an extensive study of the conditions for its detectability in cold and dense cloud cores. Methods: The water and deuterated water abundances have been estimated using an advanced chemical model simplified for the limited number of reactions or processes that are active in cold regions (<15 K). In this model, water is removed from the gas phase by freezing onto dust grains and by photodissociation. We use the LIME radiative transfer code to compute the expected intensity and profile of both H2O and HDO lines and compare them with the observations. Results: The predicted H2O line intensity of the LIME model using an abundance and structure profile, coupled with their dust opacity, is over-estimated by a factor of ~3.5 compared to the observations. We present several ad hoc profiles that best-fit the observations and compare the profiles with results from an astrochemical modelling, coupling gas phase and grain surface chemistry. The water deuteration weakly depends on the external visual extinction, the external ISRF, and contraction timescale. The [HDO]/[H2O] and [D2O]/[H2O] abundance

  18. Structural and spectral studies of sunspots. [umbral core modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyller, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of umbral cores, both by multicolor photometry and by narrow band photometry in the vicinity of the sodium D lines, are described, and evidence is given which supports the validity of many umbral models, each of which describes different aspects of the observed umbral cores. Theoretical studies carried on at the observatory include the following: (1) Zeeman profiles of the sodium D sub 2 line and other lines; (2) turbulent heat conduction, sound waves, and the missing flux in sunspots; (3) chromospheric heating above spots by Alfven waves; (4) magnetic convection in the sun and solar neutrinos; (5) models of starspots on flare stars; (5) starspots on the primaries of contact binary systems; and (6) implications of starspots on red dwarfs.

  19. Unresolved dielectronic satellites of the resonance line of heliumlike iron (Fe XXV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Horton, R.; Johnson, D.; Roney, W.; Sauthoff, N.; Silver, E.; Stodiek, W.

    1981-02-01

    (1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2pnl, n greater than or equal to 3) dielectronic satellites of the resonance line of Fe XXV at 1.85 A have been observed from PLT (Princeton Large Torus) tokamak discharges and are used for a detailed comparison with theory. The necessary corrections for Doppler broadening measurements are discussed, and accurate satellite to resonance line ratios allowing for a determination of the total dielectronic recombination rate of Fe XXV are derived.

  20. Robust atomistic calculation of dislocation line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajewski, B. A.; Pavia, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The line tension Γ of a dislocation is an important and fundamental property ubiquitous to continuum scale models of metal plasticity. However, the precise value of Γ in a given material has proven difficult to assess, with literature values encompassing a wide range. Here results from a multiscale simulation and robust analysis of the dislocation line tension, for dislocation bow-out between pinning points, are presented for two widely-used interatomic potentials for Al. A central part of the analysis involves an effective Peierls stress applicable to curved dislocation structures that markedly differs from that of perfectly straight dislocations but is required to describe the bow-out both in loading and unloading. The line tensions for the two interatomic potentials are similar and provide robust numerical values for Al. Most importantly, the atomic results show notable differences with singular anisotropic elastic dislocation theory in that (i) the coefficient of the \\text{ln}(L) scaling with dislocation length L differs and (ii) the ratio of screw to edge line tension is smaller than predicted by anisotropic elasticity. These differences are attributed to local dislocation core interactions that remain beyond the scope of elasticity theory. The many differing literature values for Γ are attributed to various approximations and inaccuracies in previous approaches. The results here indicate that continuum line dislocation models, based on elasticity theory and various core-cut-off assumptions, may be fundamentally unable to reproduce full atomistic results, thus hampering the detailed predictive ability of such continuum models.

  1. Vortex line in the unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeira, Lucas; Vitiello, Silvio A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2016-04-01

    We report diffusion Monte Carlo results for the ground state of unpolarized spin-1/2 fermions in a cylindrical container and properties of the system with a vortex-line excitation. The density profile of the system with a vortex line presents a nonzero density at the core. We calculate the ground-state energy per particle, the superfluid pairing gap, and the excitation energy per particle. These simulations can be extended to calculate the properties of vortex excitations in other strongly interacting systems such as superfluid neutron matter using realistic nuclear Hamiltonians.

  2. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1985-01-01

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  3. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  4. Systems, methods and apparatus for developing and maintaining evolving systems with software product lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Pena, Joaquin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which an evolutionary system is managed and viewed as a software product line. In some embodiments, the core architecture is a relatively unchanging part of the system, and each version of the system is viewed as a product from the product line. Each software product is generated from the core architecture with some agent-based additions. The result may be a multi-agent system software product line.

  5. Lifetime vibrational interference during the NO 1s-1π ^ast resonant excitation studied by the NO^+(A ^1Pi → X ^1Σ^+) fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, A.; Kielich, W.; Werner, L.; Demekhin, Ph. V.; Omel'Yanenko, D. V.; Sukhorukov, V. L.; Schartner, K.-H.; Schmoranzer, H.

