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Sample records for 1s-2s transition frequency

  1. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P. E. G.; Barr, J. R. M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M. G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G. H.; Ferguson, A. I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V. W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B. E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; Putlitz, G. zu; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P. G. H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W. T.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}S1/2-2{sup 2}S1/2 frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P.E.G.; Barr, J.R.M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M.G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G.H.; Ferguson, A.I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V.W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B.E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; zu Putlitz, G.; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P.G.H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W.T.; Towrie, M.; Willmann, L.; Woodle, K.A.; Woodman, G.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2}{minus}2{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2} frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  3. 1s2s2p2 5p3 5S transition in B ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannervik, S.; Cederquist, H.; Martinson, I.; Brage, T.; Froese Fischer, C.

    1987-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been made of the 1s2s2p2 5P-1s2p3 5S transition in B ii. The experimental wavelength and lifetime (1323.92+/-0.07 Å and 0.65+/-0.01 ns), determined by beam-foil spectroscopy, are more than five times more accurate than previous experimental results. Our theoretical data, from multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, 1311.6 Å and 0.601 ns, are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical predictions of Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 61A, 227 (1977)]. We have also observed the 1s2p3 5S-1s2p23s 5P transition, at 857.7+/-0.2 Å, in accord with the theoretical value 859.1 Å.

  4. Choice of gauge in 2-photon 1s-2s transition in atomic hydrogen and pseudostate expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabazz, Abdulalim A.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of gauge choice in multiphoton transitions in connection with the proper choice of the unperturbed wave functions require to insure gauge invariance was considered. J. Bassani, J. J. Forney, and A. Quattropani considered the case of 2-photon 1s-2s transition rate for hydrogen, using gauges vector E x vector r and vector A x vector p. Exactly the same results were obtained for the two gauges, but the findings indicate that the vector E x vector r interaction tends to the final result with a small number of intermediate states and is therefore the one to be used in any approximate calculation. Whether the so-called pseudostate expansion method works equally well with either gauge was tested. To accomplish this task, in addition to researching the problem, the FORTRAN programming was learned and a FORTRAN program was constructed for the calculation of the dimensionless 2-photon transition probability amplitude D(v) for 1s-2s transition in Hydrogen as a function as a function of the incident photon frequency v in gauge vector E x vector p at certain values of v, using the pseudostate method. However, some puzzling unresolved difficulties were experienced in the calculation. Then should the pseudostate calculations prove successful for gauge vector E x vector r the method will be applied to gauge vector A x vector p. If successful, then the problem is complete.

  5. Experimental considerations for testing antimatter antigravity using positronium 1S-2S spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D. A.; Friedreich, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution to the WAG 2013 workshop we report on the status of our measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency of positronium. The aim of this experiment is to reach a precision of 0.5 ppb in order to cross check the QED calculations. After reviewing the current available sources of Ps, we consider laser cooling as a route to push the precision in the measurement down to 0.1 ppb. If such an uncertainty could be achieved, this would be sensitive to the gravitational redshift and therefore be able to assess the sign of gravity for antimatter.

  6. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  7. Role of cascade and Auger effects in the enhanced population of the C{sup 3+}(1s2s2p {sup 4}P) states following single-electron capture in C{sup 4+}(1s2s {sup 3}S)-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrbein, D.; Kirchner, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-04-15

    The population of excited three-electron states in carbon ions after single-electron capture in 0.5-1.1 MeV/amu C{sup 4+}(1s2s {sup 3}S)-He collisions is analyzed theoretically by combining different methods. While the two-center basis generator method is used to calculate capture amplitudes on the single-particle level, all-electron structure calculations for the relevant C{sup 3+} states and their radiative and Auger transition rates are performed on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock level. These data are then combined and fed into a set of classical rate equations for the decay dynamics. Total cross sections for the production of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P, 1s2s2p {sup 2}P{sub -}, and 1s2s2p {sup 2}P{sub +} states are calculated and their ratios compared with recent experimental data and previous calculations [D. Strohschein et al., Phys. Rev. A 77, 022706 (2008)]. It is found that the relative intensities of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P states are considerably larger than expected on the basis of pure spin statistics. The Auger transitions, which were not included in the previous calculations, have a significant effect on the final results in that they reduce the 1s2s2p {sup 2}P intensities. Although our extended computations explain a significant part of the production of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P states, the experimentally observed enhancement of these states is still considerably larger than the theoretical one.

  8. Measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in helium-like silicon.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, M; Myers, E G

    2002-01-14

    Using Doppler-tuned fast-beam laser spectroscopy the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ has been measured to be 7230.5(2) cm(-1). The experiment made use of a single-frequency Nd:YAG (1.319 microm) laser and a high-finesse optical buildup cavity. The result provides a precision test of modern relativistic and QED atomic theory. PMID:11801009

  9. Improved measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 interval in heliumlike silicon.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Thomas R; Crosby, David N; Myers, Edmund G

    2008-06-20

    Using colinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy with copropagating and counter-propagating beams we have measured the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ with the result 7230.585(6) cm{-1}. The experiment made use of a dual-wavelength, high-finesse, power build-up cavity excited by single-frequency lasers at 1319 and 1450 nm. The result will provide a precision test of ab initio relativistic many-body atomic theory at moderate Z. PMID:18643579

  10. Single, double, and triple Auger decay probabilities of C+(1 s 2 s22 p22 D ,2 P ) resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuyang; Ma, Yulong; Qu, Yizhi

    2016-06-01

    Single, double, and triple Auger decay rates of C+(1 s 2 s22 p22 D ,2 P ) resonances were calculated in the framework of perturbation theory. The direct double Auger decay probabilities were calculated by using the approximate formulas according to the knockout and shakeoff mechanisms, in which the knockout mechanism was found to be dominant. Then the knockout mechanism was employed to investigate the complex triple Auger decay process, and the calculated rates have good agreement with the available experimental values.

  11. Measurement of Υ (1 S +2 S +3 S ) production in p +p and Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p +p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ (1 S +2 S +3 S ) , was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au +Au and p +p collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. The Υ (1 S +2 S +3 S ) →e+e- differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beed σ /d y =108 ±38 (stat) ±15 (syst) ±11 (luminosity) pb in p +p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au +Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p +p collision data. The suppression is consistent with measurements made by STAR at RHIC and at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Effects of surface residual species in SBA-16 on encapsulated chiral (1S,2S)-DPEN-RuCl2(TPP)2 in asymmetric hydrogenation of acetophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiufeng; Xing, Bin; Fan, Binbin; Xue, Zhaoteng; Li, Ruifeng

    2016-03-01

    The SBA-16 obtained by different routes of elimination of organic templates were used as the hosts for encapsulation of chiral Ru complex (1S,2S)-DPEN-RuCl2(TPP)2 ( 1) (DPEN = 1,2-diphenylethylene-diamine, TPP = triphenyl phosphine). The methods for removing templates had distinct effects on the amount of residual template in SBA-16, which made the SBA-16 with different surface and structure properties. 1 encapsulated in SBA-16 extracted with the mixture of pyridine and ethanol showed higher activity and enantioselectivity for acetophenone asymmetric hydrogenation.

  13. Evidence for the non-statistical population of the 1s2s2p4P metastable state by electron capture in 4 MeV collisions of B3+(1s2s 3S) with H2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benis, E. P.; Doukas, S.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We have revisited previously published data involving collisions of mixed 4 MeV B3+ (1s21 S, 1 s 2 s3 S) with H2 targets (Benis et al., 2002) in search of evidence for the non-statistical production of the 1 s 2 s 2 p4 P long-lived metastable state by single electron capture. Using our recently published method for the accurate determination of the effective solid angle of Auger decaying metastable projectile states in combination with knowledge of the 1 s 2 s3 S metastable beam fraction allowed us to determine the ratio R =4 P /2 P of 1 s 2 s 2 p quartet to doublet production cross sections both formed by electron capture. Our present determination of R = 2.8 ± 0.5 , clearly departs from the expected value of R = 2 based on statistical spin recoupling arguments and thus provides evidence for the active presence of additional population mechanisms in a new collision system.

  14. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. -L.; Chen, C. -H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore » total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  16. Analysis of 1s(2s2p {sup 3}P)nl Rydberg states in the K-shell photoionization of the Be atom

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Fumiko; Matsuoka, Leo; Takashima, Ryuta; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Nagata, Tetsuo; Azuma, Yoshiro; Obara, Satoshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2006-06-15

    We have observed inner-shell photoionization of Be using synchrotron radiation in the energy region of the 1s(2s2p {sup 3}P)nl Rydberg states. We used a time-of-flight method to distinguish singly and doubly charged photoions and obtained the Be{sup +} [ns; n=5-12 ({sup 1}P)3s] and Be{sup 2+} [ns; n=5-8, nd=5,6 ({sup 1}P)3s] ion spectra with high resolution corresponding to an instrumental bandpass of 13 meV. Detailed analysis enabled the autoionization parameters, resonance energy position E{sub 0}, resonance width {gamma}, and Fano parameter q, to be obtained. From the resonance positions of the {sup 3}Pnl series members, the series limit was determined to be 127.97 eV, which is in good agreement with previous experiments.

  17. Fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p 4P state of the helium negative ion He-.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Li, Chun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2014-12-31

    The fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p (4)P state of the helium negative ion He(-) are calculated in Hylleraas coordinates, including relativistic and QED corrections up to O(α(4)mc(2)), O((μ/M)α(4)mc(2)), O(α(5)mc(2)), and O((μ/M)α(5)mc(2)). Higher order corrections are estimated for the ionization energy. A comparison is made with other calculations and experiments. We find that the present results for the fine structure splittings agree with experiment very well. However, the calculated ionization energy deviates from the experimental result by about 1 standard deviation. The estimated theoretical uncertainty in the ionization energy is much less than the experimental accuracy. PMID:25615325

  18. Lifetime for Li-like Ti 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level using a mode of beam-two-foil experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, T.; Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A.A.

    2005-08-15

    The option of varying thickness of the fixed foil in the beam-two-foil technique has been incorporated in our experimental setup. It gives an opportunity to explore a new mode of this technique. In the current study, we have investigated the lifetime of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level in Li-like titanium using this technique. The data showed a dependence of foil thickness of the fixed foil on the interactions of levels produced in the first foil. Average lifetime obtained for the Li-like titanium 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level (200{+-}12 ps) is compared very well with the earlier theoretical and experimental values.

  19. Reliable measurement of the Li-like {sub 22}{sup 48}Ti 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level lifetime by beam-foil and beam-two-foil experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, T.; Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A. A.; Marketos, P.

    2006-03-15

    We have determined the lifetime of the Li-like {sub 22}{sup 48}Ti 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level (210.5{+-}13.5 ps) using data from its x-ray decay channel through beam single- and two-foil experiments, coupled to a multicomponent iterative growth and decay analysis. Theoretical lifetime estimates for this zero-nuclear-spin ion lies within the uncertainty range of our experimental results, indicating that blending contributions to this level from the He-like 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o} and 1s2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} levels are eliminated within the current approach. A previously reported discrepancy between experimental and theoretical 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup o} level lifetimes in {sub 23}{sup 51}V may, as a result, be attributed to hyperfine quenching.

  20. Progress in Spectroscopy of the 1S-3S Transition in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sandrine; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Thomas, Simon; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François; Nez, François

    2015-09-01

    We report the latest advances in the Doppler-free spectroscopy of the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen. A new continuous ultra-violet source has been developed and delivers a power level of 15 mW. With this setup, the statistical uncertainty on the 1S-3S transition frequency measurement is 2.2 kHz. Combined with the 1S-2S frequency, absolute accuracy at that level would significantly enlighten the proton radius puzzle.

  1. Crystal structure of N-[(1S,2S)-2-amino­cyclo­hex­yl]-2,4,6-tri­methyl­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Ngassa, Felix N.; Biros, Shannon M.; Staples, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C15H24N2O2S, was synthesized via a substitution reaction between the enanti­opure (1S,2S)-(+)-1,2-di­amino­cyclo­hexane and 2,4,6-tri­methyl­benzene-1-sulfonyl chloride. The cyclo­hexyl and phenyl substituents are oriented gauche around the sulfonamide S—N bond. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100]. PMID:26870419

  2. Electron heating mode transition induced by mixing radio frequency and ultrahigh frequency dual frequency powers in capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-05-01

    Electron heating mode transitions induced by mixing the low- and high-frequency power in dual-frequency nitrogen discharges at 400 mTorr pressure are presented. As the low-frequency (13.56 MHz) power decreases and high-frequency (320 MHz) power increases for the fixed power of 200 W, there is a transition of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) from Druyvesteyn to bi-Maxwellian type characterized by a distinguished warm electron population. It is shown that this EEDF evolution is attributed to the transition from collisional to collisionless stochastic heating of the low-energy electrons.

  3. Relationship between the transition frequency of local fluid flow and the peak frequency of attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cheng-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Pan, Yi-Xin; Teng, Xin-Bao

    2016-03-01

    Local fluid flow (LFF) at the mesoscopic scale is the main dissipation mechanism of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous media within the seismic frequency band. LFF is easily influenced by the structure and boundary conditions of the porous media, which leads to different behaviors of the peak frequency of attenuation. The associated transition frequency can provide detailed information about the trend of LFF; therefore, research on the transition frequency of LFF and its relationship with the peak frequency of the corresponding attenuation (i.e., inverse of quality factor) facilitates the detailed understanding of the effect of inner structures and boundary conditions in porous media. In this study, we firstly obtain the transition frequency of fluid flux based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and the fast Fourier transform algorithm in a sample containing one repeating unit cell (RUC). We then analyze changes of these two frequencies in porous media with different porous properties. Finally, we extend our analysis to the influence of the undrained boundary condition on the transition frequency and peak frequency in porous media with multiple RUCs. This setup can facilitate the understanding of the effect from the undrained boundary condition. Results demonstrate that these two frequencies have the same trend at low water saturation, but amplitude variations differ between the frequencies as the amount of saturation increases. However, for cases of high water saturation, both the trend and the amplitude variation of these two frequencies fit well with each other.

  4. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  5. The absolute frequency of the 87Sr optical clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Thomsen, Jan W.; Martin, Michael J.; de Miranda, Marcio H. G.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Boyd, Martin M.; Ye, Jun; Diddams, Scott A.; Heavner, Thomas P.; Parker, Thomas E.; Jefferts, Steven R.

    2008-10-01

    The absolute frequency of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition of 87Sr has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.65 (37) Hz using lattice-confined atoms, where the fractional uncertainty of 8.6 × 10-16 represents one of the most accurate measurements of an atomic transition frequency to date. After a detailed study of systematic effects, which reduced the total systematic uncertainty of the Sr lattice clock to 1.5 × 10-16, the clock frequency is measured against a hydrogen maser which is simultaneously calibrated to the US primary frequency standard, the NIST Cs fountain clock, NIST-F1. The comparison is made possible using a femtosecond laser based optical frequency comb to phase coherently connect the optical and microwave spectral regions and by a 3.5 km fibre transfer scheme to compare the remotely located clock signals.

  6. Precise Measurement of Vibrational Transition Frequency of Optically Trapped Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Masatoshi; Gopakumar, Geetha; Abe, Minori; Hada, Masahiko

    2013-06-01

    We propose to measure the X^{2}Σ(v,N,F,M) =( 0,0,3/2,±3/2) →( v_{u},0,3/2,±3/2) ( v_{u}=1,2,3,4,,,,) transition frequencies of X^{6}Li molecules with the uncertainty lower than 10^{-16} (X: ^{174}Yb, ^{88}Sr, ^{40}Ca). Molecules are produced by photo-association of cold atoms and trapped in the optical lattices. Measurement with molecules in optical lattices is particularly advantageous for precision measurements because (1) the molecules and probe laser interact for a long time, (2) molecules are localized within the Lamb-Dicke region, (3) the measurement is possible with a large number of molecules, and (4) collision effects are suppressed (molecules are trapped at different positions in 2D lattices). Using the proper trap laser frequency, the Stark shift induced by the trap laser is eliminated as the Stark energy shift of the upper and lower states are equal (magic frequency). When the trap laser frequency is shifted from the magic frequency by 1 MHz, the Stark shift is less than 3×10^{-15}. The N=0→0 transition is one-photon forbidden, and it is stimulated by Raman transition using two lasers. When one of two Raman lasers is higher than the magic frequency and another is lower, the total Stark shift induced by two Raman lasers can be eliminated. Measurement of molecular vibrational transition frequencies is useful to test the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio. The ^{1}S_{0}-^{3}% P_{0} transition frequencies of ^{27}Al^{+} ion or ^{87}Sr atom are useful as the reference.

  7. Robust Blind Frequency and Transition Time Estimation for Frequency Hopping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Yung-Fang

    2010-12-01

    In frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) systems, two major problems are timing synchronization and frequency estimation. A blind estimation scheme is presented for estimating frequency and transition time without using reference signals. The scheme is robust in the sense that it can avoid the unbalanced sampling block problem that occurs in existing maximum likelihood-based schemes, which causes large errors in one of the estimates of frequency. The proposed scheme has a lower computational cost than the maximum likelihood-based greedy search method. The estimated parameters are also used for the subsequent time and frequency tracking. The simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  8. Redetermination of bis-{(1S,2S,4S,5R)-2-[(R)-hy-droxy(6-meth-oxy-4-quinol-yl)meth-yl]-5-vinyl-quinuclidinium} sulfate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Mangwala Kimpende, Peter; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, known as quinine sulfate dihydrate, 2C(20)H(25)N(2)O(2) (+)·SO(4) (2-)·2H(2)O, was previously reported by Mendel [Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. (1955), 58, 132-134], but only the [010] projection was determined. Hence, we have redetermined its crystal structure at 100 K using three-dimensional data. The asymmetric unit consists of a quininium cation, viz. (R)-(6-meth-oxy-quinolinium-4-yl)[(1S,2S,4S,5R)-5-vinyl-quinuclid-in-ium-2-yl]methanol, one half of a sulfate anion and a water mol-ecule. The S atom occupies a special position on a twofold axis. The packing is characterized by infinite columns, consisting of sulfate anions and water mol-ecules, linked through hydrogen bonds along the b axis, and further stabilized by hydrogen bonds to quininium cations. The quininium cations inter-act further through C-H⋯O and C-H⋯π inter-actions. PMID:21588765

  9. Frequency and amplitude transitioned waveforms mitigate the onset response in high frequency nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Gerges, Meana; Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Narendra; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    High frequency alternating currents (HFAC) have proven to be a reversible and rapid method of blocking peripheral nerve conduction, holding promise for treatment of disorders associated with undesirable neuronal activity. The delivery of HFAC is characterized by a transient period of neural firing at its inception, termed the “onset response”. The onset response is minimized for higher frequencies and higher amplitudes, but requires larger currents. However, complete block can be maintained at lower frequencies and amplitudes, using lower currents. In this in-vivo study on whole mammalian peripheral nerves, we demonstrate a method to minimize the onset response by initiating the block using a stimulation paradigm with a high frequency and large amplitude, and then transitioning to a low frequency and low amplitude waveform, reducing the currents required to maintain the conduction block. In five of six animals it was possible to transition from a 30 kHz to a 10 kHz waveform without inducing any transient neural firing. The minimum transition time was 0.03 sec. Transition activity was minimized or eliminated with longer transition times. The results of this study show that this method is feasible for achieving a nerve block with minimal onset responses and current amplitude requirements. PMID:20966536

  10. Recommended Rest Frequencies for Observed Interstellar Molecular Microwave Transitions - 2002 Revision

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 116 NIST Recommended Rest Frequencies for Observed Interstellar Molecular Microwave Transitions - 2002 Revision (Web, free access)   Critically evaluated transition frequencies for the molecular transitions detected in interstellar and circumstellar clouds are presented.

  11. The 10 Hz Frequency: A Fulcrum For Transitional Brain States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Mahaffey, S.; Urbano, F. J.; Phillips, C.

    2016-01-01

    A 10 Hz rhythm is present in the occipital cortex when the eyes are closed (alpha waves), in the precentral cortex at rest (mu rhythm), in the superior and middle temporal lobe (tau rhythm), in the inferior olive (projection to cerebellar cortex), and in physiological tremor (underlying all voluntary movement). These are all considered resting rhythms in the waking brain which are “replaced” by higher frequency activity with sensorimotor stimulation. That is, the 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is replaced on the one hand by lower frequencies during sleep, or on the other hand by higher frequencies during volition and cognition. The 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is proposed as the natural frequency of the brain during quiet waking, but is replaced by higher frequencies capable of permitting more complex functions, or by lower frequencies during sleep and inactivity. At the center of the transition shifts to and from the resting rhythm is the reticular activating system, a phylogenetically preserved area of the brain essential for preconscious awareness.

  12. Frequency shift of hyperfine transitions due to blackbody radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E. J.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-08-15

    We have performed calculations of the size of the frequency shift induced by a static electric field on the clock transition frequencies of the hyperfine splitting in Yb{sup +}, Rb, Cs, Ba{sup +}, and Hg{sup +}. The calculations are used to find the frequency shifts due to blackbody radiation which are needed for accurate frequency measurements and improvements of the limits on variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}. Our result for Cs [{delta}{nu}/E{sup 2}=-2.26(2)x10{sup -10}Hz/(V/m){sup 2}] is in good agreement with early measurements and ab initio calculations. We present arguments against recent claims that the actual value might be smaller. The difference ({approx}10%) is due to the contribution of the continuum spectrum in the sum over intermediate states.

  13. Pharmacological profile of novel acid pump antagonist 7-(4-fluorobenzyloxy)-2,3-dimethyl-1-{[(1S,2S)-2-methyl cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyridazine (CS-526).

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Kazuya; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Inaba, Fumi; Morikawa-Inomata, Yuka; Makino, Mitsuko; Tabata, Keiichi; Shibakawa, Nobuhiko

    2007-10-01

    The pharmacological profiles of the novel acid pump antagonist 7-(4-fluorobenzyloxy)-2,3-dimethyl-1-{[(1S,2S)-2-methylcyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyridazine (CS-526) were investigated in terms of hog gastric H+,K+-ATPase activity, gastric acid secretion, and acute gastroesophageal lesions in comparison with other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). CS-526 inhibited H+,K+-ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 61 nM. The inhibitory effect of CS-526 on H+,K+-ATPase activity was more potent than that of any of the other PPIs examined. The inhibitory mechanism of CS-526 on H+,K+-ATPase was a competitive antagonism to the K+ binding site of H+,K+-ATPase, and it was also a reversible inhibition. In pylorus-ligated rats, intraduodenal or oral administration of CS-526 inhibited gastric acid secretion in a dose-dependent manner, and the ID50 values were 2.8 or 0.7 mg/kg, respectively. In Heidenhain pouch dogs, intrapouch administration of CS-526 inhibited histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion in a dose- and retention time-dependent manner. In a reflux esophagitis model, intraduodenal and oral administration of CS-526 prevented esophageal lesions with ID50 values of 5.4 and 1.9 mg/kg, respectively. Lansoprazole prevented esophagitis only by intraduodenal administration (ID50 = 2.2 mg/kg). Furthermore, CS-526 inhibited acute gastric mucosal lesions. These data demonstrate that the novel acid pump antagonist CS-526 has potent antisecretory and antiulcer effects. These findings indicate that CS-526 would have a curative effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease via its potent antisecretory and antiulcer actions. PMID:17630360

  14. Precise Measurement of ^{40}CaH^{+} Vibrational Transition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Masatoshi; Abe, Minori

    2013-06-01

    Small number of molecular ions in a linear trap can be sympathetically cooled with atomic ions and form a string crystal at the position, where the electric field is zero. Molecular ions in a strinc crystal are advantageous to measure the transition frequencies without Stark shift induced by the trap electric field, but it is required to localize small number of molecular ions in a single quantum state. ^{40}CaH^{+} molecular ion is advantageous to solve this problem, because (1) molecular ion with rotational constant of 141 GHz is localized in the vibrational-rotational ground state when the surrounding temperature is lower than 10 K, and (2) there is no hyperfine splitting in the J=0 state. In this presentation, we porpose to measure the ^{40}CaH^{+} X^{1}% Σ( v,N,F,M) =(0,0,1/2,±1/2) → (v_{u},0,1/2,±1/2) (v_{u}=1,2,3,,,) transition with the uncertainty lower than 10^{-16}. With these transitions, Zeeman shift is less than 10^{-16}/G (given by the slight dependence of schielding effect by electron cloud on the vibrational state) and electric quadrupole shift is zero because of F=1/2. The J=0→0 transition is one-photon forbidden, and it can be observed also by Raman transition using two lasers. Stark shift induced by Raman lasers actually dominates the measurement uncertainty. When v=0→1 transition is observed using Raman lasers in the 6000-15000 /cm, Stark shift with saturation power is of the order of 1.5×10^{-14} and it is higher for overtone transitions. With the following Raman laser frequencies, total Stark shift induced by two Raman lasers is zero. v=0→1 24527 /cm and 23079 /cm v=0→2 24600 /cm and 21745 /cm v=0→3 26237 /cm and 22017 /cm v=0→4 25354 /cm and 19814 /cm The ^{40}CaH^{+} X^{1}Σ( v,N,F,M) =(0,0,1/2,±1/2) →(v_{u},0,1/2,±1/2) (v_{u}=1,2,3,,,) transition can be measured with the uncertainty lower than 10^{-16}, and it is useful to test the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio.

  15. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  16. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  17. Measurements of the frequency spectrum of transition radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.

    1977-01-01

    We report a measurement of the frequency spectrum of X-ray transition radiation. X rays were generated by electrons of 5 and 9 GeV in radiators of multiple polypropylene foils, and detected in the range 4 to 30 keV with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer. The experimental results closely reproduce the features of the theoretically predicted spectrum. In particular, the pronounced interference pattern of multifoil radiators and the expected hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The overall intensity of the radiation is somewhat lower than predicted by calculations.

  18. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  19. Absolute frequency measurements and hyperfine structures of the molecular iodine transitions at 578 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Inaba, Hajime; Okubo, Sho; Tanabe, Takehiko; Yasuda, Masami; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2016-04-01

    We report absolute frequency measurements of 81 hyperfine components of the rovibrational transitions of molecular iodine at 578 nm using the second harmonic generation of an 1156-nm external-cavity diode laser and a fiber-based optical frequency comb. The relative uncertainties of the measured absolute frequencies are typically $1.4\\times10^{-11}$. Accurate hyperfine constants of four rovibrational transitions are obtained by fitting the measured hyperfine splittings to a four-term effective Hamiltonian including the electric quadrupole, spin-rotation, tensor spin-spin, and scalar spin-spin interactions. The observed transitions can be good frequency references at 578 nm, and are especially useful for research using atomic ytterbium since the transitions are close to the $^{1}S_{0}-^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition of ytterbium.

  20. Precision Spectroscopy of Hydrogen and Femtosecond Laser Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A femtosecond frequency comb is a simple and compact tool that allows the phase coherent connection of the radio frequency domain (below 100 GHz) with the optical domain (above 200 THz). It greatly simplified high precision optical frequency measurements and provides the long awaited clockwork mechanism for an all-optical atomic clock. We have used such a frequency comb to measure the absolute frequency of the 1S-2S two-photon transition in atomic hydrogen, i.e. comparing it with the Cs ground state hyperfine splitting. By comparing data taken in 2003 with earlier measurements in 1999 we can set an upper limit on the variation of the 1S-2S transition frequency of (-29 ±57) Hz within 44 months. To derive limits on the drift rates of fundamental constant such as the fine structure constant, we combine these measurements with other optical frequency measurements in Hg^+ and in Yb^+ performed at NIST, Boulder/USA and at PTB, Braunschweig/Germany respectively. This combined method gives precise and separate restrictions for the fractional time variation of the fine structure constant and the Cs nuclear magnetic moment measured in Bohr magnetons. The latter is a measure of the drift rate of the strong interaction. We also report on efforts to convert the frequency comb technology to much shorter wavelength. Based on intra cavity high harmonic generation an XUV (up to 60 nm) frequency comb is generated with a repetition rate of more than 100 MHz useful for high resolution laser spectroscopy in this region.

  1. Determination of transit time distribution and Rabi frequency by applying regularized inverse on Ramsey spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young-Ho; Lee, Soo Heyong; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Ho Seong; Kwon, Taeg Yong

    2007-04-23

    The authors report on a method to determine the Rabi frequency and transit time distribution of atoms that are essential for proper operation of atomic beam frequency standards. Their method, which employs alternative regularized inverse on two Ramsey spectra measured at different microwave powers, can be used for the frequency standards with short Ramsey cavity as well as long ones. The authors demonstrate that uncertainty in Rabi frequency obtained from their method is 0.02%.

  2. Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals' Identified Transition Competencies: Importance, Frequency, and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotner, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Services and programs for transition-age youth with disabilities have been fragmented and inadequate (Noonan, 2004; Oertle & Trach, 2007; Sitlington, Clark, & Kolstoe, 2000). These often-ineffective services have contributed to the sizeable gap betweens students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities in employment and other aspects…

  3. Frequency transitions in odor-evoked neural oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Iori; Bazhenov, Maxim; Ong, Rose Chik-ying; Raman, Baranidharan; Stopfer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Summary In many species sensory stimuli elicit the oscillatory synchronization of groups of neurons. What determines the properties of these oscillations? In the olfactory system of the moth we found that odors elicited oscillatory synchronization through a neural mechanism like that described in locust and Drosophila. During responses to long odor pulses, oscillations suddenly slowed as net olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) output decreased; thus, stimulus intensity appeared to determine oscillation frequency. However, changing the concentration of the odor had little effect upon oscillatory frequency. Our recordings in vivo and computational models based on these results suggested the main effect of increasing odor concentration was to recruit additional, less well-tuned ORNs whose firing rates were tightly constrained by adaptation and saturation. Thus, in the periphery, concentration is encoded mainly by the size of the responsive ORN population, and oscillation frequency is set by the adaptation and saturation of this response. PMID:20005825

  4. A high-frequency, secondary instability of crossflow vortices that leads to transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohama, Yasuaki; Saric, William S.; Hoos, Jon A.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional boundary-layer transition experiments are currently being conducted on a 45 deg swept wing in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel. Crossflow-dominated transition is produced via a model with contoured end liners to simulate infinite swept-wing flow. Fixed-wavelength, stationary and travelling crossflow vortices are observed. The frequencies of the most amplified travelling waves are in agreement with linear-stability theory; however travelling waves at frequencies an order of magnitude higher than predicted are also observed near transition. Near the transition location, the distorted boundary layer is due to the stationary crossflow vortex and is subject to a Rayleigh-type instability in the stream direction. As a result, a high-frequency secondary instability is detected in the transition region and spatial relations of the process are well documented by coupled use of flow visualization and hot-wire measurements.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Jin, Li

    2008-08-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (Tf) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials.

  6. Rotational frequencies of transition metal hydrides for astrophysical searches in the far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Beaton, Stuart P.; Evenson, Kenneth M.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate frequencies for the lowest rotational transitions of five transition metal hydrides (CrH, FeH, CoH, NiH, and CuH) in their ground electronic states are reported to help the identification of these species in astrophysical sources from their far-infrared spectra. Accurate frequencies are determined in two ways: for CuH, by calculation from rotational constants determined from higher J transitions with an accuracy of 190 kHz; for the other species, by extrapolation to zero magnetic field from laser magnetic resonance spectra with an accuracy of 0.7 MHz.

  7. Absolute Frequency Measurements of the D1 and D2 Transitions in Aatomic Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Donal; Almaguer, Jose; Baron, Jacob; Elgee, Peter; Rowan, Michael; Stalnaker, Jason

    2014-05-01

    We present preliminary results from our measurements of the D1 and D2 transitions in Li. The data were obtained from a collimated atomic beam excited by light from an extended cavity diode laser. The frequency of the diode laser was stabilized to an optical frequency comb, providing absolute frequency measurement and control of the excitation laser frequency. These measurements will provide a stringent test of atomic structure calculations and yield information about the nuclear structure. We also discuss plans to extend the technique to other high-lying states in lithium. Funded by the NIST Precision Measurements Grant and NSF Award #1305591.

  8. Non-Maxwellian to Maxwellian transitions of atmospheric microplasmas at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. U.; Jeong, S. Y.; Won, I. H.; Sung, S. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations and numerical analysis of a single particle motion are performed for atmospheric He microplasmas at microwave frequencies to determine the characteristics of non-Maxwellian to Maxwellian transition. The left and the right regimes of Paschen curve, divided by this transition, reveal that the transition frequencies depend on the gap of electrodes and the neutral gas pressure to follow scaling laws for a new extended Paschen law. The fluid models are reasonable at the right-side regime of Paschen breakdown areas, but not on the left side, which is highly kinetic for electrons. The plasmas driven by weaker electric fields of high enough frequencies at the right-side Paschen regime breed more energetic electrons.

  9. Amplitude Variation of Bottom Simulating Reflection with Respect to Frequency - Transitional Base or Attenuation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude of a bottom simulating reflection (BSR), which occurs near the phase boundary between gas hydrate-bearing sediments and underlying gas-filled sediments, strongly depends on the frequency content of a seismic signal, as well as the impedance contrast across the phase boundary. A strong-amplitude BSR, detectable in a conventional seismic profile, is a good indicator of the presence of free gas beneath the phase boundary. However, the BSR as observed in low-frequency multichannel seismic data is generally difficult to identify in high-frequency, single-channel seismic data. To investigate the frequency dependence of BSR amplitudes, single-channel seismic data acquired with an air gun source at Blake Ridge, which is located off the shore of South Carolina, were analyzed in the frequency range of 10-240 Hz. The frequency-dependent impedance contrast caused by the velocity dispersion in partially gas saturated sediments is important to accurately analyze BSR amplitude. Analysis indicates that seismic attenuation of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, velocity dispersion, and a transitional base all contribute to the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude variation in the frequency range of 10-500 Hz. When velocity dispersion is incorporated into the BSR amplitude analysis, the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude at Blake Ridge can be explained with gas hydrate-bearing sediments having a quality factor of about 250 and a transitional base with a thickness of about 1 meter.

