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Sample records for 1s x-ray photoemission

  1. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  2. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, M. Wiemann, C.; Weber, N.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Schneider, C. M.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. The high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.

  3. Synchrotron x-ray photoemission study of soft x-ray processed ultrathin glycine-water ice films

    SciTech Connect

    Tzvetkov, George; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-05-28

    Ultrathin glycine-water ice films have been prepared in ultrahigh vacuum by condensation of H{sub 2}O and glycine at 90 K on single crystalline alumina surfaces and processed by soft x-ray (610 eV) exposure for up to 60 min. The physicochemical changes in the films were monitored using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Two films with different amounts of H{sub 2}O have been considered in order to evaluate the influence of the water ice content on the radiation-induced effects. The analysis of C1s, N1s, and O1s spectral regions together with the changes in the valence band spectra indicates that amino acid degradation occurs fast mainly via decarboxylation and deamination of pristine molecules. Enrichment of the x-ray exposed surfaces with fragments with carbon atoms without strong electronegative substituents (C-C and C-H) is documented as well. In the thinner glycine-water ice film (six layers of glycine + six layers of water) the 3D ice suffers strongly from the x-rays and is largely removed from the sample. The rate of photodecomposition of glycine in this film is about 30% higher than for glycine in the thicker film (6 layers of glycine + 60 layers of water). The photoemission results suggest that the destruction of amino acid molecules is caused by the direct interaction with the radiation and that no chemical attack of glycine by the species released by water radiolysis is detected.

  4. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  5. Electronic Structures of Purple Bronze KMo6O17 Studied by X-Ray Photoemission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaokui; Wei, Junyin; Shi, Jing; Tian, Mingliang; Chen, Hong; Tian, Decheng

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study has been performed for the purple bronze KMo6O17. The structures of conduction band and valence band are analogous to the results of ultraviolet photoemission spectra and are also consistent with the model of Travaglini et al., but the gap between conduction and valence band is insignificant. The shape of asymmetric and broadening line of O-1s is due to unresolved contributions from the many inequivalent oxygen sites in this crystal structure. Mo 3d core-level spectrum reveals that there are two kinds of valence states of Molybdenum (Mo+5 and Mo+6). The calculated average valence state is about +5.6, which is consistent with the expectation value from the composition of this material. The tail of Mo-3d spectrum toward higher binding energy is the consequence of the excitation of electron-hole pairs with singularity index of 0.21.

  6. Comparison of Gas and Adsorbed Phase X-ray Photoemission Spectra of Oxidized Organics on Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-12-01

    Most uptake studies of small chain organics on ice surfaces at near ambient conditions have been performed using flow tube and other methods which monitor the disappearance of the gas phase. We will present results using synchrotron based, ambient pressure X-ray photoemission spectroscopy which allows for the probing of the ice surface directly at near ambient conditions. C 1s XPS and C K-edge NEXAFS gas phase and adsorbed phase spectra will be compared for 2-propanol, acetone, and 1-propanal on ice at -45 C. Uptake experiments give rise to first order Langmuirian isotherms. Acetone and 2-propanol show little difference in the photoemission spectra between the gas phase and adsorbed phase, suggesting that adsorption occurs molecularly. However, adsorption of 1-propanal shows evidence of chemical transformation (oxidation) at the interface of ice. Further studies are underway to better understand this adsorption behavior.

  7. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; et al

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge-induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  8. X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Cesium Antimonide Photocathodes for Photoinjector Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Irene; Chevallay, Eric; Fedosseev, Valentin; Hessler, Christoph; Neupert, Holger; Nistor, Valentin; Taborelli, Mauro

    Within the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project, feasibility studies of a photoinjector option for the drive beam as an alternative to its baseline design using a thermionic electron gun (Geschonke et al. [1]) are on-going. This R&D program covers both the laser and the photocathode side. Cesium antimonide cathodes were produced at CERN by co-deposition onto copper substrates and characterized by photoemission and by XPS (X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy) analysis. A systematic study on newly produced and used photocathodes was conducted in order to correlate the surface composition to the photoemissive properties.

  9. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; Nordlund, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Sellberg, J. A.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Turner, J. J.; Öström, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Wolf, M.; Wurth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse. PMID:26798795

  10. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer.

    PubMed

    Dell'Angela, M; Anniyev, T; Beye, M; Coffee, R; Föhlisch, A; Gladh, J; Kaya, S; Katayama, T; Krupin, O; Nilsson, A; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Sellberg, J A; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Öström, H; Ogasawara, H; Wolf, M; Wurth, W

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse. PMID:26798795

  11. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Alexander; Kronast, Florian; Papp, Christian; Yang, See-Hun; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Hilken, Dawn L.; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Durr, Hermann A.; Schneider, Claus M.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2010-10-29

    We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic Co microdots. The method is based on excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through sample simply by varying the photon energy around the Bragg condition. Depth-resolved PEEM images were obtained for all of the observed elements. Photoemission intensities as functions of photon energy were compared to x-ray optical calculations in order to quantitatively derive the depth-resolved film structure of the sample.

  12. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  13. Energy-filtered X-ray photoemission electron microscopy and its applications to surface and organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Tetsuya; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Niimi, Hironobu; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Sakai, Yuji; Kato, Makoto; Naito, Toshio; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2007-10-01

    Energy-filtered X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (EXPEEM) is a new surface chemical imaging method that combines X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). We have developed a collinear type EXPEEM system using a Wien-filter-type electron energy analyzer. The collinear arrangement has the advantage of carrying out an easy alignment of the electron optical axis. We have measured EXPEEM images, μ-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and μ-XPS of Au on Ta and Ag(DM) 2. We discuss the advantage of EXPEEM and future applications to organic devices.

  14. Nitrogen Doping and Thermal Stability in HfSiOxNy Studied by Photoemission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Satoshi; Okabayashi, Jun; Takahashi, Haruhiko; Oshima, Masaharu; Lee, Dong-Ick; Sun, Shiyu; sun, Steven; Pianetta, Piero A.; Ando, Takashi; Fukuda, Seiichi; /SONY, Atsugi

    2005-12-14

    We have investigated nitrogen-doping effects into HfSiO{sub x} films on Si and their thermal stability using synchrotron-radiation photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. N 1s core-level photoemission and N K-edge absorption spectra have revealed that chemical-bonding states of N-Si{sub 3-x}O{sub x} and interstitial N{sub 2}-gas-like features are clearly observed in as-grown HfSiO{sub x}N{sub y} film and they decrease upon ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) annealing due to a thermal instability, which can be related to the device performance. Annealing-temperature dependence in Hf 4f and Si 2p photoemission spectra suggests that the Hf-silicidation temperature is effectively increased by nitrogen doping into the HfSiO{sub x} although the interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer is selectively reduced. No change in valence-band spectra upon UHV annealing suggests that crystallization of the HfSiO{sub x}N{sub y} films is also hindered by nitrogen doping into the HfSiO{sub x}.

  15. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, a tool for the investigation of complex magnetic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, Andreas; Ohldag, Hendrik; Nolting, Frithjof; Stohr, Joachim; Padmore, Howard A.

    2001-08-30

    X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy unites the chemical specificity and magnetic sensitivity of soft x-ray absorption techniques with the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy. The discussed instrument possesses a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm and is located at a bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Light Source, providing linearly and circularly polarized radiation between 250 and 1300 eV. We will present examples which demonstrate the power of this technique applied to problems in the field of thin film magnetism. The chemical and elemental specificity is of particular importance for the study of magnetic exchange coupling because it allows separating the signal of the different layers and interfaces in complex multi-layered structures.

  16. Core-level x-ray photoemission: Deviations from threshold behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Frota, H. O.; Oliveira, L. N.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1985-07-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of core-level x-ray photoemission intensity in metals, with emphasis upon studying the deviations from behavior asymptotically close to threshold. For a model with a contact potential and linear conduction-electron dispersion, we have evaluated the photoemission intensity for core-hole phase shifts δ(0) between 0.05π and 0.5π. We find the following results. (i) The asymptotic regime extends out to 0.01 to 0.1 times the conduction bandwidth (D) from threshold. The range of the asymptotic regime decreases with increasing (absolute) phase shift. (ii) The linear relation between the integrated photoemission intensity and the asymptotic form holds for all phase shifts above ~0.1D. Due to our normalization procedure we cannot say whether it holds below this value. (iii) Discrepancies exist between numerical estimates of the deviations from asymptotic behavior and approximate analytic estimates. (iv) A definition of the frequency-dependent threshold singularity exponent α(ω) in terms of a moment of the photoemission intensity is stable out to the conduction-band edge and may prove useful to experimentalists attempting to extract exponents from their data.

  17. Intrinsic correlated electronic structure of CrO2 revealed by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, M.; König, C.; Güntherodt, G.; Sekiyama, A.; Funabashi, G.; Tsunekawa, M.; Imada, S.; Shigemoto, A.; Okada, K.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Renken, V.; Allmers, T.; Donath, M.; Suga, S.

    2013-06-01

    Bulk-sensitive hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) reveals for as-grown epitaxial films of half-metallic ferromagnetic CrO2(100) a pronounced screening feature in the Cr 2p3/2 core level and an asymmetry in the O 1s core level. This gives evidence of a finite, metal-type Fermi edge, which is surprisingly not observed in HAXPES. A spectral weight shift in HAXPES to below the Fermi energy is attributed to single-ion recoil effects due to high-energy photoelectrons. In conjunction with inverse PES the intrinsic correlated Mott-Hubbard-type electronic structure is unraveled, yielding an averaged Coulomb correlation energy Uav ≅ 3.2 eV.

  18. Characterization of indium tin oxide surfaces and interfaces using low intensity x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Y.; Lyon, J. E.; Beerbom, M. M.; Schlaf, R.

    2006-11-01

    Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopic (UPS) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopic (XPS) characterizations of indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces prepared in ambient environment significantly lower the work function of the ITO surface. This artifact complicates the investigation of ITO surfaces and interfaces using XPS and UPS. The presented results demonstrate that, while the exposure of the sample surface to standard UPS UV sources results in a reduction of the work function within a second or less, XPS measurements show a more gradual work function change over the course of hundreds of seconds. This allowed the design of a measurement protocol based on low intensity x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy work function measurements, which do not cause significant work function changes during the exposure time needed for characterization. Applying this technique, the orbital lineup between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the semiconducting polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the valence and conduction bands of ITO were determined. The results indicate that it is appropriate to describe the ITO/P3HT junction as semiconductor heterojunction, and that hole injection most likely occurs between ITO conduction band minimum and P3HT HOMO.

  19. Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect

    ILINSKI P.

    2012-07-10

    Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

  20. Real time cumulant approach for charge-transfer satellites in x-ray photoemission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photoemission spectra generally exhibit satellite features in addition to quasi-particle peaks due to many-body excitations which have been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. However, the satellites attributed to charge-transfer (CT) excitations in correlated materials have proved difficult to calculate from first principles. Here we report a real-time, real-space approach for such calculations based on a cumulant representation of the core-hole Green’s function and time-dependent density functional theory. This approach also yields an interpretation of CT satellites in terms of a complex oscillatory, transient response to a suddenly created core hole. Illustrative results for TiO2 and NiO are in good agreement with experiment.

  1. Lunar sample analysis. [X-ray photoemission and Auger spectroscopy of lunar glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.; Cirlin, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The surface composition of two samples from the highly shocked, glass-coated lunar basalt (12054) and from four glass-coated fragments from the 1-2 mm (14161) fines were examined by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to determine whether the agglutination process itself is responsible for the difference between their surface and bulk compositions. Auger electron spectroscopy of glass balls from the 15425 and 74001 fines were analyzed to understand the nature, extent, and behavior of volatile phases associated with lunar volcanism. Initial results indicate that (1) volatiles, in the outer few atomic layers sampled, vary considerably from ball to ball; (2) variability over the surface of individual balls is smaller; (3) the dominant volatiles on the balls are S and Zn; and (4) other volatiles commonly observed are P, Cl, and K.

  2. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetry has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.

  3. X-ray photoemission analysis and electrical contact properties of NF3 plasma cleaned Si surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino, M.; Chung, B.-C.; Tsai, W.; Salimian, S.; Favreau, D. P.; Merchant, S. M.

    1992-10-01

    The removal of native silicon oxide on <100≳ silicon with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) excited NF3 plasma is demonstrated. In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy verifies removal of the oxide and shows that a residue remains on the surface after exposure to the plasma. The residue is about 1.2 nm thick with the approximate formula Si6F8ON2 when analyzed with a uniform overlayer model. X-ray photoemission spectra of the residue show fluorine and oxygen in at least two different bonding states and a unique nitrogen having a diamagnetic bond. Chemical bonding in the residue is ascribed to Fx-Si, Fx-Si-O, Si-O-Si, and N2-O-Si species, where x=1, 2, and 3. A distinct high-energy peak is identified in the quasicore level F 2s transition that is attributed to a small amount of interstitial fluorine having diffused into the silicon lattice. The residue is stable at room temperature in both vacuum and under hydrogen, but when exposed to room ambient, it and the substrate appear to oxidize accounting for a loss of both fluorine and nitrogen. Heating the residue to 640 °C in vacuum causes a significant loss of fluorine and nitrogen also. A possible mechanism accounting for the formation of the residue is proposed assuming that there is a difference in the decay time of the atomic species in the plasma. The ECR cleaning process is integrated into a sputtered TiN/Ti metallization sequence to show the effect of in situ chemical and physical plasma cleaning methods on the electrical contact properties of devices with submicron dimensions and high-aspect ratios. The specific contact resistance of Ti to n+-polycrystalline Si and to TiSi2/n+-, p+-<100≳ Si is found comparable to that achieved with an ECR excited Ar plasma cleaning where a surface residue is not produced.

  4. In situ x-ray photoemission studies of the oxidation of Y-Ba-Cu films

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.J.; Jackman, R.B.; Foord, J.S.

    1988-12-15

    X-ray photoemission has been used to investigate the formation of Y-Ba-Cu films on Si(100) and as an in situ probe of their subsequent oxidation to yield the associated oxide ceramic. The layers are prepared by coevaporation of the metallic components under ultrahigh vacuum, and pure alloy phases can be deposited at 300 K; reaction with the underlying substrate resulting in loss of Cu and incorporation by Si in the film takes place, however, at higher temperatures. Room-temperature oxidation stabilizes the film against this interaction and results in the preferential oxidation and surface segregation of barium at the expense of Cu. This segregation process becomes even more apparent during higher temperature (approx.600 K) oxidation reactions. Chemical shifts and associated effects in x-ray photoelectron spectra are used to infer information on the chemical changes that occur in the film as oxidation proceeds. The thin-film phases prepared in situ in this work reveal a very similar surface composition to bulk superconducting samples prepared ex situ. This suggests that the surface segregation in bulk samples does not simply result from reaction with species such as water vapor, but instead may represent an equilibrium state of the oxide-oxygen interface.

  5. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H.; Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F.; Stohr, J.; Diaz, J.; Cossy-Gantner, A.

    1998-03-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) using X-rays is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper the authors give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments.

  6. Accurate determination of the valence band edge in hard x-ray photoemission spectra using GW theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Nemšák, Slavomír; Conti, Giuseppina; Gloskovskii, Andrei; Pálsson, Gunnar Karl; Schneider, Claus M.; Drube, Wolfgang; Louie, Steven G.; Fadley, Charles

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a new method for determining accurate values of the valence-band maximum in x-ray photoemission spectra. Specifically, we align the sharpest peak in the valence-band region of the experimental spectrum with the corresponding feature of a theoretical valence-band density of states curve from ab initio GW theory calculations. This method is particularly useful for soft and hard x-ray photoemission studies of materials with a mixture of valence-band characters, where strong matrix element effects can render standard methods for extracting the valence-band maximum unreliable. We apply our method to hydrogen-terminated boron-doped diamond, which is a promising substrate material for novel solar cell devices. By carrying out photoemission experiments with variable light polarizations, we verify the accuracy of our analysis and the general validity of the method.

  7. Precision measurement of the (3 p-1 s) X-ray transition in muonic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotta, D.; Covita, D. S.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gorke, H.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Nekipelov, M.; Pomerantsev, V.; Popov, M.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schmid, Ph.; Simons, L. M.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-01-01

    The (3 p — 1 s) X-ray transition to the muonic hydrogen ground state was measured with a highresolution crystal spectrometer. The assumption of a statistical population of the hyperfine levels of the muonic hydrogen ground state was directly confirmed by the experiment and measured values for the hyperfine splitting can be reported. The measurement supplements studies on line broadening effects induced by Coulomb de-excitation hindering the direct extraction of the pion-nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium X-ray lines.

  8. X-ray photoemission studies of superficially oxidized cesium antimonide photoemitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, C. W., Jr.; Wertheim, G. K.; Buchanan, D. N. E.; Clements, K. E.; Van Atekum, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Superficially oxidized cesium antimonide photoemitting surfaces prepared in ultrahigh vacuum were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Oxidation of Cs3Sb to produce a surface with enhanced photosensitivity converts part of the antimony to elemental antimony and part of the cesium to cesium suboxide. The latter is identified on the basis of an O1 s peak at 531.3 eV, characteristic of Cs11O3. The production of Cs2O is not ruled out in this process since its signature at 527.5 eV is masked by an antimony shake-up peak at 527 eV.

  9. Molecular Orbital Simulations of Metal 1s2p Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Källman, Erik; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-07-28

    For first-row transition metals, high-resolution 3d electronic structure information can be obtained using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). In the hard X-ray region, a K pre-edge (1s→3d) excitation can be followed by monitoring the dipole-allowed Kα (2p→1s) or Kβ (3p→1s) emission, processes labeled 1s2p or 1s3p RIXS. Here the restricted active space (RAS) approach, which is a molecular orbital method, is used for the first time to study hard X-ray RIXS processes. This is achieved by including the two sets of core orbitals in different partitions of the active space. Transition intensities are calculated using both first- and second-order expansions of the wave vector, including, but not limited to, electric dipoles and quadrupoles. The accuracy of the approach is tested for 1s2p RIXS of iron hexacyanides [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. RAS simulations accurately describe the multiplet structures and the role of 2p and 3d spin-orbit coupling on energies and selection rules. Compared to experiment, relative energies of the two [Fe(CN)6](3-) resonances deviate by 0.2 eV in both incident energy and energy transfer directions, and multiplet splittings in [Fe(CN)6](4-) are reproduced within 0.1 eV. These values are similar to what can be expected for valence excitations. The development opens the modeling of hard X-ray scattering processes for both solution catalysts and enzymatic systems. PMID:27398775

  10. Magnetic dichroism in angle-resolved hard x-ray photoemission from buried layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozina, Xeniya; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Ouardi, Siham; Balke, Benjamin; Felser, Claudia; Schönhense, Gerd; Ikenaga, Eiji; Sugiyama, Takeharu; Kawamura, Naomi; Suzuki, Motohiro; Taira, Tomoyuki; Uemura, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wang, Wenhong; Inomata, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the measurement of magnetic dichroism in angular-resolved photoemission from in-plane magnetized buried thin films. The high bulk sensitivity of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in combination with circularly polarized radiation enables the investigation of the magnetic properties of buried layers. HAXPES experiments with an excitation energy of 8 keV were performed on exchange-biased magnetic layers covered by thin oxide films. Two types of structures were investigated with the IrMn exchange-biasing layer either above or below the ferromagnetic layer: one with a CoFe layer on top and another with a Co2FeAl layer buried beneath the IrMn layer. A pronounced magnetic dichroism is found in the Co and Fe 2p states of both materials. The localization of the magnetic moments at the Fe site conditioning the peculiar characteristics of the Co2FeAl Heusler compound, predicted to be a half-metallic ferromagnet, is revealed from the magnetic dichroism detected in the Fe 2p states.

  11. PASSIVATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES FOR IMPROVED RADIATION DETECTORS: X-RAY PHOTOEMISSION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Ferreira, J; Nikolic, R; Payne, S

    2007-12-10

    Surface passivation of device-grade radiation detector materials was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with transport property measurements before and after various chemical treatments. Specifically Br-MeOH (2% Br), KOH with NH{sub 4}F/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and NH{sub 4}OH solutions were used to etch, reduce and oxidize the surface of Cd{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Te semiconductor crystals. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the resultant microscopic surface morphology. Angle-resolved high-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and core lines were used to evaluate the surface chemistry of the chemically treated surfaces. Metal overlayers were then deposited on these chemically treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of interface chemistry on the electronic structure at these interfaces with the goal of optimizing the Schottky barrier height for improved radiation detector devices.

  12. Band alignments in Fe/graphene/Si(001) junctions studied by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, J.-C.; Tricot, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Turban, P.; Schieffer, P.

    2016-08-01

    The control of tunnel contact resistance is of primary importance for semiconductor-based spintronic devices. This control is hardly achieved with conventional oxide-based tunnel barriers due to deposition-induced interface states. Manipulation of single 2D atomic crystals (such as graphene sheets) weakly interacting with their substrate might represent an alternative and efficient way to design new heterostructures for a variety of different purposes including spin injection into semiconductors. In the present paper, we study by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy the band alignments and interface chemistry of iron-graphene-hydrogenated passivated silicon (001) surfaces for a low and a high n-doping concentration. We find that the hydrogen passivation of the Si(001) surface remains efficient even with a graphene sheet on the Si(001) surface. For both doping concentrations, the semiconductor is close to flat-band conditions which indicates that the Fermi level is unpinned on the semiconductor side of the Graphene/Si(001):H interface. When iron is deposited on the graphene/Si(001):H structures, the Schottky barrier height remains mainly unaffected by the metallic overlayer with a very low barrier height for electrons, a sought-after property in semiconductor based spintronic devices. Finally, we demonstrate that the graphene layer intercalated between the metal and semiconductor also serves as a protection against iron-silicide formation even at elevated temperatures preventing from the formation of a Si-based magnetic dead layer.

  13. Internal Photoemission and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Studies of Sulfur-Passivated GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenji; Ikoma, Hideaki

    1993-02-01

    Internal photoemission and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements were performed to investigate the effect of sulfur passivation on the GaAs surface and the degradation of the GaAs surface exposed to air ambient after the passivation. The reverse bias dependence of the Schottky barrier height was very small in the as-sulfur-treated sample and was mainly explained by the image force lowering effect. However, it increased as this sample was exposed to air, indicating an increase in the interface state density. The XPS studies showed that both the Ga and As oxides were hardly observed in the sulfur-passivated samples. This indicates that sulfur passivation strongly suppresses oxidation of GaAs. However, a small amount of elemental arsenic was observed with a trace of the As suboxides (such as AsO) after exposure to air and it increased as the exposure time was increased. These results were probably correlated with the increase in the bias dependence of the Schottky barrier height in samples exposed to air after the passivation. Thermal oxidation of GaAs was found to be retarded by sulfur passivation until oxidation time was about 10 min at 300°C. A possible model of suppression of oxidation by sulfur passivation was also discussed.

  14. Photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of 3D topological and Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibayev, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    The advantage of studying 3D topological insulators (TIs), compounds that have attracted the attention of many in the condensed matter field, is the ability for their existence at room temperature and no magnetic fields, allowing both for resolving their band structure via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and understanding electrical transport and other properties via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS). A comprehensive quantitative analysis of Bi2Se3, a 3D TI, was carried out using these methods. The Bi2Se3\\ crystals were synthesized in-house at Princeton University. A first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, DFT, was performed using the Abinit software. The band structure of the crystal was then resolved via ARPES at the Advanced Light Source in LBNL, resulting in a surprisingly stark and clear single Dirac cone. A large band gap was confirmed, suggesting an increased potential for applications. In contrast, Kondo insulators are found in rare-earth based materials with f-electron degrees of freedom. Photon energy dependent dispersion relationships and temperature dependence studies were performed on a Kondo candidate CeB6 via ARPES, showing an even number of Dirac cones and a non-TI behavior. Analysis of I-V characteristics through PCS will follow, in addition to characterization via Bruker XRD for both compounds. Research group led by Professor M. Zahid Hasan (Princeton University).

  15. Dynamic force microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies of conducting polymer thin film on nanoscale structured Al surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hitoshi; Takemura, Susumu; Ishii, Atsuro; Takarai, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yohei; Sugiyama, Takeharu; Hiramatsu, Tomoyasu; Nanba, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2007-09-01

    A nanoscale linked-crater structure was fabricated on an Al surface by chemical and electrochemical combination processes. The surface of an Al plate was treated with Semi Clean and was successively processed in anodization in H IISO 4. Dynamic force microscopy image (DFM) showed that a linked-crater structure was formed on the Al surface. At the next stage, the authors conducted the thin film growth of conducting polymer polythiophene on the Al surface by an electrochemical method. The electrochemical polymerization on the Al surface was performed in acetonitrile containing thiophene monomer and (Et) 4NBF 4 as a supporting electrolyte. After being electrochemically processed, the contour image of each crater was still recognized implying that the polymer nanofilm was grown on the nanoscale structured Al surface. The cross section analysis demonstrated that the nanofilm was grown along the linked-crater structure because the contour of each crater became thick. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement also supported the polymer nanofilm growth because C 1s and S 2p lines were detected. Furthermore, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules are injected into the polymer nanofilm grown on the nanoscale structured Al surface by diffusing method in order to functionalize the nanoscale hybrid material.

  16. In-situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 on Silicon Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youb Lee, Seung; Jeon, Cheolho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Yooseok; Jung, Woosung; An, Ki-Seok; Park, Chong-Yun

    2012-03-01

    In-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the initial stages of TiO2 growth on a Si(001) substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The core level spectra of Si 2p, C 1s, O 1s, and Ti 2p were measured at every half reaction in the titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP)-H2O ALD process. The ligand exchange reactions were verified using the periodic oscillation of the C 1s concentration, as well as changes in the hydroxyl concentration. XPS analysis revealed that Ti2O3 and Si oxide were formed at the initial stages of TiO2 growth. A stoichiometric TiO2 layer was dominantly formed after two cycles and was chemically saturated after four cycles.

  17. In-situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 on Silicon Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Youb; Jeon, Cheolho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Yooseok; Jung, Woosung; An, Ki-Seok; Park, Chong-Yun

    2012-03-01

    In-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the initial stages of TiO2 growth on a Si(001) substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The core level spectra of Si 2p, C 1s, O 1s, and Ti 2p were measured at every half reaction in the titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP)--H2O ALD process. The ligand exchange reactions were verified using the periodic oscillation of the C 1s concentration, as well as changes in the hydroxyl concentration. XPS analysis revealed that Ti2O3 and Si oxide were formed at the initial stages of TiO2 growth. A stoichiometric TiO2 layer was dominantly formed after two cycles and was chemically saturated after four cycles.

  18. Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission with micro-positioning techniques for metallic V2O3

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Hidenori; Kiss, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Nishitani, Yoshito; Mori, Takeo; Nakata, Yuki; Kitayama, Satoshi; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Ikeda, Shinji; Fuchimoto, Hiroto; Minowa, Yosuke; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Allen, James W.; Metcalf, Patricia; Imai, Masaki; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Suga, Shigemasa; Muro, Takayuki; Sekiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission has been performed for metallic V2O3. By combining a microfocus beam (40 µm × 65 µm) and micro-positioning techniques with a long-working-distance microscope, it has been possible to observe band dispersions from tiny cleavage surfaces with a typical size of several tens of µm. The photoemission spectra show a clear position dependence, reflecting the morphology of the cleaved sample surface. By selecting high-quality flat regions on the sample surface, it has been possible to perform band mapping using both photon-energy and polar-angle dependences, opening the door to three-dimensional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for typical three-dimensional correlated materials where large cleavage planes are rarely obtained. PMID:25931096

  19. An investigation of resonant photoemission in Gd with x-ray linear dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    1998-07-01

    The constructive summing of direct and indirect channels above the absorption threshold of a core level can cause a massive increase in the emission cross section, leading to a phenomenon called "resonant photoemission". Using novel magnetic linear dichroism in angular distribution photoelectron spectroscopy experiments and theoretical simulations, we have probed the nature of the resonant photoemission process in Gd metal. It now appears that temporal matching as well as energy matching is a requirement for true resonant photoemission.

  20. Crystal structure and X-ray photoemission spectroscopic study of A{sub 2}LaMO{sub 6} [A=Ba, Ca; M=Nb, Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Alo; Saha, Sujoy; Sinha, T.P.

