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Sample records for 1s xps spectra

  1. A poly-epoxy surface explored by Hartree-Fock ΔSCF simulations of C1s XPS spectra.

    PubMed

    Gavrielides, A; Duguet, T; Esvan, J; Lacaze-Dufaure, C; Bagus, P S

    2016-08-21

    Whereas poly-epoxy polymers represent a class of materials with a wide range of applications, the structural disorder makes them difficult to model. In the present work, we use good experimental model samples in the sense that they are pure, fully polymerized, flat and smooth, defect-free, and suitable for ultrahigh vacuum x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, experiments. In parallel, we perform Hartree-Fock, HF, calculations of the binding energies, BEs, of the C1s electrons in a model molecule composed of the two constituents of the poly-epoxy sample. These C1s BEs were determined using the HF ΔSCF method, which is known to yield accurate values, especially for the shifts of the BEs, ΔBEs. We demonstrate the benefits of combining rigorous theory with careful XPS measurements in order to obtain correct assignments of the C1s XPS spectra of the polymer sample. Both the relative binding energies-by the ΔSCF method-and relative intensities-in the sudden approximation, SA, are calculated. It results in an excellent match with the experimental spectra. We are able to identify 9 different chemical environments under the C1s peak, where an exclusively experimental work would have found only 3 contributions. In addition, we observe that some contributions are localized at discrete binding energies, whereas others allow a much wider range because of the variation of their second neighbor bound polarization. Therefore, HF-ΔSCF simulations significantly increase the spectral resolution of XPS and thus offer a new avenue for the exploration of the surface of polymers. PMID:27544119

  2. The interpretation of XPS spectra: Insights into materials properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Nelin, Connie J.

    2013-06-01

    We review basic and advanced concepts needed for the correct analysis of XPS features. We place these concepts on rigorous foundations and explore their physical and chemical meanings without stressing the derivation of the mathematical formulations, which can be found in the cited literature. The significance and value of combining theory and experiment is demonstrated by discussions of the physical and chemical origins of the main and satellite XPS features for a variety of molecular and condensed phase materials. BE: binding energy. The binding energy of an electron associated with a peak in a photoelectron spectra. CI: configuration interaction. The common use is to describe many-body wavefunctions that are the mixing of several determinants for different configurations. CSF: configuration state function. A determinant or combination of determinants that is an eigenfunction of the angular momentum operators. Normally CSFs are formed for Russell-Saunders, L-S coupling but they can also be formed for j-j coupling. CT: charge transfer. Usually refers to the transfer of an electron from a ligand orbital into an unoccupied or partially occupied, metal orbital. CSOV: constrained space orbital variation. A theoretical procedure for decomposing the contributions to various properties by constraining the space of orbitals varied and the space of basis functions in which they are varied. ΔSCF: delta self-consistent field. Normally refers to the difference in the properties of two states, an initial and a final state, each determined from separate self-consistent field variations. DFT: density functional theory. DHF: Dirac-Hartree-Fock. ER: relaxation energy. Erel: relative energy. Normally of the BE of a peak relative to some reference BE taken as zero. FC: Franck-Condon. Normally used in connection with the vibrational broadening of peaks in photoemission spectra. FO: frozen orbital. Used to describe wavefunctions and other properties obtained when the orbitals of the

  3. The Interpretation of XPS Spectra: Insights Into Materials Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Nelin, Constance J.

    2013-06-01

    We review basic and advanced concepts needed for the correct analysis of XPS features. We place these concepts on rigorous foundations and explore their physical and chemical meanings without stressing the derivation of the mathematical formulations, which can be found in the cited literature. The significance and value of combining theory and experiment is demonstrated by discussions of the physical and chemical origins of the main and satellite XPS features for a variety of molecular and condensed phase materials.

  4. Quantitative analysis of satellite structures in XPS spectra of gold and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, N.; Yubero, F.; Tougaard, S.

    2016-10-01

    Identification of specific chemical states and local electronic environments at surfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is often difficult because it is not straightforward to quantitatively interpret the shape and intensity of shake-up structures that originate from the photoexcitation process. Indeed the shape and intensity of measured XPS structures are strongly affected by both extrinsic excitations due to electron transport out of the surface and intrinsic excitations induced by the sudden creation of the static core hole. These processes must be taken into account to quantitatively extract, from experimental XPS, the primary excitation spectrum of the considered transition which includes all effects that are part of the initial photo-excitation process, i.e. lifetime broadening, spin-orbit coupling, and multiplet splitting. It was previously shown [N. Pauly, S. Tougaard, F. Yubero, Surf. Sci. 620 (2014) 17] that both extrinsic and intrinsic excitations could be included in an effective energy-differential inelastic electron scattering cross section for XPS which is then convoluted with the primary excitation spectrum to model the full XPS spectrum. This method can thus be applied to determine the primary excitation spectrum from any XPS spectrum. We use this approach in the present paper to determine the Au 4f and Ag 3d photoemission spectra from pure metals. We observe that characteristic energy loss features of the XPS spectra are not only due to photoelectron energy losses. We thus prove the existence of a double shake-up process characterized by a 4d → 5s/5p transition for Ag and a 5d → 6s/6p transition for Au. We finally accurately quantify the energy position and intensity of these shake-up peaks.

  5. Principal component analysis: a versatile method for processing and investigation of XPS spectra.

    PubMed

    Mc Evoy, Kevin M; Genet, Michel J; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2008-10-01

    Given the relevance of principal component analysis (PCA) to the treatment of spectrometric data, we have evaluated potentialities and limitations of such useful statistical approach for the harvesting of information in large sets of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra. Examples allowed highlighting the contribution of PCA to data treatment by comparing the results of this data analysis with those obtained by the usual XPS quantification methods. PCA was shown to improve the identification of chemical shifts of interest and to reveal correlations between peak components. First attempts to use the method led to poor results, which showed mainly the distance between series of samples analyzed at different moments. To weaken the effect of variations of minor interest, a data normalization strategy was developed and tested. A second issue was encountered with spectra suffering of an even slightly inaccurate binding energy scale correction. Indeed, minor shifts of energy channels lead to the PCA being performed on incorrect variables and consequently to misleading information. In order to improve the energy scale correction and to speed up this step of data pretreatment, a data processing method based on PCA was used. Finally, the overlap of different sources of variation was studied. Since the intensity of a given energy channel consists of electrons from several origins, having suffered inelastic collisions (background) or not (peaks), the PCA approach cannot compare them separately, which may lead to confusion or loss of information. By extracting the peaks from the background and considering them as new variables, the effect of the elemental composition could be taken into account in the case of spectra with very different backgrounds. In conclusion, PCA is a very useful diagnostic tool for the interpretation of XPS spectra, but it requires a careful and appropriate data pretreatment. PMID:18759494

  6. Primary excitation spectra in XPS and AES of Cu, CuO: Relative importance of surface and core hole effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, N.; Tougaard, S.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative interpretation of structures observed in XPS and AES requires models to correct for various physical processes involved. Besides the initial excitation process in XPS and AES, the measured spectrum is affected by three additional effects: the corehole(s), transport to the surface region and passage through the surface and vacuum regions. These three effects can be calculated by the QUEELS-XPS software (Quantitative analysis of Electron Energy Losses at Surfaces) in terms of energy-differential inelastic electron scattering cross sections. From this and the QUASES software (Quantitative Analysis of Surfaces by Electron Spectroscopy), background contributions and primary excitation spectra are obtained for various transitions (Cu 2p from Cu or CuO and Cu L3M23M23) and we investigate the separate effect of bulk, surface, and core hole(s) excitations. We show that the shape of the XPS and AES primary spectra and background contributions are modified slightly by surface effects and very strongly by core hole(s) effects. For metals, the intrinsic excitations give rise to a prominent spike in the background close to the XPS-peak energy. This spike will be much reduced for wide band gap insulators. Moreover our method gives an easy procedure to obtain the true primary excitation spectra for XPS and AES.

  7. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N.

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  8. Correlation between N 1s core level x-ray photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós, C.; Gómez-García, J.; Palomares, F. J.; Soriano, L.; Elizalde, E.; Sanz, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the N 1s core level spectra, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), of amorphous CNx films which gives evidence of the existing correlation between the different components that constitute the respective spectra. After annealing, the contribution of XPS at 399.3 eV and the components of XAS at 399.6 and 400.8 eV are clearly enhanced. They are assigned to sp2 with two neighbors and to sp states of nitrogen. In addition, the XPS component at 401.3 eV is related to the XAS feature at 402.0 eV and has been assigned to sp2 nitrogen bonded to three carbon neighbors.

  9. Vibrationally resolved high-resolution NEXAFS and XPS spectra of phenanthrene and coronene

    SciTech Connect

    Fronzoni, Giovanna; Baseggio, Oscar; Stener, Mauro; Hua, Weijie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi; Apicella, Barbara; Alfé, Michela; Simone, Monica de; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello

    2014-07-28

    We performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the C1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy in the gas phase of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and coronene), typically formed in combustion reactions. In the NEXAFS of both molecules, a double-peak structure appears in the C1s → LUMO region, which differ by less than 1 eV in transition energies. The vibronic coupling is found to play an important role in such systems. It leads to weakening of the lower-energy peak and strengthening of the higher-energy one because the 0 − n (n > 0) vibrational progressions of the lower-energy peak appear in nearly the same region of the higher-energy peak. Vibrationally resolved theoretical spectra computed within the Frank-Condon (FC) approximation and linear coupling model agree well with the high-resolution experimental results. We find that FC-active normal modes all correspond to in-plane vibrations.

  10. C1s and O1s gas phase shake-up spectra from Mo(CO) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustad, J.; Enkvist, C.; Lunell, S.; Tillborg, H.; Nilsson, A.; Osborne, S.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Svensson, S.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental high-resolution core photoelectron C1s and O1s shake-up spectra of molybdenum hexacarbonyl, MO(CO) 6, are reported and compared with results of semiempirical INDO/CI calculations. Several hitherto unobserved peaks are identified and assigned. It is found that an intra- and inter-group classification can be used to describe the transitions. The transitions of lowest energy have Mo-CO inter-group character. Dynamical effects on the line widths of the experimental shake-up peaks are discussed. A discussion of the relevance of experimental results obtained for the MO(CO) 6 molecule for CO adsorption on metal surfaces is presented.

  11. On helium-like 1s2l-1snl prime transitions in solar flare spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Neupert, W. M.; Swartz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Expected wavelengths and intensities are computed for 1s2l-1snl prime transitions in helium-like ions of the abundant elements from oxygen to iron under coronal conditions. Probable observations of some of these lines in the spectra of solar flares are discussed, and attention is called to a possible reversal of singlet and triplet intensities as compared to laboratory observations.

  12. Vibrationally resolved O 1s core-excitation spectra of CO and NO

    SciTech Connect

    Puettner, R.; Domke, M.; Kaindl, G.; Dominguez, I.; Rotenberg, E.; Warwick, T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Morgan, T.J.; Cisneros, C.; Fink, R.F.

    1999-05-01

    High-resolution photoabsorption spectra of CO and NO below the O 1s ionization threshold are presented. The vibrational fine structure of the O 1s{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {asterisk}} and O 1s{sup {minus}1} Rydberg excitations could be resolved for both molecules, allowing a determination of the vibrational energies and intramolecular distances of the core-excitation states in CO and NO from Franck-Condon analyses. {ital Ab initio} calculations are performed for the O 1s{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {asterisk}} excitation in CO to give an independent confirmation of the spectroscopic parameters derived from the Franck-Condon analysis. The spectral features of the O 1s{sup {minus}1} Rydberg region in CO are reassigned on the basis of the experimental results. The results obtained for the O 1s{sup {minus}1}3s Rydberg state in NO support the idea of a weakening of the molecular bond upon an O 1s{sup {minus}1} ionization process. thinsp thinsp {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Pu 4f XPS spectra analyzed in the Anderson impurity model

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.E.; Peek, J.M.; Allen, J.W.

    1998-05-09

    X-ray photoemission spectra of the {alpha},{beta},{gamma}, and {delta} phases of Pu have been analyzed using the Gunnarsson-Schonhammer implementation of the Anderson impurity model. Changes in the relative intensities of the two spectral features representing mixed f{sup 5} and f{sup 6} final states are in reasonable agreement with the model`s predictions. The coulomb terms, U{sub ff} and U{sub fc}, are quite consistent with those derived from atomic and LDA calculations. Multiplet structure, which agrees with atomic calculations for 4f{sup 13}5f{sup 5}, strongly suggests 5f localization in the final state.

  14. Method for estimating ionicities of oxides using O1s photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L. Q.; Li, Y. C.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Xue, L. C.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2015-09-01

    The average valence, ValO, of the oxygen anions in the perovskite oxide BaTiO3, was found using O1s photoelectron spectra to be -1.55. This experimental result is close to the theoretical value for BaTiO3 (-1.63) calculated by Cohen [Nature 358, 136 (1992)] using density functional theory. Using the same approach, we obtained values of ValO for several monoxides, and investigated the dependence of ValO and the ionicity on the second ionization energy, V(M2+), of the metal cation. We found that the dependence of the ionicity on V(M2+) in this work is close to that reported by Phillips [Rev. Mod. Phys. 42, 317 (1970)]. We therefore suggest that O1s photoelectron spectrum measurements should be accepted as a general experimental method for estimating the ionicity and average valence of oxygen anions.

  15. Method for estimating ionicities of oxides using O1s photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D. Qi, W. H.; Xue, L. C.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.; Li, Y. C.; Li, S. Q.

    2015-09-15

    The average valence, V{sub alO}, of the oxygen anions in the perovskite oxide BaTiO{sub 3}, was found using O1s photoelectron spectra to be −1.55. This experimental result is close to the theoretical value for BaTiO{sub 3} (−1.63) calculated by Cohen [Nature 358, 136 (1992)] using density functional theory. Using the same approach, we obtained values of V{sub alO} for several monoxides, and investigated the dependence of V{sub alO} and the ionicity on the second ionization energy, V(M{sup 2+}), of the metal cation. We found that the dependence of the ionicity on V(M{sup 2+}) in this work is close to that reported by Phillips [Rev. Mod. Phys. 42, 317 (1970)]. We therefore suggest that O1s photoelectron spectrum measurements should be accepted as a general experimental method for estimating the ionicity and average valence of oxygen anions.

  16. The C 1s and N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of five azabenzenes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Vall-llosera, G; Gao, B; Kivimäki, A; Coreno, M; Alvarez Ruiz, J; de Simone, M; Agren, H; Rachlew, E

    2008-01-28

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been measured and interpreted by means of density functional theory for five different azabenzenes (pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine) in the gas phase. The experimental and theoretical spectra at the N 1s and C 1s edges show a strong resonance assigned to the transition of the 1s electron in the respective N or C atoms to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with pi(*) symmetry. As opposed to the N 1s edge, at the C 1s edge this resonance is split due to the different environments of the core hole atom in the molecule. The shift in atomic core-level energy due to a specific chemical environment is explained with the higher electronegativity of the N atom compared to the C atom. The remaining resonances below the ionization potential (IP) are assigned to sigma or pi [corrected] orbitals with mixed valence/Rydberg [corrected] character. Upon N addition, a reduction of intensity is observed in the Rydberg region at both edges as compared to the intensity in the continuum. Above the IP one or more resonances are seen and ascribed here to transitions to sigma(*) orbitals. Calculating the experimental and theoretical Delta(pi) term values at both edges, we observe that they are almost the same within +/-1 eV as expected for isoelectronic bonded pairs. The term values of the pi(*) and sigma(*) resonances are discussed in terms of the total Z number of the atoms participating in the bond. PMID:18247958

  17. Intensity analysis of XPS spectra to determine oxide uniformity - Application to SiO2/Si interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple method of determining oxide uniformity is derived which requires no knowlege of film thickness, escape depth, or film composition. The method involves only the measurement of oxide and substrate intensities and is illustrated by analysis of XPS spectral data for thin SiO2 films grown both thermally and by low-temperature chemical vapor deposition on monocrystalline Si. A region 20-30 A thick is found near the SiO2/Si interface on thermally oxidized samples which has an inelastic mean free path 35% less than that found in the bulk oxide. This is interpreted as being due to lattice mismatch resulting in a strained region which is structurally, but not stoichiometrically, distinct from the bulk oxide.

  18. The influence of oxygen adsorption on the NEXAFS and core-level XPS spectra of the C{sub 60} derivative PCBM

    SciTech Connect

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Ericsson, Leif; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen

    2015-02-07

    Fullerenes have been a main focus of scientific research since their discovery due to the interesting possible applications in various fields like organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, the derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 60}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is currently one of the most popular choices due to its higher solubility in organic solvents compared to unsubstituted C{sub 60}. One of the central issues in the field of OPVs is device stability, since modules undergo deterioration (losses in efficiency, open circuit voltage, and short circuit current) during operation. In the case of fullerenes, several possibilities have been proposed, including dimerization, oxidation, and impurity related deterioration. We have studied by means of density functional theory the possibility of oxygen adsorption on the C{sub 60} molecular moiety of PCBM. The aim is to provide guidelines for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements which can probe the presence of atomic or molecular oxygen on the fullerene cage. By analysing several configurations of PCBM with one or more adsorbed oxygen atoms, we show that a joint core level XPS and O1s NEXAFS investigation could be effectively used not only to confirm oxygen adsorption but also to pinpoint the bonding configuration and the nature of the adsorbate.

  19. Indication of single-crystal PuO2 oxidation from O 1s x-ray absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modin, A.; Yun, Y.; Suzuki, M.-T.; Vegelius, J.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Butorin, S. M.

    2011-02-01

    The electronic structure of single-crystal PuO2 is studied using O 1s x-ray absorption (XA) and x-ray emission. Interpretation of the experimental data is supported by extensive first-principles calculations on the basis of the densityfunctionaltheory+U approach. The measured XA spectra show a significant difference in intensity for the first two peaks between different spots or areas on the single crystal. Our theoretical simulations show that the first peak, at ~531 eV, can be attributed to O 2p-Pu 5f hybridization, while the second peak, at ~533.4 eV, is due to hybridization of O 2p with Pu d states. The reasons for the observed differences in the O 1s XA spectra are explored by calculating a number of defect structures PuO2±x as well as by simulating the existence of Pu(V) sites. Our results indicate the presence of oxidation states higher than Pu(IV) in some areas of the single crystal. The findings also suggest that plutonium oxide with a Pu fraction in an oxidation state higher than Pu(IV) consists of inequivalent Pu sites with Pu(IV)O2 and Pu(V)O2 rather than representing a system where the Pu oxidation state is constantly fluctuating between Pu(IV) and Pu(V).

  20. Manifestation of auger processes in C1 s-satellite spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Pesin, L. A.; Morilova, V. M.; Baitinger, E. M.

    2012-09-01

    Using the equipment of the Russian-German beamline of the synchrotron radiation at the BESSY II electron storage ring, satellite spectra accompanying the C1 s core lines in the cases of single-walled carbon nanotubes and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite have been measured with a high energy resolution. The Auger spectra corresponding to shaking of the valence system of carbon by the core vacancy have been found and investigated. The Auger spectra of the studied single-walled carbon nanotubes and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite are caused by annihilation of the excited π* electron with a hole in the π subband. It has been established that the electron states in the conduction band have 3π* (gT, K, M) symmetry; i.e., they correspond to flat 3π* subband, which is localized by 12-13 eV above the Fermi level. It has been revealed that the general regularities of the distribution of electron states in the valence system insignificantly change during its shake-up by the excited core.

  1. Origins of sp(3)C peaks in C1s X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ayaka; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Koinuma, Michio; Sato, Satoshi

    2016-06-21

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is among the most powerful techniques to analyze defective structures of carbon materials such as graphene and activated carbon. However, reported assignments of defects, especially sp(3)C and sp(2)C, are questionable. Most reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be higher than sp(2)C peaks, whereas a few reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be lower than sp(2)C peaks. Our group previously reported that calculated binding energies of sp(3)C were basically lower than those of sp(2)C. This work clarified that one of the reasons for the prevailing ambiguous assignments of sp(3)C peaks is charging effects of diamond. PMID:27264720

  2. Metal-ion Complexation Effects in C 1s-NEXAFS Spectra of Carboxylic Acids—Evidence by Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Armbruster, M.; Schimmelpfennig, B; Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Denecke, M; Klenze, R

    2009-01-01

    Previous systematic C 1s-NEXAFS studies carried out for humic acid (HA) loaded with polyvalent metal cations (Mn+) reveal spectral features which were postulated to result from metal ion complexation: a strong decrease of the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition intensity and the appearance of a new absorption feature at slightly lower energy adjacent to the carboxyl resonance. Although spectroscopic results for the Mn+-PAA (polyacrylic acid) system (selected as model for structurally ill-defined HA) reveal the same spectral features, evidence by an independent approach for interpretation of these features is desirable. It is well established that quantum chemical calculations are capable of reproducing transition features in C 1s core excitation spectra of small organic molecules, e.g., acetate, which is chosen here as a fragment containing the complexing group to model the macromolecular HA and PAA systems. In this study, the RI-ADC(2) approach, as implemented in the TURBOMOLE program package, is applied to calculate vertical core excitation spectra of various metal acetates and the acetate anion. An energy shift (?f) between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO transition of the acetate anion and various metal cation acetates is established. Calculated shifts are very similar to the experimentally observed values for the energy difference between the C 1s (COO-) ? p*Cdouble bond; length as m-dashO peak and the absorption feature appearing after metal ion complexation in Mn+-PAA/PAA. According to our computations, structural changes of the acetate complexes (e.g., the O-CeO bond angle) compared to the free acetate anion are predominantly responsible for the spectral changes observed upon metal ion complexation.

  3. Interference effects in Auger resonant Raman spectra of CO via selective vibrational excitations across the O 1s{yields}2{pi} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shindo, H.; Kitajima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Makochekanwa, C.; De Fanis, A.; Tamenori, Y.; Okada, K.; Feifel, R.; Sorensen, S.; Kukk, E.; Ueda, K.

    2005-08-15

    The Auger resonant Raman spectra of CO, arising from the transitions to the X and A final electronic states of CO{sup +}, have been recorded at photon energies corresponding to the vibrational excitations v{sup '}=3,5, and 8 in the O 1s{yields}2{pi} resonance. The spectra are simulated within the model that takes into account both the lifetime-vibrational interference (LVI) and interference with the nonresonant photoemission. The spectroscopic parameters, {omega}{sub e}, {omega}{sub e}x{sub e}, {gamma} and r{sub e}, of the O 1s{sup -1}2{pi} core-excited state, necessary for the simulation, have been derived by fitting the Franck-Condon simulation to the total ion yield spectrum, assuming a Morse potential for the O 1s{sup -1}2{pi} state. Not only the LVI but also the interference with the nonresonant photoemission turn out to be significant.

  4. XPS characterization of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Stair, P.C.; Butt, J.B.

    1986-04-01

    Analysis of Fe(2p) XPS and iron Auger spectra, combined with C(1s) XPS measurements, provides a valuable technique for studying the compositional behavior of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The extent of catalyst oxidation during synthesis at high conversions may be estimated in terms of the area contribution of oxide phases to the Fe(2p) spectrum. Similarities between the metal and carbide core level spectra are likely to complicate the determination of these phases when oxides are present. Analysis of the metal and carbide contributions to the iron Auger spectrum provides an alternate method for monitoring surface carbide formation during low conversion synthesis. The ''surface compositions'' obtained in this manner are at best semi-quantitative, since the contribution of a particular phase to the XPS or Auger spectrum will depend on both the amount and distribution of that phase within the detected volume. In spite of this, the spectrum fitting technique should prove to be useful in characterizing the time and conversion dependent nature of the active catalyst surface.

  5. NEXAFS and XPS studies of nitrosyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Schio, Luca; Li, Cui; Monti, Susanna; Salén, Peter; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Feifel, Raimund; Alagia, Michele; Richter, Robert; Falcinelli, Stefano; Stranges, Stefano; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2015-04-14

    The electronic structure of nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) has been investigated in the gas phase by X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Cl 2p, Cl 2s, N 1s and O 1s edges in a combined experimental and theoretical study. The theoretical calculations at different levels of approximation predict ionization potential values in good agreement with the experimental data and allow us to assign the main features of the absorption spectra. An unexpected failure of the density functional model is, however, observed in the calculation of the Cl 2s binding energy, which is related to a large self-interaction error. Largely different photoabsorption cross-section patterns are experimentally observed in core excitations from the investigated quantum shells (n = 1, 2). This finding is confirmed by the oscillator strength distributions calculated at different absorption edges; in the case of the n = 2 shell the bands below the threshold are extremely weak and most of the absorption intensity is due to excitations in the continuum. PMID:25754872

  6. XPS Study of Plasma- and Argon Ion-Sputtered Polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The similarity of plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene (PPTFE) and the fluoropolymer film deposited by rf (radio frequency) plasma sputtering (SPTFE) of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), noted earlier in the literature, has been reconfirmed. FT-IR (Fourier Transform Infrared), XPS (X ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) and UV (ultraviolet) spectroscopy has been employed in apparently the first study to involve preparation of PPTFE and SPTFE in the same reactor and under comparable low-power plasma conditions. Most of the work concerned the use of He or Ar as sputtering gas, but some runs were also carried out with the other rare gases Ne, Kr and Xe. The C1s XPS spectra of SPTFE films displayed a relatively higher content of CF2 groups, and yielded higher F/C (fluorine / carbon) ratios, than PPTFE films, while the SPTFE films were somewhat more transparent in the UV than PPTFE. The F/C ratios for SPTFE were essentially independent of the rare gas used for sputtering. Increasing rf power from 10 to 50 W for Xe plasma-sputtering of PTFE resulted in successively lower F/C ratios (1.55 to 1.21), accompanied by sputtering of the glass reactor occurring at 40 W and above. Some limited XPS, FT-IR and UV data are presented on Ar ion-sputtered PTFE.

  7. THEORY FOR THE XPS OF ACTINIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-08-01

    Two aspects of the electronic structure of actinide oxides that significantly affect the XPS spectra are described; these aspects are also important for the materials properties of the oxides. The two aspects considered are: (1) The spin-orbit coupling of the open 5f shell electrons in actinide cations and how this coupling affects the electronic structure. And, (2) the covalent character of the metal oxygen interaction in actinide compounds. Because of this covalent character, there are strong departures from the nominal oxidation states that are significantly larger in core-hole states than in the ground state. The consequences for the XPS of this covalent character are examined. A proper understanding of the way in which they influence the XPS makes it possible to use the XPS to correctly characterize the electronic structure of the oxides.

  8. A comparative study on defect estimation using XPS and Raman spectroscopy in few layer nanographitic structures.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, K; Ghosh, Subrata; Gopala Krishna, Nanda; Ilango, S; Kamruddin, M; Tyagi, A K

    2016-08-10

    Defects in planar and vertically oriented nanographitic structures (NGSs) synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been investigated using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. While Raman spectra reveal the dominance of vacancy and boundary type defects respectively in vertical and planar NGSs, XPS provides additional information on vacancy related defect peaks in the C 1s spectrum, which originate from non-conjugated carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Although an excellent correlation prevails between these two techniques, our results show that estimation of surface defects by XPS is more accurate than Raman analysis. Nuances of these techniques are discussed in the context of assessing defects in nanographitic structures. PMID:27445041

  9. PLA-PMMA blends: A study by XPS and ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossement, D.; Gouttebaron, R.; Cornet, V.; Viville, P.; Hecq, M.; Lazzaroni, R.

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports which are the possibilities of quantification by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) for some polymer blends. In order to assess the composition of the mixtures, we studied first different poly( L-lactide)/polymethylmethacrylate (PLA/PMMA) blends by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), this technique being quantitative. By XPS fitting of the C 1s level, we found a very good agreement of the measured concentrations with the initial compositions. Concerning ToF-SIMS data treatment, we used principal component analysis (PCA) on negative spectra allowing to discriminate one polymer from the other one. By partial least square regression (PLS), we found also a good agreement between the ToF-SIMS predicted and initial compositions. This shows that ToF-SIMS, in a similar way to XPS, can lead to quantitative results. In addition, the observed agreement between XPS (60-100 Å depth analyzed) and ToF-SIMS (10 Å depth analyzed) measurements show that there is no segregation of one of the two polymers onto the surface.

  10. Rotationally resolved S1<--S0 electronic spectra of fluorene, carbazole, and dibenzofuran: Evidence for Herzberg-Teller coupling with the S2 state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, John T.; Alvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W.

    2006-06-01

    Rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectra of the S1←S0 origin bands and higher vibronic bands of fluorene (FLU), carbazole (CAR), and dibenzofuran (DBF) have been observed and assigned. Analyses of these data show that replacement of the CH2 group in FLU with a NH group in CAR and an O atom in DBF produces only localized changes in structure, in the ground state. But the three molecules exhibit different changes in geometry when they are excited by light. The S1 states of the three molecules also are electronically very different. The S1←S0 transition moments of CAR and DBF are parallel to the C2 symmetry axis whereas the corresponding transition moment in FLU is perpendicular to this axis. Herzberg-Teller coupling involving the S2 state also has been observed in the spectra of higher vibronic bands of CAR and DBF. Possible reasons for these behaviors are discussed.

  11. Formation of Hydroxyl and Water Layers on MgO Films Studied with Ambient Pressure XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, J.T.; Starr, D.; Yamamoto, S.; Kaya, S.; Kendelewicz, T.; Mysak, E.R.; Porsgaard, S.; Salmeron, M.B.; Brown Jr., G.E.; Nilsson, A.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the interaction of water with MgO(100), a detailed quantitative assessment of the interfacial chemistry is necessary. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure molecular (H{sub 2}O) and dissociative (OH) water adsorption on a 4 monolayer (ML) thick MgO(100)/Ag(100) film under ambient conditions. Since the entire 4 ML metal oxide (Ox) film is probed by XPS, the reaction of the MgO film with water can be quantitatively studied. Using a multilayer model (Model 1) that measures changes in Ox thickness from O 1s (film) and Ag 3d (substrate) spectra, it is shown that the oxide portion of the MgO film becomes thinner upon hydroxylation. A reaction mechanism is postulated in which the top-most layer of MgO converts to Mg(OH)2 upon dissociation of water. Based on this mechanism a second model (Model 2) is developed to calculate Ox and OH thickness changes based on OH/Ox intensity ratios from O 1s spectra measured in situ, with the known initial Ox thickness prior to hydroxylation. Models 1 and 2 are applied to a 0.15 Torr isobar experiment, yielding similar results for H{sub 2}O, OH and Ox thickness changes as a function of relative humidity.

  12. Structural and XPS studies of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites prepared by ALD and Ag-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor; Kempiński, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Jancelewicz, Mariusz; Pavlenko, Mykola; Załęski, Karol; Jurga, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) were investigated. The morphology and phase structure of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The mean size of TiO2 nanocrystals was determined by TEM and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the chemical elemental composition by observing the behavior of the Ti 2p, O 1s and Si 2p lines. TEM, Raman spectroscopy and XPS binding energy analysis confirmed the formation of TiO2 anatase phase inside the PSi matrix. The XPS valence band analysis was performed in order to investigate the modification of PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites electronic structure. Surface defects states of Ti3+ at PSi/TiO2 nanocomposites were identified by analyzing of XPS valence band spectra.

  13. [XPS and Raman spectral analysis of nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films with different nitrogen content].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Shou; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Han, Jie-Cai; Tian, Gui; Tan, Man-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films were prepared on the polished C--Si substrates by introducing highly pure nitrogen gas into the cathode region and the depositing chamber synchronously using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology. The nitrogen content in the films was controlled by changing the flow rate of nitrogen gas. The configuration of ta-C : N films was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and visible Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the nitrogen content in the films increased from 0.84 at% to 5.37 at% monotonously when the nitrogen flow rate was varied from 2 seem to 20 sccm. The peak position of C (1s) core level moved towards higher binding energy with the increase in nitrogen content. The shift of C (1s) peak position could be ascribed to the chemical bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms even though more three-fold coordinated sp2 configuration as in graphite was formed when the films were doped with more nitrogen atoms. Additionally, the half width of C(1s) peak gradually was also broadened with increasing nitrogen content. In order to discover clearly the changing regularities of the microstructure of the films, the XPS C(1s) spectra and Raman spectra were deconvoluted using a Gaussian-Lorentzian mixed lineshape. It was shown that the tetrahedral hybridization component was still dominant even though the ratio of sp2/sp3 obtained from C(1s) spectra rose with the increase in nitrogen content. The Raman measurements demonstrated that the G peak position shifted towards higher frequency from 1,561 to 1,578 cm(-1) and the ratio of ID/IG also rose with the increase in nitrogen content. Both results indicated that the graphitizing tendency could occur with the increase in nitrogen content in the films. PMID:19385255

  14. Thermally Evaporated Iron (Oxide) on an Alumina Barrier Layer, by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Jensen, David S.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-06

    We report the XPS characterization of a thermally evaporated iron thin film (6 nm) deposited on an Si/SiO_2/Al_2O_3 substrate using Al Ka X-rays. An XPS survey spectrum, narrow Fe 2p scan, narrow O 1s, and valence band scan are shown.

  15. Chemical characterization of soot particles emitted by Wood-Burning Cook Stoves: A XPS and HRTEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali, Giovanni; Peralta, Oscar; Castro, Telma; Torres, Ricardo; Ruiz, Gerardo; Molina, Luisa; Saavedra, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    The morphology, microstructure, chemical composition, and electronic structure of soot particles emitted directly from biofuel cook stoves have been studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to obtain freshly emitted soot particles, copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were placed on the last two of an 8-stages MOUDI cascade impactor. The analysis of HRTEM micrographs revealed the nanostructure and the particle size of soot chain. Additionally, the morphology of soot particles was analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles sampled on the first heating stage exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df, which are present as aggregates formed by carbon ceno-spheres. The XPS survey spectrum for soot particles shows that the main particle composition is carbon. We also observed differences in the carbon/oxygen (C/O) ratio of the particles, which probably depends on the combustion process efficiency of each cook-stove analyzed. The XPS C-1s spectra show carbon with two peaks that correspond to sp2 and sp3 hybridization. Also, real-time absorption (βa) and scattering (αs) coefficients of the particles emitted by cook stoves were measured. The trend in βa and αs indicate that the cooking process has two important combustion stages which varied in its flaming strength, being vigorous in the first stage and soft in the second one.

  16. XPS characterization of naturally aged wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Tibirna, Carmen-Mihaela; Vasile, Cornelia

    2009-12-01

    Wood deterioration over time (by a simultaneously biological, chemical or physical attack) is an inevitable continuous process in the environment. This process destroys all heritage resulting in a loss of valuable old wooden structures and their properties. What type of deterioration occurs and how these processes impact the wood are important questions that need consideration if old wooden structures are to be studied and properly preserved. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to analyze the undegraded (sound wood of ˜6 years) and degraded lime wood (˜150 years, ˜180 years, ˜250 years) from painting supports, differing in terms of the provenance, conservation status and environmental conditions of storage. Elaborated XPS analysis (comparison of C and O individual spectra, decomposition for each atomic component, calculation of O/C ratio) provided a view of the composition of the sample surfaces analyzed. On the basis of these results, it was confirmed that significant changes occurred in the first period of ageing, the ˜150 years lime wood sample having the highest percent of the carbon atoms and the lowest percentage of oxygen atoms and, respectively O/C ratio. According to our previous studies (X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, analytical pyrolysis combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ESR-spectroscopy results), these features could be attributed to the fact that hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose are degraded in time, whereas the crystalline fraction of cellulose decreases more slowly than the amorphous one. Consequently, the observation may be made that lignin is not so easily degraded under the environmental conditions where paintings are frequently exposed.

  17. XPS study of surface state of novel perovskite system Dy0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ as cathode for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautkar, Pranay R.; Acharya, Smita A.; Tumram, Priya V.; Deshpande, U. P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present attempt,novel perovskite oxide Dy0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (DSCF) as cathode material has been synthesized by an Ethylene glycol-citrate combined sol-gel combustion route. Orthorhombic symmetry structure is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and data is well fitted using Rietveld refinement by Full-Prof software suite. Chemical natureof surface of DSCF has been analyzed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS result shows that Dy ions are in +3 oxidation state and Sr in +2 states. However Co2p and Fe2p spectra indicates partial change in oxidation state from Co3+/Fe3+ to Co4+/Fe4+. These attribute to develop active sites on the surface for oxygen ions. O1s XPS spectra shows two oxygen peaks relatedto lattice oxygen in perovskite and absorbed oxygen in oxygen vacancy are detected. O1s spectra demonstrate the existence of adsorbed oxygen species on the surface of DSCF oxide which is quite beneficial for intermediate temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  18. XPS characterization of the surface immobilization of antibacterial furanones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bataineh, Sameer A.; Britcher, Leanne G.; Griesser, Hans J.

    2006-02-01

    Brominated furanones have attracted recent interest as antibacterial compounds. To utilize them as protective coatings in biomedical device applications, they must be covalently immobilized onto solid surfaces; however, interfacial coupling protocols developed for other biomolecules are not applicable to furanones. An azide reaction scheme has enabled covalent immobilization onto fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer but its chemistry is less predictable, requiring detailed characterization by XPS and tapping mode AFM after each step of the immobilization sequence. XPS curve fitting resolved components in the C 1s, N 1s and Br 3d regions. Angle dependent XPS was used to assess the depth distributions and layer thicknesses. The results indicated successful covalent immobilization of furanones; however, side reactions occurred. In addition to the expected C sbnd Br, a contribution from bromine ion (Br -) was detected, indicating that photo-degradation of furanones took place during UV illumination, and this reaction was found to increase with illumination time. The Br - was removed by washing with water, whereas the C sbnd Br signal from immobilized furanone remained. Spectroscopic characterization will assist in elucidating the structure of furanone coatings, understanding their mode of action when covalently immobilized on surfaces, and rationally designing and optimizing an effective antibacterial coating for biomedical applications.

  19. XPS Study of SiO2 and the Si/SiO2 Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is analytical technique for understanding electronic structure of atoms close to surface in solids, in preference to bulk structure of material. Study found evidence for core-level chemical shifts arising from changes in local structural environment in amorphous SiO2 and at Si/SiO2 interface. Observed XPS spectra may be understood as sequential convolution of several functions, each with well-defined physical interpretation.

  20. Morphology and Chemical Composition of soot particles emitted by Wood-burning Cook-Stoves: a HRTEM, XPS and Elastic backscattering Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali-Sandoval, G. A., Sr.; Castro, T.; Peralta, O.; De la Cruz, W.; Días, J.; Amelines, O.; Rivera-Hernández, M.; Varela, A.; Muñoz-Muñoz, F.; Policroniades, R.; Murillo, G.; Moreno, E.

    2014-12-01

    The morphology, microstructure and the chemical composition on surface of soot particles were studied by using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and elastic backscattering spectrometry. In order to obtain freshly soot particles emitted by home-made wood-burning cook stoves, copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were placed on the last two of an 8-stages MOUDI cascade impactor. The analysis of HRTEM micrographs revealed the nanostructure and the particle size of soot particles. The XPS survey spectra show a large carbon peak around 285 eV and the oxygen signal at 533 eV. Some differences observed in the carbon/oxygen (C/O) ratio of the particles probably depend on the combustion process efficiency of each cook-stove analyzed. The C-1s XPS spectra show an asymmetric broad peak and other with low intensity that corresponds to sp2 and sp3hybridization, which were fitted with a convolution using Gaussian functions. Elastic backscattering technique allows a chemical elemental analysis of samples and confirms the presence of C, O and Si observed by XPS. Additionally, the morphological properties of soot aggregates were analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df. Also, real-time absorption (σabs) and scattering (σsct) coefficients of fine (with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 µm) soot particles were measured. The trend in σabs and σsct indicate that the cooking process has two important combustion stages which varied in its flaming strength, being vigorous in the first stage and soft in the second one.

  1. XPS investigation of DNA binding to zirconium-phosphonate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sarah M; Monot, Julien; Petit, Marc; Bujoli, Bruno; Talham, Daniel R

    2007-07-01

    The surface coverage of phosphorylated oligonucleotides immobilized on a zirconium-phosphonate surface was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By quantifying the intensity of the N 1s signal originating from the oligonucleotide and the Zr 3d peak from the metal-phosphonate surface, the surface coverage of the oligonucleotide could be calculated with a modified substrate-overlayer model. We found relatively low surface coverages indicating that once covalently bound via the terminal phosphate the polymer chain further physisorbs to the surface limiting the adsorption of additional molecules. PMID:17275268

  2. Samarium electrodeposited acetate and oxide thin films on stainless steel substrate characterized by XPS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myhre, Kristian; Burns, Jonathan; Meyer, Harry; Sims, Nathan; Boll, Rose

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of a samarium thin film deposited on a stainless steel substrate using molecular electrodeposition was carried out using a Thermo Scientific K-Alpha X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. We studied two types of samarium electrodeposition samples, one as-deposited and one heated to 700 °C in an air flow. Survey scans include peaks coming from the stainless steel substrate, such as Fe and Cr. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) survey spectrum, Sm 3d, C 1s, and O 1s narrow scans are shown. It was determined that the heating process decomposed the deposited Sm acetate to Sm2O3 using XPS.

  3. XANES and XPS studies of the reduction of ammonium paramolybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Halada, G.P.; Clayton, C.R.; Isaacs, H.S.; Davenport, A.J.

    1991-12-31

    in situ glancing-angle x-ray reflectivity experiments were performed on electrochemical reduction products formed in a dilute paramolybdate solution on a platinum electrode. These data were compared with x-ray photoelectron spectra which showed formation of simple molybdate, pentavalent and tetravalent species at increasingly negative potentials. X-ray absorption data demonstrated changes in edge position, pre-edge structure and edge height corresponding to reduction and subsequent growth of the reduction product film at a number of the potentials examined with XPS.

  4. XANES and XPS studies of the reduction of ammonium paramolybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Halada, G.P.; Clayton, C.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Isaacs, H.S.; Davenport, A.J. )

    1991-01-01

    in situ glancing-angle x-ray reflectivity experiments were performed on electrochemical reduction products formed in a dilute paramolybdate solution on a platinum electrode. These data were compared with x-ray photoelectron spectra which showed formation of simple molybdate, pentavalent and tetravalent species at increasingly negative potentials. X-ray absorption data demonstrated changes in edge position, pre-edge structure and edge height corresponding to reduction and subsequent growth of the reduction product film at a number of the potentials examined with XPS.

  5. XPS studies and photocurrent applications of alkali-metals-doped ZnO nanoparticles under visible illumination conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saáedi, Abdolhossein; Yousefi, Ramin; Jamali-Sheini, Farid; Zak, Ali Khorsand; Cheraghizade, Mohsen; Mahmoudian, M. R.; Baghchesara, Mohammad Amin; Dezaki, Abbas Shirmardi

    2016-05-01

    The present work is a study about a relationship between X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) results and photocurrent intensity of alkali-metals-elements doped ZnO nanoparticles, which is carried out under visible illumination conditions. The nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple sol-gel method. Structure and morphology studies of the NPs were carried out by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of doping on the optical band-gap was investigated by using UV-visible spectrometer. The absorption peak of the doped ZnO NPs was red-shifted with respect to that of the undoped ZnO NPs. After that, the photocurrent application of the products was examined under a white light source at 2 V bias. The photocurrent results showed that, the current intensity of the ZnO NPs was increased by doping materials. However, K-doped ZnO NPs showed the highest photocurrent intensity. Finally, a discussion was carried out about the obtained photocurrent results by the O-1s spectra of the XPS of the samples. Our results suggest that the alkali-metals-doped ZnO NPs exhibit considerable promise for highly sensitive visible-light photodetectors.

  6. Characterization of YBa 2Cu 3O x using core- and valence-level XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundle, C. R.; Fowler, D. E.

    1993-12-01

    Hundreds of papers have been published involving the photoelectron spectroscopy of the high- Tc superconducting oxides since 1987. The early work, originally on bulk-sintered material, sputtered films, and later on "single crystals", concentrated on finding "unusual" features in valence- or core-level spectra to relate to electronic structure effects which might explain the superconducting mechanism. The majority of this work has not adequately taken into account the facts that (a) photoemission probes only the top few monolayers of material, and (b) in many cases the top few layers are completely unrepresentative of the bulk material. This is particularly true for YBa 2Cu 3O x, where the surface is extremely reactive, unstable, and prone to contaminating phases, even when prepared under UHV conditions. This has led to a flood of misinformation concerning the true characteristic spectra of this material and their interpretation. In this paper, we present core- and valence-level XPS for YBa 2Cu 3O x single-crystal, bulk-sintered, and thin-film samples, and show that, when artifacts are eliminated, the characteristic spectra are the same, to first order, and easily allow distinction of surfaces consisting of the genuine orthorhombic phase ( x > 6.4) from those with the non-superconducting tetragonal phase ( x<6.4) or contaminant or reaction-product phases. With this information, it is possible to eliminate much of the previous literature discussion and also to follow the material changes occuring, for instance, during annealing, adsorption and reaction. We then discuss some detailed interpretations, including the DOS observed at and near EF, the explanations for the ˜1.5 eV chemical shift in Ba core-level BE between orthorhombic and tetragonal forms, and the implications of the very low O(1s) BE of the orthorhombic form.

  7. Quenching and restoring of the A {sup 2}{pi} cationic state in resonant Auger electron spectra of CO in the vicinity of the O 1s{yields}2{pi} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Feifel, R.; Tanaka, T.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Tamenori, Y.; Carravetta, V.; Ueda, K.

    2006-12-15

    The evolution of the vibrational intensity distribution of the singly ionized A {sup 2}{pi} state in CO is experimentally examined for photon energy detunings below the adiabatic 0-0 transition of the O 1s{yields}2{pi} resonance. We have found a strong suppression of the entire vibrational fine structure of this state, leading to its almost complete quenching for certain excitation energies, followed by a partial restoring for larger values of negative photon energy detuning. Our observation, that cannot be rationalized by the known model of a vibrational collapse for energy detuning, may be explained in terms of a Fano interference between the direct and resonant photoionization channels in the presence of strong lifetime vibrational interference.

  8. Synchrotron-radiation XPS analysis of ultra-thin silane films: Specifying the organic silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Paul M.; Glamsch, Stephan; Ehlert, Christopher; Lippitz, Andreas; Kulak, Nora; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of chemical and elemental in-depth variations in ultra-thin organic layers with thicknesses below 5 nm is very challenging. Energy- and angle-resolved XPS (ER/AR-XPS) opens up the possibility for non-destructive chemical ultra-shallow depth profiling of the outermost surface layer of ultra-thin organic films due to its exceptional surface sensitivity. For common organic materials a reliable chemical in-depth analysis with a lower limit of the XPS information depth z95 of about 1 nm can be performed. As a proof-of-principle example with relevance for industrial applications the ER/AR-XPS analysis of different organic monolayers made of amino- or benzamidosilane molecules on silicon oxide surfaces is presented. It is demonstrated how to use the Si 2p core-level region to non-destructively depth-profile the organic (silane monolayer) - inorganic (SiO2/Si) interface and how to quantify Si species, ranging from elemental silicon over native silicon oxide to the silane itself. The main advantage of the applied ER/AR-XPS method is the improved specification of organic from inorganic silicon components in Si 2p core-level spectra with exceptional low uncertainties compared to conventional laboratory XPS.

  9. XPS Study of Thermally Evaporated Ge-Sb-Te Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Digvijay; Thangaraj, R.

    2011-12-12

    Amorphous thin films were prepared from the bulk composition of Ge{sub 22}Sb{sub 22}Te{sub 56}(GST) alloy by thermal evaporation in good vacuum condition. The amorphous nature of as-deposited films was checked with x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to determine the binding energies of the core electrons in amorphous thin GST films. In XPS, we performed the survey scan from the binding energy (BE) range from 0-1100 eV and core level spectra of Ge 3d, Sb 3d and Te 3d.

  10. Near-ambient pressure XPS of high-temperature surface chemistry in Sr2Co2O5 thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hong, Wesley T.; Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Jeen, Hyoung Jeen; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-02-11

    Transition metal perovskite oxides are promising electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells, but a lack of fundamental understanding of oxide surfaces impedes the rational design of novel catalysts with improved device efficiencies. In particular, understanding the surface chemistry of oxides is essential for controlling both catalytic activity and long-term stability. Thus, elucidating the physical nature of species on perovskite surfaces and their catalytic enhancement would generate new insights in developing oxide electrocatalysts. In this article, we perform near-ambient pressure XPS of model brownmillerite Sr2Co2O5 (SCO) epitaxial thin films with different crystallographic orientations. Detailed analysis of themore » Co 2p spectra suggests that the films lose oxygen as a function of temperature. Moreover, deconvolution of the O 1s spectra shows distinct behavior for (114)-oriented SCO films compared to (001)-oriented SCO films, where an additional bulk oxygen species is observed. These findings indicate a change to a perovskite-like oxygen chemistry that occurs more easily in (114) SCO than (001) SCO, likely due to the orientation of oxygen vacancy channels out-of-plane with respect to the film surface. This difference in surface chemistry is responsible for the anisotropy of the oxygen surface exchange coefficient of SCO and may contribute to the enhanced ORR kinetics of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ thin films by SCO surface particles observed previously.« less

  11. Surface analysis of zeolites: An XPS, variable kinetic energy XPS, and low energy ion scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bare, Simon R.; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Teschner, Detre; Hävacker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Schlögl, Robert; Chan, Ally S. Y.; Blackwell, N.; Charochak, M. E.; ter Veen, Rik; Brongersma, Hidde H.

    2016-06-01

    The surface Si/Al ratio in a series of zeolite Y samples has been obtained using laboratory XPS, synchrotron (variable kinetic energy) XPS, and low energy ion scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy. The non-destructive depth profile obtained using variable kinetic energy XPS is compared to that from the destructive argon ion bombardment depth profile from the lab XPS instrument. All of the data indicate that the near surface region of both the ammonium form and steamed Y zeolites is strongly enriched in aluminum. It is shown that when the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons is taken into account the laboratory XPS of aluminosilicates zeolites does not provide a true measurement of the surface stoichiometry, while variable kinetic energy XPS results in a more surface sensitive measurement. A comprehensive Si/Al concentration profile as a function of depth is developed by combining the data from the three surface characterization techniques. The LEIS spectroscopy reveals that the topmost atomic layer is further enriched in Al compared to subsequent layers.

  12. Factor analysis and advanced inelastic background analysis in XPS: Unraveling time dependent contamination growth on multilayers and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Graber, T.; Ehm, D.; Tougaard, S.; Reinert, F.

    2013-10-01

    In order to follow and understand time dependent contamination growth on multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications, particular heterosystems were investigated with X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). Diverse capping layers can be used to terminate EUV multilayer mirrors to protect the underlying multilayer stack, e.g. Ru metal. In XPS problems were encountered when analyzing spectra as the core-level signals of Ru and C overlap. Further, Ru was not only present as pure metal, but also in its oxidized state. Disentangling the overlapping XPS spectra was achieved by application of factor analysis (FA) yielding not only the spectra of each component but also the according weights. Thus a model for the time dependent contamination growth was developed. This model was cross checked by advanced inelastic background analysis. Both methods displayed a way to unravel overlapping data sets and for deducing multilayer composition models.

  13. XPS and bioactivity study of the bisphosphonate pamidronate adsorbed onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kate; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Dutta, Naba; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Anderson, Gail I.; Sekel, Ron

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate bisphosphonate (BP) adsorption onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings commonly used for orthopaedic implants. BPs exhibit high binding affinity for the calcium present in HA and hence can be adsorbed onto HA-coated implants to exploit their beneficial properties for improved bone growth at the implant interface. A rigorous XPS analysis of pamidronate, a commonly used nitrogenous BP, adsorbed onto plasma sprayed HA-coated cobalt-chromium substrates has been carried out, aimed at: (a) confirming the adsorption of this BP onto HA; (b) studying the BP diffusion profile in the HA coating by employing the technique of XPS depth profiling; (c) confirming the bioactivity of the adsorbed BP. XPS spectra of plasma sprayed HA-coated discs exposed to a 10 mM aqueous BP solution (pamidronate) for periods of 1, 2 and 24 h showed nitrogen and phosphorous photoelectron signals corresponding to the BP, confirming its adsorption onto the HA substrate. XPS depth profiling of the 2 h BP-exposed HA discs showed penetration of the BP into the HA matrix to depths of at least 260 nm. The bioactivity of the adsorbed BP was confirmed by the observed inhibition of osteoclast (bone resorbing) cell activity. In comparison to the HA sample, the HA sample with adsorbed BP exhibited a 25-fold decrease in primary osteoclast cells.