  10. Accurate measurements of transition frequencies and isotope shifts of laser-trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, S; Calabrese, R; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Khanbekyan, A; Mariotti, E; de Mauro, C; Minguzzi, P; Moi, L; Stancari, G; Tomassetti, L; Veronesi, S

    2009-04-01

    An interferometric method is used to improve the accuracy of the 7S-7P transition frequencies of three francium isotopes by 1 order of magnitude. The deduced isotope shifts for 209-211Fr confirm the ISOLDE data. The frequency of the D2 transition of 212Fr--the accepted reference for all Fr isotope shifts--is revised, and a significant difference with the ISOLDE value is found. Our results will be a benchmark for the accuracy of the theory of Fr energy levels, a necessary step to investigate fundamental symmetries. PMID:19340162

  11. Biomechanical mechanism for transitions in phase and frequency of arm and leg swing during walking.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Masayoshi; Wagenaar, Robert C; Saltzman, Elliot; Holt, Kenneth G

    2004-08-01

    As humans increase walking speed, there are concurrent transitions in the frequency ratio between arm and leg movements from 2:1 to 1:1 and in the phase relationship between the movements of the two arms from in-phase to out-of-phase. Superharmonic resonance of a pendulum with monofrequency excitation had been proposed as a potential model for this phenomenon. In this study, an alternative model of paired pendulums with multiple-frequency excitations is explored. It was predicted that the occurrence of the concurrent transitions was a function of (1) changes in the magnitude ratio of shoulder accelerations at step and stride frequencies that accompany changes in walking speed and (2) proximity of these frequencies to the natural resonance frequencies of the arms modeled as a pair of passive pendulums. Model predictions were compared with data collected from 14 healthy young subjects who were instructed to walk on a treadmill. Walking speeds were manipulated between 0.18 and 1.52 m/s in steps of 0.22 m/s. Kinematic data for the arms and shoulders were collected using a 3D motion analysis system, and simulations were conducted in which the movements of a double-pendulum system excited by the accelerations at the suspension point were analyzed to determine the extent to which the arms acted as passive pendulums. It was confirmed that the acceleration waveforms at the shoulder are composed primarily of stride and step frequency components. Between the shoulders, the stride frequency components were out-of-phase, while the step frequency components were in-phase. The amplitude ratio of the acceleration waveform components at the step and stride frequencies changed as a function of walking speed and were associated with the occurrence of the transitions. Simulation results using these summed components as excitatory inputs to the double-pendulum system were in agreement with actual transitions in 80% of the cases. The potential role of state-dependent active muscle

  12. Precise laboratory measurements of methanol rotational transition frequencies in the 5 to 13 GHz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenridge, S. M.; Kukolich, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Rotational transitions for CH3OH were measured in the 5-13 GHz range with a precision and accuracy of a few kilohertz or less using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The accurate center frequencies measured should be useful in determining accurate Doppler shifts and making positive molecule identification in radio astronomy.

  13. Spectral line shapes and frequencies of the molecular oxygen B-band R-branch transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, Jolanta; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Bielska, Katarzyna; Trawiński, Ryszard S.; Ciuryło, Roman; Lisak, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We present the line-shape parameters for the first 11 lines of the oxygen B-band R-branch self-broadened transitions measured at low pressures by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer (PDH-locked FS-CRDS) linked to the optical frequency comb. The collisional self-broadening, shifting and narrowing parameters were determined together with the quadratic speed-dependence as well as phase- and velocity-changing correlations parameters. The absolute frequencies of the transitions with combined standard uncertainties below 150 kHz are reported. Dependence of line parameters on choice of the line-shape model is discussed.

  14. Frequency-domain readout multiplexing of transition-edge sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanting, T. M.; Arnold, K.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Clarke, John; Dobbs, Matt; Holzapfel, William; Lee, Adrian T.; Lueker, M.; Richards, P. L.; Smith, A. D.; Spieler, H. G.

    2006-04-01

    We have demonstrated frequency-domain readout multiplexing of eight channels for superconducting transition-edge sensor bolometer arrays. The multiplexed readout noise is 6.5 pA/√Hz, well below the bolometer dark noise of 15-20 pA/√Hz. We measure an upper limit on crosstalk of 0.004 between channels adjacent in frequency which meets our design requirement of 0.01. We have observed vibration insensitivity in our frequency-domain multiplexed transition-edge sensors, making this system very attractive for telescope and satellite observations. We also discuss extensions to our multiplexed readout. In particular, we are developing a SQUID flux-locked loop that is entirely cold and collaborating on digital multiplexer technology in order to scale up the number of multiplexed channels.

  15. Theoretical transition frequencies beyond 0.1 ppb accuracy in H2+, HD+, and antiprotonic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobov, Vladimir I.; Hilico, Laurent; Karr, Jean-Philippe

    2014-03-01

    We present improved theoretical calculations of transition frequencies for the fundamental transitions (L=0,v=1)→(L'=0,v'=0) in the hydrogen molecular ions H2+ and HD+ with a relative uncertainty 4×10-11 and for the two-photon transitions in the antiprotonic helium atom with a relative uncertainty 10-10. To do that, the one-loop self-energy correction of order α(Zα )6 is derived in the two Coulomb center approximation, and numerically evaluated in the case of the aforementioned transitions. The final results also include a complete set of other spin-independent corrections of order mα7. The leading order corrections of α2ln3(Zα )-2(Zα)6 are also considered that allows one to estimate a magnitude of yet uncalculated contributions.

  16. Transition radiation at radio frequencies from ultrahigh-energy neutrino-induced showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motloch, Pavel; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Privitera, Paolo; Zas, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    Coherent radiation at radio frequencies from high-energy showers fully contained in a dense radio-transparent medium—like ice, salt, soil, or regolith—has been extensively investigated as a promising technique to search for ultrahigh-energy neutrinos. Additional emission in the form of transition radiation may occur when a neutrino-induced shower produced close to the Earth's surface emerges from the ground into atmospheric air. We present the first detailed evaluation of transition radiation from high-energy showers crossing the boundary between two different media. We found that transition radiation is sizable over a wide solid angle and coherent up to ˜1 GHz . These properties encourage further work to evaluate the potential of a large-aperture ultrahigh-energy neutrino experiment based on the detection of transition radiation.

  17. Collision-induced radio-frequency transitions in CH 3I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamassia, F.; Danieli, R.; Scappini, F.

    1999-02-01

    The highly sensitive method of radio-frequency-infrared double resonance inside a CO 2 laser is applied to study collision-induced transitions in CH 3I in a four-level double resonance scheme. Pure nuclear quadrupole resonances are observed as the result of collision population transfer between different rotational levels. The intensity ratios of the collision-induced dips to the corresponding three-level double resonance signals are measured for a number of transitions in the ground and excited vibrational states. Collision selection rules in the pure gas and in mixtures with polar and non-polar gases are discussed.

  18. Absolute molecular transition frequencies measured by three cavity-enhanced spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Cygan, A; Wójtewicz, S; Kowzan, G; Zaborowski, M; Wcisło, P; Nawrocki, J; Krehlik, P; Śliwczyński, Ł; Lipiński, M; Masłowski, P; Ciuryło, R; Lisak, D

    2016-06-01

    Absolute frequencies of unperturbed (12)C(16)O transitions from the near-infrared (3-0) band were measured with uncertainties five-fold lower than previously available data. The frequency axis of spectra was linked to the primary frequency standard. Three different cavity enhanced absorption and dispersion spectroscopic methods and various approaches to data analysis were used to estimate potential systematic instrumental errors. Except for a well established frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we applied the cavity mode-width spectroscopy and the one-dimensional cavity mode-dispersion spectroscopy for measurement of absorption and dispersion spectra, respectively. We demonstrated the highest quality of the dispersion line shape measured in optical spectroscopy so far. We obtained line positions of the Doppler-broadened R24 and R28 transitions with relative uncertainties at the level of 10(-10). The pressure shifting coefficients were measured and the influence of the line asymmetry on unperturbed line positions was analyzed. Our dispersion spectra are the first demonstration of molecular spectroscopy with both axes of the spectra directly linked to the primary frequency standard, which is particularly desirable for the future reference-grade measurements of molecular spectra. PMID:27276950

  19. Absolute molecular transition frequencies measured by three cavity-enhanced spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, A.; Wójtewicz, S.; Kowzan, G.; Zaborowski, M.; Wcisło, P.; Nawrocki, J.; Krehlik, P.; Śliwczyński, Ł.; Lipiński, M.; Masłowski, P.; Ciuryło, R.; Lisak, D.

    2016-06-01

    Absolute frequencies of unperturbed 12C16O transitions from the near-infrared (3-0) band were measured with uncertainties five-fold lower than previously available data. The frequency axis of spectra was linked to the primary frequency standard. Three different cavity enhanced absorption and dispersion spectroscopic methods and various approaches to data analysis were used to estimate potential systematic instrumental errors. Except for a well established frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we applied the cavity mode-width spectroscopy and the one-dimensional cavity mode-dispersion spectroscopy for measurement of absorption and dispersion spectra, respectively. We demonstrated the highest quality of the dispersion line shape measured in optical spectroscopy so far. We obtained line positions of the Doppler-broadened R24 and R28 transitions with relative uncertainties at the level of 10-10. The pressure shifting coefficients were measured and the influence of the line asymmetry on unperturbed line positions was analyzed. Our dispersion spectra are the first demonstration of molecular spectroscopy with both axes of the spectra directly linked to the primary frequency standard, which is particularly desirable for the future reference-grade measurements of molecular spectra.

  20. Measurement of the lowest millimeter-wave transition frequency of the CH radical

    SciTech Connect

    Truppe, S.; Hendricks, R. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The CH radical offers a sensitive way to test the hypothesis that fundamental constants measured on Earth may differ from those observed in other parts of the universe. The starting point for such a comparison is to have accurate laboratory frequencies. Here, we measure the frequency of the lowest millimeter-wave transition of CH, near 535 GHz, with an accuracy of 0.6 kHz. This improves the uncertainty by roughly two orders of magnitude over previous determinations and opens the way for sensitive new tests of varying constants.

  1. Electron heating mode transition induced by ultra-high frequency in atmospheric microplasmas for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H. C.; Won, I. H.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-04-30

    The electron heating mode transition induced by ultra-high frequency in atmospheric-pressure microplasmas was investigated using particle-in-cell simulation with a Monte Carlo collision. Interestingly, this discharge mode transition is accompanied by non-monotonic evolution of electron kinetics such as effective electron temperature, plasma density, and electron energy on the electrode. In this study, the highest flux of energetic electrons ({epsilon} > 4 eV) usable for tailoring the surface chemistry in atmospheric microplasmas is obtained at the specific frequency (400 MHz), where an optimal trade-off is established between the amplitude of sheath oscillations and the power coupled to electrons for sub-millimeter dimensions (200 {mu}m).

  2. nu-2 band of H2 O-16 - Line strengths and transition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of H2 O-16 were recorded with a Fourier-transform spectrometer covering transitions in the (010)-(000) band from 1066 to 2582/cm. The measured line frequencies were used along with additional data taken from studies at microwave and far-infrared frequencies in an analysis to obtain rotational energies of levels in the (000) and (010) states. Measurements of the line strengths were fitted by least squares to a model in which the dipole moment matrix elements were represented by as many as 19 expansion coefficients. The results produced computed line strength values that are in excellent agreement, on the average, with the 874 experimental transitions included in the analysis. These results provide a more accurate representation of the line positions and strengths for the (010)-(000) band than are currently available on the HITRAN absorption line parameter compilation.

  3. Laser frequency stabilization to excited state transitions using electromagnetically induced transparency in a cascade system

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, R. P.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Bason, M. G.; Pritchard, J. D.; Weatherill, K. J.; Raitzsch, U.; Adams, C. S.

    2009-02-16

    We demonstrate laser frequency stabilization to excited state transitions using cascade electromagnetically induced transparency. Using a room temperature Rb vapor cell as a reference, we stabilize a first diode laser to the D{sub 2} transition and a second laser to a transition from the intermediate 5P{sub 3/2} state to a highly excited state with principal quantum number n=19-70. A combined laser linewidth of 280{+-}50 kHz over a 100 {mu}s time period is achieved. This method may be applied generally to any cascade system and allows laser stabilization to an atomic reference in the absence of a direct absorption signal.

  4. Potential of electric quadrupole transitions in radium isotopes for single-ion optical frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Jungmann, K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2011-04-15

    We explore the potential of the electric quadrupole transitions 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-6d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}, 6d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} in radium isotopes as single-ion optical frequency standards. The frequency shifts of the clock transitions due to external fields and the corresponding uncertainties are calculated. Several competitive {sup A}Ra{sup +} candidates, with A= 223-229, are identified. In particular, we show that the transition 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} (F=2,m{sub F}=0)-6d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2} (F=0,m{sub F}=0) at 828 nm in {sup 223}Ra{sup +}, with no linear Zeeman and electric quadrupole shifts, stands out as a relatively simple case, which could be exploited as a compact, robust, and low-cost atomic clock operating at a fractional frequency uncertainty of 10{sup -17}. With more experimental effort, the {sup 223,225,226}Ra{sup +} clocks could be pushed to a projected performance reaching the 10{sup -18} level.

  5. Computer Generation of Subduction Frequencies for 2ND Order Phase Transitions in Two-Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deonarine, Samaroo

    The Landau theory of 2nd order phase transitions and Group theory Criteria are used to predict which subgroups G (L-HOOK EQ) G(,0) can occur in transitions for 2-D systems (plane-group to plane-group and diperiodic to diperiodic). Previous work 1 on the 17 plane space groups has been based on the tables of Coxeter & Moser 2 and the International Tables of X-ray Crystallography (ITXRC, 1965) 3 . These tables do not exhaust all the possible subgroups of a space group 4 . Since such explicit tables are non-existent for other families of space groups we have developed algorithms that make a systematic search of the parent unit cell of G(,0) to locate the origin and orientation of all its subgroups G, G (L-HOOK EQ) G(,0). We have written a RATFOR/FORTRAN program for the VAX 11-780 which will generate the subduction frequencies. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). for allowed second order phase transitions in 2-dimensional systems that are describable by the 80 diperiodic Groups G(,0) and G 5 . Our program gives a complete tabulation (Origin, new Translation Sublattice, Subduction Frequency, Subgroup and its Generators) of the allowed continuous or second order phase transitions from a parent diperiodic group G(,0) to another diperiodic subgroup G.

  6. Blackbody radiation shift of the {sup 133}Cs hyperfine transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Lorini, Luca

    2004-05-01

    We report the theoretical evaluations of the static scalar polarizability of the {sup 133}Cs ground state and of the blackbody radiation shift induced on the transition frequency between the two hyperfine levels with m{sub F}=0. This shift is of fundamental importance in the evaluation of the accuracy of the primary frequency standards based on atomic fountains and is employed in the realization of the SI second in the International Atomic Time scale at the level of 1x10{sup -15}. Our computed value for the polarizability is {alpha}{sub 0}=(6.600{+-}0.016)x10{sup -39}C m{sup 2}/V in agreement at the level of 1x10{sup -3} with recent theoretical and experimental values. As regards the blackbody radiation shift we find for the relative hyperfine transition frequency {beta}=(-1.49{+-}0.07)x10{sup -14} at T=300 K in agreement with frequency measurements reported by our group and by Bauch and Schroeder [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 622 (1997)]. This value is lower by 2x10{sup -15} than that obtained with measurements based on the dc Stark shift and than the value commonly accepted up to now.

  7. Microwave Frequency Transitions Requiring Laser Ablated Uranium Metal Discovered Using Chirp-Pulse Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Cooke, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    A rod of depleted uranium metal (mp = 1,132° C) has been ablated with the fundamental operating frequency of a Nd:YAG laser. The resulting ablation plume of uranium was then mixed with argon gas and expanded between the transmit/receive horn antennae of a chirp-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The recorded spectra show nine strong transitions which are not present when the laser is not used in the experimental procedure. A series of experiments in which the backing gas conditions were altered provides evidence that the nine observed transitions are carried by the same species. Should the transitions be from one species it is most likely an asymmetric top. The transitions persist even when ultra-pure argon is used as the sole backing gas. The oxide coating of the uranium metal likely provides a source of oxygen and, presently, the ``top" candidate for the unknown molecule is UO_3, which is known to have C_2v symmetry. Double resonance experiments are planned to aid transition assignments. A plausible explanation for an elusive assignment to date is the presence of pseudo-rotation.

  8. Absorption coefficient, transition probability, and collision-broadening frequency of dimethylether at He-Xe laser 3.51-micron wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.; Wang, S. C.

    1970-01-01

    Absorptivity, transition probability and collision broadening frequency of dimethylether at 3.51 micron He-Xe laser wavelength, noting pressure dependence, transition lifetime and saturation intensity

  9. Seismic-frequency anelasticity of quartz through the α-β phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfern, S. A.; Peng, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The anelastic response of single-crystal and polycrystalline quartz and quartz-rich sandstones to applied stress at low frequencies has been investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis and force torsion pendulum measurements. The dynamic modulus was measured on heating and cooling through the α-β phase transition under shear and bending stress applied at low frequency (~ 1 Hz). Single crystal quartz shows highly anisotropic properties in both the real and imaginary part of the modulus. Polycrystalline novaculite quartz displays the α-β phase transition temperatures (Tc) around 8 °C higher than seen in single crystal quartz, due to the pinning stress effect of grain boundaries. The properties of the sandstone vary with heating and cooling cycles as the cementation and microfracturing of the grain structure changes at high temperature. The phase transition in quartz is ferrobielastic, and as such energy differences between domains in the transformation microstructure arise under conditions of applied shear stress. Pre-transition softening and an increase in anelastic loss above Tc are attributed to ferrobielastic switching of incipient domain microstructures that arise in the silica microstructure. The influence of temperature on this microstructure is to induce increased switching of domain as a response to thermal stress inherent in the anisotropic thermal expansion of the polycrystalline structure. These results indicate that ferrobielastic switching in quartz is an important mechanism in controlling changes in mechanical properties. As such, we anticipate that it will induce measurable anomalies in seismic signatures of the Earth's crust in regions of high thermal flux. This transition may be responsible for observed seismic velocity reductions and tectonic weakening in western North America and in certain parts of Tibetan plateau.

  10. Lymphatic vessels transition to state of summation above a critical contraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Joshua K; Stewart, Randolph H; Laine, Glen A; Quick, Christopher M

    2007-07-01

    Although behavior of lymphatic vessels is analogous to that of ventricles, which completely relax between contractions, and blood vessels, which maintain a tonic constriction, the mixture of contractile properties can yield behavior unique to lymphatic vessels. In particular, because of their limited refractory period and slow rate of relaxation, lymphatic vessels lack the contractile properties that minimize summation in ventricles. We, therefore, hypothesized that lymphatic vessels transition to a state of summation when lymphatic vessel contraction frequency exceeds a critical value. We used an isovolumic, controlled-flow preparation to compare the time required for full relaxation with the time available to relax during diastole. We measured transmural pressure and diameter on segments of spontaneously contracting bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels during 10 isovolumic volume steps. We found that beat-to-beat period (frequency(-1)) decreased with increases in diameter and that total contraction time was constant or slightly increased with diameter. We further found that the convergence of beat-to-beat period and contraction cycle duration predicted a critical transition value, beyond which the vessel does not have time to fully relax. This incomplete relaxation and resulting mechanical summation significantly increase active tension in diastole. Because this transition occurs within a physiological range, contraction summation may represent a fundamental feature of lymphatic vessel function. PMID:17363681

  11. Computational IR spectroscopy of water: OH stretch frequencies, transition dipoles, and intermolecular vibrational coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2013-05-01

    The Hessian matrix reconstruction method initially developed to extract the basis mode frequencies, vibrational coupling constants, and transition dipoles of the delocalized amide I, II, and III vibrations of polypeptides and proteins from quantum chemistry calculation results is used to obtain those properties of delocalized O-H stretch modes in liquid water. Considering the water symmetric and asymmetric O-H stretch modes as basis modes, we here develop theoretical models relating vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and coupling constants of basis modes to local water configuration and solvent electric potential. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to generate an ensemble of water configurations that was in turn used to construct vibrational Hamiltonian matrices. Obtaining the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrices and using the time-averaging approximation method, which was developed by the Skinner group, to calculating the vibrational spectra of coupled oscillator systems, we could numerically simulate the O-H stretch IR spectrum of liquid water. The asymmetric line shape and weak shoulder bands were quantitatively reproduced by the present computational procedure based on vibrational exciton model, where the polarization effects on basis mode transition dipoles and inter-mode coupling constants were found to be crucial in quantitatively simulating the vibrational spectra of hydrogen-bond networking liquid water.

  12. Liquid-glass transition as the freezing of characteristic acoustic frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sanditov, D. S.

    2010-11-15

    Half-quantum interpretation is proposed for the liquid-glass transition as the freezing of characteristic acoustic frequencies (degrees of freedom) that are related to the molecular mobility of delocalized excited kinetic units, namely, linear quantum oscillators. There exists a correlation between the energy quantum of an elementary excitation (atom delocalization energy) and the glass transition temperature, which is proportional to the characteristic Einstein temperature. By analogy with the Einstein theory of the heat capacity of solids, the temperature range of the concentration of excited atoms in an amorphous medium is divided into the following two regions: a high-temperature region with a linear temperature dependence of this concentration and a low-temperature region, where the concentration of excited atoms decreases exponentially to the limiting minimum value (about 3%). At this value, the viscosity increases to a critical value (about 10{sup 12} Pa s), which corresponds to the glass transition temperature, i.e., the temperature of freezing the mobility of excited kinetic units. The temperature dependence of the free activation energy of viscous flow in the glass transition range is specified by the temperature dependence of the relative number of excited atoms.

  13. A geometric frequency-magnitude scaling transition: Measuring b = 1.5 for large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Mark R.; Holliday, James R.; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2012-04-01

    We identify two distinct scaling regimes in the frequency-magnitude distribution of global earthquakes. Specifically, we measure the scaling exponent b = 1.0 for "small" earthquakes with 5.5 < m < 7.6 and b = 1.5 for "large" earthquakes with 7.6 < m < 9.0. This transition at mt = 7.6, can be explained by geometric constraints on the rupture. In conjunction with supporting literature, this corroborates theories in favor of fully self-similar and magnitude independent earthquake physics. We also show that the scaling behavior and abrupt transition between the scaling regimes imply that earthquake ruptures have compact shapes and smooth rupture-fronts.

  14. Broad Frequency LTCC Vertical Interconnect Transition for Multichip Modules and System on Package Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel; Glover, Michael D.; Porter, Kaoru; Cannon, Tom; Mantooth, H. Alan; Hamilton, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Various stripline structures and flip chip interconnect designs for high-speed digital communication systems implemented in low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrates are studied in this paper. Specifically, two different transition designs from edge launch 2.4 millimeter connectors to stripline transmission lines embedded in LTCC are discussed. After characterizing the DuPont (sup trademark) 9K7 green tape, different designs are proposed to improve signal integrity for high-speed digital data. The full-wave simulations and experimental data validate the presented designs over a broad frequency band from Direct Current to 50 gigahertz and beyond.

  15. Abrupt and gradual transitions between low and hyperexcited firing frequencies in neuronal models with fast synaptic excitation: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-01

    Hyperexcitability of neuronal networks is one of the hallmarks of epileptic brain seizure generation, and results from a net imbalance between excitation and inhibition that promotes excessive abnormal firing frequencies. The transition between low and high firing frequencies as the levels of recurrent AMPA excitation change can occur either gradually or abruptly. We used modeling, numerical simulations, and dynamical systems tools to investigate the biophysical and dynamic mechanisms that underlie these two identified modes of transition in recurrently connected neurons via AMPA excitation. We compare our results and demonstrate that these two modes of transition are qualitatively different and can be linked to different intrinsic properties of the participating neurons.

  16. Layering effects on low frequency modes in n-layered MX2 transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Antonio; Polcar, Tomas

    2016-02-14

    n-Layered (n = 2, 3, 4) MX2 transition metal dichalcogenides (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) have been studied using DFT techniques. Long-range van der Waals forces have been modeled using the Grimme correction to capture interlayer interactions. We study the dynamic and electronic dependence of atomic displacement on the number of layers. We find that the displacement patterns mainly affected by a change in the layer number are low-frequency modes at Γ and A k-points; such modes are connected with the intrinsic tribological response. We disentangle electro-phonon coupling by combining orbital polarization, covalency and cophonicity analysis with phonon band calculations. We find that the frequency dependence on the number of layers and the atomic type has a non-trivial relation with the electronic charge distribution in the interlayer region. We show that the interlayer electronic density can be adjusted by appropriately tuning M-X cophonicity, acting as a knob to control vibrational frequencies, hence the intrinsic frictional response. The present results can be exploited to study the electro-phonon coupling effects in TMD-based materials beyond tribological applications. PMID:26806673

  17. Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy of rovibronic transition of naphthalene calibrated with an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, A.; Nakashima, K.; Matsuba, A.; Misono, M.

    2015-12-01

    We performed Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy of naphthalene using an optical frequency comb as a frequency reference. Rotationally resolved rovibronic spectra were observed, and absolute frequencies of the rovibronic transitions were determined with an uncertainty of several tens of kHz. The resolution and precision of our system are finer than the natural width of naphthalene. We assigned 1466 lines of the Q (Ka) Q (J) transition and calculated molecular constants. We attribute systematic spectral line shifts to the Coriolis interaction, and discuss the origin of the spectral linewidths.

  18. Tuning of Kilopixel Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer Arrays with a Digital Frequency Multiplexed Readout System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermid, Kevin; Hyland, Peter; Aubin, Francois; Bissonnette, Eric; Dobbs, Matt; Hubmayr, Johannes; Smecher, Graeme; Wairrach, Shahjahen

    2009-12-01

    A digital frequency multiplexing (DfMUX) system has been developed and used to tune large arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out with SQUID arrays for mm-wavelength cosmology telescopes. The DfMUX system multiplexes the input bias voltages and output currents for several bolometers on a single set of cryogenic wires. Multiplexing reduces the heat load on the camera's sub-Kelvin cryogenic detector stage. In this paper we describe the algorithms and software used to set up and optimize the operation of the bolometric camera. The algorithms are implemented on soft processors embedded within FPGA devices operating on each backend readout board. The result is a fully parallelized implementation for which the setup time is independent of the array size.

  19. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanates at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were the following: to understand the phase transformations in barium and strontium titanates as the crystals go from one temperature to the other; and to study the dielectric behavior of barium and strontium titanate crystals at a microwave frequency of 9.12 GHz and as a function of temperature. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanate are conducted using a cylindrical microwave resonant cavity as a probe. The cavity technique is quite successful in establishing the phase changes in these crystals. It appears that dipole relaxation plays an important role in the behavior of the dielectric response of the medium loading the cavity as phase change takes place within the sample. The method of a loaded resonant microwave cavity as applied in this work has proven to be sensitive enough to monitor small phase changes of the cavity medium.

  20. Transition Densities and Sample Frequency Spectra of Diffusion Processes with Selection and Variable Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Daniel; Steinrücken, Matthias; Song, Yun S.; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Advances in empirical population genetics have made apparent the need for models that simultaneously account for selection and demography. To address this need, we here study the Wright–Fisher diffusion under selection and variable effective population size. In the case of genic selection and piecewise-constant effective population sizes, we obtain the transition density by extending a recently developed method for computing an accurate spectral representation for a constant population size. Utilizing this extension, we show how to compute the sample frequency spectrum in the presence of genic selection and an arbitrary number of instantaneous changes in the effective population size. We also develop an alternate, efficient algorithm for computing the sample frequency spectrum using a moment-based approach. We apply these methods to answer the following questions: If neutrality is incorrectly assumed when there is selection, what effects does it have on demographic parameter estimation? Can the impact of negative selection be observed in populations that undergo strong exponential growth? PMID:25873633

  1. Frequency domain impedance measurements of erythrocytes. Constant phase angle impedance characteristics and a phase transition.

    PubMed Central

    Bao, J Z; Davis, C C; Schmukler, R E

    1992-01-01

    We report measurements of the electrical impedance of human erythrocytes in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and for temperatures from 4 to 40 degrees C. In order to achieve high sensitivity in this frequency range, we embedded the cells in the pores of a filter, which constrains the current to pass through the cells in the pores. Based on the geometry of the cells embedded in the filter a circuit model is proposed for the cell-filter saline system. A constant phase angle (CPA) element, i.e., an impedance of the form Z = A/(j omega)alpha, where A is a constant, j = square root of -1, omega is angular frequency, and 0 less than alpha less than 1 has been used to describe the ac response of the interface between the cell surface and the electrolyte solution, i.e., the electrical double layer. The CPA and other elements of the circuit model are determined by a complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) fit, which simultaneously fits the real and imaginary parts of the experimental data to the circuit model. The specific membrane capacitance is determined to be 0.901 +/- 0.036 microF/cm2, and the specific cytoplasm conductivity to be 0.413 +/- 0.031 S/m at 26 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the cytoplasm conductivity, membrane capacitance, and CPA element has been obtained. The membrane capacitance increases markedly at approximately 37 degrees C, which suggests a phase transition in the cell membrane. PMID:1600086

  2. Frequency domain impedance measurements of erythrocytes. Constant phase angle impedance characteristics and a phase transition.

    PubMed

    Bao, J Z; Davis, C C; Schmukler, R E

    1992-05-01

    We report measurements of the electrical impedance of human erythrocytes in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and for temperatures from 4 to 40 degrees C. In order to achieve high sensitivity in this frequency range, we embedded the cells in the pores of a filter, which constrains the current to pass through the cells in the pores. Based on the geometry of the cells embedded in the filter a circuit model is proposed for the cell-filter saline system. A constant phase angle (CPA) element, i.e., an impedance of the form Z = A/(j omega)alpha, where A is a constant, j = square root of -1, omega is angular frequency, and 0 less than alpha less than 1 has been used to describe the ac response of the interface between the cell surface and the electrolyte solution, i.e., the electrical double layer. The CPA and other elements of the circuit model are determined by a complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) fit, which simultaneously fits the real and imaginary parts of the experimental data to the circuit model. The specific membrane capacitance is determined to be 0.901 +/- 0.036 microF/cm2, and the specific cytoplasm conductivity to be 0.413 +/- 0.031 S/m at 26 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the cytoplasm conductivity, membrane capacitance, and CPA element has been obtained. The membrane capacitance increases markedly at approximately 37 degrees C, which suggests a phase transition in the cell membrane. PMID:1600086

  3. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors' Identified Transition Competencies: Perceived Importance, Frequency, and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotner, Anthony J.; Trach, John S.; Strauser, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Vocational rehabilitation (VR) professionals are critical partners in the transition process for students with disabilities; therefore, they are required to develop transition service delivery proficiencies. VR professional perceptions of transition competencies are seldom examined due to the perception that transition falls mainly on school-based…

  4. Frequency ratio of two optical clock transitions in 171Yb+ and constraints on the time variation of fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    Godun, R M; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; Jones, J M; King, S A; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Szymaniec, K; Lea, S N; Bongs, K; Gill, P

    2014-11-21

    Singly ionized ytterbium, with ultranarrow optical clock transitions at 467 and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of 6×10(-16). Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a threefold improvement in the constraint on the time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ/μ=0.2(1.1)×10(-16)  yr(-1), along with an improved constraint on time variation of the fine structure constant, α/α=-0.7(2.1)×10(-17)  yr(-1). PMID:25479482

  5. On a Mechanism for Limiting the Frequency and Energy Characteristics of Lasers on Self-terminating Transitions of Metal Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, N. A.; Yudin, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    Electrophysical approach to estimation of conditions for efficient pumping of active medium of lasers on selfterminating transitions of metal atoms in a gas discharge tube with electrodes in cold buffer zones is used. Existence of processes that enhance the effect of the well-known mechanism of limitation of radiation frequency and energy characteristics caused by the presence of a pre-pulse electron concentration in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating transitions of metal atoms is demonstrated. The mechanism of influence of these processes on frequency and energy characteristics of lasers on self-terminating transitions of metal atoms and the technical methods of neutralization of these processes are considered. It is shown that the practical efficiency of a copper vapor laser can attain ~10% under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  6. Effective Landau-Zener transitions in the circuit dynamical Casimir effect with time-varying modulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Militello, B.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dissipative single-qubit circuit QED architecture in which the atomic transition frequency undergoes a weak external time modulation. For sinusoidal modulation with linearly varying frequency we derive effective Hamiltonians that resemble the Landau-Zener problem of finite duration associated with a two- or multilevel systems. The corresponding off-diagonal coupling coefficients originate either from the rotating or the counter-rotating terms in the Rabi Hamiltonian, depending on the values of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that in the dissipationless case one can accomplish almost complete transitions between the eigenstates of the bare Rabi Hamiltonian even for relatively short durations of the frequency sweep. To assess the experimental feasibility of our scheme we solved numerically the phenomenological and the microscopic quantum master equations in the Markovian regime at zero temperature. Both models exhibit qualitatively similar behavior and indicate that photon generation from vacuum via effective Landau-Zener transitions could be implemented with the current technology on the time scales of a few microseconds. Moreover, unlike the harmonic dynamical Casimir effect implementations, our proposal does not require precise knowledge of the resonant modulation frequency to accomplish meaningful photon generation.

  7. Precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisenbacher, Lothar; Beyer, Axel; Khabarova, Ksenia; Matveev, Arthur; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai

    2015-05-01

    A precision measurement of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen, when combined with the precisely known 1S-2S transition frequency, can be used to determine the value of the r.m.s.proton charge radius rp. We report on our progress towards an absolute frequency measurement, using a cryogenic beam of atoms optically excited to the metastable 2S state. This strongly suppresses the first order Doppler shift, which is further reduced using actively stabilized counter-propagating laser beams for the 2S-4P (one-photon) excitation. We experimentally verify this suppression using time-of-flight resolved detection. We present a theoretical and experimental study of interference effects due to spontaneous emission and the corresponding line center shifts, using a segmented detector to spatially resolved the emission pattern. An experimental scheme to suppress this systematic shift and extract the unperturbed transition frequency is shown and future measurements of transitions to higher nL states are discussed.

  8. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  9. Transition frequencies of the D lines of K39 , K40 , and K41 measured with a femtosecond laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falke, Stephan; Tiemann, Eberhard; Lisdat, Christian; Schnatz, Harald; Grosche, Gesine

    2006-09-01

    We report measurements of the transition frequencies 4sS1/22-4pP1/22 and 4sS1/22-4pP3/22 of the potassium isotopes 39, 40, and 41 through an atomic beam experiment with a fractional uncertainty of about 2×10-10 . For frequency calibration, a fs-laser comb referenced to a Cs atomic clock was used. Compared to previous results, hyperfine constants for the states 4pP1/22 and 4pP3/22 and isotope shifts are given with a considerably reduced uncertainty. This paper also resolves the discrepancy of transition frequencies measured by Banerjee [Phys. Rev. A 70, 052505 (2004)] and Scherf [Z. Phys. D 36, 31 (1996)] and the hyperfine constant A(K39,P1/22) reported by Banerjee [Europhys. Lett. 65, 172 (2004)] and Bendali [J. Phys. B 14, 4231 (1981)].