    2007-11-01

    Dispersed fluorescence from fragments formed after the de-excitation of the 1s-1π ast resonances of NastO and NOast has been measured in the spectral range of 118 142 nm. This range is dominated by lines of atomic nitrogen and oxygen fragments and by the A 1Pi ≤ft(vprimeright) → X 1Σ+≤ft(vprime primeright) bands in the NO+ ion which result from the participator Auger decay of the 1s-1π ast resonances. Ab-initio calculations of the transition probabilities between vibrational levels during the reaction NO X 2Pi≤ft(v0=0right) → Nast O≤ft( NOastright) 1s-1π ast ≤ft( vrright) Longrightarrow NO+ A 1Pi ≤ft(vprimeright) → X 1Σ+≤ft(vprime primeright) were used to explain the observed intensity dependence for the A≤ft(vprime right) → X≤ft(vprime primeright) fluorescence bands on the exciting-photon energy across the resonances and on both vprime and vprime prime vibrational quantum numbers. The multiplet structure of the 1s-1π ast resonance and lifetime vibrational interference explain the observed exciting-photon energy dependence of the A≤ft( vprimeright) → X≤ft(vprime primeright) fluorescence intensity. A strong spin-orbit coupling between singlet and triplet states of NO+ is proposed to reduce additional cascade population of the A 1Pi state via radiative transitions from the W 1Δ and Aprime 1Σ- states and to explain remaining differences between measured and calculated integral fluorescence intensities.

  6. Attenuation of krüppel-like factor 4 facilitates carcinogenesis by inducing g1/s phase arrest in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Erlin; Ma, Xin; Li, Hongzhao; Zhang, Peng; Ni, Dong; Chen, Weihao; Gao, Yu; Fan, Yang; Pang, Haigang; Shi, Taoping; Ding, Qiang; Wang, Baojun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor with diverse functions in various cancer types; however, the function of KLF4 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) carcinogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we initially examined KLF4 expression by using a cohort of surgically removed ccRCC specimens and cell lines. Results indicated that the transcription and translation of KLF4 were lower in ccRCC tissues than in patient-matched normal tissues. Furthermore, the KLF4 expression was significantly downregulated in the five ccRCC cell lines at protein and mRNA levels compared with that in normal renal proximal tubular epithelial cell lines (HKC). KLF4 downregulation was significantly correlated with tumor stage and tumor diameter. Promoter hypermethylation may contribute to its low expression. In addition, in vitro studies indicated that the KLF4 overexpression significantly inhibited proliferation in human ccRCC cell lines 786-O and ACHN. Moreover, the KLF4 overexpression arrested the cell cycle progress at the G1/S phase transition by upregulating p21 (WAF1/CIP1) expression and downregulating cyclin D1 expression, KLF4 knockdown in HKC cells did the opposite. In vivo studies confirmed the anti-proliferative effect of KLF4. Our results suggested that KLF4 had an important function in suppressing the growth of ccRCC. PMID:23861801

  7. Microsatellite-based fine mapping of the Van der Woude syndrome locus to an interval of 4.1 cM between D1S245 and D1S414

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, A.; Schmelzle, R.; Murray, J.C.; Scherpbier-Heddema, T.; Buetow, K.H.; Weissenbach, J.; Ludwig, K.; Zingg, M.

    1995-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder characterized by lip pits, clefting of the primary or secondary palate, and hypodontia. The gene has been localized, by RFLP-based linkage studies, to region 1q32-41 between D1S65-REN and D1S65-TGFB2. In this study we report the linkage analysis of 15 VWS families, using 18 microsatellite markers. Multipoint linkage analysis places the gene, with significant odds of 2,344:1, in a 4.1-cM interval flanked by D1S245 and D1S414. Two-point linkage analysis demonstrates close linkage of VWS with D1S205 (lod score [Z] = 24.41 at {theta} = .00) and with D1S491 (Z = 21.23 at {theta} = .00). The results revise the previous assignment of the VWS locus and show in an integrated map of the region 1q32-42 that the VWS gene resides more distally than previously suggested. When information about heterozygosity of the closely linked marker D1S491 in the affected members of the VWS family with a microdeletion is taken into account, the VWS critical region can be further narrowed, to the 3.6-cM interval between D1S491 and D1S414. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiorkowski, Maciej; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the effect of resonant coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset using the fully vectorial method based on the transformation optics formalism. Our study revealed that the resonant couplings to lower order cladding modes predicted by perturbative methods and observed experimentally in fibers with small core offsets are in fact prohibited for larger core offsets. This effect is related to the lack of phase matching caused by elongation of the optical path of the fundamental modes in the helical core. Moreover, strong couplings to the cladding modes of the azimuthal modal number much higher than predicted by perturbative methods may be observed for large core offsets, as the core offset introduces higher order angular harmonics in the field distribution of the fundamental modes. Finally, in contrast to previous studies, we demonstrate the existence of spectrally broad polarization sensitive couplings to the cladding modes suggesting that helical core fibers with large core offsets may be used as broadband circular polarizers.

  9. Reconnection of vorticity lines and magnetic lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and fluid vorticity share many features. First, as divergence-free vector fields they are conveniently visualized in terms of their field lines, curves that are everywhere tangent to the field. The lines indicate direction and their density indicates field strength. The question arises of the extent to which the evolution of the fields can be treated in terms of the evolution of their field lines. Newcomb (1958) derived the general conditions on the evolution of vector fields that permit the identification of field lines from one instant to the next. The equations of evolution of the vorticity field and the magnetic field fall within Newcomb's analysis. The dynamics of the flows differ between these two systems, so that geometrically similar phenomena happen in different ways in the two systems. In this paper the geometrical similarities are emphasized. Reconnection will be defined here as evolution in which it is not possible to preserve the global identification of some field lines. There is a close relation between reconnection and the topology of the vector field lines. Nontrivial topology occurs where the field has null points or there are field lines that are closed loops.