    2015-09-15

    The X-ray photoemission spectroscopic (XPS) study of the double perovskite oxides A{sub 2}LaMO{sub 6} [A=Ba, Ca; M=Nb, Ta] synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique has been carried out to investigate the nature of the chemical state of the constituent ions and the bonding between them. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns suggests the monoclinic crystal structure of all the materials at room temperature. The negative and positive chemical shifts of the core level XPS spectrum of O-1s and Nb-3d{sub 3/2}/Ta-4f{sub 5/2} respectively suggest the covalent bonding between Nb/Ta cations and O ion. The change of the bonding strength between the anion and the cations from one material to another has been analyzed. The vibrational property of the materials is investigated using the room temperature Raman spectra. A large covalency of Ta-based compound than Nb compound is confirmed from the relative shifting of the Raman modes of the materials. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of two perovskite oxides CLN and CLT is investigated. XPS study confirms the two different co-ordination environments of Ca and covalent bonding between B-site cations and O-ion. - Highlights: • Ordered perovskite structure obtained by Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. • Study of nature of chemical bonding by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. • Opposite chemical shift of d-states of Nb/Ta with respect to O. • Covalent bonding between d-states of Nb/Ta and O. • Relative Raman shifts of CLN and CLT substantiate the more covalent character of Ta than Nb.

  1. Soft X-ray photoemission study of Co2(Cr1-xFex)Ga Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunekawa, Masanori; Hattori, Yoshiro; Sekiyama, Akira; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Suga, Shigemasa; Muro, Takayuki; Kanomata, Takeshi; Imada, Shin

    2015-08-01

    We have performed soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SXPES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Co-based Heusler compounds Co2(Cr1-xFex)Ga (x = 0.0, 0.4, and 1.0) in order to study their electronic structures. Band-structure calculation was carried out and compared with the experimental results. SXPES spectra show hν-dependence, revealing the contributions of the Co, Cr, and Fe 3d electronic states in the valence band. The band width observed by the SXPES seems to be narrower than that predicted by the band-structure calculation. XAS spectra depend strongly on the the value of x in Co2(Cr1-xFex)Ga. The electron correlation effects are found to be stronger as x changes from 0.0 to 1.0.

  2. X-RAY OUTFLOWS IN THE SWIFT BURST ALERT DETECTED SEYFERT 1s

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.

    2010-12-20

    Previous surveys of outflows in low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have relied on the analysis of sources selected primarily for their optical/X-ray brightness and are therefore biased. Toward determining the outflow properties of local AGNs, we detect warm absorption signatures of O VII and O VIII absorption edges in the available Suzaku/XMM-Newton CCD spectra of an unbiased sample of 44 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources selected in the very hard X-rays (14-195 keV) with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. From our analysis, we find that O VII and O VIII absorption edges are present in 41% of the sample. This fraction is dependent on luminosity, with outflow detections in 60% of low-luminosity and 30% of high-luminosity sources. However, grating spectroscopy of the highest luminosity sources reveals that {approx}80% of these sources have ionized absorbers, but that the ionization states are higher/lower than produces the O VII and O VIII edges. This suggests that ionized absorption may be present in all local Seyfert 1s.

  3. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha; Sarkar, Indranil; Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi

    2014-09-08

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (∼75 nm and ∼155 nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6 eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500 eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg Kα (1253.6 eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  4. Correlation between N 1s core level x-ray photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, C.; Gómez-García, J.; Palomares, F. J.; Soriano, L.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the N 1s core level spectra, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), of amorphous CNx films which gives evidence of the existing correlation between the different components that constitute the respective spectra. After annealing, the contribution of XPS at 399.3 eV and the components of XAS at 399.6 and 400.8 eV are clearly enhanced. They are assigned to sp2 with two neighbors and to sp states of nitrogen. In addition, the XPS component at 401.3 eV is related to the XAS feature at 402.0 eV and has been assigned to sp2 nitrogen bonded to three carbon neighbors.

  5. Ab initio study of 3s core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 3s - and 4s -core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic transition metals by developing an ab initio method. We obtain the spectra exhibiting the characteristic shapes as a function of binding energy in good agreement with experimental observations. The spectral shapes are strikingly different between the majority spin channel and the minority spin channel for ferromagnetic metals Ni, Co, and Fe, that is, large intensities appear in the higher binding-energy side of the main peak (satellite) in the majority spin channel. Such satellite or shoulder intensities are also obtained for nonmagnetic metals V and Ru. These behaviors are elucidated in terms of the change of the one-electron states induced by the core-hole potential.

  6. Dimensionality and doping effect on the Core-level X-ray photoemission satellites in layered ruthenates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haizhong; Li, Yi; Hu, Biao; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, E. W.; Zhang, Jiandi; Urbina, D.; Liu, Tijiang; Fobes, David; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2009-03-01

    Core-level photoelectron spectra of the layered perovskite crystal Srn+1RunO3n+1 (n = 1, 2, and 3) and Mn-doped Sr3Ru2O7 are investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The Sr 3d and Ru 3d core-level spectra exhibit a two-peak structure, screened and unscreened peaks, indicating strong correlation effects among Ru 4d electrons. However, there are little changes of the core-level satellite features with n, suggesting the electron-electron correlation is mainly confined in the RuO2 plane. On the other hand, doping of Mn will drastically affect the core-level spectral weight, reflecting the doping-induced metal-to-insulator transition in the doped system. The position of Ru-core levels remain the same, thus, indicating no doping-induced change of Ru valence.

  7. X-RAY PHOTOEMISSION ANALYSIS OF PASSIVATED Cd(1-x)ZnxTe SURFACES FOR IMPROVED RADIATION DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Ferreira, J; Nikolic, R; Payne, S

    2008-05-12

    Surface passivation of device-grade CdZnTe was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with transport property measurements after Br-MeOH (2% Br) and KOH/NH{sub 4}F/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions were used to etch and oxidize the surface. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and core lines were used to evaluate the surface chemistry of the chemically treated surfaces. Metal overlayers were then deposited on these chemically treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of interface chemistry on the electronic structure at these interfaces with the goal of optimizing the Schottky barrier height for radiation detector devices.

  8. In-Situ observation of wet oxidation kinetics on Si (100) via ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Rossi, Massimiliano; Mun, Bongjin S.; Enta, Yoshiharu; Fadley, Charles S.; Lee, Ki-Suk; Kim, Sang-Koog; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Hussain, Zahid; Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    2007-08-24

    The initial stages of wet thermal oxidation of Si(100)-(2x1) have been investigated by in-situ ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (APXPS), including chemical-state resolution via Si 2p core-level spectra. Real-time growth rates of silicon dioxide have been monitored at 100 mTorr of water vapor. This pressure is considerably higher than in any prior study using XPS. Substrate temperatures have been varied between 250 and 500 C. Above a temperature of {approx} 400 C, two distinct regimes, a rapid and a quasi-saturated one, are identified and growth rates show a strong temperature dependence which cannot be explained by the conventional Deal-Grove model.

  9. X-ray photoemission study of the infinite-layer cuprate superconductor Sr(0.9) La (0.1) CuO(2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Jung, C. U.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, S. I.

    2001-01-01

    The electron-doped infinite-layer superconductor Sr(0.9)La(0.1) CuO(2) is studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). A nonaqueous chemical etchant is shown to effectively remove contaminants and to yield surfaces from which signals intrinsic to the superconductor dominate.

  10. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J. -S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; et al

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  11. Observation of electric potential in organic thin-film transistor by bias-applied hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Tada, Keisuke; Yasuno, Satoshi; Oji, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Noriyuki; Hirosawa, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    The effect of gate voltage on electric potential in a pentacene (PEN) layer was studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under a bias voltage. It was observed that applying a negative gate voltage substantially increases the width of a C 1s peak. This suggested that injected and accumulated carriers in an organic thin film transistor channel modified the potential depth profile in PEN. It was also observed that the C 1s kinetic energy tends to increase monotonically with threshold voltage.

  12. Bulk electronic structure of FeRh undergoing metamagnetic transition via hard x-ray photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Alexander; Cooke, David; Kruger, Peter; Bordel, Catherine; Fullerton, Eric; Ueda, Shigenori; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Hellman, Frances; Fadley, Charles

    2012-02-01

    In this study changes in the electronic structure accompanying a temperature-induced metamagnetic transition from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic order are investigated in strained epitaxial FeRh thin films via valence-band and core-level hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with a photon energy of 6 keV. At such high photon energy, the resulting inelastic mean-free paths of the photoemitted electrons and therefore the average probing depths are on the order of 60 å, corresponding to about 20 unit cells and ensuring truly bulk-sensitive measurement. Clear differences between the AFM and FM states are observed across the entire valence-band spectrum and these are well reproduced using density functional theory. Changes in the Fe 2p core-levels of Fe are also observed and interpreted using Anderson impurity model calculations. These results suggest that significant electronic structure changes are involved in this AFM-FM transition.

  13. Modelling of the X-ray broad absorption features in Narrow-Line Seyfert 1s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porquet, Delphine; Mouchet, Martine; Dumont Anne-Marie

    2000-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the broad absorption features detected near 1-1.4 keV in several Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies, by modelling the absorbing medium with various physical parameters, using the ionization code PEGAS. The observed properties of the X-ray absorption features can be reproduced by taking into account the peculiar soft X-ray excess which is well fitted by a blackbody plus an underlying power law. We equally stress that the emission coming from the absorbing medium (related to the covering factor) has a strong influence on the resulting X-ray spectrum, in particular on the apparent position and depth of the absorption features. A non-solar iron abundance may be required to explain the observed deep absorption. We also investigate the influence of an additional collisional ionization process ("hybrid case") on the predicted absorption features.

  14. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  15. Gas-Phase Photoemission With Soft X-Rays: Cross Sections And Angular Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, D. A.; Kobrin, P. H.; Truesdale, C. M.; Lindle, D. W.; F errett, T. A.; Heimann, P. A.; Becker, U.; Kerkhoff, H. G.; Southworth, S. H.

    1984-03-01

    A summary is presented of typical gas-phase photoemission studies based on synchrotron radiation in the 50-5000 eV range, using beam lines at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Three topics are addressed: atomic inner-shell photoelectron cross sections and asymmetries, correlation peaks in rare gases, and core-level shape resonances in molecules. Photoelectron cross-section a(nZ) and asymmetry-parameter a(n0 studies in mercury vapor at photon energies up to 270 eV (up to 600 eV for a4f) extend coverage of these parameters to n<5 and 5<3. Comparison with Dirac-Slater and relativistic random-phase approximation calculations reveals systematic discrepancies. For example, distinct Cooper minima in a(n iZ,) are observed but not predicted, while predicted a(n9) values are typically too high. Correlation satellites have been studied for the K shells of helium (hv = 68-90 eV), neon (hv = 870-960 eV) and argon (hv = 3200-3320 eV). In helium the n=2 satellite peak was shown to have mainly 2p character at threshold, and its asymmetry was measured through the autoionizing resonance region. Tentative evidence was obtained that the neon satellites are less intense near threshold than in the high-energy limit, and that their intensities stay constant or decrease with increasing energy near threshold. A new satellite was observed in argon at 24.6 eV which appears to increase in intensity with energy. Molecular core-level shape resonances were observed for the first time by photoemission, yielding a(hv) and a(hv) for core levels from 180 eV binding energy (S 2p in SF6 and OCS) through C is in CO, CO2 and CF4, N ls in N2 and NO, and 0 is in CO and CO2 to 2490 eV (S ls in SF6). Several conclusions can be drawn about the photoelectron and Auger cross sections and asymmetry parameters.

  16. Sub-nanosecond resolution x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy of magnetization processes in a permalloy ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeb, D.; Krasyuk, A.; Oelsner, A.; Nepijko, S. A.; Elmers, H. J.; Kuksov, A.; Schneider, C. M.; Schönhense, G.

    2005-04-01

    Fast magnetization processes in a microstructured permalloy ring with 80 µm o.d. and 30 nm thickness have been observed by photoemission electron microscopy exploiting x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the magnetic contrast mechanism. As a high speed probe we employed synchrotron radiation pulses at the ESRF (Grenoble) operated in 16-bunch mode, yielding photon pulses of 105 ps FWHM with a period of 176 ns. Fast magnetic field pulses have been generated by means of current pulses through coplanar waveguides with the magnetic structure being lithographically prepared on their surface. A stroboscopic pump-probe set-up with a variable time delay between the field pulse and photon pulse allowed us to take snapshots of the dynamic response of the magnetic domain structure. We observed coherent magnetization rotation during the leading edge part of the field pulse, the formation of a characteristic domain pattern ('onion state') in the plateau region of the pulse and the fast formation of a striped domain pattern (incoherent magnetization rotation) during the trailing edge part of the field pulse. A numerical simulation confirmed essential features of the stroboscopic image series.

  17. XPS study of interface formation of CVD SiO2 on InSb. [X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of CVD SiO2 films deposited on thin native oxides grown on InSb substrates is examined using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and a relatively benign chemical etching technique for depth profiling. An intensity analysis of XPS spectra is used to derive the compositional structure of the interfaces obtained in the SiO2/native oxide/InSb system. Peak positions in these spectra are used to follow the change in substrate surface potential during the etch sequence, and to establish the chemical nature of the species formed during deposition and subsequent processing. Reaction of the substrate with oxygen resulted in an In-rich native oxide and 1-2 monolayers of excess elemental Sb at the native-oxide/substrate interface, incompletely oxidized silane reduced the native oxide, leaving less than 1 monolayer of elemental In at the SiO2/native oxide interface. Etch removal of this thin In-rich layer leads to a change in the substrate surface potential of 0.06 eV, corresponding to a net increase in positive charge. The results are consistent with simple thermodynamic considerations; they are also compared to previously reported studies of deposited dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductors.

  18. Chemical interaction at the Cu/PPA interface: an X-ray photoemission investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzonetti, G.; Russo, M. V.; Iucci, G.; Furlani, A.

    1993-11-01

    A coverage-dependent XPS investigation of the early stages of interaction between evaporated Cu and polyphenylacetylene (PPA) has been carried out. Copper films have been deposited at 300 K to a final thickness of about 5 monolayers. Overlayer and substrate core-level emission behaviour indicates the layer-by-layer growth of Cu on the PPA surface without interdiffusion. At low copper coverages a chemical interaction between the Cu adatoms and the substrate is observed by monitoring the changes occurring at the π å π∗ satellite feature of the C1s core-level line. We observe a decrease of intensity for this satellite as the copper coverage increases, interpreted in terms of the formation of a Cu-π complex with the phenyl ring. The Cu Auger spectra demonstrated the presence of positively charged metal atoms up to a coverage of ˜ 5 Å. In the submonolayer region the occurence of broadening of the C1s core level on the low binding energy side is observed together with a positive shift for the Cu2p 3/2 emission. Upon completion of the first copper monolayer these phenomena are removed. The observed behaviour can be accounted for in terms of differential charging with injection and trapping of charge into the PPA film from the Cu atoms that have not yet completed the first monolayer.

  19. Hard X-ray photoemission experiments on novel Ge-based metal gate/high-k stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Martinez, E.; Batude, P.; Clavelier, L.; Soria, F.; Chabli, A.; Castro, G. R.

    2007-09-01

    The scaling of CMOS devices makes mandatory the study of new materials to overcome the physical limitations of the Si technology. Germanium is a good candidate to replace silicon for the channel to improve the carrier mobility. High-K dielectrics such as HfO2 are investigated to replace the gate oxide (SiO2) to decrease both leakage currents and EOT. For the gate electrode, it is also crucial to move from poly-silicon to a metal gate like TiN to adjust work function and to suppress poly-depletion in order to decrease EOT. However, to reach optimal device performances, both the Ge/high-K and high-K/TiN interfaces need to be optimized. In order to passive and prevent Ge oxidation we have deposited a very thin Si interlayer prior to the high-k growth. A thin Si layer (Si capping) is epitaxially grown on Ge and then partially oxidized before high-k deposition. The exact control of the Si capping layer is of major importance. It must be enough thick to prevent germanium oxidation when the partial oxidation of Si is realized and as low as possible in order to keep the benefit of the better transport properties in germanium. In this contribution, we present non-destructive chemical and concentration profile of both critical buried interfaces by mean of Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES) of a Ge/Si/SiO2/HfO2/TiN stack, with thickness of 2500, 0.9, 0.5, 4 and 4 nm, respectively. Experiments are performed at the SpLine HAXPES station of the ESRF equipped with a novel photoemission set-up in combination with surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD). The profiles obtained clearly show that the Si interlayer prevents the Ge oxidation and the presence of a new Hf state which is related to an interface chemical shift. Our results demonstrate the excellent capability of HAXPES to study buried interfaces.

  20. Study of hard disk and slider surfaces using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Bhatia, C.S.; Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Bogy, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to study the properties of amorphous hard carbon overcoats on disks and sliders, and the properties of the lubricant. The modification of lubricants after performing thermal desorption studies was measured by NEXAFS, and the results are compared to the thermal desorption data. The study of lubricant degradation in wear tracks is described. Sliders were investigated before and after wear test, and the modification of the slider coating as well as the transfer of lubricant to the slider was studied. The studies show that the lubricant is altered chemically during the wear. Fluorine is removed and carboxyl groups are formed.

  1. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    SciTech Connect

    Kapilashrami, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Fadley, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-14

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO=VBM{sub CIGS} – VBM{sub diamond}=0.3 eV±0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV±0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  2. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilashrami, M.; Conti, G.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Fadley, C. S.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO = VBMCIGS - VBMdiamond = 0.3 eV ± 0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV ± 0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  3. Indication of single-crystal PuO2 oxidation from O 1s x-ray absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modin, A.; Yun, Y.; Suzuki, M.-T.; Vegelius, J.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Butorin, S. M.

    2011-02-01

    The electronic structure of single-crystal PuO2 is studied using O 1s x-ray absorption (XA) and x-ray emission. Interpretation of the experimental data is supported by extensive first-principles calculations on the basis of the densityfunctionaltheory+U approach. The measured XA spectra show a significant difference in intensity for the first two peaks between different spots or areas on the single crystal. Our theoretical simulations show that the first peak, at ~531 eV, can be attributed to O 2p-Pu 5f hybridization, while the second peak, at ~533.4 eV, is due to hybridization of O 2p with Pu d states. The reasons for the observed differences in the O 1s XA spectra are explored by calculating a number of defect structures PuO2±x as well as by simulating the existence of Pu(V) sites. Our results indicate the presence of oxidation states higher than Pu(IV) in some areas of the single crystal. The findings also suggest that plutonium oxide with a Pu fraction in an oxidation state higher than Pu(IV) consists of inequivalent Pu sites with Pu(IV)O2 and Pu(V)O2 rather than representing a system where the Pu oxidation state is constantly fluctuating between Pu(IV) and Pu(V).

  4. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  5. Adsorption of dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110): a photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark J; Syres, Karen L; Cant, David J H; Hardman, Samantha J O; Thomas, Andrew G

    2014-07-29

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) techniques have been used to study the adsorption of dopamine on a rutile TiO2 (110) single crystal. Photoemission results suggest that dopamine bonds through the oxygen molecules in a bidentate fashion. From the data, it is ambiguous whether the oxygens bond to the same 5-fold coordinated surface titanium atom or bridges across two, although based on the bonding of pyrocatechol on rutile TiO2 (110), it is likely that the dopamine bridges two titanium atoms. Using the searchlight effect, the carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure NEXAFS spectra recorded for dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110) show the phenyl ring to be oriented at 78° ± 5° from the surface and twisted 11 ± 10° relative to the (001) direction. PMID:25003716

  6. Investigating crystalline-polarity-dependent electronic structures of GaN by hard x-ray photoemission and ab-initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Takeo; Ueda, Shigenori; Suzuki, Motohiro; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Williams, Jesse R.; Ohashi, Naoki

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline-polarity-dependent electronic structures of gallium nitride (GaN) were studied by photoemission spectroscopy (PES) using soft and hard x-rays with different linear polarizations. A peak located near the valence band (VB) maximum was enhanced for a (0001) surface compared with that for a ( 000 1 ¯ ) surface regardless of photon energy. Comparison of the VB density of states obtained by ab-initio calculations with the observed VB-PES spectra indicates that the crystalline-polarity dependence is associated with the Ga 4p and N 2p states. The most plausible origin of the crystalline-polarity-dependent VB feature is based on the photoemission phenomena of electrons in the pz-orbitals due to spontaneous electric polarization along the c-axis of GaN.

  7. Investigation of the potassium fluoride post deposition treatment on the CIGSe/CdS interface using hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ümsür, Bünyamin; Calvet, Wolfram; Steigert, Alexander; Lauermann, Iver; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Prietzel, Karsten; Greiner, Dieter; Kaufmann, Christian A; Unold, Thomas; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch

    2016-05-18

    The impact of the potassium fluoride post deposition treatment on CIGSe chalcopyrite absorbers is investigated by means of depth resolved hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the near surface region. Two similar, slightly Cu-poor CIGSe absorbers were used with one being treated by potassium fluoride prior to the chemical bath deposition of an ultrathin CdS layer. The thickness of the CdS layer was chosen to be in the range of about 10 nm in order to allow the investigation of the CIGSe/CdS interface by the application of hard X-rays, increasing the information depth up to 30 nm. Besides strong intermixing on both samples, an increased Cu depletion of the KF treated absorber was observed in combination with an increased accumulation of Cd and S. In addition, a general shift of about 0.15 eV to higher binding energies of the CIGSe valence band at the absorber surface as well as the CIGSe and CdS related core levels was measured on the KF treated sample. This phenomenon is attributed to the impact of additional cadmium which acts as donor and releases further electrons into the conduction band of the absorber. Finally, the electrons accumulate at the CdS surface after having passed the interface region. This additional surface charge leads to a pronounced shift in the photoemission spectra as observed on the KF treated CIGSe absorber compared to the non-treated absorber. PMID:27160389

  8. The C 1s and N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of five azabenzenes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Vall-llosera, G; Gao, B; Kivimäki, A; Coreno, M; Alvarez Ruiz, J; de Simone, M; Agren, H; Rachlew, E

    2008-01-28

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been measured and interpreted by means of density functional theory for five different azabenzenes (pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine) in the gas phase. The experimental and theoretical spectra at the N 1s and C 1s edges show a strong resonance assigned to the transition of the 1s electron in the respective N or C atoms to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with pi(*) symmetry. As opposed to the N 1s edge, at the C 1s edge this resonance is split due to the different environments of the core hole atom in the molecule. The shift in atomic core-level energy due to a specific chemical environment is explained with the higher electronegativity of the N atom compared to the C atom. The remaining resonances below the ionization potential (IP) are assigned to sigma or pi [corrected] orbitals with mixed valence/Rydberg [corrected] character. Upon N addition, a reduction of intensity is observed in the Rydberg region at both edges as compared to the intensity in the continuum. Above the IP one or more resonances are seen and ascribed here to transitions to sigma(*) orbitals. Calculating the experimental and theoretical Delta(pi) term values at both edges, we observe that they are almost the same within +/-1 eV as expected for isoelectronic bonded pairs. The term values of the pi(*) and sigma(*) resonances are discussed in terms of the total Z number of the atoms participating in the bond. PMID:18247958

  9. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  10. Polarized hard X-ray photoemission system with micro-positioning technique for probing ground-state symmetry of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hidenori; Naimen, Sho; Higashiya, Atsushi; Kanai, Yuina; Yomosa, Hiroshi; Yamagami, Kohei; Kiss, Takayuki; Kadono, Toshiharu; Imada, Shin; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Takase, Kouichi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso; Suga, Shigemasa; Yabashi, Makina; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Sekiyama, Akira

    2016-05-01

    An angle-resolved linearly polarized hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) system has been developed to study the ground-state symmetry of strongly correlated materials. The linear polarization of the incoming X-ray beam is switched by a transmission-type phase retarder composed of two diamond (100) crystals. The best value of the degree of linear polarization was found to be -0.96, containing a vertical polarization component of 98%. A newly developed low-temperature two-axis manipulator enables easy polar and azimuthal rotations to select the detection direction of photoelectrons. The lowest temperature achieved was 9 K, offering the chance to access the ground state even for strongly correlated electron systems in cubic symmetry. A co-axial sample monitoring system with long-working-distance microscope enables the same region on the sample surface to be measured before and after rotation. Combining this sample monitoring system with a micro-focused X-ray beam by means of an ellipsoidal Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror (25 µm × 25 µm FWHM), polarized valence-band HAXPES has been performed on NiO for voltage application as resistive random access memory to demonstrate the micro-positioning technique and polarization switching. PMID:27140153

  11. Soft x-ray photoemission of clean and sulfur-covered polar ZnO surfaces: A view of the stabilization of polar oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Jayeeta; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Batzill, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The two polar surfaces of ZnO were investigated by soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Surface components due to variation in the Madelung energy were identified in photoemission core-level spectra. Sulfur adsorption was used to passivate the surfaces in order to enable separation of the bulk from the surface components. For the ZnO0001-Zn surface the observed photoemission peaks were consistent with a Zndeficient surface, exhibiting a high density of O-terminated step edges. The ZnO000 1-O surface is very reactive toward hydrogen adsorption and only above 650 K a hydrogen free surface was observed. For hydrogen-free and small hydrogen coverage an electrostatic shift of the Fermi-level toward the band-gap center was observed. This indicates an incomplete compensation of the internal electrostatic potential by surface oxygen vacancies or charged adsorbates. Coadsorption of sulfur lowered the desorption temperature for hydrogen indicating the possibility to tune the chemical properties of these polar surfaces by dopants.

  12. Soft x-ray Photoemission of Clean and Sulfur-Covered Polar ZnO Surfaces: A View of the Stabilization of Polar Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, J.; Senanayake, S; Batzill, M

    2008-01-01

    The two polar surfaces of ZnO were investigated by soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Surface components due to variation in the Madelung energy were identified in photoemission core-level spectra. Sulfur adsorption was used to passivate the surfaces in order to enable separation of the bulk from the surface components. For the ZnO(0001)-Zn surface the observed photoemission peaks were consistent with a Zn-deficient surface, exhibiting a high density of O-terminated step edges. The ZnO(000-1)-O surface is very reactive toward hydrogen adsorption and only above 650 K a hydrogen free surface was observed. For hydrogen-free and small hydrogen coverage an electrostatic shift of the Fermi-level toward the band-gap center was observed. This indicates an incomplete compensation of the internal electrostatic potential by surface oxygen vacancies or charged adsorbates. Coadsorption of sulfur lowered the desorption temperature for hydrogen indicating the possibility to tune the chemical properties of these polar surfaces by dopants.

  13. Acid-site characterization of water-oxidized alumina films by near-edge x-ray absorption and soft x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hagan, P.J.; Merrill, R.P.; Rhodin, T.N.; Woronick, S.W.; Shinn, N.D.; Woolery, G.L.; Chester, A.W.

    1994-12-01

    Hydroxylated alumina films have been synthesized by water oxidation of single crystal Al(110) surfaces. Thermal dehydroxylation results in anion vacancies which produce an Al(3s) defect state 3.5 eV below the conduction band edge. A maximum in the defect-DOS occurs for oxides heated to 350 to 400C, which is where the materials exhibit maximum Lewis acidity with respect to C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Adsorbed C{sub 2}H{sub 4} produces thermally active C{sub 2} species which interact covalently with the defect-DOS and nonbonding O(2p) from the top of the valence band. C(1s) binding energies suggest significant charge transfer which is consistent with a carbenium ion. Ni evaporated onto the surface, however, transfers charge directly to Al species and does not interact with O atoms at the defect site. The defect-DOS is regenerated when the C{sub 2} species decomposes or when Ni migrates thermally through the oxide layer.

  14. X-Ray Photoemission Measurements and Electronic Structure of HgBa2CaCu2O6+Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Rupp, M.; Tsuei, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data presented here are the first on an epitaxial thin film of a mercury cuprate superconductor, the first in which signals from the superconducting phase dominate all the core level spectra, and the first to exhibit a clear Fermi edge in the valence band region. Mercury is found to be in a single chemical state, contrary to reports based on sintered polycrystalline pellets.

  15. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy of focused ion beam-induced magnetic patterns on iron-rhodium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohki, Atsushi; Aikoh, Kazuma; Shinoda, Ryoichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Iwase, Akihiro; Matsui, Toshiyuki

    2013-05-01

    Iron-rhodium (FeRh) thin films were irradiated with a 30 keV Ga ion beam using a focused ion beam system to produce micrometer scale ferromagnetic square dot arrays. Two-dimensional magnetic square dot arrays with dimensions of 30 × 30, 10 × 10, and 5 × 5 μm were successfully produced on the FeRh surface, which was confirmed by magnetic force microscopy. The results of photoemission electron microscopy combined with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism revealed that the magnetization of the magnetic square dots could be controlled by changing the amount of irradiation. The magnetic domain structure of the magnetic square dots with sides of 5-30 μm was found to be a single domain structure, which was possibly influenced by the interaction between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfaces.