  10. Transition from Townsend to radio-frequency homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge in a roll-to-roll configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazinette, R.; Paillol, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to better understand the transition from Townsend to radio-frequency homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. The study is done in an Ar/NH3 Penning mixture for an electrode configuration adapted to roll-to-roll plasma surface treatment. The study was led in a frequency range running from 50 kHz up to 8.3 MHz leading to different DBD modes with a 1 mm gas gap: Glow (GDBD), Townsend (TDBD), and Radio-frequency (RF-DBD). In the frequency range between TDBD and RF-DBD, from 250 kHz to 2.3 MHz, additional discharges are observed outside the inter-electrode gas gap. Because each high voltage electrode are inside a dielectric barrel, these additional discharges occur on the side of the barrel where the gap is larger. They disappear when the RF-DBD mode is attained in the 1 mm inter-electrode gas gap, i.e., for frequencies equal or higher than 3 MHz. Fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy show that the additional discharges are radio-frequency DBDs while the inter-electrode discharge is a TDBD. The RF-DBD discharge mode is attained when electrons drift becomes low enough compared to the voltage oscillation frequency to limit electron loss at the anode. To check that the additional discharges are due to a larger gas gap and a lower voltage amplitude, the TDBD/RF-DBD transition is investigated as a function of the gas gap and the applied voltage frequency and amplitude. Results show that the increase in the frequency at constant gas gap or in the gas gap at constant frequency allows to obtain RF-DBD instead of TDBD. At low frequency and large gap, the increase in the applied voltage allows RF-DBD/TDBD transition. As a consequence, an electrode configuration allowing different gap values is a solution to successively have different discharge modes with the same applied voltage.

  11. Absolute frequency and isotope shift of the magnesium (3 s2) 1S0→(3 s 3 d ) 1D2 two-photon transition by direct frequency-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E.; Reinhardt, S.; Hänsch, Th. W.; Udem, Th.

    2015-12-01

    We use a picosecond frequency-doubled mode-locked titanium sapphire laser to generate a frequency comb at 431 nm in order to probe the (3 s2) 1S0 →(3 s 3 d ) 1D2 transition in atomic magnesium. Using a second, self-referenced femtosecond frequency comb, the absolute transition frequency and the 24Mg and 26Mg isotope shift is determined relative to a global-positioning-system-referenced hydrogen maser. Our result for the transition frequency of the main isotope 24Mg of 1 391 128 606.14 (12 ) MHz agrees with previous measurements and reduces its uncertainty by four orders of magnitude. For the isotope shift we find δ ν26 ,24=3915.13 (39 ) MHz. Accurate values for transition frequencies in Mg are relevant in astrophysics and to test atomic structure calculations.

  12. Saturated CO{sub 2} absorption near 1.6 μm for kilohertz-accuracy transition frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Burkart, Johannes Romanini, Daniele; Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Sala, Tommaso; Marangoni, Marco

    2015-05-21

    Doppler-free saturated-absorption Lamb dips were measured on weak rovibrational lines of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} between 6189 and 6215 cm{sup −1} at sub-Pa pressures using optical feedback frequency stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy. By referencing the laser source to an optical frequency comb, transition frequencies for ten lines of the 30013←00001 band P-branch and two lines of the 31113←01101 hot band R-branch were determined with an accuracy of a few parts in 10{sup 11}. Involving rotational quantum numbers up to 42, the data were used for improving the upper level spectroscopic constants. These results provide a highly accurate reference frequency grid over the spectral interval from 1599 to 1616 nm.

  13. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to ⁴He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Gong, W; Peng, X; Li, W; Guo, H

    2014-07-01

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable (4)He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10(-12)@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry. PMID:25085123

  14. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.; Peng, X. Li, W.; Guo, H.

    2014-07-15

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup −12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  15. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to 4He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X.; Li, W.; Guo, H.

    2014-07-01

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable 4He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10-12@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  16. The discharge mode transition and O(5p1) production mechanism of pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Hu, J. T.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Shi, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The discharge mode transition from uniform plasma across the gas gap to the α mode happens at the rising phase of the pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (PRF CCP). This transition is attributed to the fast increasing stochastic heating at the edge of sheath. In the second stage with the stable current and voltage amplitude, the consistency between experimental and numerical spatial-temporal 777 nm emission profile suggests that He* and He2* dominate the production of O(5p1) through dissociation and excitation of O2. Finally, the sterilization efficiency of PRF CCP is found to be higher than that of plasma jet.

  17. Heating mode transition in a hybrid direct current/dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4} discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Quan-Zhi; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2014-06-14

    Computer simulations based on the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision method are performed to study the plasma characteristics and especially the transition in electron heating mechanisms in a hybrid direct current (dc)/dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled CF{sub 4} discharge. When applying a superposed dc voltage, the plasma density first increases, then decreases, and finally increases again, which is in good agreement with experiments. This trend can be explained by the transition between the four main heating modes, i.e., DF coupling, dc and DF coupling, dc source dominant heating, and secondary electron dominant heating.

  18. Frequency of close companions among Kepler planets—a transit time variation study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-07-10

    A transiting planet exhibits sinusoidal transit time variations (TTVs) if perturbed by a companion near a mean-motion resonance. We search for sinusoidal TTVs in more than 2600 Kepler candidates, using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q12). We find that the TTV fractions rise strikingly with the transit multiplicity. Systems where four or more planets transit enjoy a TTV fraction that is roughly five times higher than those where a single planet transits, and about twice as high as those for doubles and triples. In contrast, models in which all transiting planets arise from similar dynamical configurations predict comparable TTV fractions among these different systems. One simple explanation for our results is that there are at least two different classes of Kepler systems, one closely packed and one more sparsely populated.

  19. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3–3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10‑1 to 101 W cm‑3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  20. Frequency comb assisted measurement of fundamental transitions of cold H3+, H2D+ and D2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusko, Pavol; Konietzko, Christoph; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    H3+ and two of its deuterated variants have been trapped and cooled in a 4 K trap machine, and their fundamental vibrational transitions probed with the laser induced reactions method. With the help of a frequency comb system the line centers are determined with high accuracy and precision, typically well below 1 MHz. For the deuterated variants, ground state combination differences allow for comparison with existing rotational THz data, and the accurate prediction thereof.

  1. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  2. Calculation of high-pressure phase transitions in solid N2 and the pressure dependence of intramolecular mode frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, V.; Etters, R. D.; Kobashi, K.

    1983-01-01

    A calculation that minimizes the energy of solid N2 with respect to a rhombohedral distortion of the Pm 3n structure shows that a low-temperature phase transition occurs into the R 3c calcite structure at P = 19.2 kbar with a volume change of 0.125 cu cm/mole. This transition agrees with recent Raman scattering measurements. Another transition from R 3c into R3(bar)m is predicted at P = 67.5 kbar, with a volume change of 0.1 cu cm/mole. The pressure dependence of the intramolecular mode frequencies for the R 3c structure are in reasonably good agreement with the two main branches observed experimentally.

  3. Observation and absolute frequency measurements of the 1S0-3P0 optical clock transition in neutral ytterbium.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Oates, C W; Fortier, T M; Diddams, S A; Hollberg, L

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s2) 1S0 <--> (6s6p) 3P0 optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at approximately 70 microK in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in 171Yb (F=1/2) is 518,295,836,591.6 +/- 4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in 173Yb (F=5/2) is 518,294,576,847.6 +/- 4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10(6)-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be approximately 10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice. PMID:16196856

  4. Frequency-domain multiplexed readout of transition-edge sensor arrays with a superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanting, T. M.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Clarke, John; Holzapfel, W. L.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lueker, M.; Richards, P. L.; Dobbs, Matt A.; Spieler, Helmuth; Smith, A.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate an eight-channel frequency-domain readout multiplexer for superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). Each sensor is biased with a sinusoidal voltage at a unique frequency. The sensor currents are summed and measured with a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. The 100-element SQUID array is operated with shunt feedback electronics that have a slew rate of 1.2×107Φ0/s at 1MHz. The multiplexer readout noise is 6.5pA/√Hz , which is well below the expected sensor noise of 15pA /√Hz . We measure an upper limit on adjacent channel crosstalk of 0.004, which meets our design requirements. The demodulated noise spectra of multiplexed TESs are white at frequencies down to 200mHz.

  5. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  6. Absolute optical frequency measurements of the cesium D1 transitions and their effect on alpha, the fine-structured constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Keith Gordon

    The fine-structure constant or electromagnetic coupling constant, alpha e, is a dimensionless ratio which unites many physics subfields. Although known precisely via experiments in each subfield, there is disagreement within and between subfields. In particular, precise values obtained via electron ge - 2 experiments which depend heavily on QED calculations have not always been in agreement with those obtained via muon g mu - 2 experiments. Also, solid state measurements (quantum hall effect and AC Josephson effect) often disagree with neutronic hmn measurements. alphae is often said to vary with energy but the question remains as to whether or not its low energy value is stable now or has been stable over the history of the universe. Improved precision helps resolve these issues as they relate to physics, possibly beyond the standard model. The Optical Frequency Measurements group in the Time and Frequency Division at the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST, Boulder, CO) developed and maintains a femtosecond laser frequency comb which is calibrated with respect to the cesium fountain clock implementation of the second. A single frequency component of the femtosecond laser comb is used together with a solid state diode laser and cesium thermal beam to precisely measure the cesium D1 F ∈ {3,4} transition frequencies. The value of fD1centroid = 335 116 048 748.1(2.4) kHz obtained for the transition centroid is over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. A precise value for the cesium D1 hyperfine splitting fHFe = 1 167 723.6(4.7) kHz is reported as well. This value is also over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. These new neutral 133Cs 6s 2 S½ → 6p 2 P½ transition (D1) frequencies, when combined with the 2002 CODATA values of the Rydberg, proton/electron mass ratio, cesium atomic mass, and cesium recoil frequency, provide an almost QED-free value of alpha: alphae = 1/137.036 0000

  7. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  8. Absolute frequency measurement of the 7s2 1S0-7s7p 1P1 transition in Ra225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, B.; Dammalapati, U.; Groot, A.; Jungmann, K.; Willmann, L.

    2014-10-01

    Transition frequencies were determined for transitions in Ra in an atomic beam and for reference lines in Te2 molecules in a vapor cell. The absolute frequencies were calibrated against a GPS stabilized Rb clock by means of an optical frequency comb. The 7s21S0(F=1/2)-7s7p1P1(F =3/2) transition in Ra225 was determined to be 621042124(2)MHz. The measurements provide input for designing efficient and robust laser cooling of Ra atoms in preparation of a search for a permanent electric dipole moment in Ra isotopes.

  9. Elimination of the Stark shift from the vibrational transition frequency of optically trapped {sup 174}Yb{sup 6}Li molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi; Gopakumar, Geetha; Abe, Minori; Hada, Masahiko

    2011-08-15

    Transition frequencies of cold molecules must be accurately evaluated to test the variance in the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Measuring the X {sup 2}{Sigma}(v,N)=(0,0){yields}(1,0) transition frequency of optically trapped {sup 174}Yb{sup 6}Li molecules is a promising method for achieving this goal. The Stark shifts induced by trap and probe (for the Raman transition) lasers are eliminated by choosing appropriate frequencies (magic frequencies) during the construction of the optical lattice. In the far-off resonance region, the Stark shift is found to be less than 10{sup -16} even when the laser frequencies are detuned from the magic frequencies by {approx}1 MHz.

  10. Adaptation of frequency-domain readout for Transition Edge Sensor bolometers for the POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kaori; Arnold, Kam; Barron, Darcy; Dobbs, Matt; de Haan, Tijmen; Harrington, Nicholas; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Holzapfel, William L.; Keating, Brian; Lee, Adrian T.; Morii, Hideki; Myers, Michael J.; Smecher, Graeme; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tomaru, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    The POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment aims to observe B-mode polarization with high sensitivity to explore gravitational lensing of CMB and inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR-2 is an upgraded experiment based on POLARBEAR-1, which had first light in January 2012. For POLARBEAR-2, we will build a receiver that has 7588 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to two-band (95 and 150 GHz) polarization-sensitive antennas. For the large array's readout, we employ digital frequency-domain multiplexing and multiplex 32 bolometers through a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). An 8-bolometer frequency-domain multiplexing readout has been deployed with the POLARBEAR-1 experiment. Extending that architecture to 32 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics to 3 MHz. To achieve this increase in bandwidth, we use Digital Active Nulling (DAN) on the digital frequency multiplexing platform. In this paper, we present requirements and improvements on parasitic inductance and resistance of cryogenic wiring and capacitors used for modulating bolometers. These components are problematic above 1 MHz. We also show that our system is able to bias a bolometer in its superconducting transition at 3 MHz.

  11. Tuning the Attempt Frequency of Protein Folding Dynamics via Transition-State Rigidification: Application to Trp-cage

    PubMed Central

    Abaskharon, Rachel M.; Culik, Robert M.; Woolley, G. Andrew; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The attempt frequency or prefactor (k0) of the transition state rate equation of protein folding kinetics has been estimated to be on the order of 106 s−1, which is many orders of magnitude smaller than that of chemical reactions. Herein, we use the mini-protein Trp-cage to show that it is possible to significantly increase the value of k0 for a protein folding reaction by rigidifying the transition state. This is achieved by reducing the conformational flexibility of a key structural element (i.e., an α-helix) formed in the transition state via photoisomerization of an azobenzene cross-linker. We find that this strategy not only decreases the folding time of the Trp-cage peptide by more than an order of magnitude (to ~100 ns at 25 °C) but also exposes parallel folding pathways, allowing us to provide, to the best of our knowledge, the first quantitative assessment of the curvature of the transition state free energy surface of a protein. PMID:26120378

  12. Magnetic structure and frequency scaling of limit-cycle oscillations close to L- to H-mode transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkenmeier, G.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Manz, P.; Stroth, U.; Fischer, R.; Fuchert, G.; Happel, T.; Laggner, F. M.; Maraschek, M.; Medvedeva, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Prisiazhniuk, D.; Pütterich, T.; Ryter, F.; Shao, L. M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Zohm, H.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-08-01

    Limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) close to the power threshold of L- to H-mode transitions are investigated in plasmas of ASDEX Upgrade. During this phase, referred to as I-phase, a strong magnetic activity in the poloidal magnetic field {{\\overset{\\centerdot}{{B}} }θ} with an up–down asymmetry is found. In some cases, the regular LCOs during I-phase transition smoothly into a phase with intermittent bursts which have similar properties to type-III edge localised modes (ELMs). Indications of precursors during the intermittent phase as well as in the regular LCO phase point to a common nature of the I-phase and type-III ELMs. The LCO frequency measured in a set of discharges with different plasma currents and magnetic fields scales as f∼ ≤ft(B\\text{t}1/2I\\text{p}3/2\\right)/(nT) .

  13. Excess of low frequency vibrational modes and glass transition: A molecular dynamics study for soft spheres at constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Ruiz, Hugo M.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2009-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics at constant pressure, the relationship between the excess of low frequency vibrational modes (known as the boson peak) and the glass transition is investigated for a truncated Lennard-Jones potential. It is observed that the quadratic mean displacement is enhanced by such modes, as predicted using a harmonic Hamiltonian for metastable states. As a result, glasses loose mechanical stability at lower temperatures than the corresponding crystal, since the Lindemann criteria are observed, as is also deduced from density functional theory. Finally, we found that the average force and elastic constant are reduced in the glass due to such excess of modes. The ratio between average elastic constants can be approximated using the 2/3 rule between melting and glass transition temperatures.

  14. Evaluation of variation in ( m_p/m_e) from the frequency difference between the 15N2+ and 87Sr transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    The uncertainty of the 87Sr1 S0-3 P0 transition frequency (429 THz) has been reduced to the level of 10^{-18}. Also, the 15N2+ Q(0) vibrational transition frequency is expected to be measured with an uncertainty of 10^{-17} , and the v = 0-7 transition frequency (422 THz) is close to the 87Sr transition frequency. In this paper, we propose a test for the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ via precise measurement of the difference (f_d=7 THz) between these transition frequencies. By measuring f_d within the uncertainty of 10^{-16}, a variation in μ of 4 × 10^{-18} can be detected. The 15N2+ v =0 -7 Q(0) transition frequency is free from Zeeman and electric quadrupole shifts. The dc Stark coefficient is about 0.2 mHz/(V/cm)2, and the measurement of f_d with an uncertainty lower than 10^{-16} appears to be attainable using molecular ions in a string crystal. The 15N2+ transition frequency is observed via the two-photon excitation of a laser with a wavelength of 1422 nm (laser A). Another laser with a wavelength of 1396 nm (laser B) is used as a 87Sr clock laser after frequency doubling. The frequency difference between lasers A and B (3.5 THz) should be measured using a frequency comb. Lasers A and B can be transferred to another laboratory via an optical fiber. Therefore, a sensitive test of the variation in μ can be performed in cooperation between two distant laboratories.

  15. Atomic Transition Frequencies, Isotope Shifts, and Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine Structure Constant for Studies of Quasar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest spatial and temporal variation of fundamental "constants" in the Universe. A change in the fine structure constant, α = {e}2/hslash c , could be detected via shifts in the frequencies of atomic transitions in quasar absorption systems. Recent studies using 140 absorption systems from the Keck telescope and 153 from the Very Large Telescope, suggest that α varies spatially (61). That is, in one direction on the sky α seems to have been smaller at the time of absorption, while in the opposite direction it seems to have been larger.

  16. Dynamics of electronic transitions and frequency dependence of negative capacitance in semiconductor diodes under high forward bias

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Kanika; Datta, Shouvik; Henini, Mohamed; Alshammari, Marzook S.

    2014-09-22

    We observed qualitatively dissimilar frequency dependence of negative capacitance under high charge injection in two sets of functionally different junction diodes: III-V based light emitting and Si-based non-light emitting diodes. Using an advanced approach based on bias activated differential capacitance, we developed a generalized understanding of negative capacitance phenomenon which can be extended to any diode based device structure. We explained the observations as the mutual competition of fast and slow electronic transition rates which are different in different devices. This study can be useful in understanding the interfacial effects in semiconductor heterostructures and may lead to superior device functionality.

  17. Cross sections and rate coefficients for excitation of Δn = 1 transitions in Li-like ions with 6 < Z < 42.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kato, T.

    Excitation cross sections and rate coefficients by electron impact were calculated for the 1s22s - 1s2s2p, 1s22s - 1s2s2 and 1s22s - 1s2p2 transitions of the Li-like ions (C IV, N V, O VI, Ne VIII, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Fe XXIV, Ni XXVI, Zn XXVIII, Ge XXX, Se XXXII, Kr XXXIIV and Mo XXXX) by a Coulomb-Born approximation with exchange and including relativistic effects and configuration interactions. Level energies, mixing coefficients and transition wavelengths and probabilities were also computed.

  18. Time-dependent multiphoton ionization from the He 1s2s ? metastable state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.; Dionissopoulou, Stavroula; Mercouris, Theodoros

    1996-01-01

    Using the state-specific expansion approach to the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we calculated a number of observables from the response of the He 0953-4075/29/2/012/img2 metastable state to strong as well as to weak laser pulses. The photon energies (0953-4075/29/2/012/img3) were 1 eV, 2 eV, 2.47 eV and 3 eV, and the intensities (I) covered the range from 0953-4075/29/2/012/img4 to 0953-4075/29/2/012/img5. For the weak intensities, the results are in full accord with the experimental findings of Haberland and co-workers. For the strong intensities, our predictions are of quantitative as well as of qualitative value. They permit conclusions about the fingerprints left on observable spectra by electron correlation, by Rydberg levels and by doubly excited states and about the extent to which high harmonics of short wavelength can be produced as a function of I and 0953-4075/29/2/012/img6 when the initial state lies above the ground state. Finally, we argue that calculations of harmonic spectra based on the use of the acceleration form of the dipole operator will produce, in general, unreliable results even when some correlations are accounted for.

  19. Dielectron Widths of the {upsilon}(1S,2S,3S) Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J.L.; Adam, N.E.; Alexander, J.P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R.S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C.D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Kuznetsov, V.E.

    2006-03-10

    We determine the dielectron widths of the {upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(3S) resonances with better than 2% precision by integrating the cross section of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{upsilon} over the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy. Using e{sup +}e{sup -} energy scans of the {upsilon} resonances at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring and measuring {upsilon} production with the CLEO detector, we find dielectron widths of 1.252{+-}0.004({sigma}{sub stat}){+-}0.019({sigma}{sub syst}) keV, 0.581{+-}0.004{+-}0.009 keV, and 0.413{+-}0.004{+-}0.006 keV for the {upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), and {upsilon}(3S), respectively.

  20. Cloud frequency climatology at the Andes/Amazon transition: 1. Seasonal and diurnal cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halladay, Kate; Malhi, Yadvinder; New, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Tropical montane regions present a complex local climate but one that may be very sensitive to local and global change. Therefore, it is important to assess their current climatological state, and to understand how the large-scale circulation may affect local-scale cloud patterns. We examine the cloud climatology of a tropical Andean montane region in the context of tropical South American climate in terms of seasonal/diurnal cycles using a corrected ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) DX cloud product (1983-2008), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) MOD35 visible cloud flags (2000-2008) and ground-based cloud observations. Cloud climatologies were compared for three elevation zones: highlands (puna grassland), eastern slope (the montane forest) and lowlands. We found that in the dry season (JJA) the study area is part of a localized region of higher cloud frequency relative to other parts the eastern slope, and also relative to the adjacent highlands and lowlands. The highlands exhibited the greatest amplitude mean annual cycle of cloud frequency, with a minimum in June for all times of day. There were contrasts between the three zones with regard to the month in which the minimum cloud frequency occurs between different times of day. Higher lowland and eastern slope cloud frequencies compared with those on the puna in the early hours in the wet season suggest low-level convergence at lower elevations. Comparisons between satellite products show that ISCCP and MODIS produce very similar annual cycles although the absolute cloud frequencies are higher in ISCCP data.

  1. Training 2;6-Year-Olds to Produce the Transitive Construction: The Role of Frequency, Semantic Similarity and Shared Syntactic Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbot-Smith, Kirsten; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Childers and Tomasello (2001) found that training 2 1/2-year-olds on the English transitive construction greatly improves their performance on a post-test in which they must use novel verbs in that construction. In the current study, we replicated Childers and Tomasello's finding, but using a much lower frequency of transitive verbs and models in…

  2. Homoclinic and chaotic transitions in the rf (radio frequency) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Presentation paper

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.W.; Bulsara, A.R.; Schieve, W.C.

    1989-06-01

    We consider a simple model of the flux in an rf superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) subjected to an external periodic magnetic field. The dynamic equation describing the flux response of the SQUID is solved analytically in the absence of damping and external driving terms. These terms are then introduced as perturbations, and the Melnikov function for the system is constructed. The transition from periodic to chaotic behavior is studied through a calculation of the Lyapunov exponents for the systems, and the dimension of the strange attracting set is calculated.

  3. Transit-time devices as local oscillators for frequencies above 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, H.; Kidner, C.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    Very promising preliminary experimental results have been obtained from GaAs IMPATT diodes at F-band frequencies (75 mW, 3.5 percent at 111.1 GHz and 20 mW, 1.4 percent at 120.6 GHz) and from GaAs TUNNETT diodes at W-band frequencies (26 mW, 1.6 percent at 87.2 GHz and 32 mW, 2.6 percent at 93.5 GHz). These results indicate that IMPATT, MITATT and TUNNETT diodes have the highest potential of delivering significant amounts of power at Terahertz frequencies. As shown recently, the noise performance of GaAs W-band IMPATT diodes can compete with that of Gunn devices. Since TUNNETT diodes take advantage of the quieter tunnel injection, they are expected to be especially suited for low-noise local oscillators. This paper will focus on the two different design principles for IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes, the material parameters involved in the design and some aspects of the present device technology. Single-drift flat-profile GaAs D-band IMPATT diodes had oscillations up to 129 GHz with 9 mW, 0.9 percent at 128.4 GHz. Single-drift GaAs TUNNETT diodes had oscillations up to 112.5 GHz with 16 mW and output power levels up to 33 mW and efficiencies up to 3.4 percent around 102 GHz. These results are the best reported so far from GaAs IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Propenal (CH2CHCHO) transition frequencies (Daly+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, A. M.; Bermudez, C.; Kolesnikova, L.; Alonso, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    A commercially available sample of liquid propenal (b.p.=125°C) was used without further purification. Propenal spectrum was acquired using two different spectrometers. A recently upgraded Stark-modulation spectrometer employing 33kHz modulation frequency and phase-sensitive detection was used to cover the 26-110GHz range. Millimeter- and submillimeter-wave measurements, over the 50-660GHz range, were performed using a direct absorption spectrometer recently constructed at the University of Valladolid. See section 2 for further details. (2 data files).

  5. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  6. Methods and systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones

    DOEpatents

    Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

    2006-07-18

    Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

  7. Systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones

    DOEpatents

    Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

    2007-10-16

    Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

  8. Relapse frequency in transitioning from natalizumab to dimethyl fumarate: assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Jonathan; Flinn, Ashley; Sklover, Lindsay; Sloane, Jacob A

    2016-08-01

    Risk of relapse after natalizumab (NAT) cessation and switch to dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is unknown. The objective of this paper is to identify the risk and associated risk factors for relapse after switching from NAT to DMF in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Patients (n = 30) were treated with NAT for ≥12 months and then switched to DMF in a mean of 50 days. Patient age, annualized relapse rates (ARR), Expanded Disability Status Scale scores (EDSS), and lymphocyte counts were assessed. Overall, eight patients (27 %) had relapses after switching to DMF. Five patients (17 %) suffered severe relapses with multifocal clinical and radiological findings. New lesions by MRI (T2 hyperintense or enhancing) were observed in 35 % of patients. Relapses occurred at a mean of 3.5 months after NAT cessation. Patient age and elevated ARR prior to NAT use were significantly associated with risk of relapse after switch to DMF. Once on DMF for 4 months prior to relapse, lymphocyte count decreased more significantly in patients without relapses than those with relapses. Switching from NAT to DMF correlated with increased relapses. Young patient age, high ARR and stability of lymphocyte counts were risk factors for relapse after transition from NAT to DMF. PMID:27193310

  9. Energetic electron avalanches and mode transitions in planar inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas operated in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Niemi, K.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-07-25

    Space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements reveal that in certain parameter regimes, inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas exhibit three distinct operation modes. At low powers, the plasma operates as an alpha-mode capacitively coupled plasma driven through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath potential in front of the antenna. At high powers, the plasma operates in inductive mode sustained through induced electric fields due to the time varying currents and associated magnetic fields from the antenna. At intermediate powers, close to the often observed capacitive to inductive (E-H) transition regime, energetic electron avalanches are identified to play a significant role in plasma sustainment, similar to gamma-mode capacitively coupled plasmas. These energetic electrons traverse the whole plasma gap, potentially influencing plasma surface interactions as exploited in technological applications.

  10. Detection of low-frequency lambda-doublet transitions of the free 12CH and 13CH radicals

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, M. C.; Mohamed, S.; Brown, J. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    2006-01-01

    By Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, lambda-doubling transitions of 12CH and 13CH in the lowest rotational levels of the X2∏1/2 ground state have been directly detected, which has not been done previously. For both radicals, hyperfine-split lines have been measured to an accuracy of better than 1 ppm between 3 and 15 GHz, an improvement of at least 2 orders of magnitude over previous laboratory data. The measured frequencies have been combined with all previous data for CH and 13CH in the v = 0 level of the X2∏ electronic state to determine improved hyperfine parameters. The production of CH from various gases also has been studied and, with methanol, the yield of CH relative to OH. Astronomical studies of CH in higher rotational levels and 13CH can now be undertaken on the basis of the present work. PMID:16894169

  11. Low-frequency Raman modes as fingerprints of layer stacking configurations of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liangbo; Puretzky, Alexander; Sumpter, Bobby; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David; David B. Geohegan Team; Vincent Meunier Team

    The tunable optoelectronic properties of stacked two-dimensional (2D) crystal monolayers are determined by their stacking orientation, order, and atomic registry. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (AR-Z-STEM) can be used to determine the exact atomic registration between different layers in few-layer 2D stacks; however, fast and relatively inexpensive optical characterization techniques are essential for rapid development of the field. Using two- and three-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 crystals synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, we show that the generally unexplored low-frequency (LF) Raman modes (<50 cm-1) that originate from interlayer vibrations can serve as fingerprints to characterize not only the number of layers, but also their stacking configurations [Puretzky and Liang et al, ACS Nano 2015, 9, 6333]. First-principles Raman calculations and group theory analysis corroborate the experimental assignments determined by AR-Z-STEM and show that the calculated LF mode fingerprints are related to the 2D crystal symmetries. Our combined experimental/theoretical work demonstrates the LF Raman modes potentially more effective than HF Raman modes to probe the layer stacking and interlayer interaction for 2D materials. The authors acknowledge support from Eugene P. Wigner Fellowship at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  12. Spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of aqueous phase transitions inside multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Schunk, F M; Rand, D; Rose-Petruck, C

    2015-12-14

    The evaporation and condensation of water on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) surfaces was studied as a function of temperature and time using X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI). SFHI is an imaging modality that produces an absorption and scatter image in a single exposure, and has increased sensitivity to variations in electron density relative to more common place X-ray imaging techniques. Differing features exhibited in the temporal scatter intensity profiles recorded during evaporation and condensation revealed the existence of an absorption-desorption hysteresis. Effects on the aforementioned phenomena due to chemical functionalization of the carbon nanotube surfaces were also monitored. The increased interaction potential between the functionalized MWCNT walls and water molecules altered the evaporation event time scale and increased the temperature at which condensation could take place. Theoretical calculations were used to correlate the shape of the observed scatter profiles during condensation to changes in the MWCNT cross section geometry and configuration of the contained water volume. Changes in evaporation time scales with temperature coincided with the boiling point for confined water predicted by the Kelvin equation, indicating that a thermodynamic description of mesoscopic confined water is permissible in some instances. PMID:26549826

  13. Masturbation Frequency and Sexual Function Domains Are Associated With Serum Reproductive Hormone Levels Across the Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huiyong; Avis, Nancy E.; Greendale, Gail A.; Harlow, Siobán D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether reproductive hormones are related to sexual function during the menopausal transition. Design: The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a multiethnic cohort study of the menopausal transition located at seven US sites. At baseline, the 3302 community-based participants, aged 42–52, had an intact uterus and at least one ovary and were not using exogenous hormones. Participants self-identified as White, Black, Hispanic, Chinese, or Japanese. At baseline and at each of the 10 follow-up visits, sexual function was assessed by self-administered questionnaires, and blood was drawn to assay serum levels of T, estradiol, FSH, SHBG, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported frequency of masturbation, sexual desire, sexual arousal, orgasm, and pain during intercourse. Results: Masturbation, sexual desire, and arousal were positively associated with T. Masturbation, arousal, and orgasm were negatively associated with FSH. Associations were modest. Estradiol was not related to any measured sexual function domain. Pain with intercourse was not associated with any hormone. Conclusions: Reproductive hormones were associated with sexual function in midlife women. T was positively associated, supporting the role of androgens in female sexual function. FSH was negatively associated, supporting the role of menopausal status in female sexual function. The modest associations in this large study suggest that the relationships are subtle and may be of limited clinical significance. PMID:25412335

  14. Direct measurement of transition frequencies in isolated pHe+ atoms, and new CPT-violation limits on the antiproton charge and mass.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Pirkl, W; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2003-09-19

    A radio frequency quadrupole decelerator and achromatic momentum analyzer were used to decelerate antiprotons and produce p4He+ and p3He+ atoms in ultra-low-density targets, where collision-induced shifts of the atomic transition frequencies were negligible. The frequencies at near-vacuo conditions were measured by laser spectroscopy to fractional precisions of (6-19) x 10(-8). By comparing these with QED calculations and the antiproton cyclotron frequency, we set a new limit of 1 x 10(-8) on possible differences between the antiproton and proton charges and masses. PMID:14525361

  15. Performance of Frequency Division Multiplexing Readout System for AC-Biased Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Takei, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-08-01

    Frequency division multiplexing (FDM) is a promising approach to read out a large format transition-edge sensor (TES) array for future astrophysical missions. We constructed a four channel FDM readout system using baseband feedback in the MHz band. We demonstrated the principle of our FDM method with an actual TES array, a multiplexing SQUID and LC band-pass filters under 100 mK. The resonant frequencies of LC filters were consistent with the design value with an accuracy of better than 3 %. We successfully obtained X-ray pulses from two TESs simultaneously but the energy resolution was degraded to about 100 eV at 5.9 keV and crosstalk effects were observed. The origin of the crosstalk effects is investigated by modified setups. Based on comparative experiments and numerical calculations, we conclude that the non-linearity of the SQUID is the cause of some of the crosstalk effects. Unlike the regular crosstalk effect from the adjoining channels, the crosstalk effect due to non-linearity observed in this paper occurs in all channels. Solving these problems will help us to obtain FDM readout with sufficient energy resolution.

  16. Reference free, high-precision measurements of transition energies in few electron argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Csilla I.; Amaro, Pedro; Guerra, Mauro; Schlesser, Sophie; Gumberidze, Alexander; Santos, José Paulo; Indelicato, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The use of a vacuum double crystal spectrometer, coupled to an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS), allows to measure low-energy x-ray transitions energies in highly-charged ions with accuracies of the order of a few parts per million. We have used this installation to measure the 1s2p 1 P1 → 1s2 1 S0 diagram line and the 1s2s 3 S1 → 1s2 1 S0 forbidden M1 transition energies in helium-like argon, the 1s2s2p 2 Pj → 1s2 2s 2 S1/2 transitions in lithium-like argon and the 1s2s2 2p 1 P1 → 1s2 2s2 1 S0 transition in beryllium-like argon. These transition measurements have accuracies between 2 and 4 ppm depending on the line intensity. Thanks to the excellent agreement between the simulations and the measurements, we were also able to measure the transition width of all the allowed transitions. The results are compared to recent QED and relativistic many-body calculations.