  10. Improved collision strengths and line ratios for forbidden [O III] far-infrared and optical lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, Ethan; Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Eissner, Werner

    2012-06-01

    Far-infrared and optical [O III] lines are useful temperature-density diagnostics of nebular as well as dust obscured astrophysical sources. Fine-structure transitions among the ground state levels 1 s22 s22 p33 P 0,1,2 give rise to the 52- and 88-?m lines, whereas transitions among the 3 P 0,1,2, 1 D 2, 1 S 0 levels yield the well-known optical lines λλ4363, 4959 and 5007 Å. These lines are excited primarily by electron impact excitation. However, despite their importance in nebular diagnostics collision strengths for the associated fine-structure transitions have not been computed taking full account of relativistic effects. We present Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations for the collision strengths with highly resolved resonance structures. We find significant differences of up to 20 per cent in the Maxwellian averaged rate coefficients from previous works. We also tabulate these to lower temperatures down to 100 K to enable determination of physical conditions in cold dusty environments such photodissociation regions and ultraluminous infrared galaxies observed with the Herschel Space Observatory. We also examine the effect of improved collision strengths on temperature- and density-sensitive line ratios.

  11. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    DOEpatents

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  12. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  13. Core percolation on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Csóka, Endre; Zhou, Haijun; Pósfai, Márton

    2012-11-16

    We analytically solve the core percolation problem for complex networks with arbitrary degree distributions. We find that purely scale-free networks have no core for any degree exponents. We show that for undirected networks if core percolation occurs then it is continuous while for directed networks it is discontinuous (and hybrid) if the in- and out-degree distributions differ. We also find that core percolations on undirected and directed networks have completely different critical exponents associated with their critical singularities. PMID:23215509

  14. Role of nuclear dynamics in the Asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s photoejection from CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Shungo; Haxton, Dan; Rescigno, Tom; McCurdy, Bill

    2010-11-30

    We report the results of semiclassical calculations of the asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s ionization of CO{sub 2} measured with respect to the CO{sup +} and O{sup +} ions produced by subsequent Auger decay, and show how the decay event can be used to probe ultrafast molecular dynamics of the transient cation. The fixed-nuclei photoionization amplitudes were constructed using variationally obtained electron-molecular ion scattering wave functions. The amplitudes are then used in a semiclassical manner to investigate their dependence on the nuclear dynamics of the cation. The method introduced here can be used to study other core-level ionization events.

  15. An Energy-Stabilized Varied-Line-Space-Monochromator UndulatorBeam Line for PEEM Illumination and Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; McKinney, Wayne; Domning, Ed; Doran, Andrew; Padmore, Howard

    2006-06-01

    A new undulator beam line has been built and commissioned at the Advanced Light Source for illumination of the PEEM3 microscope. The beam line delivers high flux beams over an energy range from C1s through the transition metals to include the M edges of the magnetic rare earth elements. We present details of the optical design, and data on the performance of the zero-order tracking of the photon energy.

  16. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  17. An Ordered Bipolar Outflow from a Massive Early-stage Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Zhang, Yichen; Fontani, Francesco; Caselli, Paola; Butler, Michael J.

    2016-04-01

    We present ALMA follow-up observations of two massive, early-stage core candidates, C1-N and C1-S, in IRDC G028.37+00.07, that were previously identified by their {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission, and show high levels of deuteration of this species. The cores are also dark at far-infrared wavelengths up to ∼ 100 μ {{m}}. We detect 12CO(2-1) from a narrow, highly collimated bipolar outflow that is being launched from near the center of the C1-S core, which is also the location of the peak 1.3 mm dust continuum emission. This protostar, C1-Sa, has associated dense gas traced by {{{C}}}18{{O}}(2-1) and DCN(3-2), from which we estimate that it has a radial velocity that is near the center of the range exhibited by the C1-S massive core. A second outflow-driving source is also detected within the projected boundary of C1-S, but it appears to be at a different radial velocity. After considering the properties of the outflows, we conclude that C1-Sa is a promising candidate for an early-stage massive protostar and as such it shows that these early phases of massive star formation can involve highly ordered outflow, and thus accretion, processes, similar to models developed to explain low-mass protostars.

  18. 1S0 nucleon-nucleon scattering in the modified Weinberg approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.

    2015-06-01

    Nucleon-nucleon scattering in the 1 S 0 partial wave is considered in chiral effective field theory within the renormalizable formulation of a previous work (Phys. Lett. B 716, 338 (2012)) beyond the leading-order approximation. By applying subtractive renormalization, the subleading contact interaction in this channel is taken into account non-perturbatively. For a proper choice of renormalization conditions, the predicted energy dependence of the phase shift and the coefficients in the effective range expansion are found to be in a good agreement with the results of the Nijmegen partial wave analysis.

  19. Experimental considerations for testing antimatter antigravity using positronium 1S-2S spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D. A.; Friedreich, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution to the WAG 2013 workshop we report on the status of our measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency of positronium. The aim of this experiment is to reach a precision of 0.5 ppb in order to cross check the QED calculations. After reviewing the current available sources of Ps, we consider laser cooling as a route to push the precision in the measurement down to 0.1 ppb. If such an uncertainty could be achieved, this would be sensitive to the gravitational redshift and therefore be able to assess the sign of gravity for antimatter.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Ignisphaera aggregans type strain (AQ1.S1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Spring, Stefan; Yasawong, Montri; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Tapia, Roxanne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ignisphaera aggregans Niederberger et al. 2006 is the type and sole species of genus Ignisphaera. This archaeal species is characterized by a cocci-shaped, strictly anaerobic, moderately acidophilic, heterotrophic hyperthermophile and fermentative phenotype. The type strain AQ1.S1T was isolated from a near neutral, boiling spring in Kuirau Park, Rotorua, New Zealand. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Ignisphaera and the fifth genome (fourth type strain) sequence in the family Desulfurococcaceae. The 1,875,953 bp long genome with its 2,061 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. EM experiments for computational model validation for AH-1S Cobra Helicopter

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.