  16. Conduction band offset at GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission and charge-corrected x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. F.; Nishimula, T.; Nagashio, K.; Kita, K.; Toriumi, A.

    2013-03-11

    We report a consistent conduction band offset (CBO) at a GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) and charge-corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). IPE results showed that the CBO value was larger than 1.5 eV irrespective of metal electrode and substrate type variance, while an accurate determination of valence band offset (VBO) by XPS requires a careful correction of differential charging phenomena. The VBO value was determined to be 3.60 {+-} 0.2 eV by XPS after charge correction, thus yielding a CBO (1.60 {+-} 0.2 eV) in excellent agreement with the IPE results. Such a large CBO (>1.5 eV) confirmed here is promising in terms of using GeO{sub 2} as a potential passivation layer for future Ge-based scaled CMOS devices.

  17. Electronic structure of ultrathin Fe films on TiO[sub 2](110) studied with soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, U. Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118-5698 ); Tao, H. ); Shinn, N.D. ); Madey, T.E. )

    1994-11-15

    We report on soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) of a TiO[sub 2](110) surface during deposition of Fe in the monolayer regime. At low fractional monolayer coverages, the adsorbed Fe atoms are oxidized and Ti cations at the interface become reduced due to Fe adsorption. SXPS from shallow core levels and valence bands show that Fe starts to exhibit metallic character at a coverage of approximately 0.7 equivalent monolayers. Two well separated defect states appear in the band gap of TiO[sub 2] at iron coverages well below one monolayer. We use resonant photoemission to obtain information on the partial density of states, and we assign these defect states as being Fe-derived and Ti-derived states, located at the Fe and Ti sites, respectively. We suggest that a position change of oxygen is involved in the bonding of Fe on the TiO[sub 2](110) surface.

  18. Investigation of Sputtering Damage in SrRuO3 Films Prepared by Sputtering with Raman and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Takeshi; Nishide, Masamichi; Matsuoka, Masashi; Kamo, Takafumi; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Katoda, Takashi; Shima, Hiromi; Nishida, Ken; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Sputtering damage of SrRuO3 (SRO) films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering under various growth pressures was investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Phonon modes that were related to Ru and Sr ions changed and XPS spectra shifted with decreasing growth pressure. These results indicate that Sr ions switched place with Ru ions in SRO films when the SRO films had sputtering damage under low-growth-pressure sputtering condition as determined from Raman spectroscopy and XPS measurement. The antisite ion content increased with decreasing growth pressure. The resistivity of the SRO films also increased with increasing antisite ion content. The dynamics of sputtering damage revealed that the antisite Sr and Ru ions were formed in SRO films.

  19. Ultrathin magnetic oxide EuO films on Si(001) using SiOx passivation—Controlled by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, C.; Flade, S.; Gorgoi, M.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Schneider, C. M.; Müller, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present the chemical and structural optimization of ultrathin magnetic oxide EuO films on silicon. By applying a controlled in situ passivation of the Si(001) surface with SiOx in the monolayer regime, metallic silicide contaminations at the interface can be effectively reduced down to a sub-monolayer coverage, as was carefully quantified by interface-sensitive hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Heteroepitaxial growth of EuO on Si(001) is sustained for this ultrathin SiOx-passivation, and bulk-near magnetic properties are observed for the 4 nm-thin EuO films. Our successful combination of chemically and structurally optimized EuO/Si(001) heterostructures by ultrathin in situ SiOx passivation makes this system promising for an application as alternative spin functional tunnel contacts in spin-FETs.

  20. A (4x2) reconstruction of CuInSe{sub 2} (001) studied by low-energy electron diffraction and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Deniozou, Th.; Esser, N.; Schulmeyer, Th.; Hunger, R.

    2006-01-30

    Clean and flat (001) surfaces of CuInSe{sub 2}/GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy could be prepared by the combination of a Se capping and decapping process and subsequent Ar{sup +} ion sputtering and annealing. The formation of a (4x2) reconstruction was observed with low-energy electron diffraction. Soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy was performed on the prepared surfaces and revealed surface core-level binding energy shifts in the Cu 2p{sub 3/2}, Se 3d, and In 4d levels which are associated with surface atoms. The structure model of a combined metal adatom-Se dimer structure is proposed to refer to the (4x2) reconstruction.

  1. X-ray photoemission analysis of clean and carbon monoxide-chemisorbed platinum(111) stepped surfaces using a curved crystal

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Andrew L.; Schiller, Frederik; Corso, Martina; Merte, Lindsay R.; Bertram, Florian; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin; Brión-Ríos, Anto´n X.; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Ortega, J. Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Surface chemistry and catalysis studies could significantly gain from the systematic variation of surface active sites, tested under the very same conditions. Curved crystals are excellent platforms to perform such systematics, which may in turn allow to better resolve fundamental properties and reveal new phenomena. This is demonstrated here for the carbon monoxide/platinum system. We curve a platinum crystal around the high-symmetry (111) direction and carry out photoemission scans on top. This renders the spatial core-level imaging of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a ‘tunable' vicinal surface, allowing a straightforward visualization of the rich chemisorption phenomenology at steps and terraces. Through such photoemission images we probe a characteristic elastic strain variation at stepped surfaces, and unveil subtle stress-release effects on clean and covered vicinal surfaces. These results offer the prospect of applying the curved surface approach to rationally investigate the chemical activity of surfaces under real pressure conditions. PMID:26561388

  2. X-ray photoemission analysis of clean and carbon monoxide-chemisorbed platinum(111) stepped surfaces using a curved crystal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walter, Andrew L.; Schiller, Frederik; Corso, Martina; Merte, Lindsay R.; Bertram, Florian; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin; Brión-Ríos, Anto´n X.; et al

    2015-11-12

    Surface chemistry and catalysis studies could significantly gain from the systematic variation of surface active sites, tested under the very same conditions. Curved crystals are excellent platforms to perform such systematics, which may in turn allow to better resolve fundamental properties and reveal new phenomena. This is demonstrated here for the carbon monoxide/platinum system. We curve a platinum crystal around the high-symmetry (111) direction and carry out photoemission scans on top. This renders the spatial core-level imaging of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a 'tunable' vicinal surface, allowing a straightforward visualization of the rich chemisorption phenomenology at steps and terraces. Throughmore » such photoemission images we probe a characteristic elastic strain variation at stepped surfaces, and unveil subtle stress-release effects on clean and covered vicinal surfaces. Lastly, these results offer the prospect of applying the curved surface approach to rationally investigate the chemical activity of surfaces under real pressure conditions.« less

  3. X-ray photoemission analysis of clean and carbon monoxide-chemisorbed platinum(111) stepped surfaces using a curved crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Andrew L.; Schiller, Frederik; Merte, Lindsay R.; Bertram, Florian; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Gustafson, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin; Brión-Ríos, Anto´n X.; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel

    2015-11-12

    Surface chemistry and catalysis studies could significantly gain from the systematic variation of surface active sites, tested under the very same conditions. Curved crystals are excellent platforms to perform such systematics, which may in turn allow to better resolve fundamental properties and reveal new phenomena. This is demonstrated here for the carbon monoxide/platinum system. We curve a platinum crystal around the high-symmetry (111) direction and carry out photoemission scans on top. This renders the spatial core-level imaging of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a 'tunable' vicinal surface, allowing a straightforward visualization of the rich chemisorption phenomenology at steps and terraces. Through such photoemission images we probe a characteristic elastic strain variation at stepped surfaces, and unveil subtle stress-release effects on clean and covered vicinal surfaces. Lastly, these results offer the prospect of applying the curved surface approach to rationally investigate the chemical activity of surfaces under real pressure conditions.

  4. X-ray photoemission analysis of clean and carbon monoxide-chemisorbed platinum(111) stepped surfaces using a curved crystal.

    PubMed

    Walter, Andrew L; Schiller, Frederik; Corso, Martina; Merte, Lindsay R; Bertram, Florian; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin; Brión-Ríos, Anto N X; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Ortega, J Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Surface chemistry and catalysis studies could significantly gain from the systematic variation of surface active sites, tested under the very same conditions. Curved crystals are excellent platforms to perform such systematics, which may in turn allow to better resolve fundamental properties and reveal new phenomena. This is demonstrated here for the carbon monoxide/platinum system. We curve a platinum crystal around the high-symmetry (111) direction and carry out photoemission scans on top. This renders the spatial core-level imaging of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a 'tunable' vicinal surface, allowing a straightforward visualization of the rich chemisorption phenomenology at steps and terraces. Through such photoemission images we probe a characteristic elastic strain variation at stepped surfaces, and unveil subtle stress-release effects on clean and covered vicinal surfaces. These results offer the prospect of applying the curved surface approach to rationally investigate the chemical activity of surfaces under real pressure conditions. PMID:26561388

  5. Comparison of the electronic structure of anatase and rutile TiO2 single-crystal surfaces using resonant photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. G.; Flavell, W. R.; Mallick, A. K.; Kumarasinghe, A. R.; Tsoutsou, D.; Khan, N.; Chatwin, C.; Rayner, S.; Smith, G. C.; Stockbauer, R. L.; Warren, S.; Johal, T. K.; Patel, S.; Holland, D.; Taleb, A.; Wiame, F.

    2007-01-01

    A comparison of the electronic structure of rutile (110), anatase (101), and anatase (001) single-crystal surfaces has been made using resonant photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Under identical preparative conditions, the anatase (101) surface shows the lowest Ti3d and 4sp hybridization in the states close to the valence-band maximum of the three surfaces. It also shows the highest concentration of surface-oxygen vacancies. The effect on the electronic structure of modifying the surface preparative route and thus the concentration of surface-oxygen vacancies is examined. The σ -antibonding Ti3deg/O2p hybridization (probed by XAS) is reduced by the removal of surface-oxygen. Photoemission shows that as the number of surface-defects is increased, the O2p-Ti3dt2gπ -bonding interaction is disrupted. For the anatase (101) surface it is found that as the number of surface-oxygen vacancies is increased, the Ti3d and 4sp contributions at the valence-band maximum are reduced. We discuss the correlation between electronic structure and photocatalytic activity of the different polymorphs of TiO2 .

  6. Electronic Structure of Tl2Ba2CuO(6+Delta) Epitaxial Films Measured by X-Ray Photoemission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Ren, Z. F.; Wang, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    The valence electronic structure and core levels of Tl2Ba2CuO(6 + delta) (Tl-2201) epitaxial films have been measured with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and are compared to those of Tl2Ba2CaCu2O(8 + delta) (Tl-2212). Changes in the Tl-2201 core-level binding energies with oxygen doping are consistent with a change in the chemical potential. Differences between the Tl-2201 and Tl-2212 measured densities of states are consistent with the calculated Cu 3d and Tl 6s partial densities of states.

  7. In situ hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy of barrier-height control at metal/PMN-PT interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, E.; Petraru, A.; Quer, A.; Soni, R.; Kalläne, M.; Pertsev, N. A.; Kohlstedt, H.; Rossnagel, K.

    2016-06-01

    Metal-ferroelectric interfaces form the basis of novel electronic devices. A key effect determining the device functionality is the bias-dependent change of the electronic energy-level alignment at the interface. Here, hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is used to determine the energy-level alignment at two metal-ferroelectric interfaces—Au versus SrRuO3 on the relaxor ferroelectric Pb (Mg1 /3Nb2 /3 )0.72Ti0.28O3 (PMN-PT)—directly in situ as a function of electrical bias. The bias-dependent average shifts of the PMN-PT core levels are found to have two dominant contributions on the 0.1 -1-eV energy scale: one depending on the metal electrode and the remanent electric polarization and the other correlated with electric-field-induced strain. Element-specific deviations from the average shifts are smaller than 0.1 eV and appear to be related to predicted dynamical charge variations in PMN-PT. In addition, the efficiency of ferroelectric polarization switching is shown to be reduced near the coercive field under x-ray irradiation. The results establish HAXPES as a tool for the in operando investigation of metal-ferroelectric interfaces and suggest electric-field-induced modifications of the polarization distribution as a novel way to control the barrier height at such interfaces.

  8. Electronic structure changes across the metamagnetic transition in FeRh via hard X-ray photoemission.

    PubMed

    Gray, A X; Cooke, D W; Krüger, P; Bordel, C; Kaiser, A M; Moyerman, S; Fullerton, E E; Ueda, S; Yamashita, Y; Gloskovskii, A; Schneider, C M; Drube, W; Kobayashi, K; Hellman, F; Fadley, C S

    2012-06-22

    Stoichiometric FeRh undergoes a temperature-induced antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) transition at ~350 K. In this Letter, changes in the electronic structure accompanying this transition are investigated in epitaxial FeRh thin films via bulk-sensitive valence-band and core-level hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with a photon energy of 5.95 keV. Clear differences between the AFM and FM states are observed across the entire valence-band spectrum and these are well reproduced using density-functional theory. Changes in the 2p core levels of Fe are also observed and interpreted using Anderson impurity model calculations. These results indicate that significant electronic structure changes over the entire valence-band region are involved in this AFM-FM transition. PMID:23004654

  9. Electronic Structure Changes across the Metamagnetic Transition in FeRh via Hard X-Ray Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, A. X.; Cooke, D. W.; Krüger, P.; Bordel, C.; Kaiser, A. M.; Moyerman, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Ueda, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Gloskovskii, A.; Schneider, C. M.; Drube, W.; Kobayashi, K.; Hellman, F.; Fadley, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Stoichiometric FeRh undergoes a temperature-induced antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) transition at ˜350K. In this Letter, changes in the electronic structure accompanying this transition are investigated in epitaxial FeRh thin films via bulk-sensitive valence-band and core-level hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with a photon energy of 5.95 keV. Clear differences between the AFM and FM states are observed across the entire valence-band spectrum and these are well reproduced using density-functional theory. Changes in the 2p core levels of Fe are also observed and interpreted using Anderson impurity model calculations. These results indicate that significant electronic structure changes over the entire valence-band region are involved in this AFM-FM transition.

  10. Progress on PEEM3 - An Aberration Corrected X-Ray PhotoemissionElectron Microscope at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Feng, J.; DeMello, A.; Doran, A.; Duarte,R.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.A.; Miller, T.; Padmore, H.A.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2006-05-20

    A new ultrahigh-resolution photoemission electron microscope called PEEM3 is being developed and built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). An electron mirror combined with a much-simplified magnetic dipole separator is to be used to provide simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. It is installed on an elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) beamline, and will be operated with very high spatial resolution and high flux to study the composition, structure, electric and magnetic properties of complex materials. The instrument has been designed and is described. The instrumental hardware is being deployed in 2 phases. The first phase is the deployment of a standard PEEM type microscope consisting of the standard linear array of electrostatic electron lenses. The second phase will be the installation of the aberration corrected upgrade to improve resolution and throughput. This paper describes progress as the instrument enters the commissioning part of the first phase.

  11. Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemann, C.; Kaiser, A. M.; Cramm, S.; Schneider, C. M.

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime.

  12. Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Wiemann, C; Kaiser, A M; Cramm, S; Schneider, C M

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime. PMID:22755633

  13. Soft X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of semiconductor oxide nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cell: ZnSnO3 and Zn2SnO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Seong, Seungho; Moon, Soo Yeon; Shin, Yu-Ju; Baik, J.; Shin, H. J.; Kang, J.-S.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of the Zn-stannate nanoparticles of ZnSnO3 and Zn2SnO4, which are the potential nano-structured semiconductor oxides for a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), have been investigated by employing photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and compared to those of reference materials. The divalent and tetravalent valence states of Zn2+ and Sn4+ ions are confirmed experimentally. The energy levels of both the valence-band and conduction-band edges are determined experimentally. The top of the valence band in PES is slightly higher in Zn2SnO4 than in ZnSnO3. The onset energies of the O 1s XAS spectra of the Zn-stannates are found to be similar to each other, but higher than that of TiO2. The O 1 s XAS spectrum of ZnSnO3 exhibits the higher unoccupied density of states near the bottom of the conduction band than those of Zn2SnO4, SnO2 and ZnO, reflecting the larger number of holes in the Zn 3 d bands of ZnSnO3. Hence, the easier electron transfer is expected from the LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) of a dye molecule to the conduction band of ZnSnO3 nanoparticles on the transparent conductive electrode of a DSSC.

  14. 5 f -Shell correlation effects in dioxides of light actinides studied by O 1s x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modin, A.; Suzuki, M.-T.; Vegelius, J.; Yun, Y.; Shuh, D. K.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Butorin, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopic data are reported for the O 1s region of a single crystal of UO2, a polycrystalline NpO2 sample, and a single crystal of PuO2. The experimental data are interpreted using first-principles correlated-electron calculations within the framework of the density functional theory with added Coulomb U interaction (DFT+U). A detailed analysis regarding the origin of different structures in the x-ray emission and x-ray absorption spectra is given and the effect of varying the intra-atomic Coulomb interaction-U for the 5 f electrons is investigated. Our data indicate that O 1s x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies can, in combination with DFT+U calculations, successfully be used to study 5 f -shell Coulomb correlation effects in dioxides of light actinides. The values for the Coulomb U parameter in these dioxides are derived to be in the range of 4-5 eV.

  15. K promoted oxidation and nitridation on InP(100) surface: A soft-X-ray photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P. S.; Xu, S. H.; Lu, E. D.; Yu, X. J.; Ji, H.; Liang, Q.; Zhao, T. X.

    1995-05-01

    The effects of exposure of molecular nitrogen and oxygen on p-type InP(100) surfaces modified by potassium overlayers were studied by core level and valence band (VB) photoemission using synchrotron radiation. On the K pre-covered surface, the potassium coverage enhanced the nitrogen and oxygen sticking coefficients dramatically. As far as the process of nitrogen adsorption is concerned, nitrogen atoms react mainly with P atoms rather than not react directly with indium atoms. Two kinds of nitride complexes, InPXx and InPNx + y were formed at the K-precovered InP(100) surface. In case of oxygen adsorption, O may bond with K and produce the peroxides O22- and superoxides O2-. Following this a few kinds of phosphate phases, In(PO4)x, were formed on the surface. In comparison with InP(110) surface, we found that the oxidation and nitridation promotion for the InP(100) surface was much stronger. The reasons may be the number of surface defects as well as the polarity of the InP(100) surface.

  16. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  17. Orbital- and spin-order sensitive nonlocal screening in Mn 2p X-ray photoemission of La1‑xSrxMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariki, A.; Yamanaka, A.; Uozumi, T.

    2016-04-01

    The Mn 2p X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS) of LaMnO3 (LMO) and hole-doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) are investigated using a dp model simulating Mn 3d and O 2p electrons under the perovskite-type crystal structure. The observed 2p XPS features, especially the low-binding-energy structure (LBES) of the 2p3/2 main line, are reproduced well using an impurity Anderson model optimized from the dp model within the dynamical mean-field approximation. The LBES in both compounds is due to the nonlocal screening (NLS) between the neighboring Mn ions in the final state, but the screening character is quite different: The NLS in LSMO directly reflects the character of the ferromagnetic metal, while that in undoped LMO the C-type orbital order between 3x^2-r2 and 3y^2-r2 orbitals in the ab-plane. We emphasize the directive nature of the NLS in the orbital order system, which can be a sensitive probe to the order pattern.

  18. Design of an ultrahigh vacuum transfer mechanism to interconnect an oxide molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber and an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. M.; Zeng Zhaoquan; McNicholas, K. M.; Brillson, L. J.

    2013-06-15

    We designed a mechanism and the accompanying sample holders to transfer between a VEECO 930 oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and a PHI Versa Probe X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) chamber within a multiple station growth, processing, and analysis system through ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The mechanism consists of four parts: (1) a platen compatible with the MBE growth stage, (2) a platen compatible with the XPS analysis stage, (3) a sample coupon that is transferred between the two platens, and (4) the accompanying UHV transfer line. The mechanism offers a robust design that enables transfer back and forth between the growth chamber and the analysis chamber, and yet is flexible enough to allow transfer between standard sample holders for thin film growth and masked sample holders for making electrical contacts and Schottky junctions, all without breaking vacuum. We used this mechanism to transfer a barium strontium titanate thin film into the XPS analysis chamber and performed XPS measurements before and after exposing the sample to the air. After air exposure, a thin overlayer of carbon was found to form and a significant shift ({approx}1 eV) in the core level binding energies was observed.

  19. Epitaxial growth of CeO2(111) film on Ru(0001): Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomo; Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Sainoo, Yasuyuki; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    We formed an epitaxial film of CeO2(111) by sublimating Ce atoms on Ru(0001) surface kept at elevated temperature in an oxygen ambient. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement revealed a decrease of Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio in a small temperature window of the growth temperature between 1070 and 1096 K, which corresponds to the reduction of the CeO2(111). Scanning tunneling microscope image showed that a film with a wide terrace and a sharp step edge was obtained when the film was grown at the temperatures close to the reduction temperature, and the terrace width observed on the sample grown at 1060 K was more than twice of that grown at 1040 K. On the surface grown above the reduction temperature, the surface with a wide terrace and a sharp step was confirmed, but small dots were also seen in the terrace part, which are considerably Ce atoms adsorbed at the oxygen vacancies on the reduced surface. This experiment demonstrated that it is required to use the substrate temperature close to the reduction temperature to obtain CeO2(111) with wide terrace width and sharp step edges.

  20. Epitaxial growth of CeO{sub 2}(111) film on Ru(0001): Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Tomo; Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Sainoo, Yasuyuki; Beniya, Atsushi; Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-28

    We formed an epitaxial film of CeO{sub 2}(111) by sublimating Ce atoms on Ru(0001) surface kept at elevated temperature in an oxygen ambient. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement revealed a decrease of Ce{sup 4+}/Ce{sup 3+} ratio in a small temperature window of the growth temperature between 1070 and 1096 K, which corresponds to the reduction of the CeO{sub 2}(111). Scanning tunneling microscope image showed that a film with a wide terrace and a sharp step edge was obtained when the film was grown at the temperatures close to the reduction temperature, and the terrace width observed on the sample grown at 1060 K was more than twice of that grown at 1040 K. On the surface grown above the reduction temperature, the surface with a wide terrace and a sharp step was confirmed, but small dots were also seen in the terrace part, which are considerably Ce atoms adsorbed at the oxygen vacancies on the reduced surface. This experiment demonstrated that it is required to use the substrate temperature close to the reduction temperature to obtain CeO{sub 2}(111) with wide terrace width and sharp step edges.

  1. Sulfur passivation of InSb(1 0 0) surfaces: Comparison of aqueous and alcoholic ammonium sulfide solutions using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvova, Tatiana V.; Shakhmin, Aleksandr L.; Sedova, Irina V.; Lebedev, Mikhail V.

    2014-08-01

    The chemical composition and the electronic properties of the n-InSb(1 0 0) surface treated with ammonium sulfide dissolved in water or in 2-propanol has been studied by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The solvent determines the mechanism of chemical reaction between InSb(1 0 0) surface and sulfide solution. The variation of the solvent leads to variations in chemical composition and electronic structure of the final sulfide layers. Aqueous sulfide solution withdraws antimony atoms from the InSb(1 0 0) surface very fast due to solubility of antimony sulfides, whereas after treatment with alcoholic sulfide solution the antimony sulfides remain on the surface. The Fermi level at the InSb(1 0 0)/passivation layer interface occurs usually deeply in the conduction band of semiconductor and its position depends on the time of sulfur treatment. However, after prolonged treatment with aqueous sulfide solution and surface depletion with antimony the Fermi level is found in the valence band. Although both solutions remove the native oxide layer, the residual oxygen content is lower after treatment with the solution of ammonium sulfide in 2-propanol.

  2. Development of soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system with a two-dimensional angle-resolved time-of-flight analyzer at SPring-8 BL07LSU.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Manami; Yamamoto, Susumu; Kousa, Yuka; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yukawa, Ryu; Fukushima, Akiko; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kakizaki, Akito; Matsuda, Iwao

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system using synchrotron radiation (SR) at SPring-8 BL07LSU and an ultrashort pulse laser system. Two-dimensional angle-resolved measurements were performed with a time-of-flight-type analyzer. The photoemission spectroscopy system is synchronized to light pulses of SR and laser using a time control unit. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by mapping the band structure of a Si(111) crystal over the surface Brillouin zones and observing relaxation of the surface photo-voltage effect using the pump (laser) and probe (SR) method. PMID:22380081

  3. Development of soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system with a two-dimensional angle-resolved time-of-flight analyzer at SPring-8 BL07LSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Manami; Yamamoto, Susumu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yukawa, Ryu; Fukushima, Akiko; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kakizaki, Akito; Matsuda, Iwao; Kousa, Yuka; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshihito

    2012-02-15

    We have developed a soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system using synchrotron radiation (SR) at SPring-8 BL07LSU and an ultrashort pulse laser system. Two-dimensional angle-resolved measurements were performed with a time-of-flight-type analyzer. The photoemission spectroscopy system is synchronized to light pulses of SR and laser using a time control unit. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by mapping the band structure of a Si(111) crystal over the surface Brillouin zones and observing relaxation of the surface photo-voltage effect using the pump (laser) and probe (SR) method.

  4. C 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) of substituted benzoic acids: a theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Baldea,I.; Schimmelpfennig, B.; Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J.; Schirmer, J.; Trofimov, A.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to explain the discrete transitions in experimental C 1s-NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) spectra of various benzoic acid derivates. Transition energies and oscillator strengths of the contributing C 1s-{pi}* excitations are computed using the ADC(2) (second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction) method. This method is demonstrated to be well suited for the finite electronic systems represented by these simple organic acids. There is good agreement between experiment and theory reproducing all the relevant spectral features. Some transitions can only be assigned based on a theoretical foundation. Remaining discrepancies between experimental and computed spectra are discussed.

  5. Anomalous elastic scattering of linearly polarized X-ray radiation by multicharged atomic ions in the range of the ionization threshold of the 1 s-shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Novikov, S. A.; Chuvenkov, V. V.

    2002-04-01

    The absolute values and shape of differential cross-section of the process of the anomalous elastic scattering for non-zero angle are investigated within non-relativistic approximation for linearly polarized X-ray radiation scattered by multicharged atomic ions Ne 6+ in the range of the ionization threshold of 1 s-shell. The many-particle effects of radial rearrangement of electron shells in the field of an inner 1 s-vacancy and the effect of vacancy stabilization are taken into account. The results of the work are predictions.

  6. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Zanoni, R.; Stranges, S.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-07

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the {sigma}/{pi} hyperconjugation in EtFC and the {pi}-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  7. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Stranges, S.; Zanoni, R.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the σ/π hyperconjugation in EtFC and the π-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  8. Cascade effects on the polarization of He-like Fe 1s 2l - 1s2 X-ray line emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hakel, P; Mancini, R; Harris, C; Neill, P; Beiersdorfer, P; Csanak, G; Zhang, H

    2006-12-21

    We calculate X-ray line polarization degrees for cases with axial symmetry using a collisional-radiative magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics model and the properties of multipole radiation fields. This approach is well-suited for problems where the alignment is determined by the competition between many atomic processes. We benchmark this method against polarization measurements performed at the Livermore electron beam ion trap, and we study the 3-to-2 cascade effects on the polarization of 2-to-1 lines in He-like Fe.

  9. Geometrical information on core-excited states obtained from interference quenching of vibrational states in resonant x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Baev, A.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Aagren, H.; Feifel, R.; Baessler, M.; Miron, C.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Karlsson, L.; Svensson, S.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Sorensen, S.L.; Naves de Brito, A.

    2003-02-01

    An interference quenching of the m=1 final state vibrational line in the resonant Auger decay of N 1s{yields}{pi}{sup *} core-excited N{sub 2} is observed and analyzed. The intensity ratio between the m=1 and m=0 vibrational levels of the X {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} final state shows a surprising nonmonotonic variation as a function of frequency detuning, going through a minimum with a complete suppression of m=1. We have developed a simple model which indicates a linear relation between the value of the detuning frequency for this minimum and the equilibrium bond distance of the core-excited state. This implies the possibility of determining the equilibrium bond distances for core-excited states to a high degree of accuracy. Simultaneously with the simple model we present a strict theory of the studied effect. This strict theory allows us to explore the accuracy of determining the bond length of the core-excited state from resonant Auger spectra. We obtain a weak influence of the core-hole lifetime on the determined bond length, whereas the number of intermediate vibrational states accounted for in the numerical simulations seems to be quite important.

