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Sample records for 1s core lines

  1. Escape factors for Paschen 2p-1s lines in Ar, Kr, and Xe plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Cheng, Zhi-Wen; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-09-01

    Radiation trapping is often observed when investigating low-temperature plasmas. Photons emitted from an upper state may be reabsorbed by a lower state before they leave the plasmas. To account for this effect, the ``escape factor'' as a function of optical depth is often adopted. In previous works several simple expressions of the escape factor were proposed for uniform plasmas with emission line profiles dominated by Doppler broadening and without line splitting due to hyperfine structure. These assumptions are valid for atoms e.g. Ar in uniform discharges. However, the excited state density in many low-temperature plasmas is non-uniform and the emission line profile can be influenced by collisional broadening. In this work, we study the escape factors of Paschen 2p-1s lines of Ar, Kr, and Xe in non-uniform plasmas. The collisional broadening and the hyperfine structure for Kr and Xe lines are both included. The calculated escape factor expression is verified particularly by an experiment in a low-pressure discharge. The escape factor equation for high- to atmospheric-pressure discharges is also provided.

  2. The O(1S - 1D,3P) Line Intensity Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Minschwaner, K. R.; Siskind, D. E.

    2005-05-01

    The line intensity ratio of the two optically-forbidden atmospheric emissions, O(1S-1D) at 557.7 nm and O(1S-3P) at 297.2 nm, must be a single-valued number in the upper atmosphere because the upper level is common to both lines. The calculated transition probability ratio A(557.7)/A(297.2) is 16, by several authors, and the ratio found in the laboratory is significantly larger. Field observations require space-based instruments, in which case calibration between the two wavelengths is the critical issue. We circumvent this problem by using the O2 Herzberg I emission system as a bridge between the UV region below 310 nm and the ground-accessible region above that wavelength. These two spectral regions can be separately calibrated in terms of intensity, and the results of a disparate set of observations (satellite, rocket, ground-based) lead to A(557.7)/A(297.2) ratios that are consistently much smaller than the calculated value. These results have consequences for auroral and dayglow processes, and it is particularly important to ascertain the cause of the substantial difference between theory and observation.

  3. Precision frequency measurement of 1S0-3P1 intercombination lines of Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Feng; Ye-Bing, Wang; Xiao, Tian; Jie, Ren; Ben-Quan, Lu; Qin-Fang, Xu; Yu-Lin, Xie; Hong, Chang

    2015-01-01

    We report on frequency measurement of the intercombination (5s2)1S0-(5s5p)3P1 transition of the four natural isotopes of strontium, including 88Sr (82.58%), 87Sr (7.0%), 86Sr (9.86%), and 84Sr (0.56%). A narrow-linewidth laser that is locked to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity with a finesse of 12000 is evaluated at a linewidth of 200 Hz with a fractional frequency drift of 2.8×10-13 at an integration time of 1 s. The fluorescence collector and detector are specially designed, based on a thermal atomic beam. Using a double-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) combined with a fiber and laser power stabilization configuration to detune the laser frequency enables high signal-to-noise ratios and precision saturated spectra to be obtained for the six transition lines, which allows us to determine the transition frequency precisely. The optical frequency is measured using an optical frequency synthesizer referenced to an H maser. Both the statistical values and the final values, including the corrections and uncertainties, are derived for a comparison with the values given in other works. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61127901) and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  4. L1Base 2: more retrotransposition-active LINE-1s, more mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Jäger, Marten; Figlerowicz, Marek; Badge, Richard; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.; Zemojtel, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) insertions comprise as much as 17% of the human genome sequence, and similar proportions have been recorded for other mammalian species. Given the established role of L1 retrotransposons in shaping mammalian genomes, it becomes an important task to track and annotate the sources of this activity: full length elements, able to encode the cis and trans acting components of the retrotransposition machinery. The L1Base database (http://l1base.charite.de) contains annotated full-length sequences of LINE-1 transposons including putatively active L1s. For the new version of L1Base, a LINE-1 annotation tool, L1Xplorer, has been used to mine potentially active L1 retrotransposons from the reference genome sequences of 17 mammals. The current release of the human genome, GRCh38, contains 146 putatively active L1 elements or full length intact L1 elements (FLIs). The newest versions of the mouse, GRCm38 and the rat, Rnor_6.0, genomes contain 2811 and 492 FLIs, respectively. Most likely reflecting the current level of completeness of the genome project, the latest reference sequence of the common chimpanzee genome, PT 2.19, only contains 19 FLIs. Of note, the current assemblies of the dog, CF 3.1 and the sheep, OA 3.1, genomes contain 264 and 598 FLIs, respectively. Further developments in the new version of L1Base include an updated website with implementation of modern web server technologies. including a more responsive design for an improved user experience, as well as the addition of data sharing capabilities for L1Xplorer annotation. PMID:27924012

  5. Final-state symmetry of Na 1s core-shell excitons in NaCl and NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, K.P.; Seidler, G.T.; Shirley, E.L.; Fister, T.T.; Bradley, J.A.; Brown, F.C.

    2009-08-13

    We report measurements of the Na 1s contribution to the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from NaCl and NaF. Prior x-ray absorption studies have observed two pre-edge excitons in both materials. The momentum-transfer dependence (q dependence) of the measured NRIXS cross section and of real-space full multiple scattering and Bethe-Salpeter calculations determine that the higher-energy core excitons are s type for each material. The lower-energy core excitons contribute at most weakly to the NRIXS signal and we propose that these may be surface core excitons, as have been observed in several other alkali halides. The analysis of the orbital angular momentum of these features leads to a discussion of the limited sensitivity of NRIXS measurements to d-type final states when investigating 1s initial states. In this case the s- and p-type final density of states can be characterized by measurements at a small number of momentum transfers. This is in contrast to the case of more complex initial states for which measurements at a large number of momentum transfers are needed to separate the rich admixture of accessible and contributing final-state symmetries.

  6. Mus spretus LINE-1s in the Mus musculus domesticus inbred strain C57BL/6J are from two different Mus spretus LINE-1 subfamilies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yingping; Daggett, L.P.; Hardies, S.C.

    1996-02-01

    A LINE-1 element, L1C105, was found in the Mus musculus domesticus inbred strain, C57BL/6J. Upon sequencing, this element was found to belong to a M. spretus LINE-1 subfamily originating within the last 0.2 million years. This is the second spretus-specific LINE-1 subfamily found to be represented in C57BL/6J. Although it is unclear how these M. spretus LINE-1s transferred from M. spretus to M. m. domesticus, it is now clear that at least two different spretus LINE-1 sequences have recently transferred. The limited divergence between the C57BL/6J spretus-like LINE-1s and their closest spretus ancestors suggests that the transfer did not involve an exceptionally long lineage of sequential transpositions. 54 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Exploring large O 1s and N 1s core level shifts due to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation in organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gil, S.; Arnau, A.; Garcia-Lekue, A.

    2013-07-01

    Core level shifts (CLSs) induced by intermolecular hydrogen bond (H-bond) formation are studied with a recent implementation based on density functional theory using pseudopotentials and localized atomic orbitals, as applied to the SIESTA code. By calculating different CLSs for a set of representative simple systems containing O and/or N atoms as proton donors and/or acceptors, we are able to determine the role of the core hole screening, from the difference of CLS values calculated in the final and initial state approximations. Our calculations show that CLSs are dominated by electrostatic effects, and that the final magnitude of the CLSs, which are positive (higher binding energy) for the proton acceptor and negative for the proton donor, can be larger than 1 eV for strong H-bonds. We also find that core hole screening contribution to final CLS absolute values is always negative, thus being responsible for the difference in the magnitude of the CLS of the proton donor and proton acceptor.

  8. Electron-impact core excitation of SF6. I. S 2p, S 2s, and F 1s spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, James T.; Turci, Cássia C.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; de Souza, G. Gerson B.; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    1995-12-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra (EELS) of SF6 have been recorded in the region of S 2p, S 2s, and F 1s excitation, using both dipole and nondipole electron-scattering conditions. Impact energies between 700 and 3200 eV and scattering angles between 0° and 30° were used. Relative to dipole EELS or photoabsorption, there are large intensity redistributions in both the S 2p and S 2s spectra under nondipole conditions. In contrast, the F 1s spectrum is essentially the same in near-dipole and nondipole scattering regimes. A higher-order electric multiple S 2p spectra feature is observed at 181 eV. It has an unusual multipeaked line shape whose components are more closely spaced than the typical 1.15-eV S 2p spin-orbit splitting. It is attributed to the overlap of several quadrupole-coupled states, which are likely associated with the [S 2p(t1u)-1,t1u] configuration. Ab initio self-consistent field calculations for various open-shell S 2p excited states are used to assist spectral assignments.

  9. Transmission line resonance technique for eccentric core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantzos, E.; Boucouvalas, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    In several cases optical fibers in telecommunications have cores of non circular geometry. Fibre optic deformations appear in optical fibres for many reasons. Optical fibre core ellipticity for example where the fibre optic core is not perfectly circular due to fibre optic manufacturing tolerances, is measured and often is a problem. Optical fibre core eccentricity, where the fibre core is not on the axis of the fibre, but it is offset by a small length. This is another issue and very important for ensuring performance low loss splices and connector losses. Both of ellipticity and eccentricity are specified in accordance to international standards for fibre optic manufacturing telecommunications grade fibres. The present paper studies ellipticity and core eccentricity specifically and presents a new method for analysing their effect. We present an extension of the transmission line technique as a means of studying such fibers and deriving necessary parameters. Conformal mapping on the other hand is a simple mathematical tool by which we can generate sets of orthogonal two-dimensional coordinate systems. Shortly a conformal map of Cartesian two-dimensional space is defined by any analytical function W(z) where z, w, are: z = x + jy, W = θ + j φ The function deriving by the conformal mapping transformation h(θ ,φ )=| ∂w/∂z | = 1/|∂z/∂w|, can be used in order to define ∇A → and ∇×A → where A → is the magnetic or electric field in the derived orthogonal coordinate system. Useful conformal maps for fiber optics applications should have the property that the equation θ(x, y) = constant, is forming closed curves in a Cartesian two-dimensional space (x,y). If θ(x, y) = constant represents a set of co-eccentric circles, we obtain the normal case of conventional fibers with circular cores. If θ(x, y) = constant represents a set of eclipses, we are have the formation of elliptic core optical fibers. If θ(x, y) = constant represents a set of

  10. Nonadiabatic theory of atomic line broadening: Redistribution calculations for Sr(/sup 1/Preverse arrow /sup 1/S)+Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Julienne, P.S.; Mies, F.H.

    1986-11-01

    The close-coupled theory of collisions in a radiation field is used to calculate the absorption profile for the Sr /sup 1/Preverse arrow/sup 1/S resonance line broadened by collisions with Ar. The calculations predict the polarization ratios of Sr /sup 1/P fluorescence following line wing excitation by either linear or circular polarized light. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain the ground and excited SrAr molecular-potential curves, which were adjusted to give improved agreement with experiment. The radiative-scattering theory gives a unified description of the absorption coefficient and polarization redistribution from the small detuning impact limit region to the far spectral wings. The cross sections for elastic and inelastic depolarizing collisions of Sr /sup 1/P/sub 1/+Ar were also calculated. The calculated absorption coefficient, impact-broadening rate, linear- and circular-polarization ratios, and depolarization rate coefficients are for the most part in good agreement with experiment.

  11. Molecular Line Observations of Chemically Young Dark Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    In order to understand initial conditions of low-mass star formation, it is essential to study dark cloud cores in the early evolutionary stage. For the purpose of this, we carried out mapping observations with various molecular lines in quiescent starless cores L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B (Hirota et al. 2002, 2004), which are known to be rich in carbon-chain molecules like the cyanopolyyne peak of TMC-1 and hence, called "carbon-chain-producing regions" (Suzuki et al. 1992). The important results of our studies are as follows; (1) there exist compact dense cores traced by the H13CO+, HN13C, CCS, C3S, and HC3N lines, and their distributions have a single peak at the same position; (2) the distribution of CCS in these cores are different from those in well-studied starless cores such as L1544, where the distribution of CCS shows a shell-like structure; (3) although the H2 densities are as high as 105 cm-3 at the peak position of these cores, the spectral lines of NH3 and N2H+ are found to be very faint, indicating the low NH3 and N2H+ abundances; (4) abundances of carbon-chain molecules in these cores are systematically higher than those in the other dark cloud cores, and especially the abundances of sulfur-bearing carbon-chain molecules CnS are comparable to those in cyanopolyyne peak of TMC-1; (5) longer carbon-chain molecules such as HC5N and C4H are more abundant in TMC-1 than in L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B while those of sulfur-bearing molecules such as C34S, CCS, and C3S are comparable; (6) the deuterium fractionation ratios of DNC/HNC and DCO+/HCO+ are systematically lower in L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B than in the other dark cores (Hirota et al. 2001, 2003); (7) there exist neither IRAS point sources, evidence of molecular outflows, nor signature of infall motions in these cores. All these characteristic features suggest that L1521E, L1521B, and L1495B would be in the early stage of dynamical and chemical evolution, and the depletion factor of heavy atoms are

  12. Polarization diagnostics for cool core cluster emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Cracraft, M.; Meyer, E. T.; Carswell, R. F.; Voit, G. M.; Donahue, M.; Hough, J. H.; Manset, N.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between low-excitation gas filaments at ∼10{sup 4} K, seen in optical line emission, and diffuse X-ray emitting coronal gas at ∼10{sup 7} K in the centers of galaxy clusters remains a puzzle. The presence of a strong, empirical correlation between the two gas phases is indicative of a fundamental relationship between them, though as yet of undetermined cause. The cooler filaments, originally thought to have condensed from the hot gas, could also arise from a merger or the disturbance of cool circumnuclear gas by nuclear activity. Here, we have searched for intrinsic line emission polarization in cool core galaxy clusters as a diagnostic of fundamental transport processes. Drawing on developments in solar astrophysics, direct energetic particle impact induced polarization holds the promise to definitively determine the role of collisional processes such as thermal conduction in the ISM physics of galaxy clusters, while providing insight into other highly anisotropic excitation mechanisms such as shocks, intense radiation fields, and suprathermal particles. Under certain physical conditions, theoretical calculations predict of the order of 10% polarization. Our observations of the filaments in four nearby cool core clusters place stringent upper limits (≲ 0.1%) on the presence of emission line polarization, requiring that if thermal conduction is operative, the thermal gradients are not in the saturated regime. This limit is consistent with theoretical models of the thermal structure of filament interfaces.

  13. Advances in fuel management and on-line core monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.; Hansen, L.E.; Patten, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced Nuclear Fuels Corporation (ANF) has developed and implemented advanced core power distribution monitoring methods for BWRs and PWRs based on the three dimensional nodal simulator codes used for incore fuel management design and analysis. The use of these methods has resulted in a more accurate assessment of the core power distribution and corresponding increased operating margins. These increased margins allow for more economical fuel cycle designs. Since the initial application in 1982, ANF has made enhancements to the incore monitoring system. These enhancements have permitted more rapid analysis of local power changes, power distribution projections during ascent to full power and on-line statistical analysis of the incore detector signal. The on-line analysis implemented in BWRs has also been developed for application PWRs. In the future, reactors are expected to operate with longer fuel cycles, more aggressive low radial leakage loadings, load follow and use higher burnup fuel. These advances will require more burnable neutron absorbers and more sophisticated fuel designs. To accommodate these advances, the fuel management methodologies and measurement system will require improvements. The state-of-the-art methods provided by ANF provide incore monitoring systems compatible with these expected needs.

  14. Positive and negative ion formation in deep-core excited molecules: S 1s excitation in dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho, L. H.; Gardenghi, D. J.; Schlachter, A. S.; Souza, G. G. B. de; Stolte, W. C.

    2014-01-14

    The photo-fragmentation of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecule was studied using synchrotron radiation and a magnetic mass spectrometer. The total cationic yield spectrum was recorded in the photon energy region around the sulfur K edge. The sulfur composition of the highest occupied molecular orbital's and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital's in the DMSO molecule has been obtained using both ab initio and density functional theory methods. Partial cation and anion-yield measurements were obtained in the same energy range. An intense resonance is observed at 2475.4 eV. Sulfur atomic ions present a richer structure around this resonant feature, as compared to other fragment ions. The yield curves are similar for most of the other ionic species, which we interpret as due to cascade Auger processes leading to multiply charged species which then undergo Coulomb explosion. The anions S{sup −}, C{sup −}, and O{sup −} are observed for the first time in deep-core-level excitation of DMSO.

  15. sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio in amorphous carbon from C 1s core-level shifts: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerle, Rainer; Riedo, Elisa; Pasquarello, Alfredo; Baldereschi, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, we address C 1s core-level shifts in amorphous carbon. Experimental results are obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on thin-film samples of different atomic density, obtained by a pulsed-laser deposition growth process. The XPS spectra are deconvoluted into two contributions, which are attributed to sp2- and sp3-hybridized atoms, respectively, separated by 0.9 eV, independent of atomic density. The sp3 hybridization content extracted from XPS is consistent with the atomic density derived from the plasmon energy in the EELS spectrum. In our theoretical study, we generate several periodic model structures of amorphous carbon of different densities applying two schemes of increasing accuracy in sequence. We first use a molecular-dynamics approach, based on an environmental-dependent tight-binding Hamiltonian to quench the systems from the liquid phase. The final model structures are then obtained by further atomic relaxation using a first-principles pseudopotential plane-wave approach within density-functional theory. Within the latter framework, we also calculate carbon 1s core-level shifts for our disordered model structures. We find that the shifts associated to threefold- and fourfold- coordinated carbon atoms give rise to two distinct peaks separated by about 1.0 eV, independent of density, in close agreement with experimental observations. This provides strong support for decomposing the XPS spectra into two peaks resulting from sp2- and sp3-hybridized atoms. Core-hole relaxations effects account for about 30% of the calculated shifts.

  16. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of photoelectron spectra: the carbon 1s core-electron binding energies of ethanol-water solutions.

    PubMed

    Löytynoja, T; Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Vahtras, O; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2014-11-20

    Using ethanol-water solutions as illustration, we demonstrate the capability of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) paradigm to simulate core photoelectron spectroscopy: the binding energies and the chemical shifts. An integrated approach with QM/MM binding energy calculations coupled to preceding molecular dynamics sampling is adopted to generate binding energies averaged over the solute-solvent configurations available at a particular temperature and pressure and thus allowing for a statistical assessment with confidence levels for the final binding energies. The results are analyzed in terms of the contributions in the molecular mechanics model-electrostatic, polarization, and van der Waals-with atom or bond granulation of the corresponding MM charge and polarizability force-fields. The role of extramolecular charge transfer screening of the core-hole and explicit hydrogen bonding is studied by extending the QM core to cover the first solvation shell. The results are compared to those obtained from pure electrostatic and polarizable continuum models. Particularly, the dependence of the carbon 1s binding energies with respect to the ethanol concentration is studied. Our results indicate that QM/MM can be used as an all-encompassing model to study photoelectron binding energies and chemical shifts in solvent environments.

  17. Line Profiles of Cores within Clusters. I. The Anatomy of a Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Stutz, Amelia M.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-05-01

    Observations are revealing the ubiquity of filamentary structures in molecular clouds. As cores are often embedded in filaments, it is important to understand how line profiles from such systems differ from those of isolated cores. We perform radiative transfer calculations on a hydrodynamic simulation of a molecular cloud in order to model line emission from collapsing cores embedded in filaments. We model two optically thick lines, CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0), and one optically thin line, N2H+(1-0), from three embedded cores. In the hydrodynamic simulation, gas self-gravity, turbulence, and bulk flows create filamentary regions within which cores form. Though the filaments have large dispersions, the N2H+(1-0) lines indicate subsonic velocities within the cores. We find that the observed optically thick line profiles of CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0) vary drastically with viewing angle. In over 50% of viewing angles, there is no sign of a blue asymmetry, an idealized signature of infall motions in an isolated spherical collapsing core. Profiles that primarily trace the cores, with little contribution from the surrounding filament, are characterized by a systematically higher HCN(1-0) peak intensity. The N2H+(1-0) lines do not follow this trend. We demonstrate that red asymmetric profiles are also feasible in the optically thick lines, due to emission from the filament or one-sided accretion flows onto the core. We conclude that embedded cores may frequently undergo collapse without showing a blue asymmetric profile, and that observational surveys including filamentary regions may underestimate the number of collapsing cores if based solely on profile shapes of optically thick lines.

  18. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. I. THE ANATOMY OF A FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Stutz, Amelia M.

    2012-05-01

    Observations are revealing the ubiquity of filamentary structures in molecular clouds. As cores are often embedded in filaments, it is important to understand how line profiles from such systems differ from those of isolated cores. We perform radiative transfer calculations on a hydrodynamic simulation of a molecular cloud in order to model line emission from collapsing cores embedded in filaments. We model two optically thick lines, CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0), and one optically thin line, N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0), from three embedded cores. In the hydrodynamic simulation, gas self-gravity, turbulence, and bulk flows create filamentary regions within which cores form. Though the filaments have large dispersions, the N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) lines indicate subsonic velocities within the cores. We find that the observed optically thick line profiles of CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0) vary drastically with viewing angle. In over 50% of viewing angles, there is no sign of a blue asymmetry, an idealized signature of infall motions in an isolated spherical collapsing core. Profiles that primarily trace the cores, with little contribution from the surrounding filament, are characterized by a systematically higher HCN(1-0) peak intensity. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) lines do not follow this trend. We demonstrate that red asymmetric profiles are also feasible in the optically thick lines, due to emission from the filament or one-sided accretion flows onto the core. We conclude that embedded cores may frequently undergo collapse without showing a blue asymmetric profile, and that observational surveys including filamentary regions may underestimate the number of collapsing cores if based solely on profile shapes of optically thick lines.

  19. Carbon 1s photoemission line analysis of C-based adsorbate on (111)In2O3 surface: The influence of reducing and oxidizing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinzari, V.; Cho, B. K.; Korotcenkov, G.

    2016-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation photoemission study of C 1s line of (111) In2O3 surface was carried out under HV (high vacuum) doses of oxygen, carbon monoxide and water. Gas interaction with the surface was activated by heating of In2O3 monocrystalline film at temperatures of 160 or 250 °C. The study of complex structure of C 1 s line and evolution of its fine components allowed to establish their nature and to propose possible surface adsorbed species and reactions, including a direct chemisorption and dissociation of CO molecules. Reduction or oxidation of the surface determines whether the first (chemisorption) or the second (dissociation) process takes place. The latter is responsible for additional formation of ionosorbed oxygen. Both processes have not been previously reported for In2O3 and for conductive metal oxides.

  20. Reengineering a surgical service line: focusing on core process improvement.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D L; Pestotnik, S L; Coons, M C; Lelis, J W

    1997-01-01

    Integrating principles from a variety of theory has led to the development of a conceptual framework for reengineering in a clinical care delivery setting to improve the value of services provided to the customer. A conceptual framework involving the identification of three high level core processes to reengineer can provide clarity and focus for clinicians to begin directing reengineering efforts. Those core processes are: clinical management of the patient's medical needs, patient operational processes to support the clinical processes, and administrative decision-making processes to support the implementation of the clinical and operational processes. Improvement in any one of these areas has the potential to increase value, but the concurrent targeting of these core processes for reengineering has provided a synergy that has accelerated the achievement of the desired outcomes in the area of surgical services.

  1. Photochemistry of O(1D) and O(1S) lines in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; De Keyser, Johan; Maggiolo, Romain; Gibbons, Andrew; Gronoff, Guillaume; Gunell, Herbert; Dhooghe, Frederik; Loreau, Jérôme; Vaeck, Nathalie; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bieler, Andre; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; Fuselier, Stephen; Gombosi, Tamas; Haessig, Myrtha; Le Roy, Lena; Neefs, Eddy; Rubin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We present here a chemistry-emission coupled model to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1D) and O(1S) states, for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The recent discovery of O2 in significant abundance relative to water (3.80% +/- 0.85%, Bieler et al. 2015) within the coma of 67P has been taken into consideration for the first time in such models. We evaluate the effect of the presence of O2 on the green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio, which is traditionally used to assess the CO2 abundance within cometary atmospheres. Model simulations, solving the continuity equation with transport, show that not taking O2 into account leads to an underestimation of the CO2 abundance within 67P. This strongly suggests that the green to red-doublet emission intensity ratio alone is not a proper tool for determining the CO2 abundance, as previously suggested. O2 might indeed be a rather common and abundant parent species, following the re-analysis of the comet 1P/Halley data (Rubin et al. 2015). Therefore, it is likely that earlier determinations of the CO2 abundance in cometary atmospheres have to be revisited.

  2. Main steam-line break core shroud loading calculations for BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Shoop, U.; Feltus, M.A.; Baratta, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    In July 1994, the U.S. Nuclear regulatory Commission sent out Generic Letter 94-03 to all boiling water reactors in the United States, informing them of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core shrouds found in 2 reactors. The letter directed all to perform safety analysis of the BWR units. Penn State performed scoping calculations to determine the forces experienced by the core shroud during a main-stream line break transient.

  3. Twin core photonic crystal fiber for in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometric sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongkyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Cui, Long; Chung, Youngjoo

    2009-08-31

    We will discuss fabrication of twin core photonic crystal fiber (TC-PCF) using the stack-and-draw method and its application for in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometers. The small difference in the effective indexes of the two core modes leads to interference fringes and the birefringence of the twin cores results in polarization-dependent fringe spacing. The strain sensitivity was negative and wavelength-dependent. A novel intensity-based bend sensor is also demonstrated with bend-induced spatial fringe shift. High air filling fraction of fabricated TC-PCF cladding provides immunity to bend-induced intensity fluctuation.

  4. Breast cancer cell line MCF7 escapes from G1/S arrest induced by proteasome inhibition through a GSK-3β dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gavilán, Elena; Giráldez, Servando; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco; Ruano, Diego; Daza, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway has emerged as a rational approach in the treatment of human cancers. Autophagy has been described as a cytoprotective mechanism to increase tumor cell survival under stress conditions. Here, we have focused on the role of proteasome inhibition in cell cycle progression and the role of autophagy in the proliferation recovery. The study was performed in the breast cancer cell line MCF7 compared to the normal mammary cell line MCF10A. We found that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 induced G1/S arrest in MCF10A, but G2/M arrest in MCF7 cells. The effect of MG132 on MCF7 was reproduced on MCF10A cells in the presence of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor VII. Similarly, MCF7 cells overexpressing constitutively active GSK-3β behaved like MCF10A cells. On the other hand, MCF10A cells remained arrested after MG132 removal while MCF7 recovered the proliferative capacity. Importantly, this recovery was abolished in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Thus, our results support the relevance of GSK-3β and autophagy as two targets for controlling cell cycle progression and proliferative capacity in MCF7, highlighting the co-treatment of breast cancer cells with 3-MA to synergize the effect of the proteasome inhibition. PMID:25941117

  5. Breast cancer cell line MCF7 escapes from G1/S arrest induced by proteasome inhibition through a GSK-3β dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, Elena; Giráldez, Servando; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco; Ruano, Diego; Daza, Paula

    2015-05-05

    Targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway has emerged as a rational approach in the treatment of human cancers. Autophagy has been described as a cytoprotective mechanism to increase tumor cell survival under stress conditions. Here, we have focused on the role of proteasome inhibition in cell cycle progression and the role of autophagy in the proliferation recovery. The study was performed in the breast cancer cell line MCF7 compared to the normal mammary cell line MCF10A. We found that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 induced G1/S arrest in MCF10A, but G2/M arrest in MCF7 cells. The effect of MG132 on MCF7 was reproduced on MCF10A cells in the presence of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor VII. Similarly, MCF7 cells overexpressing constitutively active GSK-3β behaved like MCF10A cells. On the other hand, MCF10A cells remained arrested after MG132 removal while MCF7 recovered the proliferative capacity. Importantly, this recovery was abolished in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Thus, our results support the relevance of GSK-3β and autophagy as two targets for controlling cell cycle progression and proliferative capacity in MCF7, highlighting the co-treatment of breast cancer cells with 3-MA to synergize the effect of the proteasome inhibition.

  6. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, we developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch-diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about -109??F (-78??C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  7. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-11-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, the authors developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch -diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about {minus}109 F ({minus}78 C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  8. Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

  9. Direct potential and temperature effects on the MgHe line-core and far-wing photoabsorption profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.

    2011-03-15

    The present study deals with the collisional broadening of monatomic magnesium, evolving in a helium buffer gas, in the wavelength and temperature ranges 260-310 nm and 100-3000 K, respectively. The computed emission and absorption spectral profiles are based on the most recent potential-energy curves and transition dipole moments. The required interatomic Mg(3s{sup 2})+He(1s{sup 2}) and Mg(3s3p)+He(1s{sup 2}) potentials are constructed from two different sets. The purpose of this treatment is twofold. First, using the quantum-mechanical Baranger impact approximation, the width and shift of the line-core spectra are determined and their variation law with temperature is examined. Then, the satellite structures in the blue and red wings are analyzed quantum mechanically. The calculations show especially that the free-free transitions contribute most to the MgHe photoabsorption spectra and that a satellite structure is observable beyond the temperature 1800 K around the wavelengths 272 or 276 nm, depending on the used potential set. Weak satellites have also been investigated and, for all cases, the obtained results showed good agreement with those already published.

  10. Relation between occupation in the first coordination shells and Widom line in core-softened potentials.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Evy; Barraz, Ney M; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2013-04-28

    Three core-softened families of potentials are checked for the presence of density and diffusion anomalies. These potentials exhibit a repulsive core with a softening region and at larger distances an attractive well. We found that the region in the pressure-temperature phase diagram in which the anomalies are present increases if the slope between the core-softened scale and the attractive part of the potential decreases. The anomalous region also increases if the range of the core-softened or of the attractive part of the potential decreases. We also show that the presence of the density anomaly is consistent with the non-monotonic changes of the radial distribution function at each one of the two scales when temperature and density are varied. Then, using this anomalous behavior of the structure we show that the pressure and the temperature at which the radial distribution function of one of the two length scales equals the radial distribution function of the other length scales identify the Widom line.

  11. In-line fiber-optic etalon formed by hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y J; Zhu, T; Yang, X C; Duan, D W

    2007-09-15

    A novel fiber-optic in-line etalon formed by splicing a section of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) in between two single-mode fibers is proposed and demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge. Such a HCPCF-based etalon acts as an excellent optical waveguide to form a Fabry-Perot interferometer and hence allows the cavity length to be as long as several centimeters with good visibility as the transmission loss of the HCPCF is much smaller than that of a hollow core fiber; this offers great potential to generate a practical dense fiber-optic sensor network with spatial frequency division-multiplexing. This novel etalon is demonstrated for strain measurement, and the experimental results show that a good visibility of 0.3 and a strain accuracy of better than +/- 5 microepsilon are achieved.

  12. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  13. Comparisons of MgII core-wing data with Ground-Based Ca K-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Preminger, D.

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium_II core-wing ratio data will be compared with ground-based K-line photometry for most of cycle 22 and 23. The ground-based data is the photmetric sum computed from the composite K-line obtained from the San Fernando Observatory. We will examine several MgII core-wing composites. This work is partially supported by grants NNX11AB51G from NASA and ATM-0848518 from NSF.

  14. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Georgantzos, E.; Boucouvalas, A. C.; Papageorgiou, C.

    2015-12-31

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell’s equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method.

  15. Selection and phenotypic characterization of a core collection of Brachypodium distachyon inbred lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The model grass Brachypodium distachyon is increasingly used to study various aspects of grass biology. A large and genotypically diverse collection of B. distachyon germplasm has been assembled by the research community. The natural variation in this collection can serve as a powerful experimental tool for many areas of inquiry, including investigating biomass traits. Results We surveyed the phenotypic diversity in a large collection of inbred lines and then selected a core collection of lines for more detailed analysis with an emphasis on traits relevant to the use of grasses as biofuel and grain crops. Phenotypic characters examined included plant height, growth habit, stem density, flowering time, and seed weight. We also surveyed differences in cell wall composition using near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP). In all cases, we observed extensive natural variation including a two-fold variation in stem density, four-fold variation in ferulic acid bound to hemicellulose, and 1.7-fold variation in seed mass. Conclusion These characterizations can provide the criteria for selecting diverse lines for future investigations of the genetic basis of the observed phenotypic variation. PMID:24423101

  16. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  17. Identifying Vortex-Core-Line using a tetrahedral satellite configuration: Field Topology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yao; Lembege, Bertrand; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Cai, DongSheng; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Identifying vortices are the key to understanding the turbulence in plasma shear layers. Here, the term 'vortex' or 'vortex core' is associated with a region of Galilean invariance [Jeong and Hussain, 1995]. Unfortunately, no single precise definition of a vortex is currently universally accepted, despite the fact that many space plasma authors claim that many observations have detected "vortices" (as Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at/around the magnetopause). By using the four satellite velocity data, and Taylor series, we expand the velocity data around the satellites, calculate its first order tensor, and linearly approximate the field. We can identify the vortex structures by using various vortex identification criteria as follows: (i) The first criterion is Q-criterion that defines vortices as regions in which the vorticity energy prevails other energies; (ii) the second criterion is the lambda2-criterion that is related to the minus of the Hessian matrix of the pressure related term; and (iii) the third criterion requires the existence of vortex-core-lines that is the Galilean invariance inside the four satellite tetrahedral region. Using these methods, we can identify and analyze more precisely the 3D vortex using tetrahedral satellite configuration.

  18. The radio core and jet in the broad absorption-line quasar PG 1700+518

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Wu, F.; Paragi, Z.; An, T.

    2012-01-01

    The blueshifted broad absorption lines (BAL) or troughs are observed in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) when our line of sight is intercepted by a high-speed outflow (wind), likely originating in the accretion disc. The outflow or wind can shed light on the internal structure obscured by the AGN torus. Recently, it has been shown that this outflow is rotating in the BAL quasar PG 1700+518, further supporting the accretion disc origin of the wind. With the purpose of giving independent constraints on the wind geometry, we performed high-resolution European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Network (EVN) observations at 1.6 GHz in 2010. Combining the results with the Very Large Array (VLA) archival data at 8.4 GHz, we present its jet structure on scales of parsec (pc) to kiloparsec (kpc) for the first time. The source shows two distinct jet features in east-west direction with a separation of around 4 kpc. The eastern feature, which has so far been assumed to hide the core, is a kpc-scale hotspot, which is completely resolved out in the EVN image. In the western jet feature, we find a compact jet component, which pinpoints the position of the central black hole in the galaxy. Jet components on both sides of the core are additionally detected in the north-west-south-east direction, and they show a symmetric morphology on scale of <1 kpc. This two-sided jet feature is not common in the known BAL quasars and indicates that the jet axis is far away from the line of sight. Furthermore, it is nearly parallel to the scattering plane revealed earlier by optical polarimetry. By analogy to polar-scattered Seyfert 1 galaxies, we conclude that the jet likely has a viewing angle around 45°. The analogy is further supported by the recent report of significant cold absorption in the soft X-rays, a nearly unique feature to polar-scattered Seyfert galaxies. Finally, our observations have confirmed the earlier finding that the majority of radio emission in this galaxy arises

  19. Highly-sensitive gas pressure sensor using twin-core fiber based in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyong; Liao, Changrui; Wang, Yiping; Xu, Lei; Wang, Dongning; Dong, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shen; Wang, Qiao; Yang, Kaiming; Zhou, Jiangtao

    2015-03-09

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on a twin-core fiber was proposed and experimentally demonstrated for gas pressure measurements. The in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer was fabricated by splicing a short section of twin-core fiber between two single mode fibers. A micro-channel was created to form an interferometer arm by use of a femtosecond laser to drill through one core of the twin-core fiber. The other core of the fiber was remained as the reference arm. Such a Mach-Zehnder interferometer exhibited a high gas pressure sensitivity of -9.6 nm/MPa and a low temperature cross-sensitivity of 4.4 KPa/°C. Moreover, ultra-compact device size and all-fiber configuration make it very suitable for highly-sensitive gas pressure sensing in harsh environments.

  20. Anti-apoptotic effect of HCV core gene of genotype 3a in Huh-7 cell line

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein regulates multiple signaling pathways and alters cellular genes expression responsible for HCV induced pathogenesis leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Prevalence of HCV genotype 3a associated HCC is higher in Pakistan as compare to the rest of world; however the molecular mechanism behind this is still unclear. This study has been designed to evaluate the effect of HCV core 3a on apoptosis and cell proliferation which are involved in HCC Methodology We examined the in vitro effect of HCV Core protein of genotype 3a and 1a on cellular genes involved in apoptosis by Real time PCR in liver cell line (Huh-7). We analyzed the effect of HCV core of genotype 1a and 3a on cell proliferation by MTT assay and on phosphrylation of Akt by western blotting in Huh-7 cells. Results The HCV 3a Core down regulates the gene expression of Caspases (3, 8, 9 and 10), Cyto C and p53 which are involved in apoptosis. Moreover, HCV 3a Core gene showed stronger effect in regulating protein level of p-Akt as compared to HCV 1a Core accompanied by enhanced cell proliferation in Huh-7 cell line. Conclusion From the current study it has been concluded that reduced expression of cellular genes involved in apoptosis, increased p-Akt (cell survival gene) and enhanced cell proliferation in response to HCV 3a core confirms anti apoptotic effect of HCV 3a Core gene in Huh-7 that may lead to HCC. PMID:22108100

  1. Observation of atomic oxygen O(1S) green-line emission in the summer polar upper mesosphere associated with high-energy (≥30 keV) electron precipitation during high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Solheim, Brian; Lee, Regina; Lee, Jaejin

    2017-01-01

    The auroral green-line emission at 557.7 nm wavelength as arising from the atomic oxygen O(1S → 1D) transition typically peaks at an altitude of 100 km specifically in the nightside oval, induced by auroral electrons within an energy range of 100 eV-30 keV. Intense aurora is known as being suppressed by sunlight in summer daytime but usually occurs in low electrical background conductivity. However, in the present study in summer (July) sunlit condition, enhancements of O(1S) emission rates observed by using the Wind Imaging Interferometer/UARS were frequently observed at low altitudes below 90 km, where ice particles are created initially as subvisible and detected as polar mesosphere summer echoes, emerging to be an optical phenomenon of polar mesospheric clouds. The intense O(1S) emission occurring in summer exceeds those occurring in the daytime in other seasons both in occurrence and in intensity, frequently accompanied by occurrences of supersonic neutral velocity (300-1500 m s-1). In the mesosphere, ion motion is controlled by electric field and the momentum is transferred to neutrals. The intense O(1S) emission is well associated with high-energy electron precipitation as observed during an event of high-speed solar wind streams. Meanwhile, since the minimum occurrences of O(1S) emission and supersonic velocity are maintained even in the low precipitation flux, the mechanism responsible is not only related to high-energy electron precipitation but also presumably to the local conditions, including the composition of meteoric-charged ice particles and charge separation expected in extremely low temperatures (<150 K).