    1997-04-06

    The effort described here describes a set of outdoor experiments performed on the AH-1S Cobra helicopter in order to validate and compare to the computational electromagnetic models of the bulk structure of the airframe in the frequency bands up to 4 GHz. Also included in this were coupling measurements to wires and cables inside of the airframe and various cavity to HPM pulse in this frequency range as part of other activities. Additionally, the low power modeling compression will be completed in this time frame.

  2. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions between Yb(1S0) and Yb(3P2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dermot G.; Vaillant, Christophe L.; Frye, Matthew D.; Morita, Masato; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2016-02-01

    We calculate and analyze Feshbach resonance spectra for ultracold Yb (1S0) +Yb (3P2) collisions as a function of an interatomic potential scaling factor λ and external magnetic field. We show that, at zero field, the resonances are distributed randomly in λ , but that signatures of quantum chaos emerge as a field is applied. The random zero-field distribution arises from superposition of structured spectra associated with individual total angular momenta. In addition, we show that the resonances with respect to magnetic field in the experimentally accessible range of 400 to 2000 G are chaotically distributed, with strong level repulsion that is characteristic of quantum chaos.

  3. Two-photon excitation/ionization of the 1s-shell of the argon atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. A.; Hopersky, A. N.

    2002-02-01

    The absolute values and the shape of the two-photon excitation/ionization cross section of the 1s-shell of the argon atom are calculated with inclusion of the many-particle effects, i.e., the relaxation of the atomic residue in the field of the vacancies created, and the decay of the vacancies into the channels of Auger and (or) radiative types. The wavefunctions of the one-particle states are calculated in non-relativistic approximation. The calculations are performed for both linear and circular polarization of the laser beam.

  4. Spectroscopy of the hydrogen 1 S -3 S transition with chirped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Grinin, A.; Peters, E.; Maisenbacher, L.; Beyer, A.; Pohl, R.; Kolachevsky, N.; Khabarova, K.; Hänsch, T. W.; Udem, Th.

    2016-04-01

    We identify a systematic present in two-photon direct frequency comb spectroscopy (DFCS) which is a result of chirped laser pulses and is a manifestation of the first-order Doppler effect. We carefully analyze this systematic and propose methods for its mitigation within the context of our measurement of the hydrogen 1 S -3 S transition. We also report on our determination of the absolute frequency of this transition, which is comparable to a previous measurement using continuous-wave spectroscopy [O. Arnoult et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 60, 243 (2010), 10.1140/epjd/e2010-00249-6], but was obtained with a different experimental method.

  5. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  6. Firing up the front line.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Santamaria, J A

    1999-01-01

    For many organizations, achieving competitive advantage means eliciting superior performance from employees on the front line--the burger flippers, hotel room cleaners, and baggage handlers whose work has an enormous effect on customers. That's no easy task. Front line workers are paid low wages, have scant hope of advancement, and--not surprisingly--often care little about the company's performance. But then how do some companies succeed in engaging the emotional energy of rank-and-file workers? A team of researchers at McKinsey & Company and the Conference Board recently explored that question and discovered that one highly effective route is demonstrated by the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines' approach to motivation follows the "mission, values, and pride" path, which researchers say is practical and relevant for the business world. More specifically, the authors say the Marines follow five practices: they over-invest in cultivating core value; prepare every person to lead, including front line supervisors; learn when to create teams and when to create single-leader work groups; attend to all employees, not just the top half; and encourage self-discipline as a way of building pride. The authors admit there are critical differences between the Marines and most businesses. But using vivid examples from companies such as KFC and Marriott International, the authors illustrate how the Marines' approach can be translated for corporate use. Sometimes, the authors maintain, minor changes in a company's standard operating procedure can have a powerful effect on front line pride and can result in substantial payoffs in company performance. PMID:10387573

  7. Necrosome core machinery: MLKL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yu; He, Wenyan; Sun, Liming

    2016-06-01

    In the study of regulated cell death, the rapidly expanding field of regulated necrosis, in particular necroptosis, has been drawing much attention. The signaling of necroptosis represents a sophisticated form of a death pathway. Anti-caspase mechanisms (e.g., using inhibitors of caspases, or genetic ablation of caspase-8) switch cell fate from apoptosis to necroptosis. The initial extracellular death signals regulate RIP1 and RIP3 kinase activation. The RIP3-associated death complex assembly is necessary and sufficient to initiate necroptosis. MLKL was initially identified as an essential mediator of RIP1/RIP3 kinase-initiated necroptosis. Recent studies on the signal transduction using chemical tools and biomarkers support the idea that MLKL is able to make more functional sense for the core machinery of the necroptosis death complex, called the necrosome, to connect to the necroptosis execution. The experimental data available now have pointed that the activated MLKL forms membrane-disrupting pores causing membrane leakage, which extends the prototypical concept of morphological and biochemical events following necroptosis happening in vivo. The key role of MLKL in necroptosis signaling thus sheds light on the logic underlying this unique "membrane-explosive" cell death pathway. In this review, we provide the general concepts and strategies that underlie signal transduction of this form of cell death, and then focus specifically on the role of MLKL in necroptosis. PMID:27048809

  8. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  9. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-05-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  10. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  11. Sterol-dependent nuclear import of ORP1S promotes LXR regulated trans-activation of apoE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9041 ; Anderson, Richard G.W.; Michaely, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S translocates to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S are LXR agonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S binds to LXRs, enhances binding of LXRs to LXREs and promotes LXR-dependent transcription of apoE.