  10. Origins of sp(3)C peaks in C1s X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ayaka; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Koinuma, Michio; Sato, Satoshi

    2016-06-21

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is among the most powerful techniques to analyze defective structures of carbon materials such as graphene and activated carbon. However, reported assignments of defects, especially sp(3)C and sp(2)C, are questionable. Most reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be higher than sp(2)C peaks, whereas a few reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be lower than sp(2)C peaks. Our group previously reported that calculated binding energies of sp(3)C were basically lower than those of sp(2)C. This work clarified that one of the reasons for the prevailing ambiguous assignments of sp(3)C peaks is charging effects of diamond. PMID:27264720

  11. Resonant Auger decay of core-excited CO molecules in intense x-ray laser pulses: the O(1s → π*) excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demekhin, Ph V.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamics of the resonant Auger (RA) decay of the core-excited CO*(1s-1π*) molecule in intense x-ray laser pulses is studied theoretically. The present approach includes the impact of the analogue of conical intersections of the complex potential energy surfaces of the ground and ‘dressed’ resonant states induced by intense x-ray pulses. It also takes into account the decay of the resonance and the direct photoionization of the ground state, both populating the same final ionic states coherently, as well as the direct photoionization of the resonance state itself. The individual impacts of these physical processes on the total ion yield, the CO+(A 2Π) electron spectrum and the ro-vibrational distributions of the neutral molecules remaining in the ground electronic state after the laser pulse has expired are analysed and compared to those reported previously for the C*O resonance. It is also demonstrated that the RA effect of molecules by strong laser pulses of resonant carrier frequency is an efficient process to produce two-site double-core-hole-one-particle states of CO*.

  12. Impact of Ferrocene on the Structure of Diesel Exhaust Soot as Probed with Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering and C(1s) NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun,A.; Huggins, F.; Kelly, K.; Mun, B.; Ehrlich, S.; Huffman, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the structure of a set of diesel exhaust samples that were obtained from reference diesel fuel and diesel fuel mixed with ferrocene. Characterization was carried out with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (C(1s) NEXAFS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The reference diesel soot shows a pronounced graphite-like microstructure and molecular structure, with a strong (0 0 2) graphite Bragg reflex and a strong aromatic C{double_bond}C resonance at 285 eV. The mineral matter in the reference soot could be identified as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hematite. The soot specimen from the diesel mixed with ferrocene has an entirely different structure and lacks significantly in graphite-like characteristics. NEXAFS spectra of such soot barely show aromatics but pronounced contributions from aliphatic structures. WAXS patterns show almost no intensity at the Bragg (0 0 2) reflection of graphite, but a strong aliphatic {gamma}-side band. The iron from the ferrocene transforms to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} maghemite.

  13. Temperature-dependent electronic structure of the colossal magnetoresistive manganite La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} from hard x-ray photoemission.

    SciTech Connect

    Offi, F.; Mannella, N.; Pardini, T.; Panaccione, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Torelli, P.; West, M. W.; Mitchell, J. F.; Fadley, C. S.; Univ. Roma Tre; LBNL; Stanford Univ.; Univ. Tennessee; Univ. California at Davis; Lab. Nazionale TASC-INFM-CNR; ESRF; LURE, Centre Univ. Paris Sud; Julich Research Center; Univ. Hamburg

    2008-01-01

    We have studied in situ fractured surfaces of single-crystal La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} with hard x-ray photoemission (HXPS) at an excitation energy of 7.7 keV. These more bulk-sensitive measurements reveal low-binding-energy satellites in the Mn 2p{sub 3/2}, 3s, and 3p core spectra that are in agreement with previously observed satellites in Mn 2p{sub 3/2} for other strongly correlated materials, and which have been interpreted in terms of nonlocalized screening effects. The Mn 3s spectrum is consistent with recent soft x-ray measurements [N. Mannella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 166401 (2004)] in showing an increased multiplet splitting at temperatures 100 K or more above the Curie temperature, although the magnitude of the effect is somewhat reduced. The valence-band spectra exhibit significant enhancement of intensity at such higher temperatures that we interpret as evidence of localization of Mn 3d-derived charge, which is in agreement with the multiplet splitting change and prior soft x-ray work. Additional aspects of HXPS for the study of complex materials are thus demonstrated.

  14. Hard and soft x-ray standing-wave photoelectron spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of LaNiO3/SrTiO 3 superlattice and its interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiteneer, Daria N.

    Abstract Many classes of materials that exhibit interesting characteristics in the modulation of the electronic and magnetic properties when they are made of more than one compound, often arranged in multilayers and superlattices. In such cases, the electronic, electric, and magnetic properties of the multilayer, as well as their densities-of-states, are vastly different from the properties of the constituent materials, with the most important features often located at the interfaces. Specifically, perovskite nickelates are examples of materials that lie at the heart of correlated electron physics. Prior studies have been done on superlattices that contain multilayers of two perovskites. Specifically, it has been shown that LaNiO3 (LNO) undergoes a Mott metal-insulator transition when sandwiched between the layers of SrTiO3 (STO). However, even with prior theoretical simulations and experimental studies, no conclusion has been reached so far as to the exact reason for such a transition. To further the investigation of these ideas, we are undertaking a detailed study of the electronic structure of a LaNiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice with 10 repeats of [4 unit-cell LNO/3 unit-cell STO] bilayer grown on an (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 substrate. To provide a complete characterization of this superlattice, it is crucial to characterize the core levels of the atoms at the interface, as well as to measure the depth-dependent density of states and the element-specific magnetization through the interface. The standing-wave photoemission technique provides a unique capability for characterizing the LNO/STO interfaces by depth-resolving the electronic structure of the superlattice, particularly in its momentum-resolving form of standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission using soft x-rays in the ca. 1 keV regime. The main advantages of SW-XPS are its non-destructiveness, large effective attenuation length, and the enhanced depth resolution for buried interfaces via standing

  15. Observation of strontium segregation in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 and NdGaO3/SrTiO3 oxide heterostructures by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treske, Uwe; Heming, Nadine; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Koitzsch, Andreas; Di Gennaro, Emiliano; Scotti di Uccio, Umberto; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Krause, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    LaAlO3 and NdGaO3 thin films of different thicknesses have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 single crystals and investigated by soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The surface sensitivity of the measurements has been tuned by varying photon energy hν and emission angle Θ. In contrast to the core levels of the other elements, the Sr 3d line shows an unexpected splitting for higher surface sensitivity, signaling the presence of a second strontium component. From our quantitative analysis we conclude that during the growth process Sr atoms diffuse away from the substrate and segregate at the surface of the heterostructure, possibly forming strontium oxide.

  16. Electronic states of NO{sub 2}-exposed H-terminated diamond/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerface studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Imamura, Masaki; Hirama, Kazuyuki; Kasu, Makoto

    2014-02-17

    The energy band-lineup and the electronic structure of NO{sub 2}-exposed H-terminated diamond/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerface have been investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements. It is found that the energy band-lineup is stagger-type, so-called type-II, with its valence band discontinuity of as high as 3.9 eV and its conduction band discontinuity of 2.7 eV. The valence band maximum of the H-terminated diamond surface is positioned at Fermi level as a result of high-density hole accumulation on the diamond side. The XANES measurement has shown that the oxygen-derived interface state locates at about 1–3 eV above the Fermi level.

  17. Observation of strontium segregation in LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} and NdGaO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} oxide heterostructures by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Treske, Uwe; Heming, Nadine; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Koitzsch, Andreas; Di Gennaro, Emiliano; Scotti di Uccio, Umberto; Miletto Granozio, Fabio; Krause, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    LaAlO{sub 3} and NdGaO{sub 3} thin films of different thicknesses have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on TiO{sub 2}-terminated SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals and investigated by soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The surface sensitivity of the measurements has been tuned by varying photon energy hν and emission angle Θ. In contrast to the core levels of the other elements, the Sr 3d line shows an unexpected splitting for higher surface sensitivity, signaling the presence of a second strontium component. From our quantitative analysis we conclude that during the growth process Sr atoms diffuse away from the substrate and segregate at the surface of the heterostructure, possibly forming strontium oxide.

  18. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  19. Angle-resolved environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A new laboratory setup for photoemission studies at pressures up to 0.4 Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Mangolini, F.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Egberts, P.; Ahlund, J.; Backlund, K.; Karlsson, P. G.; Adiga, V. P.; Streller, F.; Wannberg, B.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-09-15

    The paper presents the development and demonstrates the capabilities of a new laboratory-based environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system incorporating an electrostatic lens and able to acquire spectra up to 0.4 Torr. The incorporation of a two-dimensional detector provides imaging capabilities and allows the acquisition of angle-resolved data in parallel mode over an angular range of 14 Degree-Sign without tilting the sample. The sensitivity and energy resolution of the spectrometer have been investigated by analyzing a standard Ag foil both under high vacuum (10{sup -8} Torr) conditions and at elevated pressures of N{sub 2} (0.4 Torr). The possibility of acquiring angle-resolved data at different pressures has been demonstrated by analyzing a silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO{sub 2}) sample. The collected angle-resolved spectra could be effectively used for the determination of the thickness of the native silicon oxide layer.

  20. X-ray photoemission study of delta-Pu stabilized by 1 wt. % Ga: Electronic structure and sputter-induced surface phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.E.

    1988-05-15

    Photoemission spectra of the core (4f) and valence levels of Ar-ion-sputtered, Ga-stabilized delta-Pu are similar to those of ..cap alpha..-Pu. This disordered ..cap alpha..- or ..beta..-like surface layer is readily transformed by mild annealing (225 /sup 0/C) to the delta allotrope as evidenced by profound changes in 4f spectrum. We attribute these changes to a transition from predominantly f-like final-state screening in the ..cap alpha..-like phase to predominantly d-like screening in the fcc allotrope. The latter also shows a broadened valence band, presumably resulting from many-body effects associated with incipient localization of the 5f electrons.

  1. X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of zinc protoporphyrin adsorbed on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) prepared by in situ electrospray deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C.; Magnano, Graziano; Satterley, Christopher J.; O'Shea, James N.; Ataman, Evren; Schnadt, Joachim; Schulte, Karina

    2010-02-28

    Zinc-protoporphyrin, adsorbed on the rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) surface, has been studied using photoemission spectroscopy and near-edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy to deduce the nature of the molecule-surface bonding and the chemical environment of the central metal atom. To overcome the difficulties associated with sublimation of the porphyrin molecules, samples were prepared in situ using ultrahigh vacuum electrospray deposition, a technique which facilitates the deposition of nonvolatile and fragile molecules. Monolayers of Zn protoporphyrin are found to bond to the surface via the oxygen atoms of the deprotonated carboxyl groups. The molecules initially lie largely parallel to the surface, reorienting to an upright geometry as the coverage is increased up to a monolayer. For those molecules directly chemisorbed to the surface, the interaction is sufficiently strong to pull the central metal atom out of the molecule.

  2. Characterization of heterojunctions via x-ray and uv photoemission spectroscopy: energy level implications for single and mixed monolayer SAMs, cadmium selenide nanoparticle films, and organic semiconductor depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Amy L.

    This work has centered on the interface dipoles arising at heterojunctions between metals, semiconductor nanoparticles, self-assembled monolayers, and organic semiconductor materials. Alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers, CdSe nanocrystals, and the organic semiconductors zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and Buckminster fullerene (C60) were the basis of these investigations. UV photoemission spectroscopy has proven to be an invaluable tool to observe the vacuum level shifts for these analyses while using XPS to corroborate surface structure. With a full evaluation of these surfaces, the shifts in the vacuum level, valence ionizations, and core ionizations, the impact of these interfaces, as well as their influence on the subsequent deposition of organic semiconductor layers is established. Alkanethiols possessing varying dipole moments were examined on gold and silver substrates. The viability of these alkanethiols was demonstrated to predictively adjust the work function of these metals as a function of their intrinsic dipole moments projected to surface normal, and established differences between Ag---S and Au---S bonds. The capability of the SAMs to modify the work function of gold provided an opportunity for mixed monolayers of the alkanethiols to produce a precise range of work functions by minimal adjustments of solution concentration, which were examined with a simple point dipole model. Photoemission spectroscopy offers a thorough analysis of CdSe nanoparticle films. Despite a plethora of research on these nanocrystals, there still is controversy on the magnitude of the shift in the valence band with diameter. In our research we found the majority of the valence band shift could be attributed to the interface dipole, ignored previously. Meanwhile, the valence band tethered films was obscured by the sulfur of the thiol tether. Finally, organic semiconductor layers deposited on SAMs on gold exhibited various interface dipole effects at these heterojunctions. Charge

  3. UV irradiation study of a tripeptide isolated in an argon matrix: a tautomerism process evidenced by infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Mateo-Marti, E; Pradier, C M

    2013-05-15

    Matrix isolation is a powerful tool for studying photochemical processes occurring in isolated molecules. In this way, we characterized the chemical modifications occurring within a tri peptide molecule, IGF, when exposed to the influence of Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This paper first describes the successful formation of the tripeptide (IGF) argon matrix under vacuum conditions, followed by the in situ UV irradiation and characterization of the molecular matrix reactivity after UV-irradiation. These studies have been performed by combining two complementary spectroscopic techniques, Fourier-Transform Reflexion Absorption Spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The IR spectra of the isolated peptide-matrix, before and after UV irradiation, revealed significant differences that could be associated either to a partial deprotonation of the molecule or to a tautomeric conversion of some amide bonds to imide ones on some peptide molecules. XPS analyses undoubtedly confirmed the second hypothesis; the combination of IRRAS and XPS results provide evidence that UV irradiation of peptides induces a chemical reaction, namely a shift of the double bond, meaning partial conversion from amide tautomer into an imidic acid tautomer. PMID:23542515

  4. Fermi surfaces and p -d hybridization in the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ba1 -xKx(Zn1-yMny) 2As2 studied by soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Zhao, G. Q.; Zhao, K.; Chen, B. J.; Horio, M.; Koshiishi, K.; Xu, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Minohara, M.; Sakai, E.; Horiba, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Gu, Bo; Maekawa, S.; Uemura, Y. J.; Jin, C. Q.; Fujimori, A.

    2015-12-01

    The electronic structure of the new diluted magnetic semiconductor Ba1-xKx(Zn1-yMny )2As2 (x =0.30 , y =0.15 ) in single crystal form has been investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Measurements with soft x rays clarify the host valence-band electronic structure primarily composed of the As 4 p states. Two hole pockets around the Γ point, a hole corrugated cylinder surrounding the Γ and Z points, and an electron pocket around the Z point are observed, and explain the metallic transport of Ba1-xKx(Zn1-yMny )2As2 . This is contrasted with Ga1-xMnxAs (GaMnAs), where it is located above the As 4 p valence-band maximum (VBM) and no Fermi surfaces have been clearly identified. Resonance soft x-ray ARPES measurements reveal a nondispersive (Kondo-resonance-like) Mn 3 d impurity band near the Fermi level, as in the case of GaMnAs. However, the impurity band is located well below the VBM, unlike the impurity band in GaMnAs, which is located around and above the VBM. We conclude that, while the strong hybridization between the Mn 3 d and the As 4 p orbitals plays an important role in creating the impurity band and inducing high temperature ferromagnetism in both systems, the metallic transport may predominantly occur in the host valence band in Ba1-xKx(Zn1-yMny )2As2 and in the impurity band in GaMnAs.

  5. Correlation of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} device efficiency with homojunction depth and interfacial structure: X-ray photoemission and positron annihilation spectroscopic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Sobol, P.E.; Gabor, A.M.; Contreras, M.A.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.

    1994-06-01

    Angled-resolved high resolution photoemission measurements on valence band electronic structure and Cu 2p, In 3d, Ga 2p, and Se 3d core lines were used to evaluate surface and near-surface chemistry of CuInSe{sub 2} and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} device grade thin films. XPS compositional depth profiles were also acquired from the near-surface region, and bonding of the Cu, In, Ga, and Se was determined as a function of depth. A Cu-poor region was found, indicating CuIn{sub 5}Se{sub 8} or a CuIn{sub 3}Se{sub 5}-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} mixture. Correlation between the depth of the Cu-poor region/bulk interface and device efficiency showed that the depth was 115 {angstrom} for a 16.4% CIGS device, 240 {angstrom} for a 15.0% CIGS, and 300 {angstrom} for 14.0% CIGS, with similar trends for CIS films. The surface region is n-type, the bulk is p-type, with a 0.5 eV valence band offset. Depth of homojunction may be the determining factor in device performance. Positron annihilation spectroscopy gave similarly illuminating results.

  6. Electronic structure of Li{sub 1+x}[Mn{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}]{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} studied by photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Y.; Ootsuki, D.; Sugimoto, T.; Wadati, H.; Okabayashi, J.; Yang, Xu; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang; Mizokawa, T.

    2015-07-20

    We have studied the electronic structure of Li{sub 1+x}[Mn{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}]{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} (x = 0.00 and 0.05), one of the promising cathode materials for Li ion battery, by means of x-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the valences of Mn and Ni are basically 4+ and 2+, respectively. However, the Mn{sup 3+} component in the x = 0.00 sample gradually increases with the bulk sensitivity of the experiment, indicating that the Jahn-Teller active Mn{sup 3+} ions are introduced in the bulk due to the site exchange between Li and Ni. The Mn{sup 3+} component gets negligibly small in the x = 0.05 sample, which indicates that the excess Li suppresses the site exchange and removes the Jahn-Teller active Mn{sup 3+}.

  7. Development of a high-resolution soft x-ray (30--1500 eV) beamline at the Advanced Light Source and its use for the study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W R.A.

    1996-02-01

    ALS Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 is for high resolution spectroscopy, with circularly polarized light. Fixed included-angle SGM uses three gratings for 30--1500 eV photons; circular polarization is produced by an aperture for selecting the beam above or below the horizontal plane. Photocurrent from upper and lower jaws of entrance slit sets a piezoelectric drive feedback loop on the vertically deflecting mirror for stable beam. End station has a movable platform. With photomeission data from Stanford, structure of c(2{times}2)P/Fe(100) was determined using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS). Multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations indicate that P atoms adsorb in fourfold hollow sites 1.02A above the first Fe layer. Self-consistent-field X{alpha} scattered wave calculation confirm that the Fe{sub 1}-Fe{sub 2} space is contracted for S/Fe but not for P/Fe; comparison is made to atomic N and O on Fe(100). Final-state effects on ARPEFS curves used literature data from the S 1s and 2p core levels of c(2{times}2)S/Ni(001); a generalized Ramsauer-Townsend splitting is present in the 1s but not 2p data. An approximate method for analyzing ARPEFS data from a non-s initial state using only the higher-{ell} partial wave was tested successfully. ARPEFS data from clean surfaces were collected normal to Ni(111) (3p core levels) and 5{degree} off-normal from Cu(111)(3s, 3p). Fourier transforms (FT) resemble adsorbate systems, showing backscattering signals from atoms up to 4 layers below emitters. 3p FTs show scattering from 6 nearest neighbors in the same crystal layer as the emitters. MSSW calulation indicate that Cu 3p photoemission is mostly d-wave. FTs also indicate double-scattering and single-scattering from laterally distant atoms; calculations indicate that the signal is dominated by photoemission from the first 2 crystal layers.

  8. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  9. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  10. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  11. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  12. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  13. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  14. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  15. Strong sensitivity of x-ray emission lines following charge exchange between highly charged ions and H (1 s ) in weakly screened media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariatore, N. D.; Otranto, S.

    2015-11-01

    We use the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method to analyze charge exchange processes between fully stripped projectiles with H (1 s ) in a screened environment at impact energies in the range 18 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu. For Fe+26 projectiles, (n ,l )-state selective charge exchange and line emission cross sections are presented for Debye screening lengths from 15 a.u. up to the unscreened case limit. At low-impact energies, a strong dependence of the hardness ratio on the Debye screening length is found. We show that such strong dependence also evidences itself for Ne+10,P+15,Ar+18, and Kr+36 projectiles. Clear indications of this dependence are noticeable in the photonic spectra even for large screening lengths (˜100 a.u.).

  16. Measurement of the 1s2l3l’ Dielectronic Recombination Emission Line in Li-Like Ar and Its Contribution to the Faint X-Ray Feature Found in the Stacked Spectrum of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy Christina; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Borovik, Alexander; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigated the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of, or contributor to, the emission line. The Li-like transition 1s22l-1s2l3l’ was suggested to produce a 3.62 keV photon [1] near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV and was the primary focus of our investigation. Apart from the mentioned transitions, we have found other features that can be possible contributors to the emission in this region. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances. A Johann-type crystal spectrometer and a solid-state germanium detector were used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the electron beam. The DR cross sections were measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Corrections for different instrument and method related effects such as charge state balance, electron beam space charge, and charge exchange have been considered. Our high-resolution crystal spectra allowed the experimental separation of features that are less than 2 eV apart. We have used a collisional radiative model NOMAD [2] aided by atomic data calculations by FAC [3] to interpret our observations and account for the corrections and uncertainties. Experimental results were compared to the AtomDB theoretical emission lines used to fit the galaxy cluster spectra containing the unidentified 3.57 keV line. These data points can be added benchmarks in the database and used to accurately interpret spectra from current x-ray satellites, including Hitomi, Chandra, and XMM-Newton x-ray observatories.[1] Bulbul E. et al., 2014, ApJ, 789, 13[2] Ralchenko Yu. et al., 2014, JQSRT, 71

  17. Multiatom Resonant Photoemission on NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, Charles; Mannella, Norman; Yang, See-Hun; Mun, Simon; van Hove, Michel

    2002-03-01

    In several recent papers, it has been pointed out that the core photoemission intensities of a given atom can be modified significantly when the photon energy is tuned through the absorption edge of a neighboring atom. Although some first experimental results of this type were distorted by detector non-linearity, a clear picture of the phenomenon has now emerged, with both macroscopic x-ray optical (dielectric) and microscopic quantum mechanical models quantitatively describing the effects [1]. In this talk, we will clarify a remaining experimental discrepancy with these models [2] by presenting new experimental results for O 1s photoemission from NiO(001) as photon energy is scanned through the Ni 2p absorption edges, and comparing the data to x-ray optical calculations. Other data for an adsorbate and free molecules will also be discussed. This work was supported by DOE contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. [1] A.W. Kay, F.J. Garcia de Abajo, S.-H. Yang, E. Arenholz, B.S. Mun, N. Mannella, Z. Hussain, M.A. Van Hove, and C.S. Fadley, Phys. Rev. B 63, 115119 (2001). [2] M. Finazzi, G. Ghiringhelli, O. Tjernberg, L. Duo, A. Tagliaferri, P. Ohresser, and N. B. Brookes, photoemission measurements for CuO and NiO, Phys. Rev. B 62, R16215 (2000).

  18. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  19. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  20. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  1. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  2. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Other conditions for which the test may ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 10/22/2014 Updated ...

  3. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  4. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  5. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  6. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  7. Monochromatic soft-x-ray-induced reactions of CF2Cl2 adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near the F(1s) edge.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-K; Tsai, W-C; Chou, L-C; Hsieh, Y-C; Chen, K-H; He, T-M; Feng, K-S; Wen, C-R

    2011-11-01

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was used to investigate the monochromatic soft x-ray photoreactions of CF(2)Cl(2) adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F(+) PSD spectra were observed as a function of photon exposure at the CF(2)Cl(2)-covered surface (dose = 2.0 × 10(14) molecules cm(-2), ∼0.75 monolayer). The F(+) PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of solid CF(2)Cl(2) near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F(+) PSD and TEY spectra depict three features in the energy range of 687-695 eV, and are assigned to the excitations of F(1s) to (13a(1) + 9b(2))[(C-Cl)(∗)], (7b(1) + 14a(1))[(C-F)∗] antibonding and 5p Rydberg orbitals, respectively. Following the Auger decay process, two holes are created in the C-F bonding orbitals producing the 2h1e final state which results in the F(+) desorption. This PSD mechanism, responsible for the F(+) PSD of solid CF(2)Cl(2), is used to explain the first F(+) PSD spectrum in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra. The variation of spectral shapes in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra shows the consumption of adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules and the production of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. The photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is deduced from the sequential F(+) PSD spectra and found to be ∼6.0 × 10(-18) cm(2). PMID:21996577

  8. Soft x-ray photoreactions of CF3Cl adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near F(1s) edge.

    PubMed

    Wen, C-R; Jang, C-Y; Chou, L-C; Chen, J; Wu, Y-H; Chang, S-C; Tsai, W-C; Liu, C-C; Wang, S-K; Shai, Y

    2007-09-21

    The continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was employed to monitor the monochromatic soft x-ray-induced reactions of CF3Cl adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F+ PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at the CF3Cl-covered surface (dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm2, approximately 0.75 ML). The F+ PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of molecular solid CF3Cl near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F+ PSD and TEY spectra show two features at the energy positions of 690.2 and 692.6 eV, and are attributed to the excitations of F(1s) to 11a1[(C-Cl)*] and (8e+12a1)[(C-F)*] antibonding orbitals, respectively. Following Auger decay, two holes are created in the F(2p) lone pair and/or C-F bonding orbitals forming the 2h1e final state which leads to the F+ desorption. This PSD mechanism, which is responsible for the F+ PSD of solid CF3Cl, is employed to interpret the first F+ PSD spectrum in the sequential F+ PSD spectra. The variation of spectrum shapes in the sequential F+ PSD spectra indicates the dissipation of adsorbed CF3Cl molecules and the formation of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. From the sequential F+ PSD spectra the photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF3Cl molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is determined to be approximately 1.0x10(-17) cm2. PMID:17887867

  9. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  10. Years of Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Gerrit

    A historical overview of magnetic x-ray dichroism is presented. I describe the first theoretical and experimental results that have led to the development of this powerful technique for element-specific magnetometry. The theoretical progress of the sum rules is also described, starting with the spinorbit sum rule for the isotropic spectrum which led on to the spin and orbital moment sum rules for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The latter has been particularly useful to understand the magnetic anisotropy in thin films and multilayers. Further developments of circular dichroism in (resonant) photoemission and Auger, as well as x-ray detected optical activity, also are summarized. Currently, magnetic x-ray dichroism finds a wide application in x-ray spectroscopy and imaging for the study of magnetic materials and it is considered to be one of the most important discoveries in the field of magnetism in the last few decennia. It is hard to imagine modern research into magnetism without the aid of polarized x-rays.

  11. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  12. Adsorption height determination of nonequivalent C and O species of PTCDA on Ag(110) using x-ray standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, G.; Bauer, O.; Willenbockel, M.; Fairley, N.; Reckien, W.; Schmitz, C. H.; Fiedler, B.; Soubatch, S.; Bredow, T.; Sokolowski, M.; Tautz, F. S.

    2013-01-01

    The normal incidence x-ray standing wave (NIXSW) technique is used to determine the adsorption geometry of submonolayer 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) adsorbed on the Ag(110) surface. An accurate analysis of both C1s and O1s photoemission (PE) spectra allows the respective adsorption heights of carbon and oxygen atoms in different chemical environments within PTCDA to be distinguished. Due to the intricacy of the PE fitting models, a systematic error analysis of NIXSW structural parameters was developed and employed. Based on the adsorption geometry of PTCDA on Ag(110) a bonding mechanism is discussed.

  13. Soft x-ray photoreactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near F(1s) edge

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, C.-R.; Jang, C.-Y.; Chou, L.-C.; Chen, J.; Wu, Y.-H.; Chang, S.-C.; Tsai, W.-C.; Liu, C.-C.; Wang, S.-K.; Shai, Y.

    2007-09-21

    The continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was employed to monitor the monochromatic soft x-ray-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at the CF{sub 3}Cl-covered surface (dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, {approx}0.75 ML). The F{sup +} PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of molecular solid CF{sub 3}Cl near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F{sup +} PSD and TEY spectra show two features at the energy positions of 690.2 and 692.6 eV, and are attributed to the excitations of F(1s) to 11a{sub 1}[(C-Cl)*] and (8e+12a{sub 1})[(C-F)*] antibonding orbitals, respectively. Following Auger decay, two holes are created in the F(2p) lone pair and/or C-F bonding orbitals forming the 2h1e final state which leads to the F{sup +} desorption. This PSD mechanism, which is responsible for the F{sup +} PSD of solid CF{sub 3}Cl, is employed to interpret the first F{sup +} PSD spectrum in the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra. The variation of spectrum shapes in the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra indicates the dissipation of adsorbed CF{sub 3}Cl molecules and the formation of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. From the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra the photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF{sub 3}Cl molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is determined to be {approx}1.0x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}.