  2. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. II. SIGNATURES OF DYNAMICAL COLLAPSE DURING HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Beuther, Henrik; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of atomic or molecular lines can provide important information about the physical state of star-forming regions. In order to investigate the line profiles from dynamical collapsing massive star-forming regions (MSFRs), we model the emission from hydrodynamic simulations of a collapsing cloud in the absence of outflows. By performing radiative transfer calculations, we compute the optically thick HCO{sup +} and optically thin N{sub 2}H{sup +} line profiles from two collapsing regions at different epochs. Due to large-scale collapse, the MSFRs have large velocity gradients, reaching up to 20 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1} across the central core. The optically thin lines typically contain multiple velocity components resulting from the superposition of numerous density peaks along the line of sight. The optically thick lines are only marginally shifted to the blue side of the optically thin line profiles, and frequently do not have a central depression in their profiles due to self-absorption. As the regions evolve, the lines become brighter and the optically thick lines become broader. The lower-order HCO{sup +} (1-0) transitions are better indicators of collapse than the higher-order (4-3) transitions. We also investigate how the beam sizes affect profile shapes. Smaller beams lead to brighter and narrower lines that are more skewed to the blue in HCO{sup +} relative to the true core velocity, but show multiple components in N{sub 2}H{sup +}. High-resolution observations (e.g., with Atacama Large Millimeter Array) can test these predictions and provide insights into the nature of MSFRs.

  3. Lining up: The Relationship between the Common Core State Standards and Five Sets of Comparison Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; Drummond, Kathryn V.; de Gonzalez, Alicia; Seburn, Mary; Stout, Odile; Rooseboom, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Offices (CCSSO) released the Common Core State Standards. The stated aim of the Common Core standards is to define the knowledge and skills students should achieve in order to graduate from high school ready to succeed in a…

  4. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N.

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  5. Measurement of the 1s2l3l’ Dielectronic Recombination Emission Line in Li-Like Ar and Its Contribution to the Faint X-Ray Feature Found in the Stacked Spectrum of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy Christina; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Borovik, Alexander; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigated the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of, or contributor to, the emission line. The Li-like transition 1s22l-1s2l3l’ was suggested to produce a 3.62 keV photon [1] near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV and was the primary focus of our investigation. Apart from the mentioned transitions, we have found other features that can be possible contributors to the emission in this region. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances. A Johann-type crystal spectrometer and a solid-state germanium detector were used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the electron beam. The DR cross sections were measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Corrections for different instrument and method related effects such as charge state balance, electron beam space charge, and charge exchange have been considered. Our high-resolution crystal spectra allowed the experimental separation of features that are less than 2 eV apart. We have used a collisional radiative model NOMAD [2] aided by atomic data calculations by FAC [3] to interpret our observations and account for the corrections and uncertainties. Experimental results were compared to the AtomDB theoretical emission lines used to fit the galaxy cluster spectra containing the unidentified 3.57 keV line. These data points can be added benchmarks in the database and used to accurately interpret spectra from current x-ray satellites, including Hitomi, Chandra, and XMM-Newton x-ray observatories.[1] Bulbul E. et al., 2014, ApJ, 789, 13[2] Ralchenko Yu. et al., 2014, JQSRT, 71

  6. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K; Sung, Yixing; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Xu, Yiban; Cao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  7. Molecular Line Observations of Carbon-Chain-rich Core L492

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2006-07-01

    We report on molecular abundances and distributions in a starless dense core, L492. We have found that the abundances of carbon-chain molecules such as CCS, C3S, HC3N, HC5N, and HC7N are comparable to those in chemically young dark cloud cores called ``carbon-chain-producing regions,'' such as L1495B, L1521B, L1521E, and TMC-1. This is the first dark cloud core extremely rich in carbon-chain molecules that is found outside the Taurus region. In addition, the deuterium fractionation ratios of DNC/HNC and DCO+/HCO+ are also comparable to those in carbon-chain-producing regions, being significantly lower than those in the evolved prestellar cores such as L1498 and L1544. On the other hand, the abundances of NH3 and N2H+ are systematically higher than those in carbon-chain-producing regions. Our mapping observations reveal that the central hole of molecular distributions, which were reported for CCS and C34S in evolved prestellar cores, is not significant in L492, indicating that the depletion factor of molecules is not very high. Furthermore, L492 is dynamically more evolved than carbon-chain-producing regions, and the protostellar collapse has started like in L1498 and L1544. Therefore, it is likely that the chemical and dynamical evolutionary stage of L492 is intermediate between carbon-chain-producing regions (L1495B, L1521B, L1521E, and TMC-1) and evolved prestellar cores (L1498 and L1544).

  8. Development of An On-Line, Core Power Distribution Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Tunc ALdemir; Don Miller; Peng Wang

    2007-10-02

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop a software package that can construct in three-dimensional core power distributions using the signals from constant temperature power sensors distributed in the reactor core. The software developed uses a mode-based state/parameter estmation technique that is particularly attractive when there are model uncertainties and/or large signal noise. The software yields the expected value of local power at the detector locations and points in between, as well as the probability distribution of the local power density

  9. Plasma Core Electron Density and Temperature Measurements Using CVI Line Emissions in TCABR Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, F.; Machida, M.; Severo, J. H. F.; Sanada, E.; Ronchi, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present results of electron temperature ( T e ) and density ( n e ) measurements obtained in Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén Brésilien (TCABR) tokamak using visible spectroscopy from CVI line emissions which occurs mainly near the center of the plasma column. The presented method is based on a well-known relationship between the particle flux ( Γ ion) and the photon flux ( ø ion) emitted by an ion species combined with ionizations per photon atomic data provided by the atomic data and analysis structure (ADAS) database. In the experiment, we measured the photon fluxes of three different CVI spectral line emissions, 4685.2, 5290.5, and 6200.6 Å (one line per shot). Using this method it was possible to find out the temporal evolution of T e and n e in the plasma. The results achieved are in good agreement with T e and n e measurements made using other diagnostic tools.

  10. The Title and Three Core Values from the First Three Lines of The Declaration of Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kenneth Michael

    2013-01-01

    Teaching the Declaration of Independence can be a challenge. This article presents a lesson plan based on an explication of the title and the first three lines of the Declaration intended to make the American founding era relevant to today's college students. Assuming civic education is a major goal of teaching American Government, assuming…

  11. Optical Line Radiation from Uranium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis; [for a gaseous core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maceda, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    The radiative energy current due to line radiation is calculated in a U 235 plasma over a temperature range of 5000 K to 8000 K. Also a variation in the neutron flux of 2 x 10 to the 12th power neutrons/ (sq cm-sec) to 2 x 10 to the 16th power neutrons/(sq cm-sec) is considered. The plasma forms a cylinder with a diameter and height of one meter. To calculate the radiative-energy current, a rate equation formalism is developed to solve for the atomic state densities along with a model for the energy levels in neutral and singly ionized uranium. Because the electron states in uranium lie below 5eV, recombination is the principle excitation mechanism. At and above 6000 K, inversions were found, and at all temperatures the line radiation at line center was greater than the corresponding black-body radiation. There are negligible differences in the radiative-energy current at 6000 K for variations in the neutron flux. The average opacity, which varied from 100 to 100,000 gm/sq cm, over the frequency range of line radiation is calculated.

  12. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  13. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  14. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions.

    PubMed

    Geslot, B; Vermeeren, L; Filliatre, P; Lopez, A Legrand; Barbot, L; Jammes, C; Bréaud, S; Oriol, L; Villard, J-F

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 10(20) n∕cm(2). A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  15. The 0.8 mm Spectral Line Survey toward Low-Mass Protostellar Cores with ASTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Sakai, N.; Lindberg, J.; Jørgensen, J.; Bisschop, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have conducted spectral line surveys in the 345 GHz band with Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m dish toward two low mass class 0 protostars R CrA IRS7B and Serpens SMM4. For R CrA IRS7B, 16 molecular species and 16 isotopologues are identified. Strong emission of CN and CCH is observed, whereas complex organic molecules and long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. This result indicates that the hot corino activity as well as the WCCC activity is weak in R CrA IRS7B. Lindberg & Jørgensen (2012) suggested that UV radiation from the Herbig Be star R CrA significantly affects the chemical composition in R CrA IRS7B. Our results also support their conclusion. For Serpens SMM4, we identified 12 normal molecular species and 8 isotopologues. The chemical composition in Serpens SMM4 is similar to that found in hot corinos, although sulfur bearing species seem slightly deficient. These results illustrates the further chemical diversity in low-mass protostars.

  16. Mapping coexistence lines via free-energy extrapolation: application to order-disorder phase transitions of hard-core mixtures.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Fernando A

    2014-03-07

    In this work, a variant of the Gibbs-Duhem integration (GDI) method is proposed to trace phase coexistence lines that combines some of the advantages of the original GDI methods such as robustness in handling large system sizes, with the ability of histogram-based methods (but without using histograms) to estimate free-energies and hence avoid the need of on-the-fly corrector schemes. This is done by fitting to an appropriate polynomial function not the coexistence curve itself (as in GDI schemes) but the underlying free-energy function of each phase. The availability of a free-energy model allows the post-processing of the simulated data to obtain improved estimates of the coexistence line. The proposed method is used to elucidate the phase behavior for two non-trivial hard-core mixtures: a binary blend of spheres and cubes and a system of size-polydisperse cubes. The relative size of the spheres and cubes in the first mixture is chosen such that the resulting eutectic pressure-composition phase diagram is nearly symmetric in that the maximum solubility of cubes in the sphere-rich solid (∼20%) is comparable to the maximum solubility of spheres in the cube-rich solid. In the polydisperse cube system, the solid-liquid coexistence line is mapped out for an imposed Gaussian activity distribution, which produces near-Gaussian particle-size distributions in each phase. A terminal polydispersity of 11.3% is found, beyond which the cubic solid phase would not be stable, and near which significant size fractionation between the solid and isotropic phases is predicted.

  17. Bottom-line mentality as an antecedent of social undermining and the moderating roles of core self-evaluations and conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Rebecca L; Mawritz, Mary Bardes; Eissa, Gabi

    2012-03-01

    We propose that an employee's bottom-line mentality may have an important effect on social undermining behavior in organizations. Bottom-line mentality is defined as 1-dimensional thinking that revolves around securing bottom-line outcomes to the neglect of competing priorities. Across a series of studies, we establish an initial nomological network for bottom-line mentality. We also develop and evaluate a 4-item measure of bottom-line mentality. In terms of our theoretical model, we draw on social-cognitive theory (Bandura, 1977, 1986) to propose that supervisor bottom-line mentality is positively related to employee bottom-line mentality (Hypothesis 1). On the basis of conceptual arguments pertaining to bottom-line mentality (Callahan, 2004; Wolfe, 1988), we hypothesize that employee bottom-line mentality is positively related to social undermining (Hypothesis 2). We further predict a moderated-mediation model whereby the indirect effect of supervisor bottom-line mentality on social undermining, through employee bottom-line mentality, is moderated by employee core self-evaluations and conscientiousness (Hypothesis 3). We collected multisource field data to test our theoretical model (i.e., focal-supervisor-coworker triads; N = 113). Results from moderated-mediation analyses provide general support for our hypotheses. Theoretical and practical implications of bottom-line mentality and social undermining are discussed, and areas for future research are identified.

  18. A 3.55 keV line from DM → a → γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.powell2@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  19. Analysis of cracked core spray injection line piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite content.

  20. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  1. A Core Invasiveness Gene Signature Reflects Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition but Not Metastatic Potential in Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Marsan, Melike; Van den Eynden, Gert; Limame, Ridha; Neven, Patrick; Hauspy, Jan; Van Dam, Peter A.; Vergote, Ignace; Dirix, Luc Y.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Van Laere, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. Methods & Results We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001). When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896–1.019, P = 0.186). Discussion These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential. PMID:24586640

  2. Properties of Dense Cores Embedded in Musca Derived from Extinction Maps and 13CO, C18O, and NH3 Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machaieie, Dinelsa A.; Vilas-Boas, José W.; Wuensche, Carlos A.; Racca, Germán A.; Myers, Philip C.; Hickel, Gabriel R.

    2017-02-01

    Using near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog and the Near Infrared Color Excess method, we studied the extinction distribution in five dense cores of Musca, which show visual extinction greater than 10 mag and are potential sites of star formation. We analyzed the stability in four of them, fitting their radial extinction profiles with Bonnor–Ebert isothermal spheres, and explored their properties using the J = 1–0 transition of 13CO and C18O and the J = K = 1 transition of NH3. One core is not well described by the model. The stability parameter of the fitted cores ranges from 4.5 to 5.7 and suggests that all cores are stable, including Mu13, which harbors one young stellar object (YSO), the IRAS 12322-7023 source. However, the analysis of the physical parameters shows that Mu13 tends to have larger A V, n c, and P ext than the remaining starless cores. The other physical parameters do not show any trend. It is possible that those are the main parameters to explore in active star-forming cores. Mu13 also shows the most intense emission of NH3. Its 13CO and C18O lines have double peaks, whose integrated intensity maps suggest that they are due to the superposition of clouds with different radial velocities seen in the line of sight. It is not possible to state whether these clouds are colliding and inducing star formation or are related to a physical process associated with the formation of the YSO.

  3. An in-line Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Using Thin-core Fiber for Ammonia Gas Sensing With High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xinyue; Li, Xueming; Yang, Jianchun; Tao, Chuanyi; Guo, Xiaogang; Bao, Hebin; Yin, Yanjun; Chen, Huifei; Zhu, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia is an important indicator among environmental monitoring parameters. In this work, thin-core fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer deposited with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA), poly (allyamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH) sensing film for the detection of ammonia gas has been presented. The thin-core fiber modal interferometer was made by fusion splicing a small section of thin-core fiber (TCF) between two standard single mode fibers (SMF). A beam propagation method (BPM) is employed for the design of proposed interferometer and numerical simulation. Based on the simulation results, interferometer with a length of 2 cm of thin-core fiber is fabricated and experimentally studied. (PAH/PAA)2 + [PAH/(PAA + SWCNTs-COOH)]8 film is deposited on the outer surface of thin-core fiber via layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. The gas sensor coated with (PAH/PAA)2 + [PAH/(PAA + SWCNTs-COOH)]8 film towards NH3 gas exposure at concentrations range from 1 to 960 ppm are analyzed and the sensing capability is demonstrated by optical spectrum analyzer (OSA). Experimental results show that the characteristic wavelength shift has an approximately linear relationship in the range 1–20 ppm, which is in accordance with the numerical simulation. Thus, this paper reveals the potential application of this sensor in monitoring low concentration NH3 gas. PMID:28378783

  4. OPTICAL LINE EMISSION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 0.6: EVIDENCE FOR A LACK OF STRONG COOL CORES 3.5 Gyr AGO?

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael

    2011-12-15

    In recent years the number of known galaxy clusters beyond z {approx}> 0.2 has increased drastically with the release of multiple catalogs containing >30,000 optically detected galaxy clusters over the range 0 < z < 0.6. Combining these catalogs with the availability of optical spectroscopy of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows for the evolution of optical emission-line nebulae in cluster cores to be quantified. For the first time, the continuous evolution of optical line emission in BCGs over the range 0 < z < 0.6 is determined. A minimum in the fraction of BCGs with optical line emission is found at z {approx} 0.3, suggesting that complex, filamentary emission in systems such as Perseus A is a recent phenomenon. Evidence for an upturn in the number of strongly emitting systems is reported beyond z > 0.3, hinting at an earlier epoch of strong cooling. We compare the evolution of emission-line nebulae to the X-ray-derived cool core (CC) fraction from the literature over the same redshift range and find overall agreement, with the exception that an upturn in the strong CC fraction is not observed at z > 0.3. The overall agreement between the evolution of CCs and optical line emission at low redshift suggests that emission-line surveys of galaxy clusters may provide an efficient method of indirectly probing the evolution of CCs and thus provide insights into the balance of heating and cooling processes at early cosmic times.

  5. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestål, K.; Feifel, R.; Tashiro, M.; Ehara, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ueda, K.

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s{sup −2}) and 1179.4 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The corresponding energies obtained for N{sub 2}O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s{sup −2}), 906.5 eV (central N1s{sup −2}), and 1174.1 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N{sub 2}O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s{sup −2} as well as with the O1s{sup −2} dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10{sup −3} for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10{sup −3} for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  6. A strain sensor based on in-line fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer in twin-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim Qureshi, Khurram; Liu, Zhengyong; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Fahad Zia, M.

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a strain sensor realized using a twin-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The strain sensor element consists of a 10 cm long in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer consisting of twin-core PCF. The output spectra of the sensing element is measured and analyzed under various strain levels. The sensitivity of the strain measurement of -0.31 pm/μɛ is achieved within a range from 0 to 4000 μɛ. The effect of temperature is also analyzed.

  7. The preparation of core/shell structured microsphere of multi first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs and evaluation of biological safety

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Pang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Zhengquan; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Penghui; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng; Luo, Chengke; Wang, Xiyang; Nie, Hemin

    2015-01-01

    To introduce a modified method, namely coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization for the fabrication of distinct core/shell structured microspheres of four first-line ant-tuberculosis drugs with different characteristics in hydrophilic properties in one single step. In group B, we prepared microspheres in which the core and the shell contain hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, respectively. In contrast, in group C, the opposite is prepared. The detection of encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release test were performed to confirm the feasibility of the drug-loaded core/shell structured microspheres. Moreover, cell culture experiments and animal experiments have been carried out to evaluate the biological safety of different microspheres in cell growth, cell viability, osteogenesis and migration of BMSCs in vitro and the bone fusion in a bone deficits model in SD rat. Meanwhile, the distribution of drugs and liver and kidney toxicity were monitored. The release patterns of the two groups are significantly different. The release of drugs from Group B microspheres is rather sequential, whereas group C microspheres release drugs in a parallel (co-release) manner. And various concentrations of carrier materials produces core/shell structured microspheres with different appearance. Moreover, the biological safety of core/shell structured microspheres was testified to be satisfactory. These findings present the advantages and possible application of this kind of multi-drug release system in treating skeletal tuberculosis. Moreover, the characteristic sequential release of multi-drugs can be controlled and adjusted based on treatment need and used in treating other disorders. PMID:26309493

  8. The Development of an On-Line, Partially Automated Discharge Summary and Core Clinical Data-Base in an Existing Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark S.; Zibrak, Joseph D.; Siders, Alice; Zullo, Nan; Peterson, Mark

    1989-01-01

    We describe the development of a hospital-wide computer system that produces on-line, partially automated discharge summaries, assists nursing staff with discharge functions, and stores a core clinical database on all patients. The system was created using only tools and functions contained within the existing order-entry/results reporting hospital information system. Data enters the discharge database in three ways: direct transfer from the information system, on line selection by physicians and nurses of specific data already contained in the system (eg. lab and radiology results), and by typed input of varying amounts of text (eg. chief complaint, hospital course). If completed the night prior to discharge, the system produces several products for residents and nurses, included typed prescriptions, the printed discharge summary, nursing referral or patient care forms, and simple discharge planning information for the patient. During the course of a 9 week pilot program, 428 summaries were completed on the system, 420 of which met JCHAO criteria.

  9. 1300 micron continuum and C(O-18) line mapping of the giant molecular cloud cores in Orion, W49, and W51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloerb, F. Peter; Snell, Ronald L.; Schwartz, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of the 1300-micron continuum emission and the C(O-18) spectral-line emission from three well-studied giant molecular cloud cores: Orion, W49, and W51 are presented. The observations were obtained at the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory, and they provide a means to examine the consistency of these two methods to trace the column density structure of molecular clouds. A good general correlation is found between the 1300-micron continuum, which traces the column density of dust, and the C(O-18) J = 2-1 line emission, which traces the column density of molecular gas, when the effects of source temperature are taken into consideration. Moreover, nominal values for the gas and dust abundances and the dust properties reproduce the observed continuum-to-line ratios. Thus, no strong C(O-18) abundance gradients within sources has been found, and it appears that either the C(O-18) emission lines or the submillimeter dust emission may used to derive the mass column density within molecular clouds accurately.

  10. Evaluation of a new-generation line-probe assay that detects 5' untranslated and core regions to genotype and subtype hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Rohan; Khan, G Yasmeen; Miller, Steven A; Brooks, Geo F

    2007-08-01

    The VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 Assay (LiPA 2.0; Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium; distributed by Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY) is a new-generation line-probe assay that simultaneously detects sequences in the 5' untranslated (5'UTR) and core regions to genotype and subtype hepatitis C virus (HCV). We tested 60 specimens of known genotype and subtype and 2 specimens with mixed infections with the LiPA 2.0 assay. After arbitration based on genotype and subtype determined by sequencing, there was concordance in 58 of 60 specimens (specificity, 96.7%). Computer-assisted typing yielded comparable results, but much more rapidly. Of 67 clinical specimens, 64 readily yielded genotype and subtype; 3 indeterminate specimens were typed by sequencing and were uncommon types not in the database. The newgeneration line-probe assay that detects the 5'UTR and core regions to genotype and subtype HCV is applicable to more than 95% of specimens. Interpretation is facilitated by computer-assisted analysis.

  11. A Method for Molecular-Line Radiative-Transfer Computations and Its Application to a Two-Dimensional Model for the Starless Core L1544

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. N.; Shustov, B. M.

    2004-04-01

    We present a numerical method and the URAN(IA) computer code for two-dimensional, axially symmetric radiative-transfer computations in molecular lines and spectral modeling. The algorithm is based on Monte Carlo computations of the mean radiation intensity and Accelerated Λ Iterations (ALI) to provide self-consistency between the radiation field and molecular excitation. The code is applied to the structure and kinematic properties of the starless core L1544, which is often considered to be the collapsing core of a molecular cloud. This object has been well studied, but none of the one-dimensional models obtained earlier has been able to provide a self-consistent picture of its structure and kinematics. We show that the spectral features of L1544 can be reproduced in a two-dimensional model in which the cloud has an axial ratio of 2: 1, a mean velocity of contraction (collapse) of V r˜50 m/s, and a rotational velocity of up to V φ ˜ 200 m/s. We construct the model of L1544 based on a continuous transition from an initially homogeneous cloud to the observed configuration. The velocity of the contraction is appreciably lower than is predicted by one-dimensional dynamical models. We discuss the problems of interpreting observed molecular-line profiles and prospects for developing self-consistent models for the chemical and dynamical evolution of molecular clouds.

  12. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchiani, M.; Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M.

    1995-09-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l` Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l` Energia e l` Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test {open_quotes}2{close_quotes} Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line break{close_quotes} are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2.

  13. Quantum-mechanical vs. semi-classical spectral-line widths and shifts from the line core in the non-impact region for the Ar-perturbed/ K-radiator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, W. C.

    2007-09-01

    New quantum-mechanical (QM) and semi-classical (SC) shifts (d's) and widths (HWHM's, w's) were measured from the line core of computed full spectral-line shapes for the Ar-perturbed/K-radiator system (K/Ar). The initial state of our model was based on a 4p2P3/2,1/2 pseudo-potential for the K/Ar system, and the final state on a zero potential. The Fourier transform of the line shape formed the basis for the computations. Excellent agreement was found between the QM and SC values of d and of w in a high-pressure (P) non-impact region, which was characterized by a √P dependence of w and a P dependence of d. These agreements were shown to be another example of a correspondence between classical (SC) quantities and QM quantities in the limit of large quantum numbers. Typically at P=1×106 Torr and T=400 K, wQM=448 cm-1 and wSC=479 cm-1, where the deviation from the mean is ±3.3%. Also, dQM=-3815 cm-1 and dSC=-3716 cm-1, where the deviation from the mean is ±1.3%. A new general method was formulated which yielded a definite pressure P0, which was defined as an upper limit to the low-pressure impact approximation and a lower limit to the non-impact region.

  14. Highly sensitive strain and bending sensor based on in-line fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer in solid core large mode area photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Woojin; Lee, Yeung Lak; Yu, Bong-Ahn; Noh, Young-Chul; Ahn, Tae Jung

    2010-05-01

    We have proposed highly sensitive strain and bending sensor with very low temperature sensitivity based on in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) in solid core large mode area photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and experimentally investigated its novel characteristics. The measured strain and bending sensitivities were -3 pm/μɛ and 36 nm/m -1, respectively. The proposed PCF-MZI shows negligible temperature sensitivity of ˜4.6 pm/°C over the wide temperature range from 25 to 325 °C, eliminating the effect of temperature in optical sensing applications. Furthermore, as the fabrication process of the proposed device does not require photo-inscription or complicate fabrication methods, the proposed device is cost effective and has a great potential to be applied in optical sensing systems.

  15. Fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on near-elliptical core photonic crystal fiber for temperature and strain sensing.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hu; Zhang, Weigang; Wang, Huayu; Geng, Pengcheng; Zhang, Shanshan; Gao, Shecheng; Yang, Chunxue; Li, Jieliang

    2013-10-15

    A fiber in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer is fabricated by selectively filling liquid into one air hole of the innermost layer of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The refractive index of the liquid is so close to that of the background silica in the wavelength range of 1300-1600 nm that the two-mode PCF evolves into multimode PCF with an elliptically shaped core. Due to the different propagation constants, interference can occur between the fundamental mode and higher-order modes of the liquid-filled PCF. Such a device is applied in temperature and strain measurements with high sensitivities of 16.49 nm/°C and -14.595 nm/N, respectively.

  16. On-line SPE-UHPLC method using fused core columns for extraction and separation of nine illegal dyes in chilli-containing spices.

    PubMed

    Khalikova, Maria A; Satínský, Dalibor; Smidrkalová, Tereza; Solich, Petr

    2014-12-01

    The presented work describes the development of a simple, fast and effective on-line SPE-UHPLC-UV/vis method using fused core particle columns for extraction, separation and quantitative analysis of the nine illegal dyes, most frequently found in chilli-containing spices. The red dyes Sudan I-IV, Sudan Red 7B, Sudan Red G, Sudan Orange G, Para Red, and Methyl Red were separated and analyzed in less than 9 min without labor-consuming pretreatment procedure. The chromatographic separation was performed on Ascentis Express RP-Amide column with gradient elution using mixture of acetonitrile and water, as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) and 55°C of temperature. As SPE sorbent for cleanup and pre-concentration of illegal dyes short guard fused core column Ascentis Express F5 was used. The applicability of proposed method was proven for three different chilli-containing commercial samples. Recoveries for all compounds were between 90% and 108% and relative standard deviation ranged from 1% to 4% for within- and from 2% to 6% for between-day. Limits of detection showed lower values than required by European Union regulations and were in the range of 3.3-10.3 µg L(-1) for standard solutions, 5.6-235.6 µg kg(-1) for chilli-containing spices.

  17. Water-rock interactions in the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, SW Japan revealed by core sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Tanaka, N.; Shigematsu, N.

    2012-12-01

    Alteration minerals along the fault zone of the Median Tectonic Line (MTL), the Japan's largest onshore fault, are characterized to understand the crustal faulting at various depth conditions by describing a borehole penetrating the MTL. The borehole was drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan, AIST (GSJ, AIST) to predict the forthcoming Nankai-Tonankai Earthquake at Matsusaka-Iitaka (ITA), SW Japan. The drilling length is 600m. It penetrates the MTL at the depth of 473.9m. The fault plane has an almost E-W strike and dips at 56° to the north. Hangingwall of the MTL consists of Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite and footwall of the MTL consists of fractured rocks derived from Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks. Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite in the hangingwall suffered more or less later cataclastic deformations. X-ray diffraction patterns of powdered samples derived from ITA borehole were obtained to identify alteration mineral assemblages and estimate alteration conditions. Chlorite, laumontite, white-mica, prehnite and calcite are main alteration minerals in the Ryoke belt above 400m depth, while analcine and stilbite occur as zeolite minerals instead of laumontite between 400m and 473.9m depth. Laumontite is preferentially occurred in the cataclastically deformed zones and calcite often fills fractures and cavities. The fault plane and fractures in the fault zone provide fluid conduit. The presence of laumontite and prehnite indicates that the alteration temperature was more than 200°C, while analcime and stilbite formed at lower temperature than laumontite. These suggest that the zone of hydrothermal alteration less than 200°C was restricted below 400m depth in the ITA borehole. We also applied chlorite geothermometry (Inoue et al., 2009), which yeileds temperatures of about 300°C for mylonitic rocks and those of about 200°C for cataclastic rocks. Immediately beneath the MTL, approximately 40m thick fractured rocks form the major strand of the MTL fault zone

  18. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvatić, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of π∗ -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the π⊥∗(C=C-C≡N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized π∥∗(C≡N) produces C≡N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C≡N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  19. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  1. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  2. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  3. Determination of Histamine in Silages Using Nanomaghemite Core (γ-Fe₂O₃)-Titanium Dioxide Shell Nanoparticles Off-Line Coupled with Ion Exchange Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cernei, Natalia; Lackova, Zuzana; Guran, Roman; Hynek, David; Skladanka, Jiri; Horky, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-09-12

    The presence of biogenic amines is a hallmark of degraded food and its products. Herein, we focused on the utilization of magnetic nanoparticles off-line coupled with ion exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization and Vis detection for histamine (Him) separation and detection. Primarily, we described the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with nanomaghemite core (γ-Fe₂O₃) functionalized with titanium dioxide and, then, applied these particles to specific isolation of Him. To obtain further insight into interactions between paramagnetic particles' (PMP) surface and Him, a scanning electron microscope was employed. It was shown that binding of histamine causes an increase of relative current response of deprotonated PMPs, which confirmed formation of Him-PMPs clusters. The recovery of the isolation showed that titanium dioxide-based particles were able to bind and preconcentrate Him with recovery exceeding 90%. Finally, we successfully carried out the analyses of real samples obtained from silage. We can conclude that our modified particles are suitable for Him isolation, and thus may serve as the first isolation step of Him from biological samples, as it is demonstrated on alfalfa seed variety Tereza silage.

  4. Determination of Histamine in Silages Using Nanomaghemite Core (γ-Fe2O3)-Titanium Dioxide Shell Nanoparticles Off-Line Coupled with Ion Exchange Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Cernei, Natalia; Lackova, Zuzana; Guran, Roman; Hynek, David; Skladanka, Jiri; Horky, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    The presence of biogenic amines is a hallmark of degraded food and its products. Herein, we focused on the utilization of magnetic nanoparticles off-line coupled with ion exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization and Vis detection for histamine (Him) separation and detection. Primarily, we described the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with nanomaghemite core (γ-Fe2O3) functionalized with titanium dioxide and, then, applied these particles to specific isolation of Him. To obtain further insight into interactions between paramagnetic particles’ (PMP) surface and Him, a scanning electron microscope was employed. It was shown that binding of histamine causes an increase of relative current response of deprotonated PMPs, which confirmed formation of Him-PMPs clusters. The recovery of the isolation showed that titanium dioxide-based particles were able to bind and preconcentrate Him with recovery exceeding 90%. Finally, we successfully carried out the analyses of real samples obtained from silage. We can conclude that our modified particles are suitable for Him isolation, and thus may serve as the first isolation step of Him from biological samples, as it is demonstrated on alfalfa seed variety Tereza silage. PMID:27626434

  5. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  6. Recombination rates, Resonance Strengths and Line Profiles of Dielectronic Satellite Lines of He-like Ca, Fe, Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, S. N.; Oelgoetz, J.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2009-03-01

    Dielectronic satellite (DES) lines arising from the radiative decay of ions with excited cores are used as diagnostics of the plasma conditions found in astronomical objects. In collisional plasmas, the most common DES lines are due to an electron being dielectronically captured by a He-like ion, forming a 3-electron, Li-like ion in a doubly excited, autoionizing state (i.e. 1s2l2l' (KLL), 1s2l3l' (KLM), etc). These states can decay to bound levels by emitting a photon, completing a process known as dielectronic recombination (DR). The autoionizing KLL complex gives rise to 22 DES lines, labeled `a' through `v', via transitions of the type 1s2l2l'→ls^22l. These lines are seen at energies lower than the He-like resonance line (1s2p(^1P^0_1)→ 1s^2(^1S_0) - which is also referred to as the `w' line). The unified recombination method, which treats photoionization and electron-ion recombination in a manner which couples autoionizing states to the continuum, has been extended to study the DES lines of the highly charged ions Ca XVIII, Fe XXIV, and Ni XXVI. In contrast to obtaining a single energy point for a DES line (as is the case for existing theoretical approaches based on the isolated resonance approximation - IRA), the unified method: (i) provides detailed profiles of DES lines, including the blending of lines which occurs in nature, (ii) includes the background contribution of radiative recombination (RR), and (iii) provides a simple relation between the resonance strengths and recombination rates of narrow lines which is useful for astrophysical modeling.

  7. Protective effects of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a pulmonary cell line.

    PubMed

    Charão, Mariele F; Baierle, Marília; Gauer, Bruna; Goethel, Gabriela; Fracasso, Rafael; Paese, Karina; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Bubols, Guilherme B; Dias, Bruna B; Matte, Ursula S; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange C

    2015-06-01

    Many acute poisonings lack effective and specific antidotes. Due to both intentional and accidental exposures, paraquat (PQ) causes thousands of deaths annually, especially by pulmonary fibrosis. Melatonin (Mel), when incorporated into lipid-core nanocapsules (Mel-LNC), has enhanced antioxidant properties. The effects of such a formulation have not yet been studied with respect to mitigation of PQ- induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Here, we have tested whether Mel-LNC can ameliorate PQ-induced toxicity in the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. Physicochemical characterization of the formulations was performed. Cellular uptake was measured using nanocapsules marked with rhodamine B. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. The enzyme-modified comet assay with endonuclease III (Endo III) and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) were used to investigate oxidative DNA damage. Incubation with culture medium for 24h did not alter the granulometric profile of Mel-LNC formulations. Following treatment (3 and 24h), red fluorescence was detected around the cell nucleus, indicating internalization of the formulation. Melatonin solution (Mel), Mel-LNC, and LNC did not have significant effects on cell viability or DNA damage. Pre-treatment with Mel-LNC enhanced cell viability and showed a remarkable reduction in % DNA in tail compared to the PQ group; this was not observed in cells pre-treated with Mel. PQ induces oxidative DNA damage detected with the enzyme-modified comet assay. Mel-LNC reduced this damage more effectively than did Mel. In summary, Mel-LNC is better than Mel at protecting A549 cells from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PQ.

  8. Bottom-Line Mentality as an Antecedent of Social Undermining and the Moderating Roles of Core Self-Evaluations and Conscientiousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbaum, Rebecca L.; Mawritz, Mary Bardes; Eissa, Gabi

    2012-01-01

    We propose that an employee's bottom-line mentality may have an important effect on social undermining behavior in organizations. Bottom-line mentality is defined as 1-dimensional thinking that revolves around securing bottom-line outcomes to the neglect of competing priorities. Across a series of studies, we establish an initial nomological…

  9. Many-electron aspects of molecular promotion in ion-atom collisions - Production of core-excited states of Li in Li/+/-He collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, S. B.; Vane, C. R.; Schumann, S.

    1979-01-01

    Production of core-excited autoionizing states of neutral Li having configurations of the form 1snln(prime)l(prime) has been observed over the impact-energy range from 10-50 keV. Although the results for production of all such states is remarkably consistent with a quasi-molecular-excitation model proposed by Stolterfoht and Leithaeuser (1976), production of individual lines in the observed spectra exhibits collision-velocity dependencies indicative of considerably more complex processes, including processes which appear to be inherently two-electron in nature. Excitation functions are presented for (1s2s/2/)/2/S, 1s(2s2p/3/P)/2/P, 1s(2s2p/1/P)/2/P, and (1s2p/2/)/2/D core-excited state of Li and for total core excitation.

  10. Health monitoring of engine blades by using an in-line fiber-optic F-P strain sensor based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yunjiang; Fan, Yanen; Li, Hong; Zhu, Tao

    2009-10-01

    We present the application of a fiber-optic F-P strain sensor based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) to measurement of stress of engine blades. The blade stress under different rotating speeds is tested by detecting the reflected wavelength shift of the HCPCF sensor. The experimental results show that the strain has a quadratic relationship with the rotating speed, which agrees well with the theoretical analysis. As such a HCPCF sensor with short cavity length can stand high temperature of up to 600°C and has low temperature sensitivity, it would be possible to realize real-time health monitoring of engine blades during operation.

  11. Effect of Paclitaxel-Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with a Core-Shell Structure on the Human Lung Cancer Cell Line A549

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tieliang; Liu, Ying; Wu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    A nanodrug delivery system of paclitaxel-mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a core-shell structure (PAC-csMSN) was used to increase the dissolution of paclitaxel (PAC) and improve its treatment of lung cancer. PAC was loaded into the core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (csMSN) by the adsorption equilibrium method and was in an amorphous state in terms of its mesoporous structure. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that csMSN increased the dissolution rate of PAC and improved its lung absorption. The area under concentration-time curve (AUC) value of PAC-csMSN used for pulmonary delivery in rabbits was 2.678-fold higher than that obtained with the PAC. After continuous administration for 3 days, a lung biopsy showed no signs of inflammation. Cell apoptosis results obtained by flow cytometry indicated that PAC-csMSN was more potent than pure PAC in promoting cell apoptosis. An absorption investigation of PAC-csMSN in A549 cells was carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). The obtained results indicated that the cellular uptake was time-dependent and csMSN was uptaken into the cytoplasm. All these results demonstrate that csMSN have the potential to achieve pulmonary inhalation administration of poorly water-soluble drugs for the treatment of lung cancer.