  12. Core-mantle Mill Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yikun

    2003-05-01

    Based on radiation mechanics, the history of Earth can be interpreted by core-mantle mill theory. The theory confesses the inner core as a ferromagnet. The ferromagnetism of inner core is supported by observed anisotropic property of inner core in transmitting seismic waves. Rotation of Earth originates from the magnetic interaction between Earth and Jovian planets. Since the torque caused by the magnetic interaction between Earth and Jovian planets only acts on the iron core of Earth, the core behaves as a rotating engine, tending to change both the rate and axis of Earth's rotation, while the mantle is the resistant to any alternation of rotation. The interplay between the two leads to formations of fluid outer core, basalt magmas, oceanic crust, and differential rotation between the inner core and mantle. Rock materials at the core-mantle boundary are ground into basalt magma due to the differential rotation between the inner core and mantle. Mid-ocean ridge systems are interpreted as the huge dike systems rooted in some principal magma chambers in the core-mantle boundary layer. The anisotropy of background radiation in the polar directions determines the patterns of mid-ocean ridge systems on the Earth's surface and the global tectonic movement of the Earth's crust. The theory also explains the causes of geomagnetic reversals, mass extinctions and global climate changes. The history of Earth is featured by three stages: without oceanic crust (before 2.7Ga), creation of oceanic crust (2.7-2.25Ga) and growth of continents (after 2.25Ga).

  13. Peripheral arterial line - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PAL - infants; Art line - infants ... an "art line." This article addresses PALs in babies. Why is a PAL used? Doctors and nurses use a PAL to watch your baby's blood pressure. A PAL can also be use ...

  14. Probing the Physics of Gas in Cool Core Clusters: Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2010-09-01

    We recently detected high temperature gas at 10^5K associated with the low excitation 10^4K line emission filaments of M87. This is a profoundly important observation bearing on the physics of transport processes in cool core clusters. We propose to delve deeper into the physics of cool core clusters. We propose to use ACS to compare the spatial extent and morphology of the low and high temperature gas, to use the timely presence of COS to obtain a sensitive FUV spectrum of the hot gas, and, by introducing the notion of emission line polarimetry, seek a a potentially revolutionary new plasma diagnostic. The spatial distributions will reveal whether the hotter material is more spatially extended than the cooler; the FUV spectrum will permit derivation of the emission measure {essentially amount of gas} at each temperature between the 10^4K Halpha filaments and coronal gas at 10^7K. Together these strongly constrain plausible transport processes relating the hot and cool gas phases in this cool core cluster region, and hence the dominant physical processes at work. A novel ingredient is to obtain the optical images in polarimetric mode to probe emission line polarization levels, a diagnostic used in Solar physics to determine the relevance of collisional excitation processes such as electron impact polarization in thermal conduction or shocks. With this suite of straightforward, uniquely HST observations we may dramatically change the landscape of our understanding of the physics of cool core clusters

  15. Repression of G1/S Transcription Is Mediated via Interaction of the GTB Motifs of Nrm1 and Whi5 with Swi6

    PubMed Central

    Travesa, Anna; Kalashnikova, Tatyana I.; de Bruin, Robertus A. M.; Cass, Sarah Rose; Chahwan, Charly; Lee, David E.; Lowndes, Noel F.

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, G1/S transcription factors MBF and SBF regulate a large family of genes important for entry to the cell cycle and DNA replication and repair. Their regulation is crucial for cell viability, and it is conserved throughout evolution. MBF and SBF consist of a common component, Swi6, and a DNA-specific binding protein, Mbp1 and Swi4, respectively. Transcriptional repressors bind to and regulate the activity of both transcription factors. Whi5 binds to SBF and represses its activity at the beginning of the G1 phase to prevent early activation. Nrm1 binds to MBF to repress transcription as cells progress through S phase. Here, we describe a protein motif, the GTB motif (for G1/S transcription factor binding), in Nrm1 and Whi5 that is required to bind to the transcription factors. We also identify a region of the carboxy terminus of Swi6 that is required for Nrm1 and Whi5 binding to their target transcription factors and show that mutation of this region overrides the repression of MBF- and SBF-regulated genes by Nrm1 and Whi5. Finally, we show that the GTB motif is the core of a functional module that is necessary and sufficient for targeting of the transcription factors by their cognate repressors. PMID:23382076

  16. Tet1 is required for Rb phosphorylation during G1/S phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shengsong; Zhu, Ziqi; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Yanru; Xu, Longxia; Chen, Xuemei; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Qimin; Zhao, Xin; Yu, Yi; Wu, Denglong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Tet1 was required for NIT3T3 proliferation. •Tet1 depletion inhibited G1-S entry. •Cyclin D1 accumulation and Rb phosphorylation was blocked by Tet1 knockdown. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, maintenance of chromatin conformation and genomic stability. TET-family proteins convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which indicates that these enzymes may participate in DNA demethylation. The function of TET1 has not yet been well characterized in somatic cells. Here, we show that depletion of Tet1 in NIH3T3 cells inhibits cell growth. Furthermore, Tet1 knockdown blocks cyclin D1 accumulation in G1 phase, inhibits Rb phosphorylation and consequently delays entrance to G1/S phase. Taken together, this study demonstrates that Tet1 is required for cell proliferation and that this process is mediated through the Rb pathway.