  14. Line shapes and satellites in high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectra of large pi-conjugated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schöll, A; Zou, Y; Jung, M; Schmidt, Th; Fink, R; Umbach, E

    2004-11-22

    We present a high-resolution C1s and O1 s x-ray photoemission (XPS) study for condensed films of pi-conjugated organic molecules, namely, of the anhydrides 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, 1,8-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and benzoperylene-(1,8)-dicarboxylic acid anhydride as well as the quinoic acenaphthenequinone. Although the functional groups are identical for the anhydrides, the molecules show very different photoemission fine structure thus providing a detailed fingerprint. A simultaneous peak fit analysis of the XPS spectra of all molecules allows to consistently determine the ionization potentials of all chemically different carbon and oxygen atoms. Additional structures in the C1s and O1s spectra are interpreted as shakeup satellites and assigned with the help of singles and doubles configuration interaction calculations. These satellites provide further information on multielectron excitations and must be taken into account for quantitative investigations. PMID:15549902

  15. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest Grown via Chemical Vapor Deposition from Iron Catalyst Nanoparticles, by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Madaan, Nitesh; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique chemical and physical properties. Herein, we report an XPS analysis of a forest of multiwalled CNTs using monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Survey scans show only one element: carbon. The carbon 1s peak is centered 284.5 eV. The C 1s envelope also shows the expected π → π* shake-up peak at ca. 291 eV. The valence band and carbon KVV Auger signals are presented. When patterned, the CNT forests can be used as a template for subsequent deposition of metal oxides to make thin layer chromatography plates.1-3

  16. Adsorption of acetic acid on ice studied by ambient-pressure XPS and partial-electron-yield NEXAFS spectroscopy at 230-240 K.

    PubMed

    Křepelová, Adéla; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Brown, Matthew A; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ammann, Markus

    2013-01-17

    Ice plays a key role in the environment, and the ice-air interface influences heterogeneous chemical reactions between snowpack or cirrus clouds and the surrounding air. Soluble gases have been suspected to affect the topmost, disordered layer on ice (often referred to as a quasiliquid layer, QLL). Changes are especially expected in the hydrogen-bonding structure of water in the presence of solutes at the ice surface. Here, we used ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to detect acetic acid at the ice surface at 230-240 K under atmospheric conditions for the first time. Electron-kinetic-energy-dependent C 1s spectra indicate that acetic acid remains confined to the topmost ice surface layers. Spectral analysis provides information about the protonation state of acetate at the ice surface. Surface-sensitive Auger-electron-yield C-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra were recorded to probe the molecular state of the adsorbed species. The O-edge NEXAFS spectra show only minor differences between clean ice and ice with adsorbed acetic acid and thus indicate that acetic acid does not lead to an extended disordered layer on the ice surface between 230 and 240 K. PMID:23252403

  17. Valence-band spectra of BEDT-TTF and TTF-based magnetic charge-transfer salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbian, S. G.; Finkelstein, L. D.; Neumann, M.; Turner, S. S.; Day, P.

    2002-06-01

    The electronic structure of BEDT-TTF bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene, and TTF, tetrathiafulvalene, based ferrimagnetic insulating and paramagnetic semiconducting charge-transfer salts have been studied by x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The counterions for the salts are the d-transition-metal complex anions [Cr(NCS)4(phen)]-, [Cr(NCS)4(Me2phen)]- and [Cr(NCS)4(isoq)2]- where Me2phen=4, 7-dimethyl-1, 10-phenanthroline, phen=1, 10-phenanthroline), and isoq=isoquinoline=C9H7N. The distribution of partial and total density of states was determined by comparing the XES spectra of the constituents (carbon and nitrogen Kα and Cr L2,3) with XPS valence-band spectra on the binding-energy scale. Splitting in the XPS N 1s and S 2p spectra was attributed to contributions from nonequivalent atoms, i.e., N in the NCS and phen based ligands, S in NCS and BEDT-TTF. Cr L-XES measured at the L2-threshold display an unusually high L2 to L3 intensity ratio, which is discussed in terms of Coster-Kronig transitions and a different excitation of L3 and L2 levels at the L2 threshold.

  18. In situ XPS studies of thermally deposited potassium on poly( p-phenylene vinylene) and its ring-substituted derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kang, E. T.; Neoh, K. G.; Ma, Z. H.; Tan, K. L.; Huang, Wei

    2001-09-01

    The interactions of thermally evaporated potassium atoms with poly( p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) and its soluble derivative, poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) was studied in situ by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in the C 1s core-level line shape of the polymers, the evolution of the K 2p core-level spectra, and the changes in chemical compositions at the interface with progressive deposition of the metal atoms were carefully monitored. The interactions of the K atoms with the conjugated polymer surfaces were compared with those involving metals of other work functions. Diffusion of the K atoms into the polymers and distinct charge transfer interactions were observed at the interface. The migration of bulk adsorbed oxygen to the surfaces of both polymers during the K deposition process resulted in an increase in oxygen concentration at the K/polymer interfaces. The diffusion of the adsorbed oxygen from the bulk of the conjugated polymer film played a dominant role in the interfacial reactions. The interfacial layer contains mainly oxidized metal and metal-polymer charge transfer species.

  19. Dynamic XPS measurements of ultrathin polyelectrolyte films containing antibacterial Ag–Cu nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Taner-Camcı, Merve; Suzer, Sefik

    2014-03-15

    Ultrathin films consisting of polyelectrolyte layers prepared by layer-by-layer deposition technique and containing also Ag and Cu nanoparticles exhibit superior antibacterial activity toward Escherichia coli. These films have been investigated with XPS measurements under square wave excitation at two different frequencies, in order to further our understanding about the chemical/physical nature of the nanoparticles. Dubbed as dynamical XPS, such measurements bring out similarities and differences among the surface structures by correlating the binding energy shifts of the corresponding XPS peaks. Accordingly, it is observed that the Cu2p, Ag3d of the metal nanoparticles, and S2p of cysteine, the stabilizer and the capping agent, exhibit similar shifts. On the other hand, the C1s, N1s, and S2p peaks of the polyelectrolyte layers shift differently. This finding leads us the claim that the Ag and Cu atoms are in a nanoalloy structure, capped with cystein, as opposed to phase separated entities.

  20. NEXAFS and XPS of p-Aminobenzoic Acid Polymorphs: The Influence of Local Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Jaye, C.; Fischer, D. A.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen K-edge XPS and NEXAFS of the two polymorphic forms of para- aminobenzoic acid (PABA) are significantly different reflecting variation in hydrogen bonding. Alteration in hydrogen bonding at the amino group leads to a shift to high energy for both the XPS N 1s core level and the 3π* NEXAFS resonance with β-PABA. Participation of the amine group in the aromatic system causes the 1π* resonance to be sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular bonding at the para-carboxylic acid group, and a shift to low energy for α- PABA is observed due to hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acid dimer formation. FEFF calculations also successfully reproduce both the energy and intensity variations observed for the σ* shape resonance associated with the C-N bond, with the majority of the decrease in energy observed for b-PABA arising from the longer C-N bond.

  1. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of Bacteriorhodopsin Analogues Synthesized from Fluorophenyl Retinals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masae; Takahashi, Takashi; Tokunaga, Fumio; Murano, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Kazuo; Sagawa, Takasi

    1984-04-01

    The two external point-charge (TEPC) model for bacteriorhodopsin (bR) has been examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and CNDO/S molecular orbital calculations. A main concern was given to a point charge near the β-ionone ring. XPS measurements were carried out on fluorophenyl retinal (F-ret) and their derivatives (Schiff base, protonated Schiff base and bacteriorhodopsin analogues (F-bR)), paying close attention to the chemical shift of the F 1s core level. No meaningful differences were observed among these species although numerical calculations on an assumption of the TEPC model have predicted the chemical shift of about 3 eV between F-ret and F-bR. This fact has arisen a serious question to the validity of the TEPC model. The same conclusion has been reached by the present study of absorption maxima of F-ret and their derivatives.

  2. N-derived signals in the x-ray photoelectron spectra of N-doped anatase TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. P.; Xing, X. J.; Xu, L. M.; Wu, S. X.; Li, S. W.

    2009-06-01

    The plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxial anatase TiO2-xNx (x <0.3) films were chosen to investigate the N-derived variation in the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). With increasing nitrogen concentration, the small chemical shift and the shoulder of the main peak emerge in the N 1s, O 1s, or Ti 2p3/2 core level spectra. In combination with the experimental results obtained from x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, the variations in the spectra could be ascribed to the microstructural distortion. This distortion, induced by the N3- substitution for lattice O2-, could slightly decrease the average ionicity of the Ti-O (or N) bonds. In addition, the other N 1s features (at 399.8 and 401.8 eV) and the oxygen vacancy are also discussed. For the N-doped TiO2, this work introduces a correlation between the microstructural properties and the XPS signals.

  3. RECENT XPS STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF PROCESSING ON NB SRF SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian; Binping Xiao; Michael Kelley; Charles Reece; A. Demasi; L. Pipe; Kevin Smith

    2008-02-12

    XPS studies have consistently shown that Nb surfaces for SRF chiefly comprise of a few nm of Nb2O5 on top of Nb metal, with minor amounts of Nb sub-oxides. Nb samples after BCP/EP treatment with post-baking at the various conditions have been examined by using synchrotron based XPS. Despite the confounding influence of surface roughness, certain outcomes are clear. Lower-valence Nb species are always and only associated with the metal/oxide interface, but evidence for an explicit layer structure or discrete phases is lacking. Post-baking without air exposure shows decreased oxide layer thickness and increased contribution from lower valence species, but spectra obtained after subsequent air exposure cannot be distinguished from those obtained prior to baking, though the SRF performance improvement remains.

  4. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyukhin, S.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Jain, H.

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  5. Comparison of Gas and Adsorbed Phase X-ray Photoemission Spectra of Oxidized Organics on Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-12-01

    Most uptake studies of small chain organics on ice surfaces at near ambient conditions have been performed using flow tube and other methods which monitor the disappearance of the gas phase. We will present results using synchrotron based, ambient pressure X-ray photoemission spectroscopy which allows for the probing of the ice surface directly at near ambient conditions. C 1s XPS and C K-edge NEXAFS gas phase and adsorbed phase spectra will be compared for 2-propanol, acetone, and 1-propanal on ice at -45 C. Uptake experiments give rise to first order Langmuirian isotherms. Acetone and 2-propanol show little difference in the photoemission spectra between the gas phase and adsorbed phase, suggesting that adsorption occurs molecularly. However, adsorption of 1-propanal shows evidence of chemical transformation (oxidation) at the interface of ice. Further studies are underway to better understand this adsorption behavior.

  6. XPS surface study of nanocrystalline Ti Ru Fe materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suñol, J. J.; Bonneau, M. E.; Roué, L.; Guay, D.; Schulz, R.

    2000-02-01

    The surface properties of Ti:Ru:Fe (2- x:1+ x/2:1+ x/2) (with x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1) and Ti:Ru:Fe:O (2:1:1: w) (with w=0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) have been determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in both their as-milled state and after being in contact with a chlorate oxidizing solution. The O surface concentrations of both sets of samples are almost identical, indicating that the O-free samples readily react with air. All samples in their as-milled state have an elemental Ti, Ru and Fe surface contents that closely follow that expected from their bulk composition, indicating that there is no surface enrichment in any of the elements. In the as-milled state, more than 90% of Ti and Fe atoms are in the highest possible oxidation state, while Ru is in the metallic state. Following immersion of the samples in an oxidizing chlorate electrolyte, the Ru surface concentration decreases by a factor of two. This is also accompanied by an increase in the oxidation state of the Ru atoms left at the surface from 0 to +4. From a comparison between the Ru 3 d5/2,3/2 core level spectra of the electrodes with those of crystalline and hydrated RuO 2, it is postulated that dissolution and re-deposition of Ru in the form of hydrated RuO 2 occurs at open circuit potential in the chlorate electrolyte. The consequences of these findings for the electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes in chlorate electrolyte are finally discussed.

  7. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  8. Chemical Visualization of a GaN p-n junction by XPS.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Deniz; Sezen, Hikmet; Ozbay, Ekmel; Suzer, Sefik

    2015-01-01

    We report on an operando XPS investigation of a GaN diode, by recording the Ga2p3/2 peak position under both forward and reverse bias. Areal maps of the peak positions under reverse bias are completely decoupled with respect to doped regions and allow a novel chemical visualization of the p-n junction in a 2-D fashion. Other electrical properties of the device, such as leakage current, resistivity of the domains are also tapped via recording line-scan spectra. Application of a triangular voltage excitation enables probing photoresponse of the device. PMID:26359762

  9. Chemical Visualization of a GaN p-n junction by XPS

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Deniz; Sezen, Hikmet; Ozbay, Ekmel; Suzer, Sefik

    2015-01-01

    We report on an operando XPS investigation of a GaN diode, by recording the Ga2p3/2 peak position under both forward and reverse bias. Areal maps of the peak positions under reverse bias are completely decoupled with respect to doped regions and allow a novel chemical visualization of the p-n junction in a 2-D fashion. Other electrical properties of the device, such as leakage current, resistivity of the domains are also tapped via recording line-scan spectra. Application of a triangular voltage excitation enables probing photoresponse of the device. PMID:26359762

  10. Plasma bromination of HOPG surfaces: A NEXAFS and synchrotron XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippitz, Andreas; Friedrich, Jörg F.; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Br bonding on plasma brominated graphite surfaces has been studied by using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Br2 and bromoform were used as plasma gases in an r.f. cw low pressure plasma process. Kr plasma had been used to study separately the physical and chemical plasma etching effects. At early steps of plasma bromination which lead to only small XPS Br surface concentration values a quick decay of aromaticity has been observed. At low Br surface concentration radical or even electrophilic addition of bromine onto sp2 carbon atoms is discussed as the dominating reaction pathway. At higher Br surface concentrations the inherent formation of sp3 defects in the graphene network by chemical etching processes promotes nucleophilic substitution of bromine at sp3 carbons as a competing reaction pathway. Both reaction pathways lead to C-Br species characterized by the same Br 3d XPS binding energy. However more than one Br 3d component in XP spectra has been found at lower Br2 plasma induced Br surface concentrations and complexation of bromine at HOPG is assumed as a third way of interaction with Br2 plasma.

  11. Energy Thresholds of DNA Damage Induced by UV Radiation: An XPS Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P J; Ferraria, A M; Botelho do Rego, A M; Hoffmann, S V; Ribeiro, P A; Raposo, M

    2015-04-30

    This work stresses on damage at the molecular level caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) in the range from 3.5 to 8 eV, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) films observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed quantitative XPS analysis, in which all the amounts are relative to sodium-assumed not to be released from the samples, of the carbon, oxygen, and particularly, nitrogen components, reveals that irradiation leads to sugar degradation with CO-based compounds release for energies above 6.9 eV and decrease of nitrogen groups which are not involved in hydrogen bonding at energies above 4.2 eV. Also the phosphate groups are seen to decrease to energies above 4.2 eV. Analysis of XPS spectra allowed to conclude that the damage on bases peripheral nitrogen atoms are following the damage on phosphates. It suggests that very low kinetic energy photoelectrons are ejected from the DNA bases, as a result of UV light induced breaking of the phosphate ester groups which forms a transient anion with resonance formation and whereby most of the nitrogen DNA peripheral groups are removed. The degree of ionization of DNA was observed to increase with radiation energy, indicating that the ionized phosphate groups are kept unchanged. This result was interpreted by the shielding of phosphate groups caused by water molecules hydration near sodium atoms. PMID:25844940

  12. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Constance J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in particular the U4f level, has been widely used to elucidate the chemical state of uranium in various materials. In large part, previous experimental work has relied on comparing the U4f spectra of an unknown to some “standard” or using qualitative intuitive judgments on the expected behavior of the primary lines and satellite structures as a function of oxidation state and bonding environment. Such approaches are useful and can be sufficiently robust to make defensible claims. Nonetheless, there is no quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics that control satellite structures or even the shape of the primary peaks. To address this issue, we used a rigorous, strictly ab initio theoretical approach to investigate the U(4f) XPS of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our theoretical studies are based on the electronic structures of embedded cluster models, where bonding between U and O is explicitly incorporated. We demonstrate that treatment of the many-body character of the cluster wavefunctions is essential to correctly model and interpret the U4f XPS. Here we definitively show that shake configurations, where an electron is transferred from a dominantly O2p bonding orbital into dominantly 5f or 6d antibonding orbitals, are indeed responsible for the major satellite features. Based on this rigorous theoretical framework, it is possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and the chemistry of the material.

  13. XPS characterization of polymer–monocalcium aluminate interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kalina, Lukáš Másilko, Jiří; Koplík, Jan; Šoukal, František

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this paper is the introduction of a sophisticated testing method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), used to study the interface between the hydrated cement phase and polymer after mechanochemical activation, which is fundamental for the creation of macro-defect-free (MDF) composites. The XPS results clearly explain the hypothesis of a chemical reaction mechanism in the interphase regions affecting the final properties of the MDF materials.

  14. Calcination products of gibbsite studied by X-ray diffraction, XPS and solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Malki, A.; Mekhalif, Z.; Detriche, S.; Fonder, G.; Boumaza, A.; Djelloul, A.

    2014-07-01

    The changes caused by heat treatment of gibbsite powder at 300–1473 K were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR). XRD analysis indicates that the transformation sequence involves the formation of κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an intermediate phase between χ- and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. XPS analysis indicates that the ratio of aluminium atoms to oxygen atoms in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases, whereas the expected ratio is observed in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in the transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Graphical abstract: The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Highlights: • Calcination products of gibbsite studied by XRD, XPS and solid-state NMR. • The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. • The Al/O atomic ratio determined by XPS is larger than 2/3 in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The percentage of AlO{sub 4} in the aluminas follows the same behaviour as the Al/O atomic ratio.

  15. Acetate- and thiol-capped monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles: XPS, XAS, and HRTEM studies.

    PubMed

    Chakroune, Nassira; Viau, Guillaume; Ammar, Souad; Poul, Laurence; Veautier, Delphine; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire; Villain, Françoise; Fiévet, Fernand

    2005-07-19

    Monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by reduction of RuCl3 in 1,2-propanediol. The mean particle size was controlled by appropriate choice of the reduction temperature and the acetate ion concentration. Colloidal solutions in toluene were obtained by coating the metal particles with dodecanethiol. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS for the Ru K-absorption edge) were performed on particles of two different diameters, 2 and 4 nm, and in different environments, polyol/acetate or thiol. For particles stored in polyol/acetate XPS studies revealed superficial oxidation limited to one monolayer and a surface coating containing mostly acetate ions. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra showed both oxygen and ruthenium atoms around the ruthenium atoms with a Ru-Ru coordination number N smaller than the bulk value, as expected for fine particles. In the case of 2 nm acetate-capped particles N is consistent with particles made up of a metallic core and an oxidized monolayer. For 2 nm thiol-coated particles, a Ru-S bond was evidenced by XPS and XAS. For the 4 nm particles XANES and XPS studies showed that most of the ruthenium atoms are in the zerovalent state. Nevertheless, in both cases, when capped with thiol, the Ru-Ru coordination number inferred from EXAFS is much smaller than for particles of the same size stored in polyol. This is attributed to a structural disorganization of the particles by thiol chemisorption. HRTEM studies confirm the marked dependence of the structural properties of the ruthenium particles on their chemical environment; they show the acetate-coated particles to be single crystals, whereas the thiol-coated particles appear to be polycrystalline. PMID:16008388

  16. XPS study of interface formation of CVD SiO2 on InSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-10-01

    The interfacial chemistry of CVD SiO2 films deposited on thin native oxides grown on InSb substrates is examined using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and a relatively benign chemical etching technique for depth profiling. An intensity analysis of XPS spectra is used to derive the compositional structure of the interfaces obtained in the SiO2/native oxide/InSb system. Peak positions in these spectra are used to follow the change in substrate surface potential during the etch sequence, and to establish the chemical nature of the species formed during deposition and subsequent processing. Reaction of the substrate with oxygen resulted in an In-rich native oxide and 1-2 monolayers of excess elemental Sb at the native-oxide/substrate interface, incompletely oxidized silane reduced the native oxide, leaving less than 1 monolayer of elemental In at the SiO2/native oxide interface. Etch removal of this thin In-rich layer leads to a change in the substrate surface potential of 0.06 eV, corresponding to a net increase in positive charge. The results are consistent with simple thermodynamic considerations; they are also compared to previously reported studies of deposited dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductors.

  17. Characterization of fossil remains using XRF, XPS and XAFS spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zougrou, I. M.; Katsikini, M.; Pinakidou, F.; Brzhezinskaya, M.; Papadopoulou, L.; Vlachos, E.; Tsoukala, E.; Paloura, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (μ-XRF), X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopies are applied for the study of paleontological findings. More specifically the costal plate of a gigantic terrestrial turtle Titanochelon bacharidisi and a fossilized coprolite of the cave spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta spelaea are studied. Ca L 2,3-edge NEXAFS and Ca 2p XPS are applied for the identification and quantification of apatite and Ca containing minerals. XRF mapping and XAFS are employed for the study of the spatial distribution and speciation of the minerals related to the deposition environment.

  18. AES XPS study of chromium carbides and chromium iron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of chromium rich carbides which precipitate at grain boundaries in steels is still not perfectly understood. We performed a multitechnique approach on model chromium carbide and chromium-iron carbide samples: Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED) were used to characterise the samples. Significant chemical shifts were observed for the Cr, Fe and C XPS peaks in the M 7C 3 compound (M stands for metal), indicating unambiguously that the compound formed is a mixed iron-chromium carbide.

  19. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N2O molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, L.; Tashiro, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ehara, M.; Ueda, K.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestâl, K.; Feifel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N2O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s-2) and 1179.4 eV (O1s-2). The corresponding energies obtained for N2O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s-2), 906.5 eV (central N1s-2), and 1174.1 eV (O1s-2). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N2O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s-2 as well as with the O1s-2 dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10-3 for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10-3 for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  20. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestål, K.; Feifel, R.; Tashiro, M.; Ehara, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ueda, K.

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s{sup −2}) and 1179.4 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The corresponding energies obtained for N{sub 2}O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s{sup −2}), 906.5 eV (central N1s{sup −2}), and 1174.1 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N{sub 2}O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s{sup −2} as well as with the O1s{sup −2} dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10{sup −3} for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10{sup −3} for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  1. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N2O molecules.

    PubMed

    Hedin, L; Tashiro, M; Linusson, P; Eland, J H D; Ehara, M; Ueda, K; Zhaunerchyk, V; Karlsson, L; Pernestål, K; Feifel, R

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N2O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s(-2)) and 1179.4 eV (O1s(-2)). The corresponding energies obtained for N2O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s(-2)), 906.5 eV (central N1s(-2)), and 1174.1 eV (O1s(-2)). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N2O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s(-2) as well as with the O1s(-2) dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10(-3) for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10(-3) for oxygen at 1300 eV. PMID:25669525

  2. Excitation of XPS spectra from nanoscaled particles by local generation of x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallinson, Christopher F.; Castle, James E.

    2015-09-15

    In preliminary work, the authors have shown that use of an aluminum substrate to support a distribution of copper particles enables their characteristic photoelectrons to be observed within the Auger electron spectrum generated by an incident electron beam. This observation raises the possibility of the use of chemical shifts and the corresponding Auger parameter to identify the chemical states present on the surface of individual submicrometer particles within a mixture. In this context, the technique has an advantage in that, unlike conventional Auger electron spectroscopy, the electron beam does not dwell on the particle but on the substrate adjacent to it. Given the importance, for both medical and toxicological reasons, of the surface composition of such particles, the authors have continued to explore the potential of this development. In this contribution, the authors show that proximal excitation of x-rays is equally successful with magnesium substrates. In some regions of the x-ray photoelectron spectrum, the much larger Auger peaks generated by the electron beam can cause inconvenient clustering of Auger and photoelectron peaks. As in conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the ability to switch between Al and Mg sources is useful in such situations. In this context, the authors have extended the studies to iron particles where the authors show that use of Al or Mg substrates, as necessary, can make a contribution to clear identification of individual components in the Fe 2p peaks. For this development in electron spectroscopy to achieve its full potential, it is necessary to optimize the beam conditions used to generate the local x-ray to give good selectivity of a given particle. Measurements made in support of this will be given. Of greater concern is a possible problem of local heating associated with x-ray generation. The authors continue to explore this problem and report some progress in minimizing heating of the particle while maintaining the particle selectivity that is central to this exciting development.

  3. X-PEEM, XPS and ToF-SIMS characterisation of xanthate induced chalcopyrite flotation: Effect of pulp potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegowda, Yogesh; Chan, Yuet-Loy; Wei, Der-Hsin; Harmer, Sarah L.

    2015-05-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM), X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the flotation behaviour of chalcopyrite with xanthate at different processing conditions. The flotation recovery of chalcopyrite decreased from 97% under oxidative conditions (Eh ~ 385 mV SHE, pH 4) to 41% at a reductive potential of - 100 mV SHE (at pH 9). X-PEEM images constructed from the metal L3 absorption edges were used to produce near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra from regions of interest, allowing the variability in mineral surface chemistry of each mineral particle to be analysed, and the effect of pulp potential (Eh) on the flotation of chalcopyrite to be determined. XPS, ToF-SIMS and NEXAFS analyses of chalcopyrite particles at oxidative conditions show that the surface was mildly oxidised and covered with adsorbed molecular CuEX. The Cu 2p XPS and Cu L2,3 NEXAFS spectra were dominated by CuI species attributed to bulk chalcopyrite and adsorbed CuEX. At a reductive potential of - 100 mV SHE, an increase in concentration of CuI and FeIII oxides and hydroxides was observed. X-PEEM analysis was able to show the presence of a low percentage of CuII oxides (CuO or Cu(OH)2) with predominantly CuI oxide (Cu2O) which is not evident in Cu 2p XPS spectra.

  4. Ar plasma treated and Al metallised polycarbonate: a XPS, mass spectroscopy and SFM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, C.; Kopf, H.; Gotsmann, B.; Vieth, T.; Fuchs, H.; Reihs, K.

    1999-08-01

    Ar plasma etched and Al metallised bisphenol A carbonate was analysed by mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning force microscopy (SFM). We mainly used a technical polymer (Makrolon 2808, Bayer) made by injection-moulding, as well as spin coated bisphenol A carbonate ( n=1) and polycarbonate (PC) ( n=115). The mass spectroscopy during the etching process shows the degradation of the PC in the form of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methyl groups. The photoelectron spectroscopy shows in detail the surface modification after Ar plasma treatment and metallisation. The plasma induces a reduction of the carboxylic carbon (C 1s), a strong reduction of singly bonded oxygen (O 1s) and also a slight reduction of doubly bonded oxygen. After Al metallisation, a reaction of Al with the oxygen groups and an interaction with the aromatic system is documented. Ar plasma etching increases the chemical interaction of Al mainly with the aromatic carbon. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of metallised PC under different initial conditions shows a strong influence of incorporated water in the PC bulk that cannot be seen by XPS on uncoated PC. The O 1s signal increases during metallisation and results in an oxidation of Al probably caused by the fact that the hydrophobic surfaces becomes hydrophillic. Temperature-dependent XPS was done on technical PC samples and on spin coated samples ( n=1, n=115) and supports the influence of the bulk state for the Al-PC interface. For n=1 carbonate, a diffusion of Al into the PC volume was observed. The SFM measurements showed a roughening effect on the nanometer scale even after short treatment times. Al can be seen as a weakly bound cluster on the virgin PC, and if a pre-etching is done, Al seems to grow as a good wetting film. The adhesion force of Al films on PC without any influence of the volume can be explained by the chemical bonding of Al to the carboxylic and aromatic systems. The adhesion can be increased

  5. TEM and XPS studies on CdS/CIGS interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Cha, Li-mei; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui; Besland, M.-P.

    2014-12-01

    Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) was deposited by metallic precursors sputtering and subsequently submitted to a selenization process. The upper CdS layers were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CIGS interfaces were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). As checked by XPS analysis, the CIGS surface exhibited a hydroxide-terminated CdSe layer when treated with Cd Partial Electrolyte solution (Cd PE). Its thickness was roughly estimated to several nanometers. A 100 nm thick CdS layer was deposited onto CIGS surface. The TEM images revealed a clear and sharp interface between CdS and CIGS. XPS analysis showed a CIGS surface covered by a pinhole free and homogeneous CdS layer. XPS depth profile measurement of the CdS/CIGS interface did not evidence elemental inter-diffusion between the CIGS and CdS layers, in very good agreement with TEM observations.

  6. XPS analysis of nikki N111 catalyst pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Dan

    2007-03-26

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed on several pellets of Nikki N111 catalyst to determine elemental composition. Of specific interest, the Nikki MSDS for this material cites a 20 wt. % contribution from the species "Others". XPS was employed to determine more precisely the chemical composition of the pellets and search for potential catalytic metal species not identified on the MSDS. Results are tabulated in Table 1 below. XPS analysis of the chemical composition of the catalyst pellets compares favorably to the N ikki MSDS, if the assumption is made that the nickel in the catalyst is oxidized to Ni2O3. Specifically, using a 100 g sample basis, the 49 grams of nickel metal specified in the MSDS would carry 20 grams of oxygen if it were oxidized to Ni2O3, potentially accounting for the 20 wt. %"Others". XPS was able to confirm the presence of copper and chromium in the pellets, each expected at less than 1 atomic percent and quantified at 1-3 atomic percent concentrations, but no metal species not identified by the MSDS were detected.

  7. Comparative study of the native oxide on 316L stainless steel by XPS and ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tardio, Sabrina Abel, Marie-Laure; Castle, James E.; Watts, John F.; Carr, Robert H.

    2015-09-15

    The very thin native oxide film on stainless steel, of the order of 2 nm, is known to be readily modified by immersion in aqueous media. In this paper, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry are employed to investigate the nature of the air-formed film and modification after water emersion. The film is described in terms of oxide, hydroxide, and water content. The preferential dissolution of iron is shown to occur on immersion. It is shown that a water absorbed layer and a hydroxide layer are present above the oxide-like passive film. The concentrations of water and hydroxide appear to be higher in the case of exposure to water. A secure method for the peak fitting of Fe2p and Cr2p XPS spectra of such films on their metallic substrates is described. The importance of XPS survey spectra is underlined and the feasibility of C{sub 60}{sup +} SIMS depth profiling of a thin oxide layer is shown.

  8. XPS characterization scheme for phase-pure epitaxial NbO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamek, Tobias; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alex

    NbO2 shows a semiconductor-to-metal transition with an associated structural transition of Peierls type. NbO2 and Nb2O5 or mixtures thereof have also shown electrically induced insulator-to-metal transitions. To shed light on the nature of the electrically induced insulator-to-metal transition it is important to grow high phase purity NbO2 and Nb2O5 and compare electrical measurements with mixed niobium oxides and with different electrode materials. Processing NbO2 and avoiding surface oxidation requires ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Niobium oxide thin films where grown in UHV by molecular beam epitaxy on 111-oriented STO substrates and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was shown that the NbO2 3d core level spectrum exhibits an asymmetric spin-orbit peak pair with more spectral weight on the high binding energy side. Based on the shape of the Nb 3d core levels, peak positions relative to the oxygen O 1s peak, and the valence band shape and height ratio of the niobium 4dxy split-off band to the oxygen 2p band, an identification scheme for NbO2 by XPS was devised. Complementary the NbO2 phase was confirmed by reflection high-energy electron and x-ray diffraction analysis.

  9. XPS analysis of combustion aerosols for chemical composition, surface chemistry, and carbon chemical state.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Bryg, Vicky M; Hays, Michael D

    2011-03-15

    Carbonaceous aerosols can vary in elemental content, surface chemistry, and carbon nano-structure. Each of these properties is related to the details of soot formation. Fuel source, combustion process (affecting formation and growth conditions), and postcombustion exhaust where oxidation occurs all contribute to the physical structure and surface chemistry of soot. Traditionally such physical and chemical parameters have been measured separately by various techniques. Presented here is the unified measurement of these characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the present study, XPS is applied to combustion soot collected from a diesel engine (running biodiesel and pump-grade fuels); jet engine; and institutional, plant, and residential oil-fired boilers. Elemental composition is mapped by a survey scan over a broad energy range. Surface chemistry and carbon nanostructure are quantified by deconvolution of high-resolution scans over the C1s region. This combination of parameters forms a distinct matrix of identifiers for the soots from these sources. PMID:21322576

  10. Rondorfite-type structure — XPS and UV–vis study

    SciTech Connect

    Dulski, M.; Bilewska, K.; Wojtyniak, M.; Szade, J.; Kusz, J.; Nowak, A.; Wrzalik, R.; and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Structural and spectroscopic characterization of chlorosilicate mineral, rondorfite. • Characterization of main photoemission lines and valence band spectra. • The study of color origin’s using UV–vis spectroscopy. • Analysis of structural changes in context of origin of natural fluorescence. • Discussion of a new application possibilities of analyzed mineral - Abstract: This paper focuses on X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron and UV–vis spectroscopy of two different (green, orange) rondorfite samples. The differences in the sample color originate from various O/Cl ratios. The orange color was found to be related either to the isomorphic substitution of Fe{sup 3+}/Al{sup 3+} for Mg{sup 2+}, the presence of atypical [MgO{sub 4}] tetrahedrons in crystal structure or electronegativity of the sample. The tetrahedron is known to be very prone to accumulation of impurities and substitute atoms. Moreover, the XPS data showed tetrahedrally coordinated Mg{sup 2+} and isomorphic substitution of Al{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 3+} for Mg{sup 2+}, which influences local disordering and the point defects density and distribution. Non-equilibrium chlorine positions inside the crystal cages as well as Ca-Cl bonds have also been found. The XPS measurements as a function of temperature indicate occurrence of a structural transformation at about 770 K which is accompanied by a rotation of silicate tetrahedra within magnesiosilicate pentamer and luminescence disappearance.

  11. XPS Analysis of Ti6Al4V Oxidation Under UHV Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro-Oliva, M.; Gallardo-Moreno, A. M.; González-Martín, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of Ti6Al4V is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxide layer growth was monitored on the Ti6Al4V surface for 24 hours. The surface was previously etched with Ar+ ions under ultra-high vacuum conditions. XPS spectra show that TiO and Ti2O3, together with Al2O3, were the earliest oxides formed. Vanadium, despite being detected in its elementary form in the bulk, was not found in any of its oxidized states. TiO2, directly related to the good performance of Ti6Al4V for biomedical applications, did not contribute significantly to the passive layer at the beginning; nevertheless, it was identified after the oxidation process progressed to a more advanced stage. This behavior indicates that reoxidation of Ti6Al4V permits auto-healing of its passive layer, with the presence of TiO2, even in conditions of low oxygen availability.

  12. XPS Analysis of Ti6Al4V Oxidation Under UHV Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro-Oliva, M.; Gallardo-Moreno, A. M.; González-Martín, M. L.

    2014-09-01

    Oxidation of Ti6Al4V is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxide layer growth was monitored on the Ti6Al4V surface for 24 hours. The surface was previously etched with Ar+ ions under ultra-high vacuum conditions. XPS spectra show that TiO and Ti2O3, together with Al2O3, were the earliest oxides formed. Vanadium, despite being detected in its elementary form in the bulk, was not found in any of its oxidized states. TiO2, directly related to the good performance of Ti6Al4V for biomedical applications, did not contribute significantly to the passive layer at the beginning; nevertheless, it was identified after the oxidation process progressed to a more advanced stage. This behavior indicates that reoxidation of Ti6Al4V permits auto-healing of its passive layer, with the presence of TiO2, even in conditions of low oxygen availability.

  13. Evolution from antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic Kondo insulator with increasing hybridization; XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślebarski, A.; Goraus, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present the Ce 3d x-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra for CeM2Al10 (M=Ru, Os, Fe) from which we determined the on-site hybridization between the f and conduction electron states, Δcf, and the 4f-level occupancy, nf. Those parameters have been obtained using the Gunnarsson-Schönhammer approach. We found Δcf stronger for the Kondo insulator CeFe2Al10 than for the remaining compounds with Ru and Os. We discuss the type of behaviour of CeM2Al10 on the base of the earlier theoretical phase diagram obtained within the Anderson-lattice model.

  14. XPS and IGC characterization of steam treated triticale straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyan; Boluk, Yaman

    2010-10-01

    The surface chemical composition and surface energy of native and steam treated triticale straws have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to reveal the effect of steam treatment temperature and time. The XPS results show that the contents of C elements and C-C group on the exterior surface of native triticale straw are much higher than those on the interior surface, indicating that there was a high quantity of wax on the exterior surface of the native triticale straw. Upon steam treatment, both carbon levels and C-C groups reduce with increasing steam temperature and treatment time of the exterior surfaces. However, the effect of steam treatment on the interior surface is very limited. In terms of the surface acid and base properties, the steam treated samples exhibited higher acid and base properties than the native sample, indicating a more polar surface of the steam treated sample.

  15. ToF-SIMS and XPS study of ancient papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Francesca; Marchettini, Nadia; Atrei, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The surface composition of 18th century papers was investigated by means of ToF-SIMS and XPS. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of using these surface sensitive methods to obtain information which can help to determine the manufacturing process, provenance and state of conservation of ancient papers. The ToF-SIMS results indicate that the analyzed papers were sized by gelatin and that alum was added as hardening agent. The paper sheets produced in near geographical areas but in different paper mills exhibit a similar surface composition and morphology of the fibers as shown by the ToF-SIMS measurements. The ToF-SIMS and the XPS results indicate that a significant fraction of the cellulose fibers is not covered by the gelatin layer. This was observed for the ancient papers and for a modern handmade paper manufactured according to the old recipes.

  16. XPS and XRF depth patina profiles of ancient silver coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, F.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Barreca, F.; Gentile, C.; Serafino, T.; Castrizio, D.

    2013-05-01

    Ancient silver coins of different historical periods going from IV cent. B.C. up to recent XIX century, coming from different Mediterranean countries have been investigated with different surface physical analyses. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis has been performed by using electron emission induced by 1.4 keV X-rays. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis has been devoted by using 30 keV electron beam. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been employed to analyze the surface morphology and the X-ray map distribution by using a 30 keV microbeam. Techniques were used to investigate about the patina composition and trace elements as a function of the sample depth obtained coupling XPS to 3 keV argon ion sputtering technique.

  17. Standard Test Data and Peak Fitting for XPS Measurements

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Standard Test Data and Peak Fitting for XPS Measurements (Web, free access)   This web site provides an extensive set of simulated photoelectron spectroscopy data for users to test software for determining the positions and intensities of overlapping peaks. Users download the data, perform their analyses, and then upload their results. A Java program evaluates the results and provides a graphical presentation of the errors in the user's analyses.

  18. XPS quantification of the hetero-junction interface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. S.; Wang, Yan; Huang, Y. L.; Zhou, Z. F.; Zhou, Y. C.; Zheng, Weitao; Sun, Chang Q.

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach for quantifying the heterogeneous interface bond energy using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Firstly, from analyzing the XPS core-level shift of the elemental surfaces we obtained the energy levels of an isolated atom and their bulk shifts of the constituent elements for reference; then we measured the energy shifts of the specific energy levels upon interface alloy formation. Subtracting the referential spectrum from that collected from the alloy, we can distil the interface effect on the binding energy. Calibrated based on the energy levels and their bulk shifts derived from elemental surfaces, we can derive the bond energy, energy density, atomic cohesive energy, and free energy at the interface region. This approach has enabled us to clarify the dominance of quantum entrapment at CuPd interface and the dominance of polarization at AgPd and BeW interfaces, as the origin of interface energy change. Developed approach not only enhances the power of XPS but also enables the quantification of the interface energy at the atomic scale that has been an issue of long challenge.

  19. Effects of the low Earth orbit space environment on the surface chemistry of Kapton polyimide film: An XPS study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Myung; Rooney, William; Whiteside, James

    1992-01-01

    Kapton H (DuPont Trademark) polyimide specimens exposed to the low earth (LEO) space environment suffered significant weathering with surface erosions of approximately 8.0 microns. Despite these effects, no significant changes in bulk chemistry were observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine local changes induced from approximately 25 percent in 1980 vintage ground control specimens to nearly 53 percent in space exposed specimens. The greatest increase was observed for the divalent oxygen moieties, although a slight increase in carbonyl oxygen was also measured. Furthermore, the chemical shifts of all XPS peaks of space-exposed Kapton are shifted to higher energy. This is consistent with a higher oxidation state of the space exposed surface. Finally, space exposed specimens had distinct silicon peaks (2p 100 eV and 2s 149 eV) in their XPS spectra in agreement with widespread reports of silicon contamination throughout the LDEF satellite. These results are discussed in terms of surface reactivity of the polyimide exposed to the LEO environment and the chemical nature of contaminants deposited on flight surfaces due to satellite outgassing.

  20. Simultaneous Use Of Zr And Mg Anodes In XPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgeyer, D. F.; Pratz, E. H.

    1996-01-01

    Improved x-ray source for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) contains both zirconium anode with beryllium window and magnesium anode with aluminum window. Previously unresolvable peaks of electron-energy spectrum become resolvable. Developed specifically for use in analyzing distributions of chemical constituents in surface layers of specimens of 2219 aluminum alloy and in determining the depths of surface oxide layers and relative proportions of aluminum and oxide in layers. Also used to study chemical constituents of surface layers in other material systems - for example, thin oxide films on silicon-based semiconductor devices, oxide films on alloys, and surface layers affecting adhesion of paints or bonding materials.

  1. The application of XPS to the study of MIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R. . Technical Center); Clayton, C.R.; Halada, G.P. . Dept. of Materials Science); Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) involve the transformation of chemical species at a metal surface. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is utilized in conjunction with conventional microbiological and Quantitative Chemical Analytical techniques to better understand the effect of environmental conditions on microbial behavior as well as the ability of bacteria to alter local environmental conditions. Specifically, the interaction of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo ions with Desulfovibrio sp. under anoxic conditions were studied. This is the first phase of a systematic study of microbial activity and the effects of alloy elements and thermo-mechanical treatments on the MIC resistance of stainless steels.

  2. Applications Performance on NAS Intel Paragon XP/S - 15#

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Copper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division received an Intel Touchstone Sigma prototype model Paragon XP/S- 15 in February, 1993. The i860 XP microprocessor with an integrated floating point unit and operating in dual -instruction mode gives peak performance of 75 million floating point operations (NIFLOPS) per second for 64 bit floating point arithmetic. It is used in the Paragon XP/S-15 which has been installed at NAS, NASA Ames Research Center. The NAS Paragon has 208 nodes and its peak performance is 15.6 GFLOPS. Here, we will report on early experience using the Paragon XP/S- 15. We have tested its performance using both kernels and applications of interest to NAS. We have measured the performance of BLAS 1, 2 and 3 both assembly-coded and Fortran coded on NAS Paragon XP/S- 15. Furthermore, we have investigated the performance of a single node one-dimensional FFT, a distributed two-dimensional FFT and a distributed three-dimensional FFT Finally, we measured the performance of NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the Paragon and compare it with the performance obtained on other highly parallel machines, such as CM-5, CRAY T3D, IBM SP I, etc. In particular, we investigated the following issues, which can strongly affect the performance of the Paragon: a. Impact of the operating system: Intel currently uses as a default an operating system OSF/1 AD from the Open Software Foundation. The paging of Open Software Foundation (OSF) server at 22 MB to make more memory available for the application degrades the performance. We found that when the limit of 26 NIB per node out of 32 MB available is reached, the application is paged out of main memory using virtual memory. When the application starts paging, the performance is considerably reduced. We found that dynamic memory allocation can help applications performance under certain circumstances. b. Impact of data cache on the i860/XP: We measured the performance of the BLAS both assembly coded and Fortran

  3. C 1s and N 1s core excitation of aniline: Experiment by electron impact and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Duflot, D.; Flament, J.-P.; Giuliani, A.; Heinesch, J.; Grogna, M.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.

    2007-05-15

    Core shell excitation spectra of aniline at the carbon and nitrogen 1s edges have been obtained by inner-shell electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded under scattering conditions where electric dipolar conditions dominate, with higher resolution than in the previous studies. They are interpreted with the aid of ab initio configuration interaction calculations. The spectrum at the C 1s edge is dominated by an intense {pi}{sup *} band. The calculated chemical shift due to the different chemical environment at the carbon 1s edge calculated is in agreement with the experimental observations within a few tenths of an eV. The transition energies of the most intense bands in the C 1s excitation spectrum are discussed at different levels of calculations. In the nitrogen 1s excitation spectrum the most intense bands are due to Rydberg-valence transitions involving the {sigma}{sup *}-type molecular orbitals, in agreement with the experiment. This assignment is different from that of extended Hueckel molecular orbital calculations. The geometries of the core excited states have been calculated and compared to their equivalent core molecules and benzene.

  4. Effects of X-ray flux on UHMWPE by an XPS Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buncick, M. C.; Thomas, D. E.; McKinny, K. S.; Jahan, M. S.

    1997-03-01

    For the last 25 years, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) also known as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used extensively for the study of polymers. ESCA provides chemical composition, structural data such as polymeric linking, fine structure detail such as endgroup type or branching sites, charge distribution and the nature of valence bonding. While a few studies have shown that certain polymers are damaged by the x-ray flux during measurements, ESCA is considered to be a technique that is relatively free from radiation induced changes in the polymers under study.( D. Briggs and M.P. Seah, Practical Surface Analysis by Auger and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, John Wiley, NewYork, NY, Chap. 9, (1983). D.R. Wheeler and S.V. Pepper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., 20 , pp.226-232 (1982).) We present complementary measurements by ESCA and electron spin resonance (ESR) on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). We show that ESCA induces primary free radicals in UHMWPE even for relatively short exposures to the x-ray source for both standard and monochromatic x-ray sources. High resolution core-level spectra do not show any difference between free radical rich and virgin UHMWPE. However, the valence band spectra do show changes after exposure to x-ray flux in ESCA.

  5. Screening-Constant-by-Unit-Nuclear-Charge method investigations of high lying ({sup 1}D{sub 2},{sup 1}S{sub 0}) ns, nd Rydberg series in the photoionization spectra of the halogen-like ion Kr{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Sakho, I.

    2014-01-15

    Energy positions and quantum defects of the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4} ({sup 1}D{sub 2},{sup 1}S{sub 0}) ns, nd Rydberg series originating from the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 52}P{sub 3/2}{sup ∘} ground state and from the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 52}P{sub 1/2}{sup ∘} metastable state of Kr{sup +} are reported. Calculations are performed using the Screening Constant by Unit Nuclear Charge (SCUNC) method. The results obtained are in suitable agreement with recent experimental data from the combined ASTRID merged-beam set up and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance device (Bizau et al., 2011), ALS measurements (Hinojosa et al., 2012), and multi-channel R-matrix eigenphase derivative calculations (McLaughlin and Balance, 2012). In addition, analysis of the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}({sup 1}D{sub 2})nd and the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}({sup 1}S{sub 0})nd resonances is given via the SCUNC procedure. The excellent results obtained from our work point out that the SCUNC formalism may be used to confirm the results of the analysis from the standard quantum-defect expansion formulas. Eventual errors occurring in the analysis can then be automatically detected and corrected via the SCUNC procedure.

  6. XPS investigations of ruthenium deposited onto representative inner surfaces of nuclear reactor containment buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, C.; Ehrhardt, J. J.; Lambert, J.; Madic, C.

    2007-07-01

    In the case of a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear power plant, interactions of gaseous RuO 4 with reactor containment building surfaces (stainless steel and epoxy paint) could possibly lead to a black Ru-containing deposit on these surfaces. Some scenarios include the possibility of formation of highly radiotoxic RuO 4(g) by the interactions of these deposits with the oxidizing medium induced by air radiolysis, in the reactor containment building, and consequently dispersion of this species. Therefore, the accurate determination of the chemical nature of ruthenium in the deposits is of the high importance for safety studies. An experiment was designed to model the interactions of RuO 4(g) with samples of stainless steel and of steel covered with epoxy paint. Then, these deposits have been carefully characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The analysis by XPS of Ru deposits formed by interaction of RuO 4(g), revealed that the ruthenium is likely to be in the IV oxidation state, as the shapes of the Ru 3d core levels are very similar with those observed on the RuO 2· xH 2O reference powder sample. The analysis of O 1s peaks indicates a large component attributed to the hydroxyl functional groups. From these results, it was concluded that Ru was present on the surface of the deposits as an oxyhydroxide of Ru(IV). It has also to be pointed out that the presence of "pure" RuO 2, or of a thin layer of RuO 3 or Ru 2O 5, coming from the decomposition of RuO 4 on the surface of samples of stainless steel and epoxy paint, could be ruled out. These findings will be used for further investigations of the possible revolatilisation phenomena induced by ozone.

  7. XPS, AES and SEM analysis of recent dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Soo; Sul, Young-Taeg; Oh, Se-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2009-07-01

    Today, surface chemistry modifications of titanium implants have become a development strategy for dental implants. The present study investigated the chemistry and morphology of commercially available dental implants (Nobel biocare TiUnite, Astra AB OsseoSpeed, 3i Osseotite, ITI-SLA). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and auger electron spectroscopy were employed for the analysis of surface chemistry. The morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The present study demonstrated the major differences of surface properties, mainly dependent on the surface treatment used. The blasting and acid etching technique for the OsseoSpeed, Osseotite and SLA surfaces generally showed mainly TiO(2), but a varying surface morphology. In contrast, the electrochemical oxidation process for TiUnite implants not only produces microporous surface (pore size: 0.5-3.0microm), but also changes surface chemistry due to incorporation of anions of the used electrolyte. As a result, TiUnite implants contain more than 7at.% of P in oxide layer and higher amounts of hydroxides compared to the other implants in XPS analysis. F in OsseoSpeed implants was detected at 0.3% before as well as after sputter cleaning. PMID:19261554

  8. XPS study of. beta. -carbon hydrogenation on Nickel(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, A.A.; Dhanak, V.R.; Buckingham, S.

    1984-09-01

    The methanation reaction has been studied extensively using conventional catalysis and modern surface science techniques. It is now well established that the mechanism of this reaction involves the dissociative adsorption of carbon monoxide to produce highly reactive carbidic carbon (..cap alpha..-carbon) which is subsequently hydrogenated to produce methane. Under conditions of low hydrogen concentration, and high temperature, however, the reactive ..cap alpha..-C can be transformed into relatively less-reactive graphitic carbon (..beta..-carbon). The nature of ..beta..-carbon has been suggested to be graphitic as characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed surface reaction (TPSR) in hydrogen. Using XPS, it is demonstrated directly that conversion of ..beta..-carbon to ..cap alpha..-carbon does occur at ..beta..-carbon hydrogenation temperature and that the rate-determining step in the hydrogenation of ..beta..-carbon may be the detachment of carbon atoms from ..beta..-carbon islands. 19 references, 6 figures.

  9. Data warehousing features in Informix OnLine XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Data Warehousing application domain is an important area of focus for Informix`s OnLine XPS massively parallel server. Fast query processing is a central requirement in this domain. Use of indexes has traditionally been an important query processing technique, helping to reduce response times and increase throughput. The data warehousing environment, characterized by its load-query-refresh mode of operation, offers even greater scope for use of indexes. This talk will describe three new indexing related features in OnLine XPS which together provide significant performance benefits in a wide variety of situations. Bitmap indexes, along with multi-index scans, provide orders-of-magnitude improvement for queries typified by the Set Query Benchmark. Pushdown Semi-joins combine the benefits of multi-index scans with the scalability of hash joins to efficiently process star-joins. Finally, Generalized-key indexes expand the notion of what can be an index key and provide the ability to store various pre-computed results in an index. Optimizer extensions allow these features to be used in a mix-n-match fashion, thus maximizing the benefits of these features while minimizing the need for user level directives.

  10. XPS study on La0.67Ca0.33Mn1-xCoxO3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudric, R.; Vladescu, A.; Rednic, V.; Neumann, M.; Deac, I. G.; Tetean, R.