  12. Energies, radiative and Auger transitions of the core-excited states for the boron atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Sun, Yan; Cong Gou, Bing

    2014-09-01

    Energies, radiative and Auger transitions of the 1s vacancy resonances 1s2s22p2, 1s2s22p3p, 1s2s2p3, 1s2p4, and 1s2p33p, 4L (L=S, P, D) for the neutral boron atom are calculated using the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Large-scale wave functions are used to obtain reliable results. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included by the first-order perturbation theory. The calculated term energies, x-ray wavelengths, and Auger electron energies for these core-excited states are compared with available theoretical and experimental results. Auger electron energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution B Auger spectrum produced in 300 keV B+ on CH4 collision experiment. It is found that the Auger decay of core-excited states of the boron atom gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 165-210 eV, and many previously unknown line identifications are presented.

  13. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  14. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  15. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides bearing sialyl lewis x moieties on an alternatively glycosylated form of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1).

    PubMed

    Picard, M D; Pettey, C L; Marsh, H C; Thomas, L J

    2000-02-01

    We sought to produce a complement inhibitory protein possessing oligosaccharides specifically modified to contain the sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) moiety. This modified glycoprotein could combine anti-complement activity with the ability to inhibit selectin-mediated interactions and concentrate this activity to sites of activated endothelium where selectins are upregulated. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), previously shown to be effective in inhibiting the complement cascade, was produced in a cell line capable of adding fucose to N-linked oligosaccharides in the alpha1-3 linkage, which is necessary for sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoprotein purified from these cells was designated sCR1sLe(x), and may prove to be more effective than sCR1 in some clinical applications. Detailed analysis and characterization of sCR1sLe(x) was performed to confirm that the N-linked oligosaccharides possessed sLe(x) moieties and also to determine the extent of sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoproteins were characterized by oligosaccharide profiling, sequencing, linkage analysis and quantified by differential enzymic digestion, using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The major glycans were identified as biantennary oligosaccharides (including sialylated and non-core fucosylated glycans). The linkages of sialic acid and the branched fucose were analysed by digestion with linkage-specific enzymes and subsequent separation by electrophoresis. All data were consistent with the presence of sLe(x) moieties on the N-linked oligosaccharides of sCR1sLe(x). sCR1sLe(x) is a prime example of a recombinant protein expressed with oligosaccharides engineered for a specific biological function, and produced using a commercially viable method.

  16. Measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in helium-like silicon.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, M; Myers, E G

    2002-01-14

    Using Doppler-tuned fast-beam laser spectroscopy the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ has been measured to be 7230.5(2) cm(-1). The experiment made use of a single-frequency Nd:YAG (1.319 microm) laser and a high-finesse optical buildup cavity. The result provides a precision test of modern relativistic and QED atomic theory.

  17. A fully automated and fast method using direct sample injection combined with fused-core column on-line SPE-HPLC for determination of ochratoxin A and citrinin in lager beers.

    PubMed

    Lhotská, Ivona; Šatínský, Dalibor; Havlíková, Lucie; Solich, Petr

    2016-05-01

    A new fast and sensitive method based on on-line solid-phase extraction on a fused-core precolumn coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection has been developed for ochratoxin A (OTA) and citrinin (CIT) determination in lager beer samples. Direct injection of 100 μL filtered beer samples into an on-line SPE-HPLC system enabled fast and effective sample extraction including separation in less than 6 min. Preconcentration of OTA and CIT from beer samples was performed on an Ascentis Express RP C18 guard column (5 × 4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 μm, with a mobile phase of methanol/0.5% aqueous acetic acid pH 2.8 (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1). The flow switch from extraction column to analytical column in back-flush mode was set at 2.0 min and the separation was performed on the fused-core column Ascentis Express Phenyl-Hexyl (100 × 4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 μm, with a mobile phase acetonitrile/0.5% aqueous acetic acid pH 2.8 in a gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) and temperature of 50 °C. Fluorescence excitation/emission detection wavelengths were set at 335/497 nm. The accuracy of the method, defined as the mean recoveries of OTA and CIT from light and dark beer samples, was in the range 98.3-102.1%. The method showed high sensitivity owing to on-line preconcentration; LOQ values were found to be 10 and 20 ng L(-1) for OTA and CIT, respectively. The found values of OTA and CIT in all tested light, dark and wheat beer samples were significantly below the maximum tolerable limits (3.0 μg kg(-1) for OTA and 2000 μg kg(-1) for CIT) set by the European Union.

  18. Measurement of the 1S-2S Frequency in Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildum, Edward Ames

    A first precise measurement of the 1S-2S energy interval in atomic hydrogen has been obtained by observing the 1S-2S transition in an atomic beam by pulsed Doppler -free two-photon spectroscopy and using an interferometrically calibrated line of ('130)Te(,2) at 486 nm as the reference. The measured 1S-2S frequency is 2 466 061 395.6(4.9) MHz. With the calculated 1S Lamb shift, the 1S-2S frequency yields a value for the Rydberg constant, R(,(INFIN)) = 109 737.314 92(22) cm('-1), which is not in good agreement with the most recent previously measured value, 109 737.315 44(11) cm('-1), obtained by S. R. Amin et al.('16) It is, however, in good agreement with a previous Rydberg value, 109 737.315 04(32) cm('-1), measured by J. E. M. Goldsmith('17). If the Rydberg constant is taken as given, the 1S-2S frequency determines a value for the 1S Lamb shift. With Amin's Rydberg, the measured Lamb shift is 8161.0(5.4) MHz, in poor agreement with the theoretical value of 8149.43(8) MHz. With Goldsmith's Rydberg, the measured Lamb shift is 8151.0(8.7) MHz, in good agreement with theory.

  19. Nuclear accumulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and acceleration of G1/S stage by Epstein-Barr-encoded oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Yongguang; Song Xing; Deng Xiyun; Xie Daxin; Lee, Leo M.; Liu Yiping; Li Wei; Li Lili; Deng Lin; Wu Qiao; Gong Jianping; Cao Ya . E-mail: ycao98@public.cs.hn.cn

    2005-02-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is considered to be the major oncogenic protein of EBV-encoded proteins and has always been the core of the oncogenic mechanism of EBV. Advanced studies on nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family have greatly improved our knowledge of the biological function of cell surface receptors. In this study, we used the Tet-on LMP1 HNE2 cell line as a cell model, which is a dual-stable LMP1-integrated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line and the expression of LMP1 which could be regulated by the Tet system. We found that LMP1 could regulate the nuclear accumulation of EGFR in a dose-dependent manner quantitatively and qualitatively. We also demonstrated that the nuclear localization sequence of EGFR played some roles in the location of the protein within the nucleus under LMP1 regulation and EGFR in the nucleus could bind to the promoters of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, respectively. We further demonstrated that EGFR is involved in the acceleration of the G1/S phase transition by LMP1 through binding to cyclinD1 and cyclinE directly. These findings provided a novel view that the acceleration of LMP1 on the G1/S transition via the nuclear accumulation of EGFR was critical in the process of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  20. Satellite structure in the Argon 1s photoelectron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    Atomic inner-shell photoelectron spectra typically display several relatively weak {open_quotes}satellite peaks{close_quotes} at higher ionization energy than the primary peak. Such satellite peaks are associated with final-state configurations corresponding to ionization of an inner-shell electron and excitation or ionization of one or more valence electrons. The observation of satellite peaks demonstrates that the independent-electron picture is inadequate to describe atomic structure and the photoionization process. The measured energies and intensities of photoelectron satellites provide sensitive tests of many-electron theoretical models. We recorded the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum on beam line X-24A at an X-ray energy of 3628 eV. The primary peak at 3206 eV ionization energy was recorded at an observed resolution of 1.8 eV (FWHM). The satellite structure shows remarkable similarity to that recorded in the suprathreshold region of the Ar K photoabsorption cross section, demonstrating the manner in which these techniques complement each other. Surprisingly, while the region just above the K threshold in Ar was the subject of several theoretical studies using multi-configuration calculations, we find good agreement between our results and those of Dyall and collaborators using a shake model.

  1. Excitation and Ionization in H(1s)-H(1s) Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Merle E.; Ritchie, A. Burke

    1999-07-15

    Hydrogen atom - hydrogen atom scattering is a prototype for many of the fundamental principles of atomic collisions. In this work we present an approximation to the H+H system for scattering in the intermediate energy regime of 1 to 100 keV. The approximation ignores electron exchange and two-electron excitation by assuming that one of the atoms is frozen in the 1s state. We allow for the evolution of the active electron by numerically solving the 3D Schroedinger equation. The results capture many features of the problem and are in harmony with recent theoretical studies. Excitation and ionization cross sections are computed and compared to other theory and experiment. New insight into the mechanism of excitation and ionization is inferred from the solutions.

  2. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  4. A Search for Invisible Decays of the Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-17

    We search for invisible decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B Factory. We select events containing the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable {Upsilon}(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} invisible) < 3.0 x 10{sup ?4} at the 90% confidence level.

  5. Search for invisible decays of the {upsilon}(1S) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.

    2007-02-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of invisible {upsilon}(1S) decays, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {upsilon}(2S) resonance with the CLEO III detector at CESR. After subtracting expected backgrounds from events that pass selection criteria for invisible {upsilon}(1S) decay in {upsilon}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{upsilon}(1S), we deduce a 90% C.L. upper limit of B[{upsilon}(1S){yields}invisible]<0.39%.

  6. Weak- and hyperfine-interaction-induced 1s2s 1S0 → 1s2 1S0 E1 transition rates of He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laima, Radžiūtė; Erikas, Gaidamauskas; Gediminas, Gaigalas; Li, Ji-Guang; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Jönsson, Per

    2015-04-01

    Weak- and hyperfine-interaction-induced 1s2s 1S0 → 1s2 1S0 E1 transition rates for the isoelectronic sequence of He-like ions have been calculated using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) and relativistic configuration interaction methods. The results should be helpful for the future experimental investigations of parity non-conservation effects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274254, 11147108, 10979007, U1331122, and U1332206) and in part by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200).

  7. Sex Steroids Regulate Expression of Genes Containing Long Interspersed Elements-1s in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwatanakul, Saichon; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Tongsima, Sissades; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed elements-1s (LINE-1s) are dispersed all over the human genome. There is evidence that hypomethylation of LINE-1s and levels of sex steroids regulate gene expression leading to cancer development. Here, we compared mRNA levels of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 in breast cancer cells treated with various sex steroids from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with the gene expression database using chi-square analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo). We evaluated whether sex steroids influence expression of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1. Three sex steroids at various concentrations, 1 and 10 nM estradiol (E2), 10 nM progesterone (PG) and 10 nM androgen (AN), were assessed. In breast cancer cells treated with 1 or 10 nM E2, a significant percentage of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were down-regulated. A highly significant percentage of E2-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was down-regulated in cells treated with 1 nM E2 for 3 hours (<3.70E-25; OR=1.91; 95% CI=2.16-1.69). Similarly, high percentages of PG or AN- regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were also down-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM PG or 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=9.53E-06; OR=1.65; 95% CI=2.06-1.32 and p=3.81E-14; OR=2.01; 95% CI=2.42-1.67). Interestingly, a significant percentage of AN-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was up-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=4.03E-02; OR=1.40; 95% CI=1.95-1.01). These findings suggest that intragenic LINE-1s may play roles in sex steroid mediated gene expression in breast cancer cells, which could have significant implications for the development and progression of sex steroid-dependent cancers.

  8. The excitation energies and term energies of the excited states 1s2ns (n=3,4,5) and 1s2nf (n=4,5) of lithium-like systems of Z=11-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zi-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhou, Ya-Jun; He, Li-Ming; Liu, Guo-Guang

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, the full-core plus correlation (FCPC) and the Ritz method is extended to calculate the non-relativistic energies of 1s2ns (n=3,4,5) and 1s2nf (n=4,5) states and the wavefunctions of the lithium-like systems from Z=11-20. The mass-polarization and the relativistic correction including the kinetic-energy correction, the Darwin term, the electron-electron contact term and the orbit-orbit interaction are evaluated perturbatively as the first-order correction. The contribution from quantum electrodynamic is also included by using the effective nuclear charge formula. The excited energies, the term-energy and fine structure, are given and compared with the other theoretical calculation and experimental results. It is shown that the correlative wave in the FCPC method embodies well the strong correlation between the 1s2 core and the valence electron.

  9. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  10. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  11. A comparison of methods for calculating O(1S) lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, G. B.; Reid, J. S.

    It is shown theoretically and with simulated data that O(1S) lifetimes determined by the cross-spectral method (Paulson and Shepherd, 1965) are significant overestimates. A comparison is made of the cross-spectral and impulse function analysis (Burns and Reid, 1984) methods using photometric data collected at Macquarie Island (54.5 deg S, 159.0 deg E geographic). The results support the view that the O(1S) state is excited predominantly by an indirect process.

  12. Analysis of magnesium XI line profiles from solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.; Cowan, R. D.; Felthauser, H.; Fenimore, E. E.; Hockaday, M. P.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Faucher, P.; Steenman-Clark, L.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution solar spectra of the Mg XI 1s2 1S0-1s2p 1P1 resonance line at 9.169 A and the associated nearby satellite lines obtained from two rocket-borne crystal spectrometer measurements are presented. Comparisons with two independent sets of theoretical calculations for the 1s2nl-1s2pnl dielectronic satellite lines with n = 3-7 indicate electron temperatures of 4-4.5 million K. Measured line widths indicate either that the ion temperature exceeds the electron temperature by about a million K or that about 28 km/s of turbulence is present.

  13. Wasting Away: Chicago's Declining Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissel, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The University of Chicago met widespread national opposition ten years ago after it instituted a new, less demanding core curriculum to make way for more electives. It was part of a plan to make the curriculum significantly less demanding in order to attract more students and improve the school's bottom line in a time of putative budget deficits.…

  14. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  15. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  16. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  17. O(1S → 1D,3P) branching ratio as measured in the terrestrial nightglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Cosby, P. C.; Sharpee, B. D.; Minschwaner, K. R.; Siskind, D. E.

    2006-12-01

    The branching ratio of the two optically forbidden atmospheric emission lines, O(1S - 1D) at 557.7 nm and O(1S - 3P) at 297.2 nm, is a fixed number in the upper atmosphere because the O(1S) level is common to both lines. The value for the ratio A(557.7)/A(297.2) currently recommended by NIST is 16.7, and the ratio found in the laboratory is somewhat larger. Field observations require space-based instruments, in which case calibration between the two wavelength regions is the critical issue. We circumvent this problem by using the O2(A-X) Herzberg I emission system as a bridge between the UV region below 310 nm and the ground-accessible region above that wavelength. These two spectral regions can be separately calibrated in terms of intensity, and the results of a disparate set of observations (satellite, rocket, ground-based sky spectra) lead to a quite consistent value of 9.8 ± 1.0 for A(557.7)/A(297.2). This conclusion has consequences for auroral and dayglow processes and for spectral calibration. It is particularly important to ascertain the cause of the substantial difference between this value and those from theory.

  18. Vibrationally Resolved B 1s Photoionization Cross Section of BF3.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, D; Kimura, M; Kooser, K; Patanen, M; Plésiat, E; Argenti, L; Mondal, S; Travnikova, O; Sakai, K; Palacios, A; Kukk, E; Decleva, P; Ueda, K; Martín, F; Miron, C

    2015-06-11

    Photoelectron diffraction is a well-established technique for structural characterization of solids, based on the interference of the native photoelectron wave with those scattered from the neighboring atoms. For isolated systems in the gas phase similar studies suffer from orders of magnitude lower signals due to the very small sample density. Here we present a detailed study of the vibrationally resolved B 1s photoionization cross section of BF3 molecule. A combination of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and of state-of-the-art static-exchange and time-dependent DFT calculations shows the evolution of the photon energy dependence of the cross section from a complete trapping of the photoelectron wave (low energies) to oscillations due to photoelectron diffraction phenomena. The diffraction pattern allows one to access structural information both for the ground neutral state of the molecule and for the core-ionized cation. Due to a significant change in geometry between the ground and the B 1s(-1) core-ionized state in the BF3 molecule, several vibrational final states of the cation are populated, allowing investigation of eight different relative vibrationally resolved photoionization cross sections. Effects due to recoil induced by the photoelectron emission are also discussed.

  19. Simplifier cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    Advantages of specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels for use in high frequency power converters and pulse width modulated switching regulators are discussed. A method for rating cores assigns to each core a number which is the product of its window and core cross section area, called 'Area Product A sub p.' A correlation between the A sub p numbers and current density for a given temperature rise was developed. Also, straight line relationships were developed for A sub p and volume, A sub p and surface area, and A sub p and weight. These relationships can be used to simplify and standardize the process of inductor design. They also make it possible to design inductors of small bulk and volume or to optimize efficiency.

  20. The superstring, DiffS/sup 1//S/sup 1/, and holomorphic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Hong, Deog Ki; Ramond, P.; Rodgers, V.G.J.

    1987-04-01

    We incorporate superstrings into the non-perturbative formulation of string field theories based on Kahler geometry recently proposed by Bowick and Rajeev. The string field is conjectured to be the Kahler potential of loop space, its equation of motion given by the vanishing of the curvature of a product bundle constructed over a graded DiffS/sup 1//S/sup 1/, as required for reparametrization invariance of the theory. We find that bosonic and fermionic loops in a Minkowski background solve the equation for the Kahler potential only in ten dimensions. We use geometric quantization techniques to calculate the curvature of the superholomorphic vector bundle, since they emphasize the role of the complex geometry, and flag manifold techniques to calculate the curvature of the line bundle over SuperDiffS/sup 1//S/sup 1/.

  1. HOW STARLESS ARE STARLESS CORES?

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Scott; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Enoch, Melissa; Sadavoy, Sarah

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we present the results of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy continuum and spectral line observations of the dense core Per-Bolo 45. Although this core has previously been classified as starless, we find evidence for an outflow and conclude that Per-Bolo 45 is actually an embedded, low-luminosity protostar. We discuss the impact of newly discovered, low-luminosity, embedded objects in the Perseus molecular cloud on starless core and protostar lifetimes. We estimate that the starless core lifetime has been overestimated by 4%-18% and the Class 0/I protostellar lifetime has been underestimated by 5%-20%. Given the relatively large systematic uncertainties involved in these calculations, variations on the order of 10% do not significantly change either core lifetimes or the expected protostellar luminosity function. Finally, we suggest that high-resolution (sub)millimeter surveys of known cores lacking near-infrared and mid-infrared emission are necessary to make an accurate census of starless cores.

  2. Magic Wavelength for the Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2016-05-01

    The state of the art precision measurement of the transition frequencies of neutral atoms is performed with atoms trapped by the magic wavelength optical lattice that cancels the ac Stark shift of the transitions. Trapping with magic wavelength lattice is also expected to improve the precision of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency, which so far has been measured only with the atomic beam. In this talk, I discuss the magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition, and the possibility of implementing the optical lattice trapping for hydrogen. Optical trapping of hydrogen also opens the way to perform magnetic field free spectroscopy of antihydrogen for the test of CPT theorem.

  3. A Hunt for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Liu, Mengyao; Butler, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out an ALMA {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) and 1.3 mm continuum survey of 32 high-mass surface density regions of seven infrared dark clouds, with the aim of finding massive starless cores that may form the initial conditions for the formation of massive stars. Cores showing strong {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission are expected to be highly deuterated and indicative of early, potentially pre-stellar stages of star formation. We also present maps of these regions in ancillary line tracers, including C18O(2-1), DCN(3-2), and DCO+(3-2). Over 100 {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+ cores are identified with our newly developed core-finding algorithm, based on connected structures in position–velocity space. The most massive core has ∼ 70 {M}ȯ (potentially ∼ 170 {M}ȯ ) and so may be representative of the initial conditions or early stages of massive star formation. The existence and dynamical properties of such cores constrain massive star formation theories. We measure the line widths and thus velocity dispersion of six of the cores with strongest {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) line emission, finding results that are generally consistent with virial equilibrium of pressure confined cores.

  4. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1S201F displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1S201F and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1S201F in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1S191F) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  5. Dislocation core fields and forces in FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2004-04-01

    Atomistic models were used to obtain dislocation core fields for edge, screw, and mixed dislocations in Al and Cu using EAM. Core fields are analyzed using a line force dipole representation, with dilatant and dipole terms. The core field contribution to the force between dislocations is shown to be significant for interactions within 50b.

  6. LB1's virtual endocast, microcephaly, and hominin brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Falk, Dean; Hildebolt, Charles; Smith, Kirk; Morwood, M J; Sutikna, Thomas; Jatmiko; Wayhu Saptomo, E; Prior, Fred

    2009-11-01

    Earlier observations of the virtual endocast of LB1, the type specimen for Homo floresiensis, are reviewed, extended, and interpreted. Seven derived features of LB1's cerebral cortex are detailed: a caudally-positioned occipital lobe, lack of a rostrally-located lunate sulcus, a caudally-expanded temporal lobe, advanced morphology of the lateral prefrontal cortex, shape of the rostral prefrontal cortex, enlarged gyri in the frontopolar region, and an expanded orbitofrontal cortex. These features indicate that LB1's brain was globally reorganized despite its ape-sized cranial capacity (417cm(3)). Neurological reorganization may thus form the basis for the cognitive abilities attributed to H. floresiensis. Because of its tiny cranial capacity, some workers think that LB1 represents a Homo sapiens individual that was afflicted with microcephaly, or some other pathology, rather than a new species of hominin. We respond to concerns about our earlier study of microcephalics compared with normal individuals, and reaffirm that LB1 did not suffer from this pathology. The intense controversy about LB1 reflects an older continuing dispute about the relative evolutionary importance of brain size versus neurological reorganization. LB1 may help resolve this debate and illuminate constraints that governed hominin brain evolution.

  7. Methodology for embedded transport core calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Boyan D.

    The progress in the Nuclear Engineering field leads to developing new generations of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with complex rector core designs, such as cores loaded partially with mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, high burn-up loadings, and cores with advanced designs of fuel assemblies and control rods. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the diffusion theory that has been used for several decades for calculations of the current Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) cores. To address the difficulties the diffusion approximation encounters new core calculation methodologies need to be developed by improving accuracy, while preserving efficiency of the current reactor core calculations. In this thesis, an advanced core calculation methodology is introduced, based on embedded transport calculations. Two different approaches are investigated. The first approach is based on embedded finite element (FEM), simplified P3 approximation (SP3), fuel assembly (FA) homogenization calculation within the framework of the diffusion core calculation with NEM code (Nodal Expansion Method). The second approach involves embedded FA lattice physics eigenvalue calculation based on collision probability method (CPM) again within the framework of the NEM diffusion core calculation. The second approach is superior to the first because most of the uncertainties introduced by the off-line cross-section generation are eliminated.

  8. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P.E.G.; Barr, J.R.M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M.G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G.H.; Ferguson, A.I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V.W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B.E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; zu Putlitz, G.; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P.G.H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W.T.; Towrie, M.; Willmann, L.; Woodle, K.A.; Woodman, G.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2}{minus}2{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2} frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  9. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P. E. G.; Barr, J. R. M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M. G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G. H.; Ferguson, A. I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V. W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B. E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; Putlitz, G. zu; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P. G. H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W. T.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}S1/2-2{sup 2}S1/2 frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  11. Gravitational Infall in Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Mareike

    The detection and quantification of gravitational infall in molecular cloud cores is an important task for developing a self-consistent theory of star formation. First steps towards a quantification of the collapse have been performed by Larson (1981), who examined the line width-size relation of several molecular clouds and determined from their velocity dispersion the deviations from virial equilibrium. Soon after that, observational improvements made it possible to study this relation not only for molecular clouds but also in particular for its cores. Nowadays, increased observational performance allows to resolve the core region in detail (Barranco et al, 1998). Line-of-sight velocity profiles can therefore be analyzed dependend on their radial distance from the core's center. Myers et al. (1996) pointed out that observations of optically thick tracer profiles can be used to derive the strength of collapse motions. On the basis of our semi-analytical model we suggest here a further method how to determine the gravitational infall from the radial velocity gradients of optically thin tracers inside a core. Moreover, we discuss other impacts on the line-of-sight profile due to additional effects inside the core, like for instance rotation.

  12. Ionization energies and term energies of the ground states 1s22s of lithium-like systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    We extend the Hamiltonian method of the full-core plus correlation (FCPC) by minimizing the expectation value to calculate the non-relativistic energies and the wave functions of 1s22s states for the lithium-like systems from Z = 41 to 50. The mass-polarization and the relativistic corrections including the kinetic-energy correction, the Darwin term, the electron—electron contact term, and the orbit—orbit interaction are calculated perturbatively as first-order correction. The contribution from quantum electrodynamic (QED) is also explored by using the effective nuclear charge formula. The ionization potential and term energies of the ground states 1s22s are derived and compared with other theoretical calculation results. It is shown that the FCPC methods are also effective for theoretical calculation of the ionic structure for high nuclear ion of lithium-like systems.

  13. Some aspects of core formation in Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Some questions dealing with the nature and history of a large metallic core within Mercury are considered. These include the existence of a core, its size, whether it is fluid or solid, the timescale for core formation, the geological consequences of core formation, and whether such consequences are consistent with the surface geology. Several indirect lines of evidence are discussed which suggest the presence of a large iron-rich core. A core-formation model is examined in which core infall is accompanied by an increase of 17 km in planetary radius, an increase of 700 K in mean internal temperature, and substantial melting of the mantle. It is argued that if the core differentiated from an originally homogeneous planet, that event must have predated the oldest geological units comprising most of the planetary surface. A convective dynamo model for the source of Mercury's magnetic field is shown to conflict with cosmochemical models that do not predict a substantial radiogenic heat source in the core.

  14. Observation of the 1S-2S transition in trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Alves, B X R; Baker, C J; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Cohen, S; Collister, R; Eriksson, S; Evans, A; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Johnson, M A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Mathers, M; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; Stutter, G; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, J E; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2017-01-26

    The spectrum of the hydrogen atom has played a central part in fundamental physics over the past 200 years. Historical examples of its importance include the wavelength measurements of absorption lines in the solar spectrum by Fraunhofer, the identification of transition lines by Balmer, Lyman and others, the empirical description of allowed wavelengths by Rydberg, the quantum model of Bohr, the capability of quantum electrodynamics to precisely predict transition frequencies, and modern measurements of the 1S-2S transition by Hänsch to a precision of a few parts in 10(15). Recent technological advances have allowed us to focus on antihydrogen-the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen. The Standard Model predicts that there should have been equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the primordial Universe after the Big Bang, but today's Universe is observed to consist almost entirely of ordinary matter. This motivates the study of antimatter, to see if there is a small asymmetry in the laws of physics that govern the two types of matter. In particular, the CPT (charge conjugation, parity reversal and time reversal) theorem, a cornerstone of the Standard Model, requires that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Here we report the observation of the 1S-2S transition in magnetically trapped atoms of antihydrogen. We determine that the frequency of the transition, which is driven by two photons from a laser at 243 nanometres, is consistent with that expected for hydrogen in the same environment. This laser excitation of a quantum state of an atom of antimatter represents the most precise measurement performed on an anti-atom. Our result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of about 2 × 10(-10).

  15. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-10

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed {approx}10{sup 3} yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  16. Fast Fossil Rotation of Neutron Star Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed ~103 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  17. Velocity coherence in dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alyssa A.; Barranco, Joseph A.; Wilner, David J.; Heyer, Mark H.

    1997-02-01

    At the meeting, we presented a summary of two papers which support the hypothesis that the molecular clouds which contain star-forming low-mass dense cores are self-similar in nature on size scales larger than an inner scale, Rcoh, and that within Rcoh, the cores are ``coherent,'' in that their filling factor is large and they are characterized by a very small, roughly constant, mildly supersonic velocity dispersion. We expect these two papers, by Barranco & Goodman [1] and Goodman, Barranco, Wilner, & Heyer, to appear in the Astrophysical Journal within the coming year. Here, we present a short summary of our results. The interested reader is urged to consult the on-line version of this work at cfa-www.harvard.edu/~agoodman/vel_coh.html [2].

  18. Business Planning Core Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Itzkowitz, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

  19. City Core - detecting the anthropocene in urban lake cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjaer, K. H.; Ilsøe, P.; Andresen, C. S.; Rasmussen, P.; Andersen, T. J.; Frei, R.; Schreiber, N.; Odgaard, B.; Funder, S.; Holm, J. M.; Andersen, K.

    2011-12-01

    Here, we presents the preliminary results from lake cores taken in ditches associated with the historical fortifications enclosing the oldest - central Copenhagen to achieve new knowledge from sediment deposits related to anthropogenic activities. We have examined sediment cores with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers to correlate element patterns from urban and industrial emissions. Thus, we aim to track these patterns back in time - long before regular routines of recording of atmospheric environment began around 1978. Furthermore, we compare our data to alternative sources of information in order to constrain and expand the temporal dating limits (approximately 1890) achieved from 210Pb activity. From custom reports and statistic sources, information on imported volumes from coal, metal and oil was obtained and related contaminants from these substances to the sediment archives. Intriguingly, we find a steep increase in import of coal and metals matching the exponential increase of lead and zinc counts from XRF-recordings of the sediment cores. In this finding, we claim to have constrain the initiation of urban industrialization. In order to confirm the age resolution of the lake cores, DNA was extracted from sediments, sedaDNA. Thus we attempt to trace plantation of well documented exotic plants to, for instance, the Botanical Garden. Through extraction and sampling of sedaDNA from these floral and arboreal specimens we intend to locate their strataigraphic horizons in the sediment core. These findings may correlate data back to 1872, when the garden was established on the area of the former fortification. In this line of research, we hope to achieve important supplementary knowledge of sedaDNA-leaching frequencies within freshwater sediments.

  20. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  1. World lines.

    PubMed

    Waser, Jürgen; Fuchs, Raphael; Ribicić, Hrvoje; Schindler, Benjamin; Blöschl, Günther; Gröller, Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas, decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting, the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation, visualization and computational steering into a single unified system that is capable of dealing with the extended solution space. World Lines represent simulation runs as causally connected tracks that share a common time axis. This setup enables users to interfere and add new information quickly. A World Line is introduced as a visual combination of user events and their effects in order to present a possible future. To quickly find the most attractive outcome, we suggest World Lines as the governing component in a system of multiple linked views and a simulation component. World Lines employ linking and brushing to enable comparative visual analysis of multiple simulations in linked views. Analysis results can be mapped to various visual variables that World Lines provide in order to highlight the most compelling solutions. To demonstrate this technique we present a flooding scenario and show the usefulness of the integrated approach to support informed decision making.

  2. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  3. Ψ(2 S) Decay to J/Ψ(1 S) + 2 π or J/Ψ(1 S) + σ + 2 π

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Li-juan, Zhou; Wei-xing, Ma; Shen, Pengnian

    2017-03-01

    We estimate the decay rate of the Ψ(2 S) to J/Ψ(1 S) + 2 π and J/Ψ(1 S) + σ + 2 π. This is based on the mixed hybrid theory that was developed for the Ψ(2 S) and was used to estimate the ratio {Ψ }(2S)→ J/{Ψ }(1S) + σ to {Ψ }(2S) → J/{Ψ }(1S) + 2 π in 2011. A main motivation of the present work is to predict the possible experimental detection of the decay of Ψ(2 S) to J/Ψ(1 S) + σ+2 π, or possibly to J/Ψ(1 S)+2 π+glueball.

  4. Determination of electron-impact transfer rate coefficients between argon 1s2 and 1s3 states by laser pump-probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, E. A. D.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Sadeghi, N.

    2013-10-01

    In a microwave argon plasma, the electron-impact population transfers between the first four excited states of argon are studied by time-resolved laser pump-probe technique. Metastable atoms in the 1s5 state (in Paschen's notation) are selectively pumped up to the 2p3 state, with a nanosecond pulsed dye laser tuned to the 706 nm argon transition and the temporal response of the densities in the 1s3, 1s4 and 1s5 states are monitored by time-resolved laser diode absorption. The electron density and temperature are also measured by Thomson scattering along the plasma column for different pressures. The rate coefficient measured for the 1s3 to 1s2 state transfer, for which only rough estimations exist in the literature is found to be 9 × 10-13 m3 s-1, almost five times larger than the value commonly assumed.

  5. Electrical transmission line diametrical retainer

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2004-12-14

    The invention is a mechanism for retaining an electrical transmission line. In one embodiment of the invention it is a system for retaining an electrical transmission line within down hole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second end of a drill pipe, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The invention allows the electrical transmission line to with stand the tension and compression of drill pipe during routine drilling cycles.

  6. Occupied and unoccupied orbitals of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} probed with C 1s emission and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the orbital structure of the fullerenes, and to pursue its evolution from a cluster to the infinite solid. For obtaining a complete picture of the electronic structure the authors compare a variety of experimental techniques, i.e. photoemission and core level emission for occupied orbitals and inverse photoemission and core level absorption for unoccupied orbitals. Their experimental results focus on optical probes involving the C 1s core level, i.e. absorption via transitions from the C 1s level into unoccupied {pi}* and {sigma}* orbitals and emission involving transitions from occupied orbitals into a C 1s hole. Due to the simplicity of the C 1s level there exist clear selection rules. For example, only transitions to and from orbitals with p-character are dipole-allowed. These results on the p-projected density of states are compared with inverse photoemission and photoemission results, where the selection rules are less definitive. In addition, a first-principles quasiparticle calculation of the density of states is used to assign the orbital features. The spectra from C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} are still far from their infinite analog, i.e., graphite, which is also measured with the same techniques. In order to determine the effect of electron transfer onto C{sub 60}, as in superconducting alkali fullerides, the authors are studying resonant emission of C{sub 60}. An electron is placed in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) by optical absorption from the C 1s level and the C 1s emission detected in the presence of this spectator electron.

  7. Why the Common Core Changes Math Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Valerie N.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core math standards promote several important differences in how math concepts are taught and should be talked about. These changes will make it easier for younger students to comprehend and adapt to more complex concepts in the later grades. This guide should help elementary teachers make changes and adaptations that are in line the…

  8. HOT MOLECULAR CORES IN INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Garay, G.; Jackson, J. M.; Longmore, S.; Zhang, Q.; Simon, R. E-mail: guido@das.uchile.cl E-mail: slongmore@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: simonr@ph1.uni-koeln.de

    2011-11-10

    We present high angular resolution continuum images and molecular line spectra obtained at 345 GHz with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward two massive cores that lie within Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs): G034.43+00.24 MM1 and G024.33+00.11 MM1. Both of these cores contain bright, unresolved (<2'') objects that have previously been imaged in the millimeter/submillimeter continuum with the Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) Plateau de Bure Interferometer and SMA and show complex molecular line chemistry. The new, higher angular resolution SMA continuum images reveal that both cores contain massive (8, 26 M{sub Sun }), unresolved (0.''6; {approx}3000 AU) continuum emission features and emission from many complex molecular transitions, which confirm that these are hot molecular cores, an early stage in the formation of a high-mass star. Because these hot cores are located within IRDCs, they may well represent the very earliest phases in the formation of high-mass protostars and, hence, their detailed study may reveal the initial conditions within high-mass star-forming cores, before they are shredded apart by stellar winds and radiation.

  9. A CO Survey toward Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Sun; Lee, Chang Won; Myers, Philip C.

    2004-05-01

    A CO survey is undertaken toward about 80% of the starless cores in the Lee & Myers catalog that can be observed in the northern hemisphere to investigate their general observational properties such as line width and intensity, from which one can deduce their environmental physical conditions. The peak 12CO intensity implies a kinetic temperature close to 10 K, as is already known, but for some of the cores the kinetic temperature is much higher than 10 K, suggesting either that they are not really starless or that they are externally heated. We derive the ratios of peak intensities and line widths for the pairs of 12CO and 13CO lines and find a value of ~1.7 for both. The linear correlations between them are most likely to be due to clumpy structure. These data are also compared with data sets of CS 2-1 and N2H+ 1-0 lines tracing high-density regions. It is found that the peak intensity and line width of 13CO are roughly correlated with those of CS, suggesting that the outer envelope is kinematically related to the inner dense core. Confirming that the 12CO lines seldom exhibit deep self-reversal features, whereas this is not unusual for the CS lines, we propose a heuristic model where the outer part is clumpy, but the inner part has a rather smooth density profile, with a uniform temperature and mean density decreasing outward. We apply three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations to this simple model, demonstrating that the essential observational features of the starless cores are successfully reproduced.

  10. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  11. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  13. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  14. Study of Y(3S, 2S)-> eta Y(1S) and Y(3S, 2S) -> pi pi- Y(1S) Hadronic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-03-27

    We study the {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) transitions with 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and 100 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We measure {Beta}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (2.39 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.14(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (1.35 {+-} 0.17(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We find no evidence for {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and obtain {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 1.0 x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 2.3 x 10{sup -3} as upper limits at the 90% confidence level. We also provide improved measurements of the {Upsilon}(2S)-{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S)-{Upsilon}(1S) mass differences, 562.170 {+-} 0.007(stat.) {+-} 0.088(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} and 893.813 {+-} 0.015(stat.) {+-} 0.107(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  15. Persistent crust-core spin lag in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Lasky, Paul D.

    2015-06-01

    It is commonly believed that the magnetic field threading a neutron star provides the ultimate mechanism (on top of fluid viscosity) for enforcing long-term corotation between the slowly spun-down solid crust and the liquid core. We show that this argument fails for axisymmetric magnetic fields with closed field lines in the core, the commonly used `twisted torus' field being the most prominent example. The failure of such magnetic fields to enforce global crust-core corotation leads to the development of a persistent spin lag between the core region occupied by the closed field lines and the rest of the crust and core. We discuss the repercussions of this spin lag for the evolution of the magnetic field, suggesting that, in order for a neutron star to settle to a stable state of crust-core corotation, the bulk of the toroidal field component should be deposited into the crust soon after the neutron star's birth.

  16. KILOPARSEC-SCALE JETS IN THREE RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Joseph L.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2015-02-10

    We have discovered kiloparsec-scale extended radio emission in three narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) in sub-arcsecond resolution 9 GHz images from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We find all sources show two-sided, mildly core-dominated jet structures with diffuse lobes dominated by termination hotspots. These span 20–70 kpc with morphologies reminiscent of FR II radio galaxies, while the extended radio luminosities are intermediate between FR I and FR II sources. In two cases the structure is linear, while a 45° bend is apparent in the third. Very Long Baseline Array images at 7.6 GHz reveal parsec-scale jet structures, in two cases with extended structure aligned with the inner regions of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Based on this alignment, the ratio of the radio core–luminosity to the optical luminosity, the jet/counter-jet intensity and extension length ratios, and moderate core brightness temperatures (≲10{sup 10} K), we conclude these jets are mildly relativistic (β≲0.3, δ∼1−1.5) and aligned at moderately small angles to the line of sight (10–15°). The derived kinematic ages of ∼10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} yr are much younger than radio galaxies but comparable to other NLS1s. Our results increase the number of radio-loud NLS1s with known kiloparsec-scale extensions from 7 to 10 and suggest that such extended emission may be common, at least among the brightest of these sources.