  17. Using ecological forecasting of future vegetation transition and fire frequency change in the Sierra Nevada to assess fire management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, J. H.; Schwartz, M. W.; Holguin, A. J.; Moritz, M.; Batllori, E.; Folger, K.; Nydick, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ecological systems may respond in complex manners as climate change progresses. Among the responses, site-level climate conditions may cause a shift in vegetation due to the physiological tolerances of plant species, and the fire return interval may change. Natural resource managers challenged with maintaining ecosystem health need a way to forecast how these processes may affect every location, in order to determine appropriate management actions and prioritize locations for interventions. We integrated climate change-driven vegetation type transitions with projected change in fire frequency for 45,203 km2 of the southern Sierra Nevada, California, containing over 10 land management agencies as well as private lands. This Magnitude of Change (MOC) approach involves classing vegetation types in current time according to their climate envelopes, and identifying which sites will in the future have climates beyond what that vegetation currently occurs in. Independently, fire models are used to determine the change in fire frequency for each site. We examined 82 vegetation types with >50 grid cell occurrences. We found iconic resources such as the giant sequoia, lower slope oak woodlands, and high elevation conifer forests are projected as highly vulnerable by models that project a warmer drier future, but not as much by models that project a warmer future that is not drier than current conditions. Further, there were strongly divergent vulnerabilities of these forest types across land ownership (National Parks versus US Forest Service lands), and by GCM. For example, of 50 giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves and complexes, all but 3 (on Sierra National Forest) were in the 2 highest levels of risk of climate and fire under the GFDL A2 projection, while 15 groves with low-to-moderate risk were found on both the National Parks and National Forests 18 in the 2 under PCM A2. Landscape projections of potential MOC suggest that the region is likely to experience

  18. Measurement of absolute transition frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states by means of electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Markus; Karlewski, Florian; Hattermann, Helge; Hoeckh, Simone; Jessen, Florian; Cano, Daniel; Fortagh, Jozsef

    2011-05-15

    We report the measurement of absolute excitation frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states. The Rydberg transition frequencies are obtained by observing electromagnetically induced transparency on a rubidium vapor cell. The accuracy of the measurement of each state is < or approx. 1 MHz, which is achieved by frequency stabilizing the two diode lasers employed for the spectroscopy to a frequency comb and a frequency comb calibrated wavelength meter, respectively. Based on the spectroscopic data we determine the quantum defects of {sup 87}Rb, and compare it with previous measurements on {sup 85}Rb. We determine the ionization frequency from the 5S{sub 1/2}(F=1) ground state of {sup 87}Rb to 1010.029 164 6(3)THz, providing the binding energy of the ground state with an accuracy improved by two orders of magnitude.

  19. Red-shifted cyanide stretching frequencies in cyanide-bridged transition metal donor-acceptor complexes. Support for vibronic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Watzky, M.A.; Endicott, J.F.; Song, X.

    1996-06-05

    Patterns in the cyanide stretching frequencies have been examined in several series of monometal- and CN{sup {minus}} bridged transition metal complexes. Metal-to-cyanide back-bonding can be identified as a major factor contributing to red shifts of v{sub CN} in monometal complexes. This effect is complicated in cyanide-bridged complexes in two ways: (a) when both metals can back-bond to cyanide, the net interaction is repulsive and results in a blue shift of v{sub CN}: and (b) when a donor and acceptor are bridged, V{sub CN} undergoes a substantial red shift (sometimes more than 60 cm{sup {minus}1} lower in energy than the parent monometal complex). These effects can be described by simple perturbational models for the electronic interactions. Monometal cyanide complexes and CN{sup {minus}}-bridged backbonding metals can be treated in terms of their perturbations of the CN{sup {minus}} {pi} and {pi}* orbitals by using a simple, Hueckel-like, three-center perturbational treatment of electronic interactions. However, bridged donor-acceptor pairs are best described by a vibronic model in which it is assumed that the extent of electronic delocalization is in equilibrium with variations of some nuclear coordinates. Consistent with this approach, it is found that (a) the oscillator strength of the donor-acceptor charge transfer (DACT) absorption is roughly proportional to the red shift of v{sub CN} and (b) there are strong symmetry constraints on the coupling.

  20. Identification of main-sequence stars with mid-infrared excesses: Frequency of beta Pictoris analogs and transition disk systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzpen, Brian Robert

    spectroscopy is obtained for a large subset of the mid-IR excess sources for the purpose of stellar and circumstellar characterization. Finally, a statistical analysis of a complete stellar sample is investigated to determine that the frequency of dusty mid-IR debris disks is 0.3±0.3% and transition disks is 1.2±0.6%. The frequencies of these mid-IR excess sources are used to constrain disk lifetimes to 5±2 Myr.

  1. The Transitional Protoplanetary Disk Frequency as a Function of Age: Disk Evolution In the Coronet Cluster, Taurus, and Other 1-8 Myr Old Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora

    2011-05-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-24 μm photometry and spectroscopy for stars in the 1-3 Myr old Coronet Cluster, expanding upon the survey of Sicilia-Aguilar et al. Using sophisticated radiative transfer models, we analyze these new data and those from Sicilia-Aguilar et al. to identify disks with evidence for substantial dust evolution consistent with disk clearing: transitional disks. We then analyze data in Taurus and others young clusters—IC 348, NGC 2362, and η Cha—to constrain the transitional disk frequency as a function of time. Our analysis confirms previous results finding evidence for two types of transitional disks—those with inner holes and those that are homologously depleted. The percentage of disks in the transitional phase increases from ~15%-20% at 1-2 Myr to >=50% at 5-8 Myr the mean transitional disk lifetime is closer to ~1 Myr than 0.1-0.5 Myr, consistent with previous studies by Currie et al. and Sicilia-Aguilar et al. In the Coronet Cluster and IC 348, transitional disks are more numerous for very low mass M3-M6 stars than for more massive K5-M2 stars, while Taurus lacks a strong spectral-type-dependent frequency. Assuming standard values for the gas-to-dust ratio and other disk properties, the lower limit for the masses of optically thick primordial disks is M disk ≈ 0.001-0.003 M sstarf. We find that single color-color diagrams do not by themselves uniquely identify transitional disks or primordial disks. Full spectral energy distribution modeling is required to accurately assess disk evolution for individual sources and inform statistical estimates of the transitional disk population in large samples using mid-IR colors.

  2. The Transitional Protoplanetary Disk Frequency as a Function of Age: Disk Evolution in the Coronet Cluster, Taurus, and Other 1--8 Myr-old Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Sicilia-Aguilar, Auora

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-24 micron photometry and spectroscopy for stars in the 1-3 Myr-old Coronet Cluster, expanding upon the survey of Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2008). Using sophisticated radiative transfer models, we analyze these new data and those from Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2008) to identify disks with evidence for substantial dust evolution consistent with disk clearing: transitional disks. We then analyze data in Taurus and others young clusters - IC 348, NGC 2362, and eta Cha -- to constrain the transitional disk frequency as a function of time. Our analysis confirms previous results finding evidence for two types of transitional disks -- those with inner holes and those that are homologously depleted. The percentage of disks in the transitional phase increases from approx.15-20% at 1-2 Myr to > 50% at 5-8 Myr; the mean transitional disk lifetime is closer to approx. 1 Myr than 0.1-0.5 Myr, consistent with previous studies by Currie et al. (2009) and Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2009). In the Coronet Cluster and IC 348, transitional disks are more numerous for very low-mass M3--M6 stars than for more massive K5-M2 stars, while Taurus lacks a strong spectral type-dependent frequency. Assuming standard values for the gas-to-dust ratio and other disk properties, the lower limit for the masses of optically-thick primordial disks is Mdisk approx. 0.001-0.003 M*. We find that single color-color diagrams do not by themselves uniquely identify transitional disks or primordial disks. Full SED modeling is required to accurately assess disk evolution for individual sources and inform statistical estimates of the transitional disk population in large samples using mid-IR colors.

  3. THE TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK FREQUENCY AS A FUNCTION OF AGE: DISK EVOLUTION IN THE CORONET CLUSTER, TAURUS, AND OTHER 1-8 Myr OLD REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora

    2011-05-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-24 {mu}m photometry and spectroscopy for stars in the 1-3 Myr old Coronet Cluster, expanding upon the survey of Sicilia-Aguilar et al. Using sophisticated radiative transfer models, we analyze these new data and those from Sicilia-Aguilar et al. to identify disks with evidence for substantial dust evolution consistent with disk clearing: transitional disks. We then analyze data in Taurus and others young clusters-IC 348, NGC 2362, and {eta} Cha-to constrain the transitional disk frequency as a function of time. Our analysis confirms previous results finding evidence for two types of transitional disks-those with inner holes and those that are homologously depleted. The percentage of disks in the transitional phase increases from {approx}15%-20% at 1-2 Myr to {>=}50% at 5-8 Myr; the mean transitional disk lifetime is closer to {approx}1 Myr than 0.1-0.5 Myr, consistent with previous studies by Currie et al. and Sicilia-Aguilar et al. In the Coronet Cluster and IC 348, transitional disks are more numerous for very low mass M3-M6 stars than for more massive K5-M2 stars, while Taurus lacks a strong spectral-type-dependent frequency. Assuming standard values for the gas-to-dust ratio and other disk properties, the lower limit for the masses of optically thick primordial disks is M{sub disk} {approx} 0.001-0.003 M{sub *}. We find that single color-color diagrams do not by themselves uniquely identify transitional disks or primordial disks. Full spectral energy distribution modeling is required to accurately assess disk evolution for individual sources and inform statistical estimates of the transitional disk population in large samples using mid-IR colors.

  4. Finite Frequency Traveltime Tomography of Lithospheric and Upper Mantle Structures beneath the Cordillera-Craton Transition in Southwestern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Hung, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on finite-frequency theory and cross-correlation teleseismic relative traveltime data from the USArray, Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN) and Canadian Rockies and Alberta Network (CRANE), we present a new tomographic model of P-wave velocity perturbations for the lithosphere and upper mantle beneath the Cordillera-cration transition region in southwestern Canada. The inversion procedure properly accounts for the finite-volume sensitivities of measured travel time residuals, and the resulting model shows a greater resolution of upper mantle velocity heterogeneity beneath the study area than earlier approaches based on the classical ray-theoretical approach. Our model reveals a lateral change of P velocities from -0.5% to 0.5% down to ~200-km depth in a 50-km wide zone between the Alberta Basin and the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, which suggests a sharp structural gradient along the Cordillera deformation front. The stable cratonic lithosphere, delineated by positive P-velocity perturbations of 0.5% and greater, extends down to a maximum depth of ~180 km beneath the Archean Loverna Block (LB). In comparison, the mantle beneath the controversial Medicine Hat Block (MHB) exhibits significantly higher velocities in the uppermost mantle and a shallower (130-150 km depth) root, generally consistent with the average depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath Southwest Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). The complex shape of the lithospheric velocities under the MHB may be evidence of extensive erosion or a partial detachment of the Precambrian lithospheric root. Furthermore, distinct high velocity anomalies in LB and MHB, which are separated by 'normal' mantle block beneath the Vulcan structure (VS), suggest different Archean assembly and collision histories between these two tectonic blocks.

  5. Absolute frequency measurement of the ^1S0<->^3P0 clock transition at 578.4 nm in ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Chad; Barber, Zeb; Oates, Chris; Fortier, Tara; Diddams, Scott

    2005-05-01

    We report the first precision absolute frequency measurements of the highly forbidden (6s^2)^1S0<->(6s6p)^3P0 optical clock transition at 578.4 nm in two odd isotopes of ytterbium. Atoms are cooled to tens of microkelvins in two successive stages of laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping that use transitions at 398.9 nm and 555.8 nm, respectively. The resulting trapped atomic cloud is irradiated with excitation light at 578.4 nm and absorption is detected by monitoring trapped atom depletion. With the laser on resonance, we demonstrate trap depletions of more than 80 % relative to the off-resonance case. Absolute frequency measurements are made for ^171Yb (I=1/2) and ^173Yb (I=5/2) with an uncertainty of 4.4 kHz using a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the NIST cesium fountain clock. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is ˜10 mHz, making them well-suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice. Lattice-based optical clocks have the potential to surpass the performance of the best current atomic clocks by orders of magnitude. The accurate ytterbium frequency knowledge presented here (nearly a million-fold reduction in uncertainty) will greatly expedite Doppler- and recoil-free lattice spectroscopy.

  6. Analysis of methods for calculating the transition frequencies of the torsional vibration of acrolein isomers in the ground ( S 0) electronic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroleva, L. A.; Tyulin, V. I.; Matveev, V. K.; Pentin, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    B3LYP, MP2, CCSD(T), and MP4/MP2 in the 6-311G( d, p), 6-311++G( d, p), cc-pVTZ, aug-cc-pVTZ bases used to calculate the transition frequencies of torsional vibration of trans- and cis-isomers of acrolein in the ground electronic state ( S 0) are analyzed. It is found that for trans-isomers, all methods of calculation except for B3LYP in the cc-pVTZ basis yield good agreement between the calculated and experimental values. It is noted that for the cis-isomer of acrolein, no method of calculation confirms the experimental value of the frequency of torsional vibration (138 cm-1). It is shown that the calculated and experimental values for obertones at 273.0 cm-1 and other transitions of torsional vibration are different for this isomer in particular. However, it is established that in some calculation methods (B3LYP, MP2), the frequency of the torsional vibration of the cis-isomer coincides with another experimental value of this frequency (166.5 cm-1). It is concluded that in analyzing the vibrational structure of the UV spectrum, the calculated and experimental values of its obertone (331.3 cm-1) coincide, along with its frequency. It is also noted that the frequency of torsional vibration for the cis-isomer (166.5 cm-1) can also be found in other experimental works if we change the allocation of torsional transition 18{1/1}.

  7. Sub-MHz accuracy measurement of the S(2) 2-0 transition frequency of D2 by Comb-Assisted Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Sala, T.; Romanini, D.; Gatti, D.; Campargue, A.

    2016-08-01

    The line position of the very weak S(2) transition of deuterium in the 2-0 band has been measured with a Comb-Assisted Cavity Ring Down spectrometer. The high sensitivity spectra were recorded at 5 and 10 mbar with a Noise Equivalent Absorption, αmin, of 8 × 10-11 cm-1. The line positions at 5 and 10 mbar were measured with sub-MHz accuracy (460 and 260 kHz, respectively). After correction of the line pressure-shift, the frequency at zero pressure of the S(2) transition of the first overtone band was determined to be 187 104 299.51 ± 0.50 MHz. This value agrees within 1.7 MHz with the frequency obtained from the best available ab initio calculations and corresponds to only 15% of the claimed theoretical uncertainty.

  8. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-15

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  9. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures (˜140 °C) the discharge transitions from "ring mode" to "red mode," which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from "good emission" for optical pumping to "poor emission." Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  10. Sampling frequency trade-offs in the assessment of mean transit times of tropical montane catchment waters under semi-steady-state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbe, E.; Windhorst, D.; Celleri, R.; Timbe, L.; Crespo, P.; Frede, H.-G.; Feyen, J.; Breuer, L.

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation event samples and weekly based water samples from streams and soils were collected in a tropical montane cloud forest catchment for 2 years and analyzed for stable water isotopes in order to understand the effect of sampling frequency in the performance of three lumped-parameter distribution functions (exponential-piston flow, linear-piston flow and gamma) which were used to estimate mean transit times of waters. Precipitation data, used as input function for the models, were aggregated to daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly and bi-monthly sampling resolutions, while analyzed frequencies for outflows went from weekly to bi-monthly. By using different scenarios involving diverse sampling frequencies, this study reveals that the effect of lowering the sampling frequency depends on the water type. For soil waters, with transit times on the order of few weeks, there was a clear trend of over predictions. In contrast, the trend for stream waters, which have a more damped isotopic signal and mean transit times on the order of 2 to 4 years, was less clear and showed a dependence on the type of model used. The trade-off to coarse data resolutions could potentially lead to misleading conclusions on how water actually moves through the catchment, notwithstanding that these predictions could reach better fitting efficiencies, fewer uncertainties, errors and biases. For both water types an optimal sampling frequency seems to be 1 or at most 2 weeks. The results of our analyses provide information for the planning of future fieldwork in similar Andean or other catchments.

  11. Behavior of the low-frequency conductivity of silver iodide nanocomposites in the superionic phase transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergent'ev, T. Yu.; Koroleva, E. Yu.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Naberezhnov, A. A.; Filimonov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of the specific conductivity of composites based on silver iodide embedded in porous glasses with an average pore diameter of 7 ± 1 nm and in artificial opals with a pore diameter of 40-100 nm has been investigated in the temperature range from 300 to 500 K. It has been shown that a decrease in the characteristic pore size does not lead to a change in the order of the phase transition and that the temperature of the transition to the superionic state of silver iodide in a porous glass and in an opal upon heating is close to the phase transition temperature T c in the bulk material (˜420 K). Upon cooling, the phase transition temperature T c significantly decreases, and the phase transition becomes diffuse. With a decrease in the pore size, the region of the temperature hysteresis of the phase transition increases. The dc conductivities of the composites have been estimated from the impedance diagrams. The temperature dependence of the dc conductivity of both composites has a thermally activated nature, and the slope of the curve σ(1/ T) changes near the phase transition, which indicates a change in the activation energy. The activation energies in the low-temperature and high-temperature phases have been estimated at ˜450-470 and ˜100 meV, respectively. The equivalent electrical circuit describing the charge transfer processes in the studied samples has been proposed.

  12. Observation and Absolute Frequency Measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} Optical Clock Transition in Neutral Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, C.W.; Barber, Z.W.; Oates, C.W.; Fortier, T.M.; Diddams, S.A.; Hollberg, L.

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at {approx}70 {mu}K in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in {sup 171}Yb (F=1/2) is 518 295 836 591.6{+-}4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in {sup 173}Yb (F=5/2) is 518 294 576 847.6{+-}4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10{sup 6}-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be {approx}10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice.

  13. Theoretical studies for the N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O van der Waals complex: The potential energy surface, intermolecular vibrations, and rotational transition frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Rui; Zheng, Limin; Yang, Minghui E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn; Lu, Yunpeng E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn

    2015-10-21

    Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface (PES) and bound states are performed for the N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O van der Waals (vdW) complex. A four-dimensional intermolecular PES is constructed at the level of single and double excitation coupled-cluster method with a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. Two equivalent T-shaped global minima are located, in which the O atom of N{sub 2}O monomer is near the N{sub 2} monomer. The intermolecular fundamental vibrational states are assigned by inspecting the orientation of the nodal surface of the wavefunctions. The calculated frequency for intermolecular disrotation mode is 23.086 cm{sup −1}, which is in good agreement with the available experimental data of 22.334 cm{sup −1}. A negligible tunneling splitting with the value of 4.2 MHz is determined for the ground vibrational state and the tunneling splitting increases as the increment of the vibrational frequencies. Rotational levels and transition frequencies are calculated for both isotopomers {sup 14}N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O and {sup 15}N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O. The accuracy of the PES is validated by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results for the transition frequencies and spectroscopic parameters.

  14. Theoretical studies for the N2-N2O van der Waals complex: The potential energy surface, intermolecular vibrations, and rotational transition frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rui; Zheng, Limin; Lu, Yunpeng; Yang, Minghui

    2015-10-21

    Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface (PES) and bound states are performed for the N2-N2O van der Waals (vdW) complex. A four-dimensional intermolecular PES is constructed at the level of single and double excitation coupled-cluster method with a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. Two equivalent T-shaped global minima are located, in which the O atom of N2O monomer is near the N2 monomer. The intermolecular fundamental vibrational states are assigned by inspecting the orientation of the nodal surface of the wavefunctions. The calculated frequency for intermolecular disrotation mode is 23.086 cm(-1), which is in good agreement with the available experimental data of 22.334 cm(-1). A negligible tunneling splitting with the value of 4.2 MHz is determined for the ground vibrational state and the tunneling splitting increases as the increment of the vibrational frequencies. Rotational levels and transition frequencies are calculated for both isotopomers (14)N2-N2O and (15)N2-N2O. The accuracy of the PES is validated by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results for the transition frequencies and spectroscopic parameters. PMID:26493904

  15. The effect of large amplitude motions on the transition frequency redshift in hydrogen bonded complexes: A physical picture

    SciTech Connect

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.; Salmi, Teemu; Hänninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2014-05-14

    We describe the vibrational transitions of the donor unit in water dimer with an approach that is based on a three-dimensional local mode model. We perform a perturbative treatment of the intermolecular vibrational modes to improve the transition wavenumber of the hydrogen bonded OH-stretching transition. The model accurately predicts the transition wavenumbers of the vibrations in water dimer compared to experimental values and provides a physical picture that explains the redshift of the hydrogen bonded OH-oscillator. We find that it is unnecessary to include all six intermolecular modes in the vibrational model and that their effect can, to a good approximation, be computed using a potential energy surface calculated at a lower level electronic structure method than that used for the unperturbed model.

  16. Vibrational frequency shifts of fluid nitrogen fundamental and hot band transitions as a function of pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Schiferl, D.; Zinn, A.S.; Ragan, D.D.; Moore, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy have been used to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed and static high-pressure fluid nitrogen, respectively. Vibrational frequencies were obtained from the CARS data using a semiclassical model for these spectra. Spontaneous Raman vibrational frequencies were determined by fitting data using a Lorentz shape line. A functional form was found for the dependence of the vibrational frequency on pressure and temperature to 40 GPa and 5000 K, respectively. The result is compared to a recent theoretical model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. First Laboratory Measurement of the J = 1 - 0 Transitions of 36ArH+ and38ArH+: New, Improved Rest Frequencies for Astronomical Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Dore, Luca; Degli Esposti, Claudio; Tamassia, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The recent detections of {}36{{ArH}}+ and {}38{{ArH}}+ in the interstellar medium have triggered interest in argonium. This molecular cation has proved to be widespread in our galaxy in the diffuse medium and may serve as a very specific tracer of atomic gas and as a proxy for the cosmic-ray ionization rate. Pure rotational transitions of the two isotopologues detected in the ISM have never been recorded in the laboratory until this work. Here, we report on the first detection of the J=1≤ftarrow 0 transition of both {}36{{ArH}}+ and {}38{{ArH}}+ produced in a low-pressure glow discharge. All of the rotational and ro-vibrational transition frequencies available have been analyzed in global multi-isotopologues fit to give a comprehensive set of isotopic independent spectroscopic parameters. These data allow us to compute an improved set of rotational and ro-vibrational rest frequencies to assist astronomical searches of {}{{ArH}}+.

  18. Frequency Ratio of Two Optical Clock Transitions in Yb+ 171 and Constraints on the Time Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godun, R. M.; Nisbet-Jones, P. B. R.; Jones, J. M.; King, S. A.; Johnson, L. A. M.; Margolis, H. S.; Szymaniec, K.; Lea, S. N.; Bongs, K.; Gill, P.

    2014-11-01

    Singly ionized ytterbium, with ultranarrow optical clock transitions at 467 and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of Yb+ 171 . The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of 6 ×1 0-16. Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a threefold improvement in the constraint on the time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ ˙ /μ =0.2 (1.1 )×1 0-16 yr-1 , along with an improved constraint on time variation of the fine structure constant, α ˙ /α =-0.7 (2.1 )×1 0-17 yr-1 .

  19. The discharge mode transition and O({sup 5}p{sub 1}) production mechanism of pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; Hu, J. T.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Shi, J. J.

    2012-07-23

    The discharge mode transition from uniform plasma across the gas gap to the {alpha} mode happens at the rising phase of the pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (PRF CCP). This transition is attributed to the fast increasing stochastic heating at the edge of sheath. In the second stage with the stable current and voltage amplitude, the consistency between experimental and numerical spatial-temporal 777 nm emission profile suggests that He* and He{sub 2}* dominate the production of O({sup 5}p{sub 1}) through dissociation and excitation of O{sub 2}. Finally, the sterilization efficiency of PRF CCP is found to be higher than that of plasma jet.

  20. Predicting stability and change in frequency of intoxication from the college years to beyond: individual-difference and role transition variables.

    PubMed

    Gotham, H J; Sher, K J; Wood, P K

    1997-11-01

    The authors examined whether individual-difference variables (e.g., family history of alcoholism, sex, personality traits, positive alcohol expectancies) and role transition-related variables (full-time work status, marital status, parenthood) moderate the "maturing-out" process whereby young adults who drink heavily during college decrease their drinking in the following years. Analyses were based on 288 young adults, assessed as full-time students (mostly college seniors, Year 4 of a larger study) and 3 years later (Year 7) when all had earned bachelor's degrees, and the analyses showed that frequency of intoxication (per week) decreased significantly (p < .0001). Entering the workforce full time, being male, and being less open to experience were associated with decreased postcollege drinking. Furthermore, relatively extraverted individuals were more likely to continue a pattern of frequent intoxication from Year 4 to year 7. The findings stress the importance of studying how individual-difference variables predict behavior across role transitions. PMID:9358692

  1. Sampling frequency trade-offs in the assessment of mean transit times of tropical montane catchment waters under semi-steady-state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbe, E.; Windhorst, D.; Celleri, R.; Timbe, L.; Crespo, P.; Frede, H.-G.; Feyen, J.; Breuer, L.

    2014-11-01

    Stream and soil waters were collected on a weekly basis in a tropical montane cloud forest catchment for two years and analyzed for stable water isotopes in order to infer transit time distribution functions and to define the mean transit times. Depending on the water type (stream or soil water), lumped distribution functions such as Exponential-Piston flow, Linear-Piston flow and Gamma models using temporal isotopic variations of precipitation event samples as input, were fitted. Samples were aggregated to daily, weekly, biweekly, monthly and bimonthly time scales in order to check the sensitivity of temporal sampling on model predictions. The study reveals that the effect of decreasing sampling frequency depends on the water type. For soil waters with transit times in the order of weeks to months, there was a clear trend of over prediction. In contrast, the trend of prediction for stream waters, with a dampened isotopic signal and mean transit times in the order of 2 to 4 years, was less clear and depending on the type of model used. The trade-off to coarse data resolutions could potentially lead to misleading conclusions on how water actually moves through the catchment, while at the same time predictions can reach better fitting efficiencies, lesser uncertainties, errors and biases. For both water types an optimal sampling frequency seems to be one or at most two weeks. The results of our analyses provide information for the planning (in particular in terms of cost-benefit and time requirements) of future fieldwork in similar Andean or other catchments.

  2. Progress Report on a Portable TI:SAPPHIRE Comb Laser with Frequencies Referring to Cesium Atom Two-Photon Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wang-Yau; Wu, Chien-Ming; Liu, Tz-Wei; Chen, Yo-Huan

    2010-06-01

    A portable Ti:sapphire comb laser would contribute significantly to generalize comb-laser applications, such as the astro-comb missions or other interdisciplinary collaborations. To develop a portable comb laser, three barriers lie ahead: one is to miniaturize and robotize the frequency reference system of the comb laser; the second is to ensure the long-term frequency accuracy without satellite connection, and the third is to miniaturize the pumping laser system. We developed two hand-size cesium-stabilized diode lasers at 822 nm and 884 nm to serve as frequency references for a comb laser and we carried out a comb-laser-based CPT experiment with one single cesium cell that might offer a locking procedure for long-term comb laser accuracy. We will also report our plans and progress on a fiber laser pumped Ti:sapphire comb laser.

  3. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft

  4. Changes in LH pulse frequency and amplitude in intact mares during the transition into the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, B P; Affleck, K J; Barrows, S P; Murdoch, W L; Barker, K B; Loy, R G

    1987-03-01

    Two groups of mares were exposed to an abrupt, artificial increase or a natural increase in daylength. In both groups, mean LH pulse frequency increased with time of year and was accompanied by a reciprocal decrease in LH pulse amplitude. A non-pulsatile pattern of LH secretion was observed in some mares sampled close to the day of ovulation. Maximum mean LH pulse frequency and the onset of the breeding season occurred earlier in those mares exposed to an abrupt artificial increase in daylength. In blood samples collected frequently, mean serum LH concentrations increased in relation to time of year. However, during 60 days before ovulation, when LH pulse frequency increased, mean daily serum LH values only increased on Day -3 before ovulation. The magnitude of the periovulatory LH rise was greater before the second than the first ovulation of the breeding season. These results support the hypothesis that, in the mare, a photoperiod-induced seasonal alteration in LH pulse frequency and/or amplitude may play a role in the onset of the breeding season. PMID:3572880

  5. Experimentally constrained CA1 fast-firing parvalbumin-positive interneuron network models exhibit sharp transitions into coherent high frequency rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Katie A.; Huh, Carey Y. L.; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Williams, Sylvain; Skinner, Frances K.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of high frequency oscillations (HFOs; >100 Hz) and theta oscillations (3–12 Hz) in the CA1 region of rats increases during REM sleep, indicating that it may play a role in memory processing. However, it is unclear whether the CA1 region itself is capable of providing major contributions to the generation of HFOs, or if they are strictly driven through input projections. Parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons may play an essential role in these oscillations due to their extensive connections with neighboring pyramidal cells, and their characteristic fast-spiking. Thus, we created mathematical network models to investigate the conditions under which networks of CA1 fast-spiking PV+ interneurons are capable of producing high frequency population rhythms. We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings of fast-spiking, PV+ cells in the CA1 region of an intact hippocampal preparation in vitro to derive cellular properties, from which we constrained an Izhikevich-type model. Novel, biologically constrained network models were constructed with these individual cell models, and we investigated networks across a range of experimentally determined excitatory inputs and inhibitory synaptic strengths. For each network, we determined network frequency and coherence. Network simulations produce coherent firing at high frequencies (>90 Hz) for parameter ranges in which PV-PV inhibitory synaptic conductances are necessarily small and external excitatory inputs are relatively large. Interestingly, our networks produce sharp transitions between random and coherent firing, and this sharpness is lost when connectivity is increased beyond biological estimates. Our work suggests that CA1 networks may be designed with mechanisms for quickly gating in and out of high frequency coherent population rhythms, which may be essential in the generation of nested theta/high frequency rhythms. PMID:24155715

  6. Mapping of Low-Frequency Raman Modes in CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Layer Number, Stacking Orientation and Resonant Effects.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Hanlon, Damien; Hallam, Toby; Coleman, Jonathan N; Duesberg, Georg S

    2016-01-01

    Layered inorganic materials, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have attracted much attention due to their exceptional electronic and optical properties. Reliable synthesis and characterization of these materials must be developed if these properties are to be exploited. Herein, we present low-frequency Raman analysis of MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Raman spectra are acquired over large areas allowing changes in the position and intensity of the shear and layer-breathing modes to be visualized in maps. This allows detailed characterization of mono- and few-layered TMDs which is complementary to well-established (high-frequency) Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. This study presents a major stepping stone in fundamental understanding of layered materials as mapping the low-frequency modes allows the quality, symmetry, stacking configuration and layer number of 2D materials to be probed over large areas. In addition, we report on anomalous resonance effects in the low-frequency region of the WS2 Raman spectrum. PMID:26766208

  7. Mapping of Low-Frequency Raman Modes in CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Layer Number, Stacking Orientation and Resonant Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Hanlon, Damien; Hallam, Toby; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2016-01-01

    Layered inorganic materials, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have attracted much attention due to their exceptional electronic and optical properties. Reliable synthesis and characterization of these materials must be developed if these properties are to be exploited. Herein, we present low-frequency Raman analysis of MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Raman spectra are acquired over large areas allowing changes in the position and intensity of the shear and layer-breathing modes to be visualized in maps. This allows detailed characterization of mono- and few-layered TMDs which is complementary to well-established (high-frequency) Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. This study presents a major stepping stone in fundamental understanding of layered materials as mapping the low-frequency modes allows the quality, symmetry, stacking configuration and layer number of 2D materials to be probed over large areas. In addition, we report on anomalous resonance effects in the low-frequency region of the WS2 Raman spectrum.

  8. Mapping of Low-Frequency Raman Modes in CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Layer Number, Stacking Orientation and Resonant Effects

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Hanlon, Damien; Hallam, Toby; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2016-01-01

    Layered inorganic materials, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have attracted much attention due to their exceptional electronic and optical properties. Reliable synthesis and characterization of these materials must be developed if these properties are to be exploited. Herein, we present low-frequency Raman analysis of MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Raman spectra are acquired over large areas allowing changes in the position and intensity of the shear and layer-breathing modes to be visualized in maps. This allows detailed characterization of mono- and few-layered TMDs which is complementary to well-established (high-frequency) Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. This study presents a major stepping stone in fundamental understanding of layered materials as mapping the low-frequency modes allows the quality, symmetry, stacking configuration and layer number of 2D materials to be probed over large areas. In addition, we report on anomalous resonance effects in the low-frequency region of the WS2 Raman spectrum. PMID:26766208

  9. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  10. Radio-frequency measurements of coherent transition and Cherenkov radiation: Implications for high-energy neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, Peter W.; Saltzberg, David P.; Schoessow, Paul; Gai, Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard; Conde, M. E.

    2000-12-01

    We report on measurements of (11--18)-cm wavelength radio emission from interactions of 15.2 MeV pulsed electron bunches at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The electrons were observed both in a configuration where they produced primarily transition radiation from an aluminum foil, and in a configuration designed for the electrons to produce Cherenkov radiation in a silica sand target. Our aim was to emulate the large electron excess expected to develop during an electromagnetic cascade initiated by an ultrahigh-energy particle. Such charge asymmetries are predicted to produce strong coherent radio pulses, which are the basis for several experiments to detect high-energy neutrinos from the showers they induce in Antarctic ice and in the lunar regolith. We detected coherent emission which we attribute both to transition and possibly Cherenkov radiation at different levels depending on the experimental conditions. We discuss implications for experiments relying on radio emission for detection of electromagnetic cascades produced by ultrahigh-energy neutrinos.

  11. Radio-frequency measurements of coherent transition and cherenkov radiation: implications for high-energy neutrino detection

    PubMed

    Gorham; Saltzberg; Schoessow; Gai; Power; Konecny; Conde

    2000-12-01

    We report on measurements of (11-18)-cm wavelength radio emission from interactions of 15.2 MeV pulsed electron bunches at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The electrons were observed both in a configuration where they produced primarily transition radiation from an aluminum foil, and in a configuration designed for the electrons to produce Cherenkov radiation in a silica sand target. Our aim was to emulate the large electron excess expected to develop during an electromagnetic cascade initiated by an ultrahigh-energy particle. Such charge asymmetries are predicted to produce strong coherent radio pulses, which are the basis for several experiments to detect high-energy neutrinos from the showers they induce in Antarctic ice and in the lunar regolith. We detected coherent emission which we attribute both to transition and possibly Cherenkov radiation at different levels depending on the experimental conditions. We discuss implications for experiments relying on radio emission for detection of electromagnetic cascades produced by ultrahigh-energy neutrinos. PMID:11138159

  12. Temperature-modulated calorimetry of the frequency dependence of the glass transition of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and ....