    2014-09-01

    The electronic structure of the polycrystalline La0.67Ca0.33Mn1-xCoxO3 compounds with x = 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1 has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence band and the transition metal core level spectra were analyzed. Several contributions from the Mn 3d, Co 3d and of extensively hybridized Mn3d-O2p and Co3d-O2p states were found in the spectral region between 2 eV and 5 eV. The core level spectra show the presence of Co4+ and Co2+ states.

  11. Carbon 1s core-hole lifetime in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. X.; Hahne, J.; Thomas, T. D.; Sæthre, L. J.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Kukk, E.

    2000-04-01

    The carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum has been measured for CO2 at photon energies of 308, 320, and 330 eV with an instrumental resolution about half the natural linewidth. These spectra have been analyzed to obtain vibrational spacings, vibrational intensities, and the lifetime, τ, of the carbon 1s core-hole state. Theoretical calculation of the lifetime width, ħ/τ, using a one-center model, which assumes that only the valence electrons localized on the atom with the core hole can participate in Auger deexcitation of the core hole, predicts a value of 66 meV, considerably smaller than that predicted for CH4 (96 meV). Experimental measurements indicate, however, that the CO2 carbon 1s width is, in fact, much larger than expected-99+/-2 meV-and is approximately the same as that found experimentally for CH4 (95+/-2 meV). This result indicates that valence electrons on the oxygen atoms may play a role in the Auger decay the carbon 1s core hole in CO2, and, hence, that a multicenter model may be necessary to describe the Auger process.

  12. XPS study of interface formation of CVD SiO2 on InSb. [X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of CVD SiO2 films deposited on thin native oxides grown on InSb substrates is examined using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and a relatively benign chemical etching technique for depth profiling. An intensity analysis of XPS spectra is used to derive the compositional structure of the interfaces obtained in the SiO2/native oxide/InSb system. Peak positions in these spectra are used to follow the change in substrate surface potential during the etch sequence, and to establish the chemical nature of the species formed during deposition and subsequent processing. Reaction of the substrate with oxygen resulted in an In-rich native oxide and 1-2 monolayers of excess elemental Sb at the native-oxide/substrate interface, incompletely oxidized silane reduced the native oxide, leaving less than 1 monolayer of elemental In at the SiO2/native oxide interface. Etch removal of this thin In-rich layer leads to a change in the substrate surface potential of 0.06 eV, corresponding to a net increase in positive charge. The results are consistent with simple thermodynamic considerations; they are also compared to previously reported studies of deposited dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductors.

  13. Analytic cross sections for 1 1S, to 1 1S to 2 1S, 1 1S to 2 1P transitions in helium by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukumar, C. V.; Faisal, F. H. M.

    1971-01-01

    The 1 1s yields 1 1s elastic and 1 1s yields 2 1s and 1 1s yields 2 excitation cross sections of Helium atoms by collision with a charged particle are obtained as analytic functions of incident velocity. The first order time dependent scattering theory is used. Numerical values of electron -He cross sections are obtained for incident energies in the range 30 eV to 800 eV and compared with earlier Born approximation calculations and with available experimental data. It is found that at 100 eV and above, the present results are in good agreement with the experimental results. They are also closer to the experimental results than the corresponding Born calculations.

  14. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvatić, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of π∗ -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the π⊥∗(C=C-C≡N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized π∥∗(C≡N) produces C≡N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C≡N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  15. Secondary electron measurement and XPS characterization of NEG coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. K. Sinha, Atul K. Gupta, Nidhi Nuwad, J. Jagannath, Gadkari, S. C. Singh, M. R. Gupta, S. K.

    2014-04-24

    Ternary alloy coatings of IVB and VB materials provide many of benefits over traditional material surfaces such as creation of extreme high vacuum(XHV), lower secondary electron yield(SEY), low photon desorption coefficient. XHV (pressure < 10{sup −10} mbar) is very useful to the study of surfaces of the material in as it is form, high energy particle accelerators(LHC, Photon Factories), synchrotrons (ESRF, Ellectra) etc.. Low secondary electron yield leads to very low multi-pacting utilizes to increase beam life time. In this paper preparation of the coatings and a study of secondary electron yield measurement after heating at different temperatures has been shown also results of their surface characterization based on shift in binding energy has been produced using the surface techniques XPS. Stoichiometry of the film was measured by Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX)

  16. Silicon (100)/SiO2 by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Madaan, Nitesh; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    Silicon (100) wafers are ubiquitous in microfabrication and, accordingly, their surface characteristics are important. Herein, we report the analysis of Si (100) via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using monochromatic Al K radiation. Survey scans show that the material is primarily silicon and oxygen, and the Si 2p region shows two peaks that correspond to elemental silicon and silicon dioxide. Using these peaks the thickness of the native oxide (SiO2) was estimated using the equation of Strohmeier.1 The oxygen peak is symmetric. The material shows small amounts of carbon, fluorine, and nitrogen contamination. These silicon wafers are used as the base material for subsequent growth of templated carbon nanotubes.

  17. XPS investigation on the structure of two dipeptides studied as models of self-assembling oligopeptides: comparison between experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Monti, S.; Carravetta, V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption on TiO2 surface of two dipeptides AE (L-alanine-L-glutamic acid) and AK (L-alanine-L-lysine), that are 'building blocks' of the more complex self-complementary amphiphilic oligopeptides and are therefore a good model in the interpretation of the complex peptide spectra, has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The chemical structure and composition of thin films of both dipeptides on TiO2 were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Theoretical ab-initio calculations (ΔSCF) were also performed to simulate the spectra allowing a direct comparison between experiment and theory.

  18. The surface chemistry of nanocrystalline MgO catalysts for FAME production: An in situ XPS study of H2O, CH3OH and CH3OAc adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, J. M.; Isaacs, M. A.; Lee, A. F.; Lynam, J. M.; Wilson, K.

    2016-04-01

    An in situ XPS study of water, methanol and methyl acetate adsorption over as-synthesised and calcined MgO nanocatalysts is reported with a view to gaining insight into the surface adsorption of key components relevant to fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) production during the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. High temperature calcined NanoMgO-700 adsorbed all three species more readily than the parent material due to the higher density of electron-rich (111) and (110) facets exposed over the larger crystallites. Water and methanol chemisorb over the NanoMgO-700 through the conversion of surface O2 - sites to OH- and coincident creation of Mg-OH or Mg-OCH3 moieties respectively. A model is proposed in which the dissociative chemisorption of methanol occurs preferentially over defect and edge sites of NanoMgO-700, with higher methanol coverages resulting in physisorption over weakly basic (100) facets. Methyl acetate undergoes more complex surface chemistry over NanoMgO-700, with C-H dissociation and ester cleavage forming surface hydroxyl and acetate species even at extremely low coverages, indicative of preferential adsorption at defects. Comparison of C 1s spectra with spent catalysts from tributyrin transesterification suggest that ester hydrolysis plays a key factor in the deactivation of MgO catalysts for biodiesel production.

  19. Os layers spontaneously deposited on the Pt(111) electrode : XPS, STM and GIF-XAS study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, C. K.; Wakisaka, M.; Tolmachev, Y.; Johnston, C.; Haasch, R.; Attenkofer, K.; Lu, G. Q.; You, H.; Wieckowski, A.; Univ. of Illinois Champaigh-Urbana

    2003-01-01

    expected from voltammetry. Also, the observed intensity of the white line of Os in the 100-400 mV region is larger than the value reported for metallic bulk Os. This discrepancy may result from the difference in the electronic properties of the metallic Os layers on Pt(111) and the metallic bulk Os: in the potential region between 100 and 400 mV, the 5d electrons in Os and Pt form a mixed electronic band, and the density of electronic states near the Fermi level, the main factor determining the white line intensity, may not be the same as in metallic bulk. The presented results on osmium adlayers are much more comprehensive than those available in our previous work due to the combined STM, GIF-XAS and XPS investigations. A nearly perfect convergence of the in situ and ex situ data is one of the main research outcomes of this project. Finally, platinum XPS spectra taken in the context of Os electrooxidation from the electrode surface are also presented and conclusions are made, that up to 900 mV platinum remain metallic, irrespective of a significant osmium oxidation on its surface.

  20. XPS and EELS characterization of Mn2SiO4, MnSiO3 and MnAl2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, A. P.; Bellhouse, E. M.; Korinek, A.; Bugnet, M.; McDermid, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) are strong candidate techniques for characterizing steel surfaces and substrate-coating interfaces when investigating the selective oxidation and reactive wetting of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) during the continuous galvanizing process. However, unambiguous identification of ternary oxides such as Mn2SiO4, MnSiO3, and MnAl2O4 by XPS or EELS, which can play a significant role in substrate reactive wetting, is difficult due to the lack of fully characterized standards in the literature. To resolve this issue, samples of Mn2SiO4, MnSiO3 and MnAl2O4 were synthesized and characterized by XPS and EELS. The unique features of the XPS and EELS spectra for the Mn2SiO4, MnSiO3 and MnAl2O4 standards were successfully derived, thereby allowing investigators to fully differentiate and identify these oxides at the surface and subsurface of Mn, Si and Al alloyed AHSS using these techniques.

  1. Chemistry Characterization of Jet Aircraft Engine Particulate by XPS: Results from APEX III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports XPS analysis of jet exhaust particulate from a B737, Lear, ERJ, and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and platforms. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20 percent or more. By lower resolution survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N, and O in the form of oxides. Burning additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their presence can be used as a tracer for identifying soots from aircraft engines as well as diagnostic for monitoring engine performance and wear.

  2. Chemistry characterization of jet aircraft engine particulate matter by XPS: Results from APEX III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.; Huang, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of jet exhaust particulate matter (PM) from a B737, Lear, ERJ and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and powers. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20% or more. By survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N and O in the form of oxides. Additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their collective presence could serve as an environmental tracer for identifying PM originating from aircraft engines and serving as a diagnostic for engine performance and wear.

  3. Analysis of Fe Nanoparticles Using XPS Measurements Under D.C. or Pulsed-Voltage Bias

    SciTech Connect

    Suzer, Sefik; Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2010-06-16

    The impact of solution exposure on the charging properties of oxide coatings on Fe metal-core oxide-shells has been examined by sample biasing during XPS measurements. The Fe nanoparticles were suspended in relatively unreactive acetone and were analyzed after particle containing solutions were deposited on SiO2/Si substrates, and/or Au substrates. The particle and substrate combinations were subjected to ± 10V d.c. biasing in the form of square waves (SQW) pulses with 5V amplitude. The samples experienced variable degrees of charging for which low energy electrons at ~1 eV, 20μA and low energy Ar+ ions were used to minimize. Application of d.c. bias and/or square wave pulses drastically influences the extent of charging, which is utilized to gather additional analytical information about the sample under investigation. This approach allows separation of otherwise overlapping peaks. Accordingly, the O1s peaks of the silicon oxide substrate, the iron oxide nanoparticles, and that of the casting solvent can be separated from each other. Similarly the C1s peak belonging to the solvent can be separated from that of the adventitious carbon. The charging shifts of the iron nanoparticles are strongly influenced by the surrounding solvent. Hence, acetone exhibits the largest shift, water the smallest, and methanol in between. Dynamical measurements performed by application of the voltage stress in the form of SQW pulses gives information about the time constants of the processes involved, which led us postulate that these charging properties we probe in these systems, stem mainly from ionic movement(s).

  4. The C1s core line in irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giorgio; Minati, Luca; Anderle, Mariano

    2007-08-15

    Recently, plasma deposited amorphous carbon films have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at correlating their electronic, structural, and mechanical properties to growth parameters. To investigate these properties, different spectral parameters reflecting the electronic structure of carbon-based materials are proposed in literature. The effects of various electronic configurations on the carbon photoelectron spectra are analyzed here with particular attention to C1s core line with the aim to better interpret its structure. The latter is commonly fitted under the assumption that it can be described by using just two spectral components related to sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybrids. Their relative intensities are then used to estimate the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases. We show that, in the presence of an amorphous network, the C1s line shape is the result of a more complex mixture of electronic states. Ar{sup +} irradiated graphite and successive oxidation was used to identify spectral features to better describe the C1s line shape.

  5. Satellite spectra of heliumlike nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsuan, H.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S. Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; Sesnic, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Karim, K.R.

    1987-02-01

    Spectra of heliumlike nickel, NiXXVII, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the heliumlike resonance line, the intercombination and forbidden lines, and all the associated satellites due to transitions 1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2l'nl'' with N greater than or equal to 2. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can thus be determined very accurately. The observed spectral data are in good agreement with results from the present Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic model calculations and predictions from the Z-expansion method.

  6. XPS-XRF hybrid metrology enabling FDSOI process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mainul; Subramanian, Ganesh; Triyoso, Dina; Wahl, Jeremy; Mcardle, Timothy; Vaid, Alok; Bello, A. F.; Lee, Wei Ti; Klare, Mark; Kwan, Michael; Pois, Heath; Wang, Ying; Larson, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Planar fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator (FDSOI) technology potentially offers comparable transistor performance as FinFETs. pFET FDOSI devices are based on a silicon germanium (cSiGe) layer on top of a buried oxide (BOX). Ndoped interfacial layer (IL), high-k (HfO2) layer and the metal gate stacks are then successively built on top of the SiGe layer. In-line metrology is critical in precisely monitoring the thickness and composition of the gate stack and associated underlying layers in order to achieve desired process control. However, any single in-line metrology technique is insufficient to obtain the thickness of IL, high-k, cSiGe layers in addition to Ge% and N-dose in one single measurement. A hybrid approach is therefore needed that combines the capabilities of more than one measurement technique to extract multiple parameters in a given film stack. This paper will discuss the approaches, challenges, and results associated with the first-in-industry implementation of XPS-XRF hybrid metrology for simultaneous detection of high-k thickness, IL thickness, N-dose, cSiGe thickness and %Ge, all in one signal measurement on a FDSOI substrate in a manufacturing fab. Strong correlation to electrical data for one or more of these measured parameters will also be presented, establishing the reliability of this technique.

  7. Universal quantification of elastic scattering effects in AES and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Aleksander

    1996-09-01

    Elastic scattering of photoelectrons in a solid can be accounted for in the common formalism of XPS by introducing two correction factors, βeff and Qx. In the case of AES, only one correction factor, QA, is required. As recently shown, relatively simple analytical expressions for the correction factors can be derived from the kinetic Boltzmann equation within the so-called "transport approximation". The corrections are expressed here in terms of the ratio of the transport mean free path (TRMFP) to the inelastic mean free path (IMFP). Since the available data for the TRMFP are rather limited, it was decided to complete an extensive database of these values. They were calculated in the present work for the same elements and energies as in the IMFP tabulation published by Tanuma et al. An attempt has been made to derive a predictive formula providing the ratios of the TRMFP to the IMFP. Consequently, a very simple and accurate algorithm for calculating the correction factors βeff, Qx and QA has been developed. This algorithm can easily be generalized to multicomponent solids. The resulting values of the correction factors were found to compare very well with published values resulting from Monte Carlo calculations.

  8. XPS and SEM characterization of electrodeposited transition metals on zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonomov, J.; Stoychev, D.; Marinova, Ts

    2000-07-01

    The structure and chemical composition of electrochemically deposited cobalt, copper and cobalt+copper on zirconia have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) methods. It has been established that as-deposited metal crystallites are mainly formed on the macroconcavities of an electrochemically roughened SS 1.4301 substrate. In the facet zones, the crystallites are much smaller and have a good dispersion. In this case, the cobalt on the surface is present as Co 2+, while copper is found as Cu +. The deposited metal crystallites show no substantial changes in structure after thermal oxidation, which leads to the formation of considerably thicker oxide layers on the metal crystallites where cobalt and copper are in the Co 3+ nd Cu 2+ states. The cobalt and copper oxides obtained on ZrO 2 are characterized by good adhesion and cause no change in the specific surface area of porous zirconia films. Modification of the structure, composition and dispersion of the oxide systems under consideration is promising, with a view to their application as thin porous inorganic catalytic films.

  9. XPS and ARPES study of the metal-insulator transition in Mn-substituted Sr3Ru2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhihuai; Levy de Castro, G.; Hossain, M. A.; Manju, U.; McCheyney, J. L.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Elfimov, I. S.; Panaccione, G.; Damascelli, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the metal-insulator transition in Mn-substituted Sr3Ru2O7 by core-level x-ray photoemission (XPS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In XPS, both the surface- and bulk-sensitive spectra show a two-peak structure, corresponding to the well screened and the unscreened excitations. The intensity of the well-screened peak is suppressed upon increasing the concentration of Mn, reflecting a metal-to-insulator transition induced by Mn impurities. In ARPES, changes in Fermi surface topology and band dispersions are observed as the system crosses over from a metal to a - possibly Mott - insulator. We observed a variation and enhancement of the Fermi-surface nesting upon Mn substitution, which might be connected to the emergence of the magnetic superstructure revealed by our resonant elastic soft x-ray scattering results [1].[4pt] [1] M.A. Hossain et al., arXiv:0906.0035 (2009).

  10. XPS study of thallium oxidation states in precursor TlBaCaCuO HTSC thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. H.; Smith, E. J.; Eddy, M. M.; James, T. W.

    1991-10-01

    The Tl oxidation state in the precursor of Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 superconducting films plays an important role in the post-deposition process and has been carefully examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Tl4f 5/2 and Tl4f 5/2 peaks in the XPS spectra have been deconvoluted into several peaks corresponding to different oxidation states. Under normal deposition conditions for laser ablation, it is found that mixtures of Tl-I(+ 1 oxidation state) and Tl-III (+ 3) are present with various percentages. The study of time evolution and depth profile data suggests that the surface oxidation state is a function of time and 200 Å of film should be removed before collecting data. The Tl-oxidation state depends strongly on the oxygen background pressure during deposition and the optimal pressure is found to be about 180 mTorr. Negatively charged Tl (presumably due to alloying with other metal constituents) is found when deposited with no background oxygen pressure.

  11. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  12. Evaluation Metrics for the Paragon XP/S-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traversat, Bernard; McNab, David; Nitzberg, Bill; Fineberg, Sam; Blaylock, Bruce T. (Technical Monitor)

    1993-01-01

    On February 17th 1993, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility located at the NASA Ames Research Center installed a 224 node Intel Paragon XP/S-15 system. After its installation, the Paragon was found to be in a very immature state and was unable to support a NAS users' workload, composed of a wide range of development and production activities. As a first step towards addressing this problem, we implemented a set of metrics to objectively monitor the system as operating system and hardware upgrades were installed. The metrics were designed to measure four aspects of the system that we consider essential to support our workload: availability, utilization, functionality, and performance. This report presents the metrics collected from February 1993 to August 1993. Since its installation, the Paragon availability has improved from a low of 15% uptime to a high of 80%, while its utilization has remained low. Functionality and performance have improved from merely running one of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to running all of them faster (between 1 and 2 times) than on the iPSC/860. In spite of the progress accomplished, fundamental limitations of the Paragon operating system are restricting the Paragon from supporting the NAS workload. The maximum operating system message passing (NORMA IPC) bandwidth was measured at 11 Mbytes/s, well below the peak hardware bandwidth (175 Mbytes/s), limiting overall virtual memory and Unix services (i.e. Disk and HiPPI I/O) performance. The high NX application message passing latency (184 microns), three times than on the iPSC/860, was found to significantly degrade performance of applications relying on small message sizes. The amount of memory available for an application was found to be approximately 10 Mbytes per node, indicating that the OS is taking more space than anticipated (6 Mbytes per node).

  13. XPS Protocol for the Characterization of Pristine and Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, E. D.; Allada, R.; Huffman, C. B.; Arepalli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in developing new applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) has fueled the need to use accurate macroscopic and nanoscopic techniques to characterize and understand their chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has proved to be a useful analytical tool for nanoscale surface characterization of materials including carbon nanotubes. Recent nanotechnology research at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) helped to establish a characterization protocol for quality assessment for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Here, a review of some of the major factors of the XPS technique that can influence the quality of analytical data, suggestions for methods to maximize the quality of data obtained by XPS, and the development of a protocol for XPS characterization as a complementary technique for analyzing the purity and surface characteristics of SWCNTs is presented. The XPS protocol is then applied to a number of experiments including impurity analysis and the study of chemical modifications for SWCNTs.

  14. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  15. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  16. CRAY-1S integer vector utility library

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1982-06-01

    This report describes thirty-five integer or packed vector utility routines, and documents their testing. These routines perform various vector searches, linear algebra functions, memory resets, and vector boolean operations. They are written in CAL, the assembly language on the CRAY-1S computer. By utilizing the vector processing features of that machine, they are optimized in terms of run time. Each routine has been extensively tested.

  17. XPS determination of Mn oxidation states in Mn (hydr)oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Post, Jeffrey E.; Heaney, Peter J.; Ling, Florence T.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrous manganese oxides are an important class of minerals that help regulate the geochemical redox cycle in near-surface environments and are also considered to be promising catalysts for energy applications such as the oxidation of water. A complete characterization of these minerals is required to better understand their catalytic and redox activity. In this contribution an empirical methodology using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is developed to quantify the oxidation state of hydrous multivalent manganese oxides with an emphasis on birnessite, a layered structure that occurs commonly in soils but is also the oxidized endmember in biomimetic water-oxidation catalysts. The Mn2p3/2, Mn3p, and Mn3s lines of near monovalent Mn(II), Mn(III), and Mn(IV) oxides were fit with component peaks; after the best fit was obtained the relative widths, heights and binding energies of the components were fixed. Unknown multivalent samples were fit such that binding energies, intensities, and peak-widths of each oxidation state, composed of a packet of correlated component peaks, were allowed to vary. Peak-widths were constrained to maintain the difference between the standards. Both average and individual mole fraction oxidation states for all three energy levels were strongly correlated, with close agreement between Mn3s and Mn3p analyses, whereas calculations based on the Mn2p3/2 spectra gave systematically more reduced results. Limited stoichiometric analyses were consistent with Mn3p and Mn3s. Further, evidence indicates the shape of the Mn3p line was less sensitive to the bonding environment than that for Mn2p. Consequently, fitting the Mn3p and Mn3s lines yielded robust quantification of oxidation states over a range of Mn (hydr)oxide phases. In contrast, a common method for determining oxidation states that utilizes the multiplet splitting of the Mn3s line was found to be not appropriate for birnessites.

  18. [Vibrational spectrum and XPS contrastive studies on pyrochlore-type oxygen-rich Ce2Zr2O8 and oxygen-defective Nd2Zr2O7 phases].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Wang, Lie-lin; Luo, De-li; Chen, Min

    2014-06-01

    Pyrochlore-type oxygen-rich Ce2Zr2O8 phase was prepared successfully by graphite reduction method. With the oxygen[U8]-defective Nd2Zr2O7 substituting for the oxidized precursor phase CeZrO3.5+Δ was carried out the structure comparative analysis with Ce2Zr2O8. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (Raman), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the crystal structure of samples. The XRD experimental results show that Ce2Zr2O8 bulk phase contains the typical structure of pyrochlore, the superstructure peaks that characterize Ce/Zr cations ordering arrangement are very obvious, but the Zr-O ligands had also transformed from octahedrons of the co-top connection in the precursor to cubes of co-edge connection in the Ce2Zr2O8, and the formation of [ZrO8] ligand reduced greatlly the structural stability of Ce2Zr2O8 phase. Raman and IR results show that vibrational spectra bands of Ce2Zr2O8 phase increased significantly, meaning that the enriched oxygen ions result in a removal of the degeneracy peak for Ce2Zr2O8 phase, which confirms further the structural symmetry of Ce2Zr2O8 phase lower than its precursor. XPS results show that Ce (IV) characteristic peak (916.3 eV) in the Ce2Zr2O8 phase surface is very obvious. No the appearance of Ce (III) peak (885 eV) suggests that Ce3+ from the precursor has been completely oxidized into Ce4+ in the Ce2Zr2O8 phase; the Zr(3d) binding energy is close to fluorite phase with Zr4+, which confirms that [ZrO8] ligand in the Ce2Zr2O8 surface is consistent with the bulk phase. The increasing low binding energy of O(1s) shows that oxygen species in the Ce2Zr2O8 bulk phase are between lattice oxygen and adsorbed oxygen, the presence of high oxygen peak suggests that the surface of Ce2Zr2O8 contains adsorbed oxygen, and the bonding strength between adsorption oxygen and Ce2Zr2O8 bulk phase is between CeO2 and Nd2Zr2O7. PMID:25358157

  19. XPS and STEM studies of Allende acid insoluble residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Clarke, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on Allende acid residues obtained both before and after etching with hot HNO3 are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectra show predominantly carbonaceous material plus Fe-deficient chromite in both cases. The HNO3 oxidizes the carbonaceous material to some extent. The small chromites in these residues have a wide range of compositions somewhat paralleling those observed in larger Allende chromites and in Murchison chromites, especially in the high Al contents; however, they are deficient in divalent cations, which makes them metastable and indicates that they must have formed at relatively low temperatures. It is suggested that they formed by precipitation of Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) from olivine at low temperature or during rapid cooling.

  20. Investigation of mussel adhesive protein adsorption on polystyrene and poly(octadecyl methacrylate) using angle dependent XPS, ATR-FTIR, and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, A.M.; Suci, P.A.; Tyler, B.J.; Geesey, G.G.

    1996-02-10

    Despite many years of research effort, the molecular interactions that are responsible for microbial adhesion and fouling of surfaces remain obscure. An understanding of these interactions would contribute to the development of surfaces that resist colonization of microorganisms. The irreversible adsorption of mussel adhesive proteins (MAP) from the marine mussel Mytilus edulis has been investigated on polystyrene (PS) and poly(octadecyl methacrylate) (POMA) surfaces using angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Angle resolved XPS was used to quantify the elemental composition with depth of the upper 90 {angstrom} of the surface, and AFM was used to obtain the surface topography. The adsorption pattern of MAP, revealed by AFM images, is distinctly different on the two polymer surfaces and suggests that the substratum influences protein adhesion. The depth profiles of MAP, obtained from angle resolved XPS, show differences in nitrogen composition with depth for MAP adsorbed to PS and POMA. Infrared spectra of hydrated adsorbed MAP revealed significant differences in the amide III region and in two bands which may originate from residues in the tandemly repeated sequences of MAP. This data demonstrates that the chemistry of the polymer film that is present at the protein-polymer interface can influence protein-protein and protein-surface interactions.

  1. A Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Protein Films: Orientation and Structure by ToF-SIMS, NEXAFS, SFG, and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baio, Joseph E.

    There are many techniques that allow surface scientists to study interfaces. However, few are routinely applied to probe biological surfaces. The work presented here demonstrates how detailed information about the conformation, orientation, chemical state, and molecular structure of biological molecules immobilized onto a surface can be assessed by electron spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy techniques. This investigation began with the development of simple model systems (small proteins, and peptides) and evolved into a study of more complex --- real world systems. Initially, two model systems based on the chemical and electrostatic immobilization of a small rigid protein (Protein G B1 domain, 6kDa) were built to develop the capabilities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToFSIMS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy as tools to probe the structure of surface immobilized proteins. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to measure the amount of immobilized protein and ToF-SIMS sampled the amino acid composition of the exposed surface of the protein film. Within the ToF-SIMS spectra, an enrichment of secondary ions from amino acids located at opposite ends of the proteins were used to describe protein orientation. SFG spectral peaks characteristic of ordered alpha-helix and beta-sheet elements were observed for both systems and the phase of the peaks indicated a predominantly upright orientation for both the covalent and electrostatic configurations. Polarization dependence of the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to pi* transition of the peptide bonds that make up the beta-sheets also indicated protein ordering at the surface. Building upon the Protein G B1 studies, the orientation and structure of a surface immobilized antibody (HuLys Fv: variant of humanized anti-lysozyme variable fragment, 26kDa) was characterized across two

  2. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  3. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  4. Combined PIXE and XPS analysis on republican and imperial Roman coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daccà, A.; Prati, P.; Zucchiatti, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Mandò, P. A.; Gemme, G.; Parodi, R.; Pera, R.

    2000-03-01

    A combined PIXE and XPS analysis has been performed on a few Roman coins of the republican and imperial age. The purpose was to investigate via XPS the nature and extent of patina in order to be capable of extracting PIXE data relative to the coins bulk. The inclusion of elements from the surface layer, altered by oxidation and inclusion, is a known source of uncertainty in PIXE analyses of coins, performed to assess the composition and the provenance.

  5. Ligand field effects on the multiplet structure of the U4f XPS of UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Bagus, Paul S.

    2008-03-01

    Ab initio, fully relativistic four component theory was used to determine atomic and interatomic many-body effects for the 4f X-ray photoelectron spectrum of an embedded UO8-12 cluster representing UO2. Many-body effects were included through the use of configuration interaction wavefunctions that allow the mixing of XPS allowed and XPS forbidden configurations. Charge transfer configurations were not included. This work extends our earlier studies on simulations of the U 4f XPS for the free U4+ cation. While the main XPS features are similar in both cases, ligand field effects changed the multiplet structure in important ways that better simulated experimental data for UO2. Neither initial nor final state covalency significantly reduced the 4f-5f exchange integrals, and the differences between the atom and cluster model was due to ligand field splitting of the 5f band and increased distributions of intensity from XPS allowed to XPS forbidden peaks. The prominent 7 eV satellites associated with UO2 were absent in the simulations, and provides further evidence that these satellites are due to charge transfer and not other interatomic effects.

  6. Structural environment of uranium (VI) and europium (III) species sorbed onto phosphate surfaces: XPS and optical spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drot, R.; Simoni, E.; Alnot, M.; Ehrhardt, J.J.

    1998-09-15

    In order to characterize the structure of the surface complexes formed by interaction between uranyl and europium (III) ions and the surface of solid matrices, optical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies experiments on uranyl/europium loaded phosphate solids have been performed. The use of complimentary spectroscopic techniques allows an identification of the sorption mechanism and a structural characterization of the sorption sites and the sorbed species on phosphate surfaces. The samples were prepared from aqueous uranyl or europium solutions in the pH range from 1.5 to 6.0. The surface coverage was varied from 1 to 40% of a monolayer. The differences between the emission spectra of europium ions either sorbed on the surface of phosphate samples or doped inside the solid unambiguously indicates that these sorbed ions are exclusively located on the surface and that they do not migrate inside the matrix, which shows clearly that surface complexation is involved during the sorption process. The XPS spectrum of uranyl ions sorbed on zirconium diphosphate exhibits only one component, while the spectrum corresponding to uranium on thorium matrix shows two different unresolved peaks attributed to two different chemical environments. These results, corroborated by the uranyl emission spectra and the associated decay times and those obtained by optical spectroscopy of europium sorbed on the same solids, have been interpreted in terms of two sorption sites probably formed by the oxygens of the PO{sub 4} and P{sub 2}O{sub 7} surface groups.

  7. Determination of the clean 4 f peak shape in XPS for plutonium metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrall, P.; Roussel, P.; Jolly, L.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F.

    2009-03-01

    Many of the interesting properties observed with plutonium are ascribed to the influence of 5 f electrons, and to the degree of localisation observed within these electrons. Indeed, changes in 5 f localisation are sensitively reflected in the final states observed in core-level photoemission measurements. However, when analysing the 4 f manifold of elemental plutonium, it is essential to obtain spectra without the influence of oxidation, which can easily be misinterpreted as 5 f localisation. The ideal method to extract elemental plutonium 4 f spectra is to remove any influence of oxidation from the 'clean' plutonium data by careful measurement of the oxygen 1 s region, and the subsequent subtraction of the unwanted oxide features. However, in order to achieve this objective it is essential to determine the relative sensitivity factor (RSF) for plutonium 4 f and the precise shape of the 4 f features from plutonium sesqui-oxide. In this paper, we report an experimental determination of the RSF for the plutonium 4 f manifold using experimental data captured from two different Vacuum Generators spectrometers; an ESCALAB Mk II and an ESCALAB 220i.

  8. Adsorption selectivity of Lewis acids and bases on an oxidized Mo(100) surface studied by LEED, Auger, and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R. M.; Walker, B. W.; Stair, P. C.

    1985-06-01

    The adsorption of a wide range of Lewis acids (CO, CO 2, B(OCH 3) 3, B(CH 3) 3, and BF 3) and Lewis bases (NH 3, N(CH 3) 3, NH(CH 3) 2, NH 2CH 3, pyridine, 2,6-dimethylpyridine, pyrrole, water, methanol, ethanol, furan, ethylene, propylene, butene, toluene and benzene) on an oxidized Mo(100) single crystal surface has been studied by LEED, Auger and XPS. The oxidized molybdenum surface was prepared by exposing clean Mo(100) at 1023 K to molecular oxygen in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) in order to produce an ordered P(2 × 1) surface structure having an atomic oxygen concentration of 1.3-1.5 monolayers. Only the strong Lewis acids B(CH 3) 3 and BF 3 adsorbed and remain on the surface under UHV conditions suggesting that the surface oxygen anions are only weakly basic. Only bases containing nitrogen adsorb strongly on the oxidized surface. No trace of benzene or ethylene could be detected on the surface even after exposures at atmospheric pressure. XPS measurements of the carbon and nitrogen (1s) core levels for gas phase and adsorbed phase NH 2CH 3, pyridine, and 2,6-dimethylpyridine indicate that bonding to the surface is through the nitrogen lone pair electrons consistent with an acid-base interaction. The preference of the oxidized surface for adsorption of lone pair electron donors in comparison to w-electron donors can be understood by considering the geometry of the electron donor orbitals. The results indicate that the overlap of the unperturbed donor and acceptor orbitals is a primary factor in determining adsorption selectivity.

  9. Surface Chemical Composition of Size-fractionated Urban Walkway Aerosols Determined by XPS and ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenjuan, Cheng; Lu-Tao, Weng; Yongjie, Li; Arthur, Lau; Chak, Chan; Chi-Ming, Chan

    2013-04-01

    In this study, aerosol particles with sizes ranging from 0.056 to 10 ?m were collected using a ten-stage impactor sampler (MOUDI) from a busy walkway of Hong Kong. The aerosol samples of each stage were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Size dependent distributions of the detected six key elements (N, S, Ca, Si, O, and C) were revealed together with the chemical states of N, S and C. The results indicated that aliphatic hydrocarbons were the dominant species on the surface of all particles while a small portion of graphitic carbon (due to elemental and aromatic hydrocarbons) was also detected on the surface of the particles with sizes ranging from 0.056 to 0.32 ?m. Organic oxygen- and nitrogen-containing surface groups as well as sulfates were more abundant on the surface of the particles with sizes ranging from 0.32 to 1 μm. Organic oxygen- and nitrogen-containing surface groups as well as sulfates were more abundant on the surface of the particles with sizes ranging from 0.32 to 1 μm. Inorganic salts and nitrates were found in coarse-mode particles. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used for detailed surface and near surface composition analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the ToF-SIMS spectra confirmed the XPS results that aromatic hydrocarbons were associated with the nucleation-mode particles. Aliphatic hydrocarbons with O- and N-containing functional groups were associated with accumulation-mode particles and inorganic salts were related to the coarse-mode particles. Depth-profiling experiments were performed on three specific sets of samples (nucleation-, accumulation- and coarse-mode particles) to study their near-surface structures. It showed that organic compounds were concentrated on the very top surface of the coarse-mode particles with inorganics in the core. The accumulation-mode particles had thick coatings of diverse organic compositions. The nucleation-mode particles, which contained

  10. XPS Study of Ion Irradiated and Unirradiated UO2 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Teterin, Yury A; Popel, Aleksej J; Maslakov, Konstantin I; Teterin, Anton Yu; Ivanov, Kirill E; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Springell, Ross; Scott, Thomas B; Farnan, Ian

    2016-08-15

    XPS determination of the oxygen coefficient kO = 2 + x and ionic (U(4+), U(5+), and U(6+)) composition of oxides UO2+x formed on the surfaces of differently oriented (hkl) planes of thin UO2 films on LSAT (Al10La3O51Sr14Ta7) and YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) substrates was performed. The U 4f and O 1s core-electron peak intensities as well as the U 5f relative intensity before and after the (129)Xe(23+) and (238)U(31+) irradiations were employed. It was found that the presence of uranium dioxide film in air results in formation of oxide UO2+x on the surface with mean oxygen coefficients kO in the range 2.07-2.11 on LSAT and 2.17-2.23 on YSZ substrates. These oxygen coefficients depend on the substrate and weakly on the crystallographic orientation. On the basis of the spectral parameters it was established that uranium dioxide films AP2,3 on the LSAT substrates have the smallest kO values, and from the XRD and EBSD results it follows that these samples have a regular monocrystalline structure. The XRD and EBSD results indicate that samples AP5-7 on the YSZ substrates have monocrystalline structure; however, they have the highest kO values. The observed difference in the kO values was probably caused by the different nature of the substrates: the YSZ substrates provide 6.4% compressive strain, whereas (001) LSAT substrates result only in 0.03% tensile strain in the UO2 films. (129)Xe(23+) irradiation (92 MeV, 4.8 × 10(15) ions/cm(2)) of uranium dioxide films on the LSAT substrates was shown to destroy both long-range ordering and uranium close environment, which results in an increase of uranium oxidation state and regrouping of oxygen ions in uranium close environment. (238)U(31+) (110 MeV, 5 × 10(10), 5 × 10(11), 5 × 10(12) ions/cm(2)) irradiations of uranium dioxide films on the YSZ substrates were shown to form the lattice damage only with partial destruction of the long-range ordering. PMID:27490370

  11. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions between Yb(1S0) and Yb(3P2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dermot G.; Vaillant, Christophe L.; Frye, Matthew D.; Morita, Masato; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2016-02-01

    We calculate and analyze Feshbach resonance spectra for ultracold Yb (1S0) +Yb (3P2) collisions as a function of an interatomic potential scaling factor λ and external magnetic field. We show that, at zero field, the resonances are distributed randomly in λ , but that signatures of quantum chaos emerge as a field is applied. The random zero-field distribution arises from superposition of structured spectra associated with individual total angular momenta. In addition, we show that the resonances with respect to magnetic field in the experimentally accessible range of 400 to 2000 G are chaotically distributed, with strong level repulsion that is characteristic of quantum chaos.

  12. Satellite structure in the Argon 1s photoelectron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    Atomic inner-shell photoelectron spectra typically display several relatively weak {open_quotes}satellite peaks{close_quotes} at higher ionization energy than the primary peak. Such satellite peaks are associated with final-state configurations corresponding to ionization of an inner-shell electron and excitation or ionization of one or more valence electrons. The observation of satellite peaks demonstrates that the independent-electron picture is inadequate to describe atomic structure and the photoionization process. The measured energies and intensities of photoelectron satellites provide sensitive tests of many-electron theoretical models. We recorded the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum on beam line X-24A at an X-ray energy of 3628 eV. The primary peak at 3206 eV ionization energy was recorded at an observed resolution of 1.8 eV (FWHM). The satellite structure shows remarkable similarity to that recorded in the suprathreshold region of the Ar K photoabsorption cross section, demonstrating the manner in which these techniques complement each other. Surprisingly, while the region just above the K threshold in Ar was the subject of several theoretical studies using multi-configuration calculations, we find good agreement between our results and those of Dyall and collaborators using a shake model.

  13. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS

  14. Angle resolved XPS of monomolecular layer of 5-chlorobenzotriazole on oxidized metallic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazansky, L. P.; Selyaninov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, Yu. I.

    2012-10-01

    Angle resolved XPS is used to study adsorption of 5-chlorobenzotriazole (5-chloroBTAH) on surfaces of the oxidized metals: mild steel, copper and zinc from borate buffer solution (pH 7.4). It is shown that for the metals studied the 5-chloroBTA anions, when adsorbed, form a monomolecular layer whose thickness is ∼6 Å comparable with the size of BTA. As XPS evidences adsorption proceeds with deprotonation of 5-chloroBTAH and formation of the coordination bonds between the lone pair of nitrogens and cation of a metal. Measuring XPS at two different angles unequivocally points out almost vertical arrangement of the anions toward the sample surface, when chlorine atoms form outmost virtual layer.

  15. An XPS study of the optimum loading of barium on high-silica MFI zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M. H.; Abdillahi, M. M.; Abbas, N. M.; Siddiqui, A. B.

    1995-12-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been applied to the characterization of barium-impregnated MFI high-silica zeolites which are used for the conversion of methanol to light alkenes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided information about the degree of the dispersion of the various barium loadings on the silicalite structure, and this information helped in elucidating the observed relationship between the activity/selectivity of the catalysts and the barium loading. The XPS results also helped in predicting that the performance of the catalyst would be optimized at 4 wt% Ba loading which was found to agree with the catalytic conversion of methanol to light alkenes.

  16. Measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in helium-like silicon.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, M; Myers, E G

    2002-01-14

    Using Doppler-tuned fast-beam laser spectroscopy the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ has been measured to be 7230.5(2) cm(-1). The experiment made use of a single-frequency Nd:YAG (1.319 microm) laser and a high-finesse optical buildup cavity. The result provides a precision test of modern relativistic and QED atomic theory. PMID:11801009

  17. Calculation of 3s photoemission spectra of vanadium on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, P.; Taguchi, M.; Parlebas, J.C.; Kotani, A.

    1997-06-01

    A few years ago, a satellite structure in the vanadium 3s x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of V clusters upon graphite was observed and attributed to the presence of magnetic moments on the V surface. Here, we present calculations of these spectra using a cluster model that takes into account intra-atomic d-d and d{endash}core electron correlation and hybridization between V d and graphite {pi} states. When the V-graphite distance is increased from 1.5 to 2.0 {Angstrom} the system undergoes a low-to-high spin transition, which is clearly evidenced in the evolution of the XPS line shape. Although direct comparison with experiment is difficult, our study suggests that the observed satellite is due to core hole screening rather than a magnetic moment on the V atom. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Surface study of stainless steel electrode deposition from soil electrokinetic (EK) treatment using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Embong, Zaidi; Johar, Saffuwan; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan

    2015-04-29

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation relies upon application of a low-intensity direct current through the soil between stainless steel electrodes that are divided into a cathode array and an anode array. This mobilizes charged species, causing ions and water to move toward the electrodes. Metal ions and positively charged organic compounds move toward the cathode. Anions such as chloride, fluoride, nitrate, and negatively charged organic compounds move toward the anode. Here, this remediation techniques lead to a formation of a deposition at the both cathode and anode surface that mainly contributed byanion and cation from the remediated soil. In this research, Renggam-Jerangau soil species (HaplicAcrisol + RhodicFerralsol) with a surveymeter reading of 38.0 ± 3.9 μR/hr has been investigation in order to study the mobility of the anion and cation under the influence electric field. Prior to the EK treatment, the elemental composition of the soil and the stainless steel electrode are measured using XRF analyses. Next, the soil sample is remediated at a constant electric potential of 30 V within an hour of treatment period. A surface study for the deposition layer of the cathode and anode using X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that a narrow photoelectron signal from oxygen O 1s, carbon, C 1s silica, Si 2p, aluminium, Al 2p and chromium, Cr 2p exhibited on the electrode surface and indicate that a different in photoelectron intensity for each element on both electrode surface. In this paper, the mechanism of Si{sup 2+} and Al{sup 2+} cation mobility under the influence of voltage potential between the cathode and anode will be discussed in detail.

  19. Surface study of stainless steel electrode deposition from soil electrokinetic (EK) treatment using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embong, Zaidi; Johar, Saffuwan; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan

    2015-04-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation relies upon application of a low-intensity direct current through the soil between stainless steel electrodes that are divided into a cathode array and an anode array. This mobilizes charged species, causing ions and water to move toward the electrodes. Metal ions and positively charged organic compounds move toward the cathode. Anions such as chloride, fluoride, nitrate, and negatively charged organic compounds move toward the anode. Here, this remediation techniques lead to a formation of a deposition at the both cathode and anode surface that mainly contributed byanion and cation from the remediated soil. In this research, Renggam-Jerangau soil species (HaplicAcrisol + RhodicFerralsol) with a surveymeter reading of 38.0 ± 3.9 μR/hr has been investigation in order to study the mobility of the anion and cation under the influence electric field. Prior to the EK treatment, the elemental composition of the soil and the stainless steel electrode are measured using XRF analyses. Next, the soil sample is remediated at a constant electric potential of 30 V within an hour of treatment period. A surface study for the deposition layer of the cathode and anode using X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that a narrow photoelectron signal from oxygen O 1s, carbon, C 1s silica, Si 2p, aluminium, Al 2p and chromium, Cr 2p exhibited on the electrode surface and indicate that a different in photoelectron intensity for each element on both electrode surface. In this paper, the mechanism of Si2+ and Al2+ cation mobility under the influence of voltage potential between the cathode and anode will be discussed in detail.

  20. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  1. Calculation of X-ray photoelectron spectra with the use of the normalized elimination of the small component method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klooster, Rob; Broer, Ria; Filatov, Michael

    2012-02-01

    A method for the calculation of X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) based on the use of the normalized elimination of the small component (NESC) formalism combined with the restricted active space state interaction (RASSI) approach with atomic mean field integrals (AMFI) is developed. Benchmark calculations carried out for the 4f XPS of U5+show that the NESC/RASSI/AMFI method is capable of reproducing the results of the full 4-component relativistic calculations with excellent accuracy. The NESC/RASSI/AMFI method is applied to study the 4p and 5p XPS of ytterbium phosphide YbP. The results of the calculations suggest an alternative interpretation of the satellite peaks in the 4p XPS of YbP.

  2. Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Nawa, Toyoharu; Owada, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masahito

    2013-10-15

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

  3. Thermally Annealed Iron (Oxide) Thin Film on an Alumina Barrier Layer, by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Jensen, David S.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-06

    Herein we show characterization of an Fe thin film on Al_2O_3 after thermal annealing under H_2 using Al Ka X-rays. The XPS survey spectrum, narrow Fe 2p scan, and valence band regions are presented. The survey spectrum shows aluminum signals due to exposure of the underlying Al_2O_3 film during Fe nanoparticle formation.

  4. XPS Study of Oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts developed in study of SiO2/Si interface applied to analysis of native oxide/GaAs interface. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been combined with precise chemical-profiling technique and resolution-enhancement methods to study stoichiometry of transitional layer. Results are presented in report now available.

  5. Sputter-induced erosion of alkali metal surfaces - AES, XPS and SIMS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper will discuss the manner in which the techniques of Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and ion-scattering spectroscopy (ISS) may be used to study the use of high secondary-ion-yield surfaces as a means of reducing plasma-impurity influx in magnetic-confinement fusion devices.

  6. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, W. C.; Bozak, M. J.; Williams, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) studies of each of sample received were completed. Since low angle X-ray could not be performed because of instrumentation problems, Auger spectrometry was employed instead. The results of these measurements for each of the samples is discussed in turn.

  7. Structure and bonding environments at the calcite surface as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED)

    SciTech Connect

    Stipp, S.L.; Hochella, M.F. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    The pure calcite surface was examined using techniques sensitive to the near-surface (XPS and LEED) immediately after fracture in ultra-high vacuum (10{sup {minus}10} mbar) and then following exposure to various atmospheres and aqueous solutions that were free of trace metals. These spectroscopic techniques allow molecular-level observations that offer the possibility of gaining more insight into geochemical processes elucidated from macroscopic solution studies. Several absolute electron binding energies for the atoms in calcite were redetermined with XPS using the gold dot method. Surface hydration is also supported, independently, by the XPS peak intensity ratios and is consistent with adsorption theory derived from macroscopic solution studies. The modified oxygen Auger parameter, {alpha}{prime}, (using O{sub 1s} and O(KVV)), was found to be 1043.9 eV for all samples of calcite tested, whether powder or cleaved from iceland Spar, clean or contaminated by adventitious carbon, freshly fractured, or exposed briefly to water, or in the process of dissolution or precipitation. LEED patterns of the {l brace}101{r brace} cleavage surface of samples that were freshly fractured in air and that were exposed to dissolving or precipitating solutions showed that the top few atomic layers exhibit long range order. Lattice spacings at the surface are statistically identical to those of bulk calcite, though some surface CO{sub 3} groups may be rotated relative to the bulk structure. This work provides direct, molecular-level evidence for the processes of reconfiguration and hydration at the calcite surface. These results provide a basis for future spectroscopic studies of trace metal adsorption on calcite and subsequent solid-solution formation.

  8. CoOx thin film deposited by CVD as efficient water oxidation catalyst: change of oxidation state in XPS and its correlation to electrochemical activity.

    PubMed

    Weidler, Natascha; Paulus, Sarina; Schuch, Jona; Klett, Joachim; Hoch, Sascha; Stenner, Patrick; Maljusch, Artjom; Brötz, Joachim; Wittich, Carolin; Kaiser, Bernhard; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2016-04-20

    To reduce energy losses in water electrolysers a fundamental understanding of the water oxidation reaction steps is necessary to design efficient oxygen evolution catalysts. Here we present CoOx/Ti electrocatalytic films deposited by thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto titanium substrates. We report electrochemical (EC), photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The electrochemical behavior of the samples was correlated with the chemical and electronic structure by recording XPS spectra before and after each electrochemical treatment (conditioning and cyclovoltammetry). The results show that the electrochemical behavior of CoOx/Ti strongly depends on the resulting electronic structure and composition. The thermal deposition leads to the formation of a pure Co(ii)Ox which transforms to a mixed Co(ii)Co(iii)Ox during the OER. This change in oxidation state is coupled with a decrease in overpotential from η = 0.57 V to η = 0.43 V at 5 mA cm(-2). Plasma deposition in oxygen leads to a Co(iii)-dominated mixed CoOx, that has a lower onset potential as deposited due to a higher Co(iii) content in the initial deposited material. After the OER XPS results of the CoOx/Ti indicate a partial formation of hydroxides and oxyhydroxides on the oxide surface. Finally the plasma deposition in air, results in a CoOxOH2 surface, that is able to completely oxidizes during OER to an oxyhydroxide Co(iii)OOH. With the in situ formed CoOOH we present a highly active catalyst for the OER (η = 0.34 at 5 mA cm(-2); η = 0.37 V at 10 mA cm(-2)). PMID:26694730

  9. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in

  10. Incorporation of low energy activated nitrogen onto HOPG surface: Chemical states and thermal stability studies by in-situ XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the chemical states analysis of activated nitrogen incorporated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface under well-controlled conditions. Nitrogen incorporation is carried out by two different processes: an indirect RF nitrogen plasma and low energy (1 keV) N2+ implantation. Bonding configuration, concentration and thermal stability of the incorporated nitrogen species by aforesaid processes are systematically compared by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively large concentration of nitrogen is incorporated onto RF nitride HOPG surface (16.2 at.%), compared to N2+ implanted HOPG surface (7.7 at.%). The evolution of N 1s components (N1, N2, N3) with annealing temperature is comprehensively discussed, which indicates that the formation and reorganization of local chemical bonding states are determined by the process of nitridation and not by the prior chemical conditioning (i.e., amorphization or hydrogenation) of the HOPG surface. A combined XPS and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that N2+ implantation process resulted in a high level of defects to the HOPG surface, which cannot be annealed-out by heat treatment up to 1000 °C. On the other hand, the RF nitrogen plasma process did not produce a high level of surface defects, while incorporating nearly the same amount of stable nitrogen species.

  11. Excitation and Ionization in H(1s)-H(1s) Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Merle E.; Ritchie, A. Burke

    1999-07-15

    Hydrogen atom - hydrogen atom scattering is a prototype for many of the fundamental principles of atomic collisions. In this work we present an approximation to the H+H system for scattering in the intermediate energy regime of 1 to 100 keV. The approximation ignores electron exchange and two-electron excitation by assuming that one of the atoms is frozen in the 1s state. We allow for the evolution of the active electron by numerically solving the 3D Schroedinger equation. The results capture many features of the problem and are in harmony with recent theoretical studies. Excitation and ionization cross sections are computed and compared to other theory and experiment. New insight into the mechanism of excitation and ionization is inferred from the solutions.

  12. SEM and XPS studies of nanohole arrays on InP(1 0 0) surfaces created by coupling AAO templates and low energy Ar + ion sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Goumet, C.; Monier, G.; Zefack, B.; Chelda, S.; Bideux, L.; Gruzza, B.; Awitor, O. K.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility to form well-ordered nanoholes on InP(1 0 0) surfaces by low Ar + ion sputtering process in UHV conditions from anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. This process is a promising approach in creating ordered arrays of surface nanostructures with controllable size and morphology. To follow the Ar + ion sputtering effects on the AAO/InP surfaces, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the different surface species. In 4d and P 2p core level spectra were recorded on different InP(1 0 0) surfaces after ions bombardment. XPS results showed the presence of metallic indium on both smooth InP(1 0 0) and AAO/InP(1 0 0) surfaces. Finally, we showed that this experiment led to the formation of metallic In dropplets about 10 nm in diameter on nanoholes patterned InP surface while the as-received InP(1 0 0) surface generated metallic In about 60 nm in diameter.