  17. Overexpression of c-Myc alters G(1)/S arrest following ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joon-Ho; Dickson, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    Study of the mechanism(s) of genomic instability induced by the c-myc proto-oncogene has the potential to shed new light on its well-known oncogenic activity. However, an underlying mechanism(s) for this phenotype is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of c-Myc overexpression on the DNA damage-induced G(1)/S checkpoint, in order to obtain mechanistic insights into how deregulated c-Myc destabilizes the cellular genome. The DNA damage-induced checkpoints are among the primary safeguard mechanisms for genomic stability, and alterations of cell cycle checkpoints are known to be crucial for certain types of genomic instability, such as gene amplification. The effects of c-Myc overexpression were studied in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as one approach to understanding the c-Myc-induced genomic instability in the context of mammary tumorigenesis. Initially, flow-cytometric analyses were used with two c-Myc-overexpressing, nontransformed immortal lines (184A1N4 and MCF10A) to determine whether c-Myc overexpression leads to alteration of cell cycle arrest following ionizing radiation (IR). Inappropriate entry into S phase was then confirmed with a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay measuring de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Direct involvement of c-Myc overexpression in alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was then confirmed by utilizing the MycER construct, a regulatable c-Myc. A transient excess of c-Myc activity, provided by the activated MycER, was similarly able to induce the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Significantly, the transient expression of full-length c-Myc in normal mortal HMECs also facilitated entry into S phase and the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Furthermore, irradiated, c-Myc-infected, normal HMECs developed a sub-G(1) population and a >4N population of cells. The c-Myc-induced alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was also compared to the effects of expression of MycS (N

  18. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  19. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  20. Induction of the autophagy-associated gene MAP1S via PU.1 supports APL differentiation.

    PubMed

    Haimovici, Aladin; Brigger, Daniel; Torbett, Bruce E; Fey, Martin F; Tschan, Mario P

    2014-09-01

    The PU.1 transcription factor is essential for myeloid development. We investigated if the microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S) is a novel PU.1 target with a link to autophagy, a cellular recycling pathway. Comparable to PU.1, MAP1S expression was significantly repressed in primary AML blasts as compared to mature neutrophils. Accordingly, MAP1S expression was induced during neutrophil differentiation of CD34(+) progenitor and APL cells. Moreover, PU.1 bound to the MAP1S promoter and induced MAP1S expression during APL differentiation. Inhibiting MAP1S resulted in aberrant neutrophil differentiation and autophagy. Taken together, our findings implicate the PU.1-regulated MAP1S gene in neutrophil differentiation and autophagy control.

  1. Full Core Multiphysics Simulation with Offline Mesh Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, R.; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    In this report, building on previous reports issued in FY13 we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core. The focus of the present report is a full core simulation with off-line mesh deformation.

  2. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  3. Core saturation in a moving medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Ulmschneider, P.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical technique for solving the line transfer equation of a two-level atom in static equilibrium is presented. Complete redistribution of emitted photons is assumed, as is saturation at the line core. Emission intensity is calculated either by a generalized Eddington-Barber relation, a first-order differential equation for the specific intensity, or by a formal transfer integral. Sample calculations are performed of the line transfer equation in a semi-infinite atmosphere with a constant Planck function of the collision parameter and for the Mg II resonance line in a model solar atmosphere experiencing shocks. Attention is focused on the line wings in the latter problem. The first order differential equation approach yields the best intensity values and temperature structure.

  4. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  5. The surface core level shift for lithium at the surface of lithium borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, David; Ketsman, I.; Xiao, Jie; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Petrosky, J.; McClory, J.; Burak, Ya. V.; Adamiv, V. T.; Dowben, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    The shallow Li 1s core level exhibits a surface-to-bulk core level shift for the stoichiometric Li 2B 4O 7(1 1 0) surface. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy was used to indentify Li 1s bulk and surface core level components at binding energies -56.5±0.4 and -53.7±0.5 eV, respectively. We find photoemission evidence for surface states of Li 2B 4O 7(1 1 0) that exist in the gap of the projected bulk density of states. The existence of surface states is consistent with the large surface-to-bulk core level shift for the Li 1s core.

  6. CoreWall: A Scalable Interactive Tool for Visual Core Description, Data Visualization, and Stratigraphic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. G.; Rack, F.; Kamp, B.; Fils, D.; Ito, E.; Morin, P.; Higgins, S.; Leigh, J.; Johnson, A.; Renambot, L.

    2005-12-01

    A primary need for studies of sediment, ice and rock cores is an integrated environment for visual core description. CoreWall is a tool that uses digital line-scan images of split-core surfaces as the fundamental template for all sediment descriptive work. Textual and image annotations support description about structures, lithologic variation, macroscopic grain size variation, bioturbation intensity, chemical composition, and micropaleontology at points of interest registered within the core image itself. The integration of core-section images with discrete data streams and nested annotations provide a robust approach to the description of sediment and rock cores. This project provides for the real-time and/or simultaneous display of multiple integrated databases, with all the data rectified (co-registered) to the fundamental template of the core image. This visualization tool enables rapid multidisciplinary interpretation during the Initial Core Description process. A prototype computer environment for working with the high-resolution data is the Personal GeoWall-2, a single computer used to drive six tiled LCD screens. As a wideband display, the Personal GeoWall-2 can show more content then a single display system. This new visualization tool is both scaleable and portable from the Personal GeoWall-2 environment down to a single screen driven by a laptop computer. Using the screen resolution, core sections are drawn at a life size scale with both core and downhole wireline logging data drawn alongside. Using standard computer interfaces, individuals can pan through meters of core imagery and data, annotating along the length of the core itself. They can zoom in on a high-resolution core image to see details that appear under the proper lighting in which the images were taken. Using the Internet, CoreWall can retrieve images and data files from remote databases or web portals/services, such as CHRONOS, allowing individuals from ship to shore to look at data and

  7. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  8. Core Concepts of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    1995-01-01

    Core concepts of kinesiology are the basis of communication about movement that facilitate progression of skill levels. The article defines and exemplifies each of 10 core concepts: range of motion, speed of motion, number of segments, nature of segments, balance, coordination, compactness, extension at release/contact, path of projection, and…

  9. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  10. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  11. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  12. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  13. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  14. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  15. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  16. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  17. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  18. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  19. AP1S3 Mutations Are Associated with Pustular Psoriasis and Impaired Toll-like Receptor 3 Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Setta-Kaffetzi, Niovi; Simpson, Michael A.; Navarini, Alexander A.; Patel, Varsha M.; Lu, Hui-Chun; Allen, Michael H.; Duckworth, Michael; Bachelez, Hervé; Burden, A. David; Choon, Siew-Eng; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Kirby, Brian; Kolios, Antonios; Seyger, Marieke M.B.; Prins, Christa; Smahi, Asma; Trembath, Richard C.; Fraternali, Franca; Smith, Catherine H.; Barker, Jonathan N.; Capon, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) is an evolutionary conserved heterotetramer that promotes vesicular trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the endosomes. The knockout of most murine AP-1 complex subunits is embryonically lethal, so the identification of human disease-associated alleles has the unique potential to deliver insights into gene function. Here, we report two founder mutations (c.11T>G [p.Phe4Cys] and c.97C>T [p.Arg33Trp]) in AP1S3, the gene encoding AP-1 complex subunit σ1C, in 15 unrelated individuals with a severe autoinflammatory skin disorder known as pustular psoriasis. Because the variants are predicted to destabilize the 3D structure of the AP-1 complex, we generated AP1S3-knockdown cell lines to investigate the consequences of AP-1 deficiency in skin keratinocytes. We found that AP1S3 silencing disrupted the endosomal translocation of the innate pattern-recognition receptor TLR-3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and resulted in a marked inhibition of downstream signaling. These findings identify pustular psoriasis as an autoinflammatory phenotype caused by defects in vesicular trafficking and demonstrate a requirement of AP-1 for Toll-like receptor homeostasis. PMID:24791904

  20. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Core-level excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, R.; Plenge, J.; Rühl, E.

    2006-03-01

    Inner-shell excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-excitation regime is reported. The electronic structure of the element-selectively excited radical is studied by X-ray absorption and total cation yields. A comparison of both approaches allows us to estimate the absolute photoionization cross-section and the ionization yield near the Cl 2p- and O 1s-absorption edges. The latter quantity is characteristically enhanced in core-ionization continua. We observe below both core-absorption edges intense core-to-valence-transitions. These are assigned in comparison with related work on core-excited sulfur dioxide. These results give clear evidence that the highest molecular orbital of OClO is half-filled. High-resolution spectra recorded in the Cl 2p-regime show evidence for Rydberg transitions. The extrapolation of the term values of the low-lying Rydberg states allows us to derive the Cl 2p-ionization energy of OClO. Fragmentation of core-excited OClO is reported. Photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (PEPICO) spectra are recorded, indicating that singly and doubly charged fragments are formed. Fission of the doubly and multiply charged OClO leads to singly charged fragments. These are measured by photoion-photoion-coincidence (PIPICO) spectra, where characteristic changes in intensity of the fission channels in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-continuum are observed.

  2. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  3. Oscillator strengths for 1s2 1S0-1s2p 3P1,2 transitions in helium-like carbon, nitrogen and oxygen including the effects of a finite nuclear mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Donald C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2016-12-01

    We have calculated the electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) oscillator strengths and spontaneous decay rates for the 1{{{s}}}2{}1{{{S}}}0{--}1{{s}}2{{p}}{}3{{{P}}}{1,2} spin-changing transitions of helium-like C v, N vi and O vii. We added the effects of the finite nuclear mass and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron including an extra term derived by Pachucki. For the E1 calculations we used the Breit approximation and pseudostate expansions to perform the perturbation sums over intermediate states in both the length and velocity gauge as a check on numerical accuracy and the validity of the transition operators. There is some cancellation in the corrections for the nuclear mass and the electron anomaly so that if one is included the other should not be ignored

  4. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  5. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  6. Radioisotope Characterization of HB Line Low Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.J.

    1999-08-05

    The purpose of this document is to provide a physical, chemical, hazardous and radiological characterization of Low-Level Waste (LLW) generated in HB-Line as required by the 1S Manual, Savannah River Site Waste Acceptance Criteria Manual.

  7. Site-specific recoil-induced effects on inner-shell photoionization of linear triatomic molecules: N 1 s photoelectron spectra of N2 O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosenko, Yu. S.; Pavlychev, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate hard X-ray ionization of linear triatomic molecules accenting recoil-induced effects on the dynamics of molecular frame. This dynamics is studied within the two-springs and harmonic approximations. The mode-channel relationship connecting the excitations of vibrational, rotational and translational degrees of freedom with the Σ → Σ and Σ → Π photoionization channels is applied to compute the N 1s-1 photoelectron spectra of molecular N2 O for various photon energies. The distinct ionized-site- and molecular-orientation-specific changes in the vibration structure of the 1 s photoelectron lines of terminal and central nitrogen atoms are revealed and discussed.

  8. Investigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    A detailed investigation of the atomic structure and radiative parameters involving the lowest states within the 6p4, 6p36d, 6p37s, 6p37p and 6p37d configurations of neutral polonium is reported in the present paper. Using different physical models based on the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock approach, the influence of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation on the atomic parameters is discussed in detail. This work allowed us to fix the spectroscopic designation of some experimental level energy values and to provide for the first time a set of reliable oscillator strengths corresponding to 31 Po I spectral lines in the wavelength region from 175 to 987 nm.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA-5 binds to Epstein-Barr virus-induced Fte1/S3a protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kashuba, Elena . E-mail: Elena.Kashuba@mtc.ki.se; Yurchenko, Mariya; Szirak, Krisztina; Stahl, Joachim; Klein, George; Szekely, Laszlo

    2005-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms resting human B cells into immortalized immunoblasts. EBV-encoded nuclear antigens EBNA-5 (also called EBNA-LP) is one of the earliest viral proteins expressed in freshly infected B cells. We have recently shown that EBNA-5 binds p14ARF, a nucleolar protein that regulates the p53 pathway. Here, we report the identification of another protein with partially nucleolar localization, the v-fos transformation effector Fte-1 (Fte-1/S3a), as an EBNA-5 binding partner. In transfected cells, Fte-1/S3a and EBNA-5 proteins showed high levels of colocalization in extranucleolar inclusions. Fte-1/S3a has multiple biological functions. It enhances v-fos-mediated cellular transformation and is part of the small ribosomal subunit. It also interacts with the transcriptional factor CHOP and apoptosis regulator poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Fte-1/S3a is regularly expressed at high levels in both tumors and cancer cell lines. Its high expression favors the maintenance of malignant phenotype and undifferentiated state, whereas its down-regulation is associated with cellular differentiation and growth arrest. Here, we show that EBV-induced B cell transformation leads to the up-regulation of Fte-1/S3a. We suggest that EBNA-5 through binding may influence the growth promoting, differentiation inhibiting, or apoptosis regulating functions of Fte-1/S3a.

  10. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  11. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  12. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  13. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  14. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  15. Observation of the Inclusive D^{* -} Production in the Decay of Y(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J.Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-17

    The authors present a study of the inclusive D*{sup {+-}} production in the decay of {Upsilon}(1S) using (98.6 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance. Using the decay chain {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S), {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X, where X is unobserved, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X] = (2.52 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.15(syst))% and the D*{sup {+-}} momentum distribution in the rest frame of the {Upsilon}(1S). They find evidence for an excess of D*{sup {+-}} production over the expected rate from the virtual photon annihilation process {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {gamma}* {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sup {+-}} X.

  16. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  18. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  19. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  20. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  1. The ϒ(1S)→Bcρ decay with perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling; Li, Qingxia; Lu, Gongru; Huang, Jinshu; Chang, Qin

    2016-08-01

    With the potential prospects of the ϒ (1 S) data samples at the running LHC and upcoming SuperKEKB, the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ weak decay is studied with the pQCD approach. It is found that (1) the lion's share of branching ratio comes from the longitudinal polarization helicity amplitudes; (2) branching ratio for the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ decay can reach up to O (10-9), which might be hopefully measurable.

  2. 1s22pns(1P0) autoionizing levels in Be-like Al and C ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancalie, V.

    2005-04-01

    This work is focused on the possibility of using the R-matrix Floquet theory and codes and its extension to laser induced degenerate state to describe dielectronic recombination of Li-like into Be-like ions. The uncertainty concerning the best way to include radiative damping effect is no longer a problem when the full electron collision and radiative processes are treated simultaneously and radiation field is treated to all orders. The method accounts for the reverse process corresponding to single-photon ionization. Following this approach, the 1s22snl(Se1) and 1s22pnl(P01) Rydberg states, embedded in the electric dipole field of the 2s-2p core, are dressed by a laser field, assumed to be monochromatic, monomode, linearly polarized, and spatially homogeneous. As in the R-matrix Floquet theory, in the external region, since the coupling field potential vanishes, the calculation yields the complete information on the autoionizing rate and field-free positions. Comparisons with available data are presented.

  3. CONTRACTION SIGNATURES TOWARD DENSE CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Pineda, J. E.; Kauffmann, J.

    2016-03-10

    We report the results of an HCO{sup +} (3–2) and N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3–2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO{sup +} asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δ{sub v}, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO{sup +} profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δ{sub v} and collapse model results, we find that δ{sub v} is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s{sup −1}) to supersonic (0.4 km s{sup −1}), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/M{sub J} > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/M{sub J}, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  4. Contraction Signatures toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δv, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δv and collapse model results, we find that δv is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s-1) to supersonic (0.4 km s-1), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/MJ > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/MJ, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  5. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair.

  6. A spectrophotometric atlas of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.; Gonçalves, A. C.

    2001-06-01

    We have compiled a list of 83 objects classified as Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) or known to have a broad Balmer component narrower than 2 000 km s-1. Of these, 19 turned out to have been spectroscopically misidentified in previous studies; only 64 of the selected objects are genuine NLS1s. We have spectroscopically observed 59 of them and tried to characterize their Narrow and Broad-Line Regions (NLR and BLR) by fitting the emission-lines with Gaussian and/or Lorentzian profiles. In most cases, the broad Balmer components are well fitted by a single Lorentzian profile, confirming previous claims that Lorentzian rather than Gaussian profiles are better suited to reproduce the shape of the NLS1s broad emission lines. This has consequences concerning their FWHMs and line ratios: when the broad Balmer components are fitted with a Lorentzian, most narrow line regions have line ratios typical of Seyfert 2s while, when a Gaussian profile is used for fitting the broad Balmer components, the line ratios are widely scattered in the usual diagnostic diagrams (Veilleux & Osterbrock \\cite{vei87}); moreover, the FWHM of the best fitting Lorentzian is systematically smaller than the FWHM of the Gaussian. We find that, in general, the [O III] lines have a relatively narrow Gaussian profile ( ~ 200-500 km s-1 FWHM) with often, in addition, a second broad ( ~ 500-1 800 km s-1 FWHM), blueshifted Gaussian component. We do not confirm that the [O III] lines are weak in NLS1s. As previously suggested, there is a continuous transition of all properties between NLS1s and classical Broad-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies (BLS1s) and the limit of 2000 km s-1 used to separate the two species is arbitrary; R4570, the ratio of the Fe II to the Hβ fluxes, could be a physically more meaningful parameter to distinguish them.

  7. Core Monitoring System for TSN EPR Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Maxime

    2015-07-01

    In the context of Chinese (TSN) EPR reactors project, a new on-line support system was introduced to give information, either continuously or upon request, to the plant operators about some advanced physics parameters corresponding to the current state of the nuclear core. This document provides a description of the functions that are available and the advantages provided by using their results. For each function the Human Machine Interface (HMI) is illustrated. (authors)

  8. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  9. Double-slit experiment with a polyatomic molecule: vibrationally resolved C 1s photoelectron spectra of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, L.; Thomas, T. D.; Plésiat, E.; Liu, X.-J.; Miron, C.; Lischke, T.; Prümper, G.; Sakai, K.; Ouchi, T.; Püttner, R.; Sekushin, V.; Tanaka, T.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Decleva, P.; Ueda, K.; Martín, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report the first evidence for double-slit interferences in a polyatomic molecule, which we have observed in the experimental carbon 1s photoelectron spectra of acetylene (or ethyne). The spectra have been measured over the photon energy range of 310-930 eV and show prominent oscillations in the intensity ratios σg(υ)/σu(υ) for the vibrational quantum numbers υ = 0,1 and for the ratios σs(υ = 1)/σs(υ = 0) for the symmetry s = g,u. The experimental findings are in very good agreement with ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations and are compatible with the Cohen-Fano mechanism of coherent emission from two equivalent atomic centers. This interpretation is supported by the qualitative predictions of a simple model in which the effect of nuclear recoil is taken into account to the lowest order. Our results confirm the delocalized character of the core hole created in the primary photoionization event and demonstrate that intramolecular core-hole coherence can survive the decoherent influence associated with the asymmetric nuclear degrees of freedom which are characteristic of polyatomic molecules.

  10. (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-Mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines and their incorporation into hormaomycin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhushkov, Sergei I; Yufit, Dmitrii S; Grosse, Christian; Kaiser, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Efficient and scalable syntheses of enantiomerically pure (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines 9a–c, as well as allo-D-threonine (4) and (2S,3R)-β-methylphenylalanine (3), using the Belokon' approach with (S)- and (R)-2-[(N-benzylprolyl)amino]benzophenone [(S)- and (R)-10] as reusable chiral auxiliaries have been developed. Three new fluoromethyl analogues of the naturally occurring octadepsipeptide hormaomycin (1) with (fluoromethylcyclopropyl)alanine moieties have been synthesized and subjected to preliminary tests of their antibiotic activity. PMID:25550751

  11. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  12. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  13. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  14. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  15. GATA1s induces hyperproliferation of eosinophil precursors in Down syndrome transient leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maroz, Aliaksandra; Stachorski, Lena; Emmrich, Stephan; Reinhardt, Katarina; Xu, Jian; Shao, Zhen; Käbler, Sebastian; Dertmann, Tobias; Hitzler, Johann; Roberts, Irene; Vyas, Paresh; Juban, Gaetan; Hennig, Christian; Hansen, Gesine; Li, Zhe; Orkin, Stuart; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2014-01-01

    Transient leukemia (TL) is evident in 5–10% of all neonates with Down syndrome (DS) and associated with N-terminal truncating GATA1-mutations (GATA1s). Here we report that TL cell clones generate abundant eosinophils in a substantial fraction of patients. Sorted eosinophils from patients with TL and eosinophilia carried the same GATA1s-mutation as sorted TL-blasts, consistent with their clonal origin. TL-blasts exhibited a genetic program characteristic of eosinophils and differentiated along the eosinophil lineage in vitro. Similarly, ectopic expression of Gata1s, but not Gata1, in wild-type CD34+-hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells induced hyperproliferation of eosinophil promyelocytes in vitro. While GATA1s retained the function of GATA1 to induce eosinophil genes by occupying their promoter regions, GATA1s was impaired in its ability to repress oncogenic MYC and the pro-proliferative E2F transcription network. ChIP-seq indicated reduced GATA1s occupancy at the MYC promoter. Knockdown of MYC, or the obligate E2F-cooperation partner DP1, rescued the GATA1s-induced hyperproliferative phenotype. In agreement, terminal eosinophil maturation was blocked in Gata1Δe2 knockin mice, exclusively expressing Gata1s, leading to accumulation of eosinophil precursors in blood and bone marrow. These data suggest a direct relationship between the N-terminal truncating mutations of GATA1 and clonal eosinophilia in DS patients. PMID:24336126

  16. Blocking the association of HDAC4 with MAP1S accelerates autophagy clearance of mutant Huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fei; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Xu, Guibin; Huang, Hai; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Sheng; Gallinari, Paola; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Liu, Leyuan

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy controls and executes the turnover of abnormally aggregated proteins. MAP1S interacts with the autophagy marker LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux. HDAC4 associates with the aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) that causes Huntington's disease, and colocalizes with it in cytosolic inclusions. It was suggested HDAC4 interacts with MAP1S in a yeast two-hybrid screening. Here, we found that MAP1S interacts with HDAC4 via a HDAC4-binding domain (HBD). HDAC4 destabilizes MAP1S, suppresses autophagy flux and promotes the accumulation of mHTT aggregates. This occurs by an increase in the deacetylation of the acetylated MAP1S. Either suppression of HDAC4 with siRNA or overexpression of the MAP1S HBD leads to stabilization of MAP1S, activation of autophagy flux and clearance of mHTT aggregates. Therefore, specific interruption of the HDAC4-MAP1S interaction with short peptides or small molecules to enhance autophagy flux may relieve the toxicity of mHTT associated with Huntington's disease and improve symptoms of HD patients.

  17. Si XII X-ray Satellite Lines in Solar Flare Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dubau, J.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.

    2006-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Si XII n=3 and n=4 dielectronic satellite line features at 5.82A and 5.56A respectively, near the Si XIII 1s(sup 2)-1s3p and 1s(sup 2)-1s4p lines (5.681A and 5.405A), is calculated using atomic data presented here. The resulting theoretical spectra are compared with solar flare spectra observed by the RESIK spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft. The satellites, like the more familiar n=2 satellites near the Si XIII 1s(sup 2)-1s2p lines, are formed mostly by dielectronic recombination, but unlike the n=2 satellites are unblended. The implications for similar satellite lines in flare Fe spectra are discussed.

  18. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Kong, S.; Butler, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Progress towards resolving a decade-long debate about how massive stars form can be made by determining if massive starless cores exist in a state of near virial equilibrium. These are the initial conditions invoked by the Core Accretion model of McKee & Tan (2003). Alternatively, the Competitive Accretion model of Bonnell et al. (2001) requires sub-virial conditions. We have identified 4 prime examples of massive ( 50 Msun) cores from mid-infrared (MIR) extinction mapping (Butler & Tan 2009, 2012) of Infrared Dark Clouds. We have found spectacularly high deuterated fractions of N_2H+ of 0.5 in these objects with the IRAM 30m telescope (Fontani et al. 2011). Thus N_2D+ is expected to be an excellent tracer of the kinematics of these cold, dark cores, where most other molecular tracers are thought to be depleted from the gas phase. We report on ALMA Cycle 0 Compact Configuration Band 6 observations of these 4 cores that probe the N_2D+(3-2) line on scales from 9" down to 2.3", well-matched to the structures we see in MIR extinction and discuss their implications for massive star formation theories.

  19. {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) decay

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bingan

    2009-12-01

    Decay {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) is studied by an approach in which the tensor meson, f{sub 2}(1270), is strongly coupled to gluons. Besides the strong suppression of the amplitude {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}gg, gg{yields}f{sub 2} by the mass of the b-quark, d-wave dominance in {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) is revealed from this approach, which provides a large enhancement. The combination of these two factors leads to larger B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270)). The decay rate of {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270) and the ratios of the helicity amplitudes are obtained and they are in agreement with the data.

  20. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  1. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  2. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  3. The novel function of JADE1S in cytokinesis of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Nirodhini S; Meyer, Rosana D; Panchenko, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    JADE1 belongs to a small family of PHD zinc finger proteins that interacts with histone acetyl transferase (HAT) HBO1 and is associated with chromatin. We recently reported JADE1 chromatin shuttling and phosphorylation during G2/M to G1 transition, which was sensitive to Aurora A inhibition. In the current study we examined mechanisms of the cell cycle regulation by the small isoform of JADE1 protein, JADE1S, and report data showing that JADE1S has a novel function in the regulation of cytokinesis. Using FACS assays, we show that, JADE1S depletion facilitated rates of G1-cells accumulation in synchronously dividing HeLa cell cultures. Depletion of JADE1S protein in asynchronously dividing cells decreased the proportion of cytokinetic cells, and increased the proportion of multi-nuclear cells, indicative of premature and failed cytokinesis. In contrast, moderate overexpression of JADE1S increased the number of cytokinetic cells in time- and dose- dependent manner, indicating cytokinetic delay. Pharmacological inhibition of Aurora B kinase resulted in the release of JADE1S-mediated cytokinetic delay and allowed progression of abscission in cells over-expressing JADE1S. Finally, we show that JADE1S protein localized to centrosomes in interphase and mitotic cells, while during cytokinesis JADE1S localized to the midbody. Neither JADE1L nor partner of JADE1, HAT HBO1 was localized to the centrosomes or midbodies. Our study identifies the novel role for JADE1S in regulation of cytokinesis and suggests function in Aurora B kinase-mediated cytokinesis checkpoint. PMID:26151225

  4. Gas Hydrate Research Coring and Downhole Logging Operational Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Riedel, M.; Malone, M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent gas hydrate deep coring and downhole logging projects, including ODP Leg 204, IODP Expedition 311, and the India NGHP-01 effort have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate. These projects have also built on the relatively sparse history of gas hydrate drilling experience to collectively develop a unique operational protocol to examine and sample gas hydrate in nature. The ideal gas hydrate research drill site in recent history, consists of at least three drill holes, with the first hole dedicated to LWD/MWD downhole logging in order to identify intervals to be pressurized cored and to collect critical petrophysical data. The second hole is usually dedicated for continuous coring operations. The third hole is used for special downhole tool measurements such as pressure coring and wire line logging. There is a strong scientific need to obtain LWD/MWD data prior to coring. The coring operations are complemented by frequent deployment of the PCS/HYACINTH pressure core systems. It is essential to know what the gas hydrate concentrations and vertical distribution are before deploying the available pressure core systems in order to choose the optimum depths for pressure coring operations. The coring operations are also complemented by frequent sampling for interstitial water, headspace gas, and microbiological analyses. Although those samples will be taken at relatively regular depths, the sampling frequency can be adjusted if gas hydrate concentrations and distribution can be forward predicted through the analysis of the LWD/MWD pre-core logging surveys. After completing the LWD/MWD logging program, usually as a dedicated drilling leg, field efforts will switch to conventional and pressure-controlled coring operations at each of the sites drilled during the LWD/MWD campaign. The standard continuous core hole will usually include APC coring to an expected refusal depth of ~100 mbsf; each hole is usually

  5. 1s22p3 and 1s22s23l, l = s,p,d, excited states of boron isoelectronic series from explicitly correlated wave functions.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, F J; Buendía, E; Sarsa, A

    2005-07-15

    For some members of the boron isoelectronic series and starting from explicitly correlated wave functions, six low-lying excited states have been studied. Three of them arise from the 1s(2)2p(3) configuration, and the other three from the 1s(2)2s(2)3l, l = s,p,d, configurations. This work follows a previous one on both the 1s(2)2s(2)2p-(2)P ground state and the four excited states coming from the 1s(2)2s2p(2) configuration. Energies, one- and two-body densities in position space and some other two-body properties in position and momentum spaces have been obtained. A systematic analysis of the energetic ordering of the states as a function of the total orbital angular momentum and spin is performed in terms of the electron-nucleus and electron-electron potential energies and the role of the angular correlation is discussed. All calculations have been carried out by using the Monte Carlo algorithm.

  6. Determination of the de-excitation probability of argon metastable (1s5 and 1s3) atoms on aluminum, stainless steel, silicon, quartz and Pyrex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Bin; Li, Jiang-Tao; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The de-excitation probability of argon 1s5 and 1s3 metastable atoms on aluminum (alloy 2024), stainless steel (304), silicon (100), quartz (JGS1) and Pyrex surfaces is measured with a low pressure (1-5 mTorr) pulsed capacitively coupled plasma. The de-excitation probability is deduced from the loss rate of the metastable atoms in the late afterglow, which is obtained from the temporal evolution of the metastable atom density measured by laser absorption. Under the low pressure condition, the loss of the metastable atoms is mainly due to volume diffusion and de-excitation on the surface. The measured de-excitation probability for both Ar*(1s5) and Ar*(1s3) atoms ranges from 0.74 to 0.88 on these five materials, with an uncertainty of ±0.11. The measured probabilities on the Pyrex surface are in good agreement with those reported in previous work, and those on aluminum, stainless steel, silicon and quartz surfaces are reported here for the first time.

  7. Core level shifts of intercalated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Ulrike A.; Petrović, Marin; Gerber, Timm; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Grånäs, Elin; Arman, Mohammad A.; Herbig, Charlotte; Schnadt, Joachim; Kralj, Marko; Knudsen, Jan; Michely, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Through intercalation of metals and gases the Dirac cone of graphene on Ir(111) can be shifted with respect to the Fermi level without becoming destroyed by strong hybridization. Here, we use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to measure the C 1s core level shift (CLS) of graphene in contact with a number of structurally well-defined intercalation layers (O, H, Eu, and Cs). By analysis of our own and additional literature data for decoupled graphene, the C 1s CLS is found to be a non-monotonic function of the doping level. For small doping levels the shifts are well described by a rigid band model. However, at larger doping levels, a second effect comes into play which is proportional to the transferred charge and counteracts the rigid band shift. Moreover, not only the position, but also the C 1s peak shape displays a unique evolution as a function of doping level. Our conclusions are supported by intercalation experiments with Li, with which, due to the absence of phase separation, the doping level of graphene can be continuously tuned.

  8. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  9. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  10. Live imaging-based model selection reveals periodic regulation of the stochastic G1/S phase transition in vertebrate axial development.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mayu; Saitou, Takashi; Kurokawa, Hiroshi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Imamura, Takeshi; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2014-12-01

    In multicellular organism development, a stochastic cellular response is observed, even when a population of cells is exposed to the same environmental conditions. Retrieving the spatiotemporal regulatory mode hidden in the heterogeneous cellular behavior is a challenging task. The G1/S transition observed in cell cycle progression is a highly stochastic process. By taking advantage of a fluorescence cell cycle indicator, Fucci technology, we aimed to unveil a hidden regulatory mode of cell cycle progression in developing zebrafish. Fluorescence live imaging of Cecyil, a zebrafish line genetically expressing Fucci, demonstrated that newly formed notochordal cells from the posterior tip of the embryonic mesoderm exhibited the red (G1) fluorescence signal in the developing notochord. Prior to their initial vacuolation, these cells showed a fluorescence color switch from red to green, indicating G1/S transitions. This G1/S transition did not occur in a synchronous manner, but rather exhibited a stochastic process, since a mixed population of red and green cells was always inserted between newly formed red (G1) notochordal cells and vacuolating green cells. We termed this mixed population of notochordal cells, the G1/S transition window. We first performed quantitative analyses of live imaging data and a numerical estimation of the probability of the G1/S transition, which demonstrated the existence of a posteriorly traveling regulatory wave of the G1/S transition window. To obtain a better understanding of this regulatory mode, we constructed a mathematical model and performed a model selection by comparing the results obtained from the models with those from the experimental data. Our analyses demonstrated that the stochastic G1/S transition window in the notochord travels posteriorly in a periodic fashion, with doubled the periodicity of the neighboring paraxial mesoderm segmentation. This approach may have implications for the characterization of the

  11. Differential phenotypic and functional properties of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ling; Peng, Hui; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells, tissue-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s. Recently identified liver-resident NK cells, which can mount contact hypersensitivity responses, and mucosal ILC1s that are involved in pathogenesis of colitis are distinct from cNK cells in several aspects, but the issue of how they are related to each other has not been clearly clarified. Here, we show that liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s have different phenotypes, as evidenced by distinct expression patterns of homing-associated molecules. Moreover, mucosal ILC1s exhibit tissue residency akin to liver-resident NK cells. Importantly, liver-resident NK cells express relative high levels of cytotoxic effector molecules, which are poorly expressed by mucosal ILC1s, and exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity compared with mucosal ILC1s. These results demonstrate differential phenotypic and functional characteristics of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s, shedding new light on the diversity of ILC family.

  12. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  13. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  14. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  16. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  17. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  18. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  19. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  20. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which…

  1. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  2. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  3. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  4. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  5. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  6. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  7. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  8. STARLESS CLOUD CORE L1517B IN ENVELOPE EXPANSION WITH CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Tianming; Gao Yang; Lou Yuqing

    2011-11-10

    Various spectral emission lines from the star-forming molecular cloud core L1517B manifest red asymmetric double-peaked profiles with stronger red peaks and weaker blue peaks, in contrast to the oft-observed blue-skewed molecular spectral line profiles with blue peaks stronger than red peaks. Invoking a spherically symmetric general polytropic hydrodynamic shock model for the envelope expansion with a core collapse (EECC) phase, we show the radial flow velocity, mass density, and temperature structures of a self-similar evolution for L1517B in a dynamically consistent manner. By prescribing simple radial profiles of abundance distribution for pertinent molecules, we perform molecular excitation and radiative transfer calculations using the publicly available RATRAN code set for the spherically symmetric case. Emphatically, the spectral profiles of line emissions from the same molecules but for different line transitions as well as spectra of closely pertinent isotopologues strongly constrain the self-similar hydrodynamics of a cloud core with prescribed abundances. Our computational results show that the EECC model reproduces molecular spectral line profiles in sensible agreement with the observational data of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM), Five College Radio Astronomical Observatory, and Effelsberg 100 m telescopes for L1517B. We also report the spatially resolved observations of the optically thick line HCO{sup +}(1 - 0) using the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope at Delingha in China and the relevant fitting results. Hyperfine line structures of NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} transitions are also fitted to consistently reveal the dynamics of the central core collapse. As a consistent model check, radial profiles of 1.2 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continua observed by the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array, respectively, are also fitted numerically using the same EECC model that produces the molecular

  9. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  10. Suspended core photonic microcells for sensing and device applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ying; Ho, Hoi Lut; Shi, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In-line fiber-optic microcells are fabricated by postprocessing NKT LMA10 photonic crystal fibers. The cells are suspended core (SC) elements created by locally inflating some of the air holes while the core is being tapered. Based on a SC microcell with six air holes, a cantilever beam accelerometer is demonstrated. The microcells could also be used as gain and absorption cells for amplifier and spectroscopy applications.

  11. Flute stabilization by a cold line-tied blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, D.; Wickham, M.; Rynn, N.

    1982-09-01

    The curvature-driven flute instability in an axisymmetric mirror was stabilized by an annular line-tied plasma blanket. A significant temperature difference was maintained between core and blanket. Theoretical calculations support the experimental observations.

  12. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  13. 7. JOB NO. 1347G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. JOB NO. 1347-G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD MOTOR COMPANY; PLANS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Oil House, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Observation of Upsilon(2S)-->etaUpsilon(1S) and search for related transitions.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Xavier, J V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J

    2008-11-07

    We report the first observation of Upsilon(2S)-->etaUpsilon(1S), with a branching fraction B=(2.1(-0.6)+0.7(stat)+/-0.3(syst)) x 10(-4) and a statistical significance 5.3sigma. Data were acquired with the CLEO III detector at the CESR e+e(-) symmetric collider. This is the first process observed involving a b-quark spin flip. For related transitions, 90% confidence limits in units of 10(-4) are B(Upsilon(2S)-->pi0Upsilon(1S)) < 1.8, B(Upsilon(3S)-->etaUpsilon(1S)) < 1.8, B(Upsilon(3S)-->pi0Upsilon(1S)) < 0.7, and B(Upsilon(3S)-->pi0Upsilon(2S)) < 5.1.

  15. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  16. Autophagy enhanced by microtubule- and mitochondrion-associated MAP1S suppresses genome instability and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Liu, Leyuan

    2011-12-15

    Dysfunctional autophagy is associated with tumorigenesis; however, the relationship between the two processes remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that MAP1S levels immediately become elevated in response to diethylnitrosamine-induced or genome instability-driven metabolic stress in a murine model of hepatocarcinoma. Upregulation of MAP1S enhanced autophagy to remove aggresomes and dysfunctional organelles that trigger DNA double-strand breaks and genome instability. The early accumulation of an unstable genome before signs of tumorigenesis indicated that genome instability caused tumorigenesis. After tumorigenesis, tumor development triggered the activation of autophagy to reduce genome instability in tumor foci. We, therefore, conclude that an increase in MAP1S levels triggers autophagy to suppress genome instability such that both the incidence of diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis and malignant progression are suppressed. Taken together, the data establish a link between MAP1S-enhanced autophagy and suppression of genomic instability and tumorigenesis.