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, I.

    1997-03-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC, is new technique that permits to measure the apparent heat capacity vs modulation frequency. The method is briefly described and a quasi- isothermal measurement method is used to derive the kinetic parameters for PET and PS. A first-order kinetics expression was used to describe the approach to equilibrium and point out the limits caused by asymmetry and cooperativity of the kinetics. Use of a complex description of heat capacity and entropy is discussed. Activation energies vary from 75 to 350 kJ/mol, dependent on thermal pretreatment and the preexponential factor is correlated with the activation energy.

  13. Quadrature frequency resolved spectroscopy (QFRS) of radiative transitions of Er3+ and Nd3+ ions in chalcogenide glasses (ChGs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Saitou, D.; Fujimoto, K.; Fujihashi, C.; Shimakawa, K.; Koughia, K.; Kasap, S. O.

    2010-11-01

    Wideband quadrature frequency resolved spectroscopy (QFRS) of photoluminescence (PL) lifetime distributions from 2 ns to 160 s is shown to be very effective in elucidating the characteristic features of radiative transitions of Er3+ ions in GeGaSe and GeGaS chalcogenides glasses (ChGs). Undoped GeGaSe ChGs show triple-peak lifetime distributions of which two short-lifetimes are associated with singlet-triplet excitons and longest-lifetime, ~20 s, with radiative tunnelling (RT) of distant-pairs (DPs). Er-doped GeGaSe and GeGaS ChGs exhibit a double-peak lifetime distribution, consisting of a peak at ~3.3 and ~5.3 ms, respectively, a characteristic of the Er3+ luminescence centre and another peak at ~20 s, similar to that of undoped GeGaSe ChGs. It is shown that the QFRS can separate and analyse two mixed radiative transitions of Nd3+ ions, 4F3/2V4I15/2 and 4F5/2,2H9/2V4I15/2 in GaLaS ChGs. From the QFRS results we can experimentally extract the branching ratio βJ and lifetime τ approx 77 (μs for 4 lasing transitions 4F3/2→4IJ(J = 9/2, 11/2, 13/2, 15/2) of Nd3+ ions in GaLaS ChGs, in particular, the weakest transition 4F3/2→4I15/2.

  14. Frequency discriminating laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.D.

    1987-10-20

    A laser is described for discriminating between a higher gain transition and a lower gain transition to permit the laser to lase at the lower gain transition. It consists of: a laser cavity, including more than two mirrors each of which is highly transmissive at the frequency of the higher gain transition, one of which is partially reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition, and all but the one of which are highly reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition; an active laser medium disposed within the cavity; and means for pumping the active laser medium.

  15. Five-year tracking of Plasmodium falciparum allele frequencies in a holoendemic area with indistinct seasonal transitions

    PubMed Central

    Akala, Hoseah M; Achieng, Angela O; Eyase, Fredrick L; Juma, Dennis W; Ingasia, Luiser; Cheruiyot, Agnes C; Okello, Charles; Omariba, Duke; Owiti, Eunice A; Muriuki, Catherine; Yeda, Redemptah; Andagalu, Ben; Johnson, Jacob D; Kamau, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Background The renewed malaria eradication efforts require an understanding of the seasonal patterns of frequency of polymorphic variants in order to focus limited funds productively. Although cross-sectional studies in holoendemic areas spanning a single year could be useful in describing parasite genotype status at a given point, such information is inadequate in describing temporal trends in genotype polymorphisms. For Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Kisumu District Hospital, Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt-K76T) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (PfMDR1-N86Y), were analyzed for polymorphisms and parasitemia changes in the 53 months from March 2008 to August 2012. Observations were compared with prevailing climatic factors, including humidity, rainfall, and temperature. Methods Parasitemia (the percentage of infected red blood cells per total red blood cells) was established by microscopy for P. falciparum malaria-positive samples. P. falciparum DNA was extracted from whole blood using a Qiagen DNA Blood Mini Kit. Single nucleotide polymorphism identification at positions Pfcrt-K76T and PfMDR1-N86Y was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and/or sequencing. Data on climatic variables were obtained from http://www.tutiempo.net/en/. Results A total of 895 field isolates from 2008 (n=169), 2009 (n=161), 2010 (n=216), 2011 (n=223), and 2012 (n=126) showed large variations in monthly frequency of PfMDR1-N86Y and Pfcrt-K76T as the mutant genotypes decreased from 68.4%±15% and 38.1%±13% to 29.8%±18% and 13.3%±9%, respectively. The mean percentage of parasitemia was 2.61%±1.01% (coefficient of variation 115.86%; n=895). There was no correlation between genotype or parasitemia and climatic factors. Conclusion This study shows variability in the frequency of Pfcrt-K76T and PfMDR1-N86Y polymorphisms during the study period, bringing into focus the role of cross-sectional studies in describing temporal

  16. Definition of Shifts of Optical Transitions Frequencies due to Pulse Perturbation Action by the Photon Echo Signal Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisin, V. N.; Shegeda, A. M.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    A relative phase shift between the different groups of excited dipoles, which appears as result of its frequency splitting due to action of a pulse of electric or magnetic fields, depends on a time, if the pulse overlaps in time with echo-pulse. As а consequence, the echo waveform is changed. The echo time form is modulated. The inverse modulation period well enough approximates Zeeman and pseudo-Stark splitting in the cases of magnetic and, therefore, electrical fields. Thus the g-factors of ground 4I15/2 and excited 4F9/2 optical states of Er3+ ion in LuLiF4 and YLiF4 have been measured and pseudo-Stark shift of R1 line in ruby has been determined.

  17. From amorphous to microcrystalline: Phase transition in rapid synthesis of hydrogenated silicon thin film in low frequency inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S. Q.; Xu, S.; Wei, D. Y.; Huang, S. Y.; Zhou, H. P.; Xu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by low frequency inductively coupled plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using a silane precursor with low hydrogen dilution at room temperature. The crystallinity and microstructure properties of the Si:H thin films deposited at different inductive radio-frequency (rf) power density were systematically studied by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. We found that at a low rf power density of 16.7 to 20.8 mW/cm{sup 3}, the structure of silicon thin films evolves from a completely amorphous phase to an intermediate phase containing both amorphous and microcrystalline silicon. As the power density is increased to a moderate value of 25 mW/cm{sup 3}, a highly crystallized (111)-preferred hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) film featuring a vertically aligned cone-shaped structure, is emerging. Both the crystallinity and deposition rate exhibit a monotonic increase with the increase in the rf power density, reaching a maximum value of 85% and 1.07 nm/s, respectively, at a power density of 41.7 mW/cm{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that continuous and dense {mu}c-Si:H films with grain size of tens to hundreds nanometers can be achieved deterministically without the formation of amorphous incubation layer, and this is of great importance for synthesis of multilayer structures in p-i-n solar cells. The formation mechanism of the {mu}c-Si:H films and the elimination of the amorphous incubation layer are explained in terms of the high electron density and the plasma-surface interactions.

  18. Effects of molecular weight on the liquid-liquid transition in polystyrene melts studied by low-frequency anelastic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. B.; Shang, S. Y.; Xu, Q. L.; Zhu, Z. G.

    2008-04-01

    A substantial internal friction peak associated with the liquid-liquid transition (Tll) has been observed in polystyrene (PS) melts with different molecular weights Mw. The peak is of the relaxation type and suggested to be caused by the cooperative rearrangement of PS chains. The relaxation time follows the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. With increasing Mw, the PS melt exhibits a higher energy barrier, a smaller concentration of mobile species, and a stronger coupling between mobile species at Tll. In addition, to quantify the strength of the temperature dependence of the relaxation time, a parameter mll is defined for PS melt according to Angell's fragility concept. The value of mll decreases with increasing Mw, indicating a slower cooperative rearrangement of PS chains toward Tll. Moreover, at Mw⩽52.5kg/mol, mll rapidly drops with Mw, while it more slowly decreases at Mw>52.5kg/mol. The fact suggests more topological constraints due to the intrachain interactions in very long chains.

  19. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma

  20. A 2.5-dimensional method for the prediction of structure-borne low-frequency noise from concrete rail transit bridges.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Song, Xiaodong; Wu, Dingjun

    2014-05-01

    Predicting structure-borne noise from bridges subjected to moving trains using the three-dimensional (3D) boundary element method (BEM) is a time consuming process. This paper presents a two-and-a-half dimensional (2.5D) BEM-based procedure for simulating bridge-borne low-frequency noise with higher efficiency, yet no loss of accuracy. The two-dimensional (2D) BEM of a bridge with a constant cross section along the track direction is adopted to calculate the spatial modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) of the bridge using the space-wave number transforms of its 3D modal shapes. The MATVs calculated using the 2.5D method are then validated by those computed using the 3D BEM. The bridge-borne noise is finally obtained through the MATVs and modal coordinate responses of the bridge, considering time-varying vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction. The presented procedure is applied to predict the sound pressure radiating from a U-shaped concrete bridge, and the computed results are compared with those obtained from field tests on Shanghai rail transit line 8. The numerical results match well with the measured results in both time and frequency domains at near-field points. Nevertheless, the computed results are smaller than the measured ones for far-field points, mainly due to the sound radiation from adjacent spans neglected in the current model. PMID:24815255

  1. Monitoring of slip at the transition zone on the plate interface estimated from non-volcanic deep low-frequency tremors in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, R.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Obara, K.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    In southwestern Japan, non-volcanic deep low-frequency (DLF) tremors (e.g., Obara, 2002) and short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs; e.g., Obara et al., 2004) occur in temporal and spatial coincidence with the active stages of DLF tremors (Obara et al., 2004). Based on this feature, Hiramatsu et al. (2008) proposed a method to monitor slip at the transition zone between the locked and aseismic slip zones on the plate interface using DLF tremors. In this study, we applied the method as the same way of previous studies (Hiramatsu et al., 2008; Hirose et al., 2010) and estimated the long-term average slip rate at the transition zone from DLF tremors in southwestern Japan. We also estimated the slip distributions of S-SSEs from DLF tremors using the modified envelope correlation method (ECM) tremor catalog (Maeda and Obara, 2009) and the hourly centroid tremor catalog (Obara et al., 2010) along with the ECM tremor catalog (Obara, 2002) in southwestern Japan. The modified ECM applied both the differential travel time and the spatial distribution of mean square amplitudes to estimate a tremor's spatial location and radiation energy. The hourly centroid tremor catalog is constructed using a clustering process to estimate centroid locations, revealing clear depth-dependent behavior of the tremor activity. The cumulative seismic moment from 2001 to 2009 increases at a constant rate, indicating a constant moment release rate in the long-term average. We estimated slip rate at the transition zone using the formula ˙ {M0} = μ S_˙ {U}, where ˙ {M0} is the moment release rate, μ the rigidity, S the fault area that is related to the slip of S-SSEs in each region, and ˙ {U} the slip rate. We obtained the slip rates of 4.1 ± 0.5 cm/yr, 3.7 ± 0.6 cm/yr, and 2.6 ± 0.2 cm/yr in the western Shikoku, northern Kii peninsula, and Tokai regions, respectively, at the transition zone through the analyzed period. The slip deficit rate at the transition zone in each region is 2.6cm/yr, 2

  2. Illuminating the Transition Between Steady Sliding and Episodic Tremor and Slow Slip Using Low Frequency Earthquakes at the Downdip Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.

    2012-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments, we have identified eight Low-Frequency Earthquake (LFE) families on the subduction plate interface, under the Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. We analyze the time history of each during the time interval 2007-2012. The updip-most family (LFE1) only lights up during the well-known northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events that recur every 15 months. The recurrence intervals shorten from updip LFE1 to the downdip-most family (LFE4), which repeats every 14 days; 30 times more frequently. This presentation focuses on the downdip family. See the Sweet presentation, this session, for an analysis of the updip-most LFE family. LFEs from family 4 typically have durations of about one hour, with as many as 100 repeats during that time. Unlike their updip counterparts, they occur as discrete events without other LFEs or tremor visible during that time. They are strongly modulated by tidal shear stress. Twice as many LFEs occur during encouraging shear stress as during discouraging times. In contrast, these same LFEs occur when tidal normal stress is compressive which should inhibit slip. To reconcile LFE occurrence with favorable tidal Coulomb stress requires that the friction coefficient be less than 0.2 .This extreme sensitivity to very small shear stresses also suggests near lithostatic pore fluid pressures. We propose that the bursts of LFEs in this family correspond to discrete slow-slip events that occur with remarkable regularity. To add up to plate rates, each burst would correspond to a little more than 1 mm of slip, and each individual LFE to a little less than 0.1 mm, assuming all the slip occurs in the form of LFE activity and each LFE ruptures the same spot. One of these event sequences was captured by our 1-km aperture 80-element Big Skidder Array in 2008. Careful stacked correlation functions from 32 LFEs relative to a reference event showed S-P times varied only up to 0.02s, which

  3. The Accuracy of Measurements of the Spectral-Line Frequencies in the Studies of the Rotational Transitions of the 16O12C32S Molecule in the Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Belov, S. P.; Lapinov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The absolute error of determining the center frequency of the molecule spectral line during a single measurement, which is obtained by fitting the line shape to the model profile, is usually significantly smaller than the statistical spread in the frequencies of the repeated measurements. We discuss the possible causes of the systematic errors leading to an increase in the uncertainty of measurements of the line-center frequency. For an example of the multiple spectral measurements of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave ranges (with a frequency of up to 522 GHz), by the Lamb-dip method, we determine the absolute error of the performed measurements, which amounts to 0 .4 kHz. New precision values of the center frequencies of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule and more accurate values of the rotational constants, which are calculated using the measured frequencies, are presented.

  4. An ultra-stable optical frequency standard for telecommunication purposes based upon the 5S1/2 → 5D5/2 two-photon transition in rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the development of a frequency standard for optical fiber communication applications based on a two-photon transition in rubidium at 385.2 THz. This standard kills two birds with one stone in the sense it is capable of providing us with two highly stable serviceable wavelengths at 778.1 and 1556.2 nm. In this system, we exploit the narrow line-width of a fiber laser emitting at 1556.2 nm in conjunction with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier to generate a sufficient second harmonic laser beam at 778.1 nm in a periodically polled lithium niobate waveguide mixer in order to probe and frequency-lock the laser to the 5S1/2 ( F g = 3)-5D5/2 ( F e = 5) hyperfine two-photon transition component in 85Rb. The metrological performance of the standard is evaluated with the aid of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Allan variance measurement shows a stability of 4 × 10-12 at 1 s (limited by the comb stability), reaching a floor of 6.8 × 10-13 at 1000 s. After correction of all the major systematic frequency shifts including the light shift, the absolute frequency is found to be 385 285 142 374.0 (5.0) kHz. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of most of the hyperfine components of the 5S1/2-5D5/2 transition of the two naturally existing rubidium isotopes are measured using a femtosecond frequency comb synthesizer after stabilizing a laser on each component.

  5. Absolute frequency measurement of 1S0(F = 1/2)-3P0(F = 1/2) transition of 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice at KRISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Yong; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Lee, Won-Kyu; Eon Park, Sang; Kim, Eok Bong; Lee, Sun Kyung; Cho, Jun Woo; Yoon, Tai Hyun; Mun, Jongchul; Jong Park, Sung; Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum

    2013-04-01

    We measured the absolute frequency of the optical clock transition 1S0(F = 1/2)-3P0(F = 1/2) of 171Yb atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice and it was determined to be 518 295 836 590 863.5(8.1) Hz. The frequency was measured against Terrestrial Time (TT; the SI second on the geoid) using an optical frequency comb of which the frequency was phase-locked to an H-maser as a flywheel oscillator traceable to TT. The magic wavelength was also measured as 394 798.48(79) GHz. The results are in good agreement with two previous measurements of other institutes within the specified uncertainty of this work.

  6. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  7. K-shell energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Si ix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. G.; Shi, J. R.; Wang, F. L.; Zhong, J. Y.; Liang, G. Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Accurate atomic data are needed to analyze the Si ix K-shell features in astrophysical X-ray spectra. Relative large discrepancies in the existing atomic data have impeded this progress. Aims: We present the accurate Si ix K-shell transition data, including K-shell energy levels, wavelengths, radiative rates, and oscillator strengths. Methods: The flexible atomic code (FAC), which is a fully relativistic atomic code with configuration interaction (CI) included, was employed to calculate these data. To investigate the CI effects, calculations with different configurations included were carried out. Results: The K-shell atomic data of Si ix transitions between 1s22s22p2, 1s22s2p3, 1s22p4, 1s2s22p3, 1s2s2p4, and 1s2p5 are reported. The accuracy of our data is demonstrated by comparing them with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. The energy levels are accurate to 3.5 eV, the wavelengths to within 15 mÅ. For most transitions, the radiative rates an accuracy of 20%. The effects of CI from high-energy configurations were investigated as well. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A105

  8. Applications of Kinetic Inductance: Parametric Amplifier & Phase Shifter, 2DEG Coupled Co-planar Structures & Microstrip to Slotline Transition at RF Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdi, Harshad

    Kinetic inductance springs from the inertia of charged mobile carriers in alternating electric fields and it is fundamentally different from the magnetic inductance which is only a geometry dependent property. The magnetic inductance is proportional to the volume occupied by the electric and magnetic fields and is often limited by the number of turns of the coil. Kinetic inductance on the other hand is inversely proportional to the density of electrons or holes that exert inertia, the unit mass of the charge carriers and the momentum relaxation time of these charge carriers, all of which can be varied merely by modifying the material properties. Highly sensitive and broadband signal amplifiers often broaden the field of study in astrophysics. Quantum-noise limited travelling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers offer a noise figure of around 0.5 K +/- 0.3 K as compared to 20 K in HEMT signal amplifiers and can be designed to operate to cover the entire W-band (75 GHz -- 115 GHz). The research cumulating to this thesis involves applying and exploiting kinetic inductance properties in designing a W-band orthogonal mode transducer, quadratic gain phase shifter with a gain of ~49 dB over a meter of microstrip transmission line. The phase shifter will help in measuring the maximum amount of phase shift Deltaφmax(I) that can be obtained from half a meter transmission line which helps in predicting the gain of a travelling wave parametric amplifier. In another project, a microstrip to slot line transition is designed and optimized to operate at 150 GHz and 220 GHz frequencies, that is used as a part of horn antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector proposed to operate from 138 GHz to 250 GHz. In the final project, kinetic inductance in a 2D electron gas (2DEG) is explored by design, simulation, fabrication and experimentation. A transmission line model of a 2DEG proposed by Burke (1999), is simulated and verified experimentally by fabricating a

  9. Identification by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy of an imino tautomer of 5-hydroxy-2′-deoxycytidine, a powerful base analog transition mutagen with a much higher unfavored tautomer frequency than that of the natural residue 2′-deoxycytidine

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Wu; Spiro, Thomas G.; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Fresco, Jacques R.

    1999-01-01

    UV resonance Raman spectroscopy was used to detect and estimate the frequency of the unfavored imino tautomer of the transition mutagen 5-hydroxy-2′-deoxycytidine (HO5dCyt) in its anionic form. In DNA, this 2′-deoxycytidine analog arises from the oxidation of 2′-deoxycytidine and induces C → T transitions with 102 greater frequency than such spontaneous transitions. An imino tautomer marker carbonyl band (≈1650 cm−1) is enhanced at ≈65°C against an otherwise stable spectrum of bands associated with the favored amino tautomer. This band is similarly present in the UV resonance Raman spectra of the imino cytidine analogs N3-methylcytidine at high pH and N4-methoxy-2′-deoxycytidine at pH 7 and displays features attributable to the imino form of C residues and their derivatives. The fact that the imino tautomer of HO5dCyt occurs at a frequency consistent with its high mutagenic enhancement lends strong support to the hypothesis that unfavored base tautomers play important roles in the mispair intermediates of replication leading to substitution mutations. PMID:10200291

  10. Tidal frequencies in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Catherine; Takai, Helio

    2016-03-01

    Tidal frequencies are observed in the spectral analysis of time series muon flux measurements performed by the MARIACHI experiment over a period of seven years. The prominent peaks from the frequency spectrum correspond to tidal frequencies S1,S2,S3,K1,P1 and Ψ1 . We will present these results and compare them to the regular density oscillations from balloon sounding data. We interpret the observed data as being the effect of regular atmospheric density oscillations induced by the thermal heating of layers in Earth's atmosphere. As the density of the atmosphere varies, the altitude where particles are produced varies accordingly. As a consequence, the muon decay path elongates or contracts, modulating the number of muons detected at ground level. The role of other tidal effects, including geomagnetic tides, will also be discussed.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SiIX K-shell energy levels and transitions (Wei+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. G.; Shi, J. R.; Wang, F. L.; Zhong, J. Y.; Liang, G. Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate atomic data are needed to analyze the SiIX K-shell features in astrophysical X-ray spectra. Relative large discrepancies in the existing atomic data have impeded this progress. We present the accurate SiIX K-shell transition data, including K-shell energy levels, wavelengths, radiative rates, and oscillator strengths. The flexible atomic code (FAC), which is a fully relativistic atomic code with configuration interaction (CI) included, was employed to calculate these data. To investigate the CI effects, calculations with different configurations included were carried out. The K-shell atomic data of SiIX transitions between 1s22s22p2, 1s22s2p3, 1s22p4, 1s2s22p3, 1s2s2p4, and 1s2p5 are reported. The accuracy of our data is demonstrated by comparing them with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. The energy levels are accurate to 3.5eV, the wavelengths to within 15mÅ. For most transitions, the radiative rates an accuracy of 20%. The effects of CI from high-energy configurations were investigated as well. (2 data files).

  12. The 31S0-33P0 transition in the aluminum isotope ion 26A1+: a potentially superior passive laser frequency standard and spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N; Dehmelt, H; Nagourney, W

    1992-01-01

    The aluminum 26 isotope ion is proposed here as a possible candidate for a superior atomic clock. For this even isotope, the extraordinarily long lifetime of the 33P0 state offers a potential clock transition (31S0-33P0) linewidth of 300 microHz. The mF = 0 --> 0 transition has only a quadratic Zeeman shift approximately 4 x 10(-18) at 0.1 Gauss magnetic field, compared to approximately 10(-8) for the hydrogen maser. Electronic quadrupole moments vanish for both J and J' states and with them shifts due to electric field gradients. All shifts have been estimated and are orders of magnitude less than for Hg+ and Ba+, which are being studied as atomic clock elements. PMID:11607314

  13. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  14. How the transition frequencies of microtubule dynamic instability (nucleation, catastrophe, and rescue) regulate microtubule dynamics in interphase and mitosis: analysis using a Monte Carlo computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, N R; Skibbens, R V; Salmon, E D

    1993-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) in newt mitotic spindles grow faster than MTs in the interphase cytoplasmic microtubule complex (CMTC), yet spindle MTs do not have the long lengths or lifetimes of the CMTC microtubules. Because MTs undergo dynamic instability, it is likely that changes in the durations of growth or shortening are responsible for this anomaly. We have used a Monte Carlo computer simulation to examine how changes in the number of MTs and changes in the catastrophe and rescue frequencies of dynamic instability may be responsible for the cell cycle dependent changes in MT characteristics. We used the computer simulations to model interphase-like or mitotic-like MT populations on the basis of the dynamic instability parameters available from newt lung epithelial cells in vivo. We started with parameters that produced MT populations similar to the interphase newt lung cell CMTC. In the simulation, increasing the number of MTs and either increasing the frequency of catastrophe or decreasing the frequency of rescue reproduced the changes in MT dynamics measured in vivo between interphase and mitosis. Images PMID:8298190

  15. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  16. Parity nonconservation in atomic Zeeman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E. J.; Dinh, T. H.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2005-11-15

    We discuss the possibility of measuring nuclear anapole moments in atomic Zeeman transitions and perform the necessary calculations. Advantages of using Zeeman transitions include variable transition frequencies and the possibility of enhancement of parity nonconservation effects.

  17. Absolute configuration of (1S,2S)-3-methyl-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro­thia­zolo[2,3-b]quinazolin-5-one

    PubMed Central

    Ghorab, Mostafa. M.; Al-Said, Mansour. S.; Abdel-Kader, Maged. S.; Hemamalini, Madhukar; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-01-01

    The absolute structure of the molecule in the crystal of the title compound, C17H14N2OS, was determined by the refinement of the Flack parameter to 0.0 (2) based on 1011 Friedel pairs. The quinazoline ring is essentially planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.037 (2) Å. The thia­zole ring is distorted from planarity [maximum deviation = 0.168 (2) Å] and adopts a slightly twisted envelope conformation, with the C atom as the flap atom. The central thia­zole ring makes dihedral angles of 7.01 (8) and 76.80 (10)° with the quinazoline and phenyl rings, respectively. The corresponding angle between the quinazoline and phenyl rings is 3.74 (9)°. In the crystal, there are no classical hydrogen bonds but stabilization is provided by weak C—H⋯π inter­actions, involving the centroids of the phenyl rings. PMID:22589992

  18. Lifetime of the 1s2s 3S1 metastable level in He-like S14+ measured with an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    L?pez-Urrutia, J C; Beiersdorfer, P; Widmann, K

    2006-03-16

    A precision measurement of the lifetime of the lowest exited level of the He-like S{sup 14+} ion carried out at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap yielded a value of (703 {+-} 4) ns. Our method extends the range of lifetime measurements accessible with electron beam ion traps into the nanosecond region and improves the accuracy of currently available data for this level by an order of magnitude.

  19. (1S,2R,2'S)- and (1S,2S, 2'S)-1-phenyl-2-phenylthio-2-(tetrahydropyran-2'-ylthio)ethanol diastereoisomers at 193 K.

    PubMed

    Kansikas, J; Sipilä, K

    2000-11-01

    In the synthesis of 1-phenyl-2-phenylthio-2-(tetrahydropyran-2-ylthio)ethanol, C(19)H(22)O(2)S(2), four diastereoisomers are formed. Two non-centrosymmetric enantiomeric forms which crystallize in space groups P2(1)2(1)2(1) and Pna2(1) are presented. The former has an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the O atom of the tetrahydropyran ring. In the latter isomer, the hydroxyl group forms an intermolecular hydrogen bond to the O atom of the tetrahydropyranyl group of a neighbouring molecule, joining the molecules into chains in the c-axis direction; the O.O distances are 2.962 (4) and 2.764 (3) A, respectively. The tetrahydropyran rings are in chair conformations in both isomers and the S side chain has an equatorial orientation in the former, but an axial orientation in the latter molecule. PMID:11077307

  20. Evaluation of high-frequency mean streamwater transit-time estimates using groundwater age and dissolved silica concentrations in a small forested watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.; Burns, Douglas A.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    Many previous investigations of mean streamwater transit times (MTT) have been limited by an inability to quantify the MTT dynamics. Here, we draw on (1) a linear relation (r 2 = 0.97) between groundwater 3H/3He ages and dissolved silica (Si) concentrations, combined with (2) predicted streamwater Si concentrations from a multiple-regression relation (R 2 = 0.87) to estimate MTT at 5-min intervals for a 23-year time series of streamflow [water year (WY) 1986 through 2008] at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. The time-based average MTT derived from the 5-min data was ~8.4 ± 2.9 years and the volume-weighted (VW) MTT was ~4.7 years for the study period, reflecting the importance of younger runoff water during high flow. The 5-min MTTs are normally distributed and ranged from 0 to 15 years. Monthly VW MTTs averaged 7.0 ± 3.3 years and ranged from 4 to 6 years during winter and 8–10 years during summer. The annual VW MTTs averaged 5.6 ± 2.0 years and ranged from ~5 years during wet years (2003 and 2005) to >10 years during dry years (2002 and 2008). Stormflows are composed of much younger water than baseflows, and although stormflow only occurs ~17 % of the time, this runoff fraction contributed 39 % of the runoff during the 23-year study period. Combining the 23-year VW MTT (including stormflow) with the annual average baseflow for the period (~212 mm) indicates that active groundwater storage is ~1,000 mm. However, the groundwater storage ranged from 1,040 to 1,950 mm using WY baseflow and WY VW MTT. The approach described herein may be applicable to other watersheds underlain by granitoid bedrock, where weathering is the dominant control on Si concentrations in soils, groundwater, and streamwater.

  1. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  2. Theory and computation of the attosecond dynamics of pairs of electrons excited by high-frequency short light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mercouris, Th.; Komninos, Y.; Nicolaides, C.A.

    2004-03-01

    By defining and solving from first principles, using the state-specific expansion approach, a time-dependent pump-probe problem with real atomic states, we show computationally that, if time resolution reaches the attosecond regime, strongly correlated electronic ''motion'' can be probed and can manifest itself in terms of time-dependent mixing of symmetry-adapted configurations. For the system that was chosen in this study, these configurations, the He 2s2p,2p3d, and 3s3p P{sup o1}, whose radials are computed by solving multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock equations, label doubly excited states (DES) of He inside the 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} scattering continuum and act as nonstationary states that mix, and simultaneously decay exponentially to 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1} via the atomic Hamiltonian, H{sub A}. The herein presented theory and analysis permitted the computation of attosecond snapshots of pairs of electrons in terms of time-dependent probability distributions of the angle between the position vectors of the two electrons. The physical processes were determined by solving ab initio the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, using as initial states either the He 1s{sup 2} or the 1s2s S{sup 1} discrete states and two femtosecond Gaussian pulses of 86 fs full width at half-maximum, having frequencies in resonance with the energies of the correlated states represented by the 2s2p and 2p3d configurations. We calculated the probability of photoabsorption and of two-photon resonance ionization and of the simultaneous oscillatory mixing of the configurations 2s2p,2p3d,3s3p, and 1s{epsilon}p P{sup o1}, within the attosecond scale, via the interactions present in H{sub A}. Among the possible channels for observing the attosecond oscillations of the occupation probabilities of the DES, is the de-excitation path of the transition to the He 1s3d D{sup 1} discrete state, which emits at 6680 A.

  3. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  4. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  5. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  6. Electron impact excitation of resonance transitions in atomic potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S.S.; Msezane, A.Z.

    1993-05-01

    Cross sections for electron impact excitation of the 4 s{sup 2}S - 4p {sup 2}P{sup o} and 4s {sup 2}S - 5p {sup 2}P{sup o} transitions in atomic potassium are calculated in the low-energy region from 1.5 to 30 eV using the R-matrix method. We included eight target states (4s {sup 2}S, 4p {sup 2}P{sup o}, 5s {sup 2}S, 3d {sup 2}D, 5p {sup 2}P{sup o}, 4d {sup 2}D, 6S {sup 2}S, and 4f {sup 2}F{sup o}) in the close-coupling expansion. These states are represented by extensive configuration- interaction wavefunctions constructed from the orthogonal one-electron orbitals: 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, 4p, 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, and 6s. The calculated results are compared with the available experiments and other calculations. The present calculation shows a resonance structure in the cross section for the excitation of the resonance 4s {sup 2}S - 4p {sup 2}P{sup o} transition around 2.5 eV.

  7. Moons over Jupiter: transits and shadow transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; et al.

    2003-06-01

    There is no more beautiful illustration of orbital motions than the movements of Jupiter's satellites. Every six years, their movements are most strikingly displayed, when the jovian system is presented edge-on to Earth. This means that there is a higher frequency of multiple transits over the face of the planet, as all the moons transit across the equatorial zone, whereas in other years Ganymede and Callisto transit near the poles or not at all. Also, for a few months, the satellites pass in front of each other, displaying mutual eclipses and occultations. In 2002/2003 we have been able to observe a fine series of these multiple and mutual events. On the cover, and on these pages, are some of the highest-resolution images received.

  8. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  9. Influence of modulation frequency in rubidium cell frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.; Viennet, J.; Cyr, N.; Vanier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The error signal which is used to control the frequency of the quartz crystal oscillator of a passive rubidium cell frequency standard is considered. The value of the slope of this signal, for an interrogation frequency close to the atomic transition frequency is calculated and measured for various phase (or frequency) modulation waveforms, and for several values of the modulation frequency. A theoretical analysis is made using a model which applies to a system in which the optical pumping rate, the relaxation rates and the RF field are homogeneous. Results are given for sine-wave phase modulation, square-wave frequency modulation and square-wave phase modulation. The influence of the modulation frequency on the slope of the error signal is specified. It is shown that the modulation frequency can be chosen as large as twice the non-saturated full-width at half-maximum without a drastic loss of the sensitivity to an offset of the interrogation frequency from center line, provided that the power saturation factor and the amplitude of modulation are properly adjusted.

  10. Robust adiabatic sum frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Suchowski, Haim; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Oron, Dan; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-07-20

    We discuss theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the robustness of the adiabatic sum frequency conversion method. This technique, borrowed from an analogous scheme of robust population transfer in atomic physics and nuclear magnetic resonance, enables the achievement of nearly full frequency conversion in a sum frequency generation process for a bandwidth up to two orders of magnitude wider than in conventional conversion schemes. We show that this scheme is robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and of the incoming light. These include the crystal temperature, the frequency of the incoming field, the pump intensity, the crystal length and the angle of incidence. Also, we show that this extremely broad bandwidth can be tuned to higher or lower central wavelengths by changing either the pump frequency or the crystal temperature. The detailed study of the properties of this converter is done using the Landau-Zener theory dealing with the adiabatic transitions in two level systems. PMID:19654679

  11. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  12. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  13. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  14. Frequency doubled operation of a ground state depleted laser using the Nd(3+)(4)F(sub 3/2)-(4)I(sub 9/2) transition in Y2SiO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, R.; Albrecht, G.; Mitchell, S.; Comaskey, B.; Solarz, R.; Krupke, William F.; Brandle, C.; Berkstresser, G.

    1990-01-01

    A ground state depleted (GSD) laser has been demonstrated at 912 nm in the form of a Q-switched oscillator operating on the Nd(3+) F-4(sub 3/2) - I-4(sub 9/2) transition in Y2SiO5. Samarium scandium gallium garnet has been demonstrated effective at selectively suppressing the competing and much stronger F-4(sub 3/2) - I-4(sub 11/2) lasing transition. Efficient harmonic generation has been demonstrated using non-critically phase matched KNbO3.