  13. Improved measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 interval in heliumlike silicon.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Thomas R; Crosby, David N; Myers, Edmund G

    2008-06-20

    Using colinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy with copropagating and counter-propagating beams we have measured the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ with the result 7230.585(6) cm{-1}. The experiment made use of a dual-wavelength, high-finesse, power build-up cavity excited by single-frequency lasers at 1319 and 1450 nm. The result will provide a precision test of ab initio relativistic many-body atomic theory at moderate Z. PMID:18643579

  14. Self-assembly of mechanically interlocked and threaded rings: a HREELS and XPS study of thiol-functionalised catenane and rotaxane molecules on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nadaı̈, C.; Whelan, C. M.; Perollier, C.; Clarkson, G.; Leigh, D. A.; Caudano, R.; Rudolf, P.

    2000-05-01

    Thiol-functionalised catenane and rotaxane thin films were investigated in order to understand the self-assembly of such complex molecules on Au(111). Adsorption from the liquid phase at 300 K leads to the formation of overlayers without long-range order, as evidenced by high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). As expected for thiol adsorption, the sulfur 2p binding energies determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are consistent with the formation of thiolate surface intermediates. The properties of these films are explored as a function of annealing. Changes in vibrational spectra such as the emergence of a AuO band and variations in core-level binding energies and intensities reveal molecular rearrangement due to partial desorption. In addition, based on coherent domain sizes estimated by the angular width of the elastic beam intensity, annealing promotes long-range order within the adlayers.

  15. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  16. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  17. Structural evolution of Ga-Ge-Te glasses by combined EXAFS and XPS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, R.; Calvez, L.; Bureau, B.; Jain, H.

    2013-08-07

    The structural evolution of Ga{sub x}Ge{sub y}Te{sub 100−x−y} glasses in the vicinity of GeTe{sub 4}-GaTe{sub 3} pseudo-binary tie-line is determined with high-resolution X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies. The analysis of XPS data is complicated by similar electronegativity values for the constituent chemical elements, but then the interpretation is facilitated by information from complementary EXAFS analysis of the structure around each element independently. The results show 4/4/2 coordination for Ga/Ge/Te atoms and absence of Ga(Ge)-Ge(Ga) bonds or extended Te clusters in significant concentrations within the whole range of studied composition. The observed structural features correlate well with the measured basic physical properties of Ga-containing germanium telluride glasses.

  18. Decay characterization of glassy pigments: an XPS investigation of smalt paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, C.; Ciliberto, E.

    The identification and characterization of a particular pigment in an art object or in a paint layer is an important step in the history of art and technology. Moreover, the understanding of deterioration mechanisms is an essential prerequisite for diagnostics and restoration. In this work we used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study pure smalt (cobalt-based blue pigment) and smalt in a tempera media (`leather-glue'). XPS was used to characterize the pure pigment efficiently and to distinguish it in real paint layers. We also studied smalt in leather-glue samples aged in a climatic chamber to investigate the effects of weathering and pollutant concentration on the deterioration process of this paint system.

  19. An XPS study of gold deposition at low temperatures on sulfide minerals: Reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, M.M.; Bancroft, G.M. )

    1989-02-01

    The reduction of KAuCl{sub 4} to metallic gold by pyrite, high iron content sphalerite and galena was studied using surface analytical and solution techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (A.A.). High resolution XPS of the reacted mineral showed that the mineral surface is the Au reducing agent. On galena and high iron sphalerite, a corroded layer forms rapidly as S{sup 2 minus} is oxidized to polysulfides, S{sup 2{minus}}{sub x}, and the metals are leached from the surface. Although Au is also reduced on pyrite, the formation of surface polysulfide is not concurrent with Au reduction. Solution analysis for the pyrite and high iron sphalerite reactions shows, however, that considerable sulfate is produced due to the oxidation of S{sup 2{minus}}, S{sup 2{minus}}{sub 2} or the intermediate polysulphide.

  20. GD-OES and XPS coupling: A new way for the chemical profiling of photovoltaic absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Dimitri; Bouttemy, Muriel; Vigneron, Jackie; Chapon, Patrick; Etcheberry, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we examine the complementarity of Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GD-OES) and X Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for the realization of fine chemical depth profiling of photovoltaic absorbers using Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) materials. The possibility to use sequentially these two techniques is discussed in this paper. We have evaluated the chemical modifications of the crater after GD-OES analyses which depend on the manner of finishing the plasma etching sequence; and we propose different ways to limit or eliminate this effect. For the moment, an intermediate step (wet chemical etching or weak sputtering) is required to obtain a CIGS phase in the crater. Finally, we have demonstrated the possibility to restart the GD-OES analyses of the materials after XPS quantification or GD-OES breaking without modifying the profile shape.

  1. Detergency of stainless steel surface soiled with human brain homogenate: an XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, M.; Le Mogne, Th.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Rauwel, G.; Criquelion, J.; De Barros, M. I.; Cêtre, J. C.; Martin, J. M.

    2005-02-01

    In the detergency field of re-usable medical devices, a special attention is focused on the non conventional transmissible agent called prions which is a proteinaceous infectious agent. Few cleaning procedures are effective against prions and few techniques are available to study cleaning effectiveness with respect to proteins in general. In our study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to evaluate the effectiveness of detergent formulations to remove proteins from stainless steel surface soiled with a brain homogenate (BH) from human origin. Our results showed that XPS is a reliable surface analysis technique to study chemical species remaining on surface and substrate properties after cleaning procedures. A semi-quantitative evaluation of the detergency effectiveness could also be performed.

  2. Surface and optical analyses of a dye-mineral composite -- an XPS, FTIR and Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, William; Manciu, Felicia; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2007-10-01

    Maya Purple is a pigment produced by mixing the dye thioindigo with the clay mineral palygorskite. In this investigation, we address the questions of how the dye binds to the clay and how such binding might be affected by the organic-inorganic material ratio and of the heating time used in the preparation of the pigment. Synthetically prepared Maya Purple samples were examined using XPS, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy. XPS measurements show that pigment preparation results in interactions between the dye and the mineral that give rise to several different binding states of the key elemental components oxygen, sulfur, and aluminum. These results are in good agreement with the Raman analysis, where the appearance and disappearance of bands in the 600 cm-1, 1100 cm-1, and 1600 cm-1 regions demonstrate interaction affecting oxygen and sulfur. The data are further corroborated by vibrational line shifting in the FTIR data.

  3. Toward a better determination of dairy powders surface composition through XPS matrices development.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Y; Petit, J; Sanders, C; Gianfrancesco, A; Scher, J; Gaiani, C

    2015-01-01

    The surface composition of dairy powders prepared by mixing various amounts of micellar casein (MC), whey proteins isolate (WPI), lactose, and anhydrous milk fat (AMF) was investigated by XPS measurements. The use of matrices are generally accepted to transform surface atomic composition (i.e., C, O, N contents) into surface component composition (i.e., lactose, proteins, lipids). These atomic-based matrices were revisited and two new matrices based on the surface bond composition were developed. Surface compositions obtained from atomic and bond-based matrices were compared. A successful matrix allowing good correlations between XPS predicted and theoretical surface composition for powders free from fat was identified. Nevertheless, samples containing milk fat were found to present a possible segregation of components owing to the AMF overrepresentation on the surface. Supplementary analyses (FTIR, SEM) were carried out in order to investigate the homogeneity of the mixtures. PMID:25460597

  4. A Search for Invisible Decays of the Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-17

    We search for invisible decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B Factory. We select events containing the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable {Upsilon}(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} invisible) < 3.0 x 10{sup ?4} at the 90% confidence level.

  5. Search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-18

    We search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Upsilon(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Upsilon(1S) --> invisible) < 3.0 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:20366249

  6. Search for Invisible Decays of the Υ(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    We search for invisible decays of the Υ(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4×106 Υ(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Υ(3S)→π+π-Υ(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Υ(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→invisible)<3.0×10-4 at the 90% confidence level.

  7. Fluorescence, XPS, and TOF-SIMS surface chemical state image analysis of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Harbers, Gregory M; Grainger, David W; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G

    2007-08-01

    Performance improvements in DNA-modified surfaces required for microarray and biosensor applications rely on improved capabilities to accurately characterize the chemistry and structure of immobilized DNA molecules on micropatterned surfaces. Recent innovations in imaging X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) now permit more detailed studies of micropatterned surfaces. We have exploited the complementary information provided by imaging XPS and imaging TOF-SIMS to detail the chemical composition, spatial distribution, and hybridization efficiency of amine-terminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bound to commercial polyacrylamide-based, amine-reactive microarray slides, immobilized in both macrospot and microarray diagnostic formats. Combinations of XPS imaging and small spot analysis were used to identify micropatterned DNA spots within printed DNA arrays on slide surfaces and quantify DNA elements within individual microarray spots for determination of probe immobilization and hybridization efficiencies. This represents the first report of imaging XPS of DNA immobilization and hybridization efficiencies for arrays fabricated on commercial microarray slides. Imaging TOF-SIMS provided distinct analytical data on the lateral distribution of DNA within single array microspots before and after target hybridization. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to TOF-SIMS imaging datasets demonstrated that the combination of these two techniques provides information not readily observable in TOF-SIMS images alone, particularly in identifying species associated with array spot nonuniformities (e.g., "halo" or "donut" effects often observed in fluorescence images). Chemically specific spot images were compared to conventional fluorescence scanned images in microarrays to provide new information on spot-to-spot DNA variations that affect current diagnostic reliability, assay variance, and sensitivity. PMID:17625851

  8. XPS investigation on vacuum thermal desorption of UV/ozone treated GaAs(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossu, G.; Ingo, G. M.; Mattogno, G.; Padeletti, G.; Proietti, G. M.

    In order to prepare suitable surfaces for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), sacrificial thin oxide layers on HCl etched GaAs(100) surfaces were grown by both air and UV/ozone exposure. Passive films were subsequently removed by vacuum thermal desorption to achieve surfaces that were smooth and clean on an atomic scale. The evolution of the surface chemical composition, as a function of vacuum desorption temperature, has been studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results have evidenced for air and UV/ozone exposed GaAs(100) surfaces a relationship between desorption temperature and surface chemical composition; indeed, the oxide removal is temperature dependent and sequentially selective as follows: As 2O 3. AsO and Ga 2O 3. Furthermore, XPS results have shown that air-grown films have a chemical composition and thermal desorption behaviour different from UV/ozone treated materials. Indeed, these latter have an As 2O 3/Ga 2O 3 and an unoxidized As/Ga ratio close to unity for as grown and thermal treated at 580°C surfaces, respectively. By contrast, air-exposed GaAs(100) materials are Ga 2O 3-enriched and after vacuum thermal desorption treatments have never a stoichiometric composition(As (GaAs)/Ga (GaAs)= 1). Furthermore UV/ozone treated GaAs(100) surfaces subjected to a vacuum thermal treatment at 580°C, have a troublesome organic contamination level below XPS detectability, whereas from air-exposed surfaces, carbon is not completely thermally removable

  9. XPS and Raman study of slope-polished Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beak, Gun Yeol; Jeon, Chan-Wook

    2016-05-01

    The growth of quality Cu(In,Ga)Se2 photovoltaic absorber without secondary phases is very important for improving the solar cell efficiency. Although X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy can identify the secondary phases, they provide insufficient information because of their insufficient resolution and complexity in analysis. In general, normal Raman spectroscopy is better for the analysis of secondary phases. On the other hand, the Raman signal provides information for film depths of less than 300 nm, and the Raman information cannot represent the properties of the entire film. In this regard, the authors introduce a new way of identifying secondary phases in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films using depth Raman analysis. The as-prepared film was polished using a dimple grinder, which expanded a 2 μm thick film to approximately 1 mm, which is more than sufficient to resolve the depth distribution. Raman analysis indicated that the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 film showed different secondary phases, such as CuIn3Se5, InSe and CuSe, present in different depths of the film, whereas XPS provided complex information about the phases. Overall, the present study emphasizes that the Raman depth profile is more efficient for the identification of secondary phases in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films than XPS and XRD. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Multiplet splitting for the XPS of heavy elements: Dependence on oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Al-Salik, Yahya; Ilton, Eugene S.; Idriss, Hicham

    2016-01-01

    Multiplet splittings in X-ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy, XPS, are a means of distinguishing different open shell occupations, or different oxidation states, in a material being studied. Indeed, especially for 3d transition metal complexes, they have provided fingerprints of the metal oxidation state. The present work provides theoretical and experimental evidence that it may also be possible to use multiplets to characterize the oxidation state of heavy metal, lanthanide and actinide, cations in complexes. However, it is important to make a proper choice of the XPS region to study in order to obtain large multiplet splittings. We identify a low binding energy, BE, peak that had been observed for Ce(III) in CeOx as a high spin coupled multiplet. Furthermore, we show that a low BE feature with reasonable intensity is characteristic of other XPS regions and of other metals. This feature arises from a high spin multiplet and serves as a fingerprint to distinguish closed shell from open shell cations. Evidence is presented that it may also be possible to distinguish different open shell occupations.

  11. Adsorption of Cu(II) on the (0001) plane of mica: A REFLEXAFS and XPS study

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, M.L.; England, K.E.R.; Vaughan, D.J.; Charnock, J.M. |

    1996-02-10

    Using reflection extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (REFLEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) it has been established that Cu(II) in low concentration in aqueous media can be chemisorbed onto the (0001) surface of muscovite mica. From the XPS studies it is suggested that the Cu species is in a similar bonding environment to the copper in copper hydroxide. A depth profile of the reacted mica surface was also carried out using XPS and this suggests that there had been no diffusion of the Cu into the mica surface. REFLEXAFS studies of the reacted mica surface provided information about shells of O, AlSi, and Cu surrounding a central Cu absorber. The best-fit bond distances are as follows: O{single_bond}Cu, 1.98 {angstrom}; Cu{single_bond}Cu, 2.64 {angstrom}; Al/Si{single_bond}Cu, 3.09 {angstrom}. This provides direct evidence for Cu being bound to the surface at aluminate or silicate groups and suggests that the Cu species adsorbed onto the surface are similar to the copper species found in copper hydroxide, plancheite, and shattuckite. It is proposed that Cu is chemisorbed at atomic imperfections, such as steps and kinks, on the mica surface.

  12. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  13. Fast Inversion of Solar Ca II Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast (Lt1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ~ -3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = -6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  14. Chandra Spectra of the Cassiopeia A Point Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stage, Michael D.; Joss, Paul C.

    2001-09-01

    We present the first Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectra of the X-ray point source (XPS) at the center of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, using our recent HETGS observation of Cas A (Obsid 1046), as well as spectra extracted from the long duration archival 50 ksec ACIS-S3 observation (Obsid 114). Discovered in the Chandra first light image, the flux and spectrum of XPS strongly indicate that it is associated with the remnant, but it has been difficult to classify the point source unambiguously. The assertion that the XPS is a weakly magnetized neutron star (B <= 1010 G) radiating primarily via thermal emission is supported by the recent discovery of weak X-ray pulsations with a 13 ms period (H. Tananbaum, talk presented at 198th Mtg. AAS). Such a source is an ideal candidate to fit with our new theoretical atmosphere models (Joss, Madej, and Stage, these proceedings). Early data fit well to a variety of spectral forms, including power laws, model neutron star atmospheres, pure blackbody, and thermal bremsstrahlung (Chakrabarty et al., ApJ 548: 800; Pavlov et al., ApJ 531: L53). With our longer duration and higher resolution observations, we have greater ability to discriminate among the possible spectral models. We have previously carried out model atmosphere fits to a spectrum extracted from the archival 50 ksec observation. Our results yielded effective temperatures (kTeff ~= 0.2 keV) and radii (Reff ~= 2 km) that are comparable to those obtained in earlier fits to neutron-star model atmospheres (Chakrabarty et. al.). The lack of detection of radio pulsations or of a synchrotron nebula from the location of the XPS (McLaughlin et al., ApJ 547: L41) suggests that the XPS is not a classical young pulsar, a result with which we agree. The quality of our model atmosphere fits is superior to those we obtained using simple power law or blackbody models. Furthermore, recent upper limits on the emission from the XPS at near infrared and optical

  15. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  16. Determination of the Cu 2p primary excitation spectra for Cu, Cu2O and CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, N.; Tougaard, S.; Yubero, F.

    2014-02-01

    The shape and intensity of photoelectron peaks are strongly affected by extrinsic excitations due to electron transport out of the surface (including bulk and surface effects) and to intrinsic excitations due to the sudden creation of the static core hole. These effects must be included in the theoretical description of the emitted photoelectron spectra. We have calculated the effective energy-differential inelastic electron scattering cross section for XPS, including both surface and core hole effects, within the dielectric response theory by means of the QUEELS-XPS software (QUantitative analysis of Electron Energy Losses at Surfaces for XPS). The full XPS spectrum is then modeled by convoluting this energy loss cross section with the primary excitation spectrum that accounts for all effects which are part of the initial photo-excitation process, i.e. lifetime broadening, spin-orbit coupling, and multiplet splitting. The shape of this primary excitation spectrum is determined by requiring close agreement between the resulting theoretical spectrum and the experimental XPS spectrum. These calculations were performed for Cu 2p peaks of Cu, Cu2O, and CuO. For CuO, we compare the obtained primary excitation spectra with first principle calculations performed with the CTM4XAS software (Charge Transfer Multiplet program for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy) for the corresponding emissions and we find good quantitative agreement.

  17. Long-range properties of 1 S bottomonium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Nora; Krein, Gastão; Tarrús Castellà, Jaume; Vairo, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of weakly coupled potential nonrelativistic QCD, we derive, first, an analytical expression for the chromopolarizability of 1 S bottomonium states in agreement with previous determinations. Then we use the QCD trace anomaly to obtain the two-pion production amplitude for the chromopolarizability operator and match the result to a chiral effective field theory with 1 S bottomonium states and pions as degrees of freedom. In this chiral effective field theory we compute some long-range properties of the 1 S bottomonium generated by the pion coupling such as the leading chiral logarithm to the 1 S bottomonium mass and the van der Waals potential between two 1 S bottomonium states. Both results improve on previously known expressions.

  18. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  19. Enhanced the photocatalytic activity of Ni-doped ZnO thin films: Morphological, optical and XPS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Jilani, Asim; Yahia, I. S.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure and Ni-doped ZnO thin films with different concentration of Ni (3.5 wt%, 5 wt%, 7 wt%) were prepared by DC/RF magnetron sputtering technique. The X-rays diffraction pattern showed the polycrystalline nature of pure and Ni-doped ZnO thin films. The surface morphology of pure and Ni doped ZnO thin films were investigated through atomic force microscope, which indicated the increase in the grain dimension and surface roughness with increasing the Ni doping. The UV-Visible transmission spectra showed the decrease in the transmittance of doped ZnO thin films with the incorporation of Ni dopants. The surface and chemical state analysis of pure and Ni doped ZnO thin films were investigated by X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by an aqueous solution of methyl green dye. The tungsten lamp of 500 W was used as a source of visible light for photocatalytic study. The degradation results showed that the Ni-doped ZnO thin films exhibit highly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the pure ZnO thin films. The enhanced photocatalytic activities of Ni-doped ZnO thin films were attributed to the enhanced surface area (surface defects), surface roughness and decreasing the band gap of Ni-doped ZnO thin films. Our work supports the applications of thin film metal oxides in waste water treatment.

  20. Carbon 1s photoelectron spectroscopy of CF4 and CO: Search for chemical effects on the carbon 1s hole-state lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Thomas X.; Borve, Knut J.; Saethre, Leif J.; Bozek, John D.; Kukk, Edwin; Hahne, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, T. Darrah

    2002-06-01

    Carbon 1s photoelectron spectra for CF4 and CO have been measured at several photon energies near the carbon 1s threshold. The spectra have been analyzed in terms of the vibrational structure and the natural linewidth. For CO the vibrational structure shows evidence for anharmonicity in both the energy spacing and the intensity. Analysis of the results using an anharmonic model gives an equilibrium bond length for core-ionized CO that is 4.85 pm shorter than that of neutral CO. For CF4, the vibrational structure is very weak, and the analysis shows that the change in equilibrium CF bond length upon ionization is no more than 0.54 pm. Ab initio theoretical calculations give results in accord with these bond-length changes. The unusually small bond-length contraction in CF4 can be understood in terms of nonbonded fluorine-fluorine repulsion. The natural linewidth for core-ionized CO, 95plus-or-minus5 meV, is essentially the same as that of CH4. This result is in contrast with expectations based on the one-center model of Auger decay and earlier predictions based on semiempirical molecular orbital theory. More recent calculations indicate, however, that there is only a small difference between CO and CH4, in agreement with the observed result. For CF4, the natural linewidth is 77plus-or-minus6 meV. This value differs from that for CH4 in the direction expected from the electronegativities of hydrogen and fluorine, but is greater than the prediction based on semiempirical theory. The natural linewidth for CO with a carbon 1s electron excited to the 2pi resonance is 83 meV, which is significantly less than is found for core-ionized CO. Although this difference is supported by theoretical calculations, the direction of the difference is counterintuitive. An overview is presented of the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge on carbon 1s linewidths.

  1. Investigation of V oxidation states in reduced V/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, M.A.; Proctor, A.; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    The distribution of vanadium oxidation states in a 5.9 wt% V/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst reduced in H{sub 2} or CO was determined from XPS V 2p spectra. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to statistically determine the number of components (oxidation states) that describe the V 2p{sub 3/2} envelope of the reduced V/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The peak positions and FWHMs of the components were obtained from iterative target transformation factor analysis (ITTFA). The V 2p{sub 3/2} envelope is composed of two components (oxidation states), which are centered at 517.2 and 515.5 eV (FWHMs of 2.6 and 2.3 eV, respectively) when H{sub 2} is the reducing agent and at 517.3 and 515.8 eV (FWHMs 2.7-2.8 eV) when CO is the reducing agent. The components were assigned to V{sup 5+} and V{sup 3+} based on the difference in the binding energies and the results of a volumetric study of catalyst reduction in CO. The spectral information gained from PCA and ITTFA was used to curve fit the V 2p envelopes. The extent of reduction of the V phase was estimated from the relative abundances of V{sup 5+} and V{sup 3+} determined by curve fitting and corrected for the presumably lower dispersion of the V{sup 3+} species. The results indicated a decrease in the average oxidation state of V to 3.5 with increasing the reduction temperature in H{sub 2} up to 662{degrees}C. Reduction in the presence of CO was measured volumetrically and showed a decrease in the average oxidation state from 5 to 3.3 over the temperature range 155-510{degrees}C. Curve fitting the spectra of the CO-reduced samples using the two spectral components identified through factor analysis yielded an average oxidation state of ca.3.6 upon reduction at 510{degrees}C. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. XPS Chemical Shifts for CO Adsorbed on Ni(100):. a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, L.; Rovida, G.; Russo, N.

    Starting from the observed chemical shift of C-1s and O-1s ionization potentials (IP), reported in the literature for the adsorption of CO on Ni(100), and correlated to the different CO adsorption sites at different coverages, we have carried out a theoretical investigation, using a first-principle density-functional method, to calculate ionization energies for adsorbed CO in the atop and bridge sites. In our approach, the Ni(100) surface was simulated with clusters of up to nine metal atoms of different geometry, in order to test the two adsorption sites. For each cluster, the CO adsorption geometry was optimized and the O-1s and C-1s ionizations were calculated. The main result was that the (O-1s-C-1s) difference was very well reproduced even with clusters of modest size, thus confirming the possibility to use this value as a structure-sensitive parameter.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  4. In Situ Studies of Surface Mobility on Noble Metal Model Catalysts Using STM and XPS at Ambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Derek Robert

    2010-06-01

    are present on the Pt(100) hex reconstructed phase, but not the (100)-(1x1) surface. The increase in ethylene pressure caused the adsorbate interactions to dominate the crystal morphology and imposed a surface layer structure that matched the ethylidyne binding geometry. The STM results also showed that the surface was reversibly deformed during imaging due to increases in Pt mobility at high pressure. The size dependence on the activity and surface chemistry of Rh nanoparticles was studied using AP-XPS. The activity was found to increase with particle size. The XPS spectra show that in reaction conditions the particle surface has an oxide layer which is chemically distinct from the surface structure formed by heating in oxygen alone. This surface oxide which is stabilized in the catalytically active CO oxidation conditions was found to be more prevalent on the smaller nanoparticles. The reaction-induced surface segregation behavior of bimetallic noble metal nanoparticles was observed with APXPS. Monodisperse 15 nm RhPd and PdPt nanoparticles were synthesized with well controlled Rh/Pd and Pd/Pt compositions. In-situ XPS studies showed that at 300 C in the presence of an oxidizing environment (100 mTorr NO or O2) the surface concentration of the more easily oxidized element (Rh in RhPd and Pd in PdPt) was increased. Switching the gas environment to more reducing conditions (100 mTorr NO and 100 mTorr CO) caused the surface enrichment of the element with the lowest surface energy in its metallic state. Using in-situ characterization, the redox chemistry and the surface composition of bimetallic nanoparticle samples were monitored in reactive conditions. The particle surfaces were shown to reversibly restructure in response to the gas environment at high temperature. The oxidation behavior of the Pt(110) surface was studied using surface sensitive in-situ characterization by APXPS and STM. In the presence of 500 mTorr O2 and temperatures between 25

  5. Repair and Utilization of the Kratos XSAM 800 X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives for this summer faculty fellowship were first to repair the Kratos XSAM 800 X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS) and then to utilize the instrument to participate in ongoing research projects at KSC and in the researcher's own laboratory at UCF. The first 6 weeks were used in repairing the instrument. Working both alone and with the Kratos service engineer, a number of hardware problems, largely associated with the sample stage control system, were corrected. Defective parts were identified and fixed in the computer driver boards, the stage power supply, and the driver interface. The power supply was completely replaced. After four weeks of work, the instrument was functional. This occurred on a Wednesday. The following Friday the instrument had to be completely shut down because the power to the O & C Building was to be turned off. The instrument was properly secured. On Monday, the instrument was powered up and the original problems returned. After another 2 weeks of work, a software problem was identified. This problem caused the computer to use a defective port for the sample stage control. It was circumvented by rewriting the startup routine. The final 3 weeks of the fellowship were spent using the XPS to analyze samples being studied in the Langley materials project (Martha Williams) and a catalyst project (Dr. Orlando Melendez). During this time, several sample analysis requests from other groups at KSC also came in and those samples were run as well. The summer faculty fellowship also allowed many contacts to be made. After meeting with the sensors group, two projects were identified for collaboration and white papers are being prepared. One project aims to develop small, very sensitive hydrogen detectors and the other to develop a broad area, easily monitored, zero power consumption hydrogen detector. In addition to the work mentioned above, the XPS was utilized in a study underway in Dr. Hampton's laboratory at UCF.

  6. Repair and Utilization of the Kratos XSAM 800 X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Michael D.

    2002-06-01

    The objectives for this summer faculty fellowship were first to repair the Kratos XSAM 800 X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS) and then to utilize the instrument to participate in ongoing research projects at KSC and in the researcher's own laboratory at UCF. The first 6 weeks were used in repairing the instrument. Working both alone and with the Kratos service engineer, a number of hardware problems, largely associated with the sample stage control system, were corrected. Defective parts were identified and fixed in the computer driver boards, the stage power supply, and the driver interface. The power supply was completely replaced. After four weeks of work, the instrument was functional. This occurred on a Wednesday. The following Friday the instrument had to be completely shut down because the power to the O & C Building was to be turned off. The instrument was properly secured. On Monday, the instrument was powered up and the original problems returned. After another 2 weeks of work, a software problem was identified. This problem caused the computer to use a defective port for the sample stage control. It was circumvented by rewriting the startup routine. The final 3 weeks of the fellowship were spent using the XPS to analyze samples being studied in the Langley materials project (Martha Williams) and a catalyst project (Dr. Orlando Melendez). During this time, several sample analysis requests from other groups at KSC also came in and those samples were run as well. The summer faculty fellowship also allowed many contacts to be made. After meeting with the sensors group, two projects were identified for collaboration and white papers are being prepared. One project aims to develop small, very sensitive hydrogen detectors and the other to develop a broad area, easily monitored, zero power consumption hydrogen detector. In addition to the work mentioned above, the XPS was utilized in a study underway in Dr. Hampton's laboratory at UCF.

  7. XPS investigation of surface reactivity of electrode materials: effect of the transition metal.

    PubMed

    Andreu, N; Flahaut, D; Dedryvère, R; Minvielle, M; Martinez, H; Gonbeau, D

    2015-04-01

    The role of the transition metal nature and Al2O3 coating on the surface reactivity of LiCoO2 and LiNi(1/3)Mn(1/3)Co(1/3)O2 (NMC) materials were studied by coupling chemisorption of gaseous probes molecules and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The XPS analyses have put in evidence the low reactivity of the LiMO2 materials toward basic gaseous probe (NH3). The reactivity toward SO2 gaseous probe is much larger (roughly more than 10 times) and strongly influenced by the nature of metal. Only one adsorption mode (redox process producing adsorbed sulfate species) was observed at the LiCoO2 surface, while NMC materials exhibit sulfate and sulfite species at the surface. On the basis of XPS analysis of bare materials and previous theoretical work, we propose that the acid-base adsorption mode involving the Ni(2+) cation is responsible for the sulfite species on the NMC surface. After Al2O3 coating, the surface reactivity was clearly decreasing for both LiCoO2 and NMC materials. In addition, for LiCoO2, the coating modifies the surface reactivity with the identification of both sulfate and sulfite species. This result is in line with a change in the adsorption mode from redox toward acid-base after Al/Co substitution. In the case of NMC materials, the coating induced a decrease of the sulfite species content at the surface. This phenomenon can be related to the cation mixing effect in the NMC. PMID:25751495

  8. Characterization of antigens adsorbed to anionic PLG microparticles by XPS and TOF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Chesko, James; Kazzaz, Jina; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Madden, Claire; Perkins, Mark; Patel, Nikin

    2008-04-01

    The chemical composition of the surface of anionic PLG microparticles before and after adsorption of vaccine antigens was measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The interfacial distributions of components will reflect underlying interactions that govern properties such as adsorption, release, and stability of proteins in microparticle vaccine delivery systems. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles were prepared by a w/o/w emulsification method in the presence of the anionic surfactant dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS). Ovalbumin, lysozyme, a recombinant HIV envelope glyocoprotein and a Neisseria meningitidis B protein were adsorbed to the PLG microparticles, with XPS and time-of-flight secondary mass used to analyze elemental and molecular distributions of components of the surface of lyophilized products. Protein (antigen) binding to PLG microparticles was measured directly by distinct elemental and molecular spectroscopic signatures consistent with amino acids and excipient species. The surface sensitive composition of proteins also included counter ions that support the importance of electrostatic interactions being crucial in the mechanism of adsorptions. The protein binding capacity was consistent with the available surface area and the interpretation of previous electron and atomic force microscope images strengthened by the quantification possible by XPS and the qualitative identification possible with TOF-SIMS. Protein antigens were detected and quantified on the surface of anionic PLG microparticles with varying degrees of efficiency under different adsorption conditions such as surfactant level, pH, and ionic strength. Observable changes in elemental and molecular composition suggest an efficient electrostatic interaction creating a composite surface layer that mediates antigen binding and release. PMID:17724659

  9. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunfeng; Gao, Bin; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra-near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C59N and its derivatives (C59N)(+), C59HN, (C59N)2, and C59N-C60, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C59N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C59N-C60 is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C59N part to the C60 part in this charge-transfer complex. PMID:24697438

  10. Al2O3 e-Beam Evaporated onto Silicon (100)/SiO2, by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Jensen, David S.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Samha, Hussein; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    We report the XPS characterization of a thin film of Al2O3 (35 nm) deposited via e-beam evaporation onto silicon (100). The film was characterized with monochromatic Al Ka radiation. An XPS survey scan, an Al 2p narrow scan, and the valence band spectrum were collected. The Al2O3 thin film is used as a diffusion barrier layer for templated carbon nanotube (CNT) growth in the preparation of microfabricated thin layer chromatography plates.

  11. XPS and Raman study of zinc containing silica microparticles loaded with insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanea, E.; Simon, V.

    2013-09-01

    Zinc-silica microparticles obtained by sol-gel method solely or by combining sol-gel chemistry with freeze-drying and spray-drying procedures were explored as potential insulin drug delivery carriers for their improved loading efficiency. Zinc containing silica hosts of different specific surface area and mean pore volume loaded with insulin under similar conditions were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy in order to assess the insulin adherence to these matrices and the biologically active state of the insulin after embedding.

  12. An XPS study of the KCl surface oxidation in oxygen glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoch, J.; Ladecka, M.

    1988-05-01

    The reaction between the surface of KCl and oxygen in a glow discharge has been studied by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Oxygen glow discharge treatment resulted in the formation of a superoxide, which decomposed under vacuum at room temperature to KO 2 and finally to K 2O. No evidence of KClO 3 or KClO 4 formation has been found. Binding energies of some oxygen species in potassium oxides were determined. The possible role of potassium in K-doped silver catalysts of ethylene epoxidation is discussed.

  13. Alumina supported model Pd Ag catalysts: A combined STM, XPS, TPD and IRAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N. A.; Uhl, A.; Shaikhutdinov, S.; Freund, H.-J.

    2006-05-01

    The bimetallic Pd-Ag model catalysts were prepared by physical vapor deposition on thin alumina films. The morphology and structure of the Pd-Ag particles were studied by STM, XPS, and by TPD and IRAS of CO. The results showed the formation of true alloy particles with Ag segregated at the surface. The addition of Ag first suppresses the most strongly bonded CO on threefold hollow sites of Pd. With further increasing Ag coverage, only isolated Pd atoms surrounded by Ag atoms are likely present on the surface. The results on CO adsorption suggest that the model Pd-Ag system mimics the structure of the real Pd-Ag catalysts.

  14. Characterization of Mo/C catalysts by XRD, XPS, and TOF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon, S.; Wilkinson, W.R.; Proctor, A.; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M.

    1995-11-09

    The objective of this work is to undertake a detailed study of the Mo/C system. This will include (a) study of the adsorption of Mo oxyanions from aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate onto activated carbon and (b) characterization of a series of Mo/C catalysts obtained by the equilibrium absorption method, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The structural information thus obtained will be used to evaluate the Mo speciation proposed earlier. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. An investigation of the corrosion of polycrystalline iron by XPS, TMS and CEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idczak, K.; Idczak, R.; Konieczny, R.

    2016-06-01

    The room temperature studies of polycrystalline iron exposed to air at various temperatures were performed using: the transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), the conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The unique combination of these techniques allows to determine changes of chemical composition and content of iron oxides simultaneously on the surface region, the 300 nm pre-surface region and the bulk of the samples. The results show that the chemical composition of samples changes significantly and it is strongly dependent on temperature at which the iron sample is exposed to air as well as on investigated region.

  16. Hybridization of XRF/XPS and scatterometry for Cu CMP process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Herron, Benoit; Chao, Robin; Kim, Kwanghoon; Lee, Wei Ti; Motoyama, Koichi; Deprospo, Bartlet; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Goldberg, Cindy

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the synergy between X-rays techniques and scatterometry, and the benefits to combine the data to improve the accuracy and precision for in-line metrology. Particular example is given to show that the hybridization addresses the challenges of aggressive patterning. In 10nm node back-end-of-line (BEOL) integration, we show that the hybridized data between scatterometry and simultaneous X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) provided the closest dimensional correlation to TEM results compared to the individual technique and CDSEM.

  17. A study of the 42CrMo4 steel surface by quantitative XPS electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flori, M.; Gruzza, B.; Bideux, L.; Monier, G.; Robert-Goumet, C.

    2008-05-01

    Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the native oxide film formed on 42CrMo4 steel surface by air exposure in normal conditions. In order to determine the thickness and composition of the oxide layer we have used a stacking layer model together with experimental XPS sputtering depth profiling. At a nanoscale study, to obtain quantitative results one must take into account fundamental parameters like the attenuation depth of photoelectrons. We have found that both lepidocrocit (γ-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe 3O 4) were present and the total thickness of the oxide layer was 16 monolayers.

  18. ILC1s in Tissue Inflammation and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are innate immune cells that provide an early source of cytokines to initiate and tailor the immune response to the type of the encountered pathogen or insult. The group 1 ILCs are comprised of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and subsets of “unconventional NK cells,” termed ILC1s. Although cNK cells and ILC1s share many features, such as certain phenotypic markers and the ability to produce IFN-γ upon activation, it is now becoming apparent that these two subsets develop from different progenitors and show unique tissue distribution and functional characteristics. Recent studies have aimed at elucidating the individual contributions of cNK cells and ILC1s during protective host responses as well as during chronic inflammation. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the developmental origins as well as of the phenotypic and functional characteristics of ILC1s. PMID:27047491

  19. 1. S. Lucas, Photographer, 1934. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY. WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. S. Lucas, Photographer, 1934. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY. WEST SIDE JUDGE WILSON HOUSE, ANN ARBOR, MICH. - Judge R. S. Wilson House, East Ann & North Division Streets, Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, MI

  20. Surface composition XPS analysis of a plasma treated polystyrene: Evolution over long storage periods.

    PubMed

    Ba, Ousmane M; Marmey, Pascal; Anselme, Karine; Duncan, Anthony C; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-09-01

    A polystyrene surface (PS) was initially treated by cold nitrogen and oxygen plasma in order to incorporate in particular amine and hydroxyl functions, respectively. The evolution of the chemical nature of the surface was further monitored over a long time period (580 days) by chemical assay, XPS and contact angle measurements. Surface density quantification of primary amine groups was performed using three chemical amine assays: 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NBZ), Sulfo succinimidyl 6-[3'(2 pyridyldithio)-pionamido] hexanoate (Sulfo-LC-SPDP) and iminothiolane (ITL). The results showed amine densities were in the range of 2 per square nanometer (comparable to the results described in the literature) after 5min of nitrogen plasma treatment. Over the time period investigated, chemical assays, XPS and contact angles suggest a drastic significant evolution of the chemical nature of the surface within the first two weeks. Beyond that time period and up to almost two years, nitrogen plasma modified substrates exhibits a slow and continuous oxidation whereas oxygen plasma modifed polystyrene surface is chemically stable after two weeks of storage. The latter appeared to "ease of" showing relatively mild changes within the one year period. Our results suggest that it may be preferable to wait for a chemical "stabilization" period of two weeks before subsequent covalent immobilization of proteins onto the surface. The originality of this work resides in the study of the plasma treated surface chemistry evolution over long periods of storage time (580 days) considerably exceeding those described in the literature. PMID:27131091

  1. Near-ambient XPS characterization of interfacial copper species in ceria-supported copper catalysts.

    PubMed

    Monte, Manuel; Munuera, Guillermo; Costa, Dominique; Conesa, José C; Martínez-Arias, Arturo

    2015-11-28

    Catalysts based on combinations of copper and cerium oxides are interesting alternatives to noble metal ones for processes involved in the production/purification of hydrogen produced from hydrocarbons or biomass like the water-gas shift or the preferential oxidation of CO reactions. Active sites for such processes have been proposed to correspond to reduced species formed at the interface between both oxides. The present work provides direct evidence of reduced copper species located at the interface and observed during the course of near-ambient XPS experiments performed over samples of copper oxide supported on ceria nanospheres and nanocubes subjected to interaction with CO at different temperatures. The analysis of XPS results is based on DFT+U calculations employed as a complementary method for the analysis of redox properties of the catalysts and core-level shifts produced upon such redox changes. Differences observed in interfacial redox properties as a function of the ceria support morphology appear to be most useful to explain catalytic properties of this type of system for mentioned processes. PMID:26497369

  2. XPS and AFM analysis of antifouling PEG interfaces for microfabricated silicon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sadhana; Johnson, Robert W; Desai, Tejal A

    2004-09-15

    In the past two decades, the biological and medical fields have seen great advances in the development of biosensors capable of quantifying biomolecules. Many of these biosensors have micro- and nano-scale features, are fabricated using biochip technology, and use silicon as a base material. The creation of antifouling sensor interfaces is critical to avoid serious consequences that arise due to their contact with biological fluids. To this end, we have created thin PEG interfaces of various grafting densities on silicon using a single-step PEG-silane coupling reaction scheme. Initial PEG concentration (5-50 mM) and coupling time (0.5-24 h) were varied to attain different grafting densities, and different PEG interfaces so created were analyzed using XPS and AFM. Furthermore, all the PEG interfaces were evaluated using XPS and AFM for their antifouling abilities using fibrinogen as the model protein. Results indicated that PEG interfaces created in this investigation are appropriate for biosensors with micro- and nano-scale features, and are efficient in controlling protein fouling. PMID:15308226

  3. Ti/CeOx(111) interfaces studied by XPS and STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yinghui; Zhou, Jing

    2012-04-01

    Low coverage of Ti was deposited on the well-ordered CeOx(111) (1.5 < x < 2) thin films grown on Ru(0001) by physical vapor deposition at room temperature. The structure and interaction of Ti/ceria interfaces were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. XPS data indicate that the deposition of Ti on both oxidized and reduced ceria surfaces causes the partial reduction of Ce from + 4 to + 3 state. Ti is formally in the + 4 state. STM data show the formation of small atomic-like titania features at 300 K, which coalesce to form chain structures upon heating. It is demonstrated in the study that the deposition of Ti can form mixed metal oxides at the interface and modify both electronic and structural properties of the ceria support. The structural study of Ti/ceria interfaces can be a key for understanding the higher catalytic activity of the Ti-CeOx mixed oxide catalysts as compared with the individual pure oxides.

  4. STM and XPS study of CeO2(111) reduction by atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Hasegawa, Tomo; Sainoo, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake; Beniya, Atsushi; Hirata, Hirohito; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of CeO2(111)/Ru(0001) surface by atomic hydrogen was investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We observed the formation of oxygen vacancy trimers and hydroxyl trimers on the stoichiometric CeO2(111) surface when it was exposed to atomic hydrogen at room temperature. The reaction of an impinging hydrogen atom with a surface oxygen atom yields a hydroxyl species, which diffuse on the surface until stabilized by the formation of OH trimers. The hydrogen atoms were located at atop sites of the oxygen atoms in the topmost surface layer. A reaction between the hopping hydrogen atom and the hydroxyl species yields a water molecule, which is desorbed from the surface leaving an oxygen defect. The oxygen vacancies were also observed as a trimer of vacancies. XPS measurements showed an increase of a reduced Ce and hydroxyl species with an amount of exposed hydrogen atoms. The former was estimated by measuring the ratio of Ce3 +/Ce4 + in the Ce 3d components. Our study shows the formation of hydroxyl trimer species in atomic scale upon atomic hydrogen exposure to CeO2(111) surface which could offer new catalytic activity.

  5. XAS and XPS Characterization of Mercury Binding on Brominated Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson,N.; Attwood, B.; Scheckel, K.

    2007-01-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species.

  6. XAS and XPS characterization of mercury binding on brominated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nick D. Hutson; Brian C. Attwood; Kirk G. Scheckel

    2007-03-01

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to be quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when burning Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of mercury on two commercially available brominated activated carbons. The results are compared with similar analysis of a conventional (non-halogenated) and chlorinated activated carbon. Both the XAS and XPS results indicate that the mercury, though introduced as elemental vapor, is consistently bound on the carbon in the oxidized form. The conventional and chlorinated activated carbons appeared to contain mercury bound to chlorinated sites and possibly to sulfate species that have been incorporated onto the carbon from adsorbed SO{sub 2}. The mercury-containing brominated sorbents appear to contain mercury bound primarily at bromination sites. The mechanism of capture for the sorbents likely consists of surface-enhanced oxidation of the elemental mercury vapor via interaction with surface-bound halide species with subsequent binding by surface halide or sulfate species. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Erosion Rate Variations during XPS Sputter Depth Profiling of Nanoporous Films

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Dan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Henry, Matthew C.; Baer, Donald R.

    2005-04-01

    Sputter depth profiling is commonly used to obtain valuable information regarding the three dimensional distribution of elements within a sample, and is one of the best ways to measure the composition of a buried interface or the uniformity of a thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the analysis tools often used in conjunction with ion beam erosion to obtain sputter depth profiles. However, to obtain accurate depth information it is often necessary to better understand the sputtering process for a specific materials system. Artifacts such as differential sputtering, varying sputter rates and ion beam-induced chemistry are well known. Here, however, we present evidence from experiments on a porous thin film deposited on a Si wafer that relatively small chemical and/or structural changes in a nanoporous film can affect the rate of erosion measured during sputter depth profiling. Reproducible variations in sputter rate are found with chemical modification leading to compositional changes of the nanoporous thin film. The origin of the sputter rate changes is discussed with the aid of results obtained using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, profilometry, nuclear reaction analysis, electron microscopy and XPS-based depth profiling.

  8. Quantification problems in depth profiling of pwr steels using Ar+ ion sputtering and XPS analysis.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Velislava A; Van Den Berghe, Sven; Van Dyck, Steven; Popok, Vladimir N

    2006-10-01

    The oxide scales of AISI 304 formed in boric acid solutions at 300 degrees C and pH = 4.5 have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling. The present focus is depth profile quantification both in depth and chemical composition on a molecular level. The roughness of the samples is studied by atomic force microscopy before and after sputtering, and the erosion rate is determined by measuring the crater depth with a surface profilometer and vertical scanning interferometry. The resulting roughness (20-30 nm), being an order of magnitude lower than the crater depth (0.2-0.5 microm), allows layer-by-layer profiling, although the ion-induced effects result in an uncertainty of the depth calibration of a factor of 2. The XPS spectrum deconvolution and data evaluation applying target factor analysis allows chemical speciation on a molecular level. The elemental distribution as a function of the sputtering time is obtained, and the formation of two layers is observed-one hydroxide (mainly iron-nickel based) on top and a second one deeper, mainly consisting of iron-chromium oxides. PMID:16984670

  9. Behavior of Supported Palladium Oxide Nanoparticles under Reaction Conditions, Studied with near Ambient Pressure XPS.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Astrid; Heutz, Niels; Raschke, Hannes; Merz, Klaus; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) is a promising method to close the "pressure gap", and thus, study the surface composition during heterogeneous reactions in situ. The specialized spectrometers necessary for this analytical technique have recently been adapted to operate with a conventional X-ray source, making it available for routine quantitative analysis in the laboratory. This is shown in the present in situ study of the partial oxidation of 2-propanol catalyzed with PdO nanoparticles supported on TiO2, which was investigated under reaction conditions as a function of gas composition (alcohol-to-oxygen ratio) and temperature. Exposure of the nanoparticles to 2-propanol at 30 °C leads to immediate partial reduction of the PdO, followed by a continuous reduction of the remaining PdO during heating. However, gaseous oxygen inhibits the reduction of PdO below 90 °C, and the oxidation of 2-propanol to carboxylates only occurs in the presence of oxygen above 90 °C. These results support the theory that metallic palladium is the active catalyst material, and they show that environmental conditions affect the nanoparticles and the reaction process significantly. The study also revealed challenges and limitations of this analytical method. Specifically, the intensity and fixed photon energy of a conventional X-ray source limit the spectral resolution and surface sensitivity of lab-based NAP-XPS, which affect precision and accuracy of the quantitative analysis. PMID:26144222

  10. As-Received, Ozone Cleaned and Ar+ Sputtered Surfaces of Hafnium Oxide Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition and Studied by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Herman, Jacob A.; Wallace, Robert; Baer, Donald R.

    2012-06-27

    In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization was performed on 47 nm thick hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films grown by atomic layer deposition using TEMA-Hf/H{sub 2}O at 250 C substrate temperature. HfO{sub 2} is currently being studied as a possible replacement for Silicon Oxide (SiO{sub 2}) as a gate dielectric in electronics transistors. XPS spectra were collected on a Physical Electronics Quantum 2000 Scanning ESCA Microprobe using a monochromatic Al K{sub a} X-ray (1486.7 eV) excitation source. The sample was analyzed under the following conditions: as received, after UV irradiation for five minutes, and after sputter cleaning with 2 kV Ar{sup +} ions for 180 seconds. Survey scans showed carbon, oxygen, and hafnium as the major species in the film, while the only minor species of argon and carbide was detected after sputtering. Adventitious carbon initially composed approximately 18.6 AT% of the surface, but after UV cleaning it was reduced to 2.4 AT%. This demonstrated that that the majority of carbon was due to adventitious carbon. However, after 2 kV Ar{sup +} sputtering there was still only trace amounts of carbon at {approx}1 AT%, Some of this trace carbon is now in the form of a carbide due to the interaction with Ar{sup +} used for sputter cleaning. Furthermore, the stoiciometric ratio of oxygen and hafnium is consistent with a high quality HfO{sub 2} film.

  11. GreenLight 180W XPS photovaporization of the prostate: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Kevin C; Liberman, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    , resulting in a higher-powered 532 nm wavelength green light laser while still using the same 70-degree deflecting, side firing, silica fiber delivery system. The HPS offered an 88% more collimated beam and smaller spot size, resulting in much higher irradiance or power density in its 2 predecessors (60W and 80W) with a beam divergence of 8 versus 15 degrees. The primary aim for this upgrade was to reduce lasing time and improve clinical outcomes while demonstrating the same degree of safety for patients. Limitations of the 120W system included treatment of large prostates greater than 80g-100g and increased cost related to fiber devitrification and fracture. In 2011, the 180W-Greenlight XPS system was introduced, not only with increased power setting to vaporize tissue quicker but significant fiber-design changes. Internal cooling, metal-tip cap protection and FiberLife (temperature sensing feedback), better preserve the integrity of the fiber generally producing a 1-fiber per case expectation. Initial personal experience with XPS has provided comparable outcomes related to morbidity, but with the opportunity to perform a more complete and rapid procedure. Published clinical data with the XPS is unfortunately lacking. The objective of this report is to detail our approach and technique for GreenLight XPS drawing on personal experience with both enucleation and vaporization techniques with various laser technologies along with having performed over 500 GreenLight HPS and 100 XPS procedures. In this regard, recommendations for training are also made, which relate to existing users of the 80W and 120W GreenLight laser as well as to new laser users. PMID:22018158

  12. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  13. Vibrational and VCD spectra of poly(menthyl vinyl ether)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, J. L.; Bour, P.; Wieser, H.

    1998-06-01

    The detailed assignments are reported for the vibrational and VCD spectra of (1S,2R,5S)-(+)-menthol. Energy minimized geometries, harmonic force fields, and atomic polar tensors were calculated at the Becke3LYP/6-31G** level, and atomic axial tensors with the vibronic coupling theory at the HF/6-31G level. The spectra consist of contributions mainly from two isomers (70%) distinguished only by conformation of the OH group. An attempt was made to simulate the absorption and VCD spectra of poly(methyl vinyl ether) using a component approach and invoking the excitation scheme with promising though not conclusive results at this stage.

  14. Electronic state of ruthenium deposited onto oxide supports: An XPS study taking into account the final state effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larichev, Yurii V.; Moroz, Boris L.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2011-12-01

    The electronic state of ruthenium in the supported Ru/EOx (EOx = MgO, Al2O3 or SiO2) catalysts prepared by with the use of Ru(OH)Cl3 or Ru(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate) and reduced with H2 at 723 K is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the Ru 3d, Cl 2p and O 1s regions. The influence of the final state effects (the differential charging and variation of the relaxation energy) on the binding energy (BE) of Ru 3d5/2 core level measured for supported Ru nanoparticles is estimated by comparison of the Fermi levels and the modified Auger parameters determined for the Ru/EOx samples with the corresponding characteristics of the bulk Ru metal. It is found that the negative shift of the Ru 3d5/2 peak which is observed in the spectrum of ruthenium deposited onto MgO (BE = 279.5-279.7 eV) with respect to that of Ru black (BE = 280.2 eV) or ruthenium supported on γ-Al2O3 and SiO2 (BE = 280.4 eV) is caused not by the transfer of electron density from basic sites of MgO, as considered earlier, but by the differential charging of the supported Ru particles compared with the support surface. Correction for the differential charging value reveals that the initial state energies of ruthenium in the Ru/EOx systems are almost identical (BE = 280.5 ± 0.1 eV) irrespectively of acid-base properties of the support, the mean size of supported Ru crystallites (within the range of 2-10 nm) and the surface Cl content. The results obtained suggest that the difference in ammonia synthesis activity between the Ru catalysts supported on MgO and on the acidic supports is accounted for by not different electronic state of ruthenium on the surface of these oxides but by some other reasons.