  17. Lepton Universality Test in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Elisa; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

    2012-04-10

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we measure the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} = BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -})/BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); the measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a possible search for a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson in Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenarios. Such a boson could appear in a deviation of the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} from the Standard Model expectation, that is 1, except for small lepton mass corrections. The analysis exploits the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = {mu},{tau}.

  18. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  19. Leptonic decay of the ϒ(1S) meson at third order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Beneke, Martin; Kiyo, Yuichiro; Marquard, Peter; Penin, Alexander; Piclum, Jan; Seidel, Dirk; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2014-04-18

    We present the complete next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order short-distance and bound-state QCD correction to the leptonic decay rate Γ(ϒ(1S)→ℓ+ℓ-) of the lowest-lying spin-1 bottomonium state. The perturbative QCD prediction is compared to the measurement Γ(ϒ(1S)→e+e-)=1.340(18)  keV.

  20. Double Photoionization into Double Core-Hole States in Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Hikosaka, Y.; Kaneyasu, T.; Shigemasa, E.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Eland, J. H. D.; Aoto, T.; Ito, K.

    2007-05-04

    Double photoionization (DPI) leading to double core-hole states of Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} has been studied using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The assignments of the Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} states are confirmed by the Auger lines extracted from fourfold coincidences including two photoelectrons and two Auger electrons. It is estimated that the core-core DPI into Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} at a photon energy of 301.6 eV has a favored cross section of about 0.3 MB. The intense core-core DPI is due to mixing of the 4d{sup -2} continuum with the 4p single photoionization, which is manifested in the relative intensities of the Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} components.

  1. Formation and evolution of cores in globally collapsing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    I will present recent results on the hierarchical gravitational fragmentation (HGF) of molecular clouds (MCs) leading to the formation of dense cores. I will first discuss the scenario of HGF as an alternative to the standard scenario of turbulent support --> turbulent dissipation --> collapse. In it, clouds are multi-Jeans-mass object undergoing global, multi-scale collapse, and the cores are the local centers of collapse. The lapse between the onset of local collapse and the formation of a singularity constitutes the prestellar phase. I will present numerical simulations of core growth during this phase in the idealized case of spherical geometry, immersed in a globally collapsing environment, discussing the evolution of the density and velocity profiles. I will also present synthetic molecular line observations of such idealized cores, aimed at determining to what extent such an idealized setup recovers the basic observational features of the cores, and which features require additional physics such as background turbulence and non-spherical symmetry.

  2. Test of Lepton Universality in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /more authors..

    2010-06-07

    The ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))={Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}}/{Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}} is measured using a sample of (121.8 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6}{Upsilon}(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where l = {mu}, {tau}. The result, R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))=1.005 {+-} 0.013(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements.

  3. Radiative decays of the {upsilon}(1S) to a pair of charged hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, S.B.; Avery, P.; Breva-Newell, L.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.D.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E.J.; Williams, J.; Wiss, J.

    2006-02-01

    Using data obtained with the CLEO III detector, running at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), we report on a new study of exclusive radiative {upsilon}(1S) decays into the final states {gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}, and {gamma}pp. We present branching ratio measurements for the decay modes {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270), {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525), and {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}; helicity production ratios for f{sub 2}(1270) and f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525); upper limits for the decay {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub J}(2200), with f{sub J}(2220){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, pp; and an upper limit for the decay {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}X(1860), with X(1860){yields}{gamma}pp.

  4. Simulation of XPS C1s spectra of organic monolayers by quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Giesbers, Marcel; Marcelis, Antonius T M; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-04-16

    Several simple methods are presented and evaluated to simulate the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of organic monolayers and polymeric layers by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset theory (MP2) in combination with a series of basis sets. The simulated carbon (C1s) XPS spectra as obtained via B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) or M11/6-311G(d,p) calculations are in good agreement (average mean error <0.3 eV) with the experimental spectra, and good estimates of C1s spectra can be obtained via E(C1s)(exp) = 0.9698EC1s(theory) + 20.34 (in eV) (B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)). As a result, the simulated C1s XPS spectra can elucidate the binding energies of the different carbon species within an organic layer and, in this way, greatly aid the assignment of complicated C1s XPS spectra. The paper gives a wide range of examples, including haloalkanes, esters, (thio-)ethers, leaving groups, clickable functionalities, and bioactive moieties.

  5. Test of lepton universality in Υ(1S) decays at BABAR.

    PubMed

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-05-14

    The ratio R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=Γ(Υ(1S)→τ+ τ-)/Γ(Υ(1S)→μ+ μ-) is measured using a sample of (121.8±1.2)×10(6)Υ(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays Υ(3S)→Υ(1S)π+ π-, Υ(1S)→l+ l-, where l=μ, τ. The result, R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=1.005±0.013(stat)±0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements.

  6. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

  7. Orion KL: the hot core that is not a "hot core"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, L. A.; Schmid-Burgk, J.; Menten, K. M.

    2011-05-01

    We present sensitive high angular resolution submillimeter and millimeter observations of torsionally/vibrationally highly excited lines of the CH3OH, HC3N, SO2, and CH3CN molecules and of the continuum emission at 870 and 1300 μm from the Orion KL region, made with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). These observations and SMA CO J = 3-2 and J = 2-1 imaging of the explosive flow originating in this region suggest that the molecular Orion "hot core" is a pre-existing density enhancement heated from the outside by the explosive event. Unlike in other hot cores, we do not find any self-luminous submillimeter, radio, or infrared source embedded in the hot molecular gas, nor observe filamentary CO flow structures or "fingers" in the shadow of the hot core pointing away from the explosion center. The low-excitation CH3CN emission shows the typical molecular heart-shaped structure, traditionally named the hot core, and is centered close to the dynamical origin of the explosion. The highest excitation CH3CN lines all originate from the northeast lobe of the heart-shaped structure, i.e. from the densest and most highly obscured parts of the extended ridge. The torsionally excited CH3OH and vibrationally excited HC3N lines appear to form a shell around the strongest submillimeter continuum source. All of these observations suggest that the southeast and southwest sectors of the explosive flow have impinged on a pre-existing very dense part of the extended ridge, thus creating the bright Orion KL hot core. However, additional theoretical and observational studies are required to test this new heating scenario.

  8. The Narrow-Line Region of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Binette, Luc; Pastoriza, Miriani G.; Donzelli, Carlos J.

    2000-08-01

    This work studies the optical emission-line properties and physical conditions of the narrow-line region (NLR) of seven narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1's) for which high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations were available. The resolution is 340 km s-1 (at Hα) over the wavelength interval 3700-9500 Å, enabling us to separate the broad and narrow components of the permitted emission lines. Our results show that the flux carried out by the narrow component of Hβ is, on average, 50% of the total line flux. As a result, the [O III] λ5007/Hβ ratio emitted in the NLR varies from 1 to 5, instead of the universally adopted value of 10. This has strong implications for the required spectral energy distribution that ionizes the NLR gas. Photoionization models that consider a NLR composed of a combination of matter-bounded and ionization-bounded clouds are successful at explaining the low [O III] λ5007/Hβ ratio and the weakness of low-ionization lines of NLS1's. Variation of the relative proportion of these two type of clouds nicely reproduces the dispersion of narrow-line ratios found among the NLS1 sample. Assuming similar physical model parameters of both NLS1's and the normal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, we show that the observed differences of emission-line ratios between these two groups of galaxies can be explained, to a first approximation, in terms of the shape of the input ionizing continuum. Narrow emission-line ratios of NLS1's are better reproduced by a steep power-law continuum in the EUV-soft X-ray region, with spectral index α~-2. Flatter spectral indices (α~-1.5) match the observed line ratios of NGC 5548 but are unable to provide a good match to the NLS1 ratios. This result is consistent with ROSAT observations of NLS1's, which show that these objects are characterized by steeper power-law indices than those of Seyfert 1 galaxies with strong broad optical lines. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito

  9. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  10. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  11. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  12. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  13. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  14. Gamma line radiation from supernovae. [nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent calculations of core collapse or massive stars result in explosive ejection of the mantle by a reflected shock. These hydrodynamic results are important for predictions of explosive nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission from supernovae. Previous estimates, based on simple parameterized models or the nucleosynthesis in an average supernova, are compared with these latest results.

  15. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  18. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  19. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  20. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  1. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  2. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  3. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  4. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  5. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  6. Towards Consistent Models of Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, Boris; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Shematovich, Valery; Wiebe, Dimitri; Henning, Thomas; Semenov, Dimitri; Launhardt, Ralf

    The complete theory of the earliest stages of star formation can be developed only on the basis of self-consistent coupled dynamical and chemical models for the evolution of protostellar clouds. The models including multidimensional geometry ""full"" chemistry and 2D/3D radiation transfer still do not exist. We analyze limitations of the existing approaches and main directions of the model improvements: revision of chemical reaction data bases reduction of chemical reaction network reasonable choice of model geometry radiation transfer. The most important goal of modeling of the real objects is to reveal unambiguous signatures of their evolutionary status. Starless cores are believed to be compact objects at very early stages of star formation. We use our results on 1D self-consistent evolution of starless cores to illustrate problems of modeling and interpretation. Special attention is drawn to the radiation transfer problem. New 2D code URAN(IA) for simulation of radiation transfer in molecular lines was developed. This code was used to analyze spectra of starless cores L1544 and CB17. The deduced parameters of these cores are discussed.

  7. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Starless Cores as Fundamental Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignano, Arturo; Molaro, Paolo; Levshakov, Sergei; Centurión, Miriam; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Lapinov, Alexander

    We present high resolution observations in the starless dense molecular core L1512 performed with the Medicina 32m radio telescope. The resolved hfs components of HC3N and NH3 show no kinematic sub-structure and consist of an apparently symmetric peak profile without broadened line wings or self-absorption features suggesting that they sample the same material. The velocity dispersion is 101( ± 1) m s - 1for NH3 and 85( ± 2) m s - 1 for HC3N. The kinetic temperature of the cloud is estimated at 9.2 ( ± 1.2) K and the turbulence is of 76 m s - 1in a subsonic regime. This places L1512 among the most quiescent dark cores and makes it an ideal laboratory to study variations of the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ = {m}e/{m}p by means of observations of inversion lines of NH3 combined with rotational lines of other molecular species.

  9. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  10. SMA millimeter observations of hot molecular cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Hernández, Vicente; Zapata, Luis; Kurtz, Stan; Garay, Guido

    2014-05-01

    We present Submillimeter Array observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and the CH{sub 3}CN (12 {sub K}-11 {sub K}) line of 17 hot molecular cores associated with young high-mass stars. The angular resolution of the observations ranges from 1.''0 to 4.''0. The continuum observations reveal large (>3500 AU) dusty structures with gas masses from 7 to 375 M {sub ☉}, which probably surround multiple young stars. The CH{sub 3}CN line emission is detected toward all the molecular cores at least up to the K = 6 component and is mostly associated with the emission peaks of the dusty objects. We used the multiple K-components of the CH{sub 3}CN and both the rotational diagram method and a simultaneous synthetic local thermodynamic equilibrium model with the XCLASS program to estimate the temperatures and column densities of the cores. For all sources, we obtained reasonable fits from XCLASS by using a model that combines two components: an extended and warm envelope and a compact hot core of molecular gas, suggesting internal heating by recently formed massive stars. The rotational temperatures lie in the range of 40-132 K and 122-485 K for the extended and compact components, respectively. From the continuum and CH{sub 3}CN results, we infer fractional abundances from 10{sup –9} to 10{sup –7} toward the compact inner components, which increase with the rotational temperature. Our results agree with a chemical scenario in which the CH{sub 3}CN molecule is efficiently formed in the gas phase above 100-300 K, and its abundance increases with temperature.

  11. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: yshen@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  12. Precise determination of the 1s Lamb Shift in hydrogen-like heavy ions at the ESR storage ring using microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kiselev, O.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.; Meier, J. P.; Scholz, P.

    2015-11-01

    The precise determination of the energy of the Lyman α1 and α2 lines in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields. To improve the precision of such experiments, the new detector concept of microcalorimeters, which detect the temperature change of an absorber after an incoming particle or photon has deposited its energy as heat, is now exploited. The microcalorimeters for x-rays used in these experiments consist of arrays of silicon thermometers and x-ray absorbers made of high-Z material. With such detectors, a relative energy resolution of about 1 per mille is obtained in the energy regime of 50-100 keV. Two successful measurement campaigns to determine the 1s Lamb Shift in Pb81+ and Au78+ have been completed: a prototype array has been applied successfully for the determination of the 1s Lamb Shift of Pb81+ at the ESR storage ring at GSI in a first test experiment. Based on the results of this test, a full array with 32 pixels has been equipped and has recently been applied to determine the 1s Lamb Shift in Au78+ ions. The energy of the Lyman-α1 line agrees within error bars well with theoretical predictions. The obtained accuracy is already comparable to the best accuracy obtained with conventional germanium detectors for hydrogen-like uranium.

  13. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  14. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  15. Faculty Supports Communication Core Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Asks public relations educators what they think about core classes required for students in their field. Finds they generally support the idea that their students should take core mass communications courses, even if such core courses are developed from a traditional journalism/news-editorial standpoint. (MS)

  16. Core Geometry in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Moira R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they…

  17. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2015-03-01

    Earth-based radar observation of Mercury's rotation vector combined with gravity observation by the MESSENGER spacecraft yield a measure of Mercury's moment of inertia and the amplitude of the 88-day libration of its silicate shell. These two geodetic constraints provide information on Mercury's interior structure, including the presence of a fluid core, the radius of the core-mantle boundary and the bulk densities of the core and mantle. In this work, we show how they further provide information on the size of the solid inner core and on the crystallization regime of the fluid core. If Mercury's fluid core is a Fe-FeS alloy with a sulfur concentration on the Fe-rich side of the eutectic, the largest inner core compatible with geodetic observations at the 1σ level is 1325 ± 250 km. Our results further suggest that the crystallization scenario that best fits the geodetic observations involves the formation of Fe-snow within the fluid core, and that this scenario is preferred for models with an iron-poor mantle composition. Consequently, Mercury's dynamo most likely operates in concert with snow formation. For an inner core larger than ∼650 km, snow formation extends to the inner core boundary. If a dynamo cannot be maintained by the dynamics of snow formation, or if such dynamo produces a magnetic field incompatible with observation, Mercury's inner core must then be smaller than 650 km.

  18. The relevance of paternity analysis in Romanian population using the D1S80 locus.

    PubMed

    Ceacăreanu, A C; Ceacăreanu, B

    1999-01-01

    At present, DNA fingerprinting for human identification and paternity testing is a necessary and usual procedure. D1S80 is one of the best known polymorphic loci showing a VNTR, and exhibiting a high heterozygosity. This genetic locus, with a Tsp 509 I polymorphism of its 5' flanking sequence (1, 9), have been successfully amplified from human genomic DNA isolated from blood. The Tsp 509 I polymorphism was detected by restriction after PCR amplification. We tested the relevance of paternity analysis using the D1S80 locus considering the allele frequency distribution characteristic for our country. Paternal and maternal bands were compared with the children's DNA patterns. Our data include a comparison between D1S80 alleles amplified from mother, child and the supposed father for three tested families. This study was the first of this type made in Romania. We concluded a good power of discrimination and exclusion for this locus. It can be used successfully in the case of subtypes with low frequencies, and this is frequent for our population because of the high heterozygosity of D1S80 subtypes in Romanian population. We recommend the D1S80 use for exclusion paternity tests in Romanian population, as a very useful molecular tool, but we also recommend a complete set of molecular markers for confirmation paternity test in the same population.

  19. G1/S control of anchorage-independent growth in the fibroblast cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methodology to identify the block to anchorage- independent growth and position it within the fibroblast cell cycle. Results with NRK fibroblasts show that mitogen stimulation of the G0/G1 transition and G1-associated increases in cell size are minimally affected by loss of cell anchorage. In contrast, the induction of G1/S cell cycle genes and DNA synthesis is markedly inhibited when anchorage is blocked. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anchorage-dependent transition maps to late G1 and shortly before activation of the G1/S p34cdc2-like kinase. The G1/S block was also detectable in NIH-3T3 cells. Our results: (a) distinguish control of cell cycle progression by growth factors and anchorage; (b) indicate that anchorage mediates G1/S control in fibroblasts; and (c) identify a physiologic circumstance in which the phenotype of mammalian cell cycle arrest would closely resemble Saccharomyces cerevisiae START. The close correlation between anchorage independence in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo emphasizes the key regulatory role for G1/S control in mammalian cells. PMID:1955482

  20. The Xbp1s/GalE axis links ER stress to postprandial hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yingfeng; Wang, Zhao V; Tao, Caroline; Gao, Ningguo; Holland, William L; Ferdous, Anwarul; Repa, Joyce J; Liang, Guosheng; Ye, Jin; Lehrman, Mark A; Hill, Joseph A; Horton, Jay D; Scherer, Philipp E

    2013-01-01

    Postprandially, the liver experiences an extensive metabolic reprogramming that is required for the switch from glucose production to glucose assimilation. Upon refeeding, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is rapidly, though only transiently, activated. Activation of the UPR results in a cessation of protein translation, increased chaperone expression, and increased ER-mediated protein degradation, but it is not clear how the UPR is involved in the postprandial switch to alternate fuel sources. Activation of the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) branch of the UPR signaling pathway triggers expression of the transcription factor Xbp1s. Using a mouse model with liver-specific inducible Xbp1s expression, we demonstrate that Xbp1s is sufficient to provoke a metabolic switch characteristic of the postprandial state, even in the absence of caloric influx. Mechanistically, we identified UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GalE) as a direct transcriptional target of Xbp1s and as the key mediator of this effect. Our results provide evidence that the Xbp1s/GalE pathway functions as a novel regulatory nexus connecting the UPR to the characteristic postprandial metabolic changes in hepatocytes.

  1. BECN1s, a short splice variant of BECN1, functions in mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bing; Xu, An; Qiao, Mengran; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Wenyu; Mei, Yide; Wu, Mian

    2015-11-02

    Mitochondria selective autophagy, known as mitophagy, plays a pivotal role in several biological processes, such as elimination of the damaged mitochondria, removal of the mitochondria from immature red blood cells and sperm. The defects in mitophagy are associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disease, aging, cardiac disease and autoimmune disease. However, the mechanism underlying mitophagy remains largely unclear. Here, we report the characterization of a novel splice variant of BECN1/Beclin 1, BECN1s, which is produced by an alternative splicing mechanism. BECN1s is primarily associated with the outer-membrane of mitochondria. Unlike unspliced BECN1, which is essential for nonselective macroautophagy induction, BECN1s is indispensible for mitochondria-selective autophagy. Furthermore, BECN1s plays an important role in starvation- and membrane depolarization-induced mitophagy. Taken together, our findings broaden the view of BECN1 as an important regulator in autophagy, and implicate BECN1s as a specific mitophagy mediator.

  2. CANOPEN Controller IP Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramia, Maurizio; Montagna, Mario; Furano, Gianluca; Winton, Alistair

    2010-08-01

    This paper will describe the activities performed by Thales Alenia Space Italia supported by the European Space Agency in the definition of a CAN bus interface to be used on Exomars. The final goal of this activity is the development of an IP core, to be used in a slave node, able to manage both the CAN bus Data Link and Application Layer totally in hardware. The activity has been focused on the needs of the EXOMARS mission where devices with different computational performances are all managed by the onboard computer through the CAN bus.

  3. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  4. Validation of Core Temperature Estimation Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-20

    course of 12 days in Okinawa, Japan. The field data selected for assessment consist of nearly 48,000 measurements of heart rate and core temperature...b) RMSE calculated for each subject and day . 11 6 Example of a subject and day with a (a) low RMSE (0.10 for subject 23, day 5) and b) high RMSE...0.67 for subject 31, day 7). 11 7 (a) Scatter plot of observed versus estimated PSI with the line of identity (dashed) and the least squares

  5. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  6. Weak decays of J/\\psi and {\\rm{\\Upsilon }}(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhong; Jiang, Yue; Yuan, Han; Chai, Kan; Wang, Guo-Li

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we study the weak decays of J/\\psi and {{\\Upsilon }}(1S). The cases when the final mesons are pseudo-scalars or vectors are considered. Using the Bethe–Salpeter method, we calculate the hadronic transition amplitude and give the form factors. The energy spectra of leptons for the semi-leptonic channels are also presented for convenience. In the calculation of non-leptonic decays, the naive factorization is applied. And all types of such channels, namely, flavor-favored or suppressed and color-favored or suppressed, are calculated. Our results show that, for the semi-leptonic decay modes, the largest branching ratios are of the order of 10‑10 both for J/\\psi and {{\\Upsilon }}(1S) decays, and the largest branching ratios of non-leptonic decays are of the order of 10‑9 for J/\\psi and 10‑10 for {{\\Upsilon }}(1S).

  7. Defective transient endogenous spleen colony formation in S1/S1d mice.

    PubMed

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ahmed, A; Sharkis, S J; McKee, A; Sell, K W

    1979-04-01

    WCB6F1 mice of the genotype S1/S1d did not form transient 5-day endogenous spleen colonies following midlethal irradiation, either spontaneously or in response to postirradiation bleeding. Their hematologically normal (+/+) littermates produced colonies equivalent in number and morphologic type to a normal strain (D2B6F1), as evaluated by both macroscopic and microscopic criteria. Bone marrow cells from S1/S1d mice, when transplanted into lethally irradiated +/+ mice, were able to generate equivalent numbers of transient endogenous spleen colonies (TE-CFUs), as compared to that obtained when syngeneic +/+ marrow cells were injected into lethally irradiated +/+ recipients. A defective growth of an early class of hematopoietic progenitor cells, resulting in the clinical course of the S1/S1d anemia is suggested and confirms previous reports on the microenvironmental nature of this abnormality.

  8. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  9. Optical frequency measurement of the 1S-3S two-photon transition in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, O.; Nez, F.; Julien, L.; Biraben, F.

    2010-11-01

    This article reports the first optical frequency measurement of the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen. The excitation of this transition occurs at a wavelength of 205 nm which is obtained with two frequency doubling stages of a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm. Its frequency is measured with an optical frequency comb. The second-order Doppler effect is evaluated from the observation of the motional Stark effect due to a transverse magnetic field perpendicular to the atomic beam. The measured value of the 1S_{1/2}( F = 1)-3S1/2( F = 1) frequency splitting is 2 922 742 936.729(13) MHz with a relative uncertainty of 4.5 × 10-12. After the measurement of the 1S-2S frequency, this result is the most precise of the optical frequencies in hydrogen.

  10. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  11. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  13. Core-tube data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

  14. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  15. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-06

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data.

  16. Cutting of bent vortex lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenleithner, P.

    1982-07-01

    One of the major problems in the application of type II superconductors is the appearance of resistivity in case where a current-carrying specimen is in a longitudinal magnetic field. This is explained by the onset of flux-line cutting events, followed by cross-joining of the line parts. The calculation given here shows the amount of repulsive force and energy between two curved vortex lines and examines the general stability of the vortex-vortex system. First, the actual interaction potential between curved vortices is computed. It includes all electromagnetic and core overlap terms of interactions and self-interaction, and allows computation of the system energy under all curved vortex-line configurations. A computer program is used to find the form of lowest free energy. To do this, special trial functions are established to describe the three-dimensional form of the vortex-vortex system. In these functions parameters determine the qualitative and quantitative form. The asymptotic boundary conditions are built into the nature of the trial functions. The computer program now minimizes the free energy with respect to these parameters. The resulting repulsive energy and force are more than ten times less than the known results for straight flux lines, especially for small asymptotic cutting angles. There is no sharp maximum in the plot of repulsive force versus flux-line separation. A remarkable results is the loss of general stability below a separation distance of several London penetration depths, depending on the cutting angle and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter. The explanation lies in the local attraction of central sections of the vortices as a result of configurational adaption. This explains the onset of resistance at small currents and small magnetic fields.

  17. Is there a connection between broad absorption line quasars and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies?

    SciTech Connect

    Grupe, Dirk; Nousek, John A.

    2015-02-01

    We consider whether broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) and narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are similar, as suggested by Brandt and Gallagher and Boroson. For this purpose, we constructed a sample of 11 BAL QSOs from existing Chandra and Swift observations. We found that BAL QSOs and NLS1s both operate at high Eddington ratios L/L{sub Edd}, although BAL QSOs have slightly lower L/L{sub Edd}. BAL QSOs and NLS1s in general have high Fe ii/Hβ and low [O iii]/Hβ ratios following the classic “Boroson and Green” eigenvector 1 relation. We also found that the mass accretion rates M-dot of BAL QSOs and NLS1s are more similar than previously thought, although some BAL QSOs exhibit extreme mass accretion rates of more than 10 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These extreme mass accretion rates may suggest that the black holes in BAL QSOs are relativistically spinning. Black hole masses in BAL QSOs are a factor of 100 larger than NLS1s. From their location on a M−σ plot, we find that BAL QSOs contain fully developed black holes. Applying a principal component analysis to our sample, we find eigenvector 1 to correspond to the Eddington ratio L/L{sub Edd}, and eigenvector 2 to black hole mass.

  18. Modeling ERBB receptor-regulated G1/S transition to find novel targets for de novo trastuzumab resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Özgür; Fröhlich, Holger; Löbke, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Burmester, Sara; Majety, Meher; Mattern, Jens; Schupp, Ingo; Chaouiya, Claudine; Thieffry, Denis; Poustka, Annemarie; Wiemann, Stefan; Beissbarth, Tim; Arlt, Dorit

    2009-01-01

    Background In breast cancer, overexpression of the transmembrane tyrosine kinase ERBB2 is an adverse prognostic marker, and occurs in almost 30% of the patients. For therapeutic intervention, ERBB2 is targeted by monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in adjuvant settings; however, de novo resistance to this antibody is still a serious issue, requiring the identification of additional targets to overcome resistance. In this study, we have combined computational simulations, experimental testing of simulation results, and finally reverse engineering of a protein interaction network to define potential therapeutic strategies for de novo trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Results First, we employed Boolean logic to model regulatory interactions and simulated single and multiple protein loss-of-functions. Then, our simulation results were tested experimentally by producing single and double knockdowns of the network components and measuring their effects on G1/S transition during cell cycle progression. Combinatorial targeting of ERBB2 and EGFR did not affect the response to trastuzumab in de novo resistant cells, which might be due to decoupling of receptor activation and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, examination of c-MYC in resistant as well as in sensitive cell lines, using a specific chemical inhibitor of c-MYC (alone or in combination with trastuzumab), demonstrated that both trastuzumab sensitive and resistant cells responded to c-MYC perturbation. Conclusion In this study, we connected ERBB signaling with G1/S transition of the cell cycle via two major cell signaling pathways and two key transcription factors, to model an interaction network that allows for the identification of novel targets in the treatment of trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Applying this new strategy, we found that, in contrast to trastuzumab sensitive breast cancer cells, combinatorial targeting of ERBB receptors or of key signaling intermediates does not have potential for treatment

  19. Downregulated miR-45 Inhibits the G1-S Phase Transition by Targeting Bmi-1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Jun-Ling; Yu, Liang; Liu, Xiang-Xia; Wu, Hong-Mei; Lei, Fang-Yong; Wu, Shu; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bmi-1 (B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1) is upregulated in breast cancer and was involved in many malignant progressions of breast cells, including cell proliferation, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer initiation. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of Bmi-1 in breast cancer remains unclear. After analysis of the ArrayExpress dataset GSE45666, we comparatively detected the expression levels of miR-495 in 9 examined breast cancer cell lines, normal breast epithelial cells and 8 pairs of fresh clinical tumor samples. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of miR-495 on the progression of breast cancer, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were transduced to stably overexpress miR-495. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, colony formation assays, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine labeling and immunofluorescence, anchorage-independent growth ability assay, flow cytometry analysis, and luciferase assays were used to test the effect of miR-495 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Xenografted tumor model was also used to evaluate the effect of miR-495 in breast cancer. Herein, we found that miR-495, a predicted regulator of Bmi-1, was frequently downregulated in malignant cells and tissues of breast. Upregulation of miR-495 significantly suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity via G1-S arrest. Further analysis revealed that miR-495 targeted Bmi-1 through its 3′ untranslated region. Moreover, Bmi-1 could neutralize the suppressive effect of miR-495 on cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of breast cancer in vivo. These data suggested that miR-495 could inhibit the G1-S phase transition that leads to proliferation and tumorigenicity inhibition by targeting and suppressing Bmi-1 in breast cancer. PMID:26020378

  20. 1s{sup 2}2pns({sup 1}P{sup 0}) autoionizing levels in Be-like Al and C ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stancalie, V.

    2005-04-15

    This work is focused on the possibility of using the R-matrix Floquet theory and codes and its extension to laser induced degenerate state to describe dielectronic recombination of Li-like into Be-like ions. The uncertainty concerning the best way to include radiative damping effect is no longer a problem when the full electron collision and radiative processes are treated simultaneously and radiation field is treated to all orders. The method accounts for the reverse process corresponding to single-photon ionization. Following this approach, the 1s{sup 2}2snl({sup 1}S{sup e}) and 1s{sup 2}2pnl({sup 1}P{sup 0}) Rydberg states, embedded in the electric dipole field of the 2s-2p core, are dressed by a laser field, assumed to be monochromatic, monomode, linearly polarized, and spatially homogeneous. As in the R-matrix Floquet theory, in the external region, since the coupling field potential vanishes, the calculation yields the complete information on the autoionizing rate and field-free positions. Comparisons with available data are presented.

  1. HNCO in massive galactic dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, I.; Henkel, C.; Mao, R. Q.

    2000-09-01

    We surveyed 81 dense molecular cores associated with regions of massive star formation and Sgr A in the JK-1K-1 = 505-404 and 10010-909 lines of HNCO. Line emission was detected towards 57 objects. Selected subsamples were also observed in the 101-000, 404-303, 707-606, 15015-14014, 16016-15015 and 21021-20020 lines, covering a frequency range from 22 to 461 GHz. HNCO lines from the K-1 = 2,3 ladders were detected in several sources. Towards Orion-KL, K-1 = 5 transitions with upper state energies Eu/k ~ 1100 and 1300 K could be observed. Five HNCO cores were mapped. The sources remain spatially unresolved at 220 and 461 GHz (10010-909 and 21010-20020 transitions) with beam sizes of 24'' and 18\\arcsec, respectively. The detection of hyperfine structure in the 101-000 transition is consistent with optically thin emission under conditions of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). This is corroborated by a rotational diagram analysis of Orion-KL that indicates optically thin line emission also for transitions between higher excited states. At the same time a tentative detection of interstellar HN13CO (the 100,10-90,9 line at 220 GHz toward G 310.12-0.20) suggests optically thick emission from some rotational transitions. Typical HNCO abundances relative to H2 as derived from a population diagram analysis are ~ 10-9. The rotational temperatures reach ~ 500 K. The gas densities in regions of HNCO K-1=0 emission should be n>~ 106 cm-3 and in regions of K-1>0 emission about an order of magnitude higher even for radiative excitation. HNCO abundances are found to be enhanced in high-velocity gas. HNCO integrated line intensities correlate well with those of thermal SiO emission. This indicates a spatial coexistence of the two species and may hint at a common production mechanism, presumably based on shock chemistry. Based on the observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile and on observations with the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope (HHT). The HHT

  2. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M-Σ technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  3. Core Curriculum Analysis: A Tool for Educational Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levander, Lena M.; Mikkola, Minna

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the outcome of a dimensional core curriculum analysis. The analysis process was an integral part of an educational development project, which aimed to compact and clarify the curricula of the degree programmes. The task was also in line with the harmonising of the degree structures as part of the Bologna process within higher…

  4. Core geometry in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Moira R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they preserve scene and object geometry from canonical points of view. Young children show limits when using geometry both in non-symbolic tasks and in symbolic map tasks that present 3D contexts from unusual, unfamiliar points of view. When presented with the familiar viewpoints in perspectival line drawings, however, do children engage more integrated geometric representations? In three experiments, children successfully interpreted line drawings with respect to their depicted scene or object. Nevertheless, children recruited distinct processes when navigating based on the information in these drawings, and these processes depended on the context in which the drawings were presented. These results suggest that children are flexible but limited in using geometric information to form integrated representations of scenes and objects, even when interpreting spatial symbols that are highly familiar and faithful renditions of the visual world. PMID:25441089

  5. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Identification of transitions from the 1s2l2l'3l'' autoionizing levels of the Be-like Mg IX ion in a plasma heated by a picosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Clark, R. E.; Bryunetkin, B. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnurer, M.; Pikuz, S. A.

    1993-12-01

    The x-ray emission spectrum of a magnesium plasma produced by a picosecond laser has been studied. Dielectronic satellites of the resonance line of the He-like Mg XI ion have been identified for the first time. These satellites result from radiative transitions from 1s2l2l'3l'' autoionizing levels of the Be-like Mg IX ion.

  6. Studies of Υ(1S) bottomonium state production at the Tevatron Collider Experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jundong

    2004-11-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium in hadronic collisions provides an ideal testing ground for our understanding of the production mechanisms for heavy quarks and the non-perturbative QCD effects that bind the quark pairs into quarkonium. In this analysis, the inclusive production cross section of the Υ(1S) bottomonium state is measured using the Υ(1S) → μ+μ- decay mode. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 159.1 ± 10.3 pb-1. We determine differential cross sections as functions of the Υ(1S) transverse momentum, pTΥ, for three ranges of the Υ(1S) rapidity: 0 < |yΥ| < 0.6,0.6 < |yΥ| < 1.2 and 1.2 < |yΥ| < 1.8. The shapes of dσ/dpT cross sections show little variation with rapidity and are consistent with the published Run I CDF measurement over the rapidity range |yΥ| < 0.4.

  7. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment.

  8. Recognition of disturbances with specified morphology in time series: Part 2. Spikes on 1-s magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Agayan, S. M.; Gvishiani, A. D.; Bogoutdinov, Sh. R.; Chulliat, A.

    2012-05-01

    Preliminary magnetograms contain different types of temporal anthropogenic disturbances: spikes, baseline jumps, drifts, etc. These disturbances should be identified and filtered out during the preprocessing of the preliminary records for the definitive data. As of now, at the geomagnetic observatories, such filtering is carried out manually. Most of the disturbances in the records sampled every second are spikes, which are much more abundant than those on the magnetograms sampled every minute. Another important feature of the 1-s magnetograms is the presence of a plenty of specific disturbances caused by short-period geomagnetic pulsations, which must be retained in the definitive records. Thus, creating an instrument for formalized and unified recognition of spikes on the preliminary 1-s magnetograms would largely solve the problem of labor-consuming manual preprocessing of the magnetic records. In the context of this idea, in the present paper, we focus on recognition of the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms as a key point of the problem. We describe here the new algorithm of pattern recognition, SPs, which is capable of automatically identifying the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms with a low probability of missed events and false alarms. The algorithm was verified on the real magnetic data recorded at the French observatory located on Easter Island in the Pacific.

  9. Xbp1s in Pomc neurons connects ER stress with energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal leptin and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show that induction ofthe unfolded protein response transcription factor spliced X-box binding protein 1(Xbp1s) in pro-opio-melanocortin (Pomc) neurons alone is sufficient to pr...

  10. Methods of using (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Richard B; Dewey, Stephen L; Miller, Steven

    2015-03-03

    (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid also known as CPP-115 or its pharmaceutically acceptable salts can be used to treat addiction and neurological disorders such as epilepsy without side effects such as visual field defects caused by vigabatrin (Sabril).

  11. 3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING S. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  12. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING ENE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  13. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  14. Search for the 0- glueball in ϒ (1 S ) and ϒ (2 S ) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, S.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hedges, M. T.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kulasiri, R.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Ono, H.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, H.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Widmann, E.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Ye, H.; Yelton, J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report the first search for the JP C=0- glueball in ϒ (1 S ) and ϒ (2 S ) decays with data samples of (102 ±2 )×1 06 and (158 ±4 )×1 06 events, respectively, collected with the Belle detector. No significant signals are observed in any of the proposed production modes, and the 90% credibility level upper limits on their branching fractions in ϒ (1 S ) and ϒ (2 S ) decays are obtained. The inclusive branching fractions of the ϒ (1 S ) and ϒ (2 S ) decays into final states with a χc 1 are measured to be B (ϒ (1 S )→χc 1+anything)=(1.90 ±0.43 (stat )±0.14 (syst ))×10-4 with an improved precision over prior measurements and B (ϒ (2 S )→χc 1+anything)=(2.24 ±0.44 (stat )±0.20 (syst ))×10-4 for the first time.

  15. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5’- and 3’-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species. PMID:25923814

  16. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  18. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  19. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  20. Search for radiative decays of {upsilon}(1S) into {eta} and {eta}'

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.

    2007-10-01

    We report on a search for the radiative decay of {upsilon}(1S) to the pseudoscalar mesons {eta} and {eta}{sup '} in (21.2{+-}0.2)x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(1S) decays collected with the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The {eta} meson was reconstructed in the three modes {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, or {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The {eta}{sup '} meson was reconstructed in the mode {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta} decaying through any of the above three modes, and also {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{sup 0}, where {rho}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Five out of the seven submodes are found to have very low backgrounds. In four of them we find no signal candidates and in one [{upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}] there are two good signal candidates, which is insufficient evidence to claim a signal. The other two submodes ({eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}) are background limited, and show no excess of events in their signal regions. We combine the results from different channels and obtain upper limits at the 90% C.L. which are B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta})<1.0x10{sup -6} and B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})<1.9x10{sup -6}. Our limits are an order of magnitude tighter than the previous ones and below the predictions made by some theoretical models.

  1. A flattened cloud core in NGC 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Paul T. P.; Peng, Yun-Lou; Torrelles, Jose M.; Gomez, Jose F.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    The (J, K) (1, 1) and (2, 2) NH3 lines were mapped toward a molecular cloud core in NGC 2024 using the VLA in its C/D-configuration. This region is associated with one of the most highly collimated molecular outflows. We find that the molecular condensations associated with the far-infrared sources FIR 5, FIR 6, and FIR 7 have kinetic temperatures of about 40 K. We also find line broadening toward FIR 6 and FIR 7. This suggests that these condensations may not be protostars heated by gravitational energy released during collapse but that they have an internal heating source. A flattened structure of ammonia emission is found extending parallel to the unipolar CO outflow structure, but displaced systematically to the east. If the NH3 emission traces the denser gas environment, there is no evidence that a dense gas structure is confining the molecular outflow. Instead, the location of the high-velocity outflow along the surface of the NH3 structure suggests that a wind is sweeping material from the surface of this elongated cloud core.