  15. Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Brusch, A.; Diddams, S. A.; Fortier, T. M.; Heavner, T. P.; Hollberg, L.; Hume, D. B.; Jefferts, S. R.; Lorini, L.; Parker, T. E.; Rosenband, T.; Stalnaker, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Single-trapped-ion frequency standards based on a 282 nm transition in 199Hg+ and on a 267 nm transition in 27Al + have been developed at NIST over the past several years. Their frequencies are measured relative to each other and to the NIST primary frequency standard, the NIST-F1 cesium fountain, by means of a self-referenced femtosecond laser frequency comb. Both ion standards have demonstrated instabilities and inaccuracies of less than 1 × 10 -16.

  16. Physical origin of the frequency shifts in cesium beam frequency standards: Related environmental sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Dimarcq, N.; Giordano, V.; Viennet, J.

    1990-01-01

    When observed in a cesium beam frequency standard, the hyperfine transition frequency of the atoms differs slightly from the invariant transition frequency of the unperturbed atoms at rest. The various physical and technical origins of the frequency offsets are stated. They relate to fundamental physical effects, to the method of probing the atomic resonance and to the frequency control of the slaved oscillator. The variation of the frequency offsets under a change of the value of the internal operating characteristics is considered. The sensitivity to a change of the magnetic induction, the microwave power, and the temperature is given. A comparison is made of the sensitivity of cesium beam frequency standards of the commercially available type, making use of magnetic state selection, and of devices under study, in which the state preparation and detection is accomplished optically. The pathways between the external stimuli and the physical origin of the frequency offsets are specified.

  17. Identification of hydrogenlike and heliumlike transitions in the spectrum of laser-produced magnesium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, J. C.; Goldsmith, S.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, Leonard; Knauer, J.

    1990-01-01

    Nonresonance spectral lines of Mg XII and Mg XI emitted by magnesium laser-produced plasmas have been observed in the extreme-vacuum-ultraviolet region and their transitions classified. As many as eight beams of the Omega laser system of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester were linearly focused onto magnesium-coated flat targets to produce linear plasma radiation sources from 3 to 6 mm long. The spectra were photographed end-on with a grazing-incidence spectrograph. The identified Mg XII lines are classified as 2s-3p, 2p-3d, 2s-4p, 2p-4d, and 3d-4f transitions. The identified Mg XI lines are classified as 1s2s-1s3p, 1s2p-1s3d, 1s2p-1s4d, 1s3p-1s4d, and 1s3d-1s4f.

  18. A new model for broadband waveguide to microstrip transition design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Downey, Alan N.

    1986-01-01

    A new model is presented which permits the prediction of the resonant frequencies created by antipodal finline waveguide to microstrip transitions. The transition is modeled as a tapered transmission line in series with an infinite set of coupled resonant circuits. The resonant circuits are modeled as simple microwave resonant cavities of which the resonant frequencies are easily determined. The model is developed and the resonant frequencies determined for several different transitions. Experimental results are given to confirm the models.

  19. Metric transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes NASA's metric transition in terms of seven major program elements. Six are technical areas involving research, technology development, and operations; they are managed by specific Program Offices at NASA Headquarters. The final program element, Institutional Management, covers both NASA-wide functional management under control of NASA Headquarters and metric capability development at the individual NASA Field Installations. This area addresses issues common to all NASA program elements, including: Federal, state, and local coordination; standards; private industry initiatives; public-awareness initiatives; and employee training. The concluding section identifies current barriers and impediments to metric transition; NASA has no specific recommendations for consideration by the Congress.

  20. Radar frequency radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowicki, E.

    1981-11-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar. The method is based on the following main assumptions that: (a) the total field can be computed as the vector summation of the individual fields due to each antenna element; (b) the individual field can be calculated using distances for which the field point is in the far field of the antenna element. An RFR computer program was coded for the RADC HE 6180 digital computer and exercised to calculate the radiation levels in the air and ground space for the present baseline and the possible Six DB and 10 DB growth systems of the PAVE PAWS radar system at OTIS AFB MA. The average radiation levels due to the surveillance fence were computed for three regions: in the air space in front of the radar, at the radar hazard fence at OTIS AFB MA and at representative ground points in the OTIS AFB vicinity. It was concluded that the radar frequency radiation of PAVE PAWS does not present a hazard to personnel provided there is no entry to the air hazard zone or to the area within the hazard fence. The method developed offers a cost effective way to determine radiation levels from a phased array radar especially in the near field and transition regions.

  1. Different ways to active optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    Active optical frequency standard, or active optical clock, is a new concept of optical frequency standard, where a weak feedback with phase coherence information in optical bad-cavity limitation is formed, and the continuous self-sustained coherent stimulated emission between two atomic transition levels with population inversion is realized. Through ten years of both theoretical and experimental exploration, the narrow linewidth and suppression of cavity pulling effect of active optical frequency standard have been initially proved. In this paper, after a simple review, we will mainly present the most recent experimental progresses of active optical frequency standards in Peking University, including 4-level cesium active optical frequency standards and active Faraday optical frequency standards. The future development of active optical frequency standards is also discussed.

  2. Hermetic optical-fiber iodine frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Light, Philip S; Anstie, James D; Benabid, Fetah; Luiten, Andre N

    2015-06-15

    We have built an optical-frequency standard based on interrogating iodine vapor that has been trapped within the hollow core of a hermetically sealed kagome-lattice photonic crystal fiber. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser locked to a hyperfine component of the P(142)37-0 I2127 transition using modulation transfer spectroscopy shows a frequency stability of 3×10(-11) at 100 s. We discuss the impediments in integrating this all-fiber standard into a fully optical-fiber-based system, and suggest approaches that could improve performance of the frequency standard substantially. PMID:26076241

  3. Atomic frequency standards at NICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Fujieda, M.; Hachisu, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Kajita, M.; Kojima, R.; Kumagai, M.; Locke, C.; Li, Y.; Matsubara, K.; Nogami, A.; Shiga, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hosokawa, M.; Hanado, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Various activities of atomic frequency standards studied in National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) are briefly reviewed. After BIPM accepted the first cesium fountain clock in NICT as a reference to determine International Atomic Time (TAI), efforts to further reduce the uncertainty of collision shifts are ongoing. A second fountain clock using atomic molasses is being built to enable the operation with less atomic density. Single ion clock using calcium has been pursued for several years in NICT. The absolute frequency measured in 2008 has CIPM to adopt the Ca+ clock transition as a part of the list of radiation (LoR) to realize the meter. Sr lattice clock has started its operation last year. The absolute frequency agreed well with those obtained in other institutes. Study of stable cavities to stabilize clock lasers are also introduced.

  4. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  5. Molecular frequency reference at 1.56  μm using a 12C16O overtone transition with the noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy method.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Berceau, Paul; Stochino, Alberto; Byer, Robert; Lipa, John

    2016-05-15

    We report on a molecular clock based on the interrogation of the 3ν rotational-vibrational combination band at 1563 nm of carbon monoxide C1612O. The laser stabilization scheme is based on the noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) technique in frequency modulation (FM) saturation spectroscopy. We use a high-finesse ultra-low expansion (ULE) glass optical cavity with CO as the molecular reference for long-term stabilization of the cavity resonance. We report an Allan deviation of 1.8×10-12 at 1 s that improves to ∼3.5×10-14 with 1000 s of averaging. PMID:27176959

  6. Lifetime of the 1s2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable level in He-like S{sup 14+} measured with an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    2006-07-15

    A precision measurement of the lifetime of the lowest excited level of the He-like S{sup 14+} ion carried out at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap yielded a value of (703{+-}4) ns. Our method extends the range of lifetime measurements accessible with electron beam ion traps into the nanosecond region and improves the accuracy of currently available data for this level by an order of magnitude.

  7. (1S)-1-Phenylethanaminium 4-{[(1S,2S)-1-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H,1'H-[2,2'-biinden]-2-yl]methyl}benzoate.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Christopher S; Zhang, Tao; Scalabrino, Gaia A; Frankish, Neil; Sheridan, Helen

    2012-08-01

    The title molecular salt, C(8)H(12)N(+)·C(26)H(21)O(3)(-), contains a dimeric indane pharmacophore that demonstrates potent anti-inflammatory activity. The indane group of the anion exhibits some disorder about the α-C atom, which appears common to many structures containing this group. A model to account for the slight disorder was attempted, but this was deemed unsuccessful because applying bond-length constraints to all the bonds about the α-C atom led to instability in the refinement. The absolute configuration was determined crystallographically as S,S,S by anomalous dispersion methods with reference to both the Flack parameter and Bayesian statistics on Bijvoet differences. The configuration was also determined by an a priori knowledge of the absolute configuration of the (1S)-1-phenylethanaminium counter-ion. The molecules pack in the crystal structure to form an infinite two-dimensional hydrogen-bond network in the (100) plane of the unit cell. PMID:22850861

  8. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  9. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  10. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  11. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  12. [Humanitarian transition].

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François; Troit, Virginie

    2016-02-01

    In two centuries, modern humanitarian action has experienced several fractures often linked to crises. Although its professionalism and intervention force remain indisputable, it faces, since the 2000s, a new context that limits its ability to act and confronts it with new dilemmas, even though it must deal with needs for aid of unprecedented scale. These difficulties reveal a humanitarian transition period that was not anticipated. This transition period reflects the change from a dominant paradigm of North-South solidarity of Western origin to a much more complex model. This article provides a summary of the current mutations that are dominated by the States' assertion of sovereignty. Among the possible solutions, it argues for an ethical approach and a better integration of the research carried out in the Global South, prerequisites for building a true partnership and placing the victims at the heart of the operations which involve them. PMID:26936180

  13. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  14. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  15. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum. PMID:23546253

  16. Dynamo Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M. K.; Yadav, R.; Chandra, M.; Paul, S.; Wahi, P.

    2010-11-23

    In this article we review the experimental and numerical results related to the dynamo transitions. Recent experiments of Von Karman Sodium (VKS) exhibit various dynamo states including constant, time-periodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. Similarly pseudospectral simulations of dynamo show constant, time-periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. One of the windows for the magnetic Prandtl number of unity shows period doubling route to chaos. Quasiperiodic route to chaos has been reported for the Prandtl number of 0.5. The dynamo simulations also reveal coexisting multiple attractors that were obtained for different initial conditions.

  17. C-type transitions in methyl formate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plummer, Grant M.; Herbst, Eric; De Lucia, Frank C.

    1987-01-01

    Based on previously determined spectral constants for methyl formate in its ground torsional degenerate substate, the frequencies and intensities of forbidden c-type transitions in this molecule, which is represented by a large number of lines in OMC-1, are calculated along with other 'forbidden' transitions labeled x-type. The stronger c-type transitions below 300 GHz with angular momentum quantum number of 30 or less and with upper state rotational energy of 350/cm or less are included in a list of spectral frequencies presented in this paper. Because the c-type transitions borrow intensity from the b-type transitions, the intensities of strongly affected b-type spectra are recalculated and presented.

  18. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  19. A Biochemical Magic Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1993-01-01

    Life is composed principally of four classes of biomolecules - protein, nucleic acid, polysaccharide and lipid. Using 1) estimates of the reducing equivalents (electron pairs) needed to synthesize these biomolecules from carbon dioxide, and 2) measurements of the molecular composition of different organisms, we calculated the average number of electron pairs required for the reduction of carbon dioxide to biological carbon (electron pairs/carbon atom). These calculations showed that the carbon of the Earths biosphere is at the reduction level of formaldehyde that requires 2 electron pairs/carbon atom to be synthesized from carbon dioxide. This was also the reduction level of carbon of individual organisms, except for those that stored large amounts of fuel as lipid. Since this chemical property of life is easily discovered and probably universal, it's most likely known by other intelligent life in the universe. It could be the one thing we know about other carbon-based life in the universe, and the one thing that other intelligent life knows about us. We believe this common knowledge that formaldehyde represents the reduction level of life's carbon could lead to the selection of the 72.83814 GHz line of the 0,0,0,1,0,1 ground-state rotational transition of formaldehyde as a frequency for interstellar communication.

  20. Organ vascularity and metastatic frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, L.; Haydock, K.; Pickren, J. W.; Lane, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The "hemodynamic" or "mechanical" theory proposes that the frequency of metastases in different organs is primarily determined by the numbers of cancer cells delivered to them in their arterial blood. This theory has not yet been adequately tested in man because reproducible, noninvasive measurements of organ blood flow have only recently become available. Correlation between these data and the metastatic frequency in 10 organs, in groups of patients with primary cancers in 15 anatomic sites, has therefore been sought. No correlation was obtained between metastatic frequency and organ weights, blood volumes, blood volumes per gram, "transit times," or blood flow. However, correlations significant at the 4-8% level were obtained between organ blood flow per gram and metastatic frequency in 4 of 5 groups of primary cancers with initial venous drainage into the portal system, compared with 1 of 10 draining into the caval system. At present, no definitive explanation can be offered for the apparent compliance of one set of primary cancers with the "hemodynamic" theory of metastasis, but not the others. PMID:7446696

  1. Detection and boundary identification of phonocardiogram sounds using an expert frequency-energy based metric.

    PubMed

    Naseri, H; Homaeinezhad, M R

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a new method to detect and to delineate phonocardiogram (PCG) sounds. Toward this objective, after preprocessing the PCG signal, two windows were moved on the preprocessed signal, and in each analysis window, two frequency-and amplitude-based features were calculated from the excerpted segment. Then, a synthetic decision making basis was devised by combining these two features for being used as an efficient detection-delineation decision statistic, (DS). Next, local extremums and locations of minimum slopes of the DS were determined by conducting forward-backward local investigations with the purpose of detecting sound incidences and their boundaries. In order to recognize the delineated PCG sounds, first, S1 and S2 were detected. Then, a new DS was regenerated from the signal whose S1 and S2 were eliminated to detect occasional S3 and S4 sounds. Finally, probable murmurs and souffles were spotted. The proposed algorithm was applied to 52 min PCG signals gathered from patients with different valve diseases. The provided database was annotated by some cardiology experts equipped by echocardiography and appropriate computer interfaces. The acquisition landmarks were in 2R (aortic), 2L (pulmonic), 4R (apex) and 4L (tricuspid) positions. The acquisition sensor was an electronic stethoscope (3 M Littmann® 3200, 4 kHz sampling frequency). The operating characteristics of the proposed method have an average sensitivity Se = 99.00% and positive predictive value PPV = 98.60% for sound type recognition (i.e., S1, S2, S3 or S4). PMID:22956159

  2. Explosive synchronization with asymmetric frequency distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenchang; Chen, Lumin; Bi, Hongjie; Hu, Xin; Liu, Zonghua; Guan, Shuguang

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we study the synchronization in a generalized Kuramoto model with frequency-weighted coupling. In particular, we focus on the situations in which the frequency distributions of oscillators are asymmetric. For typical unimodal frequency distributions, such as Lorentzian, Gaussian, triangle, and even special Rayleigh, we find that the synchronization transition in the model generally converts from the first order to the second order as the central frequency shifts toward positive direction. We characterize two interesting coherent states in the system: In the former, two phase-locking clusters are formed, rotating with the same frequency. They correspond to those oscillators with relatively high frequencies while the oscillators with relatively small frequencies are not entrained. In the latter, two phase-locking clusters rotate with different frequencies, leading to the oscillation of the order parameter. We further conduct theoretical analysis to reveal the relation between the asymmetric frequency distribution and the conversion of synchronization type, and justify the coherent states observed in the system.

  3. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  4. Spectral and Hydration Dependence of Protein Dynamical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, Ferdinand; Knab, J. R.; Chen, Jing Yin; He, Yunfen; Markelz, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    The protein dynamical transition, a rapid increase in flexibility at ˜ 200K, is hydration dependent suggesting that the transition may in fact be due to a transition in the surrounding water. Previously we have shown that the terahertz dielectric response is sensitive to the dynamical transition using terahertz time domain spectroscopy [1]. The broadband technique allows the determination of what motions are affected by the transition, that is whether long time scale motions such as side chain rotations, or faster vibrational motions. Here we examine both the frequency and hydration dependence of the protein dynamical transition for hydrated myoglobin powder for the 0.2 -- 2.0 THz and 80-295 K ranges. The transition is observed in both the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric response. Our earlier measurements of solutions did not show a transition in the real part of the permittivity, likely due to bulk solvent dominating the index. There is a strong frequency dependence with hydration. While a slight transition is observed at frequencies higher than 1 THz which is nearly hydration independent, for frequencies below 1 THz the strength of the transition rapidly increases with hydration. [1] A. G. Markelz, J. R. Knab, Jing Yin Chen, Yunfen He, Chem. Phys. Lett. 442, 413 (2007).

  5. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbinger, B.; Capon, A.; Diermaier, M.; Lehner, S.; Malbrunot, C.; Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Widmann, E.

    2015-08-01

    One of the ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration's goals is the measurement of the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of one of the best known systems in physics. This high precision experiment yields a sensitive test of the fundamental symmetry of CPT. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms have been performed providing information on the required antihydrogen events and the achievable precision.

  6. Charge-exchange-induced two-electron satellite transitions from autoionizing levels in dense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Rosmej, F B; Griem, H R; Elton, R C; Jacobs, V L; Cobble, J A; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Geissel, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Süss, W; Uskov, D B; Shevelko, V P; Mancini, R C

    2002-11-01

    Order-of-magnitude anomalously high intensities for two-electron (dielectronic) satellite transitions, originating from the He-like 2s(2) 1S0 and Li-like 1s2s(2) (2)S(1/2) autoionizing states of silicon, have been observed in dense laser-produced plasmas at different laboratories. Spatially resolved, high-resolution spectra and plasma images show that these effects are correlated with an intense emission of the He-like 1s3p 1P-1s(2) 1S lines, as well as the K(alpha) lines. A time-dependent, collisional-radiative model, allowing for non-Maxwellian electron-energy distributions, has been developed for the determination of the relevant nonequilibrium level populations of the silicon ions, and a detailed analysis of the experimental data has been carried out. Taking into account electron density and temperature variations, plasma optical-depth effects, and hot-electron distributions, the spectral simulations are found to be not in agreement with the observations. We propose that highly stripped target ions (e.g., bare nuclei or H-like 1s ground-state ions) are transported into the dense, cold plasma (predominantly consisting of L- and M-shell ions) near the target surface and undergo single- and double-electron charge-transfer processes. The spectral simulations indicate that, in dense and optically thick plasmas, these charge-transfer processes may lead to an enhancement of the intensities of the two-electron transitions by up to a factor of 10 relative to those of the other emission lines, in agreement with the spectral observations. PMID:12513602

  7. Effects of Reduced Frequency on Network Configuration and Synchronization Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu-Hua, Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Not Available Supported by the Open Fund from Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Complex System Optimization and Big Data Processing under Grant No 2015CSOBDP0101, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11162019.

  8. Delay of Transition Using Forced Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, Reginald J.

    2014-01-01

    Several experiments which have reported a delay of transition are analyzed in terms of the frequencies of the induced disturbances generated by different flow control elements. Two of the experiments employed passive stabilizers in the boundary layer, one leading-edge bluntness, and one employed an active spark discharge in the boundary layer. It is found that the frequencies generated by the various elements lie in the damping region of the associated stability curve. It is concluded that the creation of strong disturbances in the damping region stabilizes the boundary-layer and delays the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  9. Explosive synchronization transitions in complex neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanshuang; He, Gang; Huang, Feng; Shen, Chuansheng; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2013-09-01

    It has been recently reported that explosive synchronization transitions can take place in networks of phase oscillators [Gómez-Gardeñes et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 128701 (2011)] and chaotic oscillators [Leyva et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 168702 (2012)]. Here, we investigate the effect of a microscopic correlation between the dynamics and the interacting topology of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators on phase synchronization transition in Barabási-Albert (BA) scale-free networks and Erdös-Rényi (ER) random networks. We show that, if natural frequencies of the oscillations are positively correlated with node degrees and the width of the frequency distribution is larger than a threshold value, a strong hysteresis loop arises in the synchronization diagram of BA networks, indicating the evidence of an explosive transition towards synchronization of relaxation oscillators system. In contrast to the results in BA networks, in more homogeneous ER networks, the synchronization transition is always of continuous type regardless of the width of the frequency distribution. Moreover, we consider the effect of degree-mixing patterns on the nature of the synchronization transition, and find that the degree assortativity is unfavorable for the occurrence of such an explosive transition.

  10. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  11. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Warnecke, Sascha; Hof, Bjoern; Avila, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow. This flow is a prototype of various pulsating flows in both nature and engineering, such as in the cardiovascular system where the onset of turbulence is often possibly related to various diseases (e.g., the formation of aneurysms). The experiments are carried out in a straight rigid pipe using water with a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate. The governing parameters, Reynolds number, Womersley number α (dimensionless pulsating frequency) and the pulsating amplitude A, cover a wide range 3 < α < 23 and 0 < A < 1 . To characterize the transition to turbulence, we determine how the characteristic lifetime of turbulent spots (/puffs) are affected by the pulsation. While at high pulsation frequencies (α > 12) lifetimes of turbulent spots are entirely unaffected by the pulsation, at lower frequencies they are substantially affected. With decreasing frequency much larger Reynolds numbers are needed to obtain spots of the same characteristic lifetime. Hence at low frequency transition is delayed significantly. In addition the effect of the pulsation amplitude on the transition delay is quantified. Duo Xu would like to acknowledge the support from Humboldt Foundation.

  12. Encoding voice fundamental frequency into vibrotactile frequency.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, M; Molitor, R D

    1979-10-01

    Measured in this study was the ability of eight hearing and five deaf subjects to identify the stress pattern in a short sentence from the variation in voice fundamental frequency (F0), when presented aurally (for hearing subjects) and when transformed into vibrotactile pulse frequency. Various transformations from F0 to pulse frequency were tested in an attempt to determine an optimum transformation, the amount of F0 information that could be transmitted, and what the limitations in the tactile channel might be. The results indicated that a one- or two-octave reduction of F0 vibrotactile frequency (transmitting every second or third glottal pulse) might result in a significant ability to discriminate the intonation patterns associated with moderate-to-strong patterns of sentence stress in English. However, accurate reception of the details of the intonation pattern may require a slower than normal pronounciation because of an apparent temporal indeterminacy of about 200 ms in the perception of variations in vibrotactile frequency. A performance deficit noted for the two prelingually, profoundly deaf subjects with marginally discriminable encodings offers some support for our previous hypothesis that there is a natural association between auditory pitch and perceived vibrotactile frequency. PMID:159917

  13. 13. EAST FACADE OF THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE. IT WAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. EAST FACADE OF THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE. IT WAS IN THIS BUILDING THAT 60 CYCLE AC POWER WAS CONVERTED TO 25 CYCLE DC POWER FOR USE IN CHICAGO'S TRANSIT SYSTEM; THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE IS PRESENTLY USED FOR STORAGE. LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  14. Coupled Resonance Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Shaun; Uys, Hermann; MAQClab Team

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same photodiode signal derived from the UV laser only. For trapping and cooling Yb+ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.9 nm to drive the S1/2-P1/2 cooling cycle. Since that cycle is not closed, a repump beam is needed at 935.18 nm to drive the D3/2-D[ 3 / 2 ] transition, which rapidly decays back to the S1/2 state. Our 369 nm laser is locked using Doppler free polarization spectroscopy of Yb+ ions, generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. Without pumping, the metastable D3/2 level is only sparsely populated, making direct absorption of 935 nm light difficult to detect. A resonant 369 nm pump laser can populate the D3/2 state, and fast repumping to the S1/2 ground state by on resonant 935 nm light, can be detected via the change in absorption of the 369 nm laser. This is accomplished using lock-in detection on the same photodiode signal to which the 369 nm laser is locked. In this way, simultaneous locking of two frequencies in very different spectral regimes is accomplished, while exploiting only the photodiode signal from one of the lasers. A rate equation model gives good qualitative agreement with experimental observation. This work was partially funded by the South African National Research Foundation.

  15. Modeling Frequency Comb Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qian; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Frequency comb sources have revolutionized metrology and spectroscopy and found applications in many fields. Stable, low-cost, high-quality frequency comb sources are important to these applications. Modeling of the frequency comb sources will help the understanding of the operation mechanism and optimization of the design of such sources. In this paper,we review the theoretical models used and recent progress of the modeling of frequency comb sources.

  16. Frequency Response Tool

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could leadmore » to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.« less

  17. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  18. Frequency Response Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel; Chassin, PNNL David; Zhang, PNNL Yu; PNNL,

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could lead to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.

  19. Making Sense of Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Responds to Ellis (2002), which focuses on frequency in language processing, language use, and language acquisition. Contextualizes the frequency factor in terms of the evolution of second language acquisition (SLA) research. Suggests that although relevant and important, the frequency factor requires greater definition and qualification.…

  20. Indium Single-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagourney, Warren

    2001-01-01

    A single laser-cooled indium ion is a promising candidate for an ultimate resolution optical time or frequency standard. It can be shown that single ions from group IIIA of the periodic table (indium, thallium, etc.) can have extremely small systematic errors. In addition to being free from Doppler, transit-time and collisional shifts, these ions are also quite insensitive to perturbations from ambient magnetic and electric fields (mainly due to the use of a J=0-0 transition for spectroscopy). Of all group IIIA ions, indium seems to be the most practical, since it is heavy enough to have a tolerable intercombination cooling transition rate and (unlike thallium) has transitions which are easily accessible with frequency multiplied continuous-wave lasers. A single indium ion standard has a potential inaccuracy of one part in 10(exp 18) for integration times of 10(exp 6) seconds. We have made substantial progress during the grant period in constructing a frequency standard based upon a single indium ion. At the beginning of the grant period, single indium ions were being successfully trapped, but the lasers and optical systems were inadequate to achieve the desired goal. We have considerably improved the stability of the dye laser used to cool the ions and locked it to a molecular resonance line, making it possible to observe stable cooling-line fluorescence from a single indium ion for reasonable periods of time, as required by the demands of precision spectroscopy. We have substantially improved the single-ion fluorescence signal with significant benefits for the detection efficiency of forbidden transitions using the 'shelving' technique. Finally, we have constructed a compact, efficient UV 'clock' laser and observed 'clock' transitions in single indium ions using this laser system. We will elaborate on these accomplishments.

  1. Laser transit anemometer experiences in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present examples of velocity measurements obtained in supersonic flow fields with the laser transit anemometer system. Velocity measurements of a supersonic jet exhausting in a transonic flow field, a cone boundary survey in a Mach 4 flow field, and a determination of the periodic disturbance frequencies of a sonic nozzle flow field are presented. Each of the above three cases also serves to illustrate different modes of laser transit anemometer operation. A brief description of the laser transit anemometer system is also presented.

  2. Absolute frequency measurement of the neutral 40Ca optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on microkelvin atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilpers, G.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.; Bartels, A.; Fortier, T. M.; Oskay, W. H.; Bergquist, J. C.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Hollberg, L.

    2007-04-01

    We report an absolute frequency measurement of the optical clock transition at 657 nm in 40Ca with a relative uncertainty of 7.5 × 10-15, one of the most accurate frequency measurements of a neutral atom optical transition to date. The frequency (455 986 240 494 135.8 ± 3.4) Hz was measured by stabilizing a diode laser system to a spectroscopic signal derived from an ensemble of 106 atoms cooled in two stages to a temperature of 10 µK. The measurement used a femtosecond-laser-based frequency comb to compare the Ca transition frequency with that of the single-ion 199Hg+ optical frequency standard at NIST. The Hg+ frequency was simultaneously calibrated relative to the NIST Cs fountain via the NIST time scale to yield an absolute value for the Ca transition frequency. The relative fractional instability between the two optical standards was 2 × 10-15 for 10 s of averaging time and 2 × 10-16 for 2000 s.

  3. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  4. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  5. A new model for broadband waveguide-to-microstrip transition design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Downey, Alan N.

    1988-01-01

    A new model is presented which permits the prediction of the resonant frequencies created by antipodal finline waveguide to microstrip transitions. The transition is modeled as a tapered transmission line in series with an infinite set of coupled resonant circuits. The resonant circuits are modeled as simple microwave resonant cavities of which the resonant frequencies are easily determined. The model is developed and the resonant frequencies determined for several different transitions. Experimental results are given to confirm the models.

  6. Diophantine frequency synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sotiriadis, Paul Peter

    2006-11-01

    A methodology for fine-step, fast-hopping, low-spurs phase-locked loop based frequency synthesis is presented. It uses mathematical properties of integer numbers and linear Diophantine equations to overcome the constraining relation between frequency step and phase-comparator frequency that is inherent in conventional phase-locked loop based frequency synthesis. The methodology leads to fine-step, fast-hopping, modular-structured frequency synthesizers with potentially very low spurs, especially in the vicinity of the carrier. The paper focuses on the mathematical principles of the new methodology and the related number theoretic algorithms. PMID:17091835

  7. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  8. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  9. Regional flood frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book, the fourth of a four volume set, contains five sections encompassing major aspects of regional flood frequency analysis. Each section starts usually with an invited state-of-the-art paper followed by contributed papers. The first section provides an assessment of regional flood frequency analysis. Methods for performing regional frequency analysis for ungaged watersheds are presented in Section 2. More discussion on regional frequency analysis is provided in Section 3. Selection and comparison of regional frequency methods are dealt with in Section 4; these are of great interest to the user. Increasing attention is being focused these days on paleohydrologic flood analysis. This topic is covered in Section 5.

  10. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  11. Frequency dependent squeezed light at audio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John

    2015-04-01

    Following successful implementation in the previous generation of instruments, squeezed states of light represent a proven technology for the reduction of quantum noise in ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. As a result of lower noise and increased circulating power, the current generation of detectors places one further demand on this technique - that the orientation of the squeezed ellipse be rotated as function of frequency. This extension allows previously negligible quantum radiation pressure noise to be mitigated in addition to quantum shot noise. I will present the results of an experiment which performs the appropriate rotation by reflecting the squeezed state from a detuned high-finesse optical cavity, demonstrating frequency dependent squeezing at audio frequencies for the first time and paving the way for broadband quantum noise reduction in Advanced LIGO. Further, I will indicate how a realistic implementation of this approach will impact Advanced LIGO both alone and in combination with other potential upgrades.

  12. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  13. Frequency Measurements of Al+ and Hg+ Optical Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Rosenband, T.; Wineland, D. J.; Hume, D.; Chou, C.-W.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Diddams, S. A.; Fortier, T. M.

    2010-02-01

    Frequency standards based on narrow optical transitions in 27Al+ and 199Hg+ ions have been developed at NIST. Both standards have absolute reproducibilities of a few parts in 1017. This is about an order of magnitude better than the fractional uncertainty of the SI second, which is based on the 133Cs hyperfine frequency. Use of femtosecond laser frequency combs makes it possible to compare the optical frequency standards to microwave frequency standards or to each other. The ratio of the Al+ and Hg+ frequencies can be measured more accurately than the reproducibility of the primary cesium frequency standards. Frequency measurements made over time can be used to set limits on the time variation of fundamental constants, such as the fine structure constant α or the quark masses.

  14. Spin-exchange frequency shift in alkali-metal-vapor cell frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Levi, Filippo; Vanier, Jacques

    2006-03-15

    In this paper we calculate the effect of spin-exchange collisions in alkali-metal vapors. In the framework of the high-energy approximation, we evaluate the spin-exchange cross sections related to the line broadening and to the frequency shift of the ground state hyperfine transition. We do the calculation for the four isotopes, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs. The results are used in particular to evaluate the spin-exchange frequency shift in Rb vapor cell frequency standards used in many applications. It turns out that, due to possible fluctuations in the atomic density, spin exchange may affect significantly the medium and long term frequency stability of the frequency standard.

  15. Frequency independent quenching of pulsed emission

    SciTech Connect

    Gajjar, Vishal; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Kramer, Michael; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Smits, Roy E-mail: bcj@ncra.tifr.res.in E-mail: ramesh@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2014-12-10

    Simultaneous observations at four different frequencies, 313, 607, 1380, and 4850 MHz, for three pulsars, PSRs B0031–07, B0809+74, and B2319+60, are reported in this paper. Identified null and burst pulses are highly concurrent across more than a decade of frequency. A small fraction of non-concurrent pulses (≤3%) is observed, most of which occur at the transition instances. We report, with very high significance for the first time, the full broadband nature of the nulling phenomenon in these three pulsars. These results suggest that nulling invokes changes on the global magnetospheric scale.

  16. Quantum Theory of Hyperfine Structure Transitions in Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klempt, E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in which radio-frequency transitions between molecular hyperfine structure states may be observed. Aspects of the quantum theory applied to the analysis of this physical system, are discussed. (Authors/BT)

  17. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  18. Vibrational scaling factors for transition metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, M. K.; Devera, J. L.; Brathwaite, A. D.; Mosley, J. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Vibrational frequencies for a selected set of transition metal carbonyl complexes are computed with various forms of density functional theory (B3LYP, BP86, M06, and M06-L), employing several different basis sets. The computed frequencies for the carbonyl stretches are compared to the experimental values obtained from gas phase infrared spectra of isolated neutrals and ions. Recommended carbonyl-stretch scaling factors which are developed vary significantly for different functionals, but there is little variation with basis set. Scaled frequencies compared to experimental spectra for cobalt and tantalum carbonyl cations reveal additional variations in multiplet patterns and relative band intensities for different functionals.

  19. Transitioning NASA Space Operations to Commercial Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene E.

    1998-01-01

    Major considerations associated with "Transitioning NASA Space Operations to Commercial Services" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Government use of commercial frequencies vs. commercial use of commercial frequencies for government use; 2) Commercial use of government frequencies; 3) Government vs commercial: Access techniques, data formats, and modulation and coding; 4) Government need for multiple sources: backup and competition; 5) Government in perceived competition with commercial service providers if TDRSS is used for commercial purposes; and 6) Coordination required among plans for CSOC, NSCP, and satellite industry.

  20. The nature of transition blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, J. J.; Anderson, S. F.; Plotkin, R. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Burnett, T. H.; Myers, A. D.

    2014-12-10

    Blazars are classically divided into the BL Lacertae (BLL) and flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) subclasses, corresponding to radiatively inefficient and efficient accretion regimes, respectively, largely based on the equivalent width (EW) of their optical broad emission lines (BELs). However, EW-based classification criteria are not physically motivated, and a few blazars have previously transitioned' from one subclass to the other. We present the first systematic search for these transition blazars in a sample of 602 unique pairs of repeat spectra of 354 blazars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, finding six clear cases. These transition blazars have bolometric Eddington ratios of ∼0.3 and low-frequency synchrotron peaks, and are thus FSRQ-like. We show that the strong EW variability (up to an unprecedented factor of >60) is due to swamping of the BELs from variability in jet continuum emission, which is stronger in amplitude and shorter in timescale than typical blazars. Although these transition blazars appear to switch between FSRQ and BLL according to the phenomenologically based EW scheme, we show that they are most likely rare cases of FSRQs with radiatively efficient accretion flows and especially strongly beamed jets. These results have implications for the decrease of the apparent BLL population at high redshifts, and may lend credence to claims of a negative BLL redshift evolution.