  15. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  16. Scattering Spectra of Single Gold Nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason H.; Nehl, Colleen L.; Goodrich, Glenn P.; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi J.

    2004-03-01

    Gold nanoshells are metal coated silica nanoparticles whose plasmon resonances vary from the visible to IR depending on their core to shell thickness ratio. Monodisperse nanoshell solutions can be synthesized such that their absorbance spectra match the calculated extinction spectra for the corresponding nanoshell structure. Using transmitted light dark field illumination and high numerical aperture optics, we have studied the scattering spectra of single gold nanoshells supported on ITO substrates in an optically homogeneous medium. With the aid of alignment marks, the same nanoshell can then be structurally characterized by electron microscopy. We have used this system to investigate the lineshape of single nanoshell scattering spectra to further elucidate the relative contributions of retardation, electron-interface scattering, and structural inhomogeneity. [1] Single particle measurements also facilitate the observation subtle interparticle and particle-substrate hybridization effects. [2] [1] S. L. Westcott, J. B. Jackson, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, Phys. Rev. B 66, 155431 (2002). [2] E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, Science 302, 419-422 (2003).

  17. C 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) of substituted benzoic acids: a theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Baldea,I.; Schimmelpfennig, B.; Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J.; Schirmer, J.; Trofimov, A.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to explain the discrete transitions in experimental C 1s-NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) spectra of various benzoic acid derivates. Transition energies and oscillator strengths of the contributing C 1s-{pi}* excitations are computed using the ADC(2) (second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction) method. This method is demonstrated to be well suited for the finite electronic systems represented by these simple organic acids. There is good agreement between experiment and theory reproducing all the relevant spectral features. Some transitions can only be assigned based on a theoretical foundation. Remaining discrepancies between experimental and computed spectra are discussed.

  18. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yunfeng; Gao, Bin; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra—near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  19. Double protein functionalized poly-ε-caprolactone surfaces: in depth ToF-SIMS and XPS characterization.

    PubMed

    Desmet, T; Poleunis, C; Delcorte, A; Dubruel, P

    2012-02-01

    In biomaterial research, great attention has focussed on the immobilization of biomolecules with the aim to increase cell-adhesive properties of materials. Many different strategies can be applied. In previously published work, our group focussed on the treatment of poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) films by an Ar-plasma, followed by the grafting of 2-aminoethyl methacrylate (AEMA) under UV-irradiation. The functional groups introduced, enabled the subsequent covalent immobilisation of gelatin. The obtained coating was finally applied for the physisorption of fibronectin. The successful PCL surface functionalization was preliminary confirmed using XPS, wettability studies, AFM and SEM. In the present article, we report on an in-depth characterization of the materials developed using ToF-SIMS and XPS analysis. The homogeneous AEMA grafting and the subsequent protein coating steps could be confirmed by both XPS and ToF-SIMS. Using ToF-SIMS, it was possible to demonstrate the presence of polymethacrylates on the surface. From peak deconvoluted XPS results (C- and N-peak), the presence of proteins could be confirmed. Using ToF-SIMS, different positive ions, correlating to specific amino-acids could be identified. Importantly, the gelatin and the fibronectin coatings could be qualitatively distinguished. Interestingly for biomedical applications, ethylene oxide sterilization did not affect the surface chemical composition. This research clearly demonstrates the complementarities of XPS and ToF-SIMS in biomedical surface modification research. PMID:22203514

  20. XPS investigation of ion beam induced conversion of GaAs(0 0 1) surface into GaN overlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Kumar, Mahesh; Govind; Mehta, B. R.; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    For the advance of GaN based optoelectronic devices, one of the major barriers has been the high defect density in GaN thin films, due to lattice parameter and thermal expansion incompatibility with conventional substrates. Of late, efforts are focused in fine tuning epitaxial growth and in search for a low temperature method of forming low defect GaN with zincblende structure, by a method compatible to the molecular beam epitaxy process. In principle, to grow zincblende GaN the substrate should have four-fold symmetry and thus zincblende GaN has been prepared on several substrates including Si, 3C-SiC, GaP, MgO, and on GaAs(0 0 1). The iso-structure and a common shared element make the epitaxial growth of GaN on GaAs(0 0 1) feasible and useful. In this study ion-induced conversion of GaAs(0 0 1) surface into GaN at room temperature is optimized. At the outset a Ga-rich surface is formed by Ar + ion bombardment. Nitrogen ion bombardment of the Ga-rich GaAs surface is performed by using 2-4 keV energy and fluence ranging from 3 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 to 1 × 10 18 ions/cm 2. Formation of surface GaN is manifested as chemical shift. In situ core level and true secondary electron emission spectra by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are monitored to observe the chemical and electronic property changes. Using XPS line shape analysis by deconvolution into chemical state, we report that 3 keV N 2+ ions and 7.2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 are the optimal energy and fluence, respectively, for the nitridation of GaAs(0 0 1) surface at room temperature. The measurement of electron emission of the interface shows the dependence of work function to the chemical composition of the interface. Depth profile study by using Ar + ion sputtering, shows that a stoichiometric GaN of 1 nm thickness forms on the surface. This, room temperature and molecular beam epitaxy compatible, method of forming GaN temperature can serve as an excellent template for growing low defect GaN epitaxial overlayers.

  1. High fluence ion beam modification of polymer surfaces: EPR and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popok, V. N.; Azarko, I. I.; Odzhaev, V. B.; Tóth, A.; Khaibullin, R. I.

    2001-05-01

    Polyethylene, polyamide-6 and polyimide foils implanted with 100 keV B+, P+ and Sb + ions to a fluence range of 10 15-10 17 cm-2 have been studied using the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods. The experimental data allow the comparison of the implantation-induced changes both in a given polymer foil under different ion beam regimes and in different polymers under similar ion-bombardment conditions. The high fluence implantation of boron ions, depositing energy mainly via electronic stopping, was found to be accompanied with the effective formation of π-bonded carbon-rich clusters. By contrast, heavier (phosphorus and antimony) ions, which deposit energy predominantly in nuclear collisions, produced a lower concentration of π-radicals and a less carbonised top surface layer. The peculiarities and main trends of the alterations of the polymer structure and composition induced via electronic and nuclear stopping have also been discussed.

  2. Study of gadolinia-doped ceria solid electrolyte surface by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradyot Majewski, Peter; Aldinger, Fritz

    2009-02-15

    Gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO) is an important material to be used as electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cell for intermediate temperature operation. Ceria doped with 10 mol% gadolinia (Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95}) was prepared by conventional solid state synthesis and found to be single phase by room temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD). The chemical states of the surface of the prepared sample were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Though Gd was present in its characteristic chemical state, Ce was found in both Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} states. Presence of Ce{sup 3+} state was ascribed to the differential yield of oxygen atoms in the sputtering process.

  3. XPS/STM study of model bimetallic Pd-Au/HOPG catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Prosvirin, Igor P.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2016-03-01

    The preparation of model bimetallic Pd-Au/HOPG catalysts has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Initially, model "core-shell" type Pd-Au/HOPG catalysts with similar particle size distribution (5-8 nm), but with different densities of particle locations on the HOPG surface and Pd/Au atomic ratios are prepared. Further, their thermal stability is studied within a temperature range of 50-500 °C at UHV conditions. It has been shown that annealing the model catalysts at a temperature range of 300-400 °C leads to formation of Pd-Au alloyed particles. Enhancement of heating temperature up to 500 °C results in sintering of bimetallic nanoparticles. Contribution of different parameters controlling the properties of Pd-Au alloyed particles has been discussed.

  4. XPS study on double glow plasma corrosion-resisting surface alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jiahe; Xu, Jiang; He, Fei; Xie, Xishan; Xu, Zhong

    2003-02-01

    Double glow plasma corrosion-resisting surface alloying layer (SAL) formed on low carbon steel 1020 was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and other means. Results show that the passive film of the surface alloying layer after electrochemical test in 3.5% NaCl solution consists of Cr and Fe oxide such as CrO 3, Cr 2O 3, Fe 2O 3 and FeO and metallic Ni and Mo, and it attributes to the fact that a continuous and compact corrosion-resisting surface alloying layer with rich Cr, Ni and Mo was formed on the surface of steel 1020 so as to increase its corrosion resistance greatly. Therefore, double glow plasma technique will be widely used in corrosion-resisting surface science.

  5. Study by XPS of different conditioning processes to improve the cation exchange in clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Serrano, D.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Conde-Barajas, E.; Ramírez-Rosales, D.; Yáñez-Limón, J. M.; Ramírez-Bon, R.

    2010-09-01

    We report the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of natural clinoptilolite from a mine in Sonora, México. From these measurements we determined the chemical state and binding energy of the elements in the zeolite framework and of those in the extra framework sites. The analysis was done on natural clinoptilolite and on cation-exchanged clinoptilolites with Na + and NH4+ ions. Complementary analysis by several experimental techniques was performed to determine the structural, chemical composition and chemical state modifications experimented by clinoptilolite samples processed by the two types of cation exchange. The clinoptilolite samples were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine their structural composition, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) to measure the chemical composition and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the chemical state of iron inside the natural zeolites.

  6. Interfacial analysis of tribological systems containing molybdenum disulfide and iron using XPS and CEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabinski, J. S.; George, T.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    In the present evaluation of results from studies of the interfacial chemistry and morphology of a buried lubricant-substrate interface, specimens of increasing complexity that culminated with the effects of excess sulfur and defects were characterized by XPS and SEM, as well as conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). In order to simulate sputtered systems, single crystals of MoS2 were damaged with Ar(+) bombardment and coated with Fe. Fe is found to react differently with MoS2 depending on surface treatments, surface defects, annealing treatments, and the presence of excess sulfur. The annealing temperature determines which compounds are formed, as well as the crystal habit and plane at the Fe-MoS2 interface.

  7. Use of XPS to investigate surface problems in ULC deep drawing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberigts, Marcel; Servais, Jean-Pierre

    1999-04-01

    During continuous annealing prior to hot dip galvanising, the surface of ULC ( Ultra Low Carbon) deep drawing steels undergoes a range of chemical modifications that can affect interface reactions, thus influencing the quality of the metallic protective coating and the product's final user's properties. These phenomena were investigated by XPS, in a high-resolution, fully automatic spectrometer coupled with a tight preparation chamber, where the treatment can be simulated very faithfully, in terms of both heat cycle and protective atmosphere. Under vacuum, the equilibrium (Gibbs) surface segregation of alloying — or tramp — elements such as P, Sn, Sb, As, S and C is clearly the predominant phenomenon. Selective oxidation grows much more significant when annealing is performed under a water vapour containing N 2-5%H 2 protective atmosphere. It involves highly oxidisable elements such as Al, Mn and Si. Though much less intense than under vacuum, Gibbs segregation however remains present, in direct competition with selective oxidation.

  8. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  11. 26 CFR 1.1361-1 - S corporation defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false S corporation defined. 1.1361-1 Section 1.1361-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1361-1 S corporation defined. (a) In general. For purposes...

  12. Colloidal diatomite, radionickel, and humic substance interaction: a combined batch, XPS, and EXAFS investigation.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guodong; Shen, Runpu; Dong, Huaping; Li, Yimin

    2013-06-01

    This work determined the influence of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) on the interaction mechanism and microstructure of Ni(II) onto diatomite by using batch experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Macroscopic and spectroscopic experiments have been combined to see the evolution of the interaction mechanism and microstructure of Ni(II) in the presence of HA/FA as compared with that in the absence of HA/FA. The results indicated that the interaction of Ni(II) with diatomite presents the expected solution pH edge at 7.0, which is modified by addition of HA/FA. In the presence of HA/FA, the interaction of Ni(II) with diatomite increased below solution pH 7.0, while Ni(II) interaction decreased above solution pH 7.0. XPS analysis suggested that the enrichment of Ni(II) onto diatomite may be due to the formation of (≡SO)2Ni. EXAFS results showed that binary surface complexes and ternary surface complexes of Ni(II) can be simultaneously formed in the presence of HA/FA, whereas only binary surface complexes of Ni(II) are formed in the absence of HA/FA, which contribute to the enhanced Ni(II) uptake at low pH values. The results observed in this work are important for the evaluation of Ni(II) and related radionuclide physicochemical behavior in the natural soil and water environment. PMID:23143822

  13. Arsenopyrite and pyrite bioleaching: evidence from XPS, XRD and ICP techniques.

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, Marzia; Licheri, Cristina; Atzei, Davide; Loi, Giovanni; Elsener, Bernhard; Rossi, Giovanni; Rossi, Antonella

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a multi-technical bulk and surface analytical approach was used to investigate the bioleaching of a pyrite and arsenopyrite flotation concentrate with a mixed microflora mainly consisting of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray-induced Auger electron spectroscopy mineral surfaces investigations, along with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur determination (CHNS) analyses, were carried out prior and after bioleaching. The flotation concentrate was a mixture of pyrite (FeS(2)) and arsenopyrite (FeAsS); after bioleaching, 95% of the initial content of pyrite and 85% of arsenopyrite were dissolved. The chemical state of the main elements (Fe, As and S) at the surface of the bioreactor feed particles and of the residue after bioleaching was investigated by X-ray photoelectron and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. After bioleaching, no signals of iron, arsenic and sulphur originating from pyrite and arsenopyrite were detected, confirming a strong oxidation and the dissolution of the particles. On the surfaces of the mineral residue particles, elemental sulphur as reaction intermediate of the leaching process and precipitated secondary phases (Fe-OOH and jarosite), together with adsorbed arsenates, was detected. Evidence of microbial cells adhesion at mineral surfaces was also produced: carbon and nitrogen were revealed by CHNS, and nitrogen was also detected on the bioleached surfaces by XPS. This was attributed to the deposition, on the mineral surfaces, of the remnants of a bio-film consisting of an extra-cellular polymer layer that had favoured the bacterial action. PMID:21847529

  14. The influence of surface chemistry on GSR particles: using XPS to complement SEM/EDS analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoeble, A. J.; Strohmeier, Brian R.; Piasecki, John D.

    2010-06-01

    Gunshot residue particles (GSR) were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) to illustrate the size, shape, morphology, and elemental composition normally observed in particulate resulting from a discharged firearm. Determining the presence of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), and barium (Ba), barring other elemental tags, fused together in a single particle with the correct morphology, is all that is required for the positive identification of GSR. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), however, can reveal more detailed information on surface chemistry than SEM/EDS. XPS is a highly surface-sensitive (<= ~10 nm), non-destructive, analytical technique that provides qualitative information for all elements except hydrogen and helium. Nanometer-scale sampling depth and its ability to provide unique chemical state information make XPS a potential technique for providing important knowledge on the surface chemistry of GSR that complements results obtained from SEM/EDS analysis.

  15. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  16. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  17. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  18. Multispectral processing without spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Mark S.; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out, for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 1553 (1994) we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 33 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 3003 (1994). We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. 2003 Optical Society of America

  19. Multispectral processing without spectra.

    PubMed

    Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out,for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1553 (1994)] we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 3 x 3 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model [G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 3003 (1994)]. We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. PMID:12868625

  20. Observation of $\\Upsilon(4S) decays to$\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-19

    The authors present the first measurement of {Upsilon}(4S) decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(2S) based on a sample of 230 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. They measure the product branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (2.23 {+-} 0.25{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (1.69 {+-} 0.26{sub stat} {+-} 0.20{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6}, from which they derive the partial widths {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) = (1.8 {+-} 0.4) keV and {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) = (2.7 {+-} 0.8) keV.

  1. XRD and XPS analysis of the degradation of the polymer electrolyte in H 2-O 2 fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengde; Seng Tan, Kim; Lin, Jianyi; Lee Tan, Kuang

    2003-03-01

    Nafion ® is frequently used as electrolyte membrane in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). In this Letter the degradation of the Nafion ® polymer electrolyte was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD showed that the electrode potential and low gas humidification temperature could decrease the crystallinity of Nafion ®. XPS analysis indicated that the Nafion ® was decomposed in the hydrogen potential region of the fuel cell, through the interaction of the hydrophobic (CF 2) n groups of the membrane with H or/and C atoms.

  2. Intensity oscillations in the carbon 1s ionization cross sections of 2-butyne

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Thomas X.; Zahl, Maria G.; Borve, Knut J.; Saethre, Leif J.; Decleva, Piero; Ponzi, Aurora; Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Thomas, T. Darrah

    2013-06-21

    Carbon 1s photoelectron spectra for 2-butyne (CH{sub 3}C{identical_to}CCH{sub 3}) measured in the photon energy range from threshold to 150 eV above threshold show oscillations in the intensity ratio C2,3/C1,4. Similar oscillations have been seen in chloroethanes, where the effect has been attributed to EXAFS-type scattering from the substituent chlorine atoms. In 2-butyne, however, there is no high-Z atom to provide a scattering center and, hence, oscillations of the magnitude observed are surprising. The results have been analyzed in terms of two different theoretical models: a density-functional model with B-spline atom-centered functions to represent the continuum electrons and a multiple-scattering model using muffin-tin potentials to represent the scattering centers. Both methods give a reasonable description of the energy dependence of the intensity ratios.

  3. O1s photoionization dynamics in oriented NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stener, Mauro; Decleva, Piero; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yagishita, Akira

    2011-05-01

    We have performed extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations, partial cross sections, dipole prepared continuum orbitals, dipole amplitudes and phase shifts, asymmetry parameters β, and molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions, to elucidate the O1s photoionization dynamics of NO2 molecule with emphasis on the shape resonances in the O1s ionization continuum. In the shape resonance region, the β parameters and photoelectron angular distributions have been compared with our experimental results. Fairly good agreement between the theory and experiment has confirmed that the DFT level calculations can well describe the photoionization dynamics of the simple molecule such as NO2. Interference due to equivalent atom photoionization is theoretically considered, and the possibility of detection of the effect in the two degenerate channels with different combinations of light polarization and photoemission direction is discussed.

  4. Elastic modulus, oxidation depth and adhesion force of surface modified polystyrene studied by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, G. V.; Davidson, M. R.; Bradley, R. H.

    2004-06-01

    AFM and XPS have been used to investigate the surface and near-surface properties of polystyrene (PS) substrates which have been subjected to one of three controlled surface modification processes performed in situ in a specially constructed cell. The cell was fitted to a Digital Instruments Nanoscope III AFM measuring head and allowed close control of the gaseous environment and made it possible to UV irradiate the sample during AFM measurements. Treatments were carried out using UV at 184.9 and 253.7 nm wavelengths, in oxygen (UV-ozone), and in nitrogen (UV-only). Polystyrene surfaces were also modified by an exposure to an atmosphere of ozone in the absence of UV (ozone-only). Data show that adhesion force is highest between tip and sample for the UV-ozone exposed surfaces and that the adhesion force increases with sample exposure time. Exposure to UV-only or ozone alone results in lower ultimate adhesion levels with a slower rate of increase with exposure time. Evaluation of Young's modulus for unmodified PS gave a value of 3.37 (±0.52) GPa which agrees well with the textbook value which ranges from 2 to 4 GPa depending on the measurement technique. A 60 s exposure to combined UV-ozone resulted in the formation of a surface layer with a modulus at the surface of 1.25 (±0.19) GPa which increased to 2.5 (±0.37) GPa at a depth of 3.5 nm. The sample exposed for 60 s to UV-only had a Young's modulus of 2.6 (±0.39) GPa but showed no reduced modulus layer at the surface. The modulus of the ozone-only treated material was the least affected with a decrease of around 0.75 GPa with some evidence for a surface layer with a modulus ranging from 2.6 (±0.39) GPa at the surface to 3.2 (±0.48) GPa at a depth of 2 nm. XPS analyses reveal that the oxygen content of the modified surfaces decreased in the order of UV-ozone > UV > ozone with approximate concentrations for a 60 s exposure of 5, 0.7 and 0.05 at.%, respectively. Friction force imaging of patterned surfaces

  5. Precision frequency measurement of 1S0-3P1 intercombination lines of Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Feng; Ye-Bing, Wang; Xiao, Tian; Jie, Ren; Ben-Quan, Lu; Qin-Fang, Xu; Yu-Lin, Xie; Hong, Chang

    2015-01-01

    We report on frequency measurement of the intercombination (5s2)1S0-(5s5p)3P1 transition of the four natural isotopes of strontium, including 88Sr (82.58%), 87Sr (7.0%), 86Sr (9.86%), and 84Sr (0.56%). A narrow-linewidth laser that is locked to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity with a finesse of 12000 is evaluated at a linewidth of 200 Hz with a fractional frequency drift of 2.8×10-13 at an integration time of 1 s. The fluorescence collector and detector are specially designed, based on a thermal atomic beam. Using a double-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) combined with a fiber and laser power stabilization configuration to detune the laser frequency enables high signal-to-noise ratios and precision saturated spectra to be obtained for the six transition lines, which allows us to determine the transition frequency precisely. The optical frequency is measured using an optical frequency synthesizer referenced to an H maser. Both the statistical values and the final values, including the corrections and uncertainties, are derived for a comparison with the values given in other works. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61127901) and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  6. Carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum of methane: Vibrational excitation and core-hole lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. X.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Hahne, J.; Kukk, E.; Sæthre, L. J.; Thomas, T. D.

    1999-05-01

    The carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum has been measured for CH4 at photon energies of 302, 320, and 330 eV and for CD4 at 330 eV with an instrumental resolution about half the natural linewidth. These spectra have been analyzed to obtain vibrational spacings, vibrational intensities, and the lifetime of the carbon 1s core-hole state. The vibrational intensities vary with photon energy, in agreement with earlier results. At 330 eV, the observed Franck-Condon factors for both CH4 and CD4 can be understood only if anharmonic effects (consistent with the predictions of theory) are included. On the other hand, the vibrational spacings in CH4 show no evidence for anharmonicity (in contrast with theoretical predictions). In CD4 the observed anharmonicity in the vibrational energy spacings is about half of the predicted value, but the experimental and theoretical values differ only by an amount comparable to the experimental uncertainty. The measured values of the lifetime show a dependence on photon energy; this is attributed to failure of the theory of post-collision interaction to predict correctly the observed electron spectrum near threshold. At 330 eV, the measured Lorentzian lifetime, 93-95 meV, agrees with predictions of simple theory, but not with the prediction of more complete theory. It is also observed that there are systematic discrepancies between the observed line shapes and those predicted by the theory of postcollision interaction.

  7. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  8. Einstein spectra of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the initial stage of the CfA survey of quasar energy distributions are reviewed. Einstein imaging proportional counter spectra of 33 quasars have been studied by fitting a single power law slope and absorption by an equivalent column density of neutral hydrogen. Comparison with the higher energy HEAO-A2 data leads to a two-component model for the X-ray spectrum. The X-ray column density is systematically lower than the 21-cm measured Galactic column density along the same line of sight.

  9. Composition-dependent structure of polycrystalline magnetron-sputtered V-Al-C-N hard coatings studied by XRD, XPS, XANES and EXAFS.

    PubMed

    Krause, Bärbel; Darma, Susan; Kaufholz, Marthe; Mangold, Stefan; Doyle, Stephen; Ulrich, Sven; Leiste, Harald; Stüber, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2013-08-01

    V-Al-C-N hard coatings with high carbon content were deposited by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using an experimental combinatorial approach, deposition from a segmented sputter target. The composition-dependent coexisting phases within the coating were analysed using the complementary methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). For the analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, a new approach for evaluation of the pre-edge peak was developed, taking into account the self-absorption effects in thin films. Within the studied composition range, a mixed face-centred cubic (V,Al)(C,N) phase coexisting with a C-C-containing phase was observed. No indication of hexagonal (V,Al)(N,C) was found. The example of V-Al-C-N demonstrates how important a combination of complementary methods is for the detection of coexisting phases in complex multi-element coatings. PMID:24046506

  10. Composition-dependent structure of polycrystalline magnetron-sputtered V–Al–C–N hard coatings studied by XRD, XPS, XANES and EXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Bärbel; Darma, Susan; Kaufholz, Marthe; Mangold, Stefan; Doyle, Stephen; Ulrich, Sven; Leiste, Harald; Stüber, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2013-01-01

    V–Al–C–N hard coatings with high carbon content were deposited by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using an experimental combinatorial approach, deposition from a segmented sputter target. The composition-dependent coexisting phases within the coating were analysed using the complementary methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). For the analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, a new approach for evaluation of the pre-edge peak was developed, taking into account the self-absorption effects in thin films. Within the studied composition range, a mixed face-centred cubic (V,Al)(C,N) phase coexisting with a C–C-containing phase was observed. No indication of hexagonal (V,Al)(N,C) was found. The example of V–Al–C–N demonstrates how important a combination of complementary methods is for the detection of coexisting phases in complex multi-element coatings. PMID:24046506

  11. Core localization and {sigma}* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kivimaeki, Antti; Sorensen, Stacey L.; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO{sub 2} molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking {sigma}* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the {sigma}* valence orbital.

  12. Incorporation of amino acids within the surface reactive layers of bioactive glass in vitro: an XPS study.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, T A; Davies, J E

    2000-01-01

    Surface reaction layers grown on bioactive glass (Bioglass), by immersion in either simulated body fluid (SBF) or minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) for 2, 5, 32 and 72 h, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Layers grown in alpha-MEM exhibited delamination when observed in SEM. Low resolution XPS analysis detected nitrogen at the surface of the Bioglass exposed to alpha-MEM for 72 h (8 relative at%), whereas insignificant nitrogen was found at the surface of any sample immersed in SBF. XPS depth profiling (argon) showed the presence of nitrogen throughout the depth of the surface layer of the sample incubated in alpha-MEM for 72 h. Deconvolution of the nitrogen envelope in a high resolution XPS spectrum demonstrated nitrogen characteristic of the amine bonds present in amino acids. Carbon concentration also considerably increased over time with exposure to alpha-MEM (24-55%), whereas it remained in the 20-25% range in SBF. These results demonstrate that the amino acids contained in the culture medium were incorporated within the growing calcium phosphate rich surface reaction layer of Bioglass. PMID:15348094

  13. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  14. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Fierro, P.; Masuko, M.; Jones, W.R. Jr.; Pepper, S.V.

    1994-04-01

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R[sub f]COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  15. RBS and XPS analyses of the composite calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Yamaguchi, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2005-12-01

    The calcium phosphate coatings on metallic implants are widely used for biomedical applications. The calcium phosphate coatings require mechanical strength, strong adhesion to the metallic implants, chemical stability and low dissolution into the human body fluid for stable functioning in the corrosive environment of the human body. In this study, a novel approach for improving the calcium phosphate coatings is utilized by adding trace metallic element into the coatings. We focused on teeth enamel, which is the hardest calcium phosphate tissue in the human body. Zn concentration increases exponentially from the interior to the surface of the enamel. As the Zn concentration increases, so the local hardness increases. Our previous studies suggest that Zn has influence on the hardness and other properties of enamel, calcium phosphate tissue. Calcium phosphate coatings doped with Zn was fabricated and characterized. The atomic composition and chemical state were investigated by using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), respectively. Scratch test was also carried out for measuring the adhesion of the coatings.

  16. Soft X-ray-induced decomposition of amino acids: An XPS, massspectrometry, and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Zubavichus, Y.; Fuchs, O.; Weinhardt, L.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.; Denlinger, J.D.; Grunze, M.

    2003-02-26

    Decomposition of five amino acids, viz. alanine, serine,cysteine, aspartic acid, and asparagine under soft X-ray irradiation (MgKα X-ray source) in ultra-high vacuum has been studied by meansof XPS and mass-spectrometry. A comparative analysis of changes in XPSline shapes, stoichiometry, and residual gas composition indicates thatthe molecules decompose via severalpathways. Dehydration,decarboxylation, decarbonylation, deamination, and desulfurization ofpristine molecules accompanied by desorption of H2, H2O, CO2, CO, NH3,H2S are observed with rates depending on the specific amino acid. NEXAFSspectra of cysteine at the C, O, N K- and S L2,3-edges complement the XPSand mass-spectrometry data and show that exposure of the sample to anintense soft X-ray synchrotron beam results in a formation of C-C and C-Ndouble and triple bonds. Qualitatively, the studied amino acids can bearranged in the following ascending order for radiation stability: serine

  17. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Masuko, Masabumi; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R(sub f)COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  18. XPS analysis of the effect of fillers on PTFE transfer film development in sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchet, T. A.; Kennedy, F. E.; Jayne, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    The development of transfer films atop steel counterfaces in contact with unfilled and bronze-filled PTFE has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sliding apparatus was contained within the vacuum of the analytical system, so the effects of the native oxide, hydrocarbon, and adsorbed gaseous surface layers of the steel upon the PTFE transfer behavior could be studied in situ. For both the filled and the unfilled PTFE, cleaner surfaces promoted greater amounts of transfer. Metal fluorides, which formed at the transfer film/counterface interface, were found solely in cases where the native oxide had been removed to expose the metallic surface prior to sliding. These fluorides also were found at clean metal/PTFE interfaces formed in the absence of frictional contact. A fraction of these fluorides resulted from irradiation damage inherent in XPS analysis. PTFE transfer films were found to build up with repeated sliding passes, by a process in which strands of transfer filled in the remaining counterface area. Under these reported test conditions, the transfer process is not expected to continue atop previously deposited transfer films. The bronze-filled composite generated greater amounts of transfer than the unfilled PTFE. The results are discussed relative to the observed increase in wear resistance imparted to PTFE by a broad range of inorganic fillers.

  19. Local, global and electronic structure of supported gold nanoclusters determined by EXAFS, XRD and XPS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Nicolae; Rednic, Vasile; Pintea, Stelian; Marginean, Petru; Barz, Bogdan; Gluhoi, Andreea; Nieuwenhuys, Bernard E.; Neumann, Manfred; Yaning, Xie; Matei, Florica

    2009-07-01

    We analyze gold nanoclusters as supported catalysts by extended X-ray absorption fine structure, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to determine their local, global and electronic structure. The present study points out a strong deformation of the local structure of the metal due to its interaction with oxide supports. We determine the particle size distribution and microstrain functions of the Au nanoclusters by X-ray diffraction method. Based on X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis we show that the entire local structure of the investigated systems is strongly distorted regarding the average Au-Au coordination number. The distances between atoms are practically the same as standard Au foil. The strong metal-support interaction is confirmed by the change in shape of the electron transition probability densities that appear in the Au L III-edge. From XPS investigations we find electronic states corresponding to gold as well as to the oxide supports.

  20. Compositional aspect of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst: An XPS/reaction study

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Stair, P.C.; Butt, J.B. )

    1989-08-01

    The catalytic and compositional behaviors of prereduced and unreduced iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were investigated. Catalytic behavior was evaluated by measuring rates of hydrocarbon formation 3:1 H{sub 2}:CO mixture at 1 atm and 250C. Iron phases which evolved near the catalyst surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and bulk phases present following reaction were determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy. At low conversion levels the prereduced catalyst was gradually converted to iron carbide with no significant oxide phase formed. Synthesis activities increased initially with the formation of active surface carbon, but eventually lost some activity due to graphitic carbon formation. At higher conversions, the prereduced catalyst showed some formation of surface oxide phases and an inhibition of the synthesis rate due to water adsorption. Surface carbon accumulation was also suppressed under these conditions. Unreduced Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed no initial synthesis activity, but underwent a gradual activation to become even more active than the prereduced catalyst. The oxide catalyst was eventually completely reduced to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and any metallic phase formed was rapidly converted to iron carbide. Compared to reduced materials, the oxide catalyst accumulated considerably less surface carbon and showed no loss of activity for reaction times up to 48 h. XPS analysis suggests that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is active for synthesis.

  1. Corrosion prevention capability of polyaniline (emeraldine base and salt): An XPS study

    SciTech Connect

    Jasty, S.; Epstein, A.J.

    1995-12-01

    There has been a keen interest in the use of polyaniline coatings for the corrosion protection of Fe and its alloys. To date, the primary focus has been on the doped form of the emeraldine oxidation state; also, the polyaniline has been applied, electrochemically or chemically, as an overcoat on the metal. In the present study, the surface sensitive XPS technique has been applied to investigate (1) the effectiveness of the neutral emeraldine base as well as the doped emeraldine hydrochloride forms of polyaniline in corrosion inhibition and (2) the ability of a polyaniline undercoat in providing corrosion protection by passivating the exposed metal surface. Here 350{Angstrom} and 70{Angstrom} thick Fe was sputter deposited onto the polyaniline and control polymer (non-electroactive) substrates and exposed to different environments. We conclude that an undercoat of the neutral emeraldine base form of polyaniline passivates the outer metal (Fe) surface with a thin ({approximately} 30-50{Angstrom}) oxide layer of mainly hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and that the passivation mechanism has an electronic origin. In contrast, Fe sputtered onto doped emeraldine hydrochloride forms a thicker oxide layer with a distribution of oxidation states, effectively providing much less corrosion protection.

  2. The nature of nitrate at the ice surface studied by XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Krepelová, Adéla; Newberg, John; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ammann, Markus

    2010-08-21

    Trace contaminants such as strong acids have been suggested to affect the thickness of the quasi-liquid layer at the ice/air interface, which is at the heart of heterogeneous chemical reactions between snowpacks or cirrus clouds and the surrounding air. We used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron yield near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to probe the ice surface in the presence of HNO(3) formed from the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO(2) at 230 K. We studied the nature of the adsorbed species at the ice/vapor interfaces as well as the effect of HNO(3) on the hydrogen bonding environment at the ice surface. The NEXAFS spectrum of ice with adsorbed HNO(3) can be represented as linear combination of the clean ice and nitrate solution spectrum, thus indicating that in the presence of HNO(3) the ice surface consists of a mixture of clean ice and nitrate ions that are coordinated as in a concentrated solution at the same temperature but higher HNO(3) pressures. PMID:20532376

  3. XPS and STM studies of the oxidation of hydrogen chloride at Cu(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altass, Hatem; Carley, Albert F.; Davies, Philip R.; Davies, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The dissociative chemisorption of HCl on clean and oxidized Cu(100) surfaces has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Whereas the dissociation of HCl at the clean surface is limited to the formation of a (√ 2 × √ 2)-R45° Cl(a) monolayer, the presence of surface oxygen removes this barrier, leading to chlorine coverages up to twice that obtained at the clean surface. Additional features in the STM images that appear at these coverages are tentatively assigned to the nucleation of CuCl islands. The rate of reaction of the HCl was slightly higher on the oxidized surface but unaffected by the initial oxygen concentration or the availability of clean copper sites. Of the two distinct domains of adsorbed oxygen identified at room temperature on the Cu(100) surfaces, the (√ 2 × √ 2)-R45° structure reacts slightly faster with HCl than the missing row (√ 2 × 2 √ 2)-R45° O(a) structure. The results address the first stages in the formation of a copper chloride and present an interesting comparison with the HCl/O(a) reaction at Cu(110) surfaces, where oxygen also increased the extent of HCl reactions. The results emphasize the importance of the exothermic reaction to form water in the HCl/O(a) reaction on copper.

  4. XPS and FTIR spectroscopic study on microwave treated high phosphorus iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omran, Mamdouh; Fabritius, Timo; Elmahdy, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Khalek, Nagui A.; El-Aref, Mortada; Elmanawi, Abd El-Hamid

    2015-08-01

    A growing interest in microwave heating has emerged recently. Several potential microwave applications regarding minerals' processing have been investigated. This paper investigates the effect of microwave radiation on Egyptian high phosphorus iron ore. Three different iron ore samples have varying Fe2O3 and P2O5 contents and mineralogical textures were studied. A comparative study has been carried out between untreated and microwave treated iron ore. XRD and FTIR analyses showed that after microwave radiation the crystallinity of iron bearing minerals (hematite) increased, while the functional chemical groups of phosphorus bearing minerals (fluorapatite) and other gangues dissociated. High resolution XPS analyses of Fe 2p peaks showed that after microwave radiation a portion of Fe(+III) was reduced to Fe(+II). This means that after microwave radiation iron oxide (hematite, Fe3+) transformed into more magnetic phase. The results indicated that microwave radiation had a positive effect on the magnetic properties of iron oxide, through formation of ferromagnetic phases.

  5. [In situ FTIR and XPS study on selective hydrodesulfurization catalyst of FCC gasoline].

    PubMed

    Qiherima; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Yun-hong; Li, Hui-feng; Xu, Guang-tong

    2011-07-01

    Improvement of the selectivity of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for hydrogenation (HYD) of olefins is crucial to produce sulfur-free (S < 0.001%) gasoline from fluid catalytic-cracked (FCC) gasoline. A series of sulfided CoMo/Al2O3 catalysts with different metal loading were prepared by pore-filling impregnation. MoS2 and COMoS active phases on the surface of sulfided COMo/Al2O3 catalyst were identified and analyzed quantitatively by XPS and in-situ FTIR of adsorbed CO. The results reveal that the increase in COMoS phase on the catalyst surface improves the HDS activity and selectivity. And the HDS selectivity correlates linearly with the ratio of active site number of CoMoS and MoS2, the higher the ratio of active site number of CoMoS and MoS2, the better the HDS selectivity. In situ variable temperature FTIR analysis shows that CoMoS phase has stronger electron accepting ability than MoS2. The strong electron deficient property of CoMoS active sites is the main reason for its excellent HDS activity and selectivity. PMID:21942017

  6. An Application for Near Real-time Analysis of XPS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Alan S.; Swanson, Kenneth R.; Haack, Jereme N.; Castle, James E.; Tougaard, Sven M.; Baer, Donald R.

    2010-04-22

    Real-time analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data has significant potential advantages to scientists and analysts in that it has the potential to qualitatively alter the way an experiment is carried forward. As an example, immediate information about the magnitude of contamination and the layering of the surface could allow the scientist to immediately ask the next level of question and quickly re-direct the next experiment or test, even before the sample has been removed from the spectrometer. In addition to changing the nature of possible experiments, the immediate automated analysis of relatively simple procedures that an operator would normally conduct manually after the data files are saved, the report generation summarizing these analyses, and saving of this report to files with the critical metadata attached, has the potential to improve the turn-around time for data analysis, increase the sophistication of data analysis reportable to the scientist and reduce the labor involved in data analysis, resulting in significant time and cost savings.

  7. XPS study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on polytetrafluoroethylene (teflon) exposed to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon contamination on the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) markedly affects the oxygen uptake, and hence the wettability, of this polymer when exposed to an oxygen plasma. As revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) for such a polymer can increase sharply, and correspondingly the fluorine-to-carbon ratio (F/C) can decrease sharply, at very short exposure times; at longer times, however, such changes in the O/C and F/C ratios reverse direction, and these ratios then assume values similar to those of the unexposed PTFE. The greater the extent of hydrocarbon contamination in the PTFE, the larger are the amplitudes of the 'spikes' in the O/C- and F/C-exposure time plots. In contrast, a pristine PTFE experiences a very small, monotonic increase of surface oxidation or O/C ratio with time of exposure to oxygen atoms, while the F/C ratio is virtually unchanged from that of the unexposed polymer (2.0). Unless the presence of adventitious hydrocarbon is taken into account, anomalous surface properties relating to polymer adhesion may be improperly ascribed to PTFE exposed to an oxygen plasma.

  8. Modeling the PbI2 formation in perovskite solar cells using XRD/XPS patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Elyasi, Majid; Aldosari, Marouf; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of prolonged irradiation and air humidity on the stability of perovskite solar cells is modeled using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy patterns reported in the literature. Light or air-moisture causes the formation of a thin PbI2 or oxide defective layers (in nanoscale) at the interface of perovskite/hole-transport-layer or at the junction with metallic back contact. This thin layer blocks the carrier transport/passivation at the interfaces and cause degradation of device parameters. Variation in thickness of defective layers, changes the XRD and XPS peaks. This allows detection and estimation of the type, crystallinity and thickness of the defective layer. A simple model is developed here to extract the thickness of such thin defective layers formed in nanometer scale at the back region of several perovskite devices. Based on this information, corrected energy band diagram of every device before and after degradation/aging is drawn and discussed in order to obtain insight into the carrier transport and charge collection at the barrier region. In addition, graphene contacted perovskite devices are investigated showing that honey-comb network of graphene contact reduces the effect of aging leading to formation of a thinner defective layer at the perovskite surface compared to perovskite devices with conventional inorganic contacts i.e. Au, Al.

  9. Interfacial chemistry of a perfluoropolyether lubricant studied by XPS and TDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar C.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1992-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyether used as lubricant for space applications, with different metallic surfaces: 440C steel, gold and aluminum was studied. Thin layers of Fomblin Z25 were evaporated onto the oxide-free substrates and the interfacial chemistry studied using XPS and TDS. The reactions were induced by heating the substrate and by rubbing the substrate with a steel ball. Gold was found to be completely unreactive towards Fomblin at any temperature. Reaction at room temperature was observed only in the case of the aluminum substrate, the most reactive towards Fomblin Z25 of the substrates studied. It was necessary to heat the 440C steel substrate to 190 degree C to induce decomposition of the fluid. The degradation of the fluid was indicated by the formation of a debris layer at the interface. This debris layer, composed of inorganic and organic reaction products, when completely formed, passivated the surface from further attack to the Fromblin on top. The tribologically induced reactions on 440C steel formed a debris layer of similar chemical characteristics to the thermally induced layer. In all cases, the degradation reaction resulted in preferential consumption of the difluoroformyl carbon (-OCF2O-).

  10. XPS for probing the dynamics of surface voltage and photovoltage in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, Hikmet; Ozbay, Ekmel; Suzer, Sefik

    2014-12-01

    We describe application of two different data gathering techniques of XPS for probing the dynamics of surface voltage and surface photovoltage (SPV) developed in microseconds to seconds time-domain, in addition to the conventional steady-state measurements. For the longer (seconds to milliseconds) regime, capturing the data in the snapshot fashion is used, but for the faster one (down to microseconds), square wave (SQW) electrical pulses at different frequencies are utilized to induce and probe the dynamics of various processes causing the surface voltage, including the SPV, via the changes in the peak positions. The frequency range covers anywhere from 10-3 to 105 Hz for probing changes due to charging (slow), dipolar (intermediate), and electronic (fast) processes associated with the external stresses imposed. We demonstrate its power by application to n- and p-GaN, and discuss the chemical/physical information derived thereof. In addition, the method allows us to decompose and identify the peaks with respect to their charging nature for a composite sample containing both n- and p-GaN moieties.

  11. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applications Using Microfocused X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Robert; Cormia, Robert; Siordia, Ruth

    1986-08-01

    A focusing quartz crystal monochromator system. has been developed that provides a bright X-ray spot at 1486.6ev. The X-ray spot size may he varied from one-hundred fifty (150) to one-thousand (1000) microns in four (4) steps. The X-ray system is combined with a high. performance electron lens that collects greater than five (5) percent of the photoemitted electrons and passes them into a hemispherical capacitor energy analyzer. The electrons are detected at the exit plane with a two (2) dimensional position sensitivity detector. Using this system, XPS has been carried out on a wide variety of practical samples. We will provide a brief review of the system, design followed by examples of the solution to unique problems. Samples which have been CLosen for discussion include: Crash Zone on a Winchester Disk An interocular Lens . Single 5 micron Carbon. Fiber Plasma Modified Polymeric Say The unique benefits of a focused. source with high energy resolution will also be discussed.

  12. XPS characterization of (copper-based) coloured stains formed on limestone surfaces of outdoor Roman monuments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Limestone basements holding bronzes or other copper alloys artefacts such as sculptures, decorations and dedicatory inscriptions are frequently met both in modern and ancient monuments. In outdoor conditions, such a combination implies the corrosion products of the copper based alloy, directly exposed to rainwater, will be drained off and migrate through the porous surfaces, forming stains of different colours and intensities, finally causing the limestone structures to deteriorate. In this work we have analysed samples from two modern limestone monuments in Rome, the Botticino surfaces of the ‘Vittoriano’ (by G.Sacconi, 1885-1911- Piazza Venezia) and the travertine basement of the ‘Statua dello Studente’ (by A.Cataldi, 1920- University city, La Sapienza), and focussed our investigation on the chemical composition of the copper-stained zones using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) as a surface-specific technique. Based on observations reporting on the structure and bonding at the calcite surfaces we have identified copper complexes and mixed calcium/copper carbonates associated with the stains, as well as the chemical state of other elements therein included, and related the compositional changes with differences in chromatic characteristics and sampling locations. PMID:22594435

  13. Photoionization of atomic chlorine above the 1S threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabi, Siamak; Starace, Anthony F.; Chang, T. N.

    1984-10-01

    The total photoionization cross section of the 3p subshell of atomic chlorine is presented with use of the recently developed open-shell transition-matrix method of Starace and Shahabi. The role of electron correlations is studied by comparison with Hartree-Fock and close-coupling calculations. In contrast to 3p-subshell photoionization of argon, it is shown that, in chlorine, final-state interchannel interactions are very strong while virtual pair excitations have a weak effect on the shape of the cross section, serving mainly to reduce the discrepancy between length and velocity results. Our results are compared in detail with other theoretical results above the 1S threshold as well as with experimental relative-intensity measurements at 584 Å. While our results are lower than the others at the 1S threshold (ℏω=0.6 a.u.), at photon energies ℏω>1 a.u., our geometric mean cross section is in essentially exact agreement with unrelaxed ionic core results of Brown, Carter, and Kelly and of Fielder and Armstrong.

  14. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  15. AGNs with composite spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, P.; Goncalves, A. C.; Veron-Cetty, M.-P.

    1997-03-01

    The use of the Baldwin et al. (1981PASP...93....5B) or Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987ApJS...63..295V) diagnostic diagrams allows the unambiguous classification of the nuclear emission line regions of most galaxies into one of three categories: nuclear HII regions or starbursts, Seyfert 2 galaxies and Liners. However, a small fraction of them have a "transition" spectrum. We present spectral observations of 15 "transition" objects at high-dispersion (66Å/mm) around the Hα, [NII]λλ6548,6584 and/or Hβ, [OIII]λλ4959,5007 emission lines. We show that most of these spectra are composite, due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of a Seyfert nucleus and a HII region. Seyfert 2s and Liners seem to occupy relatively small and distinct volumes in the three-dimensional space λ5007/Hβ, λ6584/Hα, λ6300/Hα.

  16. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  17. Surface composition of biopolymer blends Biospan-SP/Phenoxy and Biospan-F/Phenoxy observed with SFG, XPS, and contact angle goniometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Eppler, A.S.; Shen, Y.R.; Somorjai, G.A.; Ward, R.; Tian, Y.

    1999-04-15

    The surface compositions of two biopolymer blends, Biospan-SP/Phenoxy (BSP/PHE) and Biospan-F/Phenoxy (BF/PHE), have been studied using sum frequency generation (SFG), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle goniometry. BSP and BF are polyurethanes capped with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and fluoroalkyl (-(-CF{sub 2}-){sub n}-) as end groups, respectively. With contact angle goniometry, the surface tensions of pure BSP, BF, and PHE were found to be 26, 16, and 45 dyne/cm. For each of the blends, the polymer component with a lower surface concentration of the surface-active component increases sharply as its bulk concentration increases. For BSP/PHE (and BF/PHE) in air, the surface of the polymer blend is fully covered by BSP (and BF) at a bulk concentration of 3.5 wt % (and 1 wt %). The contact angle measurements and the XPS studies yield compatible results. Comparison of results for BSP/PHE, BS/PHE (published before), and BF/PHE polymer blends shows that the lower the surface energy of the surface-active component (surface tension: BF < BS < BSP), the easier it is for the component to segregate to the surface (the minimum bulk concentration to saturate the surface is BF (1 wt %) < BS (1.7 wt %) < BSP (3.5 wt %)). After exposure to water, SFG spectra indicate that the surface layer of a polymer blend could be restructured. For BSP (3.5 wt %)/PHE, the hydrophobic end groups of BSP submerge while the hydrophilic polyurethane backbone emerges. For BF (1 wt %)/PHE, PHE emerges at the surface after exposure to water, but for BF (5 wt %)/PHE, the BF component dominates the surface in both air and water. Their results demonstrate the bifunctionality of polymer blends and show that the surface chemistry of polymer blends may be dominated by a minor component, while the mechanical stability of the polymer is controlled by the major component.

  18. Investigation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film on LiCoO2 cathode in fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-containing electrolyte by 2D correlation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonju; Shin, Su Hyun; Hwang, Hoon; Lee, Sung Man; Kim, Sung Phil; Choi, Hyun Chul; Jung, Young Mee

    2014-07-01

    The effects of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) on the electrochemical performance of the LiCoO2 cathode were investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge testing and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that FEC has a positive effect on cycling stability and also improves cell performance. We also studied solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film on the LiCoO2 cathode, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 2D correlation spectroscopy. The 2D correlation XPS spectra showed that, initially, the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) binder and electrolyte components are decomposed, after which SEI components are formed on the LiCoO2 cathode surface. In the FEC-containing electrolyte, the polycarbonate components are more abundant than in the FEC-free electrolyte. The formed carbonates in SEI film can act as Li+-conducting materials in reducing the electrode/electrolyte interfacial impedance. This hypothesis is supported by the results of an electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS) analysis.

  19. XPS investigation of the photon degradation of Znq2 green organic phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvenhage, Mart-Mari; Terblans, Jacobus J.; Ntwaeaborwa, Martin; Swart, Hendrik C.

    2016-01-01

    By substituting Al with Zn to form bis-(8-hydroxyquinoline) zinc (Znq2), the device performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) can be improved. Znq2 also has a more closed packed crystal structure that makes it less vulnerable to reactions with atmospheric oxygen and moisture leading to more stable and longer lasting devices. In this work the effect of photon degradation of Znq2 in air was investigated. Znq2 powder was synthesized using a co-precipitation method and recrystallized in acetone. The structure of the sample was confirmed to be Znq2·2H2O by X-ray diffraction. The photoluminescence (PL) emission data also confirmed that the Znq2·2H2O crystal form of Znq2 was present. To study the photon degradation, the sample was irradiated with a UV lamp for 400 h. The emission data was collected and the change in PL intensity with time was monitored. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the as prepared and photon-degraded samples. The Zn2p and N1s peaks showed no change after degradation. The O1s and C1s peaks confirmed that the phenoxide ring ruptured and that C=O and C-O species had formed.

  20. Carbonaceous matter in peridotites and basalts studied by XPS, SALI, and LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Tingle, T.N. SRI International, Menlo Park, CA ); Mathez, E.A. ); Hochella, M.F. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Carbonaceous matter in peridotite xenoliths and basalt from the Hualalai Volcano, in a basalt glass collected directly from an active lava lake on the east rift of Kilauea, in garnet and diopside megacrysts from the Jagersfontein kimberlite, and in gabbros from the Stillwater and Bushveld Complexes has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal-desorption surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The basalt and two of the four xenoliths from Hualalai and both Jagersfontein megacrysts yielded trace quantities ({le}10 nanomoles) of organic compounds on heating to 700C. Organics were not detected in the rocks from the layered intrusions, and neither carbonaceous matter nor organics were detected in the glass from the lava lake. Where detected, organics appear to be associated with carbonaceous films on microcrack surfaces. Carbonaceous matter exists as films less than a few nm thick and particles up to 20 {mu}m across, both of which contain elements expected to be present in significant quantities in magmatic vapors, namely Si, alkalis, halogens, N, and transition metals. LEED studies suggest that the carbonaceous films are amorphous. The data suggest two possible mechanisms for the formation of the organics. One is that they are a product of abiotic heterogeneous catalysis of volcanic gas on new, chemically active mineral surfaces formed by fracturing during cooling. Alternatively, organics may have been assimilated into the volcanic gases prior to eruption and then deposited on cracks formed during eruption and cooling. In any case, there is no evidence to suggest that the organics represent laboratory or field biogenic contamination.