  2. Core foundations of abstract geometry.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-27

    Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious geometric representations that guide their navigation and their analysis of object shape? In what way might these early-arising representations support later-developing Euclidean intuitions? To approach these questions, we investigated the relations among young children's use of geometry in tasks assessing: navigation; visual form analysis; and the interpretation of symbolic, purely geometric maps. Children's navigation depended on the distance and directional relations of the surface layout and predicted their use of a symbolic map with targets designated by surface distances. In contrast, children's analysis of visual forms depended on the size-invariant shape relations of objects and predicted their use of the same map but with targets designated by corner angles. Even though the two map tasks used identical instructions and map displays, children's performance on these tasks showed no evidence of integrated representations of distance and angle. Instead, young children flexibly recruited geometric representations of either navigable layouts or objects to interpret the same spatial symbols. These findings reveal a link between the early-arising geometric representations that humans share with diverse animals and the flexible geometric intuitions that give rise to human knowledge at its highest reaches. Although young children do not appear to integrate core geometric representations, children's use of the abstract geometry in spatial symbols such as maps may provide the earliest clues to the later construction of Euclidean geometry.

  3. Detectability of deuterated water in prestellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, D.; Taquet, V.; Vastel, C.; Caselli, P.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Water is an important molecule in the chemical and thermal balance of dense molecular gas, but knowing its history throughout the various stages of the star formation is a fundamental problem. Its molecular deuteration provides us with a crucial clue to its formation history. H2O has recently been detected for the first time towards the prestellar core L1544 with the Herschel Space Observatory with a high spectral resolution (HIFI instrument). Aims: Prestellar cores provide the original reservoir of material from which future planetary systems are built, but few observational constraints exist on the formation of water and none on its deuteration before the collapse starts and a protostar forms at the centre. We report on new APEX observations of the ground state 10,1-00,0 HDO transition at 464 GHz towards the prestellar core L1544. The line is undetected, and we present an extensive study of the conditions for its detectability in cold and dense cloud cores. Methods: The water and deuterated water abundances have been estimated using an advanced chemical model simplified for the limited number of reactions or processes that are active in cold regions (<15 K). In this model, water is removed from the gas phase by freezing onto dust grains and by photodissociation. We use the LIME radiative transfer code to compute the expected intensity and profile of both H2O and HDO lines and compare them with the observations. Results: The predicted H2O line intensity of the LIME model using an abundance and structure profile, coupled with their dust opacity, is over-estimated by a factor of ~3.5 compared to the observations. We present several ad hoc profiles that best-fit the observations and compare the profiles with results from an astrochemical modelling, coupling gas phase and grain surface chemistry. The water deuteration weakly depends on the external visual extinction, the external ISRF, and contraction timescale. The [HDO]/[H2O] and [D2O]/[H2O] abundance

  4. 76 FR 63316 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1) and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1) and derivatives thereof... a protein designated secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1). sFRP-1, also known as SARP-2 (Secreted Apoptosis Related Protein-2). The IP covers various sFRP-1 compositions and uses thereof....

  5. Structural and spectral studies of sunspots. [umbral core modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyller, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of umbral cores, both by multicolor photometry and by narrow band photometry in the vicinity of the sodium D lines, are described, and evidence is given which supports the validity of many umbral models, each of which describes different aspects of the observed umbral cores. Theoretical studies carried on at the observatory include the following: (1) Zeeman profiles of the sodium D sub 2 line and other lines; (2) turbulent heat conduction, sound waves, and the missing flux in sunspots; (3) chromospheric heating above spots by Alfven waves; (4) magnetic convection in the sun and solar neutrinos; (5) models of starspots on flare stars; (5) starspots on the primaries of contact binary systems; and (6) implications of starspots on red dwarfs.

  6. TRAC-BF1 thermal-hydraulic, ANSYS stress analysis for core shroud cracking phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Shoop, U.; Feltus, M.A.; Baratta, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sent Generic Letter 94-03 informing all licensees about the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of core shrouds found in both Dresden unit I and Quad Cities unit 1. The letter directed all licensees to perform safety analysis of their boiling water reactor (BWR) units. Two transients of special concern for the core shroud safety analysis include the main steam line break (MSLB) and recirculation line break transient.

  7. Pre-cometary ice composition from hot core chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tornow, Carmen; Kührt, Ekkehard; Motschmann, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Pre-cometary ice located around star-forming regions contains molecules that are pre-biotic compounds or pre-biotic precursors. Molecular line surveys of hot cores provide information on the composition of the ice since it sublimates near these sites. We have combined a hydrostatic hot core model with a complex network of chemical reactions to calculate the time-dependent abundances of molecules, ions, and radicals. The model considers the interaction between the ice and gas phase. It is applied to the Orion hot core where high-mass star formation occurs, and to the solar-mass binary protostar system IRAS 16293-2422. Our calculations show that at the end of the hot core phase both star-forming sites produce the same prebiotic CN-bearing molecules. However, in the Orion hot core these molecules are formed in larger abundances. A comparison of the calculated values with the abundances derived from the observed line data requires a chemically unprocessed molecular cloud as the initial state of hot core evolution. Thus, it appears that these objects are formed at a much younger cloud stage than previously thought. This implies that the ice phase of the young clouds does not contain CN-bearing molecules in large abundances before the hot core has been formed. The pre-biotic molecules synthesized in hot cores cause a chemical enrichment in the gas phase and in the pre-cometary ice. This enrichment is thought to be an important extraterrestrial aspect of the formation of life on Earth and elsewhere.

  8. Pre-Cometary Ice Composition from Hot Core Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Carmen; Kührt, Ekkehard; Motschmann, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Pre-cometary ice located around star-forming regions contains molecules that are pre-biotic compounds or pre-biotic precursors. Molecular line surveys of hot cores provide information on the composition of the ice since it sublimates near these sites. We have combined a hydrostatic hot core model with a complex network of chemical reactions to calculate the timedependent abundances of molecules, ions, and radicals. The model considers the interaction between the ice and gas phase. It is applied to the Orion hot core where high-mass star formation occurs, and to the solar-mass binary protostar system IRAS 16293-2422. Our calculations show that at the end of the hot core phase both star-forming sites produce the same prebiotic CN-bearing molecules. However, in the Orion hot core these molecules are formed in larger abundances. A comparison of the calculated values with the abundances derived from the observed line data requires a chemically unprocessed molecular cloud as the initial state of hot core evolution. Thus, it appears that these objects are formed at a much younger cloud stage than previously thought. This implies that the ice phase of the young clouds does not contain CN-bearing molecules in large abundances before the hot core has been formed. The pre-biotic molecules synthesized in hot cores cause a chemical enrichment in the gas phase and in the pre-cometary ice. This enrichment is thought to be an important extraterrestrial aspect of the formation of life on Earth and elsewhere.

  9. Dynamic Line-by-line Pulse Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willits, John Thomas

    In pursuit of optical arbitrary waveform generation (OAWG), line-by-line pulse shapers use dynamic masks that can be modulated at the repetition rate of an input pulse train. The pulse-to-pulse control of the output pulse train with the waveform fidelity provided by line-by-line pulse shaping creates the most arbitrary waveform output possible, OAWG. This thesis studies the theoretical dynamic effects of such a pulse shaper and presents efforts towards realization of OAWG. Pulse shaping theory is extended to include rapid waveform update for line-by-line pulse shaping. The fundamental tradeoff between response speed and waveform fidelity is illustrated by several examples. Line-by-line pulse shaping is demonstrated at a repetition rate of 890 MHz on a mode-locked titanium sapphire laser. This pulse shaper relies on a virtual imaged phased array (VIPA) to obtain the necessary high spectral resolution. The details of the VIPA's ideal and nonideal performance are analyzed, simulated and tested. Individual frequency modes from the mode-locked titanium sapphire laser are also resolved using the same VIPA paired with a diffraction grating creating a 2-D spectral brush with a resolution of 357 MHz. The advantages and nonideal effects of VIPA-based pulse shaping are investigated. Analysis of several high speed modulation techniques are explored. The optical system required to separate adjacent comb lines into different single mode (SM) fibers necessary for several modulation techniques is designed and tested.

  10. Atomistic calculations of dislocation core energy in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. W.; Sills, R. B.; Ward, D. K.; Karnesky, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    A robust molecular-dynamics simulation method for calculating dislocation core energies has been developed. This method has unique advantages: It does not require artificial boundary conditions, is applicable for mixed dislocations, and can yield converged results regardless of the atomistic system size. Utilizing a high-fidelity bond order potential, we have applied this method in aluminium to calculate the dislocation core energy as a function of the angle β between the dislocation line and the Burgers vector. These calculations show that, for the face-centered-cubic aluminium explored, the dislocation core energy follows the same functional dependence on β as the dislocation elastic energy: Ec=A sin2β +B cos2β , and this dependence is independent of temperature between 100 and 300 K. By further analyzing the energetics of an extended dislocation core, we elucidate the relationship between the core energy and the core radius of a perfect versus an extended dislocation. With our methodology, the dislocation core energy can accurately be accounted for in models of dislocation-mediated plasticity.

  11. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  12. Abstract Line Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevinskas, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a unit on the exploration of line. The unit was composed of two individual line lessons. In the first lesson, students were introduced to line as an element of design. They were asked to describe different types of lines, and look for them in art reproductions. The second lesson in the unit involved painting…

  13. The Language of Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breig-Allen, Cheryl; Hill, Janet; Geismar-Ryan, Lori; Cadwell, Louise Boyd

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project about lines in the environment used with 2- and 3-year olds and based on the Reggio Emilia approach. Activities included making tracks with riding toys, drawing lines on papers, seeing cloud lines, and making lines with yarn and Cuisenaire rods. Shows how young children's observations and ongoing discoveries can uncover their…

  14. Electrical Transmission Line Diametrical Retention Mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2006-01-03

    The invention is a mechanism for retaining an electrical transmission line. In one embodiment of the invention it is a system for retaining an electrical transmission line within downhole components. The invention allows a transmission line to be attached to the internal diameter of drilling components that have a substantially uniform drilling diameter. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second end of a drill pipe, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The invention allows the electrical transmission line to withstand the tension and compression of drill pipe during routine drilling cycles.

  15. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  16. Relativistic frozen core potential scheme with relaxation of core electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Hayami, Masao; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    This letter proposes a relaxation scheme for core electrons based on the frozen core potential method at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess level, called FCP-CR. The core electrons are self-consistently relaxed using frozen molecular valence potentials after the valence SCF calculation is performed. The efficiency of FCP-CR is confirmed by calculations of gold clusters. Furthermore, FCP-CR reproduces the results of the all-electron method for the energies of coinage metal dimers and the core ionization energies and core level shifts of vinyl acetate and three tungsten complexes at the Hartree-Fock and/or symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction levels.

  17. Rotational level involvement in the T1-->S0 intersystem crossing transition in thiophosgene.

    PubMed

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C

    2009-04-07

    We propose and develop theoretically a general mechanism for the involvement of rotational motion into the nonradiative transitions that occur in an isolated polyatomic molecule. The treatment is based on the different rotational constants and different (asymmetric top-symmetric top) molecular structures in the two combining electronic states. We focus our attention on the T(1)-->S(0) intersystem crossing (ISC) transition in thiophosgene and show how the rotational mechanism could lead to a considerable enhancement in the effective level density for the process. Inserting the rotational mechanism into our recently developed technique and algorithm for combined spin-orbit coupling+intramolecular vibrational redistribution analysis, we have carried out large-scale calculations that have led to a better understanding of the ISC (T(1)-->S(0)) in thiophosgene.

  18. Measurement of the t dependence in exclusive photoproduction of ϒ(1S) mesons at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-02-01

    The exclusive photoproduction reaction γp→ϒ(1S)p has been studied with the ZEUS detector in ep collisions at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb. The measurement covers the kinematic range 601S)p cross section.

  19. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  20. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  1. Systems, methods and apparatus for developing and maintaining evolving systems with software product lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Pena, Joaquin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which an evolutionary system is managed and viewed as a software product line. In some embodiments, the core architecture is a relatively unchanging part of the system, and each version of the system is viewed as a product from the product line. Each software product is generated from the core architecture with some agent-based additions. The result may be a multi-agent system software product line.

  2. SIRT1 mediates Sphk1/S1P-induced proliferation and migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Wang, Hua; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Shi, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Xu, Qin Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Ha, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is one of the most important components of embryonic organ formation and vessel growth after birth. Sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) and S1P has been confirmed to participate in various cell signaling pathways and physiological processes including neovascularisation. However, the mechanisms that Sphk1/S1P regulates neovascularisation remain unclear. In this study, we elucidated that Sphk1/S1P upregulates sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+ dependent deacetylases protease which exerts multiple cellular functions, to regulate the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. By using CCK8 and Transwell assays, we demonstrated that Sphk1 and SIRT1 knockdown could significantly decrease proliferation and migration of HUVEC cells. Sphk1 inhibition results in SIRT1 downregulation which could be reversed by exogenous S1P in HUVEC cells. Treatment of HUVECs with S1P reverses the impaired proliferation and migration caused by SIRT1 knockdown. Furthermore, Sphk1 knockdown inhibits the phosphorylation of P38 MAPK, ERK and AKT. Treatment of HUVECs with PD98059, SB203580 and Wortmannin, which are the inhibitors of ERK, P38 MAPK and AKT respectively, resulted in decreased SIRT1 expression and reduced migration of HUVEC cells. Thus, we conclude that Sphk1/S1P induces SIRT1 upregulation through multiple pathways including P38 MAPK, ERK and AKT signals. This is the first report to disclose the existence and roles of Sphk1/S1P/SIRT1 axis in regulation of endothelial cell proliferation and migration, which may provide a theoretical basis for angiogenesis.

  3. Complement 1s is the Serine Protease that Cleaves IGFBP-5 in Human Osteoarthritic Joint Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Walker H.; Yocum, Sue A.; Rowland, Michael; Kellner, Debra; Lazerwith, Scott; Sverdrup, Francis; Yates, Matthew; Radabaugh, Melissa; Clemmons, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) are trophic factors for cartilage and have been shown to be chondroprotective in animal models of osteoarthritis. IGFBP-5 is degraded in joint fluid and inhibition of IGFBP-5 degradation has been shown to enhance the trophic effects of IGF-I. Objective To determine the identity of IGFBP-5 protease activity in human osteoarthritic (OA) joint fluid. Method OA joint fluid was purified and the purified material analyzed by IGFBP-5 zymography. Results Both crude joint fluid and purified material contained a single band of proteolytic activity that cleaved IGFBP-5. Immunoblotting of joint fluid for complement 1s (C1s) showed a band that had the same Mr estimate, e.g. 88 kDa. In gel tryptic digestion and subsequent peptide analysis by LC-MS/MS showed that the band contained human complement 1s. A panel of protease inhibitors was tested for their ability to inhibit IGFBP-5 cleavage by the purified protease. Three serine protease inhibitors, FUT175 and CP 143217 and CB-349547 had IC50’s between 1and 6 uM. Two other serine protease inhibitors had intermediate activity (e.g. IC50’s 20–40 uM) and MMP inhibitors had no detectible activity at concentrations up to 300 uM. Conclusion Human OA fluid contains a serine protease that cleaves IGFBP-5. Zymography, immunoblotting and LCMS/MS analysis indicate that complement 1s is the protease that accounts for this activity. PMID:18930415

  4. Resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at double core excitations in solid LiCl

    SciTech Connect

    Agaaker, Marcus; Ahuja, Rajeev; Soederstroem, Johan; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Kaeaembre, Tanel; Glover, Chris; Schmitt, Thorsten; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2006-06-15

    Inelastic soft x-ray scattering in LiCl, resonantly enhanced at states with two Li 1s vacancies, is investigated. States in which both excited electrons are localized during the double core hole lifetime, in which one of the electrons delocalize, as well as triply excited states in which the double core excitation is accompanied by a valence-to-conduction band excitation, contribute to the scattering. The angular momentum symmetry of the involved states and the vibronic coupling during the scattering process are reflected in the angular anisotropy. The effect on the local electronic structure of multiple core holes is theoretically studied by means of supercell band calculations.

  5. Search for Production of Invisible Final States in Single-Photon Decays of Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Chistiakova, M.V.; Jensen, F.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We search for single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) resonance, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma} + invisible, where the invisible state is either a particle of definite mass, such as a light Higgs boson A{sup 0}, or a pair of dark matter particles, {chi}{bar {chi}}. Both A{sup 0} and {chi} are assumed to have zero spin. We tag {Upsilon}(1S) decays with a dipion transition {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) and look for events with a single energetic photon and significant missing energy. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range m{sub A{sup o}} {le} 9.2GeV and m{sub {chi}} {le} 4.5GeV in the sample of 98 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays collected with the BABAR detector and set stringent limits on new physics models that contain light dark matter states.

  6. Balanced Production of Ribosome Components Is Required for Proper G1/S Transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae *

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Maya, Douglas; Arista-Romero, María; de la Cruz, Jesús; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is a very accurate process that ensures cell viability and the genomic integrity of daughter cells. A fundamental part of this regulation consists in the arrest of the cycle at particular points to ensure the completion of a previous event, to repair cellular damage, or to avoid progression in potentially risky situations. In this work, we demonstrate that a reduction in nucleotide levels or the depletion of RNA polymerase I or III subunits generates a cell cycle delay at the G1/S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This delay is concomitant with an imbalance between ribosomal RNAs and proteins which, among others, provokes an accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. Consistently with a direct impact of free L5 on the G1/S transition, rrs1 mutants, which weaken the assembly of L5 and L11 on pre-60S ribosomal particles, enhance both the G1/S delay and the accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. We propose the existence of a surveillance mechanism that couples the balanced production of yeast ribosomal components and cell cycle progression through the accumulation of free ribosomal proteins. This regulatory pathway resembles the p53-dependent nucleolar-stress checkpoint response described in human cells, which indicates that this is a general control strategy extended throughout eukaryotes. PMID:24043628

  7. Determination of the auroral O/1S/ production sources from coordinated rocket and satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Torr, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines the auroral excitation mechanisms using data collected in a satellite/rocket/aurora coordination. Past theories considered that variation with altitude of the emission from the O(1S) state is the same as that from the N2(+) first negative band system. Actually, the source function for O(1S) does not covary with N2(+) but has a smaller scale height. The covariation is due to quenching of the source function by O(3P). The steadiness of the aurora in a flight of the Michigan Airglow Payload allows the profile to be differentiated for direct comparison with theory. It is concluded that when most of the relevant variables for production of the O(1S) state are simultaneously measured in aurora, the major source functions are dissociative recombination of O2(+) above 210 km to apogee at 250 km, and below 180 km the energy transfer from N2(A3sigma) in the oxygen atom quenching reaction.

  8. Core-to-core uniformity improvement in multi-core fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Cvetojevic, Nick; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Lawrence, Jon; Gris-Sanchez, Itandehui; Birks, Tim; Haynes, Roger; Haynes, Dionne

    2014-07-01

    Multi-core fiber Bragg gratings (MCFBGs) will be a valuable tool not only in communications but also various astronomical, sensing and industry applications. In this paper we address some of the technical challenges of fabricating effective multi-core gratings by simulating improvements to the writing method. These methods allow a system designed for inscribing single-core fibers to cope with MCFBG fabrication with only minor, passive changes to the writing process. Using a capillary tube that was polished on one side, the field entering the fiber was flattened which improved the coverage and uniformity of all cores.

  9. Vortex line in the unitary Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Madeira, Lucas; Vitiello, Silvio A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we report diffusion Monte Carlo results for the ground state of unpolarized spin-1/2 fermions in a cylindrical container and properties of the system with a vortex-line excitation. The density profile of the system with a vortex line presents a nonzero density at the core. We also calculate the ground-state energy per particle, the superfluid pairing gap, and the excitation energy per particle. Finally, these simulations can be extended to calculate the properties of vortex excitations in other strongly interacting systems such as superfluid neutron matter using realistic nuclear Hamiltonians.

  10. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1985-01-01

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  11. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  12. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  13. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  14. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  15. Complicated Politics to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  16. Characteristic velocities of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J. I.; Mazzali, P. A.; Deng, J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Hamuy, M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Matheson, T.; Modjaz, M.; Pian, E.; Stritzinger, M.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.

    2010-02-01

    The velocity of the inner ejecta of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) is studied by means of an analysis of their nebular spectra. Stripped-envelope CC-SNe are the result of the explosion of bare cores of massive stars (>=8Msolar), and their late-time spectra are typically dominated by a strong [OI] λλ6300, 6363 emission line produced by the innermost, slow-moving ejecta which are not visible at earlier times as they are located below the photosphere. A characteristic velocity of the inner ejecta is obtained for a sample of 56 stripped-envelope CC-SNe of different spectral types (IIb, Ib, Ic) using direct measurements of the linewidth as well as spectral fitting. For most SNe, this value shows a small scatter around 4500kms-1. Observations (<100d) of stripped-envelope CC-SNe have revealed a subclass of very energetic SNe, termed broad-lined SNe (BL-SNe) or hypernovae, which are characterized by broad absorption lines in the early-time spectra, indicative of outer ejecta moving at very high velocity (v >= 0.1c). SNe identified as BL in the early phase show large variations of core velocities at late phases, with some having much higher and some having similar velocities with respect to regular CC-SNe. This might indicate asphericity of the inner ejecta of BL-SNe, a possibility we investigate using synthetic three-dimensional nebular spectra. Based on observations at ESO-Paranal, Prog. 081.D-0173(A), 082.D-0292(A). E-mail: maurer@mpa-garching.mpg.de

  17. Measurement of the radiative lifetime of the 2s(2)2p(4) (1)S(0) metastable level of neon; a study of forbidden transitions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Adrian Nigel

    The radiative lifetime of the 2s22 p4 1S0 metastable level of Ne2+ (Ne III) has been measured to be 223 +/- 11 ms at the 90% confidence level by observing the photons emitted at 1815 Å (181.5 nm) by a decaying population of 1 S0 Ne2+ ions stored in a radio frequency ion trap. This thesis describes the first use of a method to account for any ions lost from the trap and determine the radiative lifetime. Metastable ions were produced by electron bombardment of Ne gas, and rate coefficients for Ne2+ + Ne collisions were also determined. The lifetime measurement is in good agreement with recent calculated values, and has a lower uncertainty than the calculated values. This is the first lifetime measurement for an excited term of a ground configuration ion in the second row of the periodic table. The transition probabilities (A-values) for the forbidden transitions in the ground configurations of these ions are required for astrophysical spectral line intensity ratio diagnostics. Using calculated branching ratios, we estimate that, at the 90% confidence level, A(3P1 - 1S0) = 1.94 +/- 0.17 s-1 for the forbidden line of Ne III at 1815 Å, and A(1D2 - 1S0) = 2.55 +/- 0.19 s-1 for the forbidden line of Ne III at 3344 Å.

  18. Core Petrophysical Services for IODP Mission Specific Platform Expeditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Louise; Davies, Sarah; Fehr, Annick; Inwood, Jennifer; Lofi, Johanna; Morgan, Sally

    2010-05-01

    Petrophysical and downhole logging services for Mission Specific Platform (MSP) Expeditions (310, 313 and 325) are provided by the European Petrophysics Consortium (EPC), part of the ECORD Science Operator (ESO). EPC comprises the universities of Leicester (lead), Montpellier and Aachen and has a 25 year involvement with ODP/IODP. The core petrophysical data is used in tandem with the downhole logging data (also provided by EPC) and other geological data to help identify key boundaries and trends in individual boreholes as well as allowing correlation between boreholes and formations. There are 2 phases of core petrophysical services provided by EPC. One set of measurements is taken during the offshore phase of the Expedition using a Geotek Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) provided by Leicester. The MSCL provides high resolution whole-core logging data including gamma density, P-wave velocity, non-contact resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, as well as temperature and core diameter. A second phase of measurement collection is conducted onshore prior to and during the Onshore Science Party (OSP) which is hosted by the University of Bremen. Measurements taken on whole cores prior to the OSP include natural gamma radiation (where appropriate (Exp. 302 and 313)) and discrete thermal conductivity. Once the cores are split, colour reflectance spectrophotometry and high resolution line scanning is undertaken. In addition, measurements on discrete samples from the cores are also conducted. These discrete measurements include p-wave velocity and moisture and density. Core petrophysical measurements for MSP expeditions are contracted to meet the IODP minimum measurement requirements as well as addressing the specific scientific objectives of an expedition where possible. These measurements are essential in helping provide a means of testing hypotheses and ground-truthing remotely acquired data.

  19. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (~100 M ⊙) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N2D+ (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N2D+ cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number mA ~ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ~60 M ⊙, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that mA ~= 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  20. Data interchange across cores of multi-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ehab S.

    2015-12-01

    A novel device for data interchange among space-division multiplexed cores inside MCF is demonstrated using numerical simulations. The device allows complete exchange of all WDM data channels between MCF cores in propagation direction whether the channels have the same or different sets of wavelengths. This is crucial in future MCF optical networks where in-fiber data interchange over space-division multiplexed cores can allow for a simple and fast data swapping among cores without a need for space-division demultiplexing to single-mode single-core fibers. The data core-interchange (DCI) device consists of a graded refractive-index rectangular waveguide enclosing the two interchanged cores in addition to the cladding region in between them. Both finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and eigenmode expansion (EME) simulations are performed to verify the device operation and characterize its performance. The simulations demonstrate that the DCI has a very short-length with polarization independent operation, and high performance over the broadband wavelength range S, C, L, and U bands. Moreover, the device shows a high coupling-factor of -0.13 dB with small cross-talk, back-reflection, and return-loss of -26.3, -46.1, and -48.8 dB, respectively.

  1. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  2. Reconnection of vorticity lines and magnetic lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and fluid vorticity share many features. First, as divergence-free vector fields they are conveniently visualized in terms of their field lines, curves that are everywhere tangent to the field. The lines indicate direction and their density indicates field strength. The question arises of the extent to which the evolution of the fields can be treated in terms of the evolution of their field lines. Newcomb (1958) derived the general conditions on the evolution of vector fields that permit the identification of field lines from one instant to the next. The equations of evolution of the vorticity field and the magnetic field fall within Newcomb's analysis. The dynamics of the flows differ between these two systems, so that geometrically similar phenomena happen in different ways in the two systems. In this paper the geometrical similarities are emphasized. Reconnection will be defined here as evolution in which it is not possible to preserve the global identification of some field lines. There is a close relation between reconnection and the topology of the vector field lines. Nontrivial topology occurs where the field has null points or there are field lines that are closed loops.

  3. Effects of magnetomechanical vibrations and bending stresses on three-phase three-leg transformers with amorphous cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang-Hung; Chang, Yeong-Hwa; Lee, Chun-Yao; Yao, Chia-Shiang; He, Yan-Lou; Chu, Huei-Lung; Chang, Chia-Wen; Chan, Wei-Shou

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the influence of bending stresses on the magnetic characteristics of three-phase transformers with amorphous cores. Different types of core structures, including C-cores and toroidal cores, and their magnetic properties are compared using VSM and XRD. The losses in the magnetic core of the three-phase transformer are analyzed using the finite element analysis for both design and measurement. In addition, experimental results indicated that amorphous-core transformers with rectangular corners had higher audible noise and vibration intensities. This is because the condensed distribution of magnetic flux lines in the corners of the core may create high magnetic inductions associated with high magnetostriction. Finally, experiments with three-phase amorphous-core transformers were performed to study the effects of magnetism and magnetostriction on their performance in terms of core loss, vibration, and audible noise.

  4. Enhanced oil recovery. Improved reservoir evaluation object of sponge coring process

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1981-04-01

    Oil saturation data determined by core analysis have improved. One result is the development of the sponge coring process. In the sponge coring method, the core sample is taken in much the same way as in conventional coring. The major difference is the porous, hard sponge that lines the core barrel. The sponge is so porous (approximately 80%) that cigarette smoke can be blown through it. It has one full darcy permeability and is oil-wet. The sponge is inside a thin polyvinyl chloride liner with small perforations in it. As the sponge core barrel is run into the hole, the sponge becomes wet with drilling fluid, usually water. Any oil in the core being forced out by the water and the reduction in pressure as the core is brought to surface is caught by the sponge. Since it is oil-wet the oil is retained. But water is forced out the small perforations in the liner. At the surface the 20-ft core is cut into 5-ft sections and put into special containers filled with fluid from the formation. That keeps the core in standard condition. Even much of the gas in solution remains in the core. This is noted during capping operations as the cap is forced back until the glue on it holds and seals the tube.

  5. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    DOEpatents

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  6. Is iron at the Earth's core conditions hcp-structured?

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Prakapenka, V

    2012-02-07

    Iron is the main component of the Earth's core and its structure and properties are important for interpretation of geophysical observations and modeling dynamics of the core. We argue that the diffraction lines in the high temperature high pressure X-ray diffraction pattern, presented by Tateno et al., 2010 and interpreted as those of solely hot hcp-Fe, correspond indeed to the insufficiently heated part of the sample. We show that observed diffraction spots are either due to bcc-Fe or carbides.

  7. A 'similarity' solution for laminar swirling core flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D. G.

    1984-05-01

    The far downstream region of laminar core flows with weak, strong, or very strong swirl embedded in a uniform parallel following stream is investigated analytically. Linearized similarity solutions based on the small-axial-disturbance-velocity assumption of Oseen are obtained using methods similar to those employed by Batchelor (1964) for strong trailing vortices. Strong swirl is shown to reduce axial velocity on and near the core axis, with two reversals as distance from the axis increases. Very strong swirl (a momentumless jet) is associated with an axial velocity profile having its maximum off the center line.

  8. Firing up the front line.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Santamaria, J A

    1999-01-01

    For many organizations, achieving competitive advantage means eliciting superior performance from employees on the front line--the burger flippers, hotel room cleaners, and baggage handlers whose work has an enormous effect on customers. That's no easy task. Front line workers are paid low wages, have scant hope of advancement, and--not surprisingly--often care little about the company's performance. But then how do some companies succeed in engaging the emotional energy of rank-and-file workers? A team of researchers at McKinsey & Company and the Conference Board recently explored that question and discovered that one highly effective route is demonstrated by the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines' approach to motivation follows the "mission, values, and pride" path, which researchers say is practical and relevant for the business world. More specifically, the authors say the Marines follow five practices: they over-invest in cultivating core value; prepare every person to lead, including front line supervisors; learn when to create teams and when to create single-leader work groups; attend to all employees, not just the top half; and encourage self-discipline as a way of building pride. The authors admit there are critical differences between the Marines and most businesses. But using vivid examples from companies such as KFC and Marriott International, the authors illustrate how the Marines' approach can be translated for corporate use. Sometimes, the authors maintain, minor changes in a company's standard operating procedure can have a powerful effect on front line pride and can result in substantial payoffs in company performance.

  9. Refined genetic mapping of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP18 reduces the critical region to 2 cM between D1S442 and D1S2858 on chromosome 1q.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1998-04-01

    Linkage analysis was performed on a large Danish family to refine the position of RP18, the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, mapped previously between D1S534 and D1S305 in chromosome 1p13-q21. We genotyped the family members for five microsatellite-type DNA polymorphisms and mapped RP18 between D1S422 and D1S2858 to a region of less than 2 cM. No obvious candidate gene has yet been assigned to the chromosomal interval defined here.

  10. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  11. An Energy-Stabilized Varied-Line-Space-Monochromator UndulatorBeam Line for PEEM Illumination and Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; McKinney, Wayne; Domning, Ed; Doran, Andrew; Padmore, Howard

    2006-06-01

    A new undulator beam line has been built and commissioned at the Advanced Light Source for illumination of the PEEM3 microscope. The beam line delivers high flux beams over an energy range from C1s through the transition metals to include the M edges of the magnetic rare earth elements. We present details of the optical design, and data on the performance of the zero-order tracking of the photon energy.

  12. Multifrequency studies of massive cores with complex spatial and kinematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, L. E.; Shul'ga, V. M.; Zinchenko, I. I.; Zemlyanukha, P. M.; Patoka, A. N.; Tomasson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Five regions of massive-star formation have been observed in various molecular lines in the frequency range˜85-89 GHz. The studied regions comprise dense cores, which host young stellar objects. The physical parameters of the cores are estimated, including the kinetic temperatures (˜20-40 K), the sizes of the emitting regions (˜0.1-0.6 pc), and the virial masses (˜40-500 M ⊙). The column densities and abundances of various molecules are calculated assuming Local Thermodynamical Equilibrium(LTE). The core in 99.982+4.17, which is associated with the weakest IRAS source, is characterized by reduced molecular abundances. The molecular line widths decrease with increasing distance from the core centers ( b). For b ≳ 0.1 pc, the dependences Δ V ( b) are close to power laws (∝ b - p ), where p varies from ~0.2 to ~0.5, depending on the object. In four cores, the asymmetries of the optically thick HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) lines indicates systematicmotions along the line of sight: collapse in two cores and expansion in two others. Approximate estimates of the accretion rates in the collapsing cores indicate that the forming stars have masses exceeding the solar mass.

  13. Dynamics of the core, geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.

    1995-07-01

    "The mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field remains one of the central unsolved problems in geoscience." So states the report on the National Geomagnetic Initiative (NGI) prepared by the U.S. Geodynamics Committee, et al [1993], with advice from the NGI Workshop held in Washington D.C. in March 1992. All analyses of the geomagnetic data point to the core as containing the source of the field and "The basic premise that virtually everyone accepts is that the Earth's magnetism is created by a self-sustaining dynamo driven by fluid motions in Earth's core" (NGI, p.135). Dynamical questions at once arise, such as "What is the energy source driving those motions?" Jacobs [1953] proposed that the solid inner core (SIC) is the result of the freezing of the fluid outer core (FOC). Verhoogen [1961] noticed that the release of latent heat at the inner core boundary (ICB) during freezing would help drive thermal convection in the FOC, and Braginsky [1963] pointed out that the release of the light alloying elements during fractionation at the ICB would provide compositional buoyancy. These two sources suffice to supply the geodynamo with energy throughout geological time, even in the absence of dissolved radioactivity in the core [Braginsky and Roberts, 1994a; Kuang et al, 1994]. Stevenson [1991] argues that potential differences on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) of electrochemical origin may be partially responsible for the geomagnetic field.

  14. Simplified cut core inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    Although filter inductor designers have routinely tended to specify molypermalloy powder cores for use in high frequency power converters and pulse-width modulated switching regulators, there are sigificant advantages in specifying C cores and cut toroids fabricated from grain oriented silicon steels which should not be overlooked. Such steel cores can develop flux densities of 1.6 tesla, with useful linearity to 1.2 tesla, whereas molypermalloy cores carrying d.c. current have useful flux density capabilities only to about 0.3 tesla. The use of silicon steel cores thus makes it possible to design more compact cores, and therefore inductors of reduced volume, or conversely to provide greater load capacity in inductors of a given volume. Information is available which makes it possible to obtain quick and close approximations of significant parameters such as size, weight and temperature rise for silicon steel cores for breadboarding. Graphs, nomographs and tables are presented for this purpose, but more complete mathematical derivations of some of the important parameters are also included for a more rigorous treatment.

  15. The Transition from Hot Cores to Ultracompact HII Regions: Results of Centim eter and Millimeter Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, S.; Carral, P.; Shepherd, D.; Hofner, P.; Rodriguez, L. F.

    1998-11-01

    We present the results of continuum, molecular line, and radio recombination line studies of massive star-forming regions made with the VLA and OVRO interferometers. We discuss the results in terms of the early development of massive stars, in particular the hot core and ultracompact HII region phases, and the possible transition from one phase to the other.

  16. Core physics analysis of 100% MOX Core in IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschini, F.; Petrovic, B.

    2006-07-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced small-to-medium-size (1000 MWt) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), targeting deployment around 2015. Its reference core design is based on the current Westinghouse UO{sub 2} fuel with less than 5% {sup 235}U, and the analysis has been previously completed confirming good performance. The full MOX fuel core is currently under evaluation as one of the alternatives for the second wave of IRIS reactors. A full 3-D neutronic analysis has been performed to examine main core performance parameters, such as critical boron concentration, peaking factors, discharge burnup, etc. The enhanced moderation of the IRIS fuel lattice facilitates MOX core design, and all the obtained results are within the requirements, confirming viability of this option from the reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

  17. Core Exercises: Why You Should Strengthen Your Core Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read on to find out why. Core exercises train the muscles in your pelvis, lower back, hips ... manner that involves maintaining a stable trunk can train and strengthen several of your muscles, including your ...

  18. Atomistic calculations of dislocation core energy in aluminium

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, X. W.; Sills, R. B.; Ward, D. K.; ...

    2017-02-16

    A robust molecular dynamics simulation method for calculating dislocation core energies has been developed. This method has unique advantages: it does not require artificial boundary conditions, is applicable for mixed dislocations, and can yield highly converged results regardless of the atomistic system size. Utilizing a high-fidelity bond order potential, we have applied this method in aluminium to calculate the dislocation core energy as a function of the angle β between the dislocation line and Burgers vector. These calculations show that, for the face-centred-cubic aluminium explored, the dislocation core energy follows the same functional dependence on β as the dislocation elasticmore » energy: Ec = A·sin2β + B·cos2β, and this dependence is independent of temperature between 100 and 300 K. By further analysing the energetics of an extended dislocation core, we elucidate the relationship between the core energy and radius of a perfect versus extended dislocation. With our methodology, the dislocation core energy can be accurately accounted for in models of plastic deformation.« less

  19. On the 1s24d Fine Structures of B III and Ne VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiwen; Z, W. Wang; Kwong, T. Chung; Zhu, Xiaowei

    1995-01-01

    The fine structure of lithium-like 1s24d states in the literature behaves irregularly as a function of Z. The fine structures of the B III and Ne VIII fall well below the isoelectronic curve. The term energies of these two systems in the data tables also give worse agreement with the theoretical prediction. In this work, we show that the reason for this unusual situation is caused by a misidentification in the original spectra. When the correct identifications are made, the fine structures of both systems fall on the isoelectronic curve and the agreement between theory and experiment is excellent.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Hydrogen-Deuterium 1S-2S Isotope Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Parthey, Christian G.; Matveev, Arthur; Alnis, Janis; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Kolachevsky, Nikolai; Haensch, Theodor W.; Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2010-06-11

    Measuring the hydrogen-deuterium isotope shift via two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition, we obtain 670 994 334 606(15) Hz. This is a 10-times improvement over the previous best measurement [A. Huber et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 468 (1998)] confirming its frequency value. A calculation of the difference of the mean square charge radii of deuterium and hydrogen results in {sub d}-{sub p}=3.820 07(65) fm{sup 2}, a more than twofold improvement compared to the former value.