  1. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  2. Twisted transition of one bit written by trapezoidal single pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengbin; Yuan, Zhimin; Taslim, Sumitro Joyo; Yu, Shengkai; Liu, Bo

    This paper investigates bits transition shift written by a trapezoid single pole at a large skew angle. This work uses the even harmonic ripple effect to modulate the demagnetization field and observe the transition shape clearly. Experiment results indicate that the trapezoid single pole can produce a twisted transition at a large skew angle. This phenomenon is mainly due to the low-frequency data overwriting on the media. The twisted transition will limit the recording density in the perpendicular recording. Simulation work was completed to validate our experiment results. It suggests that the structure of single pole should be further improved to solve the twisted transition generated by the trapezoid single pole.

  3. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  4. Low frequency cultural noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jin Soo; Kang, Tae-Seob; Baag, Chang-Eob

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal cultural seismic noise is observed in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz. Cultural noise generated by human activities is generally observed in frequencies above 1 Hz, and is greater in the daytime than at night. The low-frequency noise presented in this paper exhibits a characteristic amplitude variation and can be easily identified from time domain seismograms in the frequency range of interest. The amplitude variation is predominantly in the vertical component, but the horizontal components also show variations. Low-frequency noise is markedly periodic, which reinforces its interpretation as cultural noise. Such noise is observed world-wide, but is limited to areas in the vicinity of railways. The amplitude variation in seismograms correlates strongly with railway timetables, and the waveform shows a wavelength shift associated with the Doppler effect, which indicates that the origin of seismic background noise in the frequency range 0.01-0.05 Hz is railways.

  5. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  6. Frequency selective terahertz retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard James

    The use of novel optical structures operating at terahertz frequencies in industrial and military applications continues to grow. Some of these novel structures include gratings, frequency selective surfaces, metamaterials and metasurfaces, and retroreflectors. A retroreflector is a device that exhibits enhanced backscatter by concentrating the reflected wave in the direction of the source. Retroreflectors have applications in a variety of diverse fields such as aviation, radar systems, antenna technology, communications, navigation, passive identification, and metrology due to their large acceptance angles and frequency bandwidth. This thesis describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of a retroreflector designed for terahertz frequencies and the incorporation of a frequency selective surface in order to endow the retroreflector with narrow-band frequency performance. The radar cross section of several spherical lens reflectors operating at terahertz frequencies was investigated. Spherical lens reflectors with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 8 mm were fabricated from fused silica ball lenses and their radar cross section was measured at 100 GHz, 160 GHz, and 350 GHz. Crossed-dipole frequency selective surfaces exhibiting band-pass characteristics at 350 GHz fabricated from 12 um-thick Nickel screens were applied to the apertures of the spherical lens reflectors. The radar cross section of the frequency selective retroreflectors was measured at 160 GHz and 350 GHz to demonstrate proof-of-concept of narrow-band terahertz performance.

  7. Word frequency affects hypermnesia.

    PubMed

    Macie, K M; Larsen, J D

    1996-12-01

    Hypermnesia, the tendency of participants to recall more items from a list they have studied when they are asked to recall the list several times on a free-recall test, is enhanced by factors that lead to better performance on free-recall tests. This study tested the hypothesis that words which appear with high frequency in the English language would produce hypermnesia but that low frequency words would not. The activity the 57 participants were required to do between repeated recall tests was also manipulated but had no effect on the number of words recalled. High frequency words resulted in hypermnesia but low frequency words did not. PMID:9009796

  8. Probability and Relative Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drieschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The concept of probability seems to have been inexplicable since its invention in the seventeenth century. In its use in science, probability is closely related with relative frequency. So the task seems to be interpreting that relation. In this paper, we start with predicted relative frequency and show that its structure is the same as that of probability. I propose to call that the `prediction interpretation' of probability. The consequences of that definition are discussed. The "ladder"-structure of the probability calculus is analyzed. The expectation of the relative frequency is shown to be equal to the predicted relative frequency. Probability is shown to be the most general empirically testable prediction.

  9. Frequencies of solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libbrecht, K. G.; Woodard, M. F.; Kaufman, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Solar oscillations have been observed at three different spatial scales at Big Bear Solar Observatory during 1986-1987 and, using three data sets, a new and more accurate table of solar oscillation frequencies has been compiled. The oscillations, which are presented as functions of radial order n and spherical harmonic degree l, are averages over azimuthal order and therefore approximate the normal mode frequencies of a nonrotating, spherically symmetric sun, near solar minimum. The table contains frequencies for most of the solar p and f modes with l between 0 and 1860, n between 0 and 26, and oscillation mode frequencies between 1.0 and 5.3.

  10. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  11. Cognition and the menopause transition.

    PubMed

    Maki, Pauline M; Henderson, Victor W

    2016-07-01

    Complaints about forgetfulness, "brain fog," and difficulty concentrating are common in women transitioning through menopause. Women with these cognitive complaints often express concern about whether these problems are normal, related to menopause, or represent a symptom of Alzheimer disease or another serious cognitive disorder. In this Practice Pearl, we provide a brief summary of the scientific literature on the frequency of cognitive complaints in midlife women, the validity of complaints in relation to performance on standardized cognitive tests, and the influence of menopause on cognitive performance. We then offer recommendations for healthcare providers and women to address cognitive concerns. PMID:27272226

  12. Resident Transitions to Assisted Living: A Role for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Noelle LeCrone; Koenig, Terry; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This study explored key aspects of resident transitions to assisted living (AL), including the frequency and importance of preadmission resident education and the potential role of social workers in this setting. To examine the factors that may help or hinder resident transitions to AL, a written survey was administered to a statewide,…

  13. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hof, Bjorn; Warnecke, Sascha; Xu, Duo

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow the most important example of pulsating flows is the cardiovascular system where the onset of fluctuations and turbulence can be a possible cause for various diseases such as the formation of aneurysms. The present study is limited to a straight rigid pipe, sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate and a Newtonian fluid. The dimensionless parameters (Womersley and Reynolds numbers) were chosen to include the parameter range encountered in larger arteries. We observe that at large frequencies the critical point for the onset of turbulence remains completely unaffected by pulsation for all amplitudes investigated (up to 40%). However for smaller frequencies (Womersley numbers below 10) the critical point considerably increases. Furthermore we investigate how the transition scenario is affected for a fixed frequency and increasing amplitudes (approaching oscillatory flow).

  14. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  15. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  16. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  17. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  18. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  19. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  20. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  1. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  2. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  3. High-performance iodine fiber frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Anna; Baynes, Fred N; Anstie, James D; Light, Philip S; Benabid, Fetah; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2011-12-15

    We have constructed a compact and robust optical frequency standard based around iodine vapor loaded into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). A 532 nm laser was frequency locked to one hyperfine component of the R(56) 32-0 (127)I(2) transition using modulation transfer spectroscopy. The stabilized laser demonstrated a frequency stability of 2.3×10(-12) at 1 s, almost an order of magnitude better than previously reported for a laser stabilized to a gas-filled HC-PCF. This limit is set by the shot noise in the detection system. We present a discussion of the current limitations to the performance and a route to improve the performance by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:22179880

  4. The status of cesium beam frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a lot of progress in cesium beam frequency standards in the last few years some of which will be reported here. Optical pumping is being pursued actively in a number of laboratories. Optically slowed and cooled beams have been demonstrated as well as traps for cold neutral atoms. The microwave cavity performance with regard to local phase shift at the beam holes was improved by use of carefully designed and built ring structures for the cavity ends. Work is being done on improvements in electronics with some emphasis on use of digital circuitry and microprocessors. The frequency pulling due to microwave Delta M = +/- 1 transitions (Ramsey pulling) was analyzed and shown to be important. Status of cesium beam frequency standards in some of the laboratories as well as some of the commercial work is discussed. Optical pumping and detection are discussed.

  5. Precision frequency synthesizing sources with excellent time/frequency performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Liren; Lin, Hai

    1994-01-01

    Precision frequency synthesizing sources are needed in the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards, telemetry, communication, and radar systems. This kind of frequency synthesizing source possesses high frequency accuracy and excellent long term and short term frequency stability. Several precision frequency synthesizing sources developed by Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM) which have been successfully applied to the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards system, and radar system are described. In addition, the working principle, implementation approach, and the main technical specifications of the frequency synthesizing sources are also given.

  6. Simple sweep frequency generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorov, I.

    1985-01-01

    A sweep frequency generator is described whose center frequency can be varied from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, with seven 1 to 3 and 3 to 10 scales covering the 10 kHz to 30 MHz range and one 3 to 5 scale for the 30 to 50 MHz range. It consists of a tunable pulse generator with output voltage attenuator, a diode mixer for calibration, and a sawtooth voltage generator as a source of frequency deviation. The pulse generator is a multivibrator with two emitter coupled transistors and two diodes in the collector circuit of one. The first diode extends the tuning range and increases the frequency deviation, the second diode provides the necessary base bias to the other transistor. The pulse repetition rate is modulated either directly by the sweep voltage of the calibrating oscilloscope, this voltage being applied to the base of the transistor with the two diodes in its collector circuit through an additional attenuator or a special emitter follower, or by the separate sawtooth voltage generator. The latter is a conventional two transistor multivibrator and produces signals at any constant frequency within the 40 to 60 Hz range. The mixer receives unmodulated signals from a reference frequency source and produces different frequency signals which are sent through an RCR-filter to a calibrating oscilloscope.

  7. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  8. The Managerial Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneeland, Steven J.

    1980-01-01

    Having identified the problem of managerial transition in a previous article (CE 510 277), the author outlines a strategy for change which includes performance appraisal, definition of the management structure, and counselling for the individual in transition. (SK)

  9. Glass transition(s) of ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Ionomers are predominantly nonpolar polymers that contain a small amount of bonded salt groups. Microphase separation of ion-rich microdomains occurs as a consequence of the thermodynamic incompatibility of the salt groups and the polymer matrix and associative interactions between salt groups. Associations of the salt groups usually increase the glass transition of the continuous matrix phase, presumably as a consequence of the inhibition of chain mobility that accompanies physical crosslinking. The central question raised in this paper is whether the dispersed ion-rich microphase exhibits a glass transition. Although no glass transition for the microphase is detected by calorimetry, a dynamic mechanical relaxation is commonly observed above the T{sub g} of the matrix phase. This transition has some of the attributes of a glass transition, but it is not clear what is the actual relaxation process that is measured. This paper discusses the effect of the ionic groups on the matrix glass transition, the origin of the high-temperature dynamic mechanical transition, and the effects of the addition of plasticizers on the T{sub g} of the matrix and the higher temperature mechanical relaxation.

  10. Dynamic high-resolution spectroscopic frequency referencing for frequency sweeping interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prellinger, Günther; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Pollinger, Florian

    2016-06-01

    A spectroscopic reference for the intrinsic frequency calibration of a ranging system based on frequency-sweeping interferometry (FSI) is presented. Saturation spectroscopy of iodine transitions at 636.8 nm is used to generate well-defined frequency markers. The experimental and analytic implementation is shown to enable in principle a frequency determination with an uncertainty of 0.17 MHz for a coverage factor k = 1. This corresponds to a relative standard uncertainty of 1.5× {10}-7 as contribution to the combined measurement uncertainty of the FSI-based length measurement. But the analysis also reveals the high sensitivity of the actually achievable measurement uncertainty to the quality of the spectroscopic reference data.

  11. Correcting transit time distributions in coarse MODFLOW-MODPATH models.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In low to medium resolution MODFLOW models, the area occupied by sink cells often far exceeds the surface area of the streams they represent. As a result, MODPATH will calculate inaccurate particle traces and transit times. A frequency distribution of transit times for a watershed will also be in error. Such a distribution is used to assess the long-term impact of nonpoint source pollution on surface waters and wells. Although the inaccuracies for individual particles can only be avoided by increased model grid resolution or other advanced modeling techniques, the frequency distribution can be improved by scaling the particle transit times by an adjustment factor during post-processing. PMID:22974377

  12. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  13. Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Vakoc, Benjamin; Yun, Seok Hyun

    In this chapter, we discuss a frequency-domain approach, optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), which is based on optical frequency-domain reflectometry and uses a wavelength-swept laser and standard single-element photodetectors. The chapter begins with an overview of the fundamental aspects of the technology, including the detected signal, sensitivity, depth range, and resolution, and then goes on to discuss specific component technologies including the light source, interferometer and acquisition electronics, and image processing. The final section of the chapter provides a brief glimpse at some of the biomedical applications that most directly take advantage of the improved speed and sensitivity of OFDI.

  14. Frequency stabilized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongeon, R. J.; Henschke, R. W.

    1984-08-01

    The document describes a frequency control system for a laser for compensating for thermally-induced laser resonator length changes. The frequency control loop comprises a frequency reference for producing an error signal and electrical means to move a length-controlling transducer in response thereto. The transducer has one of the laser mirrors attached thereto. The effective travel of the transducer is multiplied severalfold by circuitry for sensing when the transducer is running out of extension and in response thereto rapidly moving the transducer and its attached mirror toward its midrange position.

  15. A beat frequency buncher

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, D.W.; Corcoran, D.T.; Harper, G.C.

    1995-09-01

    A superconducting high energy buncher operating at 13/12 times the linac frequency has been built and installed, to combine with the low energy buncher operating at 1/12 the linac frequency. The system is synchronized so the linac and high energy buncher beat frequency remains in phase with the low energy buncher. On linac cycles not corresponding to a primary bunch, the high energy buncher bunches residual beam away from the linac longitudinal acceptance rather than into it. The resonator for the new high energy buncher was constructed by shortening an existing low-{beta} resonator.

  16. Quantum gates by qubit frequency modulation in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Felix; da Silva, Marcus P.; Johnson, Blake R.; Ohki, Thomas A.; Dutton, Zachary; Blais, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Several types of two-qubit gates have been realized experimentally in circuit QED. These are based, for example, on tuning the pair of qubits in resonance with each other [Majer, Nature 449, 443-447 (2007)] or on a microwave pulse on one qubit at the transition frequency of a second qubit [Chow, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 080502 (2011)]. Another realization is based on a sequence of blue-sideband transitions generated by microwave pulses [Leek, Phys. Rev. B 79, 180511(R) (2009)]. Here, we propose a different approach relying on oscillations of the qubit frequency using a flux-bias line. We explain how frequency modulation leads to tunable qubit-resonator and qubit-qubit interactions. We also show how this form of quantum control leads to faster (first-order) sideband transitions and consider applications to two-qubit gates.

  17. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to "z". Any claim of empirical violations of transitivity by…

  18. Transition: Terms and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ed

    This paper provides explanations and case examples of some terms and concepts related to transition of students with disabilities under 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Explanations and examples focus on the concepts of "statement of transition service needs" and "statement of needed transition services". The…

  19. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich

    2002-01-18

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected.

  20. Saturn as a Transiting Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Veyette, Mark J.

    2015-11-01

    Previous investigations of exoplanet atmospheres have not targeted those resembling the gas giant planets in our solar system. These types of exoplanets are too cold to be directly imaged or observed in emission, and their low transit probabilities and frequencies make characterization via transmission spectroscopy a challenging endeavor. However, studies of cold giant exoplanets would be highly valuable to our understanding of planet formation and migration and could place the gas giant members of our own solar system in a greater context. Here, we use solar occultations observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Cassini Spacecraft to extract the 1 to 5 μm transmission spectrum of Saturn, as if it were a transiting exoplanet. We detect absorption features from several molecules despite the presence of ammonia clouds. Self-consistent exoplanet atmosphere models show good agreement with Saturn's transmission spectrum but fail to reproduce the largest feature in the spectrum. We also find that atmospheric refraction determines the minimum altitude that could be probed during mid-transit of a Saturn-twin exoplanet around a Sun-like star. These results suggest that transmission spectroscopy of cold, long-period gaseous exoplanets should be possible with current and future observatories.

  1. Histograms and Frequency Density.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micromath, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Introduces exercises on histograms and frequency density. Guides pupils to Discovering Important Statistical Concepts Using Spreadsheets (DISCUSS), created at the University of Coventry. Includes curriculum points, teaching tips, activities, and internet address (http://www.coventry.ac.uk/discuss/). (KHR)

  2. Laser Frequency and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.

    2003-04-01

    The following two contributions in this volume are highlighting some remarkable recent developments at the interface between precision laser spectroscopy and ultrafast laser physics. After decades of struggle, we have finally found a practical method for measuring the frequency of light with extreme precision [1]. Femtosecond laser optical frequency comb synthesizers are opening exciting new perspectives for atomic spectroscopy and they can provide the clockwork for optical atomic clocks that will eventually far surpass the accuracy of the best microwave cesium clocks. J. C. Bergquist et al. [2] are reporting on a first optical atomic clock at NIST based on a single trapped Hg+ ion. The contribution by Jun Ye et al. [3] is illustrating the wealth of new opportunities for femtosecond laser frequency combs in the frequency and time domain.

  3. Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2007-01-01

    A radial probe transition between a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) and a waveguide has been designed for operation at frequency of 340 GHz and to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that includes the MMIC. Integrated radial probe transitions like this one are expected to be essential components of future MMIC amplifiers operating at frequencies above 200 GHz. While MMIC amplifiers for this frequency range have not yet been widely used because they have only recently been developed, there are numerous potential applications for them-- especially in scientific instruments, test equipment, radar, and millimeter-wave imaging systems for detecting hidden weapons.

  4. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  5. On letter frequency effects.

    PubMed

    New, Boris; Grainger, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    In four experiments we examined whether the frequency of occurrence of letters affects performance in the alphabetic decision task (speeded letter vs. pseudo-letter classification). Experiments 1A and 1B tested isolated letters and pseudo-letters presented at fixation, and Experiments 2A and 2B tested the same stimuli inserted at the 1st, 3rd, or 5th position in a string of Xs. Significant negative correlations between letter frequency and response times to letter targets were found in all experiments. The correlations were found to be stronger for token frequency counts compared with both type frequency and frequency rank, stronger for frequency counts based on a book corpus compared with film subtitles, and stronger for measures counting occurrences as the first letter of words compared with inner letters and final letters. Correlations for letters presented in strings of Xs were found to depend on letter case and position-in-string. The results are in favor of models of word recognition that implement case-specific and position-specific letter representations. PMID:21855049

  6. Femtosecond resolution of soft mode dynamics in structural phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Thomas P.; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Nelson, Keith A.; Garrett, Mark H.; Jensen, Hans P.; Warde, Cardinal

    1992-01-01

    The microscopic pathway along which ions or molecules in a crystal move during structural phase transition can often be described in terms of a collective vibrational mode of the lattice. In many cases, this mode, called a 'soft' phonon mode because of its characteristically low frequency near the phase transition temperature, is difficult to characterize through conventional frequency-domain spectroscopies such as light or neutron scattering. A femtosecond time-domain analog of light-scattering spectroscopy called impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) has been used to examine the soft modes of two perovskite ferroelectric crystals. The low-frequency lattice dynamics of KNbO3 and BaTiO3 are clarified in a manner that permits critical evaluation of microscopic models for their ferroelectric transitions. The results illustrate the advantages of ISRS over conventional Raman spectroscopy of low-frequency, heavily damped soft modes.

  7. Fine frequency tuning in sum-frequency generation of continuous-wave single-frequency coherent light at 252 nm with dual-wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Fine frequency tuning of the deep-ultraviolet single-mode coherent light at 252 nm was conducted through the PID feedback system automatically by changing the temperature of a beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal in a doubly resonant external cavity for the sum-frequency mixing of 373 and 780 nm light. The temperature-dependent frequency tuning rate is 19.3 MHzK(-1), which is sufficiently fine to realize the laser cooling of neutral silicon atoms because the natural width of the laser cooling transition is 28.8 MHz. PMID:17167584

  8. Hydroxyl X2Pi pure rotational transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorvitch, D.; Goldman, A.; Dothe, Hoang; Tipping, R. H.; Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    We present a list of frequencies, term values, Einstein A values, and assignments for the pure rotational transitions of the X2Pi state of the OH molecule. This list includes transitions from 3 to 2015/cm for Delta-v = 0, v-double-prime = 0-4, and J-double-prime = 0.5-49.5. The A values were computed using recent advances in calculating wave functions for a coupled system and an experimentally derived electric dipole moment function (Nelson et al., 1990) which exhibits curvature.

  9. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  10. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  11. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Bockstiegel, C.

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  12. Linear ion trap based atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, Lute

    1991-01-01

    In order to develop a trapped ion-based fieldable frequency standard with stability 1 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau for averaging times tau greater than 10,000 s, a hybrid RF/DC linear ion trap was developed which permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. The authors have confined Hg-199(+) ions in this trap and have measured very high Q transitions with good SNRs. In preliminary measurements they obtained stabilities of 1.6 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau (tau between 50 and 800 s) with a 160-mHz wide atomic resonance linewidth and a signal-to-noise ratio of 40 for each measurement cycle. Atomic resonance lines as narrow as 30 mHz on the 40.5-GHz clock transition have been measured with no appreciable reduction in the ion signal. A stability of 7 x 10 to the -14th/sq rt tau is made possible by the signal-to-noise and line Q of this measured transition. Analysis of fundamental sources of frequency instability indicates that a long-term stability of 2 x 10 to the -16th is feasible for this device with existing technology for tau = 10 to the 6th s or more.

  13. Frequency metrology using highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the scaling laws of relativistic fine structure splitting, many forbidden optical transitions appear within the ground state configurations of highly charged ions (HCI). In some hydrogen-like ions, even the hyperfine splitting of the 1s ground state gives rise to optical transitions. Given the very low polarizability of HCI, such laser-accessible transitions are extremely impervious to external perturbations and systematics that limit optical clock performance and arise from AC and DC Stark effects, such as black-body radiation and light shifts. Moreover, AC and DC Zeeman splitting are symmetric due to the much larger relativistic spin-orbit coupling and corresponding fine-structure splitting. Appropriate choice of states or magnetic sub-states with suitable total angular momentum and magnetic quantum numbers can lead to a cancellation of residual quadrupolar shifts. All these properties are very advantageous for the proposed use of HCI forbidden lines as optical frequency standards. Extremely magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, and nuclear size contributions to the binding energies of the optically active electrons make HCI ideal tools for fundamental research, as in proposed studies of a possible time variation of the fine structure constant. Beyond this, HCI that cannot be photoionized by vacuum-ultraviolet photons could also provide frequency standards for future lasers operating in that range.

  14. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  15. Characterization of a partially-stabilized frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold Dahl, M. E.; Erikson, Alex; Woodbury, Daniel; Bergeson, Scott

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of well-known frequency intervals in Cs, Rb, and Ca. These measurements are used to determine the accuracy of a partially-stabilized ti:sapphire frequency comb. One mode of our frequency comb is offset-locked to a Rb-stabilized diode laser. The comb's repetition rate is counted but not locked. A second laser is used to probe well-known atomic transitions in Cs, Rb, and Ca. We describe our offset locking and scanning techniques and demonstrate a frequency precision of 10 kHz in a 30 second measurement time. The accuracy of our laser frequency interval measurements is approximately 40 kHz. However, cell-based frequency references can be off by several hundred kHz. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-0969856) and the Air Force (Grant No. FA9950-12-1-0308).

  16. Acoustics of the Lambda Transition in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter; Meichle, David; Lathrop, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Liquid Helium undergoes a phase transition and becomes a quantum superfluid when cooled below the Lambda transition temperature of 2.17 Kelvin. The superfluid, which is a partial Bose Einstein Condensate, exhibits unique macroscopic properties such as flow without viscosity and ballistic temperature propagation. We have recorded striking audio-frequency sounds using a micro electromechanical microphone (MEMS) present as the Helium goes through the Lambda transition. Characterization of this sound, as well as its relevance to theories of the Lambda transition will be presented.

  17. Transition crossing in the Fermilab Main Ring, past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, I.; Ng, K.Y.

    1993-05-01

    A recent installation of passive mode dampers in the Booster has eliminated most of the longitudinal emittance blowup of intense bunches due to coupled-bunch instabilities. As a result, high intensity effects (negative-mass instability) dominate the present transition crossing in the Main Ring for the high-intensity cycles. A negative-mass stability limit is derived for transition crossing in the Main Ring and recent observations of high frequency signals around transition is presented. Finally, some predictions about the effect of the negative mass instability on the transition in the Main Ring with the future upgrades are attempted.

  18. Monolithic THz Frequency Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, N. R.; Narayanan, G.; Grosslein, R. M.; Martin, S.; Mehdi, I.; Smith, P.; Coulomb, M.; DeMartinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    Frequency multipliers are required as local oscillator sources for frequencies up to 2.7 THz for FIRST and airborne applications. Multipliers at these frequencies have not previously been demonstrated, and the object of this work was to show whether such circuits are really practical. A practical circuit is one which not only performs as well as is required, but also can be replicated in a time that is feasible. As the frequency of circuits is increased, the difficulties in fabrication and assembly increase rapidly. Building all of the circuit on GaAs as a monolithic circuit is highly desirable to minimize the complexity of assembly, but at the highest frequencies, even a complete monolithic circuit is extremely small, and presents serious handling difficulty. This is compounded by the requirement for a very thin substrate. Assembly can become very difficult because of handling problems and critical placement. It is very desirable to make the chip big enough to that it can be seen without magnification, and strong enough that it may be picked up with tweezers. Machined blocks to house the chips present an additional challenge. Blocks with complex features are very expensive, and these also imply very critical assembly of the parts. It would be much better if the features in the block were as simple as possible and non-critical to the function of the chip. In particular, grounding and other electrical interfaces should be done in a manner that is highly reproducible.

  19. Transits of planets with small intervals in circumbinary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Gen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Transit times around single stars can be described well by a linear ephemeris. However, transit times in circumbinary systems are influenced both by the gravitational perturbations and the orbital phase variations of the central binary star. Adopting a coplanar analog of Kepler-16 as an example, we find that circumbinary planets can transit the same star more than once during a single planetary orbit, a phenomenon we call 'tight transits.' In certain geometric architecture, the projected orbital velocity of the planet and the secondary star can approach zero and change sign, resulting in very long transits and/or 2-3 transits during a single binary orbit. Whether tight transits are possible for a particular system depends primarily on the binary mass ratio and the orbital architecture of both the binary and the planet. We derive a time-dependent criterion to judge when tight transits are possible for any circumbinary system. These results are verified with full dynamical integrations that also reveal other tight transit characteristics, i.e., the transit durations and the intervals between tight transits. For the seven currently known circumbinary systems, we estimate these critical parameters both analytically and numerically. Due to the mutual inclination between the planet and the binary, tight transits can only occur across the less massive star B in Kepler-16, -34, -35, and -47 (for both planets). The long-term average frequency of tight transits (compared to typical transits) for Kepler-16, -34, and -35 are estimated to be several percent. Using full numerical integrations, the next tight transit for each system is predicted and the soonest example appears to be Kepler-47b and -47c, which are likely to have tight transits before 2025. These unique and valuable events often deserve special observational scrutiny.

  20. Single frequency multitransmitter telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to a single frequency multitransmitter telemetry system that will deliver a substantial amount of data at low cost. The invention consists essentially of a plurality of sensor transmitter units at different locations, with individual signal conditioning and logic, which send sampled data signals to a single receiver. The transmitters operate independently on the same frequency in a frequency shift keying modulation system and are not synchronized to the receiver. The problem of reception of data from more than one transmitter simultaneously is solved by discarding the data - when there is overlap of data from two or more transmitters, the data is discarded and when there is no overlap the data is retained. The invention utilizes a unique overlap detection technique to determine if data should be retained or discarded. When data is received from a transmitter, it goes into a shift register.

  1. Low Frequency Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose to survey the sky from 10-100 GHz covering greater than 50% of the sky in intensity and polarizatiton. This will allow us to mep out the synchrotron and free - free background as well as the spinning dust component to sufficient sensitivity to allow detailed modeling and removal of the galactic foregrounds allowing for deeper polarization surveys searching for signatures of inflation. While most measurements have concentrated on the region above 100 GHz this reggion is more complex in dust contmination that originally thought. Dust is best measured at high frequencies but the atmosphere greatly hinders extremely deep dust surveys due to water vapor. Surveys ar low frequency will be complimentary to the higher frequency measurements.

  2. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  3. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  4. Frequency division multiplex technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brey, H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for monitoring a plurality of condition responsive devices is described. It consists of a master control station and a remote station. The master control station is capable of transmitting command signals which includes a parity signal to a remote station which transmits the signals back to the command station so that such can be compared with the original signals in order to determine if there are any transmission errors. The system utilizes frequency sources which are 1.21 multiples of each other so that no linear combination of any harmonics will interfere with another frequency.

  5. Frequency Tunable Wire Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides frequency tunable solid-state radiation-generating devices, such as lasers and amplifiers, whose active medium has a size in at least one transverse dimension (e.g., its width) that is much smaller than the wavelength of radiation generated and/or amplified within the active medium. In such devices, a fraction of radiation travels as an evanescent propagating mode outside the active medium. It has been discovered that in such devices the radiation frequency can be tuned by the interaction of a tuning mechanism with the propagating evanescent mode.

  6. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2Π_u - X^2Σ_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 1×10-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of isomerization transition states.

    PubMed

    Baraban, Joshua H; Changala, P Bryan; Mellau, Georg Ch; Stanton, John F; Merer, Anthony J; Field, Robert W

    2015-12-11

    Transition state theory is central to our understanding of chemical reaction dynamics. We demonstrate a method for extracting transition state energies and properties from a characteristic pattern found in frequency-domain spectra of isomerizing systems. This pattern-a dip in the spacings of certain barrier-proximal vibrational levels-can be understood using the concept of effective frequency, ω(eff). The method is applied to the cis-trans conformational change in the S1 state of C2H2 and the bond-breaking HCN-HNC isomerization. In both cases, the barrier heights derived from spectroscopic data agree extremely well with previous ab initio calculations. We also show that it is possible to distinguish between vibrational modes that are actively involved in the isomerization process and those that are passive bystanders. PMID:26659051

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of isomerization transition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Joshua H.; Changala, P. Bryan; Mellau, Georg Ch.; Stanton, John F.; Merer, Anthony J.; Field, Robert W.

    2015-12-01

    Transition state theory is central to our understanding of chemical reaction dynamics. We demonstrate a method for extracting transition state energies and properties from a characteristic pattern found in frequency-domain spectra of isomerizing systems. This pattern—a dip in the spacings of certain barrier-proximal vibrational levels—can be understood using the concept of effective frequency, ωeff. The method is applied to the cis-trans conformational change in the S1 state of C2H2 and the bond-breaking HCN-HNC isomerization. In both cases, the barrier heights derived from spectroscopic data agree extremely well with previous ab initio calculations. We also show that it is possible to distinguish between vibrational modes that are actively involved in the isomerization process and those that are passive bystanders.

  9. Dynamical Transition in polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunfen; Markelz, Andrea

    2008-03-01

    Two of the possible causes for the so called dynamical transition (the rapid increase in flexibility for biomolecules at ˜ 200 K) are: thermally activated side chain diffusive motions with hydration dependent activation energies; or a glass transition in the biological water directly adjacent to the biomolecule. If the transition is strictly due to side chain activation, it should not depend on protein structure. Previously we demonstrated that the dynamical transition remains after tertiary structure was removed using THz time domain dielectric spectroscopy (0.2 -2.0 THz, 0.5-5ps). Here measurements on polyalanine as a function of chain length show that the dynamical transition does not occur for peptide length shorter than 5. However, the transition is observed for 5 mer and higher. Structural and simulation studies indicate that the 5 mer transiently occupies structured forms [1,2]. These results suggest that A) the dynamical transition is not due to thermally activated side chain motion and B) secondary structure is necessary for the dynamical transition. Secondary structure possibly induces sufficient ordering in the adjacent water to result in a fragile to strong glass transition resulting in increased protein flexibility [3]. [1] KAH Wildman et al. Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 24 (2003) 94-109. [2] Yuguang Mu,et al. Proteins 58, (2005) 45-52. [3] S.H. Chen et al. PNAS (2006) 9012--9016.

  10. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  11. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  12. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  13. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  14. Frequency of orthodontic extraction

    PubMed Central

    Dardengo, Camila de S.; Fernandes, Luciana Q. P.; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The option of dental extraction for orthodontic purposes has been debated for more than 100 years, including periods when it was widely used in treatment, including the present, during which other methods are used to avoid dental extractions. The objective was to analyze the frequency of tooth extraction treatment performed between 1980 and 2011 at the Orthodontic Clinic of Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). Material and Methods: The clinical records of 1484 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment were evaluated. The frequency of extractions was evaluated with regard to sex, Angle's classification, the different combinations of extractions and the period when orthodontic treatment began. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between variables, while the chi-square test for trends was used to assess the frequency of extractions over the years. Results: There was a reduction of approximately 20% in the frequency of cases treated with tooth extraction over the last 32 years. The most frequently extracted teeth were first premolars. Patients with Class I malocclusion showed fewer extractions, while Class II patients underwent a higher number of extraction treatment. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to sex. Conclusion: New features introduced into the orthodontic clinic and new esthetic concepts contributed to reducing the number of cases treated with dental extractions. However, dental extractions for orthodontic purposes are still well indicated in certain cases. PMID:27007762

  15. Femtosecond frequency comb measurement of absolute frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants in cesium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Mbele, Vela; Gerginov, Vladislav; Fortier, Tara M.; Diddams, Scott A.; Hollberg, Leo; Tanner, Carol E.

    2010-04-15

    We report measurements of absolute transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants for the 8S{sub 1/2}, 9S{sub 1/2}, 7D{sub 3/2}, and 7D{sub 5/2} states in {sup 133}Cs vapor. The stepwise excitation through either the 6P{sub 1/2} or 6P{sub 3/2} intermediate state is performed directly with broadband laser light from a stabilized femtosecond laser optical-frequency comb. The laser beam is split, counterpropagated, and focused into a room-temperature Cs vapor cell. The repetition rate of the frequency comb is scanned and we detect the fluorescence on the 7P{sub 1/2,3/2{yields}}6S{sub 1/2} branches of the decay of the excited states. The excitations to the different states are isolated by the introduction of narrow-bandwidth interference filters in the laser beam paths. Using a nonlinear least-squares method we find measurements of transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants that are in agreement with other recent measurements for the 8S state and provide improvement by 2 orders of magnitude over previously published results for the 9S and 7D states.