  17. Study of dipion transitions among {upsilon}(3S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(1S) states

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Ernst, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Severini, H.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.

    2007-10-01

    We present measurements of decay matrix elements for hadronic transitions of the form {upsilon}(nS){yields}{upsilon}(mS){pi}{pi}, where (n,m)=(3,1),(2,1),(3,2). We reconstruct charged and neutral pion modes with the final state Upsilon decaying to either {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} or e{sup +}e{sup -}. Dalitz plot distributions for the 12 decay modes are fit individually as well as jointly assuming isospin symmetry, thereby measuring the matrix elements of the decay amplitude. We observe and account for the anomaly previously noted in the dipion invariant mass distribution for the {upsilon}(3S){yields}{upsilon}(1S){pi}{pi} transition and obtain good descriptions of the dynamics of the decay using the most general decay amplitude allowed by partial conservation of the axial-vector current considerations. The fits further indicate that the {upsilon}(2S){yields}{upsilon}(1S){pi}{pi} and {upsilon}(3S){yields}{upsilon}(2S){pi}{pi} transitions also show the presence of terms in the decay amplitude that were previously ignored, although at a relatively suppressed level.

  18. Unusual selection on the KIR3DL1/S1 natural killer cell receptor in Africans.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Korbel, Daniel; Gleimer, Michael; Rowley, Don; Bruno, Dan; Carrington, Christine V F; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Fraser, Patricia A; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M; Ramdath, D Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A F; Struik, Siske; Verity, David H; Vaughan, Robert W; Tyan, Dolly; Davis, Ronald W; Riley, Eleanor M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Interactions of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands diversify natural killer cell responses to infection. By analyzing sequence variation in diverse human populations, we show that the KIR3DL1/S1 locus encodes two lineages of polymorphic inhibitory KIR3DL1 allotypes that recognize Bw4 epitopes of protein">HLA-A and HLA-B and one lineage of conserved activating KIR3DS1 allotypes, also implicated in Bw4 recognition. Balancing selection has maintained these three lineages for over 3 million years. Variation was selected at D1 and D2 domain residues that contact HLA class I and at two sites on D0, the domain that enhances the binding of KIR3D to HLA class I. HLA-B variants that gained Bw4 through interallelic microconversion are also products of selection. A worldwide comparison uncovers unusual KIR3DL1/S1 evolution in modern sub-Saharan Africans. Balancing selection is weak and confined to D0, KIR3DS1 is rare and KIR3DL1 allotypes with similar binding sites predominate. Natural killer cells express the dominant KIR3DL1 at a high frequency and with high surface density, providing strong responses to cells perturbed in Bw4 expression. PMID:17694054

  19. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  20. Ionization and excitation in collisions between antiprotons and H(1s) atoms studied with Sturmian bases

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2011-02-15

    Coupled two-center as well as one-center Sturmian cross sections have been determined for ionization and excitation in p-bar-H(1s) collisions at p-bar energies from 1 to 16 000 keV, following the author's recent work for p-H(1s) collisions [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032701 (2009)]. Basis convergence is studied in detail. Results for ionization and excitation are compared to other coupled-state results and to numerical results, as well as limited experimental results for ionization only. Except for the large, two-center coupled-Gaussian-pseudostate calculation of Toshima for ionization only [Phys. Rev. A 64, 024701 (2001)], previous calculations employed one-center bases, including a one-center Sturmian calculation by Igarashi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 062712 (2000)]. A strong contrast with p-H collisions is confirmed at intermediate energies, while at high energies the extent of agreement is revealed between coupled-state results for the two collisional systems, as well as with first Born results.

  1. Method for estimating ionicities of oxides using O1s photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D. Qi, W. H.; Xue, L. C.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.; Li, Y. C.; Li, S. Q.

    2015-09-15

    The average valence, V{sub alO}, of the oxygen anions in the perovskite oxide BaTiO{sub 3}, was found using O1s photoelectron spectra to be −1.55. This experimental result is close to the theoretical value for BaTiO{sub 3} (−1.63) calculated by Cohen [Nature 358, 136 (1992)] using density functional theory. Using the same approach, we obtained values of V{sub alO} for several monoxides, and investigated the dependence of V{sub alO} and the ionicity on the second ionization energy, V(M{sup 2+}), of the metal cation. We found that the dependence of the ionicity on V(M{sup 2+}) in this work is close to that reported by Phillips [Rev. Mod. Phys. 42, 317 (1970)]. We therefore suggest that O1s photoelectron spectrum measurements should be accepted as a general experimental method for estimating the ionicity and average valence of oxygen anions.

  2. Defects in G1-S cell cycle control in head and neck cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Michalides, Rob J A M; van de Brekel, Michiel; Balm, Fons

    2002-07-01

    Tumors gradually develop as a result of a multistep acquisition of genetic alterations and ultimately emerge as selfish, intruding and metastatic cells. The genetic defects associated with the process of tumor progression affect control of proliferation, programmed cell death, cell aging, angiogenesis, escape from immune control and metastasis. Fundamental cancer research over the last thirty years has revealed a multitude of genetic alterations which specify more or less separate steps in tumor development and which are collectively responsible for the process of tumor progression. The genes affected play in normal cells a crucial role in control over cell duplication and the interaction between cells, and between cells and their direct surrounding. This is illustrated on control during the G1/S phase of the cell cycle by its ultimate regulators: cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases. These proteins not only control the transition through the G1/S phase of the cell cycle, but also serve as mediators of the interaction between cells, and between cells and their surrounding. Defaults in the regulation of these proteins are associated with tumor progression, and, therefore, serve as targets for therapy. Defaults in those genes are found in various tumor types, although some of those prevail in particular tumor types. In this review emphasis is given to the defaults that occur in head and neck cancer. PMID:12112544

  3. Newly Identified Rydberg Emission Lines in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, David K.; Rudy, R. J.; Bernstein, L. S.