  1. Optical 1's and 2's complement devices using lithium-niobate-based waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Amrindra; Kumar, Santosh; Sharma, Sandeep

    2016-12-01

    Optical 1's and 2's complement devices are proposed with the help of lithium-niobate-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers. It has a powerful capability of switching an optical signal from one port to the other port with the help of an electrical control signal. The paper includes the optical conversion scheme using sets of optical switches. 2's complement is common in computer systems and is used in binary subtraction and logical manipulation. The operation of the circuits is studied theoretically and analyzed through numerical simulations. The truth table of these complement methods is verified with the beam propagation method and MATLAB® simulation results.

  2. Scattering of H(1s) off metastable helium atom at thermal energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-06-15

    Quantal calculations for scattering of ground-state antihydrogen by metastable (n=2S) helium atoms have been performed using the nonadiabatic, atomic orbital expansion technique at thermal energies. The zero-energy elastic cross sections of the present systems are much greater than the corresponding value for the ground-state helium target. The low-energy elastic cross section for the singlet metastable helium [He(2 {sup 1}S)] target is higher than the corresponding value when the target is in the metastable triplet state [He(2 {sup 3}S)].

  3. Search for very light CP-odd Higgs Boson in radiative decays of Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M

    2008-10-10

    We search for a non-SM-like CP-odd Higgs boson (a(1)(0)) decaying to tau(+)tau(-) or mu(+)mu(-) in radiative decays of the Upsilon(1S). No significant signal is found, and upper limits on the product branching ratios are set. Our tau(+)tau(-) results are almost 2 orders of magnitude more stringent than previous upper limits. Our data provide no evidence for a Higgs state with a mass of 214 MeV decaying to mu(+)mu(-), previously proposed as an explanation for 3 Sigma(+)-->pmu(+)mu(-) events observed by the HyperCP experiment. Our results constrain NMSSM models.

  4. Experimental considerations for testing antimatter antigravity using positronium 1S-2S spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D. A.; Friedreich, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution to the WAG 2013 workshop we report on the status of our measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency of positronium. The aim of this experiment is to reach a precision of 0.5 ppb in order to cross check the QED calculations. After reviewing the current available sources of Ps, we consider laser cooling as a route to push the precision in the measurement down to 0.1 ppb. If such an uncertainty could be achieved, this would be sensitive to the gravitational redshift and therefore be able to assess the sign of gravity for antimatter.

  5. Ultrafast Dynamics in Postcollision Interaction after Multiple Auger Decays in Argon 1s Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, R.; Sheinerman, S.; Bomme, C.; Journel, L.; Marin, T.; Marchenko, T.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Trcera, N.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.

    2012-07-01

    Argon 1s photoionization followed by multiple Auger decays is investigated both experimentally, by means of photoelectron-ion coincidences, and theoretically. A strong influence of the different Auger decays on the photoelectron spectra is observed through postcollision interaction which shifts the maximum of the energy distribution and distorts the spectral shape. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectra for selected Arn+ ions (n=1-5) allows one to estimate the widths (lifetimes) of the intermediate states for each specific decay pathway.

  6. Feasibility of coherent xuv spectroscopy on the 1S-2S transition in singly ionized helium

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, M.; Saathoff, G.; Gohle, C.; Ozawa, A.; Batteiger, V.; Knuenz, S.; Kolachevsky, N.; Udem, Th.; Haas, M.; Jentschura, U. D.; Kottmann, F.; Leibfried, D.; Schuessler, H. A.; Haensch, T. W.

    2009-05-15

    The 1S-2S two-photon transition in singly ionized helium is a highly interesting candidate for precision tests of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED). With the recent advent of extreme ultraviolet frequency combs, highly coherent quasi-continuous-wave light sources at 61 nm have become available, and precision spectroscopy of this transition now comes into reach for the first time. We discuss quantitatively the feasibility of such an experiment by analyzing excitation and ionization rates, propose an experimental scheme, and explore the potential for QED tests.

  7. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in the 1S0 partial wave in the modified Weinberg approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, A. M.; Epelbaum, E.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.

    2016-03-01

    Nucleon-nucleon scattering in the 1S0 partial wave is considered in chiral effective field theory within the recently suggested renormalizable formulation based on the Kadyshevsky equation. Contact interactions are taken into account beyond the leading-order approximation. The subleading contact terms are included non-perturbatively by means of subtractive renormalization. The dependence of the phase shifts on the choice of the renormalization condition is discussed. Perturbative inclusion of the subleading contact interaction is found to be justified only very close to threshold. The low-energy theorems are reproduced significantly better compared with the leading order results.

  8. Preparation and immunogenicity of vaccine Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC towards the prevention of herpes genitalis.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G R; Woodman, C B; Hartley, C E; Buchan, A; Fuller, A; Durham, J; Synnott, M; Clay, J C; Melling, J; Wiblin, C; Wilkins, J

    1982-01-01

    A subunit antigenoid vaccine, Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC, was used to prevent primary herpes genitalis in 60 subjects considered to be at risk of this infection. There was no evidence of serious local or general side effects. Neutralising antibody responses were detected in 59% and 90% of subjects receiving the low and high doses of vaccine respectively; immunoprecipitating antibody was detected at a lower frequency, namely in 23% and 43% of subjects receiving the low and high doses respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 18 months none of the vaccinated subjects contracted herpes genitalis after completing the vaccination course. Images PMID:6293640

  9. Preparation and immunogenicity of vaccine Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC towards the prevention of herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Woodman, C B; Hartley, C E; Buchan, A; Fuller, A; Durham, J; Synnott, M; Clay, J C; Melling, J; Wiblin, C; Wilkins, J

    1982-12-01

    A subunit antigenoid vaccine, Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC, was used to prevent primary herpes genitalis in 60 subjects considered to be at risk of this infection. There was no evidence of serious local or general side effects. Neutralising antibody responses were detected in 59% and 90% of subjects receiving the low and high doses of vaccine respectively; immunoprecipitating antibody was detected at a lower frequency, namely in 23% and 43% of subjects receiving the low and high doses respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 18 months none of the vaccinated subjects contracted herpes genitalis after completing the vaccination course.

  10. Observation of the 1S0 to 3D1 clock transition in 175Lu+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K. J.; Kaewuam, R.; Roy, A.; Paez, E.; Wang, S.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    We report direct laser spectroscopy of the 1S0 to 3D1 highly-forbidden M1 clock transition in 175Lu+ . Clock operation is demonstrated on three pairs of Zeeman transitions, one pair from each hyperfine manifold of the 3D1 term. We measure the hyperfine intervals of the 3D1 to 10 ppb uncertainty and infer the optical frequency averaged over the three hyperfine transitions to be 353.639 915 952 2 (6 ) THz. The lifetime of the 3D1 state is inferred to be 174-32+23 hours from the M1 coupling strength.

  11. XPS spectra of uranyl minerals and synthetic uranyl compounds. II: The O 1s spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, M.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Freund, M. S.; Burns, P. C.

    2009-05-01

    The O 1s spectrum is examined for 19 uranyl minerals of different composition and structure. Spectra from single crystals were measured with a Kratos Axis Ultra X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer with a magnetic-confinement charge-compensation system. Well-resolved spectra with distinct maxima, shoulders and inflections points, in combination with reported and measured binding energies for specific O 2- species and structural data of the uranyl minerals are used to resolve the fine structure of the O 1s envelope. The resolution of the O 1s spectra includes, for the first time, different O 2- bands, which are assigned to O atoms linking uranyl with uranyl polyhedra ( Usbnd Osbnd U) and O atoms of uranyl groups ( Odbnd Udbnd O). The resolved bands in the O 1s spectrum occur at distinct ranges in binding energy: bands for ( Usbnd Osbnd U) occur at 529.6-530.4 eV, bands for ( Odbnd Udbnd O) occur at 530.6-531.4 eV, bands for O 2- in the equatorial plane of the uranyl polyhedra linking uranyl polyhedra with ( TO n) groups ( T = Si, S, C, P, Se) ( Tsbnd O) occur at 530.9-532.2 eV; bands for (OH) groups in the equatorial plane of the uranyl polyhedra ( OH) occur at 532.0-532.5 eV, bands of (H 2O) groups in the interstitial complex of the uranyl minerals ( H2O interst) occur at 533.0-533.8 eV and bands of physisorbed (H 2O) groups on the surface of uranyl minerals ( H2O adsorb) occur at 534.8-535.2 eV. Treatment of uranyl minerals with acidic solutions results in a decrease in Usbnd Osbnd U and an increase in OH. Differences in the ratio of OH : Odbnd Udbnd O between the surface and bulk structure is larger for uranyl minerals with a high number of Usbnd Osbnd U and Tsbnd O species in the bulk structure which is explained by protonation of underbonded Usbnd O, Usbnd Osbnd U and Tsbnd O terminations on the surface. The difference in the ratio of H2O interst : Odbnd Udbnd O between the bulk and surface structures is larger for uranyl minerals with higher percentages of H2O

  12. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  13. Surface-core fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Jonas H.; Oliveira, Ricardo; Mosquera, L.; Franco, Marcos A. R.; Heidarialamdarloo, Jamshid; Bilro, Lúcia; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the induction of long-period and Bragg gratings on surface-core optical fibers. Surface-core fibers described herein were fabricated from commercial silica tubes and germanium-doped silica rods by employing a very simple procedure. Being the core on the fiber surface, it can be sensitive to refractive index variations in the environment in which the fiber is immersed. Thus, results concerning the sensitivity of these gratings to environmental refractive index variations are presented. Besides, simulation data are presented for comparison to the experimental behavior and for projecting future steps in this research.

  14. Zooming in on the peculiar radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy, J1100+4421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabányu, K. É.; Frey, S.; Paragi, Z.; Tar, I.; An, T.; Tanaka, M.; Morokuma, T.

    2016-08-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) are interesting subsamples of active galactic nuclei, which are typically thought to contain a relatively smaller supermassive black holes (10^6-10^8 solar masses) and show quite high accretion rate. Only 7% of them are detected in radio. The radio structure of the objects in the extremely radio-loud NLS1 subsample indicates the presence of relativistically beamed jets. Some radio-loud NLS1s were detected even at high energies with the Fermi Large Array Telescope. Therefore these sources are often suggested to be the low-luminosity and younger counterparts of blazars. SDSS J110006.07+442144.3 was identified as an NLS1 at z=0.84 after its dramatic optical brightening discovered by Tanaka et al. (2014) Our dual-frequency (1.6 and 5 GHz) European VLBI Network observations taken one year after this event show a compact structre with brightness temperature of 6 x 10^9 K and a flat spectral index indicating the presence of a compact synchrotron self-absorbed core. Compared with low resolution VLA-FIRST data, the large-scale structure seen there is resolved out in the EVN observation. However the recovered flux density in our L-band EVN observation is significantly higher than the FIRST flux density, which is indicative of brightening in the radio regime. All these results fit into the picture where radio-loud NLS1s are described as faint blazars.

  15. Characterizing Facesheet/Core Disbonding in Honeycomb Core Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, Martin; Ratcliffe, James G.; Adams, Daniel O.; Krueger, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation into facesheet core disbonding in carbon fiber reinforced plastic/Nomex honeycomb sandwich structures using a Single Cantilever Beam test. Specimens with three, six and twelve-ply facesheets were tested. Specimens with different honeycomb cores consisting of four different cell sizes were also tested, in addition to specimens with three different widths. Three different data reduction methods were employed for computing apparent fracture toughness values from the test data, namely an area method, a compliance calibration technique and a modified beam theory method. The compliance calibration and modified beam theory approaches yielded comparable apparent fracture toughness values, which were generally lower than those computed using the area method. Disbonding in the three-ply facesheet specimens took place at the facesheet/core interface and yielded the lowest apparent fracture toughness values. Disbonding in the six and twelve-ply facesheet specimens took place within the core, near to the facesheet/core interface. Specimen width was not found to have a significant effect on apparent fracture toughness. The amount of scatter in the apparent fracture toughness data was found to increase with honeycomb core cell size.

  16. Expression studies of the HCV-1a core+1 open reading frame in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vassilaki, Niki; Boleti, Haralabia; Mavromara, Penelope

    2008-05-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome possesses an open reading frame overlapping the core gene in the +1 frame (core+1 ORF). Initial studies, mainly in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, indicated that the HCV-1 core+1 ORF is expressed by a -2/+1 frameshift at codons 8-11 during translation elongation of the viral polyprotein, resulting in a protein known as alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), frameshift (F), or core+1. However, subsequent investigation, based on reporter constructs carrying portions of the core+1 ORF, suggested the function of alternative mechanisms for core+1 expression in mammalian cells, including translation initiation from internal codons 85/87 or 26. Because results from these studies have been variable, we sought to re-evaluate expression of the core+1 ORF using constructs carrying the complete core+1 coding sequence fused to GFP or LUC. We showed here that codons 85/87 serve as the predominant initiation sites for internal translation initiation of core+1 ORF in Huh-7 and Huh-7/T7 mammalian cells, which support nuclear or cytoplasmic transcription, respectively. We also showed that internal translation initiation can occur concomitantly with the expression of the core+1/F protein that is produced artificially in Huh-7 or naturally in Huh-7/T7 cells. Furthermore, translation of core+1 ORF is not significantly affected by the presence of the HCV IRES element. The core+1/S-GFP protein is cytoplasmic and exhibits an ER distribution similar to that of the core+1/F-GFP protein.

  17. [PCR-based analysis of the D1S80 locus and its application in paternity test].

    PubMed

    Que, T; Lin, Y; Li, L

    1998-01-01

    Allelic data for the D1S80 locus was obtained by using the PCR and subsequent analysis with high-resolution horizontal PAGE technique. In a sample of 184 unrelated Chinese, the D1S80 locus had 75 phenotypes and 20 allelic. The distribution of genotype was in agreement with expected values according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Analysis of the D1S80 locus by the PCR has been successfully applied in 150 cases of questioned paternity.

  18. Sterol-dependent nuclear import of ORP1S promotes LXR regulated trans-activation of apoE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G.W.; Michaely, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S translocates to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S are LXR agonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S binds to LXRs, enhances binding of LXRs to LXREs and promotes LXR-dependent transcription of apoE.

  19. Assessing Core Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  20. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  1. Method for estimating ionicities of oxides using O1s photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D. Qi, W. H.; Xue, L. C.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.; Li, Y. C.; Li, S. Q.

    2015-09-15

    The average valence, V{sub alO}, of the oxygen anions in the perovskite oxide BaTiO{sub 3}, was found using O1s photoelectron spectra to be −1.55. This experimental result is close to the theoretical value for BaTiO{sub 3} (−1.63) calculated by Cohen [Nature 358, 136 (1992)] using density functional theory. Using the same approach, we obtained values of V{sub alO} for several monoxides, and investigated the dependence of V{sub alO} and the ionicity on the second ionization energy, V(M{sup 2+}), of the metal cation. We found that the dependence of the ionicity on V(M{sup 2+}) in this work is close to that reported by Phillips [Rev. Mod. Phys. 42, 317 (1970)]. We therefore suggest that O1s photoelectron spectrum measurements should be accepted as a general experimental method for estimating the ionicity and average valence of oxygen anions.

  2. Ionization and excitation in collisions between antiprotons and H(1s) atoms studied with Sturmian bases

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2011-02-15

    Coupled two-center as well as one-center Sturmian cross sections have been determined for ionization and excitation in p-bar-H(1s) collisions at p-bar energies from 1 to 16 000 keV, following the author's recent work for p-H(1s) collisions [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032701 (2009)]. Basis convergence is studied in detail. Results for ionization and excitation are compared to other coupled-state results and to numerical results, as well as limited experimental results for ionization only. Except for the large, two-center coupled-Gaussian-pseudostate calculation of Toshima for ionization only [Phys. Rev. A 64, 024701 (2001)], previous calculations employed one-center bases, including a one-center Sturmian calculation by Igarashi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 062712 (2000)]. A strong contrast with p-H collisions is confirmed at intermediate energies, while at high energies the extent of agreement is revealed between coupled-state results for the two collisional systems, as well as with first Born results.

  3. ATM and GLUT1-S490 Phosphorylation Regulate GLUT1 Mediated Transport in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Andrisse, Stanley; Patel, Gaytri D.; Chen, Joseph E.; Webber, Andrea M.; Spears, Larry D.; Koehler, Rikki M.; Robinson-Hill, Rona M.; Ching, James K.; Jeong, Imju; Fisher, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The glucose and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) transporter GLUT1 contains a phosphorylation site, S490, for ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). The objective of this study was to determine whether ATM and GLUT1-S490 regulate GLUT1. Research Design and Methods L6 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscles were used to study the effects of ATM inhibition, ATM activation, and S490 mutation on GLUT1 localization, trafficking, and transport activity. Results In myoblasts, inhibition of ATM significantly diminished cell surface GLUT1, glucose and DHA transport, GLUT1 externalization, and association of GLUT1 with Gα-interacting protein-interacting protein, C-terminus (GIPC1), which has been implicated in recycling of endosomal proteins. In contrast, ATM activation by doxorubicin (DXR) increased DHA transport, cell surface GLUT1, and the GLUT1/GIPC1 association. S490A mutation decreased glucose and DHA transport, cell surface GLUT1, and interaction of GLUT1 with GIPC1, while S490D mutation increased transport, cell surface GLUT1, and the GLUT1/GIPC1 interaction. ATM dysfunction or ATM inhibition reduced DHA transport in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles and decreased glucose transport in EDL and soleus. In contrast, DXR increased DHA transport in EDL. Conclusions These results provide evidence that ATM and GLUT1-S490 promote cell surface GLUT1 and GLUT1-mediated transport in skeletal muscle associated with upregulation of the GLUT1/GIPC1 interaction. PMID:23776597

  4. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  5. The ADNI PET Core: 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Landau, Susan M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Foster, Norman L.; Wang, Angela Y.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper reviews the work done in the ADNI PET core over the past 5 years, largely concerning techniques, methods, and results related to amyloid imaging in ADNI. METHODS The PET Core has utilized [18F]florbetapir routinely on ADNI participants, with over 1600 scans available for download. Four different laboratories are involved in data analysis, and have examined factors such as longitudinal florbetapir analysis, use of FDG-PET in clinical trials, and relationships between different biomarkers and cognition. RESULTS Converging evidence from the PET Core has indicated that cross-sectional and longitudinal florbetapir analyses require different reference regions. Studies have also examined the relationship between florbetapir data obtained immediately after injection, which reflects perfusion, and FDG-PET results. Finally, standardization has included the translation of florbetapir PET data to a centiloid scale. CONCLUSION The PET Core has demonstrated a variety of methods for standardization of biomarkers such as florbetapir PET in a multicenter setting. PMID:26194311

  6. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  7. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  8. Did Jupiter's core form in the innermost parts of the Sun's protoplanetary disc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean N.; Izidoro, Andre; Bitsch, Bertram; Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-05-01

    Jupiter's core is generally assumed to have formed beyond the snow line. Here we consider an alternative scenario that Jupiter's core may have accumulated in the innermost part of the protoplanetary disc. A growing body of research suggests that small particles (`pebbles') continually drift inward through the disc. If a fraction of drifting pebbles is trapped at the inner edge of the disc, several Earth-mass cores can quickly grow. Subsequently, the core may migrate outward beyond the snow line via planet-disc interactions. Of course, to reach the outer Solar system Jupiter's core must traverse the terrestrial planet-forming region. We use N-body simulations including synthetic forces from an underlying gaseous disc to study how the outward migration of Jupiter's core sculpts the terrestrial zone. If the outward migration is fast (τmig ˜ 104 yr), the core simply migrates past resident planetesimals and planetary embryos. However, if its migration is slower (τmig ˜ 105 yr) the core clears out solids in the inner disc by shepherding objects in mean motion resonances. In many cases, the disc interior to 0.5-1 AU is cleared of embryos and most planetesimals. By generating a mass deficit close to the Sun, the outward migration of Jupiter's core may thus explain the absence of terrestrial planets closer than Mercury. Jupiter's migrating core often stimulates the growth of another large (˜Earth-mass) core - that may provide a seed for Saturn's core - trapped in an exterior resonance. The migrating core also may transport a fraction of terrestrial planetesimals, such as the putative parent bodies of iron meteorites, to the asteroid belt.

  9. Thermal Evolution and Crystallisation Regimes of the Martian Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Pommier, A.

    2015-12-01

    Though it is accepted that Mars has a sulfur-rich metallic core, its chemical and physical state as well as its time-evolution are still unconstrained and debated. Several lines of evidence indicate that an internal magnetic field was once generated on Mars and that this field decayed around 3.7-4.0 Gyrs ago. The standard model assumes that this field was produced by a thermal (and perhaps chemical) dynamo operating in the Martian core. We use this information to construct parameterized models of the Martian dynamo in order to place constraints on the thermochemical evolution of the Martian core, with particular focus on its crystallization regime. Considered compositions are in the FeS system, with S content ranging from ~10 and 16 wt%. Core radius, density and CMB pressure are varied within the errors provided by recent internal structure models that satisfy the available geodetic constraints (planetary mass, moment of inertia and tidal Love number). We also vary the melting curve and adiabat, CMB heat flow and thermal conductivity. Successful models are those that match the dynamo cessation time and fall within the bounds on present-day CMB temperature. The resulting suite of over 500 models suggest three possible crystallization regimes: growth of a solid inner core starting at the center of the planet; freezing and precipitation of solid iron (Fe- snow) from the core-mantle boundary (CMB); and freezing that begins midway through the core. Our analysis focuses on the effects of core properties that are expected to be constrained during the forthcoming Insight mission.

  10. Multiple Sponsor Support for Core Facilities: Effective Communication and Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Colmenares, Clemencia

    2013-01-01

    The Lerner Research Institute's core services support all investigators at Cleveland Clinic, including a group of nearly 200 research faculty and their teams, as well as clinical research groups who need access to our centralized technologies. We offer approximately 20 different types of services and instruments ranging from preparation of media and cell lines to genomics and proteomics resources. Services are also available to the greater Cleveland scientific community, with selected cores open to “external” (i.e. non-Cleveland) users as long as capacity permits. Beyond the expected technical and scientific expertise, LRI researchers rely on the cores heavily for education and advice on emerging methodologies and research trends. Core structure is kept flexible by design; annual evaluations of the demand, cost-effectiveness, staffing, and customer satisfaction for each core guide decisions about continued operation or restructuring. The LRI cores are supported in part by the Cleveland Translational Science Collaborative, by the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, and by multiple PPGs to individual investigators. Resolution of differences in objectives, policies, direction, reporting, and allowable practices among funding sources requires constant, highly effective communication. To this end, we have found that a seemingly pedestrian approach – frequent meetings, scrupulous meeting attendance and insightful, diplomatic selection of meeting participants and agendas – when used consistently and inclusively, has proven effective in resolving most conflicts and generating compromises. In the best of cases, this enlightened cooperativity can result in development of services beyond the standard core fare, such as the development of a service to distribute highly purified, elutriated human peripheral blood cells, made possible by the Clinical Research Unit Core Laboratory in collaboration with 2 PPGs and with the TTR component of the CTSC. Management of ongoing

  11. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  12. Lunar magnetism. [primordial core model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown, for a very simple model of the moon, that the existence of a primordial core magnetic field would give rise to a present day nonzero dipole external field. In the investigation a uniformly magnetized core embedded in a permeable mantle is considered. The significance of the obtained results for the conclusions reported by Runcorn (1975) is discussed. Comments provided by Runcorn to the discussion are also presented.

  13. Nucleosynthesis in Asymmetric, Core-Collapse Supernovae of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Kotake, Kei

    We investigate nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of massive stars of 10.8-40M ȯ , based on 2D hydrodynamic simulations of the SN explosion. We follow long-term evolution of the explosion over 1 s after the core bounce, adopting a neutrino-core model, with which we evaluate the evolution of neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We adopt two sets of parameters for the core model; one results in early explosion of 0.2-0.4 s after the bounce and the other later explosion of 0.4-0.6 s. We then calculate abundance evolution of the SN ejecta through post-processing calculation using a large nuclear reaction network. We find that for both the early and later explosion cases, the explosion energy, Eexp, and ejected masses of 56Ni, 57Ni, and 44Ti strongly correlate with the compactness parameter at 2.5M ȯ . Only for the early explosion case, we well reproduce a correlation of the mass of 56Ni to Eexp observed in Type II-Plateau SNe and find two progenitors (˜ 20 and 25M ȯ ) whose Eexp, and the masses of 56Ni and 57Ni are comparable to those in SN1987A.

  14. Biaxial Nematic Phase in Model Bent-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (NU) and biaxial (NB) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-NB line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles.

  15. Precession of the lunar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wisdom, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Goldreich (Goldreich, P. [1967]. J. Geophys. Res. 72, 3135) showed that a lunar core of low viscosity would not precess with the mantle. We show that this is also the case for much of lunar history. But when the Moon was close to the Earth, the Moon's core was forced to follow closely the precessing mantle, in that the rotation axis of the core remained nearly aligned with the symmetry axis of the mantle. The transition from locked to unlocked core precession occurred between 26.0 and 29.0 Earth radii, thus it is likely that the lunar core did not follow the mantle during the Cassini transition. Dwyer and Stevenson (Dwyer, C.A., Stevenson, D.J. [2005]. An Early Nutation-Driven Lunar Dynamo. AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts GP42A-06) suggested that the lunar dynamo needs mechanical stirring to power it. The stirring is caused by the lack of locked precession of the lunar core. So, we do not expect a lunar dynamo powered by mechanical stirring when the Moon was closer to the Earth than 26.0-29.0 Earth radii. A lunar dynamo powered by mechanical stirring might have been strongest near the Cassini transition.

  16. Precession of the Lunar Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Wisdom, J.

    2011-10-01

    Goldreich [3] showed that a lunar core of low viscosity would not precess with the mantle. We show that this is also the case for much of lunar history. But when the Moon was close to the Earth the Moon's core was forced to follow closely the precessing mantle, in that the rotation axis of the core remained nearly aligned with the symmetry axis of the mantle. The transition from locked to unlocked core precession occurred between 26.0 and 29.0 Earth radii, thus it is likely that the lunar core did not follow the mantle during the Cassini transition. Dwyer and Stevenson [1] suggested that the lunar dynamo needs mechanical stirring to power it. The stirring is caused by the lack of locked precession of the lunar core. So, we do not expect a lunar dynamo powered by mechanical stirring when the Moon was closer to the Earth than 26.0 to 29.0 Earth radii. A lunar dynamo powered by mechanical stirring might have been strongest near the Cassini transition.

  17. Numerical studies of the margin of vortices with decaying cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G. C.; Ting, L.

    1986-01-01

    The merging of vortices to a single one is a canonical incompressible viscous flow problem. The merging process begins when the core sizes or the vortices are comparable to their distances and ends when the contour lines of constant vorticity lines are circularized around one center. Approximate solutions to this problem are constructed by adapting the asymptotic solutions for distinct vortices. For the early stage of merging, the next-order terms in the asymptotic solutions are added to the leading term. For the later stage of merging, the vorticity distribution is reinitialized by vortices with overlapping core structures guided by the 'rule of merging' and the velocity of the 'vortex centers' are then defined by a minimum principle. To show the accuracy of the approximate solution, it is compared with the finite-difference solution.

  18. Density of bound states in a vortex core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, U.

    1990-03-01

    The local density of states as derived from Kramer and Pesch's theory of bound states in a vortex core is compared with recent scanning-tunneling experiments. Effects of impurities and finite flux-line distance are approximately taken into account. In the isolated vortex regime one finds qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with all experimental data reported so far. The results depend sensitively on impurity content. A nonmonotonic behavior of the density of states as a function of the distance from the flux-line center is predicted. The unexpected properties of the density of states are discussed in terms of the direction-dependent single-particle excitations bound to the core.

  19. Monochromatic neutrino lines from sneutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara; Kulkarni, Suchita; Silk, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of observing monochromatic neutrino lines originating from annihilation of dark matter. We analyze several astrophysical sources with overdensities of dark matter that can amplify the signal. As a case study, we consider mixed left- and right-handed sneutrino dark matter. We demonstrate that in the physically viable region of the model, one can obtain a prominent monochromatic neutrino line. We propose a search strategy to observe these neutrino lines in future generations of neutrino telescopes that is especially sensitive to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We demonstrate that the presence of massive black holes in the cores of dwarfs as well as of more massive galaxies substantially boosts any putative signal. In particular, dark matter in dwarf galaxies spiked by an intermediate massive black hole provides a powerful means of probing low-annihilation cross sections well below 10-26 cm3 s-1 that are otherwise inaccessible by any future direct detection or collider experiment.

  20. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - X. A suggested evolutionary diagram for pre-stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R. J.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2011-10-01

    We propose an evolutionary path for pre-stellar cores on the radius-mass diagram, which is analogous to stellar evolutionary paths on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Using James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations of L1688 in the Ophiuchus star-forming complex, we analyse the HCO+ (J= 4 → 3) spectral line profiles of pre-stellar cores. We find that of the 58 cores observed, 14 show signs of infall in the form of a blue-asymmetric double-peaked line profile. These 14 cores all lie beyond the Jeans mass line for the region on a radius-mass plot. Furthermore, another 10 cores showing tentative signs of infall, in their spectral line profile shapes, appear on or just over the Jeans mass line. We therefore propose the manner in which a pre-stellar core evolves across this diagram. We hypothesize that a core is formed in the low-mass, low-radius region of the plot. It then accretes quasi-statically, increasing in both mass and radius. When it crosses the limit of gravitational instability, it begins to collapse, decreasing in radius, towards the region of the diagram where protostellar cores are seen.

  1. Bonding core mating surfaces improves transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Modifications to assembly procedures for C-core transformers virtually eliminates changes in core end gaps due to temperature cycling during impregnation and potting stages, thus stabilizing magnetization properties of core.

  2. Report on ICDP workshop CONOSC (COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhoff, Wim; Donders, Timme; Luthi, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ICDP workshop COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic focused on the scientific objectives and the technical aspects of drilling and sampling. Some 55 participants attended the meeting, ranging from climate scientists, drilling engineers, and geophysicists to stratigraphers and public outreach experts. Discussion on the proposed research sharpened the main research lines and led to working groups and the necessary technical details to compile a full proposal that was submitted in January 2016.

  3. Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies and the Evolution of Galaxies and Active Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita

    2000-01-01

    Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are intriguing due to their continuum as well as emission line properties. The observed peculiar properties of the NLS1s are believed to be due to accretion rate close to Eddington limit. As a consequence, for a given luminosity, NLS1s have smaller black hole (BH) masses compared to normal Seyfert galaxies. Here we argue that NLS1s might be Seyfert galaxies in their early stage of evolution and as such may be low redshift, low luminosity analogues of high redshift quasars. We propose that NLS1s may reside in rejuvenated, gas rich galaxies. The also argue in favor of collisional ionization for production of FeII in active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  4. Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

  5. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for K to Au including the outermost core orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.J.; Wadt, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio effective core potentials (ECP's) have been generated to replace the innermost core electron for third-row (K--Au), fourth-row (Rb--Ag), and fifth-row (Cs--Au) atoms. The outermost core orbitals: corresponding to the ns/sup 2/np/sup 6/ configuration for the three rows here: are not replaced by the ECP but are treated on an equal footing with the nd, (n+1)s and (n+1)p valence orbitals. These ECP's have been derived for use in molecular calculations where these outer core orbitals need to be treated explicitly rather than to be replaced by an ECP. The ECP's for the forth and fifth rows also incorporate the mass--velocity and Darwin relativistic effects into the potentials. Analytic fits to the potentials are presented for use in multicenter integral evaluation. Gaussian orbital valence basis sets are developed for the (3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, 4p), (4s, 4p, 4d, 5s, 5p), and (5s, 5p, 5d, 6s, 6p) ortibals of the three respective rows.

  6. Bond breaking, electron pushing, and proton pulling: active and passive roles in the interaction between aqueous ions and water as manifested in the O 1s Auger decay.

    PubMed

    Pokapanich, W; Ottosson, N; Svensson, S; Ohrwall, G; Winter, B; Björneholm, O

    2012-01-12

    A core-ionized H(2)O molecule in liquid water primarily relaxes through normal Auger decay, leading to a two-hole final state in which both valence holes are localized on the same water molecule. Electronic coupling to the environment, however, allows for alternative decays resembling Intermolecular Coulombic Decay (ICD), producing final states with one of the holes delocalized on a neighboring water molecule. Here we present an experimental study of such minority processes, which adds to our understanding of dynamic interactions of electronically excited H(2)O molecules with their local surrounding in liquid water and aqueous solution. We show that the solvation of metal-halide salts considerably influences these minority decay channels from the water O 1s(-1) state. By breaking water-water bonds, both the metal cations and halide anions are found to reduce the decay into water-water delocalized states, thus having a ″passive″ effect on the Auger spectrum. The halide anions also play an ″active″ role by opening a new ICD-like decay pathway into water-halide delocalized states. The importance of this contribution increases from F(-) to I(-), which we suggest to be caused by a directional polarization of the halide anion toward the core-ionized H(2)O(+) cation in the intermediate state of the Auger process. This increases the electronic overlap between the two centers and makes delocalized decays more probable. We furthermore show that F(-), the smallest and most strongly hydrated of the halides, plays an additional role as proton puller during the core-hole lifetime, resulting in proton dynamics on the low femtosecond time scale. Our results represent a step forward toward a better understanding of how aqueous solutions, when exposed to soft X-rays, channel excess energy. This has implications for several aspects of physical and radiation chemistry, as well as biology.

  7. 10 kHz accuracy of an optical frequency reference based on (12)C2H2-filled large-core kagome photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Kevin; Wu, Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Tillman, Karl A; Light, Philip S; Couny, Francois; Wheeler, Natalie; Thapa, Rajesh; Jones, Andrew M; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2009-08-31

    Saturated absorption spectroscopy reveals the narrowest features so far in molecular gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The 48-68 mum core diameter of the kagome-structured fiber used here allows for 8 MHz full-width half-maximum sub-Doppler features, and its wavelength-insensitive transmission is suitable for high-accuracy frequency measurements. A fiber laser is locked to the (12)C2H2 nu(1); + nu(3) P(13) transition inside kagome fiber, and compared with frequency combs based on both a carbon nanotube fiber laser and a Cr:forsterite laser, each of which are referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator. The absolute frequency of the measured line center agrees with those measured in power build-up cavities to within 9.3 kHz (1 sigma error), and the fractional frequency instability is less than 1.2 x 10(-11) at 1 s averaging time.

  8. Observation of the 1S0-3P0 transition in atomic ytterbium for optical clocks and qubit arrays.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Cramer, Claire; Cook, Eryn; Nagourney, Warren; Fortson, E N

    2005-10-01

    We report an observation of the weak 6 1S0-6 3P0 transition in (171,173)Yb as an important step to establishing Yb as a primary candidate for future optical frequency standards, and to open up a new approach for qubits using the 1S0 and 3P0 states of Yb atoms in an optical lattice.

  9. 75 FR 27411 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca Arriel 1B, 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... (that incorporate Turbomeca Modification (mod) TU 148), Arriel 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. That AD also requires initial and repetitive replacements of 2nd stage... incorporate mod TU 148), 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. We...

  10. Visible and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Seyfert 1 and Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Pastoriza, Miriani G.; Donzelli, Carlos J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies the continuum and emission-line properties of a sample composed of 16 normal Seyfert 1 and seven narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies using optical and near-IR CCD spectroscopy. The continuum emission of the galaxies can be described in terms of a combination of stellar population, a nonstellar continuum of power-law form, and Fe II emission. A significative difference in the optical spectral index between NLS1's and normal Seyfert 1's is observed; the latter is steeper. Most NLS1's show Fe II/Hβ ratios larger than those observed in the other Seyfert 1's. In the IRAS band, both groups of galaxies have very similar properties. We have searched for the presence of optically thin gas in the broad-line region (BLR) of the galaxies by comparing the broad O I λ8446 and Hα emission-line profiles. Our analysis show that in the NLS1's, both profiles are similar in shape and width. This result contradicts the hypothesis of thin gas emission in the high-velocity part of the BLR to explain the ``narrowness'' of broad optical permitted lines in these objects. Evidence of narrow O I λ8446 emission is found in six galaxies of our sample, implying that this line is not restricted to a pure BLR phenomenon. In the narrow-line region, we find similar luminosities in the permitted and high-ionization lines of NLS1's and normal Seyfert 1's. However, low-ionization lines such as [O I] λ6300, [O II] λ3727, and [S II] λλ6717, 6731 are intrinsically less luminous in NLS1's. Physical properties derived from density- and temperature-sensitive line ratios suggest that the [O II] and [S II] emitting zones are overlapping in normal Seyfert 1's and separated in NLS1's. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO) is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juán.

  11. Dynamic Cores in Hydrostatic Disguise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Klessen, Ralf S.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2003-07-01

    We discuss the column density profiles of ``cores'' in three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds. The SPH scheme allows us to perform a high spatial resolution analysis of the density maxima (cores) at scales between ~0.003 and 0.3 pc. We analyze simulations in three different physical conditions: large-scale driving (LSD), small-scale driving (SSD), and random Gaussian initial conditions without driving (GC), each one at two different time steps: just before self-gravity is turned on (t0) and when gravity has been operating such that 5% of the total mass in the box has been accreted into cores (t1). For this data set, we perform Bonnor-Ebert fits to the column density profiles of cores found by a clump-finding algorithm. We find that, for the particular fitting procedure we use, 65% of the cores can be matched to Bonnor-Ebert (BE) profiles, and of these, 47% correspond to stable equilibrium configurations with ξmax<6.5, even though the cores analyzed in the simulations are not in equilibrium but instead are dynamically evolving. The temperatures obtained with the fitting procedure vary between 5 and 60 K (in spite of the simulations being isothermal, with T=11.3 K), with the peak of the distribution being at T=11 K and most clumps having fitted temperatures between 5 and 30 K. Central densities obtained with the BE fit tend to be smaller than the actual central densities of the cores. We also find that for the LSD and GC cases, there are more BE-like cores at t0 than at t1 with ξmax<=20, while in the case of SSD, there are more such cores at t1 than at t0. We interpret this as a consequence of the stronger turbulence present in the cores of run SSD, which prevents good BE fits in the absence of gravity, and delays collapse in its presence. Finally, in some cases we find substantial superposition effects when we analyze the projection of the density structures, even though the scales over which we

  12. 38 CFR 0.601 - Core Values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Core Values. VA's Core Values define VA employees. They describe the organization's culture and... their individual responsibilities and organizational responsibilities. (c) Advocacy. VA employees...