  14. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High PressureX-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure,Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model SingleCrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, M.O.

    2006-05-12

    Our research focuses on taking advantage of the ability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to operate at high-temperatures and high-pressures while still providing real-time atomic resolution images. We also utilize high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS) to monitor systems under identical conditions thus giving us chemical information to compare and contrast with the structural and dynamic data provided by STM.

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  16. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  17. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  18. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  19. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  20. X-ray monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray monochromator is described, wherin a housing supports a plurality of mirrors forming a plurality of opposed mirror faces in parallel with each other and having thereon multilayer coatings, with each of said pairs of mirror faces being provided with identical coatings which are different from the coatings on the other pairs of mirror faces such that each pair of mirror faces has a peak x-ray reflection at a different wavelength regime. The housing is moveable to bring into a polychromatic x-ray beam that pair of mirror faces having the best x-ray reflection for the desired wavelength, with the mirrors being pivotable to move the mirror faces to that angle of incidence at which the peak reflectivity of the desired wavelength x-rays occurs.

  1. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  2. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  3. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  4. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  5. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  6. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  7. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  8. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  9. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  10. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  11. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  12. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  13. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  14. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  15. X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A compact laboratory x-ray "nano-CT" scanner has been created for 3D non-invasive imaging with 150-200 nanometers 3D spatial resolution, using advanced x-ray technologies and specific physical phenomena for signal detection. This spatial resolution in volume terms is 3 orders better than can be achieved in synchrotron tomography, 5 orders better then in existing laboratory micro-CT instruments and 10-12 orders better in comparison to clinical CT. The instrument employs an x-ray source with a 300-400nm x-ray spot size and uses small-angle scattering to attain a detail detectability of 150-200nm. An object manipulator allows positioning and rotation with an accuracy of 150nm. The x-ray detector is based on an intensified CCD with single-photon sensitivity. A typical acquisition cycle for 3D reconstruction of the full object volume takes from 10 to 60 minutes, with the collection of several hundred angular views. Subsequent volumetric reconstruction produces results as a set of cross sections with isotropic voxel size down to 140 x 140 x 140nm, or as a 3D-model, which can be virtually manipulated and measured. This unique spatial resolution in non-invasive investigations gives previously unattainable 3D images in several application areas, such as composite materials, paper and wood microstructure, biomedical applications and others.

  16. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  17. Nitrogen termination of single crystal (100) diamond surface by radio frequency N{sub 2} plasma process: An in-situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and secondary electron emission studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, Maneesh E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il

    2015-09-14

    In this letter, we report the electronic and chemical properties of nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) single crystal (100) diamond surface, which is a promising candidate for shallow NV{sup −} centers. N-termination is realized by an indirect RF nitrogen plasma process without inducing a large density of surface defects. Thermal stability and electronic property of N-terminated diamond surface are systematically investigated under well-controlled conditions by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron emission. An increase in the low energy cut-off of the secondary electron energy distribution curve (EDC), with respect to a bare diamond surface, indicates a positive electron affinity of the N-terminated diamond. Exposure to atomic hydrogen results in reorganization of N-terminated diamond to H-terminated diamond, which exhibited a negative electron affinity surface. The change in intensity and spectral features of the secondary electron EDC of the N-terminated diamond is discussed.

  18. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  19. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  20. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  1. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies ... be pregnant. Alternative Names ... CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014: ...

  2. Comparison of hard and soft x-ray photoelectron spectra of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, F.; Werner, W. S. M.; Sacchi, M.; Torelli, P.; Cautero, M.; Cautero, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Huotari, S.; Monaco, G.; Paolicelli, G.; Smekal, W.; Stefani, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2007-08-01

    A detailed comparison of the surface sensitivity of x-ray photoemission spectroscopy for hard and soft x rays is presented and discussed. Electron scattering parameters and their energy dependence are given for Si and two Si spectra are analyzed: a MgKα (hν=1253.6eV) excited spectrum of the Si2p and 2s lines and a hard x-ray excited spectrum (hν=5925eV) of the Si1s line. The differential inelastic scattering characteristics for Si are extracted from reflection electron energy loss spectra taken at energies of 1500 and 4000eV . Using these scattering characteristics and electron mean free paths from the literature, simulated spectra are compared with experiment. The experimental spectra are deconvoluted to give the true intrinsic line shape corresponding to the theoretical collision statistics when interference effects between intrinsic and extrinsic scattering are neglected. The magnitude of interference effects cannot be assessed by our analysis. Within the (unknown) uncertainty introduced by neglecting interference effects, it is possible to determine the relative intensity of intrinsic and extrinsic excitations. In this way, it is found that in the case of the soft x-ray excited photoelectron spectrum of the shallower electronic shells ( 2p and 2s ), intrinsic plasmon creation is rather weak, and the apparent asymmetric line shape of the spectrum might be interpreted as the fact that electron-hole pair creation dominates the intrinsic loss spectrum, while an alternative explanation in terms of surface core level shifted components is also proposed. For the deeper core electronic shell, probed with hard x rays, the opposite situation is observed: while intrinsic electron-hole pair creation was not observed, a strong contribution of intrinsic plasmon losses of about 30% was seen.

  3. Direct observation of temperature dependent magnetic domain structure of the multiferroic La{sub 0.66}Sr{sub 0.34}MnO{sub 3}/BiFeO{sub 3} bilayer system by x-ray linear dichroism- and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mix, C.; Finizio, S.; Jakob, G.; Kläui, M.; Buzzi, M.; Nolting, F.; Kronast, F.

    2014-05-21

    Low-thickness La{sub 0.66}Sr{sub 0.34}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO)/BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin film samples deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} were imaged by high resolution x-ray microscopy at different temperatures. The ultra-thin thickness of the top layer allows to image both the ferromagnetic domain structure of LSMO and the multiferroic domain structure of the buried BFO layer, opening a path to a direct observation of coupling at the interface on a microscopic level. By comparing the domain size and structure of the BFO and LSMO, we observed that, in contrast to LSMO single layers, LSMO/BFO multilayers show a strong temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic domain structure of the LSMO. Particularly, at 40 K, a similar domain size for BFO and LSMO is observed. This indicates a persistence of exchange coupling on the microscopic scale at a temperature, where the exchange bias as determined by magnetometer measurements is vanishing.

  4. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  5. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  6. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  7. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  8. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  9. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  10. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  11. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  12. Structural investigation of the Cu{sub 2}Se-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} phase diagram, X-ray photoemission and optical properties of the Cu{sub 1-z}(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 1+z/3}Se{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Souilah, M.; Lafond, A.; Guillot-Deudon, C.; Harel, S.; Evain, M.

    2010-10-15

    Structures of compounds in the Cu{sub 2}Se-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system have been investigated through X-ray diffraction. Single crystal structure studies for the so-called stoichiometric compounds Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) confirm that the chalcopyrite structure (space group I4-bar 2d) is very flexible and can adapt itself to the substitution of Ga for In. On the other hand a structure modification is evidenced in the Cu{sub 1-z}(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 1+z/3}Se{sub 2} series when the copper vacancy ratio (z) increases; the chalcopyrite structure turns to a modified-stannite structure (I4-bar 2m) when z{>=}0.26. There is a continuous evolution of the structure from Cu{sub 0.74}(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 1.09}Se{sub 2} to Cu{sub 0.25}(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 1.25}Se{sub 2} ((i.e. Cu(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 5}Se{sub 8}), including Cu{sub 0.4}(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 1.2}Se{sub 2} (i.e. Cu(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 3}Se{sub 5}). From this single crystal structural investigation, it is definitively clear that no ordered vacancy compound exists in that series. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study shows for the first time that the surface of powdered Cu{sub 1-z}(In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 1+z/3}Se{sub 2} compounds (z{ne}0) is more copper-poor than the bulk. The same result has often been observed on CIGSe thin films material for photovoltaic applications. In addition, optical band gaps of these non-stoichiometric compounds increase from 1.2 to 1.4 eV when z varies from 0 to 0.75. - Abstract: Pseudo-ternary diagram in the Cu{sub 2}Se-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system showing the composition of all the synthesized compounds. The crystal structure of the compounds corresponding to red circles are presented in this study.

  13. An energy and intensity monitor for X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Rau, Christoph; Brandes, Jay A.; Ingall, Ellery

    2010-07-01

    An in-line X-ray beam energy and intensity monitor has been developed for use in focussed X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements. The monitor uses only the X-ray intensity that would otherwise bypass our zone-plate focussing optic and relies on a measurement of photoemission current. The monitor is inexpensive, easy to align, and provides valuable feedback about the X-ray energy. Operation of the monitor is demonstrated for measurements of phosphorus XANES. The precision of the energy determination is around 0.5 eV.

  14. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  15. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  16. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  17. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  18. Nondipole Photoemission from Chiral Enantiomers of Camphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. P.; Stolte, W. C.; Young, J. A.; Demchenko, I. N.; Guillemin, R.; Hemmers, O.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Lindle, D. W.

    2010-03-01

    K-shell photoemission from the carbonyl carbon in the chiral molecule camphor has been studied in the region just above the core-shell ionization threshold. Differences between angular distributions of emitted photoelectrons from the two enantiomers are attributed to the influence of chirality combined with nondipole effects in the photoemission process, despite the fact the measurements were taken using linearly polarized x-rays. The results suggest the possibility of a new form of linear dichroism.

  19. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  20. Resonant Photoemission in f Electron Systems: Pu& Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Schulze, R K; Terry, J; Farr, J D; Shuh, D K; Heinzelman, K; Rotenberg, E; Waddill, G D; van der Laan, G

    2003-03-07

    Resonant photoemission in the Pu5f and Pu6p states is compared to that in the Gd4f and Gd5p states. Spectral simulations, based upon and atomic model with angular momentum coupling, are compared to the Gd and Pu results. Additional spectroscopic measurements of Pu, including core level photoemission and x-ray absorption are also presented.

  1. Hard X-ray emission from X-ray bursters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Liang, E.

    1996-11-01

    Hard X-ray emission from compact objects has been considered a spectral signature of black hole candidates. However, SIGMA and BATSE recently detected transient emission in the energy range 30-200keV from several X-ray bursters (XRBs) believed to contain weakly magnetized neutron stars. At least seven XRBs (including Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52) are currently known to produce erratic hard X-ray outbursts with typical durations of several weeks. These results lead us to reconsider theoretical models of high-energy emission from compact objects, and in particular thermal Comptonization models vs. non-thermal models of particle energization and X-ray emission from weakly magnetized neutron stars. We summarize here recent results for magnetic field reconnection models of non-thermal particle acceleration and high-energy emission of accretion disks. For intermediate soft X-ray luminosities below the Eddington limit, non-thermal hard X-ray emission is predicted to have a (broken) power-law spectrum with intensity anticorrelated with the soft X-ray luminosity. Recent GINGA/BATSE data for the XRB 4U 1608-52 are in agreement with the mechanism of emission proposed here: transient hard X-ray emission consistent with a broken power-law spectrum was detected for a sub-Eddington soft X-ray luminosity.

  2. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  3. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  4. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  5. Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

    2006-10-30

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

  6. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  7. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  8. Line shapes and satellites in high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectra of large pi-conjugated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schöll, A; Zou, Y; Jung, M; Schmidt, Th; Fink, R; Umbach, E

    2004-11-22

    We present a high-resolution C1s and O1 s x-ray photoemission (XPS) study for condensed films of pi-conjugated organic molecules, namely, of the anhydrides 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, 1,8-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and benzoperylene-(1,8)-dicarboxylic acid anhydride as well as the quinoic acenaphthenequinone. Although the functional groups are identical for the anhydrides, the molecules show very different photoemission fine structure thus providing a detailed fingerprint. A simultaneous peak fit analysis of the XPS spectra of all molecules allows to consistently determine the ionization potentials of all chemically different carbon and oxygen atoms. Additional structures in the C1s and O1s spectra are interpreted as shakeup satellites and assigned with the help of singles and doubles configuration interaction calculations. These satellites provide further information on multielectron excitations and must be taken into account for quantitative investigations. PMID:15549902

  9. X-ray Production By Cosmic Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Aničin, I.; Vesković, M.; Forkapić, S.

    2007-04-01

    Muons have a small cross section for interactions and high energy, so they are very penetrating and give the significant contribution to the gamma spectra of Ge detectors, even in deep underground laboratories. One of the muon interaction effects with material is X-rays production. Having in mind that gold is often used as a detectors component, in this paper the production of X-rays in gold sample is analyzed by using an coincidence system based on plastic scintillation detector and Ge detector. The Au disc-shaped sample with mass of 40.6 g, radius 3.34 cm and 0.06 cm thickness was inside 12 cm thick lead shield of extended range HPGe detector. The plastic detector of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.05 m dimensions was placed above the lead shield at the distance of 32 cm from detector endcap. The producing rate of Kα rays per Au mass unit from coincidence gamma spectrum is determined as R ~7.1 × 10-4 g-1s-1. Taking in account the measured muon flux of Φ=54 s-1m-2, the muon cross section σKα~ 43 Barn, for Au Kα X-rays production is calculated. Also, the cross sections of X-ray production by cosmic muons in lead and tungsten are measured. Unexpectedly, the results obtained did not reveal Z dependence in the Z= 74-82 region.

  10. X-ray beam pointer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive, readily assembled pointer aims X-ray machine for welded assembly radiographs. Plumb bob used for vertical alinement and yardstick used to visualize X-ray paths were inconvenient and inaccurate. Pointer cuts alinement time by one-half and eliminates necessity of retakes. For 3,000 weld radiographs, pointer will save 300 worker-hours and significant materials costs.

  11. Plug Would Collimate X Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.; Adams, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Device creates narrow, well-defined beam for radiographic measurements of thickness. Cylindrical plug collimates and aligns X rays with respect to through holes in parts. Helps in determination of wall thickness by radiography. Lead absorbs X rays that do not pass axially through central hole. Lead/vinyl seals prevent off-axis rays from passing along periphery of plug.

  12. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  13. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  15. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  16. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  17. Quantitative spectromicroscopy from inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Risterucci, P.; Wiemann, C.; Grenet, G.; Schneider, C. M.; Tougaard, S.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantitative, highly bulk-sensitive x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy by analysis of inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range, enabling elemental depth distribution analysis in deeply buried layers. We show results on patterned structures used in electrical testing of high electron mobility power transistor devices with an epitaxial Al0.25Ga0.75N channel and a Ti/Al metal contact. From the image series taken over an energy range of up to 120 eV in the Ti 1s loss feature region and over a typical 100 μm field of view, one can accurately retrieve, using background analysis together with an optimized scattering cross-section, the Ti depth distribution from 14 nm up to 25 nm below the surface. The method paves the way to multi-elemental, bulk-sensitive 3D imaging and investigation of phenomena at deeply buried interfaces and microscopic scales by photoemission.

  18. X-ray induced damage in DNA monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ptasinska, Sylwia; Stypczynska, Agnieszka; Nixon, Tony; Mason, Nigel J.; Klyachko, Dimitri V.; Sanche, Leon

    2008-08-14

    In this work, the chemical changes in calf thymus DNA samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The DNA samples were irradiated for over 5 h and spectra were taken repeatedly every 30 min. In this approach the X-ray beam both damages and probes the samples. In most cases, XPS spectra have complex shapes due to contributions of C, N, and O atoms bonded at several different sites. We show that from a comparative analysis of the modification in XPS line shapes of the C 1s, O 1s, N 1s, and P 2p peaks, one can gain insight into a number of reaction pathways leading to radiation damage to DNA.

  19. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum

  20. Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N; Santra, R

    2008-03-27

    The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  1. First Search for an X-Ray-Optical Reverberation Signal in an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Trippe, Margaret L.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gandhi, Poshak

    2016-02-01

    Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to active galactic nucleus broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (rms of 9.0 ± 0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3σ upper limit on the rms optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected rms optical variability is ≈2%, which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in this study. We find marginal evidence (3σ) for optical variability on a ˜24 hr timescale. Our results demonstrate that such measurements can be made, but photometric conditions, low sky background levels, and longer simultaneous observations will be required to reach optical variability levels similar to those of X-ray binaries.

  2. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  3. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  4. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  5. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E.

    1984-09-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  6. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  7. Picosecond x-ray science.

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, E.; Reis, D.; Wang, J.; Young, L.

    2006-01-01

    The report discusses the exciting times for short pulse X-rays and the current users of the technology in the United States. Tracking nuclear motions with X-rays transcends scientific disciplines and includes Biology, Materials Science, Condensed Matter and Chemistry. 1 picosecond accesses many phenomena previously hidden at 100ps. Synchrotron advantage over laser plasma and LCLS is that it's easily tunable. There is a large and diverse user community of this technology that is growing rapidly. A working group is being formed to implement 'fast track' Phases 1 and 2 which includes tunable, polarized, monochromatic, focused X-rays; variable pulse length (1 to 100ps) and 1 kHz, 10{sup 9} X-rays/s with 1% bandwidth. ERL would be a major advance for ultrafast time-resolved studies.

  8. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Results A radiologist, a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images, will look at ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  16. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  17. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the X-ray spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources, ranging from nearby stars to distant quasars, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of such spectroscopy as a useful and unique tool in the elucidation of the physical parameters of the sources. The spectroscopic analysis of degenerate and nondegenerate stellar systems, galactic clusters and active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants is discussed.

  18. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  19. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  20. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? ... of tooth decay. Updated: January 2012 Related Articles: X-Rays The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) Sets the ...

  1. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  2. Universal x-ray unit

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, P.

    1988-04-26

    An X-ray apparatus capable of X-ray beaming in a multiplicity of directions around and through the body of a horizontally lying stationary patient is described comprising: a horizontal patient's table; a ring in circumscribing position around the table; a X-ray equipment fixedly mounted on the ring for X-ray beaming through the table and through the body of a patient when lying thereon, the X-ray equipment comprising a source of X-rays; support means for holding the ring in the circumscribing position and first drive means on the support means and on the ring for rotating the ring about a first axis perpendicular to the general plane of the ring through the ring center; a suspension member having downwardly extending side legs, second drive means for oscillating the ring support means and the ring together in unison about the second axis; a frame having a top structure above the table, the ring and the suspension member; and a carrier assembly mounted on the top structure and at the center of the suspension member.

  3. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of research activities carried out in the area of cosmic X-ray physics is presented. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer DXS which has been flown twice as a rocket payload is described. The observation times proved to be too small for meaningful X-ray data to be obtained. Data collection and reduction activities from the Ultra-Soft X-ray background (UXT) instrument are described. UXT consists of three mechanically-collimated X-ray gas proportional counters with window/filter combinations which allow measurements in three energy bands, Be (80-110 eV), B (90-187 eV), and O (e84-532 eV). The Be band measurements provide an important constraint on local absorption of X-rays from the hot component of the local interstellar medium. Work has also continued on the development of a calorimetric detector for high-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.1 keV - 8keV energy range.

  4. Effect of X-ray flux on polytetrafluoroethylene in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the X-ray flux in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (STAT) on the constitution of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface has been examined. The radiation dose rate for our specimen was about 10 to the 7th rad/s. The structure, magnitude and binding energy of the C(1s) and F(1s) features of the XPS spectrum and the mass spectrum of gaseous species evolved during irradiation are observed. The strong time dependence of these signals over a period of several hours indicated that the surface constitution of PTFE is greatly affected by this level of radiation dose. The results are consistent with the development of a heavily cross-linked or branched structure in the PTFE surface region and the evolution of short chain fragments into the gas phase.

  5. X-ray photodesorption from methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, D. P. P.; Rocco, M. L. M.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of molecules and ions depend on the mechanisms of their formation and destruction that can occur both in the gas phase and in the condensed phase on grain surfaces. Photodesorption of grain surface species may explain the relative high abundances of gaseous neutral or ionic species detected in cold environments. X-ray photons from young stars are able to penetrate cold and dense regions inside protoplanetary discs, leading to molecular dissociation and desorption of photo-products from icy molecules on grain mantles. This paper aims to experimentally investigate the contribution of ion desorption from methanol ice stimulated by soft X-rays for producing chemically active ions in protoplanetary discs. The measurements were carried out at the Brazilian synchrotron light source (LNLS), using X-ray photons at the methanol O1s resonance energy (537 eV). Some possible pathways for the H- and O- formation from singly charged desorbed ions are suggested. The photodesorption yields for positive and negative ions were determined and compared with previous results obtained using different ionization agents, such as electrons, heavy ions and photons at different energies. We also correlate our results to the ion production in protoplanetary discs.

  6. Laser-assisted photoemission from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saathoff, G.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2008-02-15

    We investigate the laser-assisted photoelectric effect from a solid surface. By illuminating a Pt(111) sample simultaneously with ultrashort 1.6 and 42 eV pulses, we observe sidebands in the extreme ultraviolet photoemission spectrum, and accurately extract their amplitudes over a wide range of laser intensities. Our results agree with a simple model, in which soft x-ray photoemission is accompanied by the interaction of the photoemitted electron with the laser field. This strong effect can definitively be distinguished from other laser surface interaction phenomena, such as hot electron excitation, above-threshold photoemission, and space-charge acceleration. Thus, laser-assisted photoemission from surfaces promises to extend pulse duration measurements to higher photon energies, as well as opening up measurements of femtosecond-to-attosecond electron dynamics in solid and surface-adsorbate systems.

  7. Characterization of SiC fibers by soft x-ray photoelectron and photoabsorption spectroscopies and scanning Auger microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qing; McDowell, M.W.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation soft x-ray photoelectron and photoabsorption spectroscopy was used to characterize commercially obtained SiC fibers produced by CVD on a W core and followed by a C passivating layer. Depth profiling of the fiber through the C/SiC interface was done by making Si 2p and C 1s core level PES and PAS, as well as scanning Auger microscopy, measurements following Ar{sup +} sputtering. No significant changes in either photoemission or absorption or Auger line shapes were observed versus depth, indicating no significant interfacial reaction. The line shapes of the carbonaceous coatings are predominantely graphite-like and those of the CVD SiC coatings are microcrystalline, with disorder present to some extent in both cases.

  8. The Mysteries of Auroral X-rays: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.

    2001-12-01

    This talk will review the history of auroral X-ray observations and their contributions to magnetospheric physics. X-rays were first discovered in the magnetic storm of July 1, 1957 over Minneapolis by John Winckler's research group. A cosmic ray particle experiment aloft a balloon detected an anomalous increase in counting rate that was later deduced to be atmospheric bremsstrahlung X-rays from precipitated energetic electrons. X-ray experiments subsequently carried out from the auroral zone yielded the important information that precipitated electrons are highly structured in space and time. Periodic 5-30s pulsations dominate the early morning sector, while =1s microbursts in the dawn to noon sector. Satellite observations have now obtained global features about the energetic electron precipitation. Most of the auroral X-rays have energies =20-100 keV but recent data indicate that electron precipitation frequently involves intense bursts of X-rays with MeV energies. John Winckler led the way on an exciting path that extends into the future, as researchers will continue to delve into the mystery of source mechanisms of pulsations, microbursts and the MeV X-rays.

  9. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements. PMID:27294978

  10. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-11-15

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  11. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  12. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  13. VUV and soft x-ray spectroscopy of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C. G.; Joyce, J. J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Guziewicz, E.

    2004-01-01

    Optical and photoelectron spectroscopies using VUV and Soft X-ray photons are powerful tools for studies of elemental and compound actinides. Large changes in the relative atomic cross sections of the 5f, 6d and sp electrons allow decomposition of the character of the valence bands using photoemission. Resonant enhancement of photoelectrons and Auger electrons at the 5d core threshold further aids the decomposition and gives a measure of elemental specificity. Angle-resolved photoemission can be used to map the momentum dependence of the electronic states. The large changes in relative cross section with photon energy yields further details when the mapping is done at equivalent points in multiple zones. Spectra for well understood rare earth materials will be presented to establish spectral characteristics for known atomic character initial states. These signatures will be applied to the case of USb to investigate f-d hybridization near the Fermi level.

  14. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  15. Innovations in X-ray-induced electron emission spectroscopy (XIEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebitsky, K. Ju. Sharkov, M. D.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, a pressing need has arisen for controlling the local atomic and electron structure of materials irrespective of their aggregate state. Efficient approaches to the studies of short-range order are based on phenomena accompanied by interference of secondary electrons excited by primary X-ray radiation. The set of such approaches are commonly referred to as the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) methods. In reality, the XAFS methods are based on the use of synchrotron radiation and applied to structural studies in two modes of measurements, transmission analysis and recording of secondary effects. Only two such effects-specifically, the X-ray fluorescence an d X-ray-induced electron emission effect-are commonly discussed. Access to synchrotron accelerators is problematic for most researchers, so a demand is created for designing laboratory systems that make direct access possible. Since the power of laboratory systems is much lower than that of synchrotrons, it is essential to use much more efficient detectors of secondary electrons. In addition, it is of interest to analyze energy characteristics with a high spatial resolution. Channel multipliers and multichannel boards are incapable of providing such a possibility. For this reason, an improved electron detector has been developed to analyze the photoemission effect in an accelerating field.

  16. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  17. X-ray Timing Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present new, extended X-ray timing measurements of the ultra-compact binary candidates V407 Vul and RX J0806.3+1527 (J0806), as well as a summary of the first high resolution X-ray spectra of 50806 obtained with the Chandra/LETG. The temporal baseline for both objects is approximately 12 years, and our measurements confirm the secular spin-up in their X-ray periods. The spin-up rate in 50806 is remarkably uniform at 3.55x10(exp -16)Hz/s, with a measurement precision of 0.2%. We place a limit (90% confidence) on 1 d dot nu < 4x10(exp -26)Hz/sq s. Interestingly, for V407 Vul we find the first evidence that the spin-up rate is slowing, with d dot\

  18. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Stacey Giles briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  19. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Lance Weiss briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  20. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. PMID:22318258

  1. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  2. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  3. Portable X-Ray Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  4. Electronic Structure in Thin Film Organic Semiconductors Studied using Soft X-ray Emission and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Downes, J.; Wang, S.; Learmonth, T.; Plucinski, L.; Matsuura, A.; McGuinness, C.; Glans, P.; Bernardis, S.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin films of the organic semiconductors copper and vanadyl (VO) phthalocyanine (Pc) has been measured using resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. For Cu-Pc we report the observation of two discrete states near E{sub F}. This differs from published photoemission results, but is in excellent agreement with density functional calculations. For VO-Pc, the vanadyl species is shown to be highly localized. Both dipole forbidden V 3d to V 3d*, and O 2p to V 3d* charge transfer transitions are observed, and explained in a local molecular orbital model.

  5. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  6. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  7. X-ray backscatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  8. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques. PMID:26288956

  9. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  10. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  11. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  12. Thickness determination of molecularly thin lubricant films by angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chongjun; Bai, Mingwu

    2007-03-01

    An angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method used to measure the thickness of molecularly thin lubricants was developed. The method was built based on an island model of patched overlayer on a flat substrate by using the photoemission signal solely from the lubricant film. Typical molecularly thin Zdol films on the CHx overcoat of unused commercial magnetic disks were measured to verify the metrology. The lubricant thickness determined by the metrology was equal to the recent result by thermostatic high vacuum atomic force microscopy. The measured deduction in the thickness of the molecularly thin lubricant films, successively irradiated by the monochromatic source operated at 14 kV/250 W, was as low as 1 Ǻ during the first irradiation hour. XPS spectra showed that no hydrocarbons, water or oxygen were adsorbed over the Zdol outer surfaces in the tested XPS conditions. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of C 1s in Zdol or in CHx was found to be independent of take off angle (TOA) when TOA < 40°. The IMFP of C 1s in Zdol was ˜63.5 Ǻ and the lubricant island thickness was ˜35 Ǻ.