  1. XPS investigations of tribolayers formed on TiN and (Ti,Re)N coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktay, Serkan; Kahraman, Zafer; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2015-02-01

    TiN and (Ti,Re)N coatings were deposited on high-speed-steel substrates by a hybrid coating system composed of cathodic arc PVD and magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to keep rhenium content low (8 ± 1.9 at.%) in the coating, magnetron sputtering technique was utilized to evaporate rhenium. The (Ti,Re)N coating consisted of TiN and ReNx (x > 1.33) phases. The hardness of TiN and (Ti,Re)N were 31 GPa and 29 GPa (± 2 GPa), respectively. Tribological behaviors of the samples were tested against Al2O3 balls at 21 °C (RT) and 150 °C (HT) by reciprocating wear technique. The tribolayers were analyzed by XPS technique. Friction coefficients of TiN were 0.56, 0.35 for 21 °C and 150 °C tests, respectively. Rhenium addition to TiN drastically dropped the friction coefficients to 0.22 and 0.17 for RT and HT samples. Rhenium addition also improved the wear resistance of the coating at both test temperatures. For TiN, main oxide component of the tribolayers was Ti2O3 for RT tests and TiO2 for HT tests. The oxide layer formed on (Ti,Re)N were the mixture of TiO2, Tisbnd Osbnd N, ReO2 and Re2O7 for both test temperatures. Re2O7 provided very low friction coefficient to (Ti,Re)N. The findings are consistent with the crystal chemistry approach.

  2. Experimental (XAS STEM TPR and XPS) and Theoretical (DFT) Characterization of Supported Rhenium Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    S Bare; S Kelly; F Vila; D Boldingh; E Karapetrova; J Kas; G Mickelson; F Modica; N Yang; J Rehr

    2011-12-31

    A high surface area supported Re-based catalyst, fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis, is studied in the oxidic and reduced states using a combination of experimental (XAFS, STEM, TPR, and XPS) and theoretical (DFT and X-ray spectroscopy simulations) approaches. In the calcined dried catalyst, the Re species is present as an isolated trioxo(oxoaluminate) Re(VII) species. The temperature at which the Re undergoes reduction is a function of the hydrogen partial pressure and temperature ramp rate, but the maximum rate of reduction occurs in the range 300-400 C. Following reduction at 500 or 700 C in dry hydrogen, the Re is present as a mixture of species: unreduced trioxo(oxoaluminate) Re(VII) species, Re nanoclusters, and isolated Re atoms. By using a multifaceted approach, it is apparent that the majority species is an isolated Re adatom bound to the alumina support. DFT calculations identify several likely adsorption sites for these Re adatoms on the [110] surface of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The final extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) model taking into account these three species is used to identify the dominant adsorption site for Re on the alumina surface. FEFF8 X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) calculations of unsupported and alumina-supported Re nanoclusters provide interpretation of the shape and edge position of the Re L{sub 3}-edge XANES after reduction. The presence of moisture during reduction stronly affects the mobility of the Re on the alumina leading to agglomeration. Subsequent air exposure of a reduced catalyst readily reoxidizes the reduced Re. The power of using a combination of analysis tools provides insight into the behavior of dispersed Re on supported alumina under oxidizing and reducing conditions relevant to heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. In situ XPS investigation of Pt(Sn)/Mg(Al)O catalysts during ethane dehydrogenation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virnovskaia, Anastasia; Jørgensen, Sissel; Hafizovic, Jasmina; Prytz, Øystein; Kleimenov, Evgueni; Hävecker, Michael; Bluhm, Hendrik; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Olsbye, Unni

    2007-01-01

    Calcined hydrotalcite with or without added metal (Mg(Al)O, Pt/Mg(Al)O and Pt,Sn/Mg(Al)O) have been investigated with in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) during ethane dehydrogenation experiments. The temperature in the analysis chamber was 450 °C and the gas pressure was in the range 0.3-1 mbar. Depth profiling of calcined hydrotalcite and platinum catalysts under reaction, oxidation and in hydrogen-water mixture was performed by varying the photon energy, covering an analysis depth of 10-21 Å. It was observed that the Mg/Al ratio in the Mg(Al)O crystallites does not vary significantly in the analysis depth range studied. This result indicates that Mg and Al are homogeneously distributed in the Mg(Al)O crystallites. Catalytic tests have shown that the initial activity of a Pt,Sn/Mg(Al)O catalyst increases during an activation period consisting of several cycles of reduction-dehydrogenation-oxidation. The Sn/Mg ratio in a Pt,Sn/Mg(Al)O catalyst was followed during several such cycles, and was found to increase during the activation period, probably due to a process where tin spreads over the carrier material and covers an increasing fraction of the Mg(Al)O surface. The results further indicate that spreading of tin occurs under reduction conditions. A PtSn 2 alloy was studied separately. The surface of the alloy was enriched in Sn during reduction and reaction conditions at 450 °C. Binding energies were determined and indicated that Sn on the particle surface is predominantly in an oxidised state under reaction conditions, while Pt and a fraction of Sn is present as a reduced Pt-Sn alloy.

  4. New insights into the functions of intersectin-1s

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Bardita, Cristina; Predescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein known as a scaffold and regulator of the general endocytic machinery as well as a critical integrator of cellular signaling pathways. We showed recently that ITSN deficiency triggers a transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Alk5 signaling switch, from the canonical Smad 2/3 to the Erk1/2 MAPK pathway; moreover, endocytic impairment induced by ITSN deficiency enhances Alk5 ubiquitination and degradation and elicits TGFβ-paracrine effects mediated by circulating microparticles, leading to endothelial cell survival and increased proliferation. The studies expand our understanding of how ITSN facilitates cross-regulation of signaling pathways and provide insights into the involvement of ITSN deficiency in human disease. PMID:26479042

  5. New insights into the functions of intersectin-1s.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda; Bardita, Cristina; Predescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein known as a scaffold and regulator of the general endocytic machinery as well as a critical integrator of cellular signaling pathways. We showed recently that ITSN deficiency triggers a transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Alk5 signaling switch, from the canonical Smad 2/3 to the Erk1/2 MAPK pathway; moreover, endocytic impairment induced by ITSN deficiency enhances Alk5 ubiquitination and degradation and elicits TGFβ-paracrine effects mediated by circulating microparticles, leading to endothelial cell survival and increased proliferation. The studies expand our understanding of how ITSN facilitates cross-regulation of signaling pathways and provide insights into the involvement of ITSN deficiency in human disease. PMID:26479042

  6. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P. E. G.; Barr, J. R. M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M. G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G. H.; Ferguson, A. I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V. W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B. E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; Putlitz, G. zu; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P. G. H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W. T.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}S1/2-2{sup 2}S1/2 frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P.E.G.; Barr, J.R.M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M.G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G.H.; Ferguson, A.I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V.W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B.E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; zu Putlitz, G.; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P.G.H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W.T.; Towrie, M.; Willmann, L.; Woodle, K.A.; Woodman, G.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2}{minus}2{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2} frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  8. Degenerative Sacrolisthesis of S1-S2: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, Thakre Kunwar; Issac, Thomas; Swamy, B Mallikarjuna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is usually seen at L4-L5 level and less frequently at L5-S1 level. This is a rare case report of spondylolisthesis of S1 over S2 with lumbarization of S1. Lumbarization of S1 is seen in just 1-2% of the population and to have spondylolisthesis in this segment is even rarer. The purpose is to report a rare case of DS at S1-S2 level. Case Report: This is a single case report of a 66-year-old gentleman who presented with complains of lower backache for 2 years and acute retention of urine to the emergency department. Detailed clinical and radiological evaluation of the spine was done which revealed lumbarization of S1 with spondylolisthesis at S1-S2 and facetal hypertrophy at L5, S1, and S2. He underwent decompression and stabilization at L5, S1, and S2 along with placement of autologous bone graft. The bladder symptoms disappeared after 3 weeks. At 1-year follow-up, patient’s clinical symptoms were relieved, and he improved clinically. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is probably the first case of DS of sacral vertebrae to be reported in English literature. The prevalence of complete lumbarization is around 1.8% and to get spondylolisthesis in this segment is even rarer, hence the lack of literature in this regard. Since this is the first of its kind of case, further case series or longitudinal studies of such cases may help understand better the pathomechanics related to spondylolisthesis at this level. PMID:27299082

  9. Spectra of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    Non-LTE modeling is essential for interpreting the spectra of O stars and their decendents, and much progress has been made. The major uncertainty associated with analyzing photospheric spectra of O stars arises from issues related to microturbulence and macroturbulence. Many supergiants, for example, have microturbulent velocities that approach the sound speed, while macroturbulent velocities are often several times the sound speed. The cause of this turbulence is unknown, but may be related to pulsation, an underlying convection zone associated with the Fe opacity bump, or feedback from the stellar wind. Determining accurate abundances in O stars is hampered by the lack of lines belonging to low-z elements. Many species only have a few observable lines, and some of these are subject to complex non-LTE effects. A characteristic of massive stars is the existence of a stellar wind which is driven by radiation pressure. Radiation driving is inherently unstable, and this leads to winds with an inhomogeneous structure. Major issues that are still unresolved include: How are winds driven through the sonic point? What is the nature of the inhomogeneities, and how do the properties of these inhomogeneities change with density and velocity? How important is spatial porosity, and porosity in velocity space? What is the structure of the shocks, and in what stars do the shocks fail to cool? With Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars the major uncertainty arises because the classic spectroscopic radius (i.e., the location where τ = 2/3) often refers to a location in the wind — not necessarily the stellar radius associated with stellar evolution models. Derived radii are typically several times those predicted by stellar evolution calculations, although for strong-lined W-R stars it is possible to construct models that are consistent with evolution calculations. The driving of the winds in these stars is strongly coupled to the closeness of the stars to the Eddington limit and to their

  10. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  11. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  12. Initial stages of oxide formation on the Zr surface at low oxygen pressure: An in situ FIM and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Bespalov, I; Datler, M; Buhr, S; Drachsel, W; Rupprechter, G; Suchorski, Y

    2015-12-01

    An improved methodology of the Zr specimen preparation was developed which allows fabrication of stable Zr nanotips suitable for FIM and AP applications. Initial oxidation of the Zr surface was studied on a Zr nanotip by FIM and on a polycrystalline Zr foil by XPS, both at low oxygen pressure (10(-8)-10(-7)mbar). The XPS data reveal that in a first, fast stage of oxidation, a Zr suboxide interlayer is formed which contains three suboxide components (Zr(+1), Zr(+2) and Zr(+3)) and is located between the Zr surface and a stoichiometric ZrO2 overlayer that grows in a second, slow oxidation stage. The sole suboxide layer has been observed for the first time at very early states of the oxidation (oxygen exposure ≤ 4L). The Ne(+) FIM observations are in accord with a two stage process of Zr oxide formation. PMID:25766998

  13. Location and Visualization of Working p-n and/or n-p Junctions by XPS.

    PubMed

    Copuroglu, Mehmet; Caliskan, Deniz; Sezen, Hikmet; Ozbay, Ekmel; Suzer, Sefik

    2016-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to follow some of the electrical properties of a segmented silicon photodetector, fabricated in a p-n-p configuration, during operation under various biasing configurations. Mapping of the binding energy position of Si2p reveals the shift in the position of the junctions with respect to the polarity of the DC bias applied. Use of squared and triangular shaped wave excitations, while recording XPS data, allows tapping different electrical properties of the device under normal operational conditions, as well as after exposing parts of it to harsh physical and chemical treatments. Unique and chemically specific electrical information can be gained with this noninvasive approach which can be useful especially for localized device characterization and failure analyses. PMID:27582318

  14. Location and Visualization of Working p-n and/or n-p Junctions by XPS

    PubMed Central

    Copuroglu, Mehmet; Caliskan, Deniz; Sezen, Hikmet; Ozbay, Ekmel; Suzer, Sefik

    2016-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to follow some of the electrical properties of a segmented silicon photodetector, fabricated in a p-n-p configuration, during operation under various biasing configurations. Mapping of the binding energy position of Si2p reveals the shift in the position of the junctions with respect to the polarity of the DC bias applied. Use of squared and triangular shaped wave excitations, while recording XPS data, allows tapping different electrical properties of the device under normal operational conditions, as well as after exposing parts of it to harsh physical and chemical treatments. Unique and chemically specific electrical information can be gained with this noninvasive approach which can be useful especially for localized device characterization and failure analyses. PMID:27582318

  15. Polymer coatings on conductive polypyrroles surface characterization by XPS, ToFSIMS, inverse gas chromatography and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Chehimi, M.M.; Abel, M.; Delamar, M.; Watts, J.F.; Zhdan, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of PMMA adsorption on some conducting polypyrroles (PPys) using a variety of surface analytical techniques is reported. PMMA adsorption was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). XPS and ToF-SIMS permit to determine the surface composition of PMMA-coated PPy surfaces vs the solvent nature, temperature and the PPy dopant anion. Both techniques show that acid-base interactions may govern PMMA adsorption. IGC was used to determine the coating morphology by monitoring the surface energy of the coated PPy powders. It is suggested that homogeneity of PMMA coatings increases with decreasing solvent power. Preliminary atomic force microscopy (AFM) results on PMMA films cast on flat PPy surfaces confirm the IGC observation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. XPS study of the Al/SiO2 interface viewed from the SiO2 side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Maserjian, J.

    1984-01-01

    The first nondestructive measurement of the chemical and physical characteristics of the interface between bulk SiO2 and thick aluminum films is presented. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrical measurements of unannealed resistively evaporated Al films on thermal SiO2 indicate an atomically abrupt interface. Postmetallization annealing (PMA) at 450 C induces reduction of the SiO2 by the aluminum, resulting in the layer ordering SiO2/Al2O3/Si/Al. The XPS measurement is performed from the SiO2 side after removal of the Si substrate after etching with XeF2 gas and thinning of the SiO2 layer with HF:ETOH. This represents a powerful new approach to the study of metal-insulator and other interfaces.

  17. Initial stages of oxide formation on the Zr surface at low oxygen pressure: An in situ FIM and XPS study

    PubMed Central

    Bespalov, I.; Datler, M.; Buhr, S.; Drachsel, W.; Rupprechter, G.; Suchorski, Y.

    2015-01-01

    An improved methodology of the Zr specimen preparation was developed which allows fabrication of stable Zr nanotips suitable for FIM and AP applications. Initial oxidation of the Zr surface was studied on a Zr nanotip by FIM and on a polycrystalline Zr foil by XPS, both at low oxygen pressure (10−8–10−7 mbar). The XPS data reveal that in a first, fast stage of oxidation, a Zr suboxide interlayer is formed which contains three suboxide components (Zr+1, Zr+2 and Zr+3) and is located between the Zr surface and a stoichiometric ZrO2 overlayer that grows in a second, slow oxidation stage. The sole suboxide layer has been observed for the first time at very early states of the oxidation (oxygen exposure ≤4 L). The Ne+ FIM observations are in accord with a two stage process of Zr oxide formation. PMID:25766998

  18. In situ XPS and MS study of methanol decomposition and oxidation on Pd(111) under millibar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaichev, V. V.; Miller, A. V.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.

    2012-02-01

    The methanol decomposition and oxidation on a Pd(111) single crystal have been investigated in situ using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mass-spectrometry (MS) in the temperature range of 300-600 K. It was found that even in the oxygen presence the methanol decomposition on palladium proceeds through two competitive routes: fast dehydrogenation to CO and H2, and slow decomposition of methanol via the C-O bond scission. The rate of the second route is significant even in the millibar pressure range, which leads to a blocking of the palladium surface by carbon and to a prevention of the further methanol conversion. As a result, no gas phase products of methanol decomposition were detected by mass-spectrometry at 0.1 mbar CH3OH in the whole temperature range. The methanol C-O bond scission produces CHx species, which fast dehydrogenate to atomic carbon even at room temperature and further partially dissolve in the palladium bulk at 400 K with the formation of the PdCx phase. According to in situ XPS data, the PdCx phase forms even in the oxygen excess. The application of an in situ XPS-MS technique unambiguously shows a good correlation between a decrease in the surface concentration of all carbon-containing species and the rate of methanol conversion. Since these carbon species have a high reactivity towards oxygen, heating of Pd(111) above 450 K in a methanol-oxygen mixture yields CO, CO2, and water. The product distribution indicates that the main route of methanol conversion is the dehydrogenation of methanol to CO and hydrogen. However, under the experimental conditions used, hydrogen is completely oxidized to water, while CO is partially oxidized to CO2. No palladium oxide was detected by XPS in these conditions.

  19. Study on the surface chemical properties of UV excimer laser irradiated polyamide by XPS, ToF-SIMS and CFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Joanne; Chan, Kwong; Sin, Kwan Moon; Lau, Kai Shui

    2003-01-01

    Polyamide (nylon 6) was irradiated by a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser with a fluence below its ablation threshold. Chemical modifications on laser treated nylon were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). XPS study provides information about changes in chemical composition and the chemical-state of atom types on the fiber surface. The high sensitivity of ToF-SIMS to the topmost layers was used to detect crosslinking after the laser treatment. Gold-coated AFM tips modified with COOH terminated self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers (SAMs) were used to measure adhesion forces on the untreated and laser treated samples. XPS results revealed that the irradiated samples have higher oxygen content than prior to laser irradiation. Tof-SIMS analysis illustrated that carbonyl groups in nylon 6 decrease significantly but hydroxyl groups increase after low-fluence laser irradiation. The adhesion force measurements by CFM showed spatial distribution of hydroxyl groups on nylon 6 after the laser treatment.

  20. XPS and ToF-SIMS Investigation of α-Helical and β-Strand Peptide Adsorption onto SAMs

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Julia S.; Collier, Galen; Latour, Robert A.; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.

    2009-01-01

    14-mer α-helix and a 15-mer β-strand oligopeptides composed of leucine (L) and lysine (K) were used to investigate peptide adsorption and orientation onto well-defined methyl and carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). XPS showed both peptides reached monolayer thickness on both SAMs, but significantly higher solution concentrations were required to reach this coverage on the methyl SAMs. This shows that the peptides adsorb more strongly onto the carboxyl-terminated SAMs. The excess oxygen detected by XPS and the H3O+ signal detected by ToF-SIMS for the SAMs with adsorbed peptides indicated that water molecules are associated with the adsorbed peptides, even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Changes in the amount of L and K fragments detected by ToF-SIMS indicate the β-strand oriented differently on the two SAMs. The L side-chains were preferentially associated with the methyl-terminated SAM and the K side-chains were preferentially associated with the carboxyl SAM. In contrast, little change in the ToF-SIMS K/L ratio was observed for the α-helix peptide absorbed on the two SAMs, indicating ToF-SIMS was not as sensitive to orientation of the α-helix peptide. PMID:19891457

  1. An XPS and SEM evaluation of six chemical and physical techniques for cleaning of contaminated titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Mouhyi, J; Sennerby, L; Pireaux, J J; Dourov, N; Nammour, S; Van Reck, J

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse clinically failed and retrieved implants prior to and after cleaning by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as compared to unused controls. Six different chemical and physical techniques for cleaning of contaminated titanium implants were evaluated: 1) rinsing in absolute ethanol for 10 min, 2) cleaning in ultrasonic baths containing trichloroethylene (TRI) and absolute ethanol, 10 min in each solution, 3) abrasive cleaning for 30 s, 4) cleaning in supersaturated citric acid for 30 s, 5) cleaning with continuous CO2-laser in dry conditions at 5 W for 10 s, 6) cleaning with continuous CO2-laser in wet conditions (saline) at 5 W for 10 s. SEM of failed implants showed the presence of contaminants of varying sizes and XPS showed almost no titanium but high carbon signals. XPS of unused titanium implants showed lower levels of titanium as previously reported, probably due to contamination of carbon which increased with time in room air. Cleaning of used implants in citric acid followed by rinsing with deionized water for 5 min followed by cleaning in ultrasonic baths with TRI and absolute ethanol gave the best results with regard to macroscopical appearance and surface composition. However, as compared to the unused implants the results from an element composition point of view were still unsatisfactory. It is concluded that further development and testing of techniques for cleaning of organically contaminated titanium is needed. PMID:10530133

  2. How I Do It: GreenLight XPS 180W photoselective vaporization of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Elterman, Dean S

    2015-06-01

    The treatments for benign prostate enlargement (BPE), also known as lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH-LUTS), have evolved significantly over recent years. Where transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been the gold standard surgery for enlarged prostate glands < 80 grams, newer modalities such as laser technology have proliferated with safe and efficacious results. Notably, for prostates larger than 80-100 grams, the surgical options were an open, simple prostatectomy or perhaps a staged TURP. Both of these surgeries have the potential for bleeding complications, electrolyte abnormalities, and prolonged hospital admissions. Additional demographic and healthcare forces are also at play. Our aging population of men is being increasingly successfully treated for cardiovascular disease. This means more men are on anti-coagulation therapy, many of whom must stay on these drugs to prevent stent clotting or stroke. Hospital resources, especially overnight hospital admissions do add considerable strain to our healthcare systems. Men are also increasingly becoming more savvy consumers when it comes to their health. Many male patients would prefer to take as few medications as possible. Studies of BPH medications in Europe and the United States have shown drug discontinuation rates between 58%-70% at 1 year. Men who are faced with the choice of daily medication for life versus an outpatient procedure will often opt for the latter, which is in keeping with AUA guidelines that still put surgery as a patient choice alongside medications. Being able to offer GreenLight photoselective vaporization (GL-PVP) with the GreenLight XPS 180Watt system addresses all of these concerns. Men with bothersome BPH-LUTS with essentially any sized prostate gland, can be treated as same-day surgery requiring no overnight admission to hospital, while continuing necessary anti-coagulants, with significantly diminished risks of bleeding, erectile

  3. Investigation of fine atmospheric particle surfaces and lung lining fluid interactions using XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michaela; Hutton, Bernie M.; Tetley, Terry D.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Wigzell, Edward; Jones, Frances H.

    2001-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine surface chemical composition of atmospheric particles before and after immersion in saline and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Atmospheric particulate matter (PM 2.5) was collected on PTFE filters from clean air, outdoor urban and smoke-filled indoor sites. Low particle loads were present from the clean air site and the particle surface consisted of carbon, Cl - and oxide species. An increase in particle load was observed for the outdoor urban site with C(C, H) compounds dominating the particle surface. There was a significant contribution from C(O, N) and CO/COO-functionalities as well as oxides with traces of NO 3-, NH 4+, amide, SiC and SO 42- present. A further increase in particle load was observed for the smoke-filled indoor site. The surface consisted of 97% C(C, H) compounds with traces of oxide, amide and SiO 2. The particle load was reduced in all cases after immersion in saline mainly due to removal of loosely bound particles, especially for carbon. Changes in surface composition of the particles were also observed with removal of Cl - from the clean air site, NO 3-, NH 4+, amide, SO 42- and SiC from the urban air site and SiO 2 from the indoor smoke site; these species were deemed to be bio-available. Similar results were obtained after immersion in BALF. However, there was evidence of interaction of constituents from BALF with particles collected from the outdoor urban and indoor smoke sites. A strong amide signal was observed on particles remaining on the filter after immersion in BALF suggesting that possibly proteins or other N-containing biomolecular species from BALF were adsorbed on the surface of these particles. The surface concentrations of amide, oxide, C(O, N) and CO/COO - varied between outdoor urban and indoor smoke particles after immersion in BALF. This infers that a different interaction is occurring between BALF constituents and outdoor urban and indoor

  4. Investigation of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), cyclic voltammetric analyses of WO3 films and their electrochromic response in FTO/WO3/electrolyte/FTO cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Jayachandran, M.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2006-06-01

    Electrochromic thin films of tungsten oxide (WO3) were prepared on transparent conducting oxide substrates, i.e., fluorine doped tin oxide coated (FTO or SnO2:F) glass and microscopic glass substrates by the electron beam evaporation technique using pure WO3 (99.99%) pellets at various substrate temperatures (i.e., Tsub = room temperature (RT, 30 °C), 100 °C and 200 °C). The films were prepared under vacuum of the order of 1 × 10-5 mbar. The room temperature prepared films were further post-heat-treated (Tanne) at 200 and 300 °C for about 1 h in the vacuum environment. The prepared films are in monoclinic phase. The chemical composition has been characterized by using the XPS technique. The W 4f and O 1s core levels of WO3 films have been studied on the samples. The obtained core level binding energies revealed the WO3 films contained six-valent tungsten (W6+). The electrochemical nature of the films was studied by a three-electrode electrochemical cell in the configuration of FTO/WO3/H2SO4/Pt, SCE, using the cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. Electrochromic devices (ECDs) of the general type FTO/WO3/electrolyte/FTO were studied. The films produced at higher substrate temperature show smaller modulation of the visible spectrum, compared with the films produced at lower temperatures. The significant chemical bonding nature associated with the coloring/bleaching process which follows the H+ ion incorporation in the film is studied by FTIR analysis. The W-O-W framework peak was observed at 563 cm-1 and confirms the stability of the films in the electrochemical analysis. The results obtained from cyclic voltammetry technique and ECD cell characterization are used to emphasize the suitability for some applications of the solar control systems.

  5. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  6. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  7. Acid-Base Interactions of Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid in Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using a Combined UV/FTIR/XPS/ssNMR Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Chen, Xin; Nie, Haichen; Su, Ziyang; Fang, Ke; Yang, Xinghao; Smith, Daniel; Byrn, Stephen; Lubach, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the potential drug-excipient interactions of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) and two weakly basic anticancer drugs, lapatinib (LB) and gefitinib (GB), in amorphous solid dispersions. Based on the strong acidity of the sulfonic acid functional group, PSSA was hypothesized to exhibit specific intermolecular acid-base interactions with both model basic drugs. Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy identified red shifts, which correlated well with the color change observed in lapatinib-PSSA solutions. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra suggest the protonation of the quinazoline nitrogen atom in both model compounds, which agrees well with data from the crystalline ditosylate salt of lapatinib. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) detected increases in binding energy of the basic nitrogen atoms in both lapatinib and gefitinib, strongly indicating protonation of these nitrogen atoms. (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy provided direct spectroscopic evidence for protonation of the quinazoline nitrogen atoms in both LB and GB, as well as the secondary amine nitrogen atom in LB and the tertiary amine nitrogen atom in GB. The observed chemical shifts in the LB-PSSA (15)N spectrum also agree very well with the lapatinib ditosylate salt where proton transfer is known. Additionally, the dissolution and physical stability behaviors of both amorphous solid dispersions were examined. PSSA was found to significantly improve the dissolution of LB and GB and effectively inhibit the crystallization of LB and GB under accelerated storage conditions due to the beneficial strong intermolecular acid-base interaction between the sulfonic acid groups and basic nitrogen centers. PMID:26716395

  8. Ambient Pressure XPS Study of Mixed Conducting Perovskite-Type SOFC Cathode and Anode Materials under Well-Defined Electrochemical Polarization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen exchange activity of mixed conducting oxide surfaces has been widely investigated, but a detailed understanding of the corresponding reaction mechanisms and the rate-limiting steps is largely still missing. Combined in situ investigation of electrochemically polarized model electrode surfaces under realistic temperature and pressure conditions by near-ambient pressure (NAP) XPS and impedance spectroscopy enables very surface-sensitive chemical analysis and may detect species that are involved in the rate-limiting step. In the present study, acceptor-doped perovskite-type La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC), La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-δ (LSF), and SrTi0.7Fe0.3O3-δ (STF) thin film model electrodes were investigated under well-defined electrochemical polarization as cathodes in oxidizing (O2) and as anodes in reducing (H2/H2O) atmospheres. In oxidizing atmosphere all materials exhibit additional surface species of strontium and oxygen. The polaron-type electronic conduction mechanism of LSF and STF and the metal-like mechanism of LSC are reflected by distinct differences in the valence band spectra. Switching between oxidizing and reducing atmosphere as well as electrochemical polarization cause reversible shifts in the measured binding energy. This can be correlated to a Fermi level shift due to variations in the chemical potential of oxygen. Changes of oxidation states were detected on Fe, which appears as FeIII in oxidizing atmosphere and as mixed FeII/III in H2/H2O. Cathodic polarization in reducing atmosphere leads to the reversible formation of a catalytically active Fe0 phase. PMID:26877827

  9. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoding, Zhang; Jiyan, Zhang; Yang, Zhao; Gang, Xiong; Bin, Zhao; Guohong, Yang; Jian, Zheng; Jiamin, Yang

    2012-12-01

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.

  10. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaoding; Zhang Jiyan; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Zhao Bin; Zheng Jian

    2012-12-15

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.

  11. X-RAY OUTFLOWS IN THE SWIFT BURST ALERT DETECTED SEYFERT 1s

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.

    2010-12-20

    Previous surveys of outflows in low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have relied on the analysis of sources selected primarily for their optical/X-ray brightness and are therefore biased. Toward determining the outflow properties of local AGNs, we detect warm absorption signatures of O VII and O VIII absorption edges in the available Suzaku/XMM-Newton CCD spectra of an unbiased sample of 44 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources selected in the very hard X-rays (14-195 keV) with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. From our analysis, we find that O VII and O VIII absorption edges are present in 41% of the sample. This fraction is dependent on luminosity, with outflow detections in 60% of low-luminosity and 30% of high-luminosity sources. However, grating spectroscopy of the highest luminosity sources reveals that {approx}80% of these sources have ionized absorbers, but that the ionization states are higher/lower than produces the O VII and O VIII edges. This suggests that ionized absorption may be present in all local Seyfert 1s.

  12. Understanding Chemical versus Electrostatic Shifts in X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the present article is on understanding the insight that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements can provide when studying self-assembled monolayers. Comparing density functional theory calculations to experimental data on deliberately chosen model systems, we show that both the chemical environment and electrostatic effects arising from a superposition of molecular dipoles influence the measured core-level binding energies to a significant degree. The crucial role of the often overlooked electrostatic effects in polar self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is unambiguously demonstrated by changing the dipole density through varying the SAM coverage. As a consequence of this effect, care has to be taken when extracting chemical information from the XP spectra of ordered organic adsorbate layers. Our results, furthermore, imply that XPS is a powerful tool for probing local variations in the electrostatic energy in nanoscopic systems, especially in SAMs. PMID:26937264

  13. Conformations of polyaniline molecules adsorbed on Au(111) probed by in situ STM and ex situ XPS and NEXAFS.

    PubMed

    Lee, YiHui; Chang, ChinZen; Yau, ShuehLin; Fan, LiangJen; Yang, YawWen; Yang, LiangYueh Ou; Itaya, Kingo

    2009-05-13

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to examine the conformation of a monolayer of polyaniline (PAN) molecules produced on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode by anodization at 1.0 V [vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)] in 0.10 M H(2)SO(4) containing 0.030 M aniline. The as-produced PAN molecules took on a well-defined linear conformation stretching for 500 A or more, as shown by in situ and ex situ STM. The XPS and NEXAFS results indicated that the linear PAN seen at 1.0 V assumed the form of an emeraldine salt made of PAN chains and (bi)sulfate anions. Shifting the potential from 1.0 to 0.7 V altered the shape of the PAN molecules from straight to crooked, which was ascribed to restructuring of the Au(111) electrified interface on the basis of voltammetric and XPS results. In situ STM showed that further decreasing the potential to 0.5 V transformed the crooked PAN threads into a mostly linear form again, with preferential alignment and formation of some locally ordered structures. PAN molecules could be reduced from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine as the potential was decreased to 0.2 V or less. In situ STM showed that the fully reduced PAN molecules were straight but mysteriously shortened to approximately 50 A in length. The conformation of PAN did not recuperate when the potential was shifted positively to 1.0 V. PMID:19361217

  14. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  15. A XPS study of the Mo effect on passivation behaviors for highly controlled stainless steels in neutral and alkaline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Thiago J.; Chauveau, Eric; Mantel, Marc; Nogueira, Ricardo P.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of Mo additions on film passive properties of three different stainless steels (SS) types (austenitic, ferritic and duplex alloys). A comparison between Mo containing (3 wt% Mo) and free Mo (0 wt% Mo) grades of highly controlled laboratory heats was done considering their passive film formed in different aggressive conditions, from neutral to alkaline pH. The presence of oxidized Mo on the passive layer was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of Mo within the passive film improved the passivity breakdown potential for the duplex and ferritic SS, but seemed to have no effect for austenitic SS.

  16. An XPS study on the attachment of triethoxsilylbutyraldehyde to two titanium surfaces as a way to bond chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Holly J.; Schulz, Kirk H.; Bumgardner, Joel D.; Walters, Keisha B.

    2008-05-01

    A bioactive coating has the ability to create a strong interface between bone tissue and implant. Chitosan, a biopolymer derived from the exoskeletons of shellfish, exhibits many bioactive properties that make it an ideal material for use as a coating such as antibacterial, biodegradable, non-toxic, and the ability to attract and promote bone cell growth and organized bone formation. A previous study reported on the bonding of chitosan to a titanium surface using a three-step process. In the current study, 86.4% de-acetylated chitosan coatings were bound to implant quality titanium in a two-step process that involved the deposition of triethoxsilylbutyraldehyde (TESBA) in toluene, followed by a reaction between the aldehyde of TESBA with chitosan. The chitosan coatings were examined on two different metal treatments to determine if any major differences in the ability of titanium to bind chitosan could be detected. The surface of the titanium metal and the individual reaction steps were examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following the deposition of TESBA, significant changes were seen in the amounts of oxygen, silicon, carbon, and titanium present on the titanium surface, which were consistent with the anticipated reaction steps. It was demonstrated that more TESBA was bound to the piranha-treated titanium surface as compared to the passivated titanium surface. The two different silane molecules, aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and TESBA, did not affect the chemistry of the resultant chitosan films. XPS showed that both the formation of unwanted polysiloxanes and the removal of the reactive terminal groups were prevented by using toluene as the carrier solvent to bond TESBA to the titanium surfaces, instead of an aqueous solvent. Qualitatively, the chitosan films demonstrated improved adhesion after using toluene, as the films remained attached to the titanium surface even when placed under the ultra-high vacuum necessary for XPS, unlike the

  17. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  18. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  19. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Summary By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes. PMID:26734516

  20. Study of Y(3S, 2S)-> eta Y(1S) and Y(3S, 2S) -> pi pi- Y(1S) Hadronic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-03-27

    We study the {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S, 2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) transitions with 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and 100 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We measure {Beta}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (2.39 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.14(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] = (1.35 {+-} 0.17(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We find no evidence for {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S) and obtain {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 1.0 x 10{sup -4} and {Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {eta}{Upsilon}(1S)]/{Lambda}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S)] < 2.3 x 10{sup -3} as upper limits at the 90% confidence level. We also provide improved measurements of the {Upsilon}(2S)-{Upsilon}(1S) and {Upsilon}(3S)-{Upsilon}(1S) mass differences, 562.170 {+-} 0.007(stat.) {+-} 0.088(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} and 893.813 {+-} 0.015(stat.) {+-} 0.107(syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  1. Microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S) bridges autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria to affect autophagosomal biogenesis and degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Nguyen, Susan; McKeehan, Kerstin; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Liu, Leyuan

    2011-03-25

    The ubiquitously distributed MAP1S is a homologue of the exclusively neuronal distributed microtubule-associated protein 1A and 1B (MAP1A/B). They give rise to multiple isoforms through similar post-translational modification. Isoforms of MAP1S have been implicated in microtubule dynamics and mitotic abnormalities and mitotic cell death. Here we show that ablation of the Map1s gene in mice caused reduction in the B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 or xL (Bcl-2/xL) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (P27) protein levels, accumulation of defective mitochondria, and severe defects in response to nutritive stress, suggesting defects in autophagosomal biogenesis and clearance. Furthermore, MAP1S isoforms interacted with the autophagosome-associated light chain 3 of MAP1A/B (LC3), a homologue of yeast autophagy-related gene 8 (ATG8), and recruited it to stable microtubules in a MAP1S and LC3 isoform-dependent mode. In addition, MAP1S interacted with mitochondrion-associated leucine-rich PPR-motif containing protein (LRPPRC) that interacts with the mitophagy initiator and Parkinson disease-related protein Parkin. The three-way interactions of MAP1S isoforms with LC3 and microtubules as well as the interaction of MAP1S with LRPPRC suggest that MAP1S isoforms may play positive roles in integration of autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria in both autophagosomal biogenesis and degradation. For the first time, our results clarify roles of MAP1S in bridging microtubules and mitochondria with autophagic and mitophagic initiation, maturation, trafficking, and lysosomal clearance. Defects in the MAP1S-regulated autophagy may impact heart disease, cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and a wide range of other diseases. PMID:21262964

  2. Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions using miniature specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, Charles F.; Henager, Charles H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2009-01-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a tool for studying fuel-cladding chemical interactions at elevated temperatures. Materials and conditions were selected to simulate the interface of oxide fuels and fission products with high-temperature cladding materials for TRU-MOX fueled reactors. Both ex-situ and in-situ spectroscopy measurements were performed using polished HT-9 disks, uncoated and coated with yttria-stabilized zirconia, that were exposed to air oxidation at temperatures between 873-973K. Ex-situ measurements (under ambient conditions) were conducted to identify oxide phases, determine oxidation mechanisms and approximate film growth rates with an optimal signal-to-noise for the equipment used. Subsequently performed in-situ measurements were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the technique for measurements at elevated temperature in a hot-stage. Raman spectra were supported with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling. The results, which are for non-fueled materials in this study, illustrated a method for fast screening of candidate alloys with actinide-based MOX fuel mixtures.

  3. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of 304 stainless steel by aerobic Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 bacteria: AFM and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S J; Pehkonen, S O

    2007-09-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steel 304 by a marine aerobic Pseudomonas bacterium in a seawater-based medium was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM was used to observe in situ the proliferation of a sessile Pseudomonas cell by binary fission. The development of a biofilm on the coupon surface and the extent of corrosion damage beneath the biofilm after various exposure times were also characterized by AFM. Results showed that the biofilm formed on the coupon surface increased in thickness and heterogeneity with time, and thus resulting in the occurrence of extensive micro-pitting corrosion; whilst the depth of pits increased linearly with time. The XPS results confirmed that the colonization of Pseudomonas bacteria on the coupon surface induced subtle changes in the alloy elemental composition in the outermost layer of surface films. The most significant feature resulting from microbial colonization on the coupon surface was the depletion of iron (Fe) and the enrichment of chromium (Cr) content as compared to a control coupon exposed to the sterile medium, and the enrichment of Cr increased with time. These compositional changes in the main alloying elements may be correlated with the occurrence of extensive micropitting corrosion on the surface. PMID:17582747

  4. Morphological and spectroscopic studies on enlargement of Pd nanoparticle in L-cysteine aqueous solution by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, C.; Ogawa, S.; Niwa, H.; Nomoto, T.; Kutluk, G.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Yagi, S.

    2013-02-01

    We have revealed the enlargement mechanism of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on SiO2/Si by the AFM observation and the XPS measurement, when the Pd NPs react with the L-cysteine under water environment. Furthermore, the adsorbates on the Pd NPs/SiO2/Si have been confirmed by the XPS measurement. The Pd NPs with clean surface are fabricated and deposited on the SiO2/Si substrate by the gas evaporation method. In that aspect, the Pd NPs possess an interaction with the SiO2/Si surface. When the Pd NPs/SiO2/Si is reacted into the L-cysteine aqueous solution, the adsorbates originated from the L-cysteine exist on the Pd NPs surface. On the contrary, the L-cysteine hardly adsorb on the SiO2/Si. The enlargement of the Pd NPs is stimulated by the contributions of the H2O and/or the L-cysteine molecules because the Pd NPs can be more easily migrated on the SiO2/Si surface due to those contributions.

  5. Evaluation of the surface properties of PTFE foam coating filter media using XPS and contact angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byung Hyun; Lee, Myong-Hwa; Kim, Sang Bum; Jo, Young Min

    2011-02-01

    A newly developed PTFE foam coating filter was developed which can be used for hot gas cleaning at temperatures up to 250 °C. The emulsion-type PTFE was coated onto a woven glass fiber using a foam coating method. The filter surface was closely examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The XPS results were used to determine the binding force between the carbon and fluorine of PTFE, which imparts coating stability to the filter medium. More than 95% of the bonds of the PTFE foam coating filter were between carbon and fluorine, and this filter demonstrated excellent hydrophobic and good oleophobic properties at the same time. The contact angles of liquid droplets on the filter surface were used to predict the potential wetability of the filter against water or oil. In addition, the very low surface free energy of the filter medium, which was evaluated using the Owens-Wendt method, demonstrates a very stable surface and a high de-dusting quality.

  6. XPS study of ruthenium tris-bipyridine electrografted from diazonium salt derivative on microcrystalline boron doped diamond.

    PubMed

    Agnès, Charles; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Omnès, Franck; Jousselme, Bruno; Billon, Martial; Bidan, Gérard; Mailley, Pascal

    2009-12-28

    Boron doped diamond (BDD) functionalization has received an increasing interest during the last few years. Such an infatuation comes from the original properties of BDD, including chemical stability or an electrochemical window, that opens the way for the design of (bio)sensors or smart interfaces. In such a context, diazonium salts appear to be well suited for BDD functionalization as they enable covalent immobilization of functional entities such as enzymes or DNA. In this study we report microcrystalline BDD functionalization with a metallic complex, ruthenium tris(bipyridine), using the p-(tris(bipyridine)Ru(2+))phenyl diazonium salt. Electrografting using cyclic voltammetry (CV) allowed the formation of a ruthenium complex film that was finely characterized using electrochemistry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, we showed that chronopotentiometry (CP) is a convenient tool to monitor Ru complex film deposition through the control of the electrochemical pulse parameters (i.e. current density and pulse duration). Finally, such a control was demonstrated through the correlation between electrochemical and XPS characterizations. PMID:20024438

  7. Structural model of homogeneous As–S glasses derived from Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Mccloy, J. S.; Riley, B. J.; Windisch, C. F.; Sundaram, S. K.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.

    2010-11-28

    The structure of homogeneous bulk As x S100- x (25 ≤ x ≤ 42) glasses, prepared by the conventional rocking–melting–quenching method, was investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the main building blocks of their glass networks are regular AsS3/2 pyramids and sulfur chains. In the S-rich domain, the existence of quasi-tetrahedral (QT) S = As(S1/2)3 units is deduced from XPS data, but with a concentration not exceeding ~3–5% of total atomic sites. Therefore, QT units do not appear as primary building blocks of the glass backbone in these materials, and an optimally-constrained network may not be an appropriate description for glasses when x < 40. Finally, it is shown that, in contrast to Se-based glasses, the ‘chain-crossing’ model is only partially applicable to sulfide glasses.

  8. Preparation and XPS study of X-ray photochromic transparent BiOI/nylon11 composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijuan; Liu, Fen; Zhao, Liangzhong; Yan, Shouke

    2011-06-01

    Nylon11 film immersed in BiI3-ethanol solution was used for in situ generation of transparent BiOI/nylon11 X-ray photochromic composite materials via integration of the hydrolyzate (BiOI) of BiI3 into nylon11. The obtained BiOI/nylon11 composite film shows a reversible photochromic effect, changing the color from orange-red to brownish black under soft X-ray irradiation and back to orange-red after air exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the oxidation state of Bi atoms in BiOI/nylon11 composite film does not change before and after changing the color. Angle-resolved XPS analysis reveals that BiOI in nylon11 film is well distributed within an infiltration depth of about 10 nm. The source of the X-ray photochromic effect for transparent BiOI/nylon11 composite film may be related to oxygen as well as the interaction between BiOI and the amide groups. The oxygen AT% in the composite film decreases with increasing X-ray irradiation time. The present method for preparing transparent BiOI/nylon11 X-ray photochromic composite materials is facile and low cost. The X-ray photochromic effect has potential applications in some technology fields. For example, it can be used to create temporary patterning in a colored composite material surface.

  9. Influence of oxygen incorporation on the defect structure of GaN microrods and nanowires. An XPS and CL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, G.; Herrera, M.; Silva, R.; Vásquez, G. C.; Maestre, D.

    2016-05-01

    We report a cathodoluminescence (CL) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the influence of oxygen incorporation on the defect structure of GaN microrods and nanowires. The micro- and nanostructures were synthesized by a thermal evaporation method, which enables us to incorporate oxygen at different concentrations by varying the growth temperature. HR-TEM measurements revealed that oxygen generates stacking fault defects and edge dislocations along the GaN nanowires. Amorphous GaOxNy compounds were segregated on the surface of the nanowires. XPS, XRD and CL measurements suggests that the microrods and nanowires were composed of amorphous oxynitride compounds at their surface and GaN at their inner region. CL measurements revealed that the nanostructures generated an emission of 2.68 eV that increased in intensity proportionally to their oxygen content. We have attributed this emission to electronic transitions between donor substitutional-oxygen (ON) and acceptor interstitial-oxygen (Oi) state levels.

  10. Quantitative XPS depth profiling of codeine loaded poly(l-lactic acid) films using a coronene ion sputter source.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Ali; Davies, Martyn C; Shard, Alexander G; Hutton, Simon; Mishra, Gautam; Alexander, Morgan R

    2009-08-19

    The controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients from polymers over prolonged periods of time is vital for the function of drug eluting stents and other drug loaded delivery devices. Characterisation of the drug distribution in polymers allows the in vitro and in vivo performance to be rationalised. We present the first X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling study of such a drug eluting stent system for which we employ a novel coronene ion sputter source. The rationale for this is to ascertain quantitative atomic concentration data through the thickness of flat films containing codeine and poly(l-lactic acid) (PLA) as a model of a drug loaded polymer device. A range of films of thickness of up to 96 nm are spun cast from chloroform onto Piranha cleaned silicon wafers. Ellipsometry of the films is undertaken prior to depth profiling to determine the total film thickness and provide a measure of the relative loading of drug within the PLA matrix through spectroscopic analysis. Progressive XPS analysis of the bottom of the sputter crater with sputter time indicated codeine to be depleted from the surface and segregated to the bulk of the polymer films by comparison with a uniform distribution calculated from the bulk loading. This serves to illustrate that surface depletion of drug occurs, which poses important implications for drug loaded polymer delivery systems. PMID:19427343

  11. Duplex Oxide Formation during Transient Oxidation of Cu-5%Ni(001) Investigated by In situ UHV-TEM and XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.C.; Starr, D.; Kang, Y.; Luo, L.; Tong, X.; Zhou, G.

    2012-05-20

    The transient oxidation stage of a model metal alloy thin film was characterized with in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytic high-resolution TEM. We observed the formations of nanosized NiO and Cu{sub 2}O islands when Cu-5a5%Ni(100) was exposed to oxygen partial pressure, pO{sub 2} = 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr and various temperatures in situ. At 350 C epitaxial Cu{sub 2}O islands formed initially and then NiO islands appeared on the surface of the Cu{sub 2}O island, whereas at 750 C NiO appeared first. XPS and TEM was used to reveal a sequential formation of NiO and then Cu{sub 2}O islands at 550 C. The temperature-dependant oxide selection may be due to an increase of the diffusivity of Ni in Cu with increasing temperature.

  12. The composite load spectra project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H.; Kurth, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic methods and generic load models capable of simulating the load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components are being developed. Four engine component types (the transfer ducts, the turbine blades, the liquid oxygen posts and the turbopump oxidizer discharge duct) were selected as representative hardware examples. The composite load spectra that simulate the probabilistic loads for these components are typically used as the input loads for a probabilistic structural analysis. The knowledge-based system approach used for the composite load spectra project provides an ideal environment for incremental development. The intelligent database paradigm employed in developing the expert system provides a smooth coupling between the numerical processing and the symbolic (information) processing. Large volumes of engine load information and engineering data are stored in database format and managed by a database management system. Numerical procedures for probabilistic load simulation and database management functions are controlled by rule modules. Rules were hard-wired as decision trees into rule modules to perform process control tasks. There are modules to retrieve load information and models. There are modules to select loads and models to carry out quick load calculations or make an input file for full duty-cycle time dependent load simulation. The composite load spectra load expert system implemented today is capable of performing intelligent rocket engine load spectra simulation. Further development of the expert system will provide tutorial capability for users to learn from it.

  13. Analysis of photometric spectra of 17 meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The initial phase of the photometry which involved 17 meteor spectra consisting of eight Geminid spectra, six Orionid spectra and three Eta Aquarid spectra is discussed. Among these 17 spectra it is found that the Geminid spectra are of the best quality and are used for the identification of the atomic lines and molecular bands that normally appear on video tape spectra. The data from the Geminid records are used for developing calibration techniques in photometry. The Orionid and Eta Aquarid spectra are chosen for early analysis because of the current interest in all physical and chemical data relating to Comet Halley.

  14. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  15. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  16. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  17. Links between two different types of spectra of charged nanometer aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luts, A.; Komsaare, K.; Parts, T.-E.; Hõrrak, U.

    2011-08-01

    We have, since 2007, continuously measured the electrical mobility distribution of small (< 1.5 nm in diameter) corona-generated one-second-aged air ions, using our Small Air Ion Spectrometer (KAIS), in urban area, in the center of the town of Tartu, Estonia. We have simultaneously measured the mobility distributions of natural air ions (0.42-7.4 nm in diameter) with the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzer (BSMA). In this work we employ these data to establish certain links between the concurrent spectra of two types, especially for days with new particle formation events. We elaborated and tested an automatic classification method, which selected the spectra according their shape. In the case of the BSMA negative ions, we obtained four classes of the spectra which are associated with the intermediate ion (1.6-7.4 nm in diameter) nucleation burst events and rain-type events. The spectra within these classes are characterized by special shapes and they are called "event-like spectra". The first class demonstrates the strongest increase in the concentration of all ions with the mobilities below 0.8 cm 2V -1 s -1 (above 1.25 nm in diameter), it mainly contains spring and early summer spectra, recorded around midday. In the second class, the events are weaker; it contains a large number of late spring morning time spectra, when relative humidity (RH) tends to decrease. The third and the fourth classes contain many spectra, which resemble to short isolated events. These spectra are excluded from the further analysis. In the first class, the precipitation spectra make about 34% of all the event-like spectra, in the other classes about 10%. In the case of the BSMA positive ions, only the first and second classes were present. The precipitation spectra make about 20% of all event-like classes. About 45% of the event-like spectra are without precipitation, but with RH > 90%, and these spectra are excluded from the further analysis. The spectra with RH < 50% formed 12% of

  18. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  19. Cloud Processing of CCN Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud processing often makes bimodal aerosol spectra from which size at minimal concentration infers cloud effective supersaturation (Seff) (Hoppel et al. 1986). Particle hygroscopicity (κ) converts this Hoppel minimum to critical S, Sc. Only lower Sc particles that produce cloud droplets are physically (coalescence) or chemically (gas-to-particle conversion) processed, which increases soluble content so that upon evaporation, these CCN have even lower Sc whereas the unactivated CCN do not change size or Sc. This results in the size gap at Seff. DRI CCN spectrometers have revealed bimodality in 6 projects for which Seff can be obtained without κ. However in 2 projects, MASE and ICE-T, simultaneous DMA measurements also provided κ by transposing DMA sizes to Sc; the κ that makes the DMA spectra agree with simultaneous CCN spectra (Fig). There was DMA-CCN agreement for 227 MASE and 50 ICE-T measurements. Since unlike Fig. a mean κ of the processed modes was greater than mean κ of the unprocessed modes, chemical processing was indicated; since most κ were lower than ammonium sulfate κ (0.61) chemical processing should move processed κ closer to 0.61. Chemical processing was also indicated in MASE by greater sulfate and nitrate concentrations for bimodal spectra and greater sulfur dioxide and ozone concentrations for monomodal spectra. MASE above cloud measurements showed higher κ and less bimodality than below cloud measurements, this is consistent with the higher above cloud NCCN, that κ is lower in pollution and for these less cloud interacted samples. Interspersed bimodal and monomodal CCN spectra under the ubiquitous MASE stratus suggested less than well-mixed boundary layers. Somewhat surprisingly there was more bimodality for the cumulus ICE-T clouds than the MASE stratus. ICE-T indicated more physical than chemical cloud processing. Cloud-processing of CCN spectra is as important as CCN sources; it alters Seff, cloud droplet concentrations, mean

  20. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwöbel, André; Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A.; Calvet, Wolfram; Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode-electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  1. The surface reactivity of a magnesium-aluminium alloy in acidic fluoride solutions studied by electrochemical techniques and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdier, S.; van der Laak, N.; Delalande, S.; Metson, J.; Dalard, F.

    2004-08-01

    The behaviour of the 6% Al magnesium alloy AM60 in aqueous acid fluoride solutions was studied in situ by electrochemical techniques and the surface chemistry of the resulting film was examined by monochromatized XPS. The evolution of the corrosion potential and cyclic voltammograms showed that the aggressiveness of the solutions is mainly driven by their fluoride concentration, the pH having almost no detectable influence. The more concentrated and acidic fluoride solutions led to a higher degree of fluoride coverage of the surface. The surface film is composed of magnesium hydroxide and hydroxyfluoride Mg(OH) 2- xF x which approaches MgF 2 with increasing fluoride concentration in the film. The parameters governing the film evolution and their relation to surface reactions are discussed.