    2008-09-01

    Newly Identified Rydberg Emission Lines in Novae David K. Lynch, Richard. J. Rudy (The Aerospace Corporation) & Lawrence S. Bernstein (Spectral Sciences, Inc.) Novae spectra in the near infrared frequently show a set of six emission lines that have not been positively identified (Williams, Longmore, & Geballe 1996, MNRAS, 279, 804; Lynch et al. 2001, AJ, 122, 2013; Rudy et al. 2002 ApJ, 573, 794; Lynch et al. 2004 Astron. J. 127, 1089-1097). These lines are at 0.8926, 1.1114, 1.1901, 1.5545, 2.0996 and 2.425 µm ± 0.005 µm. Krautter et al. (1984 A&A 137, 304) suggested that three of the lines were due to rydberg (hydrogenic) transitions in an unspecified atomic species that was in the 4th or 5th ionization stage (core charge = 4 & 5). We believe that Krautter et al.'s explanation is correct based on 4 additional lines that we have identified in the visible and near infrared spectrum of V723 Cassiopeiae. The observed Rydberg lines appear to originate from high angular momentum states with negligible quantum defects. The species cannot be determined with any certainty because in rydberg states, the outer electron sees a nucleus shielded by the inner electrons and together the inner atom appears to have a charge of +1, like hydrogen. As a result, the atom looks hydrogenic and species such as CV, NV, OV, MgV, SiV, etc. have their rydberg transitions at very similar wavelengths. All the lines represent permitted transitions, most likely formed by recombination. Atoms with core charges 4, 5 & 6 are rarely seen in the astrophysical environment because an extremely hot radiation field is necessary to ionize them. Thermonuclear runaways on the surface of a white dwarf can reach millions of degrees K, and thus there are enough X-ray photons available to achieve the necessary high ionization levels.

  4. Characteristic velocities of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J. I.; Mazzali, P. A.; Deng, J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Hamuy, M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Matheson, T.; Modjaz, M.; Pian, E.; Stritzinger, M.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.

    2010-02-01

    The velocity of the inner ejecta of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) is studied by means of an analysis of their nebular spectra. Stripped-envelope CC-SNe are the result of the explosion of bare cores of massive stars (>=8Msolar), and their late-time spectra are typically dominated by a strong [OI] λλ6300, 6363 emission line produced by the innermost, slow-moving ejecta which are not visible at earlier times as they are located below the photosphere. A characteristic velocity of the inner ejecta is obtained for a sample of 56 stripped-envelope CC-SNe of different spectral types (IIb, Ib, Ic) using direct measurements of the linewidth as well as spectral fitting. For most SNe, this value shows a small scatter around 4500kms-1. Observations (<100d) of stripped-envelope CC-SNe have revealed a subclass of very energetic SNe, termed broad-lined SNe (BL-SNe) or hypernovae, which are characterized by broad absorption lines in the early-time spectra, indicative of outer ejecta moving at very high velocity (v >= 0.1c). SNe identified as BL in the early phase show large variations of core velocities at late phases, with some having much higher and some having similar velocities with respect to regular CC-SNe. This might indicate asphericity of the inner ejecta of BL-SNe, a possibility we investigate using synthetic three-dimensional nebular spectra. Based on observations at ESO-Paranal, Prog. 081.D-0173(A), 082.D-0292(A). E-mail: maurer@mpa-garching.mpg.de

  5. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  6. The Common Core Takes Hold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A survey administered in the spring of 2013 by the Center on Education Policy (CEP) inquired into the implementation of Common Core State Standards at that time. Based on self-reports by state officials, the survey found that curricula aligned to the common core were already being taught in at least some districts or grade levels. All states…

  7. Complicated Politics to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  8. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  9. Understanding Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Now that the Common Core standards are coming to just about every school, what every school leader needs is a straightforward explanation that lays out the benefits of the Common Core in plain English, provides a succinct overview, and gets everyone thinking about how to transition to this promising new paradigm. This handy, inexpensive booklet…

  10. A haploid genetic screen identifies the G1/S regulatory machinery as a determinant of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Blomen, Vincent A.; Bisteau, Xavier; Degener, Fabian; Matsushita, Felipe Yu; Foijer, Floris; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Wee1 cell cycle checkpoint kinase prevents premature mitotic entry by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases. Chemical inhibitors of Wee1 are currently being tested clinically as targeted anticancer drugs. Wee1 inhibition is thought to be preferentially cytotoxic in p53-defective cancer cells. However, TP53 mutant cancers do not respond consistently to Wee1 inhibitor treatment, indicating the existence of genetic determinants of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity other than TP53 status. To optimally facilitate patient selection for Wee1 inhibition and uncover potential resistance mechanisms, identification of these currently unknown genes is necessary. The aim of this study was therefore to identify gene mutations that determine Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity. We performed a genome-wide unbiased functional genetic screen in TP53 mutant near-haploid KBM-7 cells using gene-trap insertional mutagenesis. Insertion site mapping of cells that survived long-term Wee1 inhibition revealed enrichment of G1/S regulatory genes, including SKP2, CUL1, and CDK2. Stable depletion of SKP2, CUL1, or CDK2 or chemical Cdk2 inhibition rescued the γ-H2AX induction and abrogation of G2 phase as induced by Wee1 inhibition in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines. Remarkably, live cell imaging showed that depletion of SKP2, CUL1, or CDK2 did not rescue the Wee1 inhibition-induced karyokinesis and cytokinesis defects. These data indicate that the activity of the DNA replication machinery, beyond TP53 mutation status, determines Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity, and could serve as a selection criterion for Wee1-inhibitor eligible patients. Conversely, loss of the identified S-phase genes could serve as a mechanism of acquired resistance, which goes along with development of severe genomic instability. PMID:26598692