  13. X-ray and Electron Spectroscopy of Water.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Besley, Nicholas A; Winter, Bernd; Rehr, John J; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-07-13

    Here we present an overview of recent developments of X-ray and electron spectroscopy to probe water at different temperatures. Photon-induced ionization followed by detection of electrons from either the O 1s level or the valence band is the basis of photoelectron spectroscopy. Excitation between the O 1s and the unoccupied states or occupied states is utilized in X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. These techniques probe the electronic structure of the liquid phase and show sensitivity to the local hydrogen-bonding structure. Both experimental aspects related to the measurements and theoretical simulations to assist in the interpretation are discussed in detail. Different model systems are presented such as the different bulk phases of ice and various adsorbed monolayer structures on metal surfaces. PMID:27244473

  14. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  15. The Bragg solar x-ray spectrometer SolpeX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ścisłowski, D.; Sylwester, J.; Steślicki, M.; Płocieniak, S.; Bąkała, J.; Szaforz, Ż.; Kowaliński, M.; Podgórski, P.; Trzebiński, W.; Hernandez, J.; Barylak, J.; Barylak, A.; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-09-01

    Detection of polarization and spectra measurement of X-ray solar flare emission are indispensable in improving our understanding of the processes releasing energy of these most energetic phenomena in the solar system. We shall present some details of the construction of SolpeX - an innovative Bragg soft X-ray flare polarimeter and spectrometer. The instrument is a part of KORTES - Russian instrument complex to be mounted aboard the science module to be attached to the International Space Station (2017/2018). The SolpeX will be composed of three individual measuring units: the soft X-ray polarimeter with 1-2% linear polarization detection threshold, a fast-rotating flat crystal X-ray spectrometer with a very high time resolution (0.1 s) and a simple pinhole soft X-ray imager-spectrometer with a moderate spatial (~20 arcsec), spectral (0.5 keV) and high time resolution (0.1 s). Having a fast rotating unit to be served with power, telemetry and "intelligence" poses a challenge for the designer. Some of the solutions to this will be provided and described.

  16. The photoelectric effect from CsI by polarized soft X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ping S.; Church, Eric D.; Hanany, Shaul; Liu, Yee; Fleischman, Judith; Kaaret, Philip; Novick, Robert; Manzo, Giuseppe

    1991-01-01

    Studies of the polarization dependence of the photoelectric effect produced by soft X-rays from CsI indicate that the geometrical effects in these experiments can often mimic the polarization signature. This paper presents a detailed calculation of these geometrical effects that are produced when the X-ray beam is not precisely aligned on a rotatable plane photocathode. The experimentally observed geometrical effects were used to precisely determine the realignment of the incident beam of polarized X-rays on a rotatable photocathode. The results allow determinations of the true polarization dependence of the photoemission from CsI. It is shown that the photoelectric effect in CsI depends on the polarization state of the X-rays.

  17. SXRP - An X-ray polarimeter for the SPECTRUM-X-Gamma mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, E.; Piro, L.; Soffitta, P.; Massaro, E.; Matt, G.; Perola, G. C.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Manzo, G.; Santangelo, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Stellar X-ray Polarimeter (SXRP) is a focal plane instrument which will be flown on the SPECTRUM-X-Gamma mission in 1993. The polarimeter is composed of two separate instruments: the first exploits the dependence on the polarization of the Bragg reflection from a graphite crystal, and of the Thomson scattering from a metallic lithium target. The second instrument makes use of the recently discovered polarization dependence of X-ray photoemission from CsI. The SXRP will permit sensitive measurements of several classes of galactic X-ray sources, such as X-ray pulsars, black-hole candidates and supernova remnants. Moreover, and for the first time, SXRP will be able to perform highly sensitive measurements of the brightest extragalactic sources.

  18. X-ray microdiffraction of biominerals.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-01-01

    Biominerals have complex and heterogeneous architectures, hence diffraction experiments with spatial resolutions between 500 nm and 10 μm are extremely useful to characterize them. X-ray beams in this size range are now routinely produced at many synchrotrons. This chapter provides a review of the different hard X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques, used in conjunction with efficient, state-of-the-art X-ray focusing optics. These include monochromatic X-ray microdiffraction, polychromatic (Laue) X-ray microdiffraction, and microbeam small-angle X-ray scattering. We present some of the most relevant discoveries made in the field of biomineralization using these approaches. PMID:24188780

  19. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  20. Microgap x-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  1. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  2. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  3. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guehrs, Erik; Stadler, Andreas M.; Flewett, Sam; Frömmel, Stefanie; Geilhufe, Jan; Pfau, Bastian; Rander, Torbjörn; Schaffert, Stefan; Büldt, Georg; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography (‘tomoholography’) for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography.

  4. X-ray Diode Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D J; Good, D E; Hogge, K W; Molina, I; Howe, R A; Lutz, S S; Flores, P A; McGillivray, K D; Skarda, W M; Nelson, D S; Ormond, E S; Cordova, S R

    2011-06-16

    A rod pinch x-ray diode assembly culminates in a coaxial anode cathode arrangement where a small anode rod extends through the aperture of a cathode plate. Shotto- shot repeatability in rod placement, and thus x-ray source spot position, has potential to positively affect radiographic image quality. Thus, how to both control and measure, according to a Cartesian coordinate system, anode rod tip displacement (x, y) (off the beam line-of-sight retical) and also anode rod tip extension (z) (along the line-of-sight center line) become salient issues relative to radiographic image set utility. To address these issues both hardware fabrication and x-ray diode assembly methods were reviewed, and additional controls were introduced. A photogrammetric procedure was developed to quantify anode rod tip position in situ. Computer models and mock-up assemblies with precision fiducials were produced to validate this procedure. Therefore, both anode rod tip displacement and anode rod tip extension parameters were successfully controlled. Rod position was measured and met the required specifications: (1) radial displacement <0.25 mm and (2) axial placement of ±0.25 mm. We demonstrated that precision control and measurement of large scale components is achievable in a pulse power system (i.e., hardware and operations). Correlations with diode performance and radiography are presented.

  5. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  6. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  7. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, A. P.; Lee, V.; Wu, J.; West, M. M.; Cooper, G.; Berejnov, V.; Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined.

  8. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  9. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  10. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  11. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  12. Producing X-rays at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  13. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  14. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  15. X-ray radiation of poly-L-arginine hydrochloride and multilayered DNA-coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stypczyńska, Agnieszka; Nixon, Tony; Mason, Nigel

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the chemical changes induced in thin films of the dry polypeptide poly-L-arginine hydrochloride and its mixture with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) during 5 h of soft X-ray exposure. The physical and chemical effects of the soft X-ray irradiation were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of O1 s, N1 s and C1 s features in XPS spectra reveals the existence of several routes of radiation-induced decomposition and shows quantitative and qualitative changes.

  16. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  17. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  18. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  19. Optical observations of X-ray systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudets, R.

    The significance of optical observations of X-ray sources is discussed. A short review of X-ray and optical observations of X-ray stars in socialist countries, carried out by the Intercosmos program and by multilateral cooperation of the Academies of Sciences of Socialist Countries is given. Some examples and results of observations are presented.

  20. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  1. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He) using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy). Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K-p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K-d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the "kaonic helium puzzle". In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  2. A Monte Carlo photocurrent/photoemission computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadsey, W. L.; Ragona, C.

    1972-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program was developed for the computation of photocurrents and photoemission in gamma (X-ray)-irradiated materials. The program was used for computation of radiation-induced surface currents on space vehicles and the computation of radiation-induced space charge environments within space vehicles.

  3. Zernike x-ray ptychography.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mohacsi, Istvan; Stachnik, Karolina; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2016-02-15

    We present an imaging technique combining Zernike phase-contrast imaging and ptychography. The contrast formation is explained by following the theory of Zernike phase-contrast imaging. The method is demonstrated with x-rays at a photon energy of 6.2 keV, showing how ptychographic reconstruction of a phase sample leads to a Zernike phase-contrast image appearing in the amplitude reconstruction. In addition, the results presented in this Letter indicate an improvement of the resolution of the reconstructed object in the case of Zernike ptychography compared with the conventional one. PMID:26872172

  4. A new measurement of kaonic hydrogen X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddharta Collaboration; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Curceanu (Petrascu), C.; D'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R. S.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-10-01

    The K¯N system at threshold is a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD, especially for the explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Therefore, we have measured the K-series X-rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and have determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the 1s atomic state. As X-ray detectors, we used large-area silicon drift detectors having excellent energy and timing resolution, which were developed especially for the SIDDHARTA experiment. The shift and width were determined to be ɛ1s=-283±36(stat)±6(syst) eV and Γ1s=541±89(stat)±22(syst) eV, respectively. The new values will provide vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy K¯N interaction.

  5. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  6. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  7. Three-dimensional x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, B.P.; Deckman, H.W.; Roberge, W.G.; D'Amico, K.L.

    1987-09-18

    The new technique of x-ray microtomography nondestructively generates three-dimensional maps of the x-ray attenuation coefficient inside small samples with approximately 1 percent accuracy and with resolution approaching 1 micrometer. Spatially resolved elemental maps can be produced with synchrotron x-ray sources by scanning samples at energies just above and below characteristic atomic absorption edges. The system consists of a high-resolution imaging x-ray detector and high-speed algorithms for tomographic image reconstruction. The design and operation of the microtomography device are described, and tomographic images that illustrate it performance with both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources are presented.

  8. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  9. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  10. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  11. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  12. Hard X-ray Imaging Microscopy using X-ray Guide Tube as Beam Condenser for Field Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Terada, Yasuko; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Ohzawa, Sumito; Aoyama, Tomoki; Nii, Hajime; Handa, Katsumi

    2013-10-01

    An optical system for illumination of object in x-ray imaging microscopy is developed. The optical system is a beam condenser consisting of a single-bounce conical-shape mono-capillary (x-ray guide tube: XGT) made of Pyrex glass. The XGT condenser was tested at the beam line 47XU of SPring-8 using a Fresnel zone plate as an objective lens. Comparing with the microscope without beam condenser, the flux density is improved by a factor of 12-20 in the x-ray energy range of 6-8 keV. Test patterns with a 50 nm-structure are clearly resolved at 8 keV with an exposure time less than 1 s.

  13. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  14. Evolution of X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossj, B.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of X-ray astronomy up to the launching of the Einstein observatory is presented. The evaluation proceeded through the following major steps: (1) discovery of an extrasolar X-ray source, Sco X-1, orders of magnitude stronger than astronomers believed might exist; (2) identification of a strong X-ray source with the Crab Nebula; (3) identification of Sco X-1 with a faint, peculiar optical object; (4) demonstration that X-ray stars are binary systems, each consisting of a collapsed object accreting matter from an ordinary star; (5) discovery of X-ray bursts; (6) discovery of exceedingly strong X-ray emission from active galaxies, quasars and clusters of galaxies; (7) demonstration that the principal X-ray source is a hot gas filling the space between galaxies.

  15. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  16. Extended range X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray telescope system is described which is comprised of a tubular mount having a collecting region remote from the one axial end. A soft X-ray/XUV subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively soft, near on-axis X-rays/XUV radiation incident on a first portion of the collecting region into a first detector sensitive to relatively soft X-rays/XUV radiation. A hard X-ray subsystem associated with the collecting region directs only relatively hard near on-axis X-rays incident on a second portion of the collecting region into a second detector sensitive to relatively hard X-rays.

  17. X-ray deconvolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship pn with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n. PMID:27446649

  18. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-08-17

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample.

  19. Parametric X-Ray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchagin, Alexander

    1997-10-01

    The main PXR properties [1,2] are considered in the paper: energy, width, smooth tuning of monochromatic PXR spectral line; fine structure and absolute differential yields of PXR in the vicinity of and at angular distances from Brag directions; angular spread of the PXR beam; the influence of incident electron energy and of the density effect on the PXR properties; linear polarization of PXR; background in PXR spectra. Experimental setups for linacs and the results of measurements are discussed. Experimental data are compared to theoretical calculations at PXR energies between 5 and 400 keV for incident electron energies ranging from 15 to 1200 MeV. Possible applications of PXR as a new source of a bright, tunable X-ray beam in science and industry are discussed. [1] A.V. Shchagin and N.A. Khizhnyak, NIM B119, 115-122 (1996). [2] A.V. Shchagin and X.K. Maruyama, "Parametric X-rays", a chapter in the book "Accelerator-based Atomic Physics Techniques and Applications", edited by S.M. Shafroth and J.C. Austin, AIP Press, 1997, pp 279-307.

  20. Transportable X-ray cart

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The main body of the report summarizes the project scope, project milestones, highlights any unresolved problems encountered during the project and includes a summary of the financial information. The purpose of this CRADA was to assist Digiray Corporation in the development and evaluation of a Transportable Reverse Geometry X-Ray 0 (RGX-T) cart for aircraft inspection Scope: LLNL was to provide a review of the RGX-T engineering drawing package supplied by Digiray, suggest and incorporate design modifications, fabricate, assemble and provide performance evaluation testing of the RGX-T prototype. Major deliverables were (a) engineering design analysis and evaluation (b) cart prototype hardware, and (c) performance evaluation. Schedule: Procurement and technical delays extended the project twelve months past than the original four month project duration estimate. LLNL reviewed engineering drawings of the RGX-T prototype provided by Digiray, performed a engineering design analysis and evaluation, suggested and incorporated modifications to improve design safety factors, fabricated and assembled the prototype system, and evaluated the motion and positioning capabilities of the assembled system. The RGX-T provides a limited set of positioning orientations for the Digiray x-ray tube head that do not meet the overall Digiray requirements for aircraft inspection. In addition, mechanical stability concerns remain for positioning the tube head with the mechanical arm and for rolling the assembly with arbitrary orientation of the mechanical arm.

  1. X-ray lasing - Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The theoretical basis of lasing at very short wavelengths is discussed, and lasing at soft-x-ray (4-50 nm) wavelengths using the electron-collisional excitation scheme is successfully demonstrated. In research at LLNL, thin foils of selenium and yttrium are irradiated with laser light to generate a roughly cylindrical plasma containing neon-like ions. Excitation of ground state 2p electrons to the 3p state in the lasant medium is followed by very fast radioactive decay out of the 3s state, creating a population inversion between the 3s and 3p states. Stimulated x-ray emission is initiated by slower spontaneous decay from a 3p to 3s state. Design goals are to produce a plasma with a flat electron density of approximately 5 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm, a flat temperature profile, a scale length of at least 100 microns, and a population inversion lasting at least the 100 ps necessary to produce a significant gain. Good correlation is seen between experimental data and LANEX and XRASER theoretical modeling predictions over large variations in intensity, pulse length, and probing times. No explanation is found for the weakness of the J = 0 to J = 1 lasing transition line at 18.3 nm. 13 references.

  2. X-ray lasing - Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-11-01

    The theoretical basis of lasing at very short wavelengths is discussed, and lasing at soft-X-ray (4-50 nm) wavelengths using the electron-collisional excitation scheme is successfully demonstrated. In research at LLNL, thin foils of selenium and yttrium are irradiated with laser light to generate a roughly cylindrical plasma containing neon-like ions. Excitation of ground state 2p electrons to the 3p state in the lasant medium is followed by very fast radioactive decay out of the 3s state, creating a population inversion between the 3s and 3p states. Stimulated X-ray emission is initiated by slower spontaneous decay from a 3p to 3s state. Design goals are to produce a plasma with a flat electron density of approximately 5 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm, a flat temperature profile, a scale length of at least 100 microns, and a population inversion lasting at least the 100 ps necessary to produce a significant gain. Good correlation is seen between experimental data and LANEX and XRASER theoretical modeling predictions over large variations in intensity, pulse length, and probing times. No explanation is found for the weakness of the J = 0 to J = 1 lasing transition line at 18.3 nm.

  3. Generalized Franck-Condon principle for resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sałek, Paweł; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Ågren, Hans; Björneholm, Olle; Svensson, Svante

    1999-10-01

    A generalized Franck-Condon (GFC) principle for resonant x-ray Raman scattering and for resonant photoemission in particular is derived and numerically investigated. The GFC amplitudes differ from ordinary FC amplitudes by the presence of photon and photoelectron phase factors which describe the coupling-or interference-of the x-ray photons or Auger electrons with the nuclear motion. With the GFC amplitudes, a Kramers-Heisenberg relation is obtained for vibronic transitions that corrects the so-called lifetime-vibrational interference formula. For resonant photoemission in the soft-x-ray region involving typical bound potential surfaces, the generalization gives a contribution to the FC factors that can amount to 20%. For core excitation above the dissociation threshold, the GFC principle relates to Doppler effects on the ejected photoelectron both for the so-called ``molecular'' and ``atomic'' bands. The role of the GFC principle in direct photoionization is briefly discussed.

  4. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  5. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  6. Controlling x-rays with light.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Southworth, S. H.; Allison, T. K.; van Tilborg, J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Varma, H. R.; Rude, B.; Santra, R.; Belkacem, A.; Young, L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; LBNL; Univ. of California at Berkley; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast X-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largely unexplored area of ultrafast X-ray science is the use of light to control how X-rays interact with matter. To extend control concepts established for long-wavelength probes to the X-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here, an intense optical control pulse is observed to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for X-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of X-ray transparency relevant to ultrafast X-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond X-ray pulse. The ability to control X-ray-matter interactions with light will create new opportunities for present and next-generation X-ray light sources.

  7. Measurement of the kaonic hydrogen x-ray spectrum.

    PubMed

    Beer, G; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu-Petrascu, C; Egger, J-P; Fuhrmann, H; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Kienle, P; Koike, T; Lauss, B; Lucherini, V; Ludhova, L; Marton, J; Mulhauser, F; Ponta, T; Schaller, L A; Seki, R; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Zmeskal, J

    2005-06-01

    The DEAR (DAPhiNE exotic atom research) experiment measured the energy of x rays emitted in the transitions to the ground state of kaonic hydrogen. The measured values for the shift epsilon and the width Gamma of the 1s state due to the K(-)p strong interaction are epsilon(1s)=-193 +/- 37 (stat) +/- 6 (syst) eV and Gamma(1s)=249 +/- 111 (stat) +/- 30 (syst) eV, the most precise values yet obtained. The pattern of the kaonic hydrogen K-series lines, K(alpha), K(beta), and K(gamma), was disentangled for the first time. PMID:16090312

  8. Measurement of the Kaonic Hydrogen X-Ray Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, G.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu-Petrascu, C.; Egger, J.-P.; Fuhrmann, H.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Koike, T.; Lauss, B.; Lucherini, V.; Ludhova, L.; Marton, J.; Mulhauser, F.; Ponta, T.; Schaller, L. A.; Seki, R.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Zmeskal, J.

    2005-06-01

    The DEAR (DAΦNE exotic atom research) experiment measured the energy of x rays emitted in the transitions to the ground state of kaonic hydrogen. The measured values for the shift ɛ and the width Γ of the 1s state due to the K-p strong interaction are ɛ1s=-193±37 (stat) ±6 (syst) eV and Γ1s=249±111 (stat) ±30 (syst) eV, the most precise values yet obtained. The pattern of the kaonic hydrogen K-series lines, Kα, Kβ, and Kγ, was disentangled for the first time.

  9. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  10. Industrial X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, Lewis Research Center jointly sponsored a conference with the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory focused on high speed imaging. This conference, and early funding by Lewis Research Center, helped to spur work by Silicon Mountain Design, Inc. to break the performance barriers of imaging speed, resolution, and sensitivity through innovative technology. Later, under a Small Business Innovation Research contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the company designed a real-time image enhancing camera that yields superb, high quality images in 1/30th of a second while limiting distortion. The result is a rapidly available, enhanced image showing significantly greater detail compared to image processing executed on digital computers. Current applications include radiographic and pathology-based medicine, industrial imaging, x-ray inspection devices, and automated semiconductor inspection equipment.

  11. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  12. Late B Star X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The most basic conclusion to be drawn from the EINSTEIN stellar X-ray observations was that all stars are X-ray sources - except the late-B and early- to mid-A stars. While this is still true in general, observations with the ROSAT X-ray observatory have shown that young late-B/early-A stars, those in and near regions of star formation, are often bright X-ray sources. It is not yet clear why (or, indeed, whether) young B-A stars are often X-ray sources. We request time on the IUE to observe a sample of these stars. We will compare the line profiles against B star models against archival spectra, looking for evidence of mass loss or mass inflows, as well as evidence of transition region gas. Detection of the latter will prove that the B stars are indeed X-ray sources.

  13. Stimulated Electronic X-Ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Purvis, Michael; Ryan, Duncan; London, Richard A.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Graf, Alexander; Brown, Gregory; Rocca, Jorge J.; Rohringer, Nina

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate strong stimulated inelastic x-ray scattering by resonantly exciting a dense gas target of neon with femtosecond, high-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A small number of lower energy XFEL seed photons drive an avalanche of stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering processes that amplify the Raman scattering signal by several orders of magnitude until it reaches saturation. Despite the large overall spectral width, the internal spiky structure of the XFEL spectrum determines the energy resolution of the scattering process in a statistical sense. This is demonstrated by observing a stochastic line shift of the inelastically scattered x-ray radiation. In conjunction with statistical methods, XFELs can be used for stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, with spectral resolution smaller than the natural width of the core-excited, intermediate state.

  14. Deep Extragalactic X-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. N.; Hasinger, G.

    2005-09-01

    Deep surveys of the cosmic X-ray background are reviewed in the context of observational progress enabled by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton. The sources found by deep surveys are described along with their redshift and luminosity distributions, and the effectiveness of such surveys at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN) is assessed. Some key results from deep surveys are highlighted, including (a) measurements of AGN evolution and the growth of supermassive black holes, (b) constraints on the demography and physics of high-redshift AGN, (c) the X-ray AGN content of infrared and submillimeter galaxies, and (d) X-ray emission from distant starburst and normal galaxies. We also describe some outstanding problems and future prospects for deep extragalactic X-ray surveys.

  15. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  16. Time resolved x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentzepis, Peter M.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the project was to design, develop and construct an x-ray detector with high sensitivity and picosecond time resolution. This was achieved. A Ford Aerospace Charged Coupled Device, CCD, was utilized as the x-ray sensitive material around which the design and construction of the picosecond x-ray detector was built. This device has now become a commercial product sold, among other companies, by Photometrics Inc., and Princeton Research Inc. In addition we designed and built the first picosecond x-ray system. This system was utilized for the first ever picosecond x-ray diffraction experiments. The picosecond x-ray system was utilized in the oxidative fuel cell project to measure the decomposition of methanol and the change of the structure of its platinum catalyst. Another direct product of the work is the publication of 36 papers, in major scientific journals, and two patents.

  17. X-rays for medical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  18. Hard X-ray imaging from Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Murray, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

  19. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  20. X ray microcalorimeters: Principles and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Juda, M.; Kelley, R. L.; Mccammon, D.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Zhang, J.

    1992-01-01

    Microcalorimeters operating at cryogenic temperatures can be excellent X-ray spectrometers. They simultaneously offer very high spectral resolving power and high efficiency. These attributes are important for X-ray astronomy where most sources have low fluxes and where high spectral resolution is essential for understanding the physics of the emitting regions. The principles of operation of these detectors, limits to their sensitivity, design considerations, techniques of fabrication, and their performance as X-ray spectrometers, are reviewed.

  1. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Armon; Mills, Dennis M.

    2002-01-01

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  2. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  3. Lobster-Eye X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Marsikova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2010-07-15

    We report on technical and astrophysical aspects of Lobster-Eye wide-field X-ray telescopes expected to monitor the sky with high sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They will contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc.

  4. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, K. M.; Dul, D. T.; Wróbel, A.; Korecki, P.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  5. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  6. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  7. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities. PMID:26811449

  8. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  9. Bent crystal X-ray topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A television X-ray topographic camera system was constructed. The system differs from the previous system in that it incorporates the X-ray TV imaging system and has a semi-automatic wafer loading system. Also the X-ray diffraction is in a vertical plane. This feature makes wafer loading easier and makes the system compatible with any commercial X-ray generating system. Topographs and results obtained from a study of the diffraction contrast variation with impurity concentration for both boron implanted and boron diffused silicon are included.

  10. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. The Swift/XRT telescope detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component that we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component that probably originates in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e., a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the α/β/γ classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new δ classification

  11. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  12. Models for galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to those compact galactic X-ray sources whose X-ray luminosities are considerably in excess of the solar luminosity. It is pointed out that the key breakthrough in the development of an understanding of compact galactic X-ray sources was the discovery of X-ray pulsars with the UHURU satellite. There is now overwhelming evidence that these objects are neutron stars in close binary stellar systems. The X-ray pulsations are thought to be thermal emission from the magnetic polar caps of a neutron star that is accreting matter from a companion star and whose magnetic field is misaligned with its rotation axis. Among the compact galactic X-ray sources that are not X-ray pulsars, some still show direct evidence of binary membership, such as X-ray eclipses. There is evidence that the galactic-bulge sources are, in fact, close binary stellar systems. It is concluded, that the great majority of bright galactic X-ray sources, with only a tiny handful of exceptions (such as the Crab and Vela pulsars), are likely to be binaries.

  13. The Lunar X-ray Observatory (LXO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission from charge exchange recombination between the highly ionized solar wind and neutral material i n Earth's magnetosheath has complicated x-ray observations of celestial objects with x-ray observatories including ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. However, the charge-exchange emission can also be used as an important diagnostic of the solar-wind interacting with the magnetosheath. Soft x-ray observations from low-earth orbit or even the highly eccentric orbits of Chandra and XMM-Newton are likely superpositions of the celestial object of interest, the true extra-solar soft x-ray background, geospheric charge exchange, and heliospheric charge exchange. We show that with a small x-ray telescope placed either on the moon, in a similar vein as the Apollo ALSOP instruments, or at a stable orbit near L1, we can begin t o disentangle the complicated emission structure in the soft x-ray band. Here we present initial results of a feasibility study recently funded by NASA t o place a small x-ray telescope on the lunar surface. The telescope operates during lunar night to observe charge exchange interactions between the solar wind and magnetospheric neutrals, between the solar wind and the lunar atmosphere, and an unobstructed view of the soft x-ray background without the geospheric component.

  14. The efficacy of x-ray pelvimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.; Garbaciak, J.A. Jr.; Ryan, G.M., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Comparison is made of x-ray pelvimetry use on a public and private service in 1974 with experience in 1979, when the clinic service did no x-ray pelvimetry while the private service continued as before. It is concluded that the use of x-ray pelvimetry is inadequate as a predictor of cesarean section because of cephalopelvic disproportion, does not improve neonatal mortality, and poses potential hazards to the mother and fetus. Its use in the management of breech presentations is not currently established by our data. Guidelines are presented for the management of patients in labor without using x-ray pelvimetry.

  15. Tenma - Japan's X-ray satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, C.

    1984-06-01

    Japan's second X-ray satellite, designated 'Tenma', has temporal and spectral sensitivity superior to that of its predecessor, Hakucho. It is a spin-stabilized satellite whose attitude maneuvers are performed through the activation of a magnetic torquing coil, by means of which a typical, 20-deg transfer occupies several orbits. Tenma carries as its instrument set scintillation proportional counters for spectral and temporal studies, an X-ray focusing collector for the study of very soft X-ray sources, a transient source monitor for wide-field sky monitoring, and a radiation belt monitor/gamma-ray burst detector for monitoring the non-X-ray background.

  16. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  17. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  18. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Edgar, R. J.; Juda, M.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Mccammon, D.; Snowden, S. L.; Zhang, J.; Skinner, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment, or 'DXS', is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy diffuse X-ray background with about 10 eV energy resolution and 15-deg spatial resolution. During a 5-day Space Shuttle mission, DXS is to measure the spectrum of ten 15 x 15 deg regions lying along a single 150-deg-long great circle arc on the sky. DXS carries two large-area X-ray Bragg spectrometers for the 44-84 A wavelength range; these permit measurement of the wavelength spectrum of the cosmic low-energy diffuse X-ray background with good spectral resolution.