  2. XPS study of the room temperature surface oxidation of zirconium and its binary alloys with tin, chromium and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sarma, D. D.; Krummacher, S.

    1988-07-01

    Surface oxidation of pure zirconium and its dilute binary alloys with tin, chromium and iron has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with a view to comparing their oxidation behaviour at room temperature. Mostly suboxides of zirconium are formed during the initial stages of oxidation at oxygen exposures < 10 L, while at higher exposures ZrO 2 is the dominant oxide species formed together with two suboxides. The relative XPS intensity of these two suboxides shows a broad and weak maximum in the exposure range 20-30 L. Pure zirconium as well as its dilute alloys exhibit a decreasing rate of oxidation with increasing oxygen exposures. No significant difference is observed in the surface oxidation behaviour of pure zirconium and its dilute binary alloys at room temperature.

  3. Investigation of V oxidation states in reduced V/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, M.A.; Proctor, A.; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M.

    1996-04-15

    Vanadium oxidation states in a 5.9 wt% V/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were determined by XPS from the V 2p level. The V 2p{sub 3/2} envelope is composed of two components (oxidation states), appearing at 517.2 and 515.5 eV (for H{sub 2} as the reducing agent) and at 517.3 and 515.8 eV (for CO as the reducing agent). The components were assigned to V{sup 5+} and V{sup 3+}. The average oxidation state of V decreased to 3.5 with increased reduction temperature in H{sub 2} up to 662{degree}C. Reduction in the presence of CO showed a decrease in the average oxidation state from 5 to 3.3 over the temperature range 155-510{degrees}C. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. XPS study of the chemical stability of DyBa2Cu3O6+δ superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetisov, A. V.; Kozhina, G. А.; Estemirova, S. Kh.; Fetisov, V. B.; Gulyaeva, R. I.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical stability of the powder DyBa2Cu3O6+δ has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal analysis at ambient conditions. The powder was subjected to mechanical processing in a ball mill-activator to accelerate chemical degradation. The kinetic regularities of hydrolytic decomposition of DyBa2Cu3O6+δ under the influence of air moisture have been determined. The resistive properties of DyBa2Cu3O6+δ to water have been found to be better, but not much different from analogous properties of YBa2Cu3O6+δ which is unstable in a wet environment. Chemical degradation of the material is triggered by crucial concentrating of water particles near the free surface of the solid reactant (due to their low diffusibility in the bulk) leading to rapid chemical decomposition of the respective regions.

  5. XPS study of the O 2/SF 6 microwave plasma oxidation of (0 0 1) GaAs surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, G.; Bideux, L.; Desplats, O.; Fontaine, C.; Robert-Goumet, C.; Gruzza, B.

    2009-10-01

    O 2SF 6 plasma effects on processed GaAs surfaces have been investigated. The influence of plasma parameters such as composition, power and exposure time has been studied. The microwave plasma treatment efficiency has been studied by surface depth profiling (cycles consisting of XPS measurements followed by a slight etching) coupled with an original modelling calculation. We have pointed out that SF 6 addition in plasma increases the oxidative rule of oxygen by increasing the total oxide thickness and that the quantity of the different oxidative and passivating species does not limit the oxidative mechanism, in the O 2:SF 6 ratio range 80:20 to 40:60. The increase in the plasma power leads to a change in the composition of the outer region of the oxide layer with an increase in the gallium content on the surface, and to an increase in the total oxide layer. The exposure time to the plasma increases also these two phenomena.

  6. XPS study of the formation of ultrathin GaN film on GaAs(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bideux, L.; Monier, G.; Matolin, V.; Robert-Goumet, C.; Gruzza, B.

    2008-04-01

    The nitridation of GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces has been studied using XPS spectroscopy, one of the best surface sensitive techniques. A glow discharge cell was used to produce a continuous plasma with a majority of N atomic species. We used the Ga3d and As3d core levels to monitor the chemical state of the surface and the coverage of the species. A theoretical model based on stacked layers allows to determine the optimal temperature of nitridation. Moreover, this model permits the determination of the thickness of the GaN layer. Varying time of nitridation from 10 min to 1 h, it is possible to obtain GaN layers with a thickness between 0.5 nm and 3 nm.

  7. XPS study of the surface chemistry on AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloys in dilute NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Shinohara, Tadashi; Zhang, Bo-Ping

    2010-08-01

    The surface chemistry on AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloys was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the corrosion and the passivation zones. In the corrosion zone, the presence of Mg(OH) 2 and MgCO 3 species was found in the outer surface, whereas, in the inner layer, the co-existence of Mg(OH) 2, MgO and MgCO 3 species was observed for both alloys. The presence of Al 3+ in the surface electrolyte to form Al 2O 3/Al(OH) 3 and the formation of carbonate product provide a better passivation on the surfaces and retard the chloride-induced corrosion on the materials in the passivation zone.

  8. Surface chemical composition of human maxillary first premolar as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Leo; Nelson, Alan E.; Heo, Giseon; Major, Paul W.

    2008-08-01

    The surface chemical composition of dental enamel has been postulated as a contributing factor in the variation of bond strength of brackets bonded to teeth, and hence, the probability of bracket failure during orthodontic treatment. This study systematically investigated the chemical composition of 98 bonding surfaces of human maxillary premolars using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to ascertain compositional differences between right and left first premolars. The major elements detected in all samples were calcium, phosphorus, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. Surface compositions were highly variable between samples and several elements were found to be highly correlated. No statistical significant difference in the chemical composition of the maxillary right and left first premolars was found ( p > 0.05). Knowledge of the chemical composition of enamel surfaces will facilitate future studies that relate this information to the variations in dental enamel bond strength.

  9. Electrochemical and XPS study of LiFePO4 cathode nanocomposite with PPy/PEG conductive network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorková, A.; Oriňáková, R.; Oriňák, A.; Kupková, M.; Wiemhöfer, H.-D.; Audinot, J. N.; Guillot, J.

    2012-08-01

    High performance PPy/PEG-LiFePO4 nanocomposites as cathode materials were synthesized by solvothermal method and simple chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole (Py) monomer on the surface of LiFePO4 particles. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and charge-discharge tests. PPyPEG hybrid layers decrease particle to particle contact resistance while the impedance measurements confirmed that the coating of PPy-PEG significantly decreases the charge transfer resistance of the electrode material. The initial discharge capacities of this sample at C/5 and 1C are 150 and 128 mAh/g, respectively. The results show that PPy/PEGLiFePO4 composites are more effective than bare LiFePO4 as cathode material.

  10. Angle-resolved XPS analysis and characterization of monolayer and multilayer silane films for DNA coupling to silica.

    PubMed

    Shircliff, Rebecca A; Stradins, Paul; Moutinho, Helio; Fennell, John; Ghirardi, Maria L; Cowley, Scott W; Branz, Howard M; Martin, Ina T

    2013-03-26

    We measure silane density and Sulfo-EMCS cross-linker coupling efficiency on aminosilane films by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. We then characterize DNA immobilization and hybridization on these films by (32)P-radiometry. We find that the silane film structure controls the efficiency of the subsequent steps toward DNA hybridization. A self-limited silane monolayer produced from 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane (APDMES) provides a silane surface density of ~3 nm(-2). Thin (1 h deposition) and thick (19 h deposition) multilayer films are generated from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), resulting in surfaces with increased roughness compared to the APDMES monolayer. Increased silane surface density is estimated for the 19 h APTES film, due to a ∼32% increase in surface area compared to the APDMES monolayer. High cross-linker coupling efficiencies are measured for all three silane films. DNA immobilization densities are similar for the APDMES monolayer and 1 h APTES. However, the DNA immobilization density is double for the 19 h APTES, suggesting that increased surface area allows for a higher probe attachment. The APDMES monolayer has the lowest DNA target density and hybridization efficiency. This is attributed to the steric hindrance as the random packing limit is approached for DNA double helices (dsDNA, diameter ≥ 2 nm) on a plane. The heterogeneity and roughness of the APTES films reduce this steric hindrance and allow for tighter packing of DNA double helices, resulting in higher hybridization densities and efficiencies. The low steric hindrance of the thin, one to two layer APTES film provides the highest hybridization efficiency of nearly 88%, with 0.21 dsDNA/nm(2). The XPS data also reveal water on the cross-linker-treated surface that is implicated in device aging. PMID:23445373

  11. Tracking the conversion of nitrogen during pyrolysis of antibiotic mycelial fermentation residues using XPS and TG-FTIR-MS technology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Yang, Shijun; Wang, Liang; Liu, Yuchen; Qian, Feng; Yao, Wenqing; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotic mycelial fermentation residues (AMFRs), which are emerging solid pollutants, have been recognized as hazardous waste in China since 2008. Nitrogen (N), which is an environmental sensitivity element, is largely retained in AMFR samples derived from fermentation substrates. Pyrolysis is a promising technology for the treatment of solid waste. However, the outcomes of N element during the pyrolysis of AMFRs are still unknown. In this study, the conversion of N element during the pyrolysis of AMFRs was tracked using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and online TG-FTIR-MS (Thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared-Mass spectrometry) technology. In the AMFR sample, organic amine-N, pyrrolic-N, protein-N, pyridinic-N, was the main N-containing species. XPS results indicated that pyrrolic-N and pyridinic-N were retained in the AMFR-derived pyrolysis char. More stable species, such as N-oxide and quaternary-N, were also produced in the char. TG-FTIR-MS results indicated that NH3 and HCN were the main gaseous species, and their contents were closely related to the contents of amine-N and protein-N, and pyrrolic-N and pyridinic-N of AMFRs, respectively. Increases in heating rate enhanced the amounts of NH3 and HCN, but had less of an effect on the degradation degree of AMFRs. N-containing organic compounds, including amine-N, nitrile-N and heterocyclic-N, were discerned from the AMFR pyrolysis process. Their release range was extended with increasing of heating rate and carbon content of AMFR sample. This work will help to take appropriate measure to reduce secondary pollution from the treatment of AMFRs. PMID:26736052

  12. Highly efficient removal of heavy metals by polymer-supported nanosized hydrated Fe(III) oxides: behavior and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingjun; Qiu, Hui; Pan, Bingcai; Nie, Guangze; Xiao, Lili; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Quanxing; Zheng, Shourong

    2010-02-01

    The present study developed a polymer-based hybrid sorbent (HFO-001) for highly efficient removal of heavy metals [e.g., Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cu(II)] by irreversibly impregnating hydrated Fe(III) oxide (HFO) nanoparticles within a cation-exchange resin D-001 (R-SO(3)Na), and revealed the underlying mechanism based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study. HFO-001 combines the excellent handling, flow characteristics, and attrition resistance of conventional cation-exchange resins with the specific affinity of HFOs toward heavy metal cations. As compared to D-001, sorption selectivity of HFO-001 toward Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) was greatly improved from the Ca(II) competition at greater concentration. Column sorption results indicated that the working capacity of HFO-001 was about 4-6 times more than D-001 with respect to removal of three heavy metals from simulated electroplating water (pH approximately 4.0). Also, HFO-001 is particularly effective in removing trace Pb(II) and Cd(II) from simulated natural waters to meet the drinking water standard, with treatment volume orders of magnitude higher than D-001. The superior performance of HFO-001 was attributed to the Donnan membrane effect exerted by the host D-001 as well as to the impregnated HFO nanoparticles of specific interaction toward heavy metal cations, as further confirmed by XPS study on lead sorption. More attractively, the exhausted HFO-001 beads can be effectively regenerated by HCl-NaCl solution (pH 3) for repeated use without any significant capacity loss. PMID:19906397

  13. Complete cDNA sequence of human complement C1s and close physical linkage of the homologous genes C1s and C1r

    SciTech Connect

    Tosi, M.; Duponchel, C.; Meo, T.; Julier, C.

    1987-12-29

    Overlapping molecular clones encoding the complement subcomponent C1s were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence reconstructed from these clones spans about 85% of the length of the liver C1s messenger RNAs, which occur in three distinct size classes around 3 kilobases in length. Comparisons with the sequence of C1r, the other enzymatic subcomponent of C1, reveal 40% amino acid identity and conservation of all the cysteine residues. Beside the serine protease domain, the following sequence motifs, previously described in C1r, were also found in C1s: (a) two repeats of the type found in the Ba fragment of complement factor B and in several other complement but also noncomplement proteins, (b) a cysteine-rich segment homologous to the repeats of epidermal growth factor precursor, and (c) a duplicated segment found only in C1r and C1s. Differences in each of these structural motifs provide significant clues for the interpretation of the functional divergence of these interacting serine protease zymogens. Hybridizations of C1r and C1s probes to restriction endonuclease fragments of genomic DNA demonstrate close physical linkage of the corresponding genes. The implications of this finding are discussed with respect to the evolution of C1r and C1s after their origin by tandem gene duplication and to the previously observed combined hereditary deficiencies of Clr and Cls.

  14. Photoexcitation and Auger decay of the Renner-Teller split C 1s{sup -1} {pi}{sub u}{sup *} state in CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Bozek, J. D.; Berrah, N.

    2000-09-01

    The broad ({approx_equal}700 meV) C 1s{yields}{pi}{sub u}{sup *} resonance in the absorption spectrum of CO{sub 2} has been decomposed into contributions from two Renner-Teller split core-excited states with bent and linear equilibrium geometries using resonant Auger spectroscopy. The C 1s{sup -1} {pi}{sup *} excited state was found to decay primarily via participator Auger transitions to the A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u} state of CO{sub 2}{sup +}. Analysis of the vibrational structure in the high-resolution Auger spectra, measured at several photon energies across the broad C 1s{yields}{pi}{sub u}{sup *} resonance, was accomplished using calculated Franck-Condon factors for the electronic excitation and de-excitation processes. Estimations of the geometries of the Renner-Teller split core-excited states were obtained from a comparison of the calculations with the resonant Auger spectra. Transitions to the bent core-excited state were found to contribute to the absorption profile exclusively at the photon energies below the maximum of the C 1s{yields}{pi}{sub u}{sup *} resonance, whereas the linear core-excited state becomes accessible at higher photon energies. The symmetric stretch vibrational progression of the linear core-excited state was identified and assigned. The minimum of the potential energy surface of the C 1s{sup -1}{pi}{sup *} core-excited state at its linear configuration was estimated to be 290.4 eV above the ground vibrational level of the ground electronic state of CO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. L α X-Ray Emission Spectra of Copper Compounds and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1994-05-01

    With a two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with beryl crystals,the Cu Lα emission spectra in fluorescence have been measuredfor selected copper compounds Cu2O, CuO, CuCl, CuBr, CuI,CuF2, CuCl2, CuBr2, CuF2·2H2O,CuCl2·2H2O and Cu3P, and alloysα-Cu+35%Zn and Cu+2%Be. The measured spectra aregrouped into three classes. The first class comprises the spectraof alloys, which consist of a single broad band similar to thatof Cu metal. The second class includes the spectra of monovalentcopper compounds, which are composed of a prominent peak and itshigh- and low-energy structures. To the third class belong thespectra of divalent copper compounds, which consist of a strongpeak accompanied with a characteristic dip and hump on thehigh-energy side. The Cu Lα emission bands of Cu2O,CuCl and CuBr are compared with available XPS spectra andtheoretical Cu-3d-DOS.

  16. Dielectronic satellite spectra of hydrogenlike iron from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Decaux, V. ); Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Taylor, G.; Park, H. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Bhalla, C.P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-08-01

    Spectra of hydrogenlike iron, Fe26, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the Fe26 Ly-{alpha}{sub 1}and Ly-{alpha}{sub 2} lines and the associated dielectronic satellites, which are due to transitions 1snl-2pnl{prime} with n {ge} 2, as well as the heliumlike 1s{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}){minus}1s4p({sup 1}P{sub 1})and both hydrogenlike Ly-{beta}{sub 1} and Ly-{beta}{sub 2} lines from chromium. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can be determined very accurately. The spectral data are in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. The observed spectra have also been used to estimate the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficient of Fe26. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. NIST Databases on Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.; Martin, W. C.; Musgrove, A.; Fuhr, J. R.

    2002-11-01

    The NIST atomic and molecular spectroscopic databases now available on the World Wide Web through the NIST Physics Laboratory homepage include Atomic Spectra Database, Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms, Spectrum of Platinum Lamp for Ultraviolet Spectrograph Calibration, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Transition Probabilities, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Spectral Line Broadening, and Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) [1] offers evaluated data on energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities for atoms and atomic ions. Data are given for some 950 spectra and 70,000 energy levels. About 91,000 spectral lines are included, with transition probabilities for about half of these. Additional data resulting from our ongoing critical compilations will be included in successive new versions of ASD. We plan to include, for example, our recently published data for some 16,000 transitions covering most ions of the iron-group elements, as well as Cu, Kr, and Mo [2]. Our compilations benefit greatly from experimental and theoretical atomic-data research being carried out in the NIST Atomic Physics Division. A new compilation covering spectra of the rare gases in all stages of ionization, for example, revealed a need for improved data in the infrared. We have thus measured these needed data with our high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer [3]. An upcoming new database will give wavelengths and intensities for the stronger lines of all neutral and singly-ionized atoms, along with energy levels and transition probabilities for the persistent lines [4]. A critical compilation of the transition probabilities of Ba I and Ba II [5] has been completed and several other compilations of atomic transition probabilities are nearing completion. These include data for all spectra of Na, Mg, Al, and Si [6]. Newly compiled data for selected ions of Ne, Mg, Si and S, will form the basis for a new

  18. Observation of the Inclusive D^{* -} Production in the Decay of Y(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J.Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-17

    The authors present a study of the inclusive D*{sup {+-}} production in the decay of {Upsilon}(1S) using (98.6 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance. Using the decay chain {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S), {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X, where X is unobserved, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(1S) {yields} D*{sup {+-}}X] = (2.52 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.15(syst))% and the D*{sup {+-}} momentum distribution in the rest frame of the {Upsilon}(1S). They find evidence for an excess of D*{sup {+-}} production over the expected rate from the virtual photon annihilation process {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {gamma}* {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sup {+-}} X.

  19. The ϒ(1S)→Bcρ decay with perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling; Li, Qingxia; Lu, Gongru; Huang, Jinshu; Chang, Qin

    2016-08-01

    With the potential prospects of the ϒ (1 S) data samples at the running LHC and upcoming SuperKEKB, the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ weak decay is studied with the pQCD approach. It is found that (1) the lion's share of branching ratio comes from the longitudinal polarization helicity amplitudes; (2) branching ratio for the ϒ (1 S) →Bc ρ decay can reach up to O (10-9), which might be hopefully measurable.

  20. Progress in Spectroscopy of the 1S-3S Transition in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sandrine; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Thomas, Simon; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François; Nez, François

    2015-09-01

    We report the latest advances in the Doppler-free spectroscopy of the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen. A new continuous ultra-violet source has been developed and delivers a power level of 15 mW. With this setup, the statistical uncertainty on the 1S-3S transition frequency measurement is 2.2 kHz. Combined with the 1S-2S frequency, absolute accuracy at that level would significantly enlighten the proton radius puzzle.

  1. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  2. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  3. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  4. Vibrational spectra of fluorohafnate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, Bernard; Drexhage, Martin G.; Banerjee, Pranab K.; Goltman, John; Mitra, Shashanka S.; Moynihan, Cornelius T.

    1981-02-01

    We report the first detailed measurements of fundamental vibrational spectra in fluorohafnate glass. The Raman spectrum is dominated by a single relatively broad peak in the vicinity of 570-590 cm -1 attributed to Hf-F stretching modes, while the infrared spectrum displays two prominent broad peaks. The location of the high frequency peaks is shown to be consistent with the observed position of the infrared absorption edge.

  5. Defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy turnover of fibronectin cause renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongzhong; Li, Xun; Zhao, Haibo; Su, Zhengming; Jiang, Xianhan; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in renal tissues causes renal fibrosis and renal function failure. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles. MAP1S is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and predicts a better prognosis in patients suffering from clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, we have characterized that MAP1S enhances the turnover of fibronectin, and mice overexpressing LC3 but with MAP1S deleted accumulate fibronectin and develop liver fibrosis because of the synergistic impact of LC3-induced over-synthesis of fibronectin and MAP1S depletion-caused impairment of fibronectin degradation. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells caused an impairment of autophagy clearance of fibronectin and an activation of pyroptosis. Depletion of MAP1S in mice leads to an accumulation of fibrosis-related proteins and the development of renal fibrosis in aged mice. The levels of MAP1S were dramatically reduced and levels of fibronectin were greatly elevated in renal fibrotic tissues from patients diagnosed as renal atrophy and renal failure. Therefore, MAP1S deficiency may cause the accumulation of fibronectin and the development of renal fibrosis. PMID:27236336

  6. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  7. (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-Mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines and their incorporation into hormaomycin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhushkov, Sergei I; Yufit, Dmitrii S; Grosse, Christian; Kaiser, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Efficient and scalable syntheses of enantiomerically pure (2R,1'S,2'R)- and (2S,1'S,2'R)-3-[2-mono(di,tri)fluoromethylcyclopropyl]alanines 9a–c, as well as allo-D-threonine (4) and (2S,3R)-β-methylphenylalanine (3), using the Belokon' approach with (S)- and (R)-2-[(N-benzylprolyl)amino]benzophenone [(S)- and (R)-10] as reusable chiral auxiliaries have been developed. Three new fluoromethyl analogues of the naturally occurring octadepsipeptide hormaomycin (1) with (fluoromethylcyclopropyl)alanine moieties have been synthesized and subjected to preliminary tests of their antibiotic activity. PMID:25550751

  8. Occupied and unoccupied orbitals of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} probed with C 1s emission and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the orbital structure of the fullerenes, and to pursue its evolution from a cluster to the infinite solid. For obtaining a complete picture of the electronic structure the authors compare a variety of experimental techniques, i.e. photoemission and core level emission for occupied orbitals and inverse photoemission and core level absorption for unoccupied orbitals. Their experimental results focus on optical probes involving the C 1s core level, i.e. absorption via transitions from the C 1s level into unoccupied {pi}* and {sigma}* orbitals and emission involving transitions from occupied orbitals into a C 1s hole. Due to the simplicity of the C 1s level there exist clear selection rules. For example, only transitions to and from orbitals with p-character are dipole-allowed. These results on the p-projected density of states are compared with inverse photoemission and photoemission results, where the selection rules are less definitive. In addition, a first-principles quasiparticle calculation of the density of states is used to assign the orbital features. The spectra from C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} are still far from their infinite analog, i.e., graphite, which is also measured with the same techniques. In order to determine the effect of electron transfer onto C{sub 60}, as in superconducting alkali fullerides, the authors are studying resonant emission of C{sub 60}. An electron is placed in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) by optical absorption from the C 1s level and the C 1s emission detected in the presence of this spectator electron.

  9. Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Secretes Proteases and Xylanases via the Xps Type II Secretion System and Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Magali; Scheibner, Felix; Hoffmeister, Anne-Katrin; Hartmann, Nadine; Hause, Gerd; Rother, Annekatrin; Jordan, Michael; Lautier, Martine; Arlat, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant-pathogenic bacteria utilize type II secretion (T2S) systems to secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S substrates presumably mediate the degradation of plant cell wall components during the host-pathogen interaction and thus promote bacterial virulence. Previously, the Xps-T2S system from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria was shown to contribute to extracellular protease activity and the secretion of a virulence-associated xylanase. The identities and functions of additional T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, however, are still unknown. In the present study, the analysis of 25 candidate proteins from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria led to the identification of two type II secreted predicted xylanases, a putative protease and a lipase which was previously identified as a virulence factor of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Studies with mutant strains revealed that the identified xylanases and the protease contribute to virulence and in planta growth of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. When analyzed in the related pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris, several T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria were secreted independently of the T2S systems, presumably because of differences in the T2S substrate specificities of the two pathogens. Furthermore, in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria T2S mutants, secretion of T2S substrates was not completely absent, suggesting the contribution of additional transport systems to protein secretion. In line with this hypothesis, T2S substrates were detected in outer membrane vesicles, which were frequently observed for X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. We, therefore, propose that extracellular virulence-associated enzymes from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria are targeted to the Xps-T2S system and to outer membrane vesicles. IMPORTANCE The virulence of plant-pathogenic bacteria often depends on TS2 systems, which secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S

  10. Blocking the association of HDAC4 with MAP1S accelerates autophagy clearance of mutant Huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Fei; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Xu, Guibin; Huang, Hai; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Sheng; Gallinari, Paola; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L.; Liu, Leyuan

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy controls and executes the turnover of abnormally aggregated proteins. MAP1S interacts with the autophagy marker LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux. HDAC4 associates with the aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) that causes Huntington's disease, and colocalizes with it in cytosolic inclusions. It was suggested HDAC4 interacts with MAP1S in a yeast two-hybrid screening. Here, we found that MAP1S interacts with HDAC4 via a HDAC4-binding domain (HBD). HDAC4 destabilizes MAP1S, suppresses autophagy flux and promotes the accumulation of mHTT aggregates. This occurs by an increase in the deacetylation of the acetylated MAP1S. Either suppression of HDAC4 with siRNA or overexpression of the MAP1S HBD leads to stabilization of MAP1S, activation of autophagy flux and clearance of mHTT aggregates. Therefore, specific interruption of the HDAC4-MAP1S interaction with short peptides or small molecules to enhance autophagy flux may relieve the toxicity of mHTT associated with Huntington's disease and improve symptoms of HD patients. PMID:26540094

  11. High-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy of Ni at 1s : 6-eV satellite at 4 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karis, O.; Svensson, S.; Rusz, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Gorgoi, M.; Schäfers, F.; Braun, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-12-01

    Electron correlations are responsible for many profound phenomena in solid-state physics. A classical example is the 6-eV satellite in the photoelectron spectrum of Ni. Until now the satellite structure has only been investigated at the L shell and more shallow levels. Here we report a high-kinetic-energy photoemission spectroscopy (HIKE) investigation of Ni metal. We present 1s and 2p photoelectron spectra, obtained using excitation energies up to 12.6 keV. Our investigation demonstrates that the energy position of the satellite relative to the main line is different for the 1s and the 2p levels. In combination with electronic structure calculations, we show that this energy shift is attributed to unique differences in the core-valence coupling for the K and L2,3 shells in 3d transition metals, resulting in different screening of the core holes.

  12. Accuracy of Calculated Chemical Shifts in Carbon 1s Ionization Energies from Single-Reference ab Initio Methods and Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Holme, Alf; Børve, Knut J; Sæthre, Leif J; Thomas, T Darrah

    2011-12-13

    A database of 77 adiabatic carbon 1s ionization energies has been prepared, covering linear and cyclic alkanes and alkenes, linear alkynes, and methyl- or fluoro-substituted benzenes. Individual entries are believed to carry uncertainties of less than 30 meV in ionization energies and less than 20 meV for shifts in ionization energies. The database provides an unprecedented opportunity for assessing the accuracy of theoretical schemes for computing inner-shell ionization energies and their corresponding chemical shifts. Chemical shifts in carbon 1s ionization energies have been computed for all molecules in the database using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset (MP) many-body perturbation theory of order 2 and 3 as well as various approximations to full MP4, and the coupled-cluster approximation with single- and double-excitation operators (CCSD) and also including a perturbational estimate of the energy effect of triple-excitation operators (CCSD(T)). Moreover, a wide range of contemporary density functional theory (DFT) methods are also evaluated with respect to computing experimental shifts in C1s ionization energies. Whereas the top ab initio methods reproduce the observed shifts almost to within the experimental uncertainty, even the best-performing DFT approaches meet with twice the root-mean-squared error and thrice the maximum error compared to CCSD(T). However, a number of different density energy functionals still afford sufficient accuracy to become tools in the analysis of complex C1s photoelectron spectra. PMID:26598356

  13. Successful location of tin dopant cations on surface sites of anatase-type TiO2 crystallites evidenced by 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopic probe and XPS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashkin, R. A.; Fabritchnyi, P. B.; Afanasov, M. I.; Korolenko, M. V.; Wattiaux, A.; Bordère, S.; Labrugère, C.; Delmas, C.

    2013-11-01

    The present study provides the first experimental evidence for the stabilization of tin dopant cations immediately on the surface of an oxide having a tetragonal structure. 119Sn Mössbauer spectra of the dopant, introduced by air annealing into the bulk of anatase microcrystals, showed that it was located, in the tetravalent state, in somewhat distorted octahedral sites of a unique type. On the contrary, the reduced tin species, formed upon subsequent hydrogen annealing the Sn4+-doped samples, are found to occupy different sites being characterized by two sets of the isomer shift δ and quadrupole splitting ΔEQ values (δI = 3.25 mm s-1, ΔEQI = 1.75 mm s-1; and δII = 2.85 mm s-1, ΔEQII = 1.71 mm s-1). Either of them implies both the divalent state of tin atoms and their presence at low-coordination sites that can be assigned to the surface of crystallites. Mössbauer spectra of Sn4+←2+ daughter ions, formed upon contact with air of Sn2+, consist of a symmetrically broadened peak characterized by only slightly different average values of both the isomer shift (<δ> = 0.07 mm s-1) and quadrupole splitting (<ΔEQ> = 0.50 mm s-1), as compared to the δ and ΔEQ values for the bulk-located Sn4+. However, considerable broadening of Sn4+←2+ doublet components (Γ = 0.97 mm s-1) allows one to suggest that these secondary formed ions remain distributed over the non equivalent sites inherited from their Sn2+ precursors. The occurrence of Sn4+←2+ at surface sites is independently proven by XPS measurements that revealed a greater than 10-fold enrichment with tin of 3-5 nm thick surface layers.

  14. Search for X Y Z states in ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Ban, Y.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, S. D.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The branching fractions of the ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays into final states with a J /ψ or a ψ (2 S ) are measured with improved precision to be B (ϒ (1 S )→J /ψ +anything)=(5.25 ±0.13 (stat )±0.25 (syst ))×10-4 and B (ϒ (1 S )→ψ (2 S )+anything)=(1.23 ±0.17 (stat )±0.11 (syst ))×10-4 . The first search for ϒ (1 S ) decays into X Y Z states that decay into a J /ψ or a ψ (2 S ) plus one or two charged tracks yields no significant signals for X Y Z states in any of the examined decay modes, and upper limits on their production rates in ϒ (1 S ) inclusive decays are determined.

  15. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  16. Identified hadron spectra from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Gábor I.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons and protons, as well as antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity from d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 200\\,{\\rm GeV} have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The transverse momentum range of particle identification was extended to beyond 3 GeV/c using the TOF detector and a new trigger system. The pseudorapidity dependence of the nuclear modification factor for charged hadrons in d+Au collisions is presented.

  17. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  18. Planetary spectra for anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the effects on planetary spectra that would be produced by departures from isotropic scattering are examined. The phase function is the simplest departure to handle analytically and the only phase function, other than the isotropic one, that can be incorporated into a Chandrasekhar first approximation. This approach has the advantage of illustrating trends resulting from anisotropies while retaining the simplicity that yields physical insight. An algebraic solution to the two sets of anisotropic H functions is developed in the appendix. It is readily adaptable to progammable desk calculators and gives emergent intensities accurate to 0.3 percent, which is sufficient even for spectroscopic analysis.

  19. The novel function of JADE1S in cytokinesis of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Nirodhini S; Meyer, Rosana D; Panchenko, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    JADE1 belongs to a small family of PHD zinc finger proteins that interacts with histone acetyl transferase (HAT) HBO1 and is associated with chromatin. We recently reported JADE1 chromatin shuttling and phosphorylation during G2/M to G1 transition, which was sensitive to Aurora A inhibition. In the current study we examined mechanisms of the cell cycle regulation by the small isoform of JADE1 protein, JADE1S, and report data showing that JADE1S has a novel function in the regulation of cytokinesis. Using FACS assays, we show that, JADE1S depletion facilitated rates of G1-cells accumulation in synchronously dividing HeLa cell cultures. Depletion of JADE1S protein in asynchronously dividing cells decreased the proportion of cytokinetic cells, and increased the proportion of multi-nuclear cells, indicative of premature and failed cytokinesis. In contrast, moderate overexpression of JADE1S increased the number of cytokinetic cells in time- and dose- dependent manner, indicating cytokinetic delay. Pharmacological inhibition of Aurora B kinase resulted in the release of JADE1S-mediated cytokinetic delay and allowed progression of abscission in cells over-expressing JADE1S. Finally, we show that JADE1S protein localized to centrosomes in interphase and mitotic cells, while during cytokinesis JADE1S localized to the midbody. Neither JADE1L nor partner of JADE1, HAT HBO1 was localized to the centrosomes or midbodies. Our study identifies the novel role for JADE1S in regulation of cytokinesis and suggests function in Aurora B kinase-mediated cytokinesis checkpoint. PMID:26151225

  20. Mutation in the xpsD gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri affects cellulose degradation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus canker, is a major threat to the citrus industry worldwide. Although this is a leaf spot pathogen, it bears genes highly related to degradation of plant cell walls, which are typically found in plant pathogens that cause symptoms of tissue maceration. Little is known on Xac capacity to cause disease and hydrolyze cellulose. We investigated the contribution of various open reading frames on degradation of a cellulose compound by means of a global mutational assay to selectively screen for a defect in carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) secretion in X. axonopodis pv. citri. Screening on CMC agar revealed one mutant clone defective in extracellular glycanase activity, out of nearly 3,000 clones. The insertion was located in the xpsD gene, a component of the type II secretion system (T2SS) showing an influence in the ability of Xac to colonize tissues and hydrolyze cellulose. In summary, these data show for the first time, that X. axonopodis pv. citri is capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in a T2SS-dependent process. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ability to degrade cellulose contributes to the infection process as a whole. PMID:21637619

  1. Understanding the dispersion of Ag on high surface area TiO2 supports using XPS intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zenda D.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2015-10-01

    Silver-titania (Ag/TiO2) adsorbents, in the range of 4 wt% Ag, display high selectivity toward sulfur heterocyclic compounds from complex fuel streams containing other aromatics. An experimental investigation of Ag on TiO2 has been undertaken to understand the state of dispersion and growth of Ag. XPS is one of the more promising characterization tools for the state of dispersion. Silver loading from 1 wt% to 20 wt% on 150 m2/g titania was investigated. Ag/Ti intensity ratios increased linearly with Ag content up to 4 wt% and increased less significantly thereafter from 8 wt% to 20 wt% indicating nucleation and growth of Ag crystallites. Inelastic mean free path (IMFP) calculations were used to estimate Ag crystallite size based on the attenuation of the Ag signal, realizing in this regime there is insufficient Ag to attenuate background titania. At 4, 8, 12, and 20 wt% the estimated average crystallite sizes were 0.35, 0.71, 0.84, and 1.11 nm respectively. Ag loadings up to 4 wt% were present in the form of Ag+1 adatoms presumably occupying TiO2 surface defects. Saturation of surface TiO2 defects is in good agreement with quantitative sulfur heterocycle adsorption.

  2. XPS study on the selective wet etching mechanism of GeSbTe phase change thin films with tetramethylammonium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Changmeng; Geng, Yongyou; Wu, Yiqun

    Phase change lithography has pretty potential applications for high density optical data storage mastering and micro/nano structure patterning because it is not restricted by optical diffraction limitation and at relatively low cost. GeSbTe, as an initially investigated material for phase change lithography, its mechanism of selective etching in inorganic or organic alkaline aqueous solutions, such as NaOH and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), is still unknown. In this paper, XPS measurement is used to study the selective wet etching mechanism of GeSbTe phase change thin films with TMAH solution, and the results show that oxidization played an important role in the etching process. Ge, Sb and Te are oxidized into GeO2, Sb2O5 and TeO2, respectively, and then as the corresponding salts dissolved into the etchant solution. Ge-X (X is Ge, Sb or Te) bonds are first broken in the etching, then Sb-X bonds, and finally Te-Te bonds. To confirm the effect of oxidization in the etching, H2O2 as an oxidant is added into the TMAH solution, and the etching rates are increased greatly for both amorphous and crystalline states. The selective etching mechanism of Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change films is discussed by the difference of bonds breakage between the amorphous and crystalline states.

  3. Characterization of critically cleaned sapphire single-crystal substrates by atomic force microscopy, XPS and contact angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, You; Gan, Yang

    2013-06-01

    A contaminant-free surface of single-crystal α-Al2O3 (or sapphire) substrates is key to the experimental studies of its surface and interfacial properties at ambient conditions. Here we critically evaluated methods reported in the literature using comprehensive surface analysis techniques including atomic force microscopy, XPS and contact angle measurements. We found that reported methods did not perform well in terms of removing both organic and particulate contaminants from the (0 0 0 1) basal surface. After thoroughly examining the cleaning effect of various chemical solutions and UV light and plasma irradiation, and based on modified RCA cleaning protocols, we proposed a new wet-cleaning method showing outstanding cleaning performance. This new reliable method will be very useful for the next-step surface chemistry study of single-crystal α-Al2O3. It was also demonstrated that AFM, due to its high spatial resolution and sensitivity as a local probe technique, was an indispensable tool for surface contamination control studies.

  4. An XPS study of the stability of Fomblin Z25 on the native oxide of aluminum. [x ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jones, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of Fomblin Z25, a perfluoropolyalkylether lubricant, were vapor deposited onto clean, oxidized aluminum and sapphire surfaces, and their behavior at different temperatures was studied using x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It was found that the interfacial fluid molecules decompose on the native oxide at room temperature, and continue to decompose at elevated temperatures, as previous studies had shown to occur on clean metal. TDS indicated that different degradation mechanisms were operative for clean and oxidized aluminum. On sapphire substrates, no reaction was observed at room temperature. Our conclusion is that the native oxide of aluminum is neither passive nor protective towards Fomblin Z25. At high temperatures (150 C) degradation of the polymer on sapphire produced a debris layer at the interface with a chemical composition similar to the one formed on aluminum oxide. Rubbing a Fomblin film on a single crystal sapphire also induced the decomposition of the lubricant in contact with the interface and the formulation of a debris layer.

  5. Conservation of artists' acrylic emulsion paints: XPS, NEXAFS and ATR-FTIR studies of wet cleaning methods†

    PubMed Central

    Willneff, EA; Ormsby, BA; Stevens, JS; Jaye, C; Fischer, DA; Schroeder, SLM

    2014-01-01

    Works of art prepared with acrylic emulsion paints became commercially available in the 1960s. It is increasingly necessary to undertake and optimise cleaning and preventative conservation treatments to ensure their longevity. Model artists' acrylic paint films covered with artificial soiling were thus prepared on a canvas support and exposed to a variety of wet cleaning treatments based on aqueous or hydrocarbon solvent systems. This included some with additives such as chelating agents and/or surfactants, and microemulsion systems made specifically for conservation practice. The impact of cleaning (soiling removal) on the paint film surface was examined visually and correlated with results of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared, XPS and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analyses – three spectroscopic techniques with increasing surface sensitivity ranging from approximately − 1000, 10 and 5 nm, respectively. Visual analysis established the relative cleaning efficacy of the wet cleaning treatments in line with previous results. X-ray spectroscopy analysis provided significant additional findings, including evidence for (i) surfactant extraction following aqueous swabbing, (ii) modifications to pigment following cleaning and (iii) cleaning system residues. © 2014 The Authors. Surface and Interface Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25892829

  6. AFM, ellipsometry, XPS and TEM on ultra-thin oxide/polymer nanocomposite layers in organic thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Fian, A; Haase, A; Stadlober, B; Jakopic, G; Matsko, N B; Grogger, W; Leising, G

    2008-03-01

    Here we report on the fabrication and characterization of ultra-thin nanocomposite layers used as gate dielectric in low-voltage and high-performance flexible organic thin film transistors (oTFTs). Reactive sputtered zirconia layers were deposited with low thermal exposure of the substrate and the resulting porous oxide films with high leakage currents were spin-coated with an additional layer of poly-alpha-methylstyrene (P alphaMS). After this treatment a strong improvement of the oTFT performance could be observed; leakage currents could be eliminated almost completely. In ellipsometric studies a higher refractive index of the ZrO(2)/P alphaMS layers compared to the "as sputtered" zirconia films could be detected without a significant enhancement of the film thickness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the surface topography clearly showed a surface smoothing after the P alphaMS coating. Further studies with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also indicated that the polymer definitely did not form an extra layer. The polymer chains rather (self-)assemble in the nano-scaled interspaces of the porous oxide film giving an oxide-polymer "nanocomposite" with a high oxide filling grade resulting in high dielectric constants larger than 15. The dielectric strength of more than 1 MV cm(-1) is in good accordance with the polymer-filled interspaces. PMID:17952415

  7. Ab initio study of 3s core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 3s - and 4s -core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic transition metals by developing an ab initio method. We obtain the spectra exhibiting the characteristic shapes as a function of binding energy in good agreement with experimental observations. The spectral shapes are strikingly different between the majority spin channel and the minority spin channel for ferromagnetic metals Ni, Co, and Fe, that is, large intensities appear in the higher binding-energy side of the main peak (satellite) in the majority spin channel. Such satellite or shoulder intensities are also obtained for nonmagnetic metals V and Ru. These behaviors are elucidated in terms of the change of the one-electron states induced by the core-hole potential.

  8. Energy spectra and LET spectra of protons behind shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Sari; Barak, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of devices sensitive to SEU due to direct ionization by protons, it became important to know the flux and energies of protons behind aluminum shielding or within satellites. We present new analytically derived expressions for the energy distribution of incident protons, after passing the shielding, and of secondary protons emitted within the shielding. The results are compared with those of the MULASSIS code. In some cases, like a satellite in a GCR orbit, the contribution of the secondary protons to SEU might be the dominant one. Proton energy-distributions behind shielding are proportional, at low energy values, to inverse proton-LET in aluminum. Their calculated LET-spectra in silicon can be used for evaluating SEU-rate in space. The analytic expressions presented here can be useful in calculating the influence of shielding on other incident ions and secondary ions.

  9. C K-edge NEXAFS spectra of graphene with physical and chemical defects: a study based on density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Christopher; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Saalfrank, Peter

    2014-07-21

    Recently, C K-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of graphite (HOPG) surfaces have been measured for the pristine material, and for HOPG treated with either bromine or krypton plasmas (Lippitz et al., Surf. Sci., 2013, 611, L1). Changes of the NEXAFS spectra characteristic for physical (krypton) and/or chemical/physical modifications of the surface (bromine) upon plasma treatment were observed. Their molecular origin, however, remained elusive. In this work we study by density functional theory, the effects of selected point and line defects as well as chemical modifications on NEXAFS carbon K-edge spectra of single graphene layers. For Br-treated surfaces, also Br 3d X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) are simulated by a cluster approach, to identify possible chemical modifications. We observe that some of the defects related to plasma treatment lead to characteristic changes of NEXAFS spectra, similar to those in experiment. Theory provides possible microscopic origins for these changes. PMID:24901898

  10. Mutation analysis of CACNA1S and SCN4A in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Ren, Bing-Wen; Yong, Zeng-Hua; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Qiu-Xia; Yao, He-Bin

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in CACNA1S (calcium channel, voltage‑dependent, L type, alpha 1S subunit) and SCN4A (sodium channel, voltage‑gated, type IV, alpha subunit) are associated with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). The aim of the current study was to investigate CACNA1S and SCN4A mutations in patients with HPP. Mutations in CACNA1S and SCN4A were detected in three familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (FHPP) pedigrees and in two thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) pedigrees using polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and sequence alignment with GenBank data. A single base mutation from cytosine to guanine at site 1582 was identified in exon 11 of CACNA1S in one FHPP pedigree, resulting in an arginine to glycine (R528G) substitution. A single base mutation from thymine to cytosine at site 2012 was identified in exon 12 of SCN4A in one THPP pedigree, resulting in a phenylalanine to serine (F671S) substitution. No mutations in CACNA1S or SCN4A were identified in the remaining three pedigrees. The present study indicated that CACNA1S and SCN4A mutations are relatively rare in patients with HPP, and further studies are required to determine whether these mutation‑associated substitutions are representative of patients with HPP. PMID:26252573

  11. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-04-17

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair. PMID:26919559

  12. Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium bacteriophage SPN1S.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hakdong; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Lim, Jeong-A; Kim, Hyeryen; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    To understand the interaction between the host of pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and its bacteriophage, we isolated the bacteriophage SPN1S. It is a lysogenic phage in the Podoviridae family and uses the O-antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a host receptor. Comparative genomic analysis of phage SPN1S and the S. enterica serovar Anatum-specific phage ε15 revealed different host specificities, probably due to the low homology of host specificity-related genes. Here we report the complete circular genome sequence of S. Typhimurium-specific bacteriophage SPN1S and show the results of our analysis. PMID:22205721

  13. Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S.P.; Radha, P.B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V.N.; Hu, S.X.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Boehly, T.R.; Sangster, T.C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R.C.

    2009-05-19

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (Te ~ 10–40 eV, rho ~ 3–11 g/cm^3) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10^14–10^15 W/cm^2 and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4–1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10–70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer Te and rho in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f =0.06 and f =0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f = 0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  14. Preparation, characterization, magnetic susceptibility (Eu, Gd and Sm) and XPS studies of Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaya Kumar, B.; Velchuri, Radha; Rama Devi, V.; Sreedhar, B.; Prasad, G.; Jaya Prakash, D.; Kanagaraj, M.; Arumugam, S.; Vithal, M.

    2011-02-15

    Bulk and nanosized pyrochlore materials Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy, Gd and Sm) have been prepared by the sol-gel method. All the samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetic susceptibility ({chi}) measurements of Gd{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7}, Sm{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} and Eu{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} were carried out by vibrating sample magnetometer in the temperature range 2-320 K. The variation of {chi}{sup -1} (or {chi}) with temperature of Gd{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7}, Sm{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} and Eu{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} follows the Curie law, intermediate formula and the Curie-Weiss law, respectively. From the linear portion of {chi}T vs. T{sup -1} plot of Eu{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} from 2 to 15 K, the classical nearest neighbor exchange (J{sup cl}) and dipolar interactions (D{sub nn}) are obtained. The XPS of Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy and Gd) gave characteristic peaks for Ln, Ti, Zr and O. The satellite peaks are observed only for 3d La of La{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7}. -- Graphical abstract: Sm{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} does not follow the Curie or the Curie-Weiss law. The effective magnetic moment is found to be 0.768 BM (at 300 K), which is smaller than the free ion moment 1.3-1.4 BM. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} Bulk and nano Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy, Gd and Sm) have been prepared by the sol-gel method. {yields} The broad Raman lines are attributed to cation disorder and small crystallite size. {yields} XPS of Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} exhibit characteristic X-ray photoelectron spectral features. {yields} Magnetic moment of Gd{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} is obtained from magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectra.

  15. Hadronic Transitions from Upsilon (2S) to Upsilon (1s) and Upsilon Dipion Transitions at Energies Near the Upsilon (4S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotoy, Sergei Anatolievich

    This dissertation consists of two closely related analyses, both of which were performed using data collected with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. In the first analysis, using the world largest data sample of Υ(2 S) events, we have investigated the hadronic transitions between the Υ(2S) and the Υ(1S), i.e. decays of the Υ(2S) into the Υ(1S), plus a pair of pions ( p+p- or p0p0 ), a single η or a single p0 . The dipion transitions U(2S)-->U( 1S)pp were studied most closely, by using two different techniques: ``exclusive'' and ``inclusive''. In these measurements we determine the U(2S)-->U( 1S)pp branching ratios, and, by combining the exclusive and inclusive results, we derive the Υ(1S), leptonic branching ratios Bee and Bmm . Parameters of the ππ system in the dipion transitions (dipion invariant mass spectra, angular distributions) were analyzed and found to be consistent with current theoretical models. Lastly, we searched for the η and single π0 transitions and obtained upper limits on the branching ratios B(U(2S) -->U(1S)h ) and B(U(2S) -->U(1S)p 0) . In the second analysis, the data collected at the center of mass energies near the Υ(4S) were used to search for the dipion transition between pairs of Υ resonances. As a result of this search, we established upper limits on the branching ratios of the dipion transitions post='par'>p+p- and U(4S)-->U( 1S)p+p- , and measured the cross-sections for the radiative production of Υ(3 S) and Υ(2S) resonances e+e--->U(nS) g at the center of mass energies of Ecm = 10.58 GeV and Ecm = 10.52 GeV.

  16. The discontinuity near 1600 A in the spectra of DA white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of two relatively cool DA white dwarfs, L481 - 60 (= WD 1544 - 37) and BPM 1266 ( = WD 2105 - 82), with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite show a strong drop in their spectral energy distributions below 1600 A. Published model atmospheres and thier visual spectra suggest that these two stars have effective temperatures in the vicinity of 9,000-10,000 K, and it is proposed that the 1600 A feature could be due to the 342(1S) 3s2(1S) photoionization edge of Mg I.

  17. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  18. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Stefan; van den Berg, Thomas H.; Rensen, Judith; Lohse, Detlef

    2004-11-01

    The energy spectrum of single phase turbulent flow - apart from intermittency corrections - has been known since Kolomogorov 1941, E(k) ∝ k-5/3. How do bubbles modify this spectrum? To answer this question, we inject micro bubbles (radius 100 μm) in fully turbulent flow (Re_λ=200) up to volume concentrations of 0.3 %. Energy spectra and velocity structure functions are measured with hot-film anemometry. Under our experimental conditions, we find an enhancement of energy on small scales confirming numerical predictions by Mazzitelli, Lohse, and Toschi [Phys. Fluids 15, L5 (2003)]. They propose a mechanism in which bubbles are clustering most likely in downflow regions. This clustering is a lift force effect suppressing large vortical structures, while enhancing energy input on small scales.

  19. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  20. Optimal Extraction of Echelle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskunov, Nikolai

    The extraction of the echelle spectra registered with a CCD detector represents a big challenge because of three reasons: (1) the pixel sampling is often close or worse then optimal, (2) spectral orders are curved and tilted with respect to the CCD rows (or columns) and (3) every pixel contains additional noise coming from various sources as illustrated in Figure 1. The main goal of an optimal extraction is to recover as much of the science signal while minimizing the contribution of the noise. Here we present the Slit Function Decomposition algorithm which replaces the summation in a sliding window with a reconstruction of the slit illumination profile. The reconstruction is formulated as an inverse problem solved by iterations and it is robust against most of the systematic problems including cosmic rays and cosmetic defects.

  1. Graviton Spectra in String Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, M.; Occhionero, F.; Litterio, M.

    1997-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an {omega}{sup 3} increase and initiates an {omega}{sup {minus}7} decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre{endash}big bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post{endash}big bang). The frequency and the intensity of the peak may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak, at variance with ordinarily monotonic graviton spectra, would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Graviton spectra in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, Massimo; Litterio, Marco; Occhionero, Franco

    1996-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an ω³ increase and initiates an ω⁻⁷ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  3. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  4. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  5. 7. JOB NO. 1347G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. JOB NO. 1347-G, SHEET 1S, 1929, OIL HOUSE; FORD MOTOR COMPANY; PLANS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Oil House, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 1s2s2p2 5p3 5S transition in B ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannervik, S.; Cederquist, H.; Martinson, I.; Brage, T.; Froese Fischer, C.

    1987-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been made of the 1s2s2p2 5P-1s2p3 5S transition in B ii. The experimental wavelength and lifetime (1323.92+/-0.07 Å and 0.65+/-0.01 ns), determined by beam-foil spectroscopy, are more than five times more accurate than previous experimental results. Our theoretical data, from multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, 1311.6 Å and 0.601 ns, are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical predictions of Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 61A, 227 (1977)]. We have also observed the 1s2p3 5S-1s2p23s 5P transition, at 857.7+/-0.2 Å, in accord with the theoretical value 859.1 Å.

  7. Lepton Universality Test in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Elisa; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

    2012-04-10

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we measure the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} = BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -})/BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); the measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a possible search for a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson in Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenarios. Such a boson could appear in a deviation of the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} from the Standard Model expectation, that is 1, except for small lepton mass corrections. The analysis exploits the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = {mu},{tau}.