  13. 38 CFR 0.601 - Core Values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Core Values. VA's Core Values define VA employees. They describe the organization's culture and... their individual responsibilities and organizational responsibilities. (c) Advocacy. VA employees...

  14. Active Galaxy Winds from X-ray, Ultraviolet, and Optical Studies of Nearby Seyfert 1s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Mass outflows or winds from active galaxies may profoundly affect the evolution of their host galaxies by blowing away gas from star forming regions and recycling metals from near-nuclear supernovae into the galaxy disk. Such fundamental properties as the covering fraction, total energy, variability, and distance of these outflows are still unknown. We present new results in an effort to better understand the properties of active galaxy winds based on X-ray, optical, and UV observations of local Seyfert 1s. We show that the covering fraction, indicated through X-ray and optical spectroscopy, is higher than previous studies suggest. We also show new observations in the UV with the Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), showing that the UV variability is at a much lower level than X-ray variability. The COS observations also reveal weak Ly-alpha outflows, which were difficult/impossible to detect in previous generations of UV spectrographs.

  15. Matrix effects in the C 1s photoabsorption spectra of condensed naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Norman; Wenzel, Jan; Dreuw, Andreas; Fink, Rainer H.; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution C 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of naphthalene are investigated. By comparing the spectral signatures of condensed naphthalene molecules with those of naphthalene in the gas phase, we are able to unambiguously identify spectral features which are affected by the intermolecular interactions in the condensed phase. With the help of calculations using time-dependent density-functional theory and the second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme for the polarization propagator, resonances in the relevant energy range can be assigned to valence and Rydberg-like excitations. Thus, we obtain a more detailed identification of NEXAFS resonances beyond the present literature.

  16. PBOV1 promotes prostate cancer proliferation by promoting G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tiejun; Wu, Rongpei; Liu, Bo; Wen, Handong; Tu, Zhong; Guo, Jun; Yang, Jiarong; Shen, Guoqiu

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men, and thus, finding new regulators is critical for PC therapy. Prostate and breast cancer overexpressed 1 (PBOV1) is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and bladder cancers, as it is upregulated in the serum of patients with PC, but the role of PBOV1 in PC has not been studied. In this article, we found that PBOV1 was indeed overexpressed in PC cells; PBOV1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and colony formation ability and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and tumorigenicity ability in vitro, whereas knockdown of PBOV1 reduced these effects. Further analysis of PBOV1 overexpression inhibited cell cycle inhibitors, P21 and P27, and increased the phosphorylation level of Rb and cyclin D1 expression, suggesting that PBOV1 promoted cell proliferation through promoting G1/S transition. PMID:26937201

  17. Mass of the bottom quark from Upsilon(1S) at NNNLO: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; Cvetič, Gorazd; Pineda, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    We update our perturbative determination of M̅S̅ mass m̅b(m̅b), by including the recently obtained four-loop coefficient in the relation between the pole and M̅S̅ mass. First the renormalon subtracted (RS or RS’) mass is determined from the known mass of the Y(1S) meson, where we use the renormalon residue Nm obtained from the asymptotic behavior of the coefficient of the 3-loop static singlet potential. M̅S̅ mass is then obtained using the 4-loop renormalon-free relation between the RS (RS’) and M̅S̅ mass. We argue that the effects of the charm quark mass are accounted for by effectively using Nf = 3 in the mass relations. The extracted value is m̅b(m̅b) = 4222(40) MeV, where the uncertainty is dominated by the renormalization scale dependence.

  18. Intensity oscillations in the carbon 1s ionization cross sections of 2-butyne

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Thomas X.; Zahl, Maria G.; Borve, Knut J.; Saethre, Leif J.; Decleva, Piero; Ponzi, Aurora; Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Thomas, T. Darrah

    2013-06-21

    Carbon 1s photoelectron spectra for 2-butyne (CH{sub 3}C{identical_to}CCH{sub 3}) measured in the photon energy range from threshold to 150 eV above threshold show oscillations in the intensity ratio C2,3/C1,4. Similar oscillations have been seen in chloroethanes, where the effect has been attributed to EXAFS-type scattering from the substituent chlorine atoms. In 2-butyne, however, there is no high-Z atom to provide a scattering center and, hence, oscillations of the magnitude observed are surprising. The results have been analyzed in terms of two different theoretical models: a density-functional model with B-spline atom-centered functions to represent the continuum electrons and a multiple-scattering model using muffin-tin potentials to represent the scattering centers. Both methods give a reasonable description of the energy dependence of the intensity ratios.

  19. Hepatic progenitor cell resistance to TGF-{beta}1's proliferative and apoptotic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. Brian; Rice, Lisa; Sadiq, Tim; Brittain, Evan; Song, Lujun; Wang Jian; Gerber, David A. . E-mail: David_Gerber@med.unc.edu

    2005-04-01

    The success of hepatocellular therapies using stem or progenitor cell populations is dependent upon multiple factors including the donor cell, microenvironment, and etiology of the liver injury. The following experiments investigated the impact of TGF-{beta}1 on a previously described population of hepatic progenitor cells (HPC). The majority of the hepatic progenitor cells were resistant to endogenously produced TGF-{beta}1's proapoptotic and anti-proliferative effects unlike more well-differentiated cellular populations (e.g., mature hepatocytes). Surprisingly, in vitro TGF-{beta}1 supplementation significantly inhibited de novo hepatic progenitor cell colony formation possibly via an indirect mechanism(s). Therefore despite the HPC's direct resistance to supplemental TGF-{beta}1, this cytokine's inhibitory effect on colony formation could have a potential negative impact on the use of these cells as a therapy for patients with liver disease.

  20. Levels of plasma soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in normal Indian adult population.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, B; Raju, K R; Anand, V; Malu, S; Padmanabhan, S; Tiwari, S C; Das, N; Srivastava, L M

    1999-07-01

    A decrease in the membrane anchored erythrocyte complement receptor 1 (CR1) is reported as an acquired phenomenon in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases with concomitant rise in soluble CR1 (sCR1) levels in plasma. There is a need to establish the normal range of sCR1 in Indian adults to assess the function and disease association of this protein. The plasma sCR1 levels of 50 healthy individuals have been estimated by an indigenously developed sandwich ELISA. sCR1 levels from 26 patients suffering from nephropathies had also been assayed which was much higher than the normal controls. This observation suggests sCR1 as a potential market for the assessment of disease activity in nephropathies.

  1. Soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) protects against experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Piddlesden, S J; Jiang, S; Levin, J L; Vincent, A; Morgan, B P

    1996-12-01

    The loss of muscle function seen in myasthenia gravis and in the animal model of the disease, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is in part due to the activation of complement by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies at the motor end-plate. In this study we describe the effects of a soluble recombinant form of human complement receptor 1 (sCR1) on the development of clinical disease and receptor loss in EAMG induced passively by administration of anti-AChR antibodies. Daily intraperitoneal injection of sCR1 significantly reduced the weight loss and severity of clinical symptoms seen and allowed treated animals to recover normal muscle function. These data suggest that sCR1 could provide a useful additional therapeutic agent in myasthenia.

  2. One loop corrections on fragmentation function of 1S wave charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepahvand, Reza; Dadfar, Sareh

    2017-04-01

    We present the contribution of the next to leading order (NLO) corrections in fragmentation a c-quark to 1S wave charmed mesons. These corrections are calculated by using the dimensional regularization method. We use two slicing methods that allow the phase space integrals to be evaluated in 4 dimensions. Technical details are discussed about virtual and real corrections in this scheme. Our numerical calculations show the NLO corrections to D mesons fragmentation function (FF) enhance the fragmentation probability (FP). The production ratio of vector mesons D* and D+* to all states is estimated. At NLO, it is obtained a bit smaller than the one at LO. Finally our analytic results are compared with available experimental data for D0 and D+* mesons.

  3. Essential role for SphK1/S1P signaling to regulate hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression and activity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Bouquerel, P; Gstalder, C; Müller, D; Laurent, J; Brizuela, L; Sabbadini, R A; Malavaud, B; Pyronnet, S; Martineau, Y; Ader, I; Cuvillier, O

    2016-03-14

    The sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway has been reported to modulate the expression of the canonical transcription factor hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α in multiple cell lineages. HIF-2α is also frequently overexpressed in solid tumors but its role has been mostly studied in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, where HIF-2α has been established as a driver of a more aggressive disease. In this study, the role of SphK1/S1P signaling with regard to HIF-2α was investigated in various cancer cell models including ccRCC cells. Under hypoxic conditions or in ccRCC lacking a functional von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene and expressing high levels of HIF-2α, SphK1 activity controls HIF-2α expression and transcriptional activity through a phospholipase D (PLD)-driven mechanism. SphK1 silencing promotes a VHL-independent HIF-2α loss of expression and activity and reduces cell proliferation in ccRCC. Importantly, downregulation of SphK1 is associated with impaired Akt and mTOR signaling in ccRCC. Taking advantage of a monoclonal antibody neutralizing extracellular S1P, we show that inhibition of S1P extracellular signaling blocks HIF-2α accumulation in ccRCC cell lines, an effect mimicked when the S1P transporter Spns2 or the S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) is silenced. Here, we report the first evidence that the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway regulates the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible HIF-2α in diverse cancer cell lineages notably ccRCC, where HIF-2α has been established as a driver of a more aggressive disease. These findings demonstrate that SphK1/S1P signaling may act as a canonical regulator of HIF-2α expression in ccRCC, giving support to its inhibition as a therapeutic strategy that could contribute to reduce HIF-2 activity in ccRCC.

  4. Inhibition of the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway by melatonin in mice with liver fibrosis and human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Bárbara; Sánchez, Diana I; Crespo, Irene; San-Miguel, Beatriz; Álvarez, Marcelino; Tuñón, María J; González-Gallego, Javier

    2016-11-01

    The sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) system is involved in different pathological processes, including fibrogenesis. Melatonin abrogates activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and attenuates different profibrogenic pathways in animal models of fibrosis, but it is unknown if protection associates with its inhibitory effect on the SphK1/S1P axis. Mice in treatment groups received carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ) 5 μL g(-1) body wt i.p. twice a week for 4 or 6 weeks. Melatonin was given at 5 or 10 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) i.p, beginning 2 weeks after the start of CCl4 administration. At both 4 and 6 weeks following CCl4 treatment, liver mRNA levels, protein concentration and immunohistochemical labelling for SphK1 increased significantly. S1P production, and expression of S1P receptor (S1PR)1, S1PR3 and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) were significantly elevated. However, there was a decreased expression of S1PR2 and S1P lyase (S1PL). Melatonin attenuated liver fibrosis, as shown by a significant inhibition of the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen (Col) Ι. Furthermore, melatonin inhibited S1P production, lowered expression of SphK1, S1PR1, SP1R3, and ASMase, and increased expression of S1PL. Melatonin induced a reversal of activated human HSCs cell line LX2, as evidenced by a reduction in α-SMA, TGF-β, and Col I expression. Melatonin-treated cells also exhibited an inhibition of the SphK1/S1P axis. Antifibrogenic effect of SphK1 inhibition was confirmed by treatment of LX2 cells with PF543. Abrogation of the lipid signaling pathway by the indole reveals novel molecular pathways that may account for the protective effect of melatonin in liver fibrogenesis. © 2016 BioFactors, 2016.

  5. Counterrotating cores in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcella, Marc Comas

    The dynamics of the merger between a high- and a low-elliptical galaxy was studied to understand how kinematically peculiar cores in elliptical galaxies might form. Numerical simulations of mergers provide rotation curves, surface density profiles, surface density contour plots and velocity maps of the merger remnants, as well as diagnostics on the dynamics such as phase-space diagrams. This type of merger can create counterrotating cores. The core of the smaller galaxy, of higher density, is not disrupted by the primary tidal field and sinks to the center of the primary as an independent dynamical subsystem. Core counterrotation occurs only when the initial merger orbit is retrograde with respect to the pin of the primary. The remnant has higher effective radius and lower mean central surface density than the primary galaxy, but a smaller core radius. The adsorption of orbital energy and angular momentum by the primary particles greatly modifies the kinematic structure of the larger galaxy. Twisted rotation axes and isophote twists appear over the whole body of the remnant. These diagnostics may be used to determine whether observed peculiar cores might have formed via an elliptical-elliptical merger. Galaxies with counterrotating cores should show a complex velocity field, isophotal irregularities, and, in general, a slow rotation in the main body of the galaxy. The present experiments are the first galaxy-satellite merger experiments involving an active, rotating secondary. They show that part of the orbital angular momentum is absorbed by the secondary, thus the secondary contributes to its own sinking: the sinking rate depends on the orientation of the secondary spin. Long-slit spectroscopic observations of NGC 3656 are reported.

  6. MD simulations suggest important surface differences between reconstituted and circulating spherical HDL1[S

    PubMed Central

    Segrest, Jere P.; Jones, Martin K.; Catte, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Since spheroidal HDL particles (sHDL) are highly dynamic, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are useful for obtaining structural models. Here we use MD to simulate sHDL with stoichiometries of reconstituted and circulating particles. The hydrophobic effect during simulations rapidly remodels discoidal HDL containing mixed lipids to sHDL containing a cholesteryl ester/triglyceride (CE/TG) core. We compare the results of simulations of previously characterized reconstituted sHDL particles containing two or three apoA-I created in the absence of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) with simulations of circulating human HDL containing two or three apoA-I without apoA-II. We find that circulating sHDL compared with reconstituted sHDL with the same number of apoA-I per particle contain approximately equal volumes of core lipid but significantly less surface lipid monolayers. We conclude that in vitro reconstituted sHDL particles contain kinetically trapped excess phospholipid and are less than ideal models for circulating sHDL particles. In the circulation, phospholipid transfer via PLTP decreases the ratio of phospholipid to apolipoprotein for all sHDL particles. Further, sHDL containing two or three apoA-I adapt to changes in surface area by condensation of common conformational motifs. These results represent an important step toward resolving the complicated issue of the protein and lipid stoichiometry of circulating HDL. PMID:23856070

  7. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  8. Gas Physics in Cool-Core Clusters: the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2013-10-01

    We have detected and confirmed the presence of high temperature gas at 10^5K associated with the low excitation 10^4K line emission filaments of M87. This is a profoundly important observation bearing on the physics of transport processes in cool-core clusters, mergers and feedback from AGN into the surrounding ISM. We propose to obtain a deep FUV COS spectrum in order to {1} detect lines that are characteristic of gas at a wide range of temperatures and {2} measure the FUV CIV and HeII line widths and velocity. The additional emission lines will allow us to empirically determine the temperature distribution across the critical region between 10^4K {"optical"} and 10^7K {"X-ray"} in the filament and understand how these two very different components of the ISM are connected, and which theoretical scenario is viable. The line widths and velocity further offer a direct discrimination between competing physical processes that include turbulence, condensation and evaporation - observationally broadening, inflow and outflow respectively. We will also acquire a two orbit ACS/SBC image to image the HeII line, which has a higher mean emission temperature than CIV, in isolation from CIV. In conjunction with our existing FUV deep image, we will be able to study the structure of the filaments in these two lines, and hence reveal the character of spatial variations of the interface between hot and cool gas.

  9. OUTFLOW, INFALL, AND PROTOSTARS IN THE STAR-FORMING CORE W3-SE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Zhao Junhui; Wright, M. C. H. E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-10-20

    We report new results on outflow and infall in the star-forming cores W3-SE SMA-1 and SMA-2 based on analysis of {approx}2.''5 resolution observations of the molecular lines HCN(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), and CH{sub 3}OH(5{sub 2,3}-4{sub 1,3}) with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A high-velocity bipolar outflow originating from the protostellar core SMA-1 was observed in the HCN(3-2) line, with a projected outflow axis at a position angle of 48{sup 0}. The detection of the outflow is confirmed from other molecular lines. An inverse P-Cygni profile in the HCN(3-2) line toward SMA-1 suggests that at least one of the double cores accretes matter from the molecular core. A filamentary structure in the molecular gas surrounds SMA-1 and SMA-2. Based on the SMA observations, our analysis suggests that the double pre-stellar cores SMA-1 and SMA-2 result from fragmentation in the collapsing massive molecular core W3-SE, and it is likely that they are forming intermediate- to high-mass stars which will be new members of a star cluster in the W3-SE region.

  10. Core and Off-Core Processes in Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian; Forsberg, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    An emerging methodology of organizing systems-engineering plans is based on a concept of core and off-core processes or activities. This concept has emerged as a result of recognition of a risk in the traditional representation of systems-engineering plans by a Vee model alone, according to which a large system is decomposed into levels of smaller subsystems, then integrated through levels of increasing scope until the full system is constructed. Actual systems-engineering activity is more complicated, raising the possibility that the staff will become confused in the absence of plans which explain the nature and ordering of work beyond the traditional Vee model.

  11. Counterrotating Cores in Elliptical Galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcells, Marc Comas

    The dynamics of the merger between a high- and a low-luminosity elliptical galaxy has been studied to understand how kinematically peculiar cores in elliptical galaxies might form. Numerical simulations of mergers provide rotation curves, surface density profiles, surface density contour plots and velocity maps of the merger remnants, as well as diagnostics on the dynamics such as phase-space diagrams. This type of merger can create counterrotating cores. The core of the smaller galaxy, of higher density, is not disrupted by the primary tidal field and sinks to the center of the primary as an independent dynamical subsystem. Core counterrotation occurs only when the initial merger orbit is retrograde with respect to the spin of the primary. The remnant has higher effective radius and lower mean central surface density than the primary galaxy, but a smaller core radius. The adsorption of orbital energy and angular momentum by the primary particles greatly modifies the kinematic structure of the larger galaxy. Twisted rotation axes and isophote twists appear over the whole body of the remnant. These diagnostics may be used to determine whether observed peculiar cores might have formed via an elliptical-elliptical merger. Galaxies with counterrotating cores should show a complex velocity field, isophotal irregularities, and, in general, a slow rotation in the main body of the galaxy. The present experiments are the first galaxy-satellite merger experiments involving an active, rotating secondary. They show that part of the orbital angular momentum is absorbed by the secondary, thus the secondary contributes to its own sinking: the sinking rate depends on the orientation of the secondary spin. Long-slit spectroscopic observations of NGC 3656 are reported. Rotation curves indicate that NGC 3656 contains a core spinning in a direction perpendicular to the rotation in the main body of the galaxy. Velocity reversals at intermediate radii are also observed. These features

  12. ON THE INTERNAL DYNAMICS OF THE STARLESS CORE L694-2

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Min; Lee, Chang Won; Hong, Seung Soo; Lee, Seok Ho; Park, Yong Sun; Sohn, Jungjoo

    2011-08-01

    In order to understand the internal dynamics of starless cores, we take L694-2 as an example of starless cores and investigate its internal dynamics by comparing observed data of L694-2 to our two hydrodynamical simulations, which involve the gravitational collapse of marginally unstable Bonnor-Ebert and uniform cores in a quiescent region. From the comparisons, we find that the density structures of the models agree well with the observed density distribution of L694-2, but the velocity fields and HCN line profiles of the models differ from the observed ones. From the differences in the velocity fields and the HCN line profiles, we have reached the following conclusions on the internal dynamics of L694-2. First, L694-2 has different internal dynamics from the gravitational collapse of the marginally unstable Bonnor-Ebert core. Second, L694-2 has an infall speed faster than any other core that undergoes the gravitational collapse with a Bonnor-Ebert-like density structure in a quiescent region. Third, L694-2 has almost no motion at its surface. From further simulations, in which cores are perturbed by supersonic shocks and affected by an expanding inter-core medium, the differences in the HCN line profiles could be reduced considerably.

  13. Current transducers used in power line measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milcarz, Sz.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    There are many solutions used for current measurements in power lines. The study shows a transducer consisting of a ferromagnetic core, a beam placed in an air-gap and a sensor for optical readout. The beam is made of silicon with a thin 50%Ni50%Fe film. The material of the core is permalloy. A distribution of magnetic field depends on current supplying the power line. The beam is deflected due to magnetic field in the air-gap. A deflection of the beam is measured by the optical fibre sensor. Its advantage is simple design, high precision of processing, non-electric transmission, low costs and ability of a non-contact measurement. Comsol Multiphysics 4.4 and Magnetic Fields Module (mef) were used for modeling. An influence of magnetic circuit's materials and dimensions of the ferromagnetic core and the air-gap were tested in order to determine the most sufficient distribution of magnetic field in the air-gap. The study shows results of the modeling of the transducer compared to practical results for a similar construction scaled down to lower current values.

  14. Lining in nasal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sebastian; Fischer, Helmut; Gubisch, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Restoring nasal lining is one of the essential parts during reconstruction of full-thickness defects of the nose. Without a sufficient nasal lining the whole reconstruction will fail. Nasal lining has to sufficiently cover the shaping subsurface framework. But in addition, lining must not compromise or even block nasal ventilation. This article demonstrates different possibilities of lining reconstruction. The use of composite grafts for small rim defects is described. The limits and technical components for application of skin grafts are discussed. Then the advantages and limitations of endonasal, perinasal, and hingeover flaps are demonstrated. Strategies to restore lining with one or two forehead flaps are presented. Finally, the possibilities and technical aspects to reconstruct nasal lining with a forearm flap are demonstrated. Technical details are explained by intraoperative pictures. Clinical cases are shown to illustrate the different approaches and should help to understand the process of decision making. It is concluded that although the lining cannot be seen after reconstruction of the cover it remains one of the key components for nasal reconstruction. When dealing with full-thickness nasal defects, there is no way to avoid learning how to restore nasal lining.

  15. Core Formation and Evolution of Asteroid 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The howardites, eucrites, and diogenites (HEDs) are a suite of related meteorite types that formed by igneous and impact processes on the same parent body. Multiple lines of evidence, including infrared spectroscopy of the asteroid belt and the petrology and geochemistry of the HEDs, suggest that the asteroid 4 Vesta is the parent body for the HEDs. Observations by NASA's Dawn spacecraft mission strongly support the conclusion that the HEDs are from Vesta. The abundances of the moderately siderophile elements Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P in eucrites require that most or all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. These observations place important constraints on the mode and timescale of core formation on Vesta. Possible core formation mechanisms include porous flow, which potentially could occur prior to initiation of silicate melting, and metallic rain in a largely molten silicate magma ocean. Once the core forms, convection within the core could possible sustain a magnetic dynamo for a period of time. We consider each process in turn.

  16. Spatial Kinetics Calculations of MOX Fueled Core: Variant 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-11

    This work is part of a Joint US/Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactors and presents the results of spatial kinetics calculational benchmarks. The examinations were carried out with the following purposes: to verify one of spatial neutronic kinetics model elaborated in KI, to understand sensibility of the model to neutronics difference of UOX and MOX cores, to compare in future point and spatial kinetics models (on the base of a set of selected accidents) in view of eventual creation of RELAP option with 3D kinetics. The document contains input data and results of model operation of three emergency dynamic processes in the VVER-1000 core: central control rod ejection by pressure drop caused by destroying of the moving mechanism cover; overcooling of the reactor core caused by steam line rupture and non-closure of steam generator stop valve; and the boron dilution of coolant in part of the VVER-1000 core caused by penetration of the distillate slug into the core at start up of non-working loop.

  17. The Native Form and Maturation Process of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Wakita, Takaji; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Funahashi, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Masumi; Kajita, Tadahiro; Moradpour, Darius; Wands, Jack R.; Kohara, Michinori

    1998-01-01

    The maturation and subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein were investigated with both a vaccinia virus expression system and CHO cell lines stably transformed with HCV cDNA. Two HCV core proteins, with molecular sizes of 21 kDa (p21) and 23 kDa (p23), were identified. The C-terminal end of p23 is amino acid 191 of the HCV polyprotein, and p21 is produced as a result of processing between amino acids 174 and 191. The subcellular localization of the HCV core protein was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although HCV core protein resided predominantly in the cytoplasm, it was also found in the nucleus and had the same molecular size as p21 in both locations, as determined by subcellular fractionation. The HCV core proteins had different immunoreactivities to a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Antibody 5E3 stained core protein in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, C7-50 stained core protein only in the cytoplasm, and 499S stained core protein only in the nucleus. These results clearly indicate that the p23 form of HCV core protein is processed to p21 in the cytoplasm and that the core protein in the nucleus has a higher-order structure different from that of p21 in the cytoplasm. HCV core protein in sera of patients with HCV infection was analyzed in order to determine the molecular size of genuinely processed HCV core protein. HCV core protein in sera was found to have exactly the same molecular weight as the p21 protein. These results suggest that p21 core protein is a component of native viral particles. PMID:9621068

  18. Time-resolved measurements of nonthermal X-ray emission of Ti XXI lines in electron-cyclotron-heated tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.; Lieber, A. J.; Pradham, A. K.; Xu, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of heliumlike titanium spectra with 20 ms temporal resolution during high-power injection of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of up to 250 ms pulse length into the Doublet III tokamak is reported. The prominent lines in the spectra and the observed dielectronic satellite lines from the autoionizing lithiumlike ionization states are given. The intensity of the resonance line 1s2 1S0 - 1s 2p 1P1 is found to be extremely sensitive to the ECH power. Time-resolved line ratios are also presented. It is concluded that a significant departure from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons exists in the present ECH plasmas.

  19. Managing the Evolution of an Enterprise Architecture using a MAS-Product-Line Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Joaquin; Hinchey, Michael G.; Resinas, manuel; Sterritt, Roy; Rash, James L.

    2006-01-01

    We view an evolutionary system ns being n software product line. The core architecture is the unchanging part of the system, and each version of the system may be viewed as a product from the product line. Each "product" may be described as the core architecture with sonre agent-based additions. The result is a multiagent system software product line. We describe an approach to such n Software Product Line-based approach using the MaCMAS Agent-Oriented nzethoclology. The approach scales to enterprise nrchitectures as a multiagent system is an approprinre means of representing a changing enterprise nrchitectclre nnd the inferaction between components in it.

  20. Identifying ELIXIR Core Data Resources

    PubMed Central

    Durinx, Christine; McEntyre, Jo; Appel, Ron; Apweiler, Rolf; Barlow, Mary; Blomberg, Niklas; Cook, Chuck; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stockinger, Heinz; Teixeira, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    The core mission of ELIXIR is to build a stable and sustainable infrastructure for biological information across Europe. At the heart of this are the data resources, tools and services that ELIXIR offers to the life-sciences community, providing stable and sustainable access to biological data. ELIXIR aims to ensure that these resources are available long-term and that the life-cycles of these resources are managed such that they support the scientific needs of the life-sciences, including biological research. ELIXIR Core Data Resources are defined as a set of European data resources that are of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data. They are complete collections of generic value to life-science, are considered an authority in their field with respect to one or more characteristics, and show high levels of scientific quality and service. Thus, ELIXIR Core Data Resources are of wide applicability and usage. This paper describes the structures, governance and processes that support the identification and evaluation of ELIXIR Core Data Resources. It identifies key indicators which reflect the essence of the definition of an ELIXIR Core Data Resource and support the promotion of excellence in resource development and operation. It describes the specific indicators in more detail and explains their application within ELIXIR’s sustainability strategy and science policy actions, and in capacity building, life-cycle management and technical actions. The identification process is currently being implemented and tested for the first time. The findings and outcome will be evaluated by the ELIXIR Scientific Advisory Board in March 2017. Establishing the portfolio of ELIXIR Core Data Resources and ELIXIR Services is a key priority for ELIXIR and publicly marks the transition towards a cohesive infrastructure. PMID:27803796

  1. Identifying ELIXIR Core Data Resources.

    PubMed

    Durinx, Christine; McEntyre, Jo; Appel, Ron; Apweiler, Rolf; Barlow, Mary; Blomberg, Niklas; Cook, Chuck; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Kim, Jee-Hyub; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stockinger, Heinz; Teixeira, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The core mission of ELIXIR is to build a stable and sustainable infrastructure for biological information across Europe. At the heart of this are the data resources, tools and services that ELIXIR offers to the life-sciences community, providing stable and sustainable access to biological data. ELIXIR aims to ensure that these resources are available long-term and that the life-cycles of these resources are managed such that they support the scientific needs of the life-sciences, including biological research. ELIXIR Core Data Resources are defined as a set of European data resources that are of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data. They are complete collections of generic value to life-science, are considered an authority in their field with respect to one or more characteristics, and show high levels of scientific quality and service. Thus, ELIXIR Core Data Resources are of wide applicability and usage. This paper describes the structures, governance and processes that support the identification and evaluation of ELIXIR Core Data Resources. It identifies key indicators which reflect the essence of the definition of an ELIXIR Core Data Resource and support the promotion of excellence in resource development and operation. It describes the specific indicators in more detail and explains their application within ELIXIR's sustainability strategy and science policy actions, and in capacity building, life-cycle management and technical actions. The identification process is currently being implemented and tested for the first time. The findings and outcome will be evaluated by the ELIXIR Scientific Advisory Board in March 2017. Establishing the portfolio of ELIXIR Core Data Resources and ELIXIR Services is a key priority for ELIXIR and publicly marks the transition towards a cohesive infrastructure.

  2. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  3. Core Leadership: Teacher Leaders and Common Core Implementation in Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, thousands of teachers across the United States attended several days of professional development workshops. The workshops, which focused on the Common Core State Standards, were part of a Tennessee Department of Education initiative in teacher leadership. The department recruited and trained 200 highly-effective teachers to…

  4. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  5. Earth's core and the geodynamo

    PubMed

    Buffett

    2000-06-16

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the liquid iron core. Details of how this occurs are now emerging from numerical simulations that achieve a self-sustaining magnetic field. Early results predict a dominant dipole field outside the core, and some models even reproduce magnetic reversals. The simulations also show how different patterns of flow can produce similar external fields. Efforts to distinguish between the various possibilities appeal to observations of the time-dependent behavior of the field. Important constraints will come from geological records of the magnetic field in the past.

  6. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothesis passes the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale range. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small-scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magnetogeostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other

  7. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other

  8. Core competencies in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Porcel, José Manuel; Casademont, Jordi; Conthe, Pedro; Pinilla, Blanca; Pujol, Ramón; García-Alegría, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The working group on Competencies of Internal Medicine from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) proposes a series of core competencies that we consider should be common to all European internal medicine specialists. The competencies include aspects related to patient care, clinical knowledge, technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, cost-awareness in medical care and academic activities. The proposal could be used as a working document for the Internal Medicine core curriculum in the context of the educational framework of medical specialties in Europe.

  9. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    2004-05-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypotheses pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton [1992; GAFD] to scale-variant field and flow [Voorhies, 2004; JGR-SE, in press]. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field [Voorhies, Sabaka and Purucker, 2002; JGR-P], and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The

  10. Transmission in Optically Transparent Core Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilper, Dan; Jensen, Rich; Petermann, Klaus; Karasek, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    related to the interworking between core and edge networks. The core network topics suitable for inclusion in this feature issue are:

    • Optically transparent system design issues, transmission experiments, and field trials
    • Optically transparent network architectures and topologies
    • Dispersion management in reconfigurable and mesh systems
    • Optically transparent network device and sub-system performance, design, characterization and control, including: amplifiers, transmitters, receivers, switches, add/drop multiplexers
    • Transient and fault management
    • Physical layer system control
    • Monitoring and compensation to support transparency
    • Wavelength routing and planning as they relate to physical layer transmission
    • Hardware cost and configuration optimization for optically transparent networks
    To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON and select "TTCN" in the features indicator of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this feature issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "TTCN." Additional information can be found on the JON website: . Submission Deadline: 15 June 2007

  11. Observation of 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) radiative transition in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

    PubMed

    Kasthurirangan, S; Saha, J K; Agnihotri, A N; Bhattacharyya, S; Misra, D; Kumar, A; Mukherjee, P K; Santos, J P; Costa, A M; Indelicato, P; Mukherjee, T K; Tribedi, L C

    2013-12-13

    We present an experimental determination of the 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) x-ray line emitted from He-like Si, S, and Cl projectile ions, excited in collisions with thin carbon foils, using a high-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer. A good agreement between the observation and state-of-the-art relativistic calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock formalism including the Breit interaction and QED effects implies the dominance of fluorescent decay over the autoionization process for the 2p3d(^{1}P^{o}) state of He-like heavy ions. This is the first observation of the fluorescence-active doubly excited states in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

  12. The preparation, efficacy and safety of 'antigenoid' vaccine NFU1 (S-L+) MRC toward prevention of herpes simplex virus infections in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Buchan, A; Hartley, C E; Turner, S P; Williams, D R

    1980-01-01

    Vaccine NFU1 (S-L+) MRC was prepared by high multiplicity infection of serum-deprived human embryonic lung (MRC 5) cells with type 1 Herpes simplex virus. The preparative process removed inoculum virus particles and virus DNA while virus particle and DNA synthesis was inhibited by the presence of lithium chloride in the cell culture medium. The vaccine stimulated neutralising antibody in vaccinated mice and provided long-term protection against intra-vaginal challenge with type 2 herpes virus. The safety of the vaccine was confirmed by inoculation into newborn mice and cell lines of human, mammalian, and rodent origin. There was no evidence of cell transformation in vitro or of oncogenicity or teratogenicity in rodent species. It is intended to investigate the efficiency of this vaccine in human subjects.

  13. 7-Epiclusianone, a Benzophenone Extracted from Garcinia brasiliensis (Clusiaceae), Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1/S Transition in A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ionta, Marisa; Ferreira-Silva, Guilherme A; Niero, Evandro L; Costa, Éderson D'Martin; Martens, Adam A; Rosa, Welton; Soares, Marisi G; Machado-Santelli, Gláucia M; Lago, João Henrique G; Santos, Marcelo H

    2015-07-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Disease stage is the most relevant factor influencing mortality. Unfortunately, most patients are still diagnosed at an advanced stage and their five-year survival rate is only 4%. Thus, it is relevant to identify novel drugs that can improve the treatment options for lung cancer. Natural products have been an important source for the discovery of new compounds with pharmacological potential including antineoplastic agents. We have previously isolated a prenylated benzophenone (7-epiclusianone) from Garcinia brasiliensis (Clusiaceae) that has several biological properties including antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines. In continuation with our studies, the present work aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved with antiproliferative activity of 7-epiclusianone in A549 cells. Our data showed that 7-epiclusianone reduced the viability of A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 16.13 ± 1.12 μM). Cells were arrested in G1/S transition and apoptosis was induced. In addition, we observed morphological changes with cytoskeleton disorganization in consequence of the treatment. Taken together, the results showed that cell cycle arrest in G1/S transition is the main mechanism involved with antiproliferative activity of 7-epiclusianone. Our results are promising and open up the prospect of using this compound in further anticancer in vivo studies.

  14. Melatonin-induced CBF/DREB1s are essential for diurnal change of disease resistance and CCA1 expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Wei, Yunxie; He, Chaozu

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is an important regulator of circadian rhythms and immunity in animals. However, the diurnal changes of endogenous melatonin and melatonin-mediated diurnal change of downstream responses remain unclear in Arabidopsis. Using the publicly available microarray data, we found that the transcript levels of two melatonin synthesis genes (serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) and caffeate O-methyltransferase (COMT)) and endogenous melatonin level were regulated by diurnal cycles, with different magnitudes of change. Moreover, the transcripts of C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) were co-regulated by exogenous melatonin and diurnal changes, indicating the possible correlation among clock, endogenous melatonin level and AtCBFs expressions. Interestingly, diurnal change of plant immunity against Pst DC3000 and CIRCADIANCLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1) expression were largely lost in AtCBFs knockdown line-amiR-1. Taken together, this study identifies the molecular pathway underlying the diurnal changes of immunity in Arabidopsis. Notably, the diurnal changes of endogenous melatonin may regulate corresponding changes of AtCBF/DREB1s expression and their underlying diurnal cycle of plant immunity and AtCCA1.

  15. Producing gapped-ferrite transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Improved manufacturing techniques make reproducible gaps and minimize cracking. Molded, unfired transformer cores are cut with thin saw and then fired. Hardened semicircular core sections are bonded together, placed in aluminum core box, and fluidized-coated. After winding is run over box, core is potted. Economical method significantly reduces number of rejects.

  16. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  17. Line graphs for fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchalowski, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Malgorzata J.

    2017-03-01

    We found the Lindenmayer systems for line graphs built on selected fractals. We show that the fractal dimension of such obtained graphs in all analysed cases is the same as for their original graphs. Both for the original graphs and for their line graphs we identified classes of nodes which reflect symmetry of the graph.

  18. Product Line Systems Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Mellon University Product Line Systems Program Our mission: • create, mature, apply, and transition technology and practices • to effect... Technology Initiative) Predictable Software Construction (Predictable Assembly from Certifiable Code Initiative) Software Product Lines (Product...Presentation Software Architecture (Software Architecture Technology Initiative) Predictable Software Construction (Predictable Assembly from Certifiable

  19. Software Product Lines Essentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    improvement Technology innovation Reuse 7 Software Product Lines Linda Northrop © 2008 Carnegie Mellon University Few Systems Are Unique Most...Focus was small-grained, opportunistic, and technology -driven. Results did not meet business goals. Reuse History 9 Software Product Lines Linda...servers, storage servers, network camera and scanner servers Bold Stroke Avionics Customized solutions for transportation industries E-COM Technology

  20. Attachment Line Blockage Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Photographs shows the attachment-line experiment model with fairing and fence for supersonic attachment-line experiments. The fairing is intended to eliminate the wing/fuselage juncture shock and align the flow for the streamlined fence. The streamlined fence traps the turbulent fuselage boundary layer to prevent turbulent contamination of the leading edge flow.