  19. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Alan Hap

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  20. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  1. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  2. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  3. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  4. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  5. Real Time Observation of X-ray-Induced Surface Modification Using Simultaneous XANES and XEOL-XANES

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In experiments preliminary to the design of an X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL)-based chemical mapping tool we have used X-ray micro (4.5 × 5.2 μm) and macro (1 × 6 mm) beams with similar total fluxes to assess the effects of a high flux density beam of X-rays at energies close to an absorption edge on inorganic surfaces in air. The near surface composition of corroded cupreous alloys was analyzed using parallel X-ray and optical photoemission channels to collect X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data at the Cu K edge. The X-ray fluorescence channel is characteristic of the composition averages over several micrometers into the surface, whereas the optical channel is surface specific to about 200 nm. While the X-ray fluorescence data were mostly insensitive to the X-ray dose, the XEOL-XANES data from the microbeam showed significant dose-dependent changes to the superficial region, including surface cleaning, changes in the oxidation state of the copper, and destruction of surface compounds responsible for pre-edge fluorescence or phosphorescence in the visible. In one case, there was evidence that the lead phase in a bronze had melted. Conversely, data from the macrobeam were stable over several hours. Apart from localized heating effects, the microbeam damage is probably associated with the O3 loading of the surface and increased reaction rate with atmospheric water vapor. PMID:24044633

  6. X-Ray Imaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 1O(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionally less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. At the same time, there will be substantial potential for collisions between the space platforms and space debris. The current NASA catalogue contains over 4500 objects floating in space which are not considered payloads. This debris can have significant effects on collision with orbiting spacecraft. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are being performed to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. In particular the study of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact on the various surfaces anticipated on the Space Station is very important at this point in time. The need to assess the threat of such debris clouds on space structures is an on-going activity. The Space Debris Impact facility in Building 4612 provides a test facility to monitor the types of damage produced with hypervelocity impact. These facilities are used to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Flash radiography or x-ray imaging has traditionally provided such information and as such has been an important tool for recording damage in situ with the event. The proper

  7. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), fully developed in orbit in a star field with Earth. In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  8. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), in orbit in a star field. In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  9. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Computer Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  10. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul

    1998-05-16

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

  11. The X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Dongdong; Li, Wenbin; Lian, Jian; Shi, Yufeng; Song, Juan; Wang, Wencong; Sun, Shukun

    2016-01-01

    The effective X-ray optics is a key premise for X-ray pulsar detection and navigation. However, it is very difficult to focus the X-ray photons through refraction for the reason that the X-ray photon is very easy to be absorbed by the materials. The most effective ways for the X-ray focusing is reflection. In this paper, we will give a brief introduction of the theory of the grazing incidence and the corresponding optical systems. By comparing the design parameters of main X-ray astronomical telescope in NASA and ESA, we will give the development trend of the X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation and introduce several new technology for the manufacture of the micro-pore optics (MPO).

  12. SN X-ray Progenitor?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Identifying stars that explode, right before they explode, is a tricky proposition since the end of starlife comes swiftly: in thermonuclear deflagrations, in nuclear exhaustion, or maybe in a rapid swirling merger of two dead stellar cores. On the right in the image above is an image of the galaxy NGC 1404 taken by the UV/optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift observatory. The circle surrounds SN 2007on, a supernova of Type Ia produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary system. These types of supernovae are important since they are believed to be 'standard candles', events which have the same intrinsic brightness which can serve as an important yardstick to measure cosmic distances. On the left is an image of the same galaxy taken by the Chandra X-ray observatory four years before the supernova. Conspicuous in the SN source circle is a bright source in the Chandra image, believed to be emission from a compact object+normal star companion: a similar system to the supposed precursor of SN 2007on. If true this would be the first time a Type Ia supernova precursor has ever been seen. But astronomers are still debating whether the Chandra source really is the precursor or not; it seems there's a slight but significant difference in the location of the Chandra source and the supernova. Stay tuned for more developments.

  13. SMM X-ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  14. X-ray satellite (Rosat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the current status of the ROSAT X-Ray satellite project is given. Areas discussed include an overview of problem areas, systems and mechanical subsystems, the electrical subsystem, power supply, data processing and transmission, the wide field camera, ground support equipment and the production scheduling. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to schedule, including the hardware production and costs. However, it is stated that estimated additional costs will exceed the plan. The previous schedule for production of the flight model will no longer be met. A modified milestone plan has been worked out with Dornier Systems. The current working schedule calls for a launch data of December 21, 1987; however, this does not take into account a 4-week buffer prior to transporting the flight model to the launch site. As of the date of this report, milestone M5 has been met. Previous problems with the gold vapor deposition on the flight model mirror due to contamination have been eliminated.

  15. Nonthermal X-ray Microflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Rauscher, E.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides unique sensitivity in the 3-15 keV energy range, with an effective area ˜100 times larger than similar past instruments. Along with its high spectral resolution (1 keV) RHESSI is uniquely suited to study small events. Microflares have been observed by Benz & Grigis (2002) and Krucker et al. (2002) to have anomalously steep spectra ( spectral index between -5 and -8) extending down to ˜ 7 keV. Thermal emission is found to dominate below ˜ 7 keV. In many other respects, microflares show properties similar to larger flares. We present single event studies of different types of x-ray microflares. RHESSI observations during quiet times (04-May 10-14; GOES level low B class) reveal a set 5 microflares (>=A Class). These microflares show power law spectra (spectral index of ˜4-8) with little or no thermal emission in the 3- ˜7 keV energy range above the nonthermal part of the spectrum. Other microflares in the same GOES class range, however, have been found which show extremely hard spectra with emission up to 50 keV (power law index ˜2). At lower energies, emission is dominated by a hot thermal component (20 MK). This work was supported by NASA contract NAS5-98033.

  16. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  17. X-ray Attenuation and Absorption Calculations.

    1988-02-25

    This point-source, polychromatic, discrete energy X-ray transport and energy deposition code system calculates first-order spectral estimates of X-ray energy transmission through slab materials and the associated spectrum of energy absorbed by the material.

  18. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  19. X-ray determination of parts alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining the alignment of adjoining metal objects is provided. The method comprises producing an X-ray image of adjoining surfaces of the two metal objects. The X-ray beam is tangential to the point the surfaces are joined. The method is particularly applicable where the alignment of the two metal objects is not readily susceptible to visual inspection.

  20. X-Ray Determination of Weld Misalinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Simple technique uses ordinary X-ray equipment. Weld line between hemispheres of hidden spherical pressure vessel examined for misalinement between hemispheres. Central X-ray tangent to pressure vessel at weld line. Technique not limited to spheres. Also used to check alinement between insulated sections of pipelines or chemical-reaction vessels without removing insulation or interrupting flow or process.

  1. Tracing the X-Ray Trail

    MedlinePlus

    What you need to know about… Tracing the X-ray Trail If you’ve just completed an x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) Start here! or other diagnostic imaging procedure, you probably want to know when you will ... los rayos X Si acaba de hacerse una radiografía, tomografía ¡Empezar ...

  2. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  3. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  4. X-rays Flares and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2011-04-01

    X-ray observations of star forming regions show that magnetic reconnection flares are powerful and frequent in pre-main sequence solar-type stars. Well-defined samples in the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus clouds exhibit flares with peak X- ray luminosities Lx˜10^29 - 10^32 erg/s, orders of magnitude stronger and more frequent than contemporary solar flares. X-rays are emitted in magnetic loops extending 0.1-10 R * above the stellar surface and thus have a favorable geometry to irradiate the protoplanetary disk. Several lines of evidence - fluorescent iron X-ray emission line, forbidden [NeII] infrared line, and excited molecular bands - support X-ray irradiation of cold material in some young systems. Several astrophysical consequences of X-ray irradiation are outlined. As ionization fractions need only reach 10-12 to induce the magnetorotational instability and associated turbulence, X-rays may be the principal determinant of the extent of the viscous "active zone" and laminar "dead zone" in the layered accretion disk. X-ray irradiation may thus play a major role in planet formation processes: particle settling; meter-size inspiral; protoplanetary migration; and dissipation of the gaseous disk.

  5. Course Manual for X-Ray Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Radiological Health.

    This publication is the third of three sequential course manuals for instructors in x-ray science and engineering. This course manual has been tested by introducing it into the Oregon State University curriculum. The publication is prepared for the purpose of improving the qualifications of x-ray users and to reduce the ionizing radiation exposure…

  6. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  7. Building X-ray tube based irradiators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The construction of economical x-ray tube based irradiators in a variety of configurations is described using 1000 Watt x-ray tubes. Single tube, double tube, and four tube designs are described, as well as various cabinet construction techniques. Relatively high dose rates were achieved for small s...

  8. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Giorgio

    I discuss two topics in X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs: reflection from the white dwarf surface, and opacity effects in the post shock plasma. I also briefly mention future observational perspectives, with particular emphasis on the Constellation X-ray mission.

  10. Nearly Anastigmatic X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed X-ray telescope made of many concentric reflecting rings, each of which consists of two portions of cone. Proposed design is variation on conventional grazing incidence X-ray telescope, which has just one twosegment reflecting element but suffers from excessive astigmatism and field curvature. Using many short elements instead of single long element, new design gives nearly anastigmatic image.

  11. X-rays from intermediate mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    I will review the X-ray properties of intermediate mass stars and discuss possible X-ray generating mechanisms. Main-sequence stars of spectral type mid B to mid A neither drive sufficiently strong winds to produce shock generated X-rays, nor possess an outer convection zone to generate dynamo driven magnetic activity and coronae. Consequently they should be virtually X-ray dark and occasionally detected X-ray emission was usually attributed to undetected low-mass companions. However, in magnetic intermediate mass stars, the Ap/Bp stars, a different X-ray production mechanism may operate. It is termed the magnetically channeled wind-shock model, where the stellar wind from both hemispheres is channelled towards the equatorial plane, collides and forms a rigidly rotating disk around the star. The strong shocks of the nearly head-on wind collision as well as the existence of magnetically confined plasma in a dynamic circumstellar disk can lead to diverse X-ray phenomena. In this sense Ap/Bp stars bridge the 'classical' X-ray regimes of cool and hot stars.

  12. Soft X-Ray Spectra of AGN Discovered Via Their Hard X-Ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Investigation of the soft x-ray spectra of AGN were performed by using their hard x-ray emission. ROSAT observations of AGN was also performed, which allowed for the study of these x-ray spectra and the structures of 7 clusters of galaxies.

  13. The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility. Observing the Universe in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, V.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Advanced X ray Astronophysics Facility (AXAF) program is presented. Beginning with a brief introduction to X ray astrophysics, the AXAF observatory is described including the onboard instrumentation and system capabilities. Possible X ray sources suitable for AXAF observation are identified and defined.

  14. X-rays from hot subdwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; La Palombara, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to the high sensitivity of the instruments on board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, it has become possible to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarfs. The small but growing sample of hot subdwarfs detected in X-rays includes binary systems, in which the X-rays result from wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low mass stars provide information which can be useful also for our understanding of the winds of more luminous and massive early-type stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems.

  15. X-Rays from Green Pea Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    X-rays may have contributed to the heating and reionization of the IGM in the early universe. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) within small, low-metallicity galaxies are expected to be the main source of X-rays at this time. Since studying these high-redshift galaxies is currently impossible, we turn to local analogs that have the same properties the galaxies in the early are expected to have. A number of recent studies have shown an enhanced number of HMXBs in nearby low metallicity galaxies. We propose to observe a sample of metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG) in order to determine if the X-ray luminosity is enhanced relative to SFR, thereby providing further evidence to the importance of X-rays in the early universe.

  16. X-ray emission from normal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.

    1983-01-01

    The results of Einstein Observatory studies of X-ray emission from normal galaxies, including the LMC and SMC, M31, M33, M101, NGC 247, M81 and M100, and N253 are surveyed. The X-ray luminosity of normal galaxies is proportional to their optical luminosity, revealing no strong dependence on galaxy type. The number of individual sources detected are comparable to the number of sources expected on mass considerations. There are substantial numbers of X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds with luminosities in the range 10 to the 35th-36th ergs/s, lower than most X-ray binaries but higher than known uncollapsed stellar systems. About seven X-ray sources with luminosities of at least 10 to the 39th ergs/s in the 0.5-3.0 keV band have been found in the arms of nearby spiral galaxies.

  17. Theoretical investigations of X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    Current theoretical understanding of the X-ray burst phenomenon is reviewed, providing a framework in which the burst radiation can be used as a diagnostic of the fundamental properties of the underlying neutron star. The typical Type I X-ray burst is detected as a rapid increase in emission to a level about a factor of 10 above that seen during the quiescent state and recurs on time scales which range from several hours to several days. The thermonuclear flash model has successfully reproduced the basic features of the X-ray burst phenomenon and thereby provided strong theoretical evidence that neutron stars are involved. Topics covered include: theory of the emission spectrum; oscillation modes and prospects for diagnosing the thermal state of neutron stars through experiments on board the X-Ray Timing Explorer or the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility; applications to the mass and radius of a neutron star.

  18. Solar x ray astronomy rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics were studied of the solar corona through the imaging of large scale coronal structures with AS&E High Resolution Soft X ray Imaging Solar Sounding Rocket Payload. The proposal for this program outlined a plan of research based on the construction of a high sensitivity X ray telescope from the optical and electronic components of the previous flight of this payload (36.038CS). Specifically, the X ray sensitive CCD camera was to be placed in the prime focus of the grazing incidence X ray mirror. The improved quantum efficiency of the CCD detector (over the film which had previously been used) allows quantitative measurements of temperature and emission measure in regions of low x ray emission such as helmet streamers beyond 1.2 solar radii or coronal holes. Furthermore, the improved sensitivity of the CCD allows short exposures of bright objects to study unexplored temporal regimes of active region loop evolution.

  19. White beam x-ray waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarre, A.; Salditt, T.; Panzner, T.; Pietsch, U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2004-07-12

    We report a white beam x-ray waveguide (WG) experiment. A resonant beam coupler x-ray waveguide (RBC) is used simultaneously as a broad bandpass (or multibandpass) monochromator and as a beam compressor. We show that, depending on the geometrical properties of the WG, the exiting beam consists of a defined number of wavelengths which can be shifted by changing the angle of incidence of the white x-ray synchrotron beam. The characteristic far-field pattern is recorded as a function of exit angle and energy. This x-ray optical setup may be used to enhance the intensity of coherent x-ray WG beams since the full energetic acceptance of the WG mode is transmitted.

  20. Polars - soft X-ray emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel

    2010-10-01

    The defining criterion of polars (AM Herculis stars) was their prominent soft X-ray emission, which led to numerous discoveries with the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT and EUVE satellites. XMM-Newton observations of those X-ray selected polars and genuine discoveries of new polar systems reveal growing evidence that the prevailence or even the existence of a soft X-ray component may be rather the exception than the rule. In the last decade polars were discovered in optical surveys like the SDSS and the CSS. Here we propose XMM-Newton observations of 5 optically selected polars to search for soft X-ray spectral components, answer the question why they escaped detection in past X-ray surveys and shed new light on the intrinsic energy distribution of polars.

  1. X-ray diagnostics of globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of compact X-ray sources in globular clusters allows diagnostic studies of both the X-ray sources themselves and the globular clusters to be carried out. A review of much of this work, primarily based on Einstein X-ray observations and supporting studies of globular clusters at radio through UV wavelengths, is presented. The compact X-ray sources in globular clusters are found to be compact binaries containing neutron stars and - in a separate lower luminosity component of an apparently bimodal luminosity function - possibly white dwarfs. Implications for the formation and evolution of compact binary X-ray sources in globular clusters and in the galactic bulge are discussed. In particular, new evidence is presented that the galactic bulge sources may be compact binaries in the remnants of disrupted globular clusters.

  2. Apollo 15 X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1971-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, carried in the SIM bay of the command service module was employed principally for compositional mapping of the lunar surface while in lunar orbit, and secondarily, for X-ray astronomical observations during the trans-earth coast. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristics energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The astronomical observations consisted of relatively long periods of measurements of X-rays from pre-selected galactic sources such as Cyg-X-1 and Sco X-1 as well as from the galactic poles.

  3. Instrument Development for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current x-ray observatories such as Chandra and XMM-Newton have delivered spectacular results at soft-x-ray energies thanks to their grazing incidence mirrors. To continue these advances necessitates the development of mirrors with even larger collecting areas, yet within manageable weights and budgets, and focal detectors with improved energy resolution. At higher energies where x-ray critical-grazing angles become very small, x-ray optics have typically not been employed and thus this region remains relatively unexplored at high sensitivity levels and fine angular resolutions. This situation is changing with the development of hard-x-ray optics carried aloft by high-altitude balloons, which promise to bring about dramatic advances. This presentation will review developments in all these areas.

  4. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  5. Guides for intraoral x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunsunlade, O.A.

    1988-03-15

    An h-shaped exterior guide for use in combination with a SNAP-A-RAY film holder for accurately aligning a beam from an X-ray cone with an X-ray film during the process of taking intraoral periapical dental X-rays of the maxillary and mandibular teeth is described comprising: a first guide arm laterally and detachably connectable through a housing means; a traverse arm extending from the midpoint of the first guide arm and parallel to the X-ray film; and a second guide arm extending perpendicularly from an end of the traverse arm toward a plane of the X-ray film and in parallel relation up to an end point of the first guide arm.

  6. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joanne E.; Barthelmy, Scott; Black, J. kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Jahoda, Keith; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kaaret, Philip; McConnell, Mark L.; Bloser, Peter F.; Macri, John R.; Legere, Jason S.; Ryan, James M.; Smith, Billy R., Jr.; Zhang, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are one of the most powerful explosions in the universe and have been detected out to distances of almost 13 billion light years. The exact origin of these energetic explosions is still unknown but the resulting huge release of energy is thought to create a highly relativistic jet of material and a power-law distribution of electrons. There are several theories describing the origin of the prompt GRB emission that currently cannot be distinguished. Measurements of the linear polarization would provide unique and important constraints on the mechanisms thought to drive these powerful explosions. We present the design of a sensitive, and extremely versatile gamma-ray burst polarimeter. The instrument is a photoelectric polarimeter based on a time-projection chamber. The photoelectric time-projection technique combines high sensitivity with broad band-pass and is potentially the most powerful method between 2 and 100 keV where the photoelectric effect 1s the dominant interaction process We present measurements of polarized and unpolarized X-rays obtained with a prototype detector and describe the two mission concepts, the Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter (GRBP) for thc U S Naval Academy satellite MidSTAR-2, and thc Low Energy Polarimeter (LEP) onboard POET, a broadband polarimetry concept for a small explorer mission.

  7. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  8. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  9. Chemical-shift X-ray standing wavefield determination of the local structure of methanethiolate phases on Ni( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. J.; Woodruff, D. P.; Jones, R. G.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Formoso, V.

    2002-01-01

    By monitoring the X-ray absorption through the chemically-shifted components of the S 1s photoemission signal, normal-incidence X-ray standing wavefield absorption at the (1 1 1) and ( 1¯ 1 1) scatterer planes has been used to determine the local adsorption geometry of the two distinct methanethiolate (CH 3S-) species which occur on Ni(1 1 1) following exposure to methanethiol. The species which is favoured at low temperatures is found to occupy either mixed hollow or bridge sites on a non-reconstructed Ni(1 1 1) surface, whereas that seen at higher temperatures is shown to involve Ni surface layer reconstruction and the data are consistent with hollow site adsorption on a reduced density outermost Ni layer. The relative merits of alternative reconstruction models based on that which occurs due to methanethiolate adsorption on Cu(1 1 1), or the (5√3×2)rect. phase formed by atomic S on Ni(1 1 1), are discussed. Both of these models are based on local square or `pseudo-(1 0 0)' outermost Ni layers. Co-adsorbed atomic sulphur, to which the methanethiolate species decompose at higher temperatures, appears to occupy mainly fcc hollow sites at low temperatures, but is partially converted to the local geometry of the ordered reconstructed (5√3×2)rect.-S phase after higher temperature annealing.

  10. Hard X-Ray Emission and the Ionizing Source in LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terashima, Y.; Ho, L. C.; Ptak, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray luminosities of 21 LINERs (low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions) and 17 low-luminosity Seyferts obtained with ASCA and discuss the ionizing source in LINERs. Most LINERs with broad H-alpha emission in their optical spectra (LINER 1s) have a compact hard X-ray source and their 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities (LX) are proportional to their H alpha luminosities (L-H-alpha). This correlation strongly supports the hypothesis that the dominant ionizing source in LINER 1s is photoionization by hard photons from low-luminosity AGNs. Although some LINERs without broad H-alpha emission (LINER 2s) have X-ray properties similar to LINER 1s, the X-ray luminosities of many LINER 2s in our sample are lower than LINER 1s at a given H-alpha luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities in these objects are insufficient to power their H-alpha luminosities, suggesting that their primary ionizing source is something other than an AGN, or that an AGN, if present, is obscured even at energies above 2 keV. LINER 2s having small LX/LH-alpha occupy a localized region with small [OI]/H-alpha on the excitation diagram. Such LINER spectra can be reproduced by photoionization by very hot stars.

  11. Large area soft x-ray collimator to facilitate x-ray optics testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Samuel L.

    1994-01-01

    The first objective of this program is to design a nested conical foil x-ray optic which will collimate x-rays diverging from a point source. The collimator could then be employed in a small, inexpensive x-ray test stand which would be used to test various x-ray optics and detector systems. The second objective is to demonstrate the fabrication of the x-ray reflectors for this optic using lacquer-smoothing and zero-stress electroforming techniques.

  12. Soft-x-ray fluorescence study of buried silicides in antiferromagnetically coupled Fe/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1997-04-01

    Multilayer films made by alternate deposition of two materials play an important role in electronic and optical devices such as quantum-well lasers and x-ray mirrors. In addition, novel phenomena like giant magnetoresistance and dimensional crossover in superconductors have emerged from studies of multilayers. While sophisticated x-ray techniques are widely used to study the morphology of multilayer films, progress in studying the electronic structure has been slower. The short mean-free path of low-energy electrons severely limits the usefulness of photoemission and related electron free path of low-energy electrons severely limit spectroscopies for multilayer studies. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) is a bulk-sensitive photon-in, photon-out method to study valence band electronic states. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) measured with partial photon yield can give complementary bulk-sensitive information about unoccupied states. Both these methods are element-specific since the incident x-ray photons excite electrons from core levels. By combining NEXAFS and SXF measurements on buried layers in multilayers and comparing these spectra to data on appropriate reference compounds, it is possible to obtain a detailed picture of the electronic structure. Results are presented for a study of a Fe/Si multilayer system.

  13. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr

    2012-05-08

    Next generation ultrabright light sources will operate at megahertz repetition rates with temporal resolution in the attosecond regime. For an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) to operate at such repetition rate requires a high quantum efficiency (QE) cathode to produce electron bunches of 300 pC per 1.5 μJ incident laser pulse. Semiconductor photocathodes have sufficient QE in the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible spectrum, however, they produce picosecond electron pulses due to the electron-phonon scattering. On the other hand, metals have two orders of magnitude less QE, but can produce femtosecond pulses, that are required to form the optimum electron distribution for high efficiency FEL operation. In this work, a novel metallic photocathode design is presented, where a set of nano-cavities is introduced on the metal surface to increase its QE to meet the FEL requirements, while maintaining the fast time response. Photoemission can be broken up into three steps: (1) photon absorption, (2) electron transport to the surface, and (3) crossing the metal-vacuum barrier. The first two steps can be improved by making the metal completely absorbing and by localizing the fields closer to the metal surface, thereby reducing the electron travel distance. Both of these effects can be achieved by coupling the incident light to an electron density wave on the metal surface, represented by a quasi-particle, the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP). The photoemission then becomes a process where the photon energy is transferred to an SPP and then to an electron. The dispersion relation for the SPP defines the region of energies where such process can occur. For example, for gold, the maximum SPP energy is 2.4 eV, however, the work function is 5.6 eV, therefore, only a fourth order photoemission process is possible. In such process, four photons excite four plasmons that together excite only one electron. The yield of such non-linear process depends strongly on the light intensity. In

  14. Recent X-ray Variability of Eta Car Approaching The X-ray Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.; Swank, J. H.; Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T.; Humphreys, R.; Damineli, A.; Walborn, N.; Hillier, D. J.; Davidson, K.; White, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss recent X-ray spectral variability of the supermassive star Eta Car in the interval since the last X-ray eclipse in 1998. We concentrate on the interval just prior to the next X-ray eclipse which is expected to occur in June 2003. We compare the X-ray behavior during the 2001-2003 cycle with the previous cycle (1996-1998) and note similarities and differences in the temporal X-ray behavior. We also compare a recent X-ray observation of Eta Car obtained with the Chandra high energy transmission grating in October 2002 with an earlier observation from Nov 2002, and interpret these results in terms of the proposed colliding wind binary model for the star. In addition we discuss planned observations for the upcoming X-ray eclipse.

  15. Selection of patients for x-ray examinations: Chest x-ray screening examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Five chest x-ray referral criteria statements have been developed and unanimously endorsed by a panel of physicians convened as part of a major voluntary cooperative effort between FDA's National Center for Devices and Radiological Health (NCDRH) and the medical professional community. The referral criteria statements include recommendations concerning the following applications of chest x-ray screening: mandated routine chest x-ray screening examinations, routine prenatal chest x-ray examinations, routine hospital admission chest x-ray examinations, chest x-ray examinations for tuberculosis detection and control, and routine chest x-ray examinations for occupational medicine. The complete text of the five referral criterial statements plus a brief discussion of the rationale for the development of each statement is presented.

  16. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism imaging with hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Ueji, Y; Okitsu, K; Matsushita, T; Amemiya, Y

    2001-05-01

    X-ray polarization-contrast images resulting from X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) in the hard X-ray region have been successfully recorded for the first time. The apparatus used consisted of an X-ray polarizer, double X-ray phase retarders, and a high-spatial-resolution X-ray charge-coupled-device detector. The sample used was a hexagonal-close-packed cobalt polycrystal foil having a thickness of about 4 microns. The X-ray polarization-contrast image resulting from XMCD was observed at a photon energy of 10 eV above the cobalt K-absorption edge (7709 eV). The observed contrast in the image was reversed by inversion of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the contrast was reversed again at a photon energy of 32 eV above the cobalt K-absorption edge. PMID:11486407

  17. Design and Performance of the Cornell ERL DC Photoemission Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolenski, K.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Li, H.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Ouzounov, D.; Sinclair, C.

    2009-08-01

    Cornell University is planning to build an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) X-ray facility. For an ERL, it is well known that the x-ray beam brightness for the users is mainly determined by the initial electron beam emittance provided by the injector. To address technical challenges of producing very low emittance beams at high average current as required for an ERL, Cornell University has proposed a prototype injector with 5-15 MeV beam energy, 100 mA maximum average current and 77 pC/bunch. In this article, we describe the design, construction and initial results for a DC photoemission gun now under operation.

  18. X-ray ionization and fragmentation of XeF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, S. H.; Dunford, R. W.; Doumy, G.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Ho, P. J.; March, A. M.; Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Young, L.; Ray, D.; Wehlitz, R.

    2014-05-01

    An inner-shell hole produced by x-ray absorption in a heavy atom decays in a multi-step process with emission of fluorescent photons and Auger electrons. If the heavy atom is in a molecular environment, the initial hole and the holes produced by the first decay steps remain localized, but eventually charge is redistributed to neighboring atoms and the system Coulomb explodes. Such processes are responsible for x-ray damage in molecules and materials. It is informative to study charge redistribution in XeF2 molecules in comparison with core-hole decays in atomic Xe. We have used hard x rays at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to produce Xe 1s holes and a multi-hit x-ray/ion spectrometer to measure charge distributions and kinetic energies released to the fragment ions. At Wisconsin's Synchrotron Radiation Center, soft x rays were used to measure ion charge-state yields resulting from Xe 3d5/2, Xe 3d3/2, and F 1s holes. To explore core-hole decay dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, x-ray-pump/x-ray-probe experiments are planned at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Dept of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Toward active x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-09-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (< 1") optics with very-large-aperture (> 25 m2) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kg/m2 or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, active optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom (UK) and the Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States (US). This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  20. Toward Adaptive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Tim W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peer; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (less than 1 inch) optics with very-large-aperture (greater than 25 square meter) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the surface areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kilogram per square meter or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve adaptive (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, adaptive optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States, and the Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward adaptive x-ray telescopes.

  1. X-rays and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, E. D.

    2005-12-01

    Planets form in cold circumstellar disks that can not emit X-rays. Nonetheless, X-ray band studies may have profound implications for the physical processes of planet formation in several ways. Observations of young stellar clusters, such as the recent Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP), demonstrate that all pre-main sequence stars produce powerful magnetic reconnection flares during the planet formation era. Calculations indicate that the X-rays can penetrate deeply into protoplanetary disks and will be the dominant source of gas ionization. COUP observations of fluorescent line emission in heavy disk stars and soft X-ray absorption in proplyds demonstrate that disk irradiation by X-rays does in fact occur. This may induce MHD turbulence in disk gases, which may substantially affect planetesimal growth and protoplanet migration. X-ray flares or associated shock waves may flash melt dustballs into chondrules, and spallation by energetic flare particles may generate shortlived radioactive isotopes which are prevalent in the meteoritic record. X-ray surveys are also useful for locating older stellar systems where the protoplanetary disk is dissipating but magnetic flaring continues. Infrared studies of such systems show a great diversity of older disk properties. The planned Constellation-X mission will propel all of these investigations in powerful ways. For example, reverberation mapping of fluorescent line emission following flares could give unique insights into the structure of the gaseous components of protoplanetary disks.

  2. X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, L.; Burrows, D.; Cash, W.; Cerna, D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Jakubek, J.; Marsikova, V.; Sieger, L.; Tichy, V.