  8. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. Monochromatic soft-x-ray-induced reactions of CF2Cl2 adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near the F(1s) edge.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-K; Tsai, W-C; Chou, L-C; Hsieh, Y-C; Chen, K-H; He, T-M; Feng, K-S; Wen, C-R

    2011-11-01

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was used to investigate the monochromatic soft x-ray photoreactions of CF(2)Cl(2) adsorbed on Si(111)-7 × 7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F(+) PSD spectra were observed as a function of photon exposure at the CF(2)Cl(2)-covered surface (dose = 2.0 × 10(14) molecules cm(-2), ∼0.75 monolayer). The F(+) PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of solid CF(2)Cl(2) near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F(+) PSD and TEY spectra depict three features in the energy range of 687-695 eV, and are assigned to the excitations of F(1s) to (13a(1) + 9b(2))[(C-Cl)(∗)], (7b(1) + 14a(1))[(C-F)∗] antibonding and 5p Rydberg orbitals, respectively. Following the Auger decay process, two holes are created in the C-F bonding orbitals producing the 2h1e final state which results in the F(+) desorption. This PSD mechanism, responsible for the F(+) PSD of solid CF(2)Cl(2), is used to explain the first F(+) PSD spectrum in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra. The variation of spectral shapes in the sequential F(+) PSD spectra shows the consumption of adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules and the production of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. The photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF(2)Cl(2) molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is deduced from the sequential F(+) PSD spectra and found to be ∼6.0 × 10(-18) cm(2). PMID:21996577

  10. Soft x-ray photoreactions of CF3Cl adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 studied by continuous-time photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy near F(1s) edge.

    PubMed

    Wen, C-R; Jang, C-Y; Chou, L-C; Chen, J; Wu, Y-H; Chang, S-C; Tsai, W-C; Liu, C-C; Wang, S-K; Shai, Y

    2007-09-21

    The continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was employed to monitor the monochromatic soft x-ray-induced reactions of CF3Cl adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 near the F(1s) edge (681-704 eV). Sequential F+ PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at the CF3Cl-covered surface (dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm2, approximately 0.75 ML). The F+ PSD and total electron yield (TEY) spectra of molecular solid CF3Cl near the F(1s) edge were also measured. Both F+ PSD and TEY spectra show two features at the energy positions of 690.2 and 692.6 eV, and are attributed to the excitations of F(1s) to 11a1[(C-Cl)*] and (8e+12a1)[(C-F)*] antibonding orbitals, respectively. Following Auger decay, two holes are created in the F(2p) lone pair and/or C-F bonding orbitals forming the 2h1e final state which leads to the F+ desorption. This PSD mechanism, which is responsible for the F+ PSD of solid CF3Cl, is employed to interpret the first F+ PSD spectrum in the sequential F+ PSD spectra. The variation of spectrum shapes in the sequential F+ PSD spectra indicates the dissipation of adsorbed CF3Cl molecules and the formation of surface SiF species as a function of photon exposure. From the sequential F+ PSD spectra the photolysis cross section of the adsorbed CF3Cl molecules by photons with varying energy (681-704 eV) is determined to be approximately 1.0x10(-17) cm2. PMID:17887867

  11. Measurement of the branching ratio of UPSILON(2S). --> pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/+UPSILON(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.J.; Potter, D.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Stone, R.; Brody, A.; Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kooy, H.; Lariccia, P.; Moneti, G.C.; Bridges, D.L.; Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Hicks, R.; Panvini, R.S.; Poucher, J.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cabenda, P.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Gentile, T.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Kreinick, D.L.; Mistry, N.B.; Nordberg, E.; Perchonok, R.; Plunkett, R.; Shinsky, K.A.; Siemann, R.H.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Talman, R.; Thonemann, H.G.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Izen, J.M.; Longuemare, C.; Loomis, W.A.; Mackay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Tanenbaum, W.; Wilson, R.; Chadwick, K.; Ganci, P.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.

    1981-05-04

    We have observed the decay of the UPSILON(2S) into the UPSILON(1S), obtaining a branching ratio of 19.1 +- 3.1 +- 2.9% for the mode UPSILON(2S)..--> pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/UPSILON(1S). The di-pion mass spectrum peaks at large invariant mass, and the angular distribution of the di-pion system is consistent with s-wave production.

  12. Leptonic decay of the ϒ(1S) meson at third order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Beneke, Martin; Kiyo, Yuichiro; Marquard, Peter; Penin, Alexander; Piclum, Jan; Seidel, Dirk; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2014-04-18

    We present the complete next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order short-distance and bound-state QCD correction to the leptonic decay rate Γ(ϒ(1S)→ℓ+ℓ-) of the lowest-lying spin-1 bottomonium state. The perturbative QCD prediction is compared to the measurement Γ(ϒ(1S)→e+e-)=1.340(18)  keV. PMID:24785029

  13. Electronic state-lifetime interference in resonant Auger spectra: a tool to disentangle overlapping core-excited states.

    PubMed

    Goldsztejn, Gildas; Marchenko, Tatiana; Céolin, Denis; Journel, Loïc; Guillemin, Renaud; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Püttner, Ralph; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc

    2016-06-01

    We have measured resonant-Auger decay following Cl 1s(-1) excitations in HCl and CH3Cl molecules, and extracted the pseudo-cross sections of different Cl 2p(-2) final states. These cross sections show clear evidence of shake processes as well as contributions of electronic state-lifetime interference (ELI). To describe the spectra we developed a fit approach that takes into account ELI contributions and ultrafast nuclear dynamics in dissociative core-excited states. Using this approach we utilized the ELI contributions to obtain the intensity ratios of the overlapping states Cl 1s(-1)4pπ/1s(-1)4pσ in HCl and Cl 1s(-1)4pe/1s(-1)4pa1 in CH3Cl. The experimental value for HCl is compared with theoretical results showing satisfactory agreement. PMID:27199185

  14. Test of Lepton Universality in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /more authors..

    2010-06-07

    The ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))={Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}}/{Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}} is measured using a sample of (121.8 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6}{Upsilon}(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where l = {mu}, {tau}. The result, R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))=1.005 {+-} 0.013(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements.

  15. Intersectin-1s regulates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda A; Predescu, Dan N; Knezevic, Ivana; Klein, Irene K; Malik, Asrar B

    2007-06-01

    Intersectins (ITSNs) are multidomain adaptor proteins implicated in endocytosis, regulation of actin polymerization, and Ras/MAPK signaling. We have previously shown that ITSN-1s is required for caveolae fission and internalization in endothelial cells (ECs). In the present study, using small interfering RNA to knock down ITSN-1s protein expression, we demonstrate a novel role of ITSN-1s as a key antiapoptotic protein. Knockdown of ITSN-1s in ECs activated the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis as determined by genomic DNA fragmentation, extensive mitochondrial fission, activation of the proapoptotic proteins BAK and BAX, and cytochrome c efflux from mitochondria. ITSN-1 knockdown acts as a proapoptotic signal that causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and generation of reactive oxygen species. These effects were secondary to decreased activation of Erk1/2 and its direct activator MEK. Bcl-X(L) overexpression prevented BAX activation and the apoptotic ECs death induced by suppression of ITSN-1s. Our findings demonstrate a novel role of ITSN-1s as a negative regulator of the mitochondrial pathway-dependent apoptosis secondary to activation of the Erk1/2 survival signaling pathway. PMID:17405881

  16. Test of lepton universality in Υ(1S) decays at BABAR.

    PubMed

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-05-14

    The ratio R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=Γ(Υ(1S)→τ+ τ-)/Γ(Υ(1S)→μ+ μ-) is measured using a sample of (121.8±1.2)×10(6)Υ(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays Υ(3S)→Υ(1S)π+ π-, Υ(1S)→l+ l-, where l=μ, τ. The result, R(τμ)(Υ(1S))=1.005±0.013(stat)±0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements. PMID:20866959

  17. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling. PMID:26565030

  18. G1/S Cell Cycle Arrest Provides Anoikis Resistance through Erk-Mediated Bim Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicole L.; Reginato, Maurico J.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Proper attachment to the extracellular matrix is essential for cell survival. Detachment from the extracellular matrix results in an apoptotic process termed anoikis. Anoikis induction in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells is due not only to loss of survival signals following integrin disengagement, but also to consequent downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and loss of EGFR-induced survival signals. Here we demonstrate that G1/S arrest by overexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a, p21Cip1, or p27Kip1 or by treatment with mimosine or aphidicolin confers anoikis resistance in MCF-10A cells. G1/S arrest-mediated anoikis resistance involves suppression of the BH3-only protein Bim. Furthermore, in G1/S-arrested cells, Erk phosphorylation is maintained in suspension and is necessary for Bim suppression. Following G1/S arrest, known proteins upstream of Erk, including Raf and Mek, are not activated. However, retained Erk activation under conditions in which Raf and Mek activation is lost is observed, suggesting that G1/S arrest acts at the level of Erk dephosphorylation. Thus, anoikis resistance by G1/S arrest is mediated by a mechanism involving Bim suppression through maintenance of Erk activation. These results provide a novel link between cell cycle arrest and survival, and this mechanism could contribute to the survival of nonreplicating, dormant tumor cells that avert apoptosis during early stages of metastasis. PMID:15923641

  19. Contribution of the 1s2l3l' Dielectronic Recombination in Li-Like Ar to the Hypothesized Dark Matter Related Faint Feature in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Amy; Silwal, Roshani; Dreiling, Joan; Ajello, Marco; Gillaspy, John; Kilgore, Ethan; Ralchenko, Yuri; Takacs, Endre

    2016-05-01

    Driven by the recent detection of an unidentified emission line previously reported at 3.55-3.57 keV in a stacked spectrum of galaxy clusters, we investigate the resonant DR process in Li-like Ar as a possible source of or contributor to the emission line. We are particularly interested in the Li-like transition 1 s22l-1s2l3l', which produces a 3.62 keV photon near the unidentified line at 3.57 keV. The Electron Beam Ion Trap at NIST was used to produce and trap the highly-charged ions of argon. The energy of the quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, set to a current of 60 mA, was incremented in steps of 15 eV to scan over all of the Li-like Ar DR resonances, including the resonance peak of interest. A solid-state germanium detector was used to take x-ray measurements perpendicular to the trap region. The DR cross section was measured and normalized to the well-known photoionization cross sections using radiative recombination peaks in the measured spectra. Our measurements are compared to the AtomDB emission lines used to fit the spectra containing the unidentified line, and conclusions are presented.

  20. Auger and radiative deexcitation of the 1s2l3l-prime configurations of lithium-like neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray energies, Auger and radiative decay rates, and fluorescence yields have been computed in intermediate coupling for the various states of the 1s2s3s, 1s2s3p, 1s2p3p, 1s2p3s, and 1s2p3d configurations of Ne-10(7+). The results supplement recent experimental work on these transitions.

  1. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  2. XPS and STEM Study of the Interface Formation between Ultra-Thin Ru and Ir OER Catalyst Layers and Perylene Red Support Whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasoska, Liliana; Cullen, David A; Hester, Amy E; Atanasoski, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    The interface formation between perylene red (PR) and ruthenium or iridium OER catalysts has been studied systematically by XPS and STEM. The OER catalyst over-layers with thicknesses ranging from ~0.1 to ~50 nm were vapor deposited onto PR ex-situ. As seen by STEM, Ru and Ir form into nanoparticles, which agglomerate with increased loading. XPS data show a strong interaction between Ru and PR. Ir also interacts with PR although not to the extent seen for Ru. At low coverages, the entire Ru deposit is in the reacted state while a small portion of the deposited Ir remains metallic. Ru and Ir bonding occur at the PR carbonyl sites as evidenced by the attenuation of carbonyl photoemission and the emergence of new peak assigned to C-O single bond. The curve fitting analysis and the derived stoichiometry indicates the formation of metallo-organic bonds. The co-existence of oxide bonds is also apparent.

  3. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on the Ru(0 0 0 1)- p(2 × 2)O surface: A TPD and XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhipeng; Tang, W. H.

    2007-05-01

    Methanethiol adsorbed on Ru(0 0 0 1)- p(2 × 2)O has been studied by TPD and XPS. The dissociation of methanethiol to methylthiolate and hydrogen at 90 K is evidenced by the observation of hydroxyl and water. The saturation coverage of methylthiolate is ˜0.15 ML, measured by both XPS and TPD. A detailed analysis suggests that only the hcp-hollow sites have been occupied. Upon annealing the surface, water and hydroxyl desorb from the surface at ˜210 K. Methylthiolate decomposes to methyl radical and atomic sulphur via C-S cleavage between 350 and 450 K. Some methyl radicals (0.05 ML) have been transferred to Ru atoms before they decompose to carbon and hydrogen. The rest of methyl radicals desorb as gaseous phase. No evidence for the transfer of methyl radical to surface oxygen has been found.

  4. XPS and ToF-SIMS analysis of natural rubies and sapphires heat-treated in a reducing (5 mol% H 2/Ar) atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiwawanich, S.; James, B. D.; Liesegang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Surface effects on Mong Hsu rubies and Kanchanaburi sapphires after heat treatment in a controlled reducing atmosphere (5 mol% H 2/Ar) have been investigated using advanced surface science techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Visual appearance of the gemstones is clearly affected by the heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere. Kanchanaburi sapphires, in particular, exhibit Fe-containing precipitates after the heat treatment which have not been observed in previous studies under an inert atmosphere. Significant correlation between changes in visual appearance of the gemstones and variations in surface concentration of trace elements, especially Ti and Fe are observed. The XPS and ToF-SIMS results suggest that; (1) a reducing atmosphere affects the oxidation state of Fe; (2) dissociation of Fe-Ti interaction may occur during heat treatment.

  5. In Situ SR-XPS Observation of Ni-Assisted Low-Temperature Formation of Epitaxial Graphene on 3C-SiC/Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Mika; Sugawara, Kenta; Suto, Ryota; Sambonsuge, Shota; Teraoka, Yuden; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Filimonov, Sergey; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Suemitsu, Maki

    2015-10-01

    Low-temperature (~1073 K) formation of graphene was performed on Si substrates by using an ultrathin (2 nm) Ni layer deposited on a 3C-SiC thin film heteroepitaxially grown on a Si substrate. Angle-resolved, synchrotron-radiation X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SR-XPS) results show that the stacking order is, from the surface to the bulk, Ni carbides(Ni3C/NiCx)/graphene/Ni/Ni silicides (Ni2Si/NiSi)/3C-SiC/Si. In situ SR-XPS during the graphitization annealing clarified that graphene is formed during the cooling stage. We conclude that Ni silicide and Ni carbide formation play an essential role in the formation of graphene.

  6. Characterization of equine CSN1S2 variants considering genetics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Pawlak, Piotr; Wodas, Lukasz; Borowska, Alicja; Stachowiak, Anna; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Mackowski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Currently, research interest is increasing in horse milk composition and its effect on human health. Despite previously published studies describing the presence of intra- and interbreed variability of equine milk components, no investigations have focused on the genetic background of this variation. Among horse caseins and the genes encoding them, least is known about the structure and expression of the α-S2 casein gene, CSN1S2. Herein, based on direct sequencing of the equine CSN1S2 coding sequence, we describe the presence of 51-bp insertion-deletion (in/del) polymorphism, which significantly changes the protein sequence (lack or presence of 17-amino acid serine-rich peptide). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the observed in/del polymorphism spanned exactly 2 exons; therefore, we hypothesized that we were observing different CSN1S2 splicing isoforms. However, further investigation indicated that the detected sequence variation was caused by a large (1.3-kb) deletion in the genomic DNA. We found that the polymorphic forms (A, longer; B, shorter; KP658381 and KP658382 GenBank records, respectively) were unevenly distributed among different horse breeds (the highest frequency of variant B was observed in coldblood horses and Haflingers). We propose that the analyzed polymorphism is associated with CSN1S2 expression level (the highest expression was recorded for individuals carrying the BB genotype), which was much more pronounced for milk CSN1S2 protein content than for relative transcript abundance (measured in milk somatic cells). Our results provide insight into the equine CSN1S2 structure and lay a foundation for further functional analyses regarding, for example, allergenicity or physiochemical properties of the observed CSN1S2 variants. PMID:26709185

  7. Site-specific Auger electron spectra of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules studied by magnetic bottle electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, Hiroshi; Shigemasa, Eiji; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Ito, Kenji; Lablanquie, Pascal; Penet, Francis; Andric, Lidija; Selles, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    We performed multielectron coincidence measurements for inner-shell photoionizations of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules (C4H5F3O2) using a magnetic bottle electron spectrometer. From a two dimensional coincidence map between a photoelectron and Auger electron for C 1s ionizations, we extracted site-specific Auger electron spectra for each carbon site and corresponding binding energy of doubly charged states.

  8. Dual spectra well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, T.W.

    1982-09-07

    A dual spectra well logging system includes a well logging tool which is adapted to pass through a bore hole in an earth formation. The well logging tool includes at least two sensors which sense at least one condition of the earth formation and provides corresponding pulse signals. A circuit connected to the sensors provides a combined pulse signal wherein the pulses of the pulse signal from one sensor has one polarity and the pulses of the pulse signal from the other sensor has pulses of an opposite polarity. A circuit applies the combined pulse signal to a well logging cable which conducts the combined pulse signal to the surface of the earth formation. Surface apparatus includes a network connected to the cable which provides control signals in accordance with the polarity of the pulses in the combined pulse signal. A network connected to the cable inverts the combined pulse signal and provides a combined pulse signal and an inverted combined pulse signal. A first switching network receiving the combined pulse signal passes the pulses derived from the pulses of the one polarity in acccordance with the control signals to provide a first pulse signal while a second switching network receiving the inverted combined pulse signal passes the pulses derived from the pulses of the opposite polarity in accordance with the control signals to provide a second pulse signal. An output network processes the two pulse signals to provide an indication of the earth's condition in accordance with the processed pulse signals.

  9. Infrared spectra of protostellar collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David J.; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neufeld, David A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the formation of low mass stars by cloud collapse predict that OI(63 micrometers) and IR rotational lines of CO and H2O dominate the cooling in the freefalling region 10-1000 AU from the protostar. The freefalling gas supersonically hits the protoplanetary disk orbiting the protostar, forming an accretion shock with strong IR emission in rotational lines of H2O and OH, and OI(63 microns). The accretion shock spectra and line profiles depend on the mass flux through the shock and the typical distance r-bar at which the freefalling gas strikes the disk. The line widths are of order the Keplerian speed, or approx. 10(r-bar/10AU)(exp -0.5) km/s, for the accretion shock lines, and less for the lines from the infalling gas. Measurements of the IR line fluxes and profiles from the freefalling gas and the accretion shock diagnoses how a protostar and disk are formed and requires high sensitivity and high spectral and spatial resolving power. SOFIA will be the optimum observatory for many of these lines, although ISO will contribute and the KAO may make a few pioneering detections.

  10. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  11. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  12. Overcoming Degeneracies in Exoplanet Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benneke, Björn

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets can provide invaluable insights into the planets’ compositions, their formation and evolution histories, and even their habitability. Obtaining exoplanet spectra is observationally challenging; however, and we are generally limited to relatively low signal-to-noise, low spectral resolution, disk-integrated observations , often with relatively narrow wavelength coverage. This low data situation results in strong correlations and degeneracies between the different planet and atmospheric parameters of interest. In this talk, I will present a conceptual picture of how vital information about the planet is encoded in its observable spectrum. I will then give an overview about the wide range of correlations and degeneracies relevant to today’s exoplanet observations. Finally, I will demonstrate how some degeneracies can be overcome and improved constraints can be obtained by including prior knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and physics in the retrieval. I present a new atmospheric retrieval framework, SCARLET, that combines observational data and our prior (limited) knowledge of atmospheric processes in a statistical robust Bayesian framework. New results for hot Jupiters will be presented.

  13. Structural, XPS and magnetic studies of pulsed laser deposited Fe doped Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep; Prakash, Ram; Choudhary, R.J.; Phase, D.M.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Growth of Fe doped Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films by PLD. • XRD and Raman’s spectroscopy used for structure confirmation. • The electronic states of Eu and Fe are confirmed by XPS. • Magnetic properties reveals room temperature magnetic ordering in deposited film. - Abstract: Fe (4 at.%) doped europium (III) oxide thin film was deposited on silicon (1 0 0) substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique. Structural, spectral and magnetic properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and magnetization measurements. XRD and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the grown film is single phased and belongs to the cubic structure of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XPS study of the Eu{sub 1.92}Fe{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} film shows that Fe exists in Fe{sup 3+} ionic state in the film. The film exhibits magnetic ordering at room temperature.

  14. Electronic and geometric properties of Au nanoparticles on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

    PubMed

    Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Lim, Dong Chan; Dietsche, Rainer; Bertram, Nils; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-01-26

    Au nanoparticles grown on mildly sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surfaces were studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared with those of Ag nanoparticles on the same substrate. By varying the defect densities of HOPG and the Au coverages, one can create Au nanoparticles in various sizes. At high Au coverages, the structures of the Au films significantly deviate from the ideal truncated octahedral form: the existence of many steps between different Au atomic layers can be observed, most likely due to a high activation barrier of the diffusion of Au atoms across the step edges. This implies that the particle growth at room temperature is strongly limited by kinetic factors. Hexagonal shapes of Au structures could be identified, indicating preferential growth of Au nanostructures along the (111) direction normal to the surface. In the case of Au, XPS studies reveal a weaker core level shift with decreasing particle size compared to the 3d level in similarly sized Ag particles. Also taking into account the Auger analysis of the Ag particles, the core level shifts of the metal nanoparticles on HOPG can be understood in terms of the metal/substrate charge transfer. Ag is (partially) positively charged, whereas Au negatively charged on HOPG. It is demonstrated that XPS can be a useful tool to study metal-support interactions, which plays an important role for heterogeneous catalysis, for example. PMID:16471654

  15. Cell Wall Composition of Bacillus subtilis Changes as a Function of pH and Zn2+ Exposure: Insights from Cryo-XPS Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of metals in the environment. Consequently, there is an interest to understand how the bacterial surfaces interact with metals in solution and how this affects the bacterial surface. In this work we have used a surface-sensitive analysis technique, cryogenic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (cryo-XPS), to monitor the surface of Bacillus subtilis cells as a function of pH and Zn2+ content in saline solution. The objective of the study was twofold: (1) to investigate the agreement between two data treatment methods for XPS, as well as investigate to what extent sample pretreatment may influence XPS data of bacterial samples, and (2) to characterize how the surface chemistry of bacterial cells is influenced by different external conditions. (1) It was found that the two data treatment methods gave rise to comparable results. However, identical samples analyzed fast-frozen or dry exhibited larger differences in surface chemistry, indicating that sample pretreatment can to large extents influence the obtained surface composition of bacterial samples. (2) The bacterial cell wall (in fast-frozen samples) undergoes dramatic compositional changes with pH and with Zn2+ exposure. The compositional changes are interpreted as an adaptive metal resistance response changing the biochemical composition of the bacterial cell wall. These results have implications for how adsorption processes at the surface of bacterial cells are analyzed, understood, modeled, and predicted. PMID:24670213

  16. Copper segregated layer and oxide layer formed on the surface of an Fe-0.8 at% Cu alloy by angle resolved XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Waseda, Y.

    1997-04-15

    The influence of copper on the surface properties of steel is of great interest, since it is known as a tramp element in recycled steel produced from steel scrap. Since copper is sometimes detected on the surface of alloy steel, it may be considered to affect the surface properties. Moreover, it has been recognized that the surface reaction such as initial oxidation of iron and steel may be affected by the surface composition. For instance, it has been shown by angle resolved XPS (AR-XPS) that the chromium segregation reduces the initial oxidation occurring at room temperature. Thus, the surface reaction behaviors are considered to depend significantly on species of constituent elements, and also the surface composition which is determined by processing conditions, e.g., annealing and pickling, may modify the surface reaction. This prompts a study of the surface segregation of copper and its influence on the oxidation of an iron-copper alloy at room temperature. In the present work, it may also be stressed that the AR-XPS method enables one to investigate the segregated layers and oxide layers, of which thickness is comparable to the escape depth of X-ray photoelectrons, non-destructively.

  17. XPS characterization and photoelectrochemical behaviour of p-type 3C-SiC films on p-Si substrates for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Quan-Bao; Kaiser, Bernhard; Ziegler, Jürgen; Fertig, Dominic; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2012-08-01

    The electrochemical (EC) properties of single-crystalline p-type 3C-SiC films on p-Si substrates were investigated as electrodes in H2SO4 aqueous solutions in dark and under white light illumination. Before EC tests, the SiC films were etched by HF solution and aqua-regia-HF solution, respectively, and then investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) including one untreated SiC sample. After EC tests, XPS was also applied to investigate the surface chemical state changes. The EC measurements indicate that the p-type 3C-SiC films on p-Si substrates can generate a cathodic photocurrent as the photocathode, which corresponds to hydrogen production, and generate an anodic photocurrent as the photoanode, which corresponds to oxygen evolution. XPS shows the surface of all the SiC films was oxidized due to anodic oxidation applied by a positive bias during the EC test, which indicates the formation of silicon oxides, CO2 or CO and carbonates.

  18. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  19. Infrared spectra of natural and synthetic malachites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuiskii, A. V.; Zorina, M. L.

    2013-09-01

    IR absorption and reflection spectra of dark and light samples of natural and synthetic malachite over 400-4000 cm-1 are studied for the purpose of improving the synthesis technique and in order to distinguish between natural malachite and malachite grown from ammonia solutions. Nitrogen was not detected in the IR spectra or in microprobe analyses of the synthetic material. The differences found in the IR spectra were insignificant and cannot be regarded as distinctive indicators of these materials.

  20. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  1. Infrared spectra of thyroid tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study thyroid tumor tissues removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, the spectra of proteins in the region of C=O vibrations are different from the spectra of these substances in benign tumors and in tissues outside the pathological focus at a distance >1 cm from the margin of the tumor. The differences in the spectra are due to changes in the supermolecular structure of the proteins, resulting from rearrangement of the system of hydrogen bonds. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathologies.

  2. Human Pancreatic β-Cell G1/S Molecule Cell Cycle Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W.; Salim, Fatimah G.; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E.; Takane, Karen K.; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic β-cells is a key goal of diabetes research, yet induction of adult human β-cell replication has proven frustratingly difficult. In part, this reflects a lack of understanding of cell cycle control in the human β-cell. Here, we provide a comprehensive immunocytochemical “atlas” of G1/S control molecules in the human β-cell. This atlas reveals that the majority of these molecules, previously known to be present in islets, are actually present in the β-cell. More importantly, and in contrast to anticipated results, the human β-cell G1/S atlas reveals that almost all of the critical G1/S cell cycle control molecules are located in the cytoplasm of the quiescent human β-cell. Indeed, the only nuclear G1/S molecules are the cell cycle inhibitors, pRb, p57, and variably, p21: none of the cyclins or cdks necessary to drive human β-cell proliferation are present in the nuclear compartment. This observation may provide an explanation for the refractoriness of human β-cells to proliferation. Thus, in addition to known obstacles to human β-cell proliferation, restriction of G1/S molecules to the cytoplasm of the human β-cell represents an unanticipated obstacle to therapeutic human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493570

  3. AP1S3 is required for hepatitis C virus infection by stabilizing E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Chi, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuying; Yang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 130 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The interactions between viral elements and host factors play critical role on HCV invade, replication and release. Here, we identified adaptor protein complex 1 sigma 3 subunit (AP1S3) as a dependency factor for the efficient HCV infection in hepatoma cells. AP1S3 silencing in cultivated Huh7.5.1 cells significantly reduced the production of HCV progeny particles. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that AP1S3 interacted with the HCV E2 protein. With this interaction, AP1S3 could protect HCV E2 from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Using in vivo ubiquitylation assay, we identified that E6-Associated Protein (E6AP) was associated with HCV E2. In addition, treatment with synthetic peptide that contains the AP1S3-recognized motif inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells. Our data reveal AP1 as a novel host network that is required by viruses during infection and provides a potential target for developing broad-spectrum anti-virus strategies. PMID:27079945

  4. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst). PMID:19905689

  5. Vibrational spectra of guaiacylglycerol-β-guaiacyl ether: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Su, Tong-Fu; Huang, Rong; Su, Ya-Qiong; Zhao, Guo-Zhong; Wu, De-Yin; Wang, Jian-An; Gong, Chang-Rong; Xu, Cui-Lian

    2015-03-15

    As an important inter-unit of lignin, guaiacylglycerol-β-guaiacyl (GG) ether has been synthesized, and characterized using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the frequency range of 5-85 cm(-1). Seven absorption peaks have been observed. Among these peaks, the 49.8 cm(-1) and 57.6 cm(-1) vibrations are propose to be characteristic absorption peaks of GG ether. Raman spectra were also measured in the range of 50-3500 cm(-1). The vibrations of the two lowest energy forms, i.e., erythro 1r4s and threo 1s4s, were calculated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ level and assigned according to potential energy distribution. In addition, the contents of erythro and threo forms in GG sample could be estimated by comparing the waveform similarities between theoretical and observed curves in the 33.0-80.0 cm(-1) range. Results showed that the observed curve of GG sample is a combination of erythro 1s4r and threo 1s4s. The four absorption vibrations below 33.0 cm(-1) could be assigned to phonon, inter-molecular modes and/or hydrogen bond vibrations. Terahertz spectra and Raman spectra, together with theoretical calculations, could be powerful methods for predicting contents of different isomers in sample. PMID:25576943

  6. Application of maximum-entropy spectral estimation to deconvolution of XPS data. [X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Klein, J. D.; Barton, J. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between maximum-entropy spectral estimation and traditional methods of deconvolution used in electron spectroscopy. The maximum-entropy method is found to have higher resolution-enhancement capabilities and, if the broadening function is known, can be used with no adjustable parameters with a high degree of reliability. The method and its use in practice are briefly described, and a criterion is given for choosing the optimal order for the prediction filter based on the prediction-error power sequence. The method is demonstrated on a test case and applied to X-ray photoelectron spectra.

  7. Dynamics of the C 1 s →π* excitation and decay in CO2 probed by vibrationally and angularly resolved Auger spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, E.; Patanen, M.; Nicolas, C.; Benkoula, S.; Neville, J. J.; Sukhorukov, V. L.; Bozek, J. D.; Demekhin, Ph. V.; Miron, C.

    2015-10-01

    Participator resonant Auger decay spectra populating the X , A , B , and C states of CO2+ are recorded with angular and vibrational resolution for selected photon energies in the vicinity of the C 1 s →π* resonance of CO2 using a narrow photon bandwidth and a high-resolution electron spectrometer. The measured electron spectra and the corresponding angular distribution parameters exhibit significant changes as functions of the photon energy across the resonance and with respect to the vibrational sublevels of a final ionic state. The measured spectra are interpreted by ab initio electronic structure and nuclear dynamics calculations which attribute observed variations to the effects of lifetime vibrational interference and of electronic state interference between the direct ionization amplitude and the resonant amplitudes for the excitation and decay of two overlapping resonant states of different symmetry. The present results provide deeper insight into the femtosecond relaxation dynamics of the core-excited CO2, which is not achievable with lower resolution, angle-averaged measurements.

  8. Incorporating Spectra Into Periodic Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Alanna; Hong, J.; Protopapas, P.; Kashyap, V.

    2011-09-01

    The Chandra surveys have resulted in a wealth of data on low-luminosity X-ray sources (Lx 1030-34 erg/s) of Galactic scales beyond the local solar neighborhood. Many of these are compact binaries, in particular, cataclysmic variables, often identified by their periodic X-ray variability and spectra. Hong et al. (2009, 2011) have used energy quantiles (Hong, Schlegel & Grindlay, 2004) as a fast, robust indicator of spectral hardness and absorption of the X-ray sources. Energy quantiles also enable a simple but effective illustration of spectral changes with phase in these periodic systems: e.g. absorption by the accreting material is understood to drive the periodic light-curves. An interesting question is how to best make use of the information encapsulated in the periodic change in energy spectrum, along with the periodic change in intensity, especially for cases of ambiguous period determination? And, how to do it computationally efficiently? A first approach is to do the period search in intensity, as is standard; and then use a criterion of spectral variation to verify possible periods. Huijse, Zegers & Protopapas (2011) recently demonstrated a powerful period estimation technique using information potential and correntropy embedded in the light curve. Similar quantities based on energies (or energy quantiles) of X-ray photons can serve as criteria of spectral variation. A different approach treats the spectrum variations and intensity variations completely independently, searching through period-space in each, and then combining the results. A more general method would include both at the same time, looking for statistically significant variations above what is expected for a constant (in intensity and spectrum).

  9. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  10. a Novel Method to Measure Spectra of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Satrajit; Holz, Mathias; Campbell, Ewen; Banerjee, Agniva; Gerlich, Dieter; Maier, John P.

    2014-06-01

    A universal method has been developed in our group for measuring the spectra of molecular ions in a 22-pole radio frequency trap at low temperatures. It is based on laser induced inhibition of complex growth (LIICG)1. At low temperatures and high number densities of buffer gas, helium attaches to ions via ternary association. The formation of these weakly bound complexes, however, is inhibited following resonant absorption of the bare molecular ion. The first successful measurements have been demonstrated on the A 2Π_u ← X ^2Σ_g^+ electronic transition of N_2^+, with some thousand N_2^+ ions, helium densities of 1015 cm-3, and storage times of 1 s. The reduction in the number of N_2+-He complexes is the result of an interplay between excitation, radiative and collisional cooling, ternary association, and collision induced dissociation, and is explained using a kinetic model. The method is also applicable to larger molecular species. In this case internal conversion following electronic excitation produces internally "hot" ions, reducing the attachment of helium. The technique is universal because complex formation can be impeded over a wide wavelength range. [1] S. Chakrbarty, M. Holz, E. K. Campbell, A. Banerjee, D. Gerlich, and J. P. Maier, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 4051.

  11. Pro-inflammatory endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with intersectin-1s down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The response of lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is central to the pathogenesis of lung injury. It is dual in nature, with one facet that is pro-inflammatory and another that is cyto-protective. In previous work, overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL rescued ECs from apoptosis triggered by siRNA knockdown of intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a pro-survival protein crucial for ECs function. Here we further characterized the cyto-protective EC response to LPS and pro-inflammatory dysfunction. Methods and Results Electron microscopy (EM) analyses of LPS-exposed ECs revealed an activated/dysfunctional phenotype, while a biotin assay for caveolae internalization followed by biochemical quantification indicated that LPS causes a 40% inhibition in biotin uptake compared to controls. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression, respectively, for several regulatory proteins of intrinsic apoptosis, including ITSN-1s. The decrease in ITSN-1s mRNA and protein expression were countered by Bcl-XL and survivin upregulation, as well as Bim downregulation, events thought to protect ECs from impending apoptosis. Absence of apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL and lack of cytochrome c (cyt c) efflux from mitochondria. Moreover, LPS exposure caused induction and activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and a mitochondrial variant (mtNOS), as well as augmented mitochondrial NO production as measured by an oxidation oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) assay applied on mitochondrial-enriched fractions prepared from LPS-exposed ECs. Interestingly, expression of myc-ITSN-1s rescued caveolae endocytosis and reversed induction of iNOS expression. Conclusion Our results suggest that ITSN-1s deficiency is relevant for the pro-inflammatory ECs dysfunction induced by LPS. PMID:21486462

  12. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  13. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  14. A Unique Role of GATA1s in Down Syndrome Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia Biology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Balci, Tugce B.; Berman, Jason N.; Dellaire, Graham; Xie, Chengzhi; Buck, Steven A.; Matherly, Larry H.; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) in Down syndrome (DS) children is uniformly associated with somatic GATA1 mutations, which result in the synthesis of a shorter protein (GATA1s) with altered transactivation activity compared to the wild-type GATA1. It is not fully established whether leukemogenesis and therapeutic responses in DS AMkL patients are due to loss of the wild-type GATA1 or due to a unique function of GATA1s. Methodology Stable clones of CMK cells with decreased GATA1s or Bcl-2 levels were generated by using GATA1- or BCL-2-specific lentivirus shRNAs. In vitro ara-C, daunorubicin, and VP-16 cytotoxicities of the shRNA stable clones were determined by using the Cell Titer-blue reagent. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Changes in gene transcript levels were determined by gene expression microarray and/or real-time RT-PCR. Changes in protein levels were measured by Western blotting. In vivo binding of GATA1s to IL1A promoter was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Results Lentivirus shRNA knockdown of the GATA1 gene in the DS AMkL cell line, CMK (harbors a mutated GATA1 gene and only expresses GATA1s), resulting in lower GATA1s protein levels, promoted cell differentiation towards the megakaryocytic lineage and repressed cell proliferation. Increased basal apoptosis and sensitivities to ara-C, daunorubicin, and VP-16 accompanied by down-regulated Bcl-2 were also detected in the CMK GATA1 shRNA knockdown clones. Essentially the same results were obtained when Bcl-2 was knocked down with lentivirus shRNA in CMK cells. Besides Bcl-2, down-regulation of GATA1s also resulted in altered expression of genes (e.g., IL1A, PF4, and TUBB1) related to cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest that GATA1s may facilitate leukemogenesis and potentially impact therapeutic responses in DS AMkL by promoting proliferation and survival, and by repressing

  15. Experimental and theoretical study of s 2p and c 1s spectroscopyin cs2

    SciTech Connect

    Eustatiu, I.G.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cooper, G.; Hitchcock, Adam; Turci, C.C.; Rocha, A.B.; Barbatti, M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.

    2006-12-01

    The generalized oscillator strength profiles in the momentumtransfer range (K) of (2 a.u.- 21s transitions of carbon disulfide (CS2) arepresented. Optical oscillator strengths and generalized oscillatorstrength profiles have been calculated for vertical excitation from theground X1SIGMAg+ electronic state to several C(1s) and S(2p) inner-shellelectronic excited states of CS2, using high level ab initio (HF-CI)calculations. The experimental and computed GOS profiles of CS2 arecompared and found to be generally in reasonable agreement.

  16. A New NIST Database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA): Application to Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 Films on Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.J.; Smekal, W.; Werner, W.S.M.

    2005-09-09

    We describe a new NIST database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA). This database provides data for the many parameters needed in quantitative Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, AES and XPS spectra can be simulated for layered samples. The simulated spectra, for layer compositions and thicknesses specified by the user, can be compared with measured spectra. The layer compositions and thicknesses can then be adjusted to find maximum consistency between simulated and measured spectra. In this way, AES and XPS can provide more detailed characterization of multilayer thin-film materials. We report on the use of SESSA for determining the thicknesses of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 films on Si by angle-resolved XPS. Practical effective attenuation lengths (EALs) have been computed from SESSA as a function of film thickness and photoelectron emission angle (i.e., to simulate the effects of tilting the sample). These EALs have been compared with similar values obtained from the NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (SRD 82). Generally good agreement was found between corresponding EAL values, but there were differences for film thicknesses less than the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons in the overlayer film. These differences are due to a simplifying approximation in the algorithm used to compute EALs in SRD 82. SESSA, with realistic cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering in the film and substrate materials, is believed to provide more accurate EALs than SRD 82 for thin-film thickness measurements, particularly in applications where the film and substrate have different electron-scattering properties.

  17. A New NIST Database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA): Application to Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 Films on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. J.; Smekal, W.; Werner, W. S. M.

    2005-09-01

    We describe a new NIST database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA). This database provides data for the many parameters needed in quantitative Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, AES and XPS spectra can be simulated for layered samples. The simulated spectra, for layer compositions and thicknesses specified by the user, can be compared with measured spectra. The layer compositions and thicknesses can then be adjusted to find maximum consistency between simulated and measured spectra. In this way, AES and XPS can provide more detailed characterization of multilayer thin-film materials. We report on the use of SESSA for determining the thicknesses of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 films on Si by angle-resolved XPS. Practical effective attenuation lengths (EALs) have been computed from SESSA as a function of film thickness and photoelectron emission angle (i.e., to simulate the effects of tilting the sample). These EALs have been compared with similar values obtained from the NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (SRD 82). Generally good agreement was found between corresponding EAL values, but there were differences for film thicknesses less than the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons in the overlayer film. These differences are due to a simplifying approximation in the algorithm used to compute EALs in SRD 82. SESSA, with realistic cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering in the film and substrate materials, is believed to provide more accurate EALs than SRD 82 for thin-film thickness measurements, particularly in applications where the film and substrate have different electron-scattering properties.

  18. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  19. Heavy primary spectra observed by RUNJOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apanasenko, A. V.; Beresovskaya, V. A.; Fujii, M.; Galkin, V. I.; Hareyama, M.; Ichimura, M.; Ito, S.; Kamioka, E.; Kitami, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopenkin, V. V.; Kuramata, S.; Kuriyama, T.; Lapshin, V. I.; Managadze, A. K.; Matsutani, H.; Mikami, H.; Misnikova, N. P.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Namiki, M.; Nanjo, H.; Nazarov, S. N.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Oe, T.; Ohta, S.; Osedlo, V. I.; Oshuev, D. S.; Publichenko, P. A.; Rakobolskaya, I. V.; Roganova, T. M.; Saito, M.; Sazhina, G. P.; Semba, H.; Shabanova, Yu. N.; Shibata, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Sveshnikova, L. G.; Takahashi, K.; Tsutiya, T.; Taran, V. M.; Yajima, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yashin, I. V.; Zamchalova, E. A.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2001-08-01

    RUssian Nippon JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) has been observing the primary spectra of cosmic ray nuclei since 1995. Data from 6 out of 10 succesful flights will be used to report the spectra of heavy primaries up to iron nucleus with the energy range more than 1014 eV/particle. The details of analysis like charge and energy determinations will be also given.

  20. (abstract) Spectra of Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Hayward, T. L.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of Hale-Bopp were acquired in mid-1996 at R > 3.5 AU. Strong silicate emission is present in all the spectra. The shape of the feature is very similar to that seen in comet P/Halley. This is the first time that a strong silicate feature has been detected in a comet beyond 2 AU.

  1. COMPUTER INTERPRETATION OF POLLUTANT MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to improve systems for computer examination of the mass spectra of unknown pollutants. For this we have developed a new probability based matching (PBM) system for the retrieval of mass spectra from a large data base, and have substantially impr...

  2. On background subtraction for quantitative analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectra of rare earth fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnellbügel, A.; Anton, R.

    2001-10-01

    The applicability of Tougaard's method of a "universal" form of background correction in photoelectron spectra was investigated for thin films of the wide gap insulators YbF x, DyF x, SmF x, and YF x. These films were produced by ion assisted deposition with varying fluorine content x⩽3, caused by preferential sputtering. For YbF x, in particular, acceptable accuracy was obtained for x⩾2.4 by shifting the universal background function by the band gap energy, while for x<2.4, no reasonable fit of the experimental background could be obtained. More realistic profiles of the inelastic scattering background were calculated on the basis of published fast-electron energy-loss data of DyF 3, which yielded highly accurate quantification of spectra of YbF x in the whole range of x between 2 and 3. This was confirmed by measurements of the intensity ratios of the 4f peaks of Yb 2+ and Yb 3+, representing valence states 2 and 3, respectively, which are directly correlated with the fluorine content. Stoichiometry values from XPS data were compared with Rutherford backscattering analysis and yielded good agreement.

  3. High-resolution Visible Spectra of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Chae Kyung; Kim, S.

    2006-09-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (R 30,000) spectra of Titan between 4,000 and 10,000 A on Feb. 23, 2005 (UT) using an optical echelle spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8-m telescope at Bohyunsan Observatory, Korea. The raw Titan spectra contain telluric and solar absorption/emission lines. We used Kitt Peak solar atlases to remove the solar lines effectively. We also constructed synthetic spectra for the atmosphere of Titan including haze layers and utilizing laboratory spectra of CH4 available in literature. Preliminary results on the identifications of weak CH4 lines and on the derived opacities of the haze layers will be presented. Since the observations were carried out near the activities of Cassini observations of Titan, these high-resolution visible spectra are complementary to Cassini/VIMS imagery.

  4. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules. PMID:20707545

  5. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

  6. Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy of shock-wave heating and compression in laser-driven planar foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J. A.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R. C.

    2009-05-15

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (T{sub e}{approx}10-40 eV, {rho}{approx}3-11 g/cm{sup 3}) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4-1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10-70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer T{sub e} and {rho} in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f=0.06 and f=0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f=0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  7. The elusive S2 state, the S1/S2 splitting, and the excimer states of the benzene dimer.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Franziska A; Trachsel, Maria A; van der Avoird, Ad; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-06-21

    We observe the weak S0 → S2 transitions of the T-shaped benzene dimers (Bz)2 and (Bz-d6)2 about 250 cm(-1) and 220 cm(-1) above their respective S0 → S1 electronic origins using two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. Spin-component scaled (SCS) second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) calculations predict that for the tipped T-shaped geometry, the S0 → S2 electronic oscillator strength fel(S2) is ∼10 times smaller than fel(S1) and the S2 state lies ∼240 cm(-1) above S1, in excellent agreement with experiment. The S0 → S1 (ππ(∗)) transition is mainly localized on the "stem" benzene, with a minor stem → cap charge-transfer contribution; the S0 → S2 transition is mainly localized on the "cap" benzene. The orbitals, electronic oscillator strengths fel(S1) and fel(S2), and transition frequencies depend strongly on the tipping angle ω between the two Bz moieties. The SCS-CC2 calculated S1 and S2 excitation energies at different T-shaped, stacked-parallel and parallel-displaced stationary points of the (Bz)2 ground-state surface allow to construct approximate S1 and S2 potential energy surfaces and reveal their relation to the "excimer" states at the stacked-parallel geometry. The fel(S1) and fel(S2) transition dipole moments at the C2v-symmetric T-shape, parallel-displaced and stacked-parallel geometries are either zero or ∼10 times smaller than at the tipped T-shaped geometry. This unusual property of the S0 → S1 and S0 → S2 transition-dipole moment surfaces of (Bz)2 restricts its observation by electronic spectroscopy to the tipped and tilted T-shaped geometries; the other ground-state geometries are impossible or extremely difficult to observe. The S0 → S1/S2 spectra of (Bz)2 are compared to those of imidazole ⋅ (Bz)2, which has a rigid triangular structure with a tilted (Bz)2 subunit. The S0 → S1/ S2 transitions of imidazole-(benzene)2 lie at similar energies as those of (Bz)2, confirming our assignment of the

  8. Isotope shifts of the 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) {yields} 1s{sup 2}2p{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) transition in the doubly ionized carbon ion C{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-05-15

    Highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations are performed for the 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) {yields} 1s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) transition energy in the isotopomers of C{sup 2+} ion to determine the isotope shifts. Explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and a variational approach that explicitly includes the nuclear motion are employed in the calculations. The leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections to the transition energy are also calculated using the perturbation theory with the nonrelativistic wave function as the zero-order approximation. It is determined that the {sup 12}C{sup 2+} transitions energy, which is obtained from the calculations to be 182 519.031 cm{sup -1} (vs the experimental value of 182 519.88 cm{sup -1}, an excellent sub-wave-number agreement) up-shifts by 1.755 cm{sup -1} for {sup 13}C{sup 2+} and by additional 1.498 cm{sup -1} for {sup 14}C{sup 2+}. Those shifts are sufficiently large to be measured experimentally.

  9. SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/S1P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/S1P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/S1P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/S1P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment. PMID:25573299

  10. Methods of using (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, Richard B; Dewey, Stephen L; Miller, Steven

    2015-03-03

    (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid also known as CPP-115 or its pharmaceutically acceptable salts can be used to treat addiction and neurological disorders such as epilepsy without side effects such as visual field defects caused by vigabatrin (Sabril).

  11. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1.

    PubMed

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  12. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1

    PubMed Central

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  13. Recognition of disturbances with specified morphology in time series: Part 2. Spikes on 1-s magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Agayan, S. M.; Gvishiani, A. D.; Bogoutdinov, Sh. R.; Chulliat, A.

    2012-05-01

    Preliminary magnetograms contain different types of temporal anthropogenic disturbances: spikes, baseline jumps, drifts, etc. These disturbances should be identified and filtered out during the preprocessing of the preliminary records for the definitive data. As of now, at the geomagnetic observatories, such filtering is carried out manually. Most of the disturbances in the records sampled every second are spikes, which are much more abundant than those on the magnetograms sampled every minute. Another important feature of the 1-s magnetograms is the presence of a plenty of specific disturbances caused by short-period geomagnetic pulsations, which must be retained in the definitive records. Thus, creating an instrument for formalized and unified recognition of spikes on the preliminary 1-s magnetograms would largely solve the problem of labor-consuming manual preprocessing of the magnetic records. In the context of this idea, in the present paper, we focus on recognition of the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms as a key point of the problem. We describe here the new algorithm of pattern recognition, SPs, which is capable of automatically identifying the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms with a low probability of missed events and false alarms. The algorithm was verified on the real magnetic data recorded at the French observatory located on Easter Island in the Pacific.

  14. Xbp1s in Pomc neurons connects ER stress with energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal leptin and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show that induction ofthe unfolded protein response transcription factor spliced X-box binding protein 1(Xbp1s) in pro-opio-melanocortin (Pomc) neurons alone is sufficient to pr...

  15. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  16. DHPR alpha1S subunit controls skeletal muscle mass and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Piétri-Rouxel, France; Gentil, Christel; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Baas, Dominique; Mouisel, Etienne; Ferry, Arnaud; Vignaud, Alban; Hourdé, Christophe; Marty, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis

    2010-02-01

    The alpha1S subunit has a dual function in skeletal muscle: it forms the L-type Ca(2+) channel in T-tubules and is the voltage sensor of excitation-contraction coupling at the level of triads. It has been proposed that L-type Ca(2+) channels might also be voltage-gated sensors linked to transcriptional activity controlling differentiation. By using the U7-exon skipping strategy, we have achieved long-lasting downregulation of alpha1S in adult skeletal muscle. Treated muscles underwent massive atrophy while still displaying significant amounts of alpha1S in the tubular system and being not paralysed. This atrophy implicated the autophagy pathway, which was triggered by neuronal nitric oxide synthase redistribution, activation of FoxO3A, upregulation of autophagy-related genes and autophagosome formation. Subcellular investigations showed that this atrophy was correlated with the disappearance of a minor fraction of alpha1S located throughout the sarcolemma. Our results reveal for the first time that this sarcolemmal fraction could have a role in a signalling pathway determining muscle anabolic or catabolic state and might act as a molecular sensor of muscle activity. PMID:20033060

  17. Structure of the S1S2 Glutamate Binding Domain of GluR3

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Wang, Qi; Sondermann, Holger; Oswald, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are the most prevalent excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the vertebrate central nervous system. Determining the structural differences between the binding sites of different subtypes is crucial to our understanding of neuronal circuits and to the development of subtype specific drugs. The structures of the binding domain (S1S2) of the GluR3 (flip) AMPA receptor subunit bound to glutamate and AMPA and the GluR2 (flop) subunit bound to glutamate were determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.9, 2.1, and 1.55 Å, respectively. Overall, the structure of GluR3 (flip) S1S2 is very similar to GluR2 (flop) S1S2 (backbone RMSD of 0.30 ± 0.05 for glutamate-bound and 0.26 ± 0.01 for AMPA-bound). The differences in the flip and flop isoforms are subtle and largely arise from one hydrogen bond across the dimer interface and associated water molecules. Comparison of the binding affinity for various agonists and partial agonists suggest that the S1S2 domains of GluR2 and GluR3 show only small differences in affinity, unlike what is found for the intact receptors (with the exception of one ligand, Cl-HIBO, which has a ten-fold difference in affinity for GluR2 vs GluR3). PMID:19003990

  18. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING ENE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  19. 3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. N ELEVATION OF BUILDING 1'S E WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING S. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  20. Studies of Upsilon(1S) bottomonium state production at the Tevatron Collider Experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jundong

    2004-11-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium in hadronic collisions provides an ideal testing ground for our understanding of the production mechanisms for heavy quarks and the non-perturbative QCD effects that bind the quark pairs into quarkonium. In this analysis, the inclusive production cross section of the {Upsilon}(1S) bottomonium state is measured using the {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay mode. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 159.1 {+-} 10.3 pb{sup -1}. We determine differential cross sections as functions of the {Upsilon}(1S) transverse momentum, p{sub T}{sup {Upsilon}}, for three ranges of the {Upsilon}(1S) rapidity: 0 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.6,0.6 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 1.2 and 1.2 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 1.8. The shapes of d{sigma}/d{sub p{sub T}} cross sections show little variation with rapidity and are consistent with the published Run I CDF measurement over the rapidity range |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.4.