  11. Anisotropic charged core envelope star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafa Takisa, P.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study a charged compact object with anisotropic pressures in a core envelope setting. The equation of state is quadratic in the core and linear in the envelope. There is smooth matching between the three regions: the core, envelope and the Reissner-Nordström exterior. We show that the presence of the electric field affects the masses, radii and compactification factors of stellar objects with values which are in agreement with previous studies. We investigate in particular the effect of electric field on the physical features of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 in the core envelope model. The gravitational potentials and the matter variables are well behaved within the stellar object. We demonstrate that the radius of the core and the envelope can vary by changing the parameters in the speed of sound.

  12. Viscosity of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of the coefficient of kinematical viscosity nu of the earth's liquid metallic core that are given in the geophysical literature range from approximately 0.001 sq cm/s, the viscosity of molten iron at ordinary pressures, to approximately less than 10 to the 8th power sq cm/s, based on the observation that compressional waves traverse the core without suffering serious attenuation. Bumps on the core-mantle boundary with typical horizontal dimensions up to a few thousand km and vertical dimensions h of a few km would produce the topographic coupling between the core and mantle that is evidently implied by the observed decade variations in the length of the day (unless the coupling is due to the presence of rapidly fluctuating magnetic fields in the core).

  13. Core formation by giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas about the accretion and early evolution of the Earth and the other terrestrial planets have recently undergone a number of revolutionary changes. It has become clear that giant impacts were far from rare events. In the later stages of accretion any given planetary embryo is liable to be struck several times by other bodies of up to half its own diameter. Such an impact may have the ability to trigger core formation. Traditional accretion models have had great difficulty explaining the formation of the core. If one admits the importance of infrequent large events that may melt an entire hemisphere, the core formation difficulty vanishes. Millimeter-size iron blebs in the melted region will rain out due to their density difference with the silicate melt. Core formation may not require the melting of the entire hemisphere of the planet. The conditions are explored under which impact induced core formation may occur.

  14. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (~100 M ⊙) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N2D+ (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N2D+ cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number mA ~ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ~60 M ⊙, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that mA ~= 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  15. Data interchange across cores of multi-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ehab S.

    2015-12-01

    A novel device for data interchange among space-division multiplexed cores inside MCF is demonstrated using numerical simulations. The device allows complete exchange of all WDM data channels between MCF cores in propagation direction whether the channels have the same or different sets of wavelengths. This is crucial in future MCF optical networks where in-fiber data interchange over space-division multiplexed cores can allow for a simple and fast data swapping among cores without a need for space-division demultiplexing to single-mode single-core fibers. The data core-interchange (DCI) device consists of a graded refractive-index rectangular waveguide enclosing the two interchanged cores in addition to the cladding region in between them. Both finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and eigenmode expansion (EME) simulations are performed to verify the device operation and characterize its performance. The simulations demonstrate that the DCI has a very short-length with polarization independent operation, and high performance over the broadband wavelength range S, C, L, and U bands. Moreover, the device shows a high coupling-factor of -0.13 dB with small cross-talk, back-reflection, and return-loss of -26.3, -46.1, and -48.8 dB, respectively.

  16. Is iron at the Earth's core conditions hcp-structured?

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Prakapenka, V

    2012-02-07

    Iron is the main component of the Earth's core and its structure and properties are important for interpretation of geophysical observations and modeling dynamics of the core. We argue that the diffraction lines in the high temperature high pressure X-ray diffraction pattern, presented by Tateno et al., 2010 and interpreted as those of solely hot hcp-Fe, correspond indeed to the insufficiently heated part of the sample. We show that observed diffraction spots are either due to bcc-Fe or carbides.

  17. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  18. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A K; Rietwyk, K J; Tadich, A; Stacey, A; Ley, L; Pakes, C I

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of [Formula: see text] eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers. PMID:27299369

  19. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  20. Effects of magnetomechanical vibrations and bending stresses on three-phase three-leg transformers with amorphous cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang-Hung; Chang, Yeong-Hwa; Lee, Chun-Yao; Yao, Chia-Shiang; He, Yan-Lou; Chu, Huei-Lung; Chang, Chia-Wen; Chan, Wei-Shou

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the influence of bending stresses on the magnetic characteristics of three-phase transformers with amorphous cores. Different types of core structures, including C-cores and toroidal cores, and their magnetic properties are compared using VSM and XRD. The losses in the magnetic core of the three-phase transformer are analyzed using the finite element analysis for both design and measurement. In addition, experimental results indicated that amorphous-core transformers with rectangular corners had higher audible noise and vibration intensities. This is because the condensed distribution of magnetic flux lines in the corners of the core may create high magnetic inductions associated with high magnetostriction. Finally, experiments with three-phase amorphous-core transformers were performed to study the effects of magnetism and magnetostriction on their performance in terms of core loss, vibration, and audible noise.