    2014-09-01

    This work addresses the issue of X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications. The proposed wide-field optical system has not been used in space yet. The proposed novel approach is based on the use of 1D "Lobster eye" optics in combination with Timepix X-ray detector in the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The proposed project includes theoretical study and a functional sample of the Timepix X-ray detector with multifoil wide-field X-ray "Lobster eye" optics. Using optics to focus X-rays on a detector is the only solution in cases the intensity of impinging X-ray radiation is below the sensitivity of the detector, e.g. while monitoring astrophysical objects in space, or phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere. The optical system could be used in a student rocket experiment at University of Colorado. Ideal opportunity is to extend the CubeSat of Pennsylvania State University with the hard X-ray telescope demonstrator consisting of an optical module and Timepix detector.

  3. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  4. Technological Challenges to X-Ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    1999-09-16

    There is strong interest in the development of x-ray free electron lasers (x-ray FELs). The interest is driven by the scientific opportunities provided by intense, coherent x-rays. An x-ray FEL has all the characteristics of a fourth-generation source: brightness several orders of magnitude greater than presently achieved in third-generation sources, full transverse coherence, and sub-picosecond long pulses. The SLAC and DESY laboratories have presented detailed design studies for X-Ray FEL user facilities around the 0.1 nm wavelength-regime (LCLS at SLAC, TESLA X-Ray FEL at DESY). Both laboratories are engaged in proof-of-principle experiments are longer wavelengths (TTF FEL Phase I at 71 nm, VISA at 600-800 nm) with results expected in 1999. The technologies needed to achieve the proposed performances are those of bright electron sources, of acceleration systems capable of preserving the brightness of the source, and of undulators capable of meeting the magnetic and mechanical tolerances that are required for operation in the SASE mode. This paper discusses the technological challenges presented by the X-Ray FEL projects.

  5. Technological challenges to X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2000-05-01

    There is strong interest in the development of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). The interest is driven by the scientific opportunities provided by intense, coherent X-rays. An X-ray FEL has all the characteristics of a fourth-generation source: brightness several orders of magnitude greater than presently achieved in third-generation sources, full transverse coherence, and sub-picosecond long pulses. The SLAC and DESY laboratories have presented detailed design studies for X-ray FEL user-facilities around the 0.1 nm wavelength regime (LCLS at SLAC, TESLA X-ray FEL at DESY). Both laboratories are engaged in proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths (TTF FEL Phase I at 71 nm, VISA at 600-800 nm) with results expected in 1999. The technologies needed to achieve the proposed performances are those of bright electron sources, of acceleration systems capable of preserving the brightness of the source, and of undulators capable of meeting the magnetic and mechanical tolerances that are required for operation in the SASE mode. This paper discusses the technological challenges presented by the X-ray FEL projects.

  6. GEMS X-ray Polarimeter Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Strohmayer, Tod; Kallman, Tim; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) is an X-ray polarization telescope selected as a NASA small explorer satellite mission. The X-ray Polarimeter on GEMS uses a Time Projection Chamber gas proportional counter to measure the polarization of astrophysical X-rays in the 2-10 keV band by sensing the direction of the track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray. We have simulated the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter to polarized X-rays. We use the simulation package Penelope to model the physics of the interaction of the initial photoelectron with the detector gas and to determine the distribution of charge deposited in the detector volume. We then model the charge diffusion in the detector,and produce simulated track images. Within the track reconstruction algorithm we apply cuts on the track shape and focus on the initial photoelectron direction in order to maximize the overall sensitivity of the instrument, using this technique we have predicted instrument modulation factors nu(sub 100) for 100% polarized X-rays ranging from 10% to over 60% across the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We also discuss the simulation program used to develop and model some of the algorithms used for triggering, and energy measurement of events in the polarimeter.

  7. Refraction and absorption of x rays by laser-dressed atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray refraction and absorption by neon atoms under the influence of an 800 nm laser with an intensity of 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} is investigated. For this purpose, we use an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. Its results are interpreted in terms of a three-level model. On the Ne 1s {yields} 3p resonance, we find electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for x rays. Our work opens novel perspectives for ultrafast x-ray pulse shaping.

  8. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  9. Quasar X-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1993-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the IPC on the Einstein satellite is used to reexamine the relationship of the soft X-ray energy index with radio properties and the optical Fe II emission. The tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray energy indices than radio-quiet quasars is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect. There is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed. For the radio-quiet quasars, the soft X-ray energy indices with a mean of about 1.0 are consistent with the indices found at higher energies, although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data. The correlation of Fe II emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 objects. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and line emission from the broad emission-line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models. The correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and Fe II equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet subclasses, respectively, imply that the observed wide range of X-ray energy indices is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  10. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 1033 ergs-1) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  11. X-ray Interferometer Using Prism Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2004-05-12

    Two-beam X-ray interferometer using refractive optics has been developed. A prism made of acrylic resin is used as the beam deflector for hard X-ray wavefront dividing interferometer. This configuration is the same as that of the Fresnel's bi-prism interferometer or the Leith-Upatnieks type two-beam holography in visible light region. Therefore, quantitative analysis of the degree of transversal coherence can be performed by measuring the visibility of interference fringes. It is also possible to realize two-beam holographic imaging in hard X-ray regions.

  12. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  13. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lider, V. V. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  14. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-01-01

    We are developing a hard x-ray microscope for direct observation of solidification dynamics in metal alloys and metal matrix composites. The Fein-Focus Inc. x-ray source was delivered in September and found to perform better than expected. Confirmed resolution of better than 2 micrometers was obtained and magnifications up to 800X were measured. Nickel beads of 30 micrometer diameter were easily detected through 6mm of aluminum. X-ray metallography was performed on several specimens showing high resolution and clear definition of 3-dimensional structures. Prototype furnace installed and tested.

  15. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  16. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  17. X-ray streak crystal spectography

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Brown, T.; Medecki, H.

    1983-07-01

    We have built an x-ray streaked crystal spectrograph for making time-resolved x-ray spectral measurements. This instrument can access Bragg angles from 11/sup 0/ to 38/sup 0/ and x-ray spectra from 200 eV to greater than 10 keV. We have demonstrated resolving powers, E/..delta..E > 200 at 1 keV and time resolution less than 20 psec. A description of the instrument and an example of the data is given.

  18. 'Microquasars' and the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1984-01-01

    The recent discovery of small active nuclei (via emission lines) in normal spiral galaxies greatly expands the range of the quasar phenomenon. By using the relationship between Lx and L(H-alpha) found in more luminous Seyfert galaxies and assuming that it holds for smaller active nuclei, a bivariate X-ray luminosity function can be calculated. This luminosity function fits naturally onto the higher luminosity X-ray luminosity function derived from the HEAO-1/A2 survey. The contribution to the X-ray background from small active nuclei hiding in large spiral galaxies is greater than 15 percent.

  19. "X-Ray Transients in Star-Forming Regions" and "Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    This grant funded work on the analysis of data obtained with the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The goal of the work was to search for hard x-ray transients in star forming regions using the all-sky hard x-ray monitoring capability of BATSE. Our initial work lead to the discovery of a hard x-ray transient, GRO J1849-03. Follow-up observations of this source made with the Wide Field Camera on BeppoSAX showed that the source should be identified with the previously known x-ray pulsar GS 1843-02 which itself is identified with the x-ray source X1845-024 originally discovered with the SAS-3 satellite. Our identification of the source and measurement of the outburst recurrence time, lead to the identification of the source as a Be/X-ray binary with a spin period of 94.8 s and an orbital period of 241 days. The funding was used primarily for partial salary and travel support for John Tomsick, then a graduate student at Columbia University. John Tomsick, now Dr. Tomsick, received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in July 1999, based partially on results obtained under this investigation. He is now a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of California, San Diego.

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  2. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  3. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  4. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  5. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Boone, John M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1998-01-27

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  6. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  7. Rosat and the X-ray universe

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.K.

    1990-08-01

    A major new satellite (Rosat) promises to provide astronomers with a map of perhaps 100,000 beacons in the X-ray sky, fresh images of high-energy objects approaching the resolution of visible-light photographs, and a first-ever survey of the sky at extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths. The German and British governments along with NASA are participating in this program. The grazing incidence technique previously used by Einstein and other missions is used to bring the X-rays to a focus and thus to create images. The X-ray telescope is equipped with three instruments, though only one can occupy the focus at any given time. Two are redundant detectors called position-sensitive proportional counters. The whole-sky survey will yield a complete X-ray image of the celestial sphere with 1/2-arc-minute detail of sources large and small, not just crude scans by wide-angle sensors.

  8. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  9. Future X-Ray Timing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barret, Didier; van der Klis, Michiel; Skinner, Gerry K.; Staubert, Rüdiger; Stella, Luigi

    Thanks to the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), it is now widely recognized that fast X-ray timing can be used to probe strong gravity fields around collapsed objects and constrain the equation of state of dense matter in neutron stars. We first discuss some of the outstanding issues which could be solved with an X-ray timing mission building on the great successes of RXTE and providing an order of magnitude better sensitivity. Then we briefly describe the `Experiment for X-ray timing and Relativistic Astrophysics' (EXTRA) recently proposed to the European Space Agency as a follow-up to RXTE and the related US mission `Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer' (RAE).

  10. Inelastic magnetic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, P. M.; Tzoar, N.

    1985-04-01

    The theory of magnetic X-ray scattering is used to discuss the possibilities for employing inelastic scattering to probe the magnetic properties of condensed matter systems. In particular, it is shown how the interference between the nonmagnetic (Compton) and magnetic scattering arising from the use of circularly polarized X-rays is absolutely essential in such experiments. The very beautiful preliminary experiments by Sakai and Ono (1976) on Fe which use circularly polarized Moessbauer gamma-rays will be discussed. They already show the sensitivity of the technique to the 'magnetic form factor'. In addition, the physics of a unique quarter wave plate employed in obtaining circularly polarized X-rays is considered, and the implications of this advance for doing such experiments on existing synchrotron X-ray sources are discussed.

  11. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  12. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  13. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  14. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the third 6 month period, from February 28, 1995 to August 31, 1995, under this contract. The main efforts during this period were the construction of the X-ray furnace, evaluation and selection of the CCD technology for the X-ray camera, solidification experiments with Al alloys and Al-zirconia composites in the prototype furnace, evaluation of specimens for the particle pushing flight experiment - PEPSI, measurements of emitted spectra from X-ray source, testing of the high resolution X-ray test targets, and the establishment of criteria for and selection of peripheral equipment. In addition to these tasks, two presentations were prepared in this period; one for the AIAA Microgravity Symposium and another for the Gordon Conference on Gravitational Effects in Pyisico-Chemical Systems.

  15. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  16. The X-ray emission of subflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valnichek, B. I.; Likin, O. B.; Morozova, E. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Farnik, F.

    1983-08-01

    Optical observations of subflares in the active region Mc Math 14553 in the period 8-15 December, 1976 are compared with the X-ray emission bursts measured during the same period by the X-ray photometer on board the Prognoz-5 automatic observatory. X-ray emissions with energies 2-7 and 6-10 keV are used in the analysis presented here. It is found that energy release in the X-ray emissions is directly proportional to the area of the H-alpha flare events over a wide range of flare intensities, i.e., from subflares to high-power flares of the class 3B.

  17. X-ray holography in-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkhover, Tais; Ulmer, Anatoli; Ferguson, Ken; Bucher, Max; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Daurer, Benedikt; Nettelblad, Carl; Bielecki, Johan; Faigel, Guila; Hasse, Dirk; Morgan, Andrew; Mühlig, Kerstin; Seibert, Marvin; Chapman, Henry; Hajdu, Janos; Maia, Filipe; Moeller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, delivering ultra intense femtosecond X-ray flashes, opens the door for structure determination of single nanoparticles and biosamples with single shots. The first X-ray diffraction imaging experiments at LCLS delivered promising results on samples in the gas phase. However, the reconstruction of non-periodic structures is still challenging due to the loss of phase information. Meanwhile, X-ray holographic approaches allow for recording the phase directly into the diffraction image. In my talk, I will present the first successful proof-of-principle experiment for ``in-flight''-holography with free viruses. Our experiments pave the way for unique studies on levitating nanospecimen that are of central interest in several scientific communities including atmosphere research, chemistry, material sciences, and studies on matter under extreme conditions.

  18. Solar flare hard X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    Recent hard X-ray observations of solar flares are reviewed with emphasis on results obtained with instruments on the solar maximum satellite. Flares with three sets of characteristics, designated as Type A, Type B, and Type C, are discussed and hard X-ray temporal, spatial spectral, and polarization measurements are reviewed in this framework. Coincident observations are reviewed at other wavelengths including the UV, microwaves, and soft X-rays, with discussions of their interpretations. In conclusion, a brief outline is presented of the potential of future hard X-ray observations with sub-second time resolution, arcsecond spatial resolution, and keV energy resolution, and polarization measurements at the few percent level up to 100 keV.

  19. X-ray imaging: Status and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, R.W.; Martz, H.E.; Hernandez, J.M.; Haskins, J.J.; Day, R.A.; Brase, J.M.; Cross, B.; Wherry, D.

    1987-08-01

    There is a veritable renaissance occurring in x-ray imaging. X-ray imaging by radiography has been a highly developed technology in medicine and industry for many years. However, high resolution imaging has not generally been practical because sources have been relatively dim and diffuse, optical elements have been nonexistent for most applications, and detectors have been slow and of low resolution. Materials analysis needs have therefore gone unmet. Rapid progress is now taking place because we are able to exploit developments in microelectronics and related material fabrication techniques, and because of the availability of intense x-ray sources. This report describes the methods and uses of x-ray imaging along with a discussion of technology advances in these areas.

  20. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  1. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  2. Polars - soft X-ray emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel

    2011-10-01

    The defining criterion of polars (AM Herculis stars) was their prominent soft X-ray emission, which led to numerous discoveries with the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT and EUVE satellites. XMM-Newton discovered polars however and new polar systems from optical surveys (SDSS, CSS) reveal growing evidence that the prevalence or even the existence of a soft X-ray component may be rather the exception than the rule. Here we propose XMM-Newton observations of 5 optically identified polars to search for soft X-ray spectral components, answer the question why they escaped detection in past X-ray surveys and shed new light on the intrinsic energy distribution and accretion energy release of polars.

  3. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  4. X-Ray Shawdowgraph Camera Design

    SciTech Connect

    Edward J. McCrea; Michael J. Doman; Randy A. Rohde

    1999-01-01

    An imagining camera that is used with X-Ray radiography systems in high explosive experiments has been built and fielded. The camera uses a 40mm diameter Micro-Channel Plate Itensifier (MCPI) for optical gain and photographic film for image recording. In the normal location of the X-ray film pack, a scintillating screen is placed instead. The camera system views the screen and records the image. The sensitivity of the MCPI to light makes the camera design sensitive to small details that a film pack does not need to consider. The X-ray image recording system was designed and bulit for situations where the film pack of the X-ray shadowgraph is not retrievable after the experiment. The system has been used in a number of experiments.

  5. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.-F.; Kahn, S. M.; Lepson, J. K.; Savin, D. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in its ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, X-Ray Multi-Mirror telescope (XMM), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE).

  6. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... a radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... by a radiologist (a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  10. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  11. Coherent x-ray lasers for applications

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Amendt, P.; Rosen, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Fleck, J.A. ); Strauss, M. )

    1990-12-01

    Many of the projected applications of x-ray lasers require high quality output radiation with properties such as short wavelength, high power, good focusability, short pulse, and high degree of coherence. We discuss the requirements of an x-ray laser for the application of holography of biological samples. We present ideas for achieving these properties. Given that population inversions can be established to provide laser gain, we discuss how the propagation and amplification of x-rays within the lasing medium affect the quality of the output radiation. Particular attention is given toward the development of transverse coherence. Results are presented from several methods for calculating the coherence, including a modal analysis and a numerical-wave propagation code. Calculations of the expected degree of coherence of standard x-ray lasers are given, as well as designs for more coherent lasers. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  13. X-ray microbeam for speech research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Murray A.; Robl, Phillip E.

    A steerable X-ray beam system is being built for use in speech research. A beam of 150 keV to 600 keV electrons will be steered by a computer and the resulting X-rays will be selected by a pinhole to give a beam with a width of 0.6 mm. The X-ray beam will be used to follow about 8 gold pellets on tongue and throat surfaces at sampling frequencies of about 125 frames/s. The pattern recognition system and X-ray energies have been chosen to allow the tracking of pellets behind some teeth fillings of mercury amalgam and gold caps.

  14. VETA-I x ray test analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissenden, R. J. V.; Chartas, G.; Freeman, M. D.; Hughes, J. P.; Kellogg, E. M.; Podgorski, W. A.; Schwartz, D. A.; Zhao, P.

    1992-01-01

    This interim report presents some definitive results from our analysis of the VETA-I x-ray testing data. It also provides a description of the hardware and software used in the conduct of the VETA-I x-ray test program performed at the MSFC x-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). These test results also serve to supply data and information to include in the TRW final report required by DPD 692, DR XC04. To provide an authoritative compendium of results, we have taken nine papers as published in the SPIE Symposium, 'Grazing Incidence X-ray/EUV Optics for Astronomy and Projection Lithography' and have reproduced them as the content of this report.

  15. X ray opacity in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the emergent x-ray properties for a set of spherically symmetric, steady-state cluster cooling flow models including the effects of radiative transfer. Opacity due to resonant x-ray lines, photoelectric absorption, and electron scattering have been included in these calculations, and homogeneous and inhomogeneous gas distributions were considered. The effects of photoionization opacity are small for both types of models. In contrast, resonant line optical depths can be quite high in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous models. The presence of turbulence in the gas can significantly lower the line opacity. We find that integrated x-ray spectra for the flow cooling now are only slightly affected by radiative transfer effects. However x-ray line surface brightness profiles can be dramatically affected by radiative transfer. Line profiles are also strongly affected by transfer effects. The combined effects of opacity and inflow cause many of the lines in optically thick models to be asymmetrical.

  16. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  17. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a

  18. Scattered X-ray beam nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, G.; Kosanetzky, J.

    1989-08-01

    X-ray scatter interactions generally dominate the linear attenuation coefficient at the photon energies typical of medical and industrial radiography. Specific advantages of X-ray scatter imaging, including a flexible choice of measurement geometry, direct 3D-imaging capability (tomography) and improved information for material characterization, are illustrated with results from Compton and coherent scatter devices. Applications of a Compton backscatter scanner (ComScan) in the aerospace industry and coherent scatter imaging in security screening are briefly considered.

  19. X-ray laser program at MBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickles, P. V.; Janulewicz, K. A.; Lucianetti, A.; Priebe, G.; Zigler, A.; Rocca, J. J.; Sandner, W.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of the Max Born Institute (MBI) activities in the field of X-ray lasers (XRLs) is presented. The main interest is focused on the transient soft X-ray lasers. Additionally, much work is put to look for new, efficient, compact (table-top) pumping schemes with a prospect to be applied in practice. The current state of the research and the plans for the future are described as well.

  20. Next-Generation X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2012-04-01

    This review of future timing capabilities in X-ray astronomy includes missions in implementation (astro-h, gems, srg and astrosat), those under study (currently nicer, athena and loft), and new technologies that may be the seeds for future missions, such as lobster-eye optics. Those missions and technologies will offer exciting new capabilities that will take X-ray Astronomy into a new generation of achievements.

  1. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  2. Real-Time X-Ray Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulthuis, Ronald V.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray imaging instrument adapted to continuous scanning. Modern version of fluoroscope enables rapid x-ray inspection of parts. Developed for detection of buckling in insulated ducts. Uses radiation from radioactive gadolinium or thallium source. Instrument weighs only 6 1/2 lb. Quickly scanned by hand along duct surface, providing real-time image. Based on Lixiscope, developed at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  3. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  4. Handbook of X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Keith; Smith, Randall; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2011-09-01

    1. X-ray astronomy optics Daniel A. Schwartz; 2. Proportional counters and other detector techniques Richard J. Edgar; 3. CCDs for x-ray astronomy Catherine E. Grant; 4. Data reduction and calibration Keith A. Arnaud and Randall K. Smith; 5. Data analysis Randall K. Smith, Keith A. Arnaud and Aneta Siemiginowska; 6. Archives, surveys, catalogues and software Keith Arnaud; 7. Statistics Aneta Siemiginowska; 8. Analysis of extended emission K. D. Kuntz; Appendices; Index.

  5. X-ray apparatus for tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, E.; Linde, R.; Tiemens, U.; Weiss, H.

    1981-01-20

    Apparatus for examining objects includes a group of x-ray sources, which are activated group-wise by a generator. A group of sub-images are separately projected onto a photographic film. During a subsequent step, the film is re-imaged with the aid of an optical lens matrix the lenses in the matrix are arranged in a manner similar to the x-ray sources.

  6. The impact of inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi; Schlaf, Rudy; Sun, Siqi; Li, Xiao

    2014-01-13

    Inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES) enables the characterization of the density of states of unoccupied energy states above the Fermi level. However, due to the relatively high electron currents required to achieve useful signal to noise ratios, sample damage is a concern. Regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT) was used to systematically study the influence of electron radiation during IPES measurements on a prototypical conductive polymer. A series of IPES measurements exposing the samples to a range of electron fluxes was performed. An analysis of the electronic structure and the morphology showed that significant changes occurred in the investigated samples depending on the electron flux. X-ray diffraction results revealed that the root cause of the spectral changes is most likely related to crystallization of the film in an edge-on orientation. This was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy where both the C-C and C=C stretch modes shifted to lower frequencies after 5 IPES scans indicating a more ordered molecular structure. The observation of these stretch modes even after exposure to higher electron flux indicates that the main chemical structure of the P3HT molecules remains mostly intact during the IPES measurements. The absence of significant changes in C 1s and S 2p photoemission core level lines also confirmed this conclusion.

  7. Einstein observations of extended galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Features of the X-ray pictures taken aboard the space observatory are presented. Imaging proportional counter pictures in three broad X-ray energy ranges were obtained. The X-ray spectrum of supernova remnants is described.

  8. Imaging slitless spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursky, H.; Zehnpfennig, T.

    1968-01-01

    Imaging slitless spectrometer, a combination of an X ray transmission /or reflection/ grating and image-forming X ray telescope, is capable of obtaining simultaneous spatial and spectral information about celestial X ray sources.

  9. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  10. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  11. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  12. Assembled Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photograph shows TRW technicians preparing the assembled Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) for an official unveiling at TRW Space and Electronics Group of Redondo Beach, California. The CXO is formerly known as the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which was renamed in honor of the late Indian-American Astronomer, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in 1999. The CXO will help astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. X-ray astronomy can only be done from space because Earth's atmosphere blocks x-rays from reaching the surface. The Observatory provides images that are 50 times more detailed than previous x-ray missions. At more than 45 feet in length and weighing more than 5 tons, it will be one of the largest objects ever placed in Earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor and assembled and tested the observatory for NASA. The CXO program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The Observatory was launched on July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW)

  13. Assembled Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph shows a TRW technician inspecting the completely assembled Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) in the Thermal Vacuum Chamber at TRW Space and Electronics Group of Redondo Beach, California. The CXO is formerly known as the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which was renamed in honor of the late Indian-American Astronomer, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in 1999. The CXO will help astronomers worldwide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes and other exotic celestial objects. X-ray astronomy can only be done from space because Earth's atmosphere blocks x-rays from reaching the surface. The Observatory provides images that are 50 times more detailed than previous x-ray missions. At more than 45 feet in length and weighing more than 5 tons, it will be one of the largest objects ever placed in Earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor and assembled and tested the observatory for NASA. The CXO program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The Observatory was launched on July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW)

  14. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  15. X-ray emission from normal stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The paper addresses the potential for future X-ray missions to determine the fundamental cause of stellar X-ray emissions based on available results and existing analyses. The determinants of stellar X-ray emission are listed, and the relation of stellar X-ray emissions to the 'universal' activity-rotation connection is discussed. The specific rotation-activity connection for evolved stars is mentioned, and the 'decay' of stellar activity at the low-mass end of the main sequence is related to observational data. The data from Einstein and EXOSAT missions that correspond to these issues are found to be sparse, and more observational work is found to be necessary. Also, it is concluded that some issues need to be addressed, such as the X-ray dividing line in evolved stars and the absence of X-ray emission from dA stars. The related observational requirements and instrumental capabilities are given for each significant research focus.

  16. X-ray nanotomography in a SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, Bart; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    We have developed an x-ray computer tomography (CT) add-on to perform X-ray micro- and nanotomography in any scanning electron microscope (SEM). The electron beam inside the SEM is focused on a metal target to generate x-rays. Part of the X-rays pass through the object that is installed on a rotation stage. Shadow X-ray images are collected by a CCD camera with direct photon detection mounted on the external wall of the SEM specimen chamber. An extensive description on the working principles of this micro/nano-CT add-on together with some examples of CT-scans will be given in this paper. The resolution that can be obtained with this set-up and the influence of the shape of the electron beam are discussed. Furthermore, possible improvements on this SEM-CT set-up will be discussed: replacing the backilluminated CCD with a fully depleted CCD with improved quantum efficiency (QE) for higher energies, reduces the exposure time by 6 when using metal targets with x-ray characteristic lines around 10 keV.

  17. The ROSAT X-ray background dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, M.; Georgantopoulos, I.

    1999-06-01

    We estimate the dipole of the diffuse 1.5-keV X-ray background from the ROSAT all-sky survey map of Snowden et al. We first subtract the diffuse Galactic emission by fitting an exponential scaleheight, finite-radius, disc model to the data. We further exclude regions of low galactic latitudes, of local X-ray emission (e.g. the North Polar Spur) and model them using two different methods. We find that the ROSAT X-ray background dipole points towards (l,b) ~ (288 deg 25 deg) +/- 19 deg in consistency with the cosmic microwave background (within ~ 30 deg) its direction is also in good agreement with the HEAO-1 X-ray dipole at harder energies. The normalized amplitude of the ROSAT XRB dipole is ~ 1.7 per cent. Subtracting from the ROSAT map the expected X-ray background dipole resulting from the reflex motion of the observer with respect to the cosmic rest frame (Compton-Getting effect) we find the large-scale dipole of the X-ray emitting extragalactic sources having an amplitude D_LSS ~ 0.9 D_XRB, in general agreement with the predictions of Lahav et al. We finally estimate that the Virgo cluster is responsible for ~ 20 per cent of the total measured XRB dipole amplitude.

  18. Optics Developments for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    X-ray optics has revolutionized x-ray astronomy. The degree of background suppression that these afford, have led to a tremendous increase in sensitivity. The current Chandra observatory has the same collecting area (approx. 10(exp 3)sq cm) as the non-imaging UHURU observatory, the first x-ray observatory which launched in 1970, but has 5 orders of magnitude more sensitivity due to its focusing optics. In addition, its 0.5 arcsec angular resolution has revealed a wealth of structure in many cosmic x-ray sources. The Chandra observatory achieved its resolution by using relatively thick pieces of Zerodur glass, which were meticulously figured and polished to form the four-shell nested array. The resulting optical assembly weighed around 1600 kg, and cost approximately $0.5B. The challenge for future x-ray astronomy missions is to greatly increase the collecting area (by one or more orders of magnitude) while maintaining high angular resolution, and all within realistic mass and budget constraints. A review of the current status of US optics for x-ray astronomy will be provided along with the challenges for future developments.

  19. A million X-ray detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N.; XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC)

    2016-06-01

    Part of the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre responsibilities include producing an X-ray catalogue of all X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton. The latest version, 3XMM, takes advantage of improvements made to the source characterisation, reducing the number of spurious detections, but providing better astrometric precision, greater net sensitivity, as well as spectra and timeseries for a quarter of all catalogue detections. The data release 5 (3XMM-DR5, April 2015) is derived from the first 13 years of observations with XMM-Newton. 3XMM-DR5 includes 565962 X-ray detections and 396910 unique sources, detected as many as 48 times. 3XMM-DR5 is therefore the largest X-ray source catalogue. 3XMM-DR6 will be made available during 2016 and will augment the catalogue with 70000 X-ray detections. Over the next decade the catalogue will reach 1 million X-ray detections, including galaxy clusters, galaxies, tidal disruption events, gamma-ray bursts, stars, stellar mass compact objects, supernovae, planets, comets and many other systems. Thanks to the wide range of data products for each catalogue detection, the catalogue is an excellent resource for finding populations of sources as well as new and extreme objects. Here we present results achieved from searching the catalogue and discuss improvements that will be provided in future versions.

  20. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.