  16. Measuring absolute frequencies beyond the GPS limit via long-haul optical frequency dissemination.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Cappellini, Giacomo; Livi, Lorenzo F; Poggiali, Francesco; de Cumis, Mario Siciliani; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Frittelli, Matteo; Mura, Alberto; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo; Inguscio, Massimo

    2016-05-30

    Global Positioning System (GPS) dissemination of frequency standards is ubiquitous at present, providing the most widespread time and frequency reference for the majority of industrial and research applications worldwide. On the other hand, the ultimate limits of the GPS presently curb further advances in high-precision, scientific and industrial applications relying on this dissemination scheme. Here, we demonstrate that these limits can be reliably overcome even in laboratories without a local atomic clock by replacing the GPS with a 642-km-long optical fiber link to a remote primary caesium frequency standard. Through this configuration we stably address the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in an ultracold gas of 173Yb, with a precision that exceeds the possibilities of a GPS-based measurement, dismissing the need for a local clock infrastructure to perform beyond-GPS high-precision tasks. We also report an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy on the transition frequency reported in literature. PMID:27410109

  17. Measurements of fast transition instability in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Lee, R.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    A fast transition instability presents a limiting factor for ion beam intensity in RHIC. Several pieces of evidence show that electron clouds play an important role in establishing the threshold of this instability. In RHIC Runs8 the measurements of the instability, using a button BPM, were done in order to observe details of the instability development on the scale over hundreds and thousands turns. The paper presents and discusses the results of those measurements in time and frequency domains.

  18. Optical frequency comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Foltynowicz, A; Masłowski, P; Ban, T; Adler, F; Cossel, K C; Briles, T C; Ye, J

    2011-01-01

    Optical frequency combs offer enormous potential in the detection and control of atoms and molecules by combining their vast spectral coverage with the extremely high spectral resolution of each individual comb component. Sensitive and multiplexed trace gas detection via cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy has been demonstrated for various molecules and applications; however, previous demonstrations have been confined to the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. Future spectroscopic capabilities are created by developing comb sources and spectrometers for the deep ultraviolet and mid-infrared spectral regions. Here we present a broadband high resolution mid-infrared frequency comb-based Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the important molecular fingerprint spectral region of 2100-3600 cm(-1) (2.8-4.8 microm). The spectrometer, employing a multipass cell, allows simultaneous acquisition of broadband, high resolution spectra (down to 0.0035 cm(-1) of many molecular species at concentrations in the part-per-billion range in less than 1 min acquisition time. The system enables precise measurements of concentration even in gas mixtures that exhibit continuous absorption bands. The current sensitivity, 2 x 10(-8) cm(-1) Hz-1/2 per spectral element, is expected to improve by two orders of magnitude with an external enhancement cavity. We have demonstrated this sensitivity increase by combining cavity-enhanced frequency comb spectroscopy with a scanning Fourier transform spectrometer in the near-infrared region and achieving a sensitivity of 4.7 x 10(-10) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). A cavity-enhanced mid-infrared comb spectrometer will provide a near real-time, high sensitivity, high resolution, precisely frequency calibrated, broad bandwidth system for many applications. PMID:22457942

  19. Coarse frequency comb interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwider, J.

    2008-08-01

    Real wedge interferometers of the Fizeau-type do not allow for fringes in case of a spectral broad band source - or in short: for white light fringes. Here, the use of a suitable frequency comb source will help to overcome this limitation on the one hand and on the other will offer the capability for enhanced phase sensitivity in high precision measurements of surface deviations. Frequency combs can be produced either by using a pulse train from a fs-laser or by passive filtering of the light emitted by a broad band source as a superlum-diode or a fs-laser. The frequency comb produced by a common fs-laser is extremely fine, i.e., the frequency difference of consecutive peaks is very small or the distance of consecutive pulses of the pulse train might be of the order of 1m. Therefore, the coarse pulse train produced by passive filtering of a broad band source is better adapted to the needs of surface testing interferometers. White light fringes are either applied for the profiling of discontinuous surfaces and/or can serve as an indication for the correct choice of multiplication factors in superposition interferometry. During the last decennium it became more and more clear that spatially incoherent sources provide better measuring accuracy in surface measurements due to the reduced influence of dust diffraction patterns. The advantage of laser illumination can nevertheless be maintained if the laser light is made spatially incoherent through moving scatterers in the light path. Here, we will discuss the application of spatially incoherent broad band light frequency filtered through a Fabry-Perot filter. The main applications are in the following fields: (1) surface profiling applications using two-beam Fizeau interferometers, (2) selection of single cavities out of a series of interlaced cavities, and (3) sensitivity enhancement for multi-beam interferometers for planeness or sphericity measurements. Some of the discussed possibilities will be experimentally

  20. Frequency Domain Modeling of SAW Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    New SAW sensors for integrated vehicle health monitoring of aerospace vehicles are being investigated. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. However, the lack of design tools for MEMS devices in general, and for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices specifically, has led to the development of tools that will enable integrated design, modeling, simulation, analysis and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. A frequency domain model has been created. The model is mainly first order, but it includes second order effects from triple transit echoes. This paper presents the model and results from the model for a SAW delay line device.

  1. Phase Stabilization of a Frequency Comb using Multipulse Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadarso, Andrea; Mur-Petit, Jordi; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2014-02-01

    From the interaction between a frequency comb and an atomic qubit, we derive quantum protocols for the determination of the carrier-envelope offset phase, using the qubit coherence as a reference, and without the need of frequency doubling or an octave spanning comb. Compared with a trivial interference protocol, the multipulse protocol results in a polynomial enhancement of the sensitivity O(N-2) with the number N of laser pulses involved. We specialize the protocols using optical or hyperfine qubits, Λ schemes, and Raman transitions, and introduce methods where the reference is another phase-stable cw laser or frequency comb.

  2. Phase stabilization of a frequency comb using multipulse quantum interferometry.

    PubMed

    Cadarso, Andrea; Mur-Petit, Jordi; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2014-02-21

    From the interaction between a frequency comb and an atomic qubit, we derive quantum protocols for the determination of the carrier-envelope offset phase, using the qubit coherence as a reference, and without the need of frequency doubling or an octave spanning comb. Compared with a trivial interference protocol, the multipulse protocol results in a polynomial enhancement of the sensitivity O(N-2) with the number N of laser pulses involved. We specialize the protocols using optical or hyperfine qubits, Λ schemes, and Raman transitions, and introduce methods where the reference is another phase-stable cw laser or frequency comb. PMID:24579598

  3. Explosive transitions to synchronization in networks of phase oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Leyva, I.; Navas, A.; Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Almendral, J. A.; Buldú, J. M.; Zanin, M.; Papo, D.; Boccaletti, S.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of dynamical abrupt transitions in the macroscopic state of a system is currently a subject of the utmost interest. The occurrence of a first-order phase transition to synchronization of an ensemble of networked phase oscillators was reported, so far, for very particular network architectures. Here, we show how a sharp, discontinuous transition can occur, instead, as a generic feature of networks of phase oscillators. Precisely, we set conditions for the transition from unsynchronized to synchronized states to be first-order, and demonstrate how these conditions can be attained in a very wide spectrum of situations. We then show how the occurrence of such transitions is always accompanied by the spontaneous setting of frequency-degree correlation features. Third, we show that the conditions for abrupt transitions can be even softened in several cases. Finally, we discuss, as a possible application, the use of this phenomenon to express magnetic-like states of synchronization. PMID:23412391

  4. Small-amplitude synchrotron tune near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The separatrices of the rf buckets near transition are mapped when the synchronous phase is neither 0 or {pi}. The small-amplitude synchronous tune is derived when the rf frequency is changed. Synchrotron radiation is present in all electron storage ring. As a result, the synchronous phase is always offset from {phi}{sub s} = {pi} to compensate for the power loss. Even for proton storage rings with negligible synchrotron radiation, the synchronous phase is also required to be offset from {phi}{sub s} = 0 or {pi} slightly to compensate for beam loading. Thus for all storage rings operating near transition, beam particles reside in accelerating buckets instead of stationary bucket. It is of interest to map these buckets and see how they evolve near transition. When the rf frequency is varied, the closed orbit is pushed radially inward or outward. The momentum of the particle synchronous with the rf is thus changed. By measuring the small-amplitude synchrotron tune as a function of the rf frequency, the lowest first few orders of the slip factor can be inferred. Here, we derive this relationship up to the lowest first three orders of the slip factor when the particle velocity is not ultra-relativistic.

  5. Transition to Old Age (Transition to Retirement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Simon

    Several conceptualizations and definitions of retirement have been proposed. One of them--the three-stage transition process--can be illustrated from studies in Israel: (1) leaving the old role; (2) going through the act of formal separation; and (3) adjusting to the new situation and role. Today's higher rate of survival into later years means…

  6. Laser frequency locking based on Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuechun, Jiao; Jingkui, Li; Limei, Wang; Hao, Zhang; Linjie, Zhang; Jianming, Zhao; Suotang, Jia

    2016-05-01

    We present a laser frequency locking to Rydberg transition with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra in a room-temperature cesium vapor cell. Cesium levels 6S1/2, 6P3/2, and the nD5/2 state, compose a cascade three-level system, where a coupling laser drives Rydberg transition, and probe laser detects the EIT signal. The error signal, obtained by demodulating the EIT signal, is used to lock the coupling laser frequency to Rydberg transition. The laser frequency fluctuation, ∼0.7 MHz, is obtained after locking on, with the minimum Allan variance to be 8.9 × 10‑11. This kind of locking method can be used to stabilize the laser frequency to the excited transition. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274209, 61475090, 61378039, and 61378013), and the Research Project Supported by Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Grant No. 2014-009).

  7. Absolute frequency of an atomic hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Hall, R. G.; Percival, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate determination was made of the unperturbed atomic hydrogen ground state hyperfine transition frequency (F=1,m=0 - F=0,m=0) in reference to present world wide realizations of internationally defined time interval. In relation to the international atomic time system, the composite value is 1,420,405,751.7755 plus or minus 0.0031 HZ.

  8. Transitions in Spousal Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynda C.; Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Jackson, Sharon; Hirsch, Calvin

    2003-01-01

    Describes transitions over 5 years among community-dwelling elderly spouses into and within caregiving roles and associated health outcomes. The trajectory of health outcomes associated with caregiving was generally downward. Those who transitioned to heavy caregiving had more symptoms of depression, and poorer self-reported health and health…

  9. Good Transitions = Great Starts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The smooth transition of outgoing and incoming board members and officers is of vital importance and can determine the PTA's success for years to come. The transition process is the responsibility of both incoming and outgoing officers and board members. It gives closure to those leaving their positions and allows those coming in to be properly…

  10. Children and Transition Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Daily transitions in early childhood centers and classrooms include periods when children are completing one activity, preparing to begin a new activity, and moving from place to place in a room or building. Transition activities involve teaching techniques that prepare learners to listen, relax, sit down, move between locations or activities, and…

  11. Matter in transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU( N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU( N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  12. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  13. Researching Student Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Richard A.; Smith, Gregory P.; Luan, Jing

    2006-01-01

    This article sketches a research agenda for the further study of community college student transitions. Specific techniques are depicted as are potential data sources that can be used to pursue that agenda. The role of student tracking systems in transition research is discussed as well as the applicability of national surveys to the study of…

  14. Transitions and Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    If children are to benefit from a healthy, supportive early childhood experience, it is important to strengthen transitions between early childhood experiences in educational and care settings and the more formal educational system. This issue of Coordinator's Notebook focuses on strengthening linkages and transitions between home, preschool, and…

  15. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  16. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K{alpha} transitions in Fe XVIII-XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T.; Jacobs, V.L.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Kahn, S.M.

    1992-11-01

    The iron K{alpha} emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 {Angstrom} is analyzed. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII through Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1--0.4 m{Angstrom}. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with non-spectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2s{sup r}2p{sup s} configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K{alpha} emission from the Sun. While many similarities are found, a few differences arise from the somewhat higher electron density in tokamak plasmas (10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}), which affects the fine-structure level populations of the ground states of the initial ion undergoing electron-impact excitation or dielectronic recombination. We also find that several spectral features are comprised of different transitions from those reported in earlier analyses of solar data.

  17. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K[alpha] transitions in Fe XVIII-XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T. ); Jacobs, V.L. . Condensed Matter and Radiation Sciences Div.); Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Kahn, S.M. )

    1992-11-01

    The iron K[alpha] emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 [Angstrom] is analyzed. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII through Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1--0.4 m[Angstrom]. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with non-spectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2s[sup r]2p[sup s] configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K[alpha] emission from the Sun. While many similarities are found, a few differences arise from the somewhat higher electron density in tokamak plasmas (10[sup 13] cm[sup [minus]3]), which affects the fine-structure level populations of the ground states of the initial ion undergoing electron-impact excitation or dielectronic recombination. We also find that several spectral features are comprised of different transitions from those reported in earlier analyses of solar data.

  18. Infrared frequency standard based on magnetically trapped NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2006-09-15

    An infrared frequency standard based on the NH |n{sub v}=0,N{sub 0}=0,J=1,F{sub 1}=3/2,F=5/2,M{sub F}=5/2>{yields}|n{sub v}=1,N{sub 0}=0,J=1,F{sub 1}=3/2,F=5/2,M{sub F}== 5/2> transition (3 {mu}m) is proposed. There is no Zeeman shift with this transition frequency, because the Zeeman coefficient is not dependent on the vibrational state. NH molecules, precooled by collisions with liquid {sup 3}He vapor, are trapped by an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The temperature of the trapped NH molecules holds the potential to be reduced down to several {mu}K by evaporative cooling. The uncertainty of the clock transition can potentially be reduced to lower than 10{sup -17}.

  19. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  20. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  1. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  2. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  3. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  4. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  5. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10−10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile. PMID:26190043

  6. Image enhancement by non-linear extrapolation in frequency space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H. (Inventor); Greenspan, Hayit K. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An input image is enhanced to include spatial frequency components having frequencies higher than those in an input image. To this end, an edge map is generated from the input image using a high band pass filtering technique. An enhancing map is subsequently generated from the edge map, with the enhanced map having spatial frequencies exceeding an initial maximum spatial frequency of the input image. The enhanced map is generated by applying a non-linear operator to the edge map in a manner which preserves the phase transitions of the edges of the input image. The enhanced map is added to the input image to achieve a resulting image having spatial frequencies greater than those in the input image. Simplicity of computations and ease of implementation allow for image sharpening after enlargement and for real-time applications such as videophones, advanced definition television, zooming, and restoration of old motion pictures.

  7. Multiwire thermocouples: Frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements are made with a novel two wire thermocouple. Signals from two wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the two wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 2 omega(sub 1) where omega is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. A compensation factor is recommended for larger frequencies omega greater than 2 omega(sub 1). Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5 omega(sub 1) where omega (sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter. Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data were used and knowledge of the gas velocity is available.

  8. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  9. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  10. Drought Frequency Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Valdes, J. B.

    2003-04-01

    Droughts are related with prolonged time periods during moisture is significantly below normal situation. Drought indexes try to scale the main drought features based on similar definitions. The Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) is a well-known index, which for a given aggregation-time measures the deviation from the normality of the precipitation. One of the SPI weak points in the representation of drought phenomenon is that drought duration should be analyzed by using different aggregation-times. In this work, a new index is presented, which simultaneously characterize droughts based on the deviation from the normal precipitation regime and the drought persistence, both from the statistical point of view. The new index does not require aggregation at different time-lengths. Instead droughts are treated as multivariate events, whose dimensionality depends on the duration. Probabilistic events with different dimensionalities are compared on a common dimension of interest. In this case the dimension chosen is the mean frequency of recurrence. The derived index, named Drought Frequency Index (DFI) may be used to characterize historical droughts or current situation. It can be apply not only over precipitation but also over flows or other hydroclimatic variables. The new index was applied to several places in USA and Spain both for precipitation and flow historical sequences, and compared with SPI. The DFI allows the representation of the main drought characteristics in a single value, based on the stochastic feature of the phenomenon, and scaled on the mean frequency of recurrence.

  11. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  12. A Posteriori Transit Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Daniel J.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2013-08-01

    Given the radial velocity (RV) detection of an unseen companion, it is often of interest to estimate the probability that the companion also transits the primary star. Typically, one assumes a uniform distribution for the cosine of the inclination angle i of the companion's orbit. This yields the familiar estimate for the prior transit probability of ~Rlowast/a, given the primary radius Rlowast and orbital semimajor axis a, and assuming small companions and a circular orbit. However, the posterior transit probability depends not only on the prior probability distribution of i but also on the prior probability distribution of the companion mass Mc, given a measurement of the product of the two (the minimum mass Mc sin i) from an RV signal. In general, the posterior can be larger or smaller than the prior transit probability. We derive analytic expressions for the posterior transit probability assuming a power-law form for the distribution of true masses, dΓ/dMcvpropMcα, for integer values -3 <= α <= 3. We show that for low transit probabilities, these probabilities reduce to a constant multiplicative factor fα of the corresponding prior transit probability, where fα in general depends on α and an assumed upper limit on the true mass. The prior and posterior probabilities are equal for α = -1. The posterior transit probability is ~1.5 times larger than the prior for α = -3 and is ~4/π times larger for α = -2, but is less than the prior for α>=0, and can be arbitrarily small for α > 1. We also calculate the posterior transit probability in different mass regimes for two physically-motivated mass distributions of companions around Sun-like stars. We find that for Jupiter-mass planets, the posterior transit probability is roughly equal to the prior probability, whereas the posterior is likely higher for Super-Earths and Neptunes (10 M⊕ - 30 M⊕) and Super-Jupiters (3 MJup - 10 MJup), owing to the predicted steep rise in the mass function toward smaller

  13. A high-performance Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-performance frequency standard based on (199)Hg(+) ions confined in a hybrid radio frequency (RF)/dc linear ion trap is demonstrated. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. A 160-mHz-wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5-GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5-mHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10(exp -15) for 24,000-second averaging times. Measurements with a 37-mHz line width for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is better than 1 x 10(exp -15) at 10,000-second averaging times.

  14. Ultra-stable Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    We report the development of a fieldable frequency standard based on Hg-199(+) ions confined in a hybrid r.f./dc linear ion trap. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the r.f. confining fields. A 160 mHz wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5 GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5 MHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10 exp -15 for 24,000 s averaging times. For longer averaging intervals, measurements are limited by instabilities in available hydrogen maser frequency standards. Measurements with 37 mHz linewidth for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is at least as good as 1 x 10 exp -15.

  15. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalnaker, Jason; Almaguer, Jose; Sherry, Leanne

    2011-05-01

    The atomic structure of lithium (Li) has aroused a significant amount theoretical and experimental interest as a system in which precision atomic calculations and spectroscopic measurements can be united to yield scientifically significant results. While there have been many experimental investigations of Li spectroscopy, particularly of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure on the 22S1 / 2 --> 22P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 (D 1 , D 2) transitions, they suffer from significant disagreements and systematic effects. By utilizing the optical-to-microwave frequency conversion made possible by a stabilized optical frequency comb, we will be able to resolve the discrepancies and measure the optical frequencies of the D 1 and D 2 transitions to an accuracy of 5 kHz. We present preliminary data from an atomic beam source and discuss future plans to develop a laser-cooled and trapped source. Supported by NIST Precision Measurements Grant.

  16. High-resolution optical frequency metrology with stabilized femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ronald Jason

    The merging of such seemingly disparate fields as optical frequency metrology and ultrafast physics over the past few years has had a revolutionary impact on both fields. Extensive research over the past several decades has focused on stabilizing cw lasers to atomic and molecular transitions. These transitions in the optical and near-infrared regimes provide some of the highest Q's accessible in spectroscopy due to their high resonant frequencies (Q ≡ nu o/deltanu). Modern experiments have enjoyed increasing levels of precision and accuracy due to such stabilized laser systems. A long standing problem in optical frequency metrology, however, is the difficulty to perform direct frequency measurements in the optical spectrum. Traditional optical frequency chains are complex, costly, and lack flexibility. Recent experiments based on mode-locked femtosecond (fs) lasers promise to eliminate this problem and make optical frequency measurements accessible as a general laboratory tool. The use of fs lasers now enables the direct measurement of optical transitions by simply linking these frequencies to the repetition rate of the fs laser. The ability of the femtosecond laser to link the optical and radio frequency regimes is ultimately limited by its stability. In this dissertation, we present a novel stabilization scheme in which the frequency, phase, and repetition rate of a Kerr-lens mode-locked (KLM) ti:sapphire laser are locked to that of an ultra-stable Fabry-Perot reference cavity. The large signal to noise ratio of the recovered cavity resonance allows the superb short term stability (tau < 1 second) of the passive reference cavity to be transferred to the femtosecond laser. This technique may find future application in any experiment involving the use of femtosecond pulses in which a resonant cavity is employed, such as intracavity studies of light-matter interactions with ultra-short pulses. The short term instability of the cavity stabilized femtosecond laser

  17. Fiber optic frequency transfer link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Sydnor, Richard L. (Inventor); Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A reference frequency distribution system is disclosed for transmitting a reference frequency from a reference unit to a remote unit while keeping the reference frequency at the reference unit and the remote unit in phase. A fiber optic cable connects the reference unit to the remote unit. A frequency source at the reference unit produces a reference frequency having an adjustable phase. A fiber optic transmitter at the reference unit modulates a light beam with the reference frequency and transmits the light beam into the fiber optic cable. A 50/50 reflector at the remote unit reflects a first portion of the light beam from the reference unit back into the fiber optic cable to the reference unit. A first fiber optic receiver disposed at the remote unit receives a second portion of the light beam and demodulates the reference frequency to be used at the remote unit. A second fiber optic receiver disposed at the reference unit receives the first portion of the light beam and demodulates a reference frequency component. A phase conjugator is connected to the frequency source for comparing the phase of the reference frequency component to the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam being transmitted from the reference unit to maintain a conjugate (anti-symmetric) relationship between the reference frequency component and the reference frequency modulating the light beam where virtually no phase difference exists between the phase of the reference frequency component and the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam.

  18. Extrasolar Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew Collier

    An extrasolar planet will transit the visible hemisphere of its host star if its orbital plane lies sufficiently close to the observer's line of sight. The resulting periodic dips in stellar flux reveal key system parameters, including the density of the host star and, if radial-velocity observations are available, the surface gravitational acceleration of the planet. In this chapter I present the essential methodology for modelling the time-dependent flux variation during a transit, and its use in determining the posterior probability distribution for the physical parameters of the system. Large-scale searches for transiting systems are an efficient way of discovering planets whose bulk densities, and hence compositions, can be accessed if their masses can also be determined. I present algorithms for detrending large ensembles of light curves, for searching for transit-like signals among them. I also discuss methods for identifying diluted stellar eclipsing binaries mimicking planetary transit signals, and validation of transit candidates too faint for radial-velocity follow-up. I review the use of time-resolved spectrophotometry and high-resolution spectroscopy during transits to identify the molecular constituents of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  19. Predictability of critical transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance. PMID:26651760

  20. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  1. High-precision frequency measurement of the 423-nm Ca i line

    SciTech Connect

    Salumbides, E. J.; Maslinskas, V.; Dildar, I. M.; Wolf, A. L.; Duijn, E.-J. van; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.

    2011-01-15

    We have performed an accurate frequency calibration of the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0{yields}}4s4p {sup 1}P{sub 1} principal resonance line of the neutral calcium atom at 423 nm. Doppler-free cw excitation on a Ca atomic beam was performed by utilizing a Sagnac geometry in the alignment of the excitation beams. From frequency calibrations against a frequency comb, stabilized to a global positioning system (GPS) disciplined Rb standard, the transition frequency is determined at 709 078 373.01(35) MHz for the main {sup 40}Ca isotope. Slightly lower accuracies are obtained for the transition frequencies of the less abundant isotopes. The achieved fractional uncertainty of 5x10{sup -10} exceeds the requirements for including this transition in investigations that aim to probe a possible variation in the fine-structure constant {alpha} on cosmological time scales.

  2. Two-photon transitions to excited states in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Quattropani, A.; Bassani, F.; Carillo, S.

    1982-06-01

    Resonant two-photon transition rates from the ground state of atomic hydrogen to ns excited states have been computed as a function of photon frequencies in the length and velocity gauges in order to test the accuracy of the calculation and to discuss the rate of convergence over the intermediate states. The dramatic structure of the transition rates produced by intermediate-state resonances is exhibited. A two-photon transparency is found in correspondence to each resonance.

  3. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  4. Multi-frequency modes in superconducting resonators: Bridging frequency gaps in off-resonant couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    A SQUID inserted in a superconducting waveguide resonator imposes current and voltage boundary conditions that makes it suitable as a tuning element for the resonator modes. If such a SQUID element is subject to a periodically varying magnetic flux, the resonator modes acquire frequency side bands. We calculate the multi-frequency eigenmodes and these can couple resonantly to physical systems with different transition frequencies and this makes the resonator an efficient quantum bus for state transfer and coherent quantum operations in hybrid quantum systems. As an example of the application, we determine their coupling to transmon qubits with different frequencies and we present a bi-chromatic scheme for entanglement and gate operations. In this calculation, we obtain a maximally entangled state with a fidelity F = 95 % . Our proposal is competitive with the achievements of other entanglement-gates with superconducting devices and it may offer some advantages: (i) There is no need for additional control lines and dephasing associated with the conventional frequency tuning of qubits. (ii) When our qubits are idle, they are far detuned with respect to each other and to the resonator, and hence they are immune to cross talk and Purcell-enhanced decay.

  5. Thermodynamics, phase transition and quasinormal modes with Weyl corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Subhash

    2016-04-01

    We study charged black holes in D dimensional AdS space, in the presence of four derivative Weyl correction. We obtain the black hole solution perturbatively up to first as well as second order in the Weyl coupling, and show that first law of black hole thermodynamics is satisfied in all dimensions. We study its thermodynamic phase transition and then calculate the quasinormal frequencies of the massless scalar field perturbation. We find that, here too, the quasinormal frequencies capture the essence of black hole phase transition. Few subtleties near the second order critical point are discussed.

  6. Resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv K; Padmanabhan, Thallam V

    2011-01-01

    Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized, prospective

  7. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  8. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  9. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Frequency agile relativistic magnetrons

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.; Price, H.D.

    1995-11-01

    The authors are developing a family of frequency agile relativistic magnetrons to continuously cover the bands from 1 to 3 GHz. They have achieved tuning ranges of > 33%. The magnetrons have been operated repetitively in burst mode at rates up to 100 pps for 10 sec. Power is extracted from two resonators, and is in the range of 400--600 MW, fairly flat across the tuning bandwidth. They are using a network of phase shifters and 3-dB hybrids to combine the power into a single arm and to provide a continuously adjustable attenuator.

  11. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  12. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  13. Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy of optical clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Oates, C. W.; Barber, Z. W.; Lemke, N. D.; Ludlow, A. D.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Riehle, F.

    2010-07-15

    We present nonstandard optical Ramsey schemes that use pulses individually tailored in duration, phase, and frequency to cancel spurious frequency shifts related to the excitation itself. In particular, the field shifts and their uncertainties can be radically suppressed (by two to four orders of magnitude) in comparison with the usual Ramsey method (using two equal pulses) as well as with single-pulse Rabi spectroscopy. Atom interferometers and optical clocks based on two-photon transitions, heavily forbidden transitions, or magnetically induced spectroscopy could significantly benefit from this method. In the latter case, these frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10{sup -17}. Moreover, our approach opens the door for high-precision optical clocks based on direct frequency comb spectroscopy.

  14. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. I. Basic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new fireball configuration has been developed which produces vircator-like instabilities. Electrons are injected through a transparent anode into a spherical plasma volume. Strong high-frequency oscillations with period corresponding to the electron transit time through the sphere are observed. The frequency is below the electron plasma frequency, hence does not involve plasma eigenmodes. The sphere does not support electromagnetic eigenmodes at the instability frequency. However, the rf oscillations on the gridded anode create electron bunches which reinforce the grid oscillation after one transit time or rf period, which leads to an absolute instability. Various properties of the instability are demonstrated and differences to the sheath-plasma instability are pointed out, one of which is a relatively high conversion efficiency from dc to rf power. Nonlinear effects are described in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012105 (2011)].

  15. On transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Q.; Wang, X.

    2014-07-15

    We revisit the transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection with a focus on the property of their singularities. As the driven frequency tends to zero, the logarithmic singularity of Alfvén resonance shifts to the power-law singularity of forced reconnection, due to merging of the two resonance layers. The transition criterion depends on either kinetic effects or dissipations that resolve the singularity. As an example, a small but finite resistivity η is introduced to investigate the transition process. The transition threshold is then obtained as the driven frequency reaches a level of ∼O((η/k){sup 1/3})

  16. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  17. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  18. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  19. The Heliosphere in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The heliosphere consists of the connective tissue of particles, fields and photons that mediate our interaction with the Sun and with interstellar space. Exploration of the heliosphere yields clues to the nature of environments we cannot reach ourselves, illuminating the composition of the solar interior, or the acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy. The heliosphere is also a laboratory for us to understand the fundamental physics of magnetized plasma, from heating and instabilities to coupling with neutral gas and dust. This talk will review some of the most exciting recent results in the heliosphere with a focus on transitions: what we can learn by exploring transitions within the heliosphere, how the heliosphere is responding to the long term transition in solar activity, and how our very view of the heliosphere is in transition with upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and IMAP.

  20. Magellan in transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doody, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Aerobraking Magellan would provide the possibility of obtaining gravity field data for Venus all the way to the poles. Attempts to accomplish aerobraking, which began on May 25, 1993 in the Magellan Transition Experiment, are discussed.

  1. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  2. Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows the difference between planet transit timing of single and multiple planet system. In tightly packed planetary systems, the gravitational pull of the planets among themselves ca...

  3. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  4. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition, and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  5. Matter in transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, wheremore » a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.« less

  6. Neural representation of dynamic frequency is degraded in older adults.

    PubMed

    Clinard, Christopher G; Cotter, Caitlin M

    2015-05-01

    Older adults, even with clinically normal hearing sensitivity, often report difficulty understanding speech in the presence of background noise. Part of this difficulty may be related to age-related degradations in the neural representation of speech sounds, such as formant transitions. Frequency-following responses (FFRs), which are dependent on phase-locked neural activity, were elicited using sounds consisting of linear frequency sweeps, which may be viewed as simple models of formant transitions. Eighteen adults (ten younger, 22-24 years old, and nine older, 51-67 years old) were tested. FFRs were elicited by tonal sweeps in six conditions. Two directions of frequency change, rising or falling, were used for each of three rates of frequency change. Stimulus-to-response cross correlations revealed that older adults had significantly poorer representation of the tonal sweeps, and that FFRs became poorer for faster rates of change. An additional FFR signal-to-noise ratio analysis based on time windows revealed that across the FFR waveforms and rates of frequency change, older adults had smaller (poorer) signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate that older adults, even with clinically-normal hearing sensitivity, have degraded phase-locked neural representations of dynamic frequency. PMID:25724819

  7. Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha

    1995-01-01

    Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes during the solar cycle are calculated for a non-magnetic polytrope convection zone model. An isothermal chromospheric atmosphere threaded by a uniform horizontal magnetic field is correlated to this model. The relevant observations of such frequency changes are discussed. The calculated simultaneous changes in the field strength and chromospheric temperature result in the frequency shifts that are similar to those of the observations.

  8. Toroidal mode number transition of the edge localized modes in the KSTAR plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Yun, G. S.; Kim, M.; Lee, J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Ko, W. H.; the KSTAR Team

    2015-09-01

    Rapid transitions of the toroidal mode number (n ) have been often detected during the evolution of the edge localized modes (ELMs) in the inter-ELM-crash periods of the KSTAR tokamak plasmas. The mode number transitions accompany changes of the mode frequency ({{f}\\text{mode}} ) (e.g. n changed from 8 to 5 while {{f}\\text{mode}} changed from ~32 to 9 kHz). The observed transition phenomena have been diverse including small and large increase (or decrease) in the mode number and multiple transitions during a single inter-ELM-crash period. Two classes of the mode transitions were identified: non-overlapping transition and overlapping transition. The former case is characterized by the absence of coherent filamentary structure during the transition and the latter case is characterized by co-existence of two coherent filamentary structures with different mode numbers. Each transition process typically lasts a few hundreds to thousands of μs.

  9. Frequency selective bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowitt, M. S.; Fixsen, D. J.; Goldin, A.; Meyer, S. S.

    1996-10-01

    We propose a concept for radiometry in the millimeter, the submillimeter, and the far-IR spectral regions, the frequency selective bolometer (FSB). This system uses a bolometer as a coupled element of a tuned quasi-optical interference filter in which the absorption, the transmission, and the reflection characteristics of the filter depend on the frequency in a controlled manner. Several FSB's can be cascaded within a straight light pipe to produce a high-efficiency, compact, multiband radiometer. A prototype design is presented together with its anticipated performance based on a one-dimensional transmission-line model. Instruments based on FSB technology should have several advantages over current multiband bolometric radiometers including smaller and more compact cryogenic optics, reduced demands on cryostat size and weight, high coupling efficiency, minimum constraints on the geometry in the focal plane. An FSB system can be configured as a multiband, close-packed focal-plane array, permitting efficient use of the throughput of a telescope.

  10. Laser-frequency multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    A high quality mode locked pulse train was obtained at 9.55 micrometers, the CO2 wavelength chosen for frequency doubling into the atmospheric window at 4.8 micrometers. The pulse train consists of a 3 micro sec burst of 1.5 nsec pulses separated by 40 nsec, in a TEM(00) mode and with a total energy of 100 mJ. The pulse intensity without focussing is about 3 MW/sq.cm., already quite close to the target intensity of 10 MW/sq.cm. for frequency doubling in a AgGaSe2 crystal. The mode-locked train is obtained by intracavity modulation at 12.5 MHz using a germanium crystal driven with a power of about 30 Watts. Line selection is achieved firstly by the use of a 0.92 mm thick CaF2 plate at the Brewster angle within the cavity, which completely suppresses 10.6 micrometer band radiation. Secondly, a particular rotational line, the P20 at 9.55 micrometers, is selected by the injection of a continuous beam is mode-matched to the pulsed laser cavity using a long focal length lens, and for best line-locking it is necessary to fine tune the length of the pulsed laser resonator. Injection causes substantial depression of the gain switched spike.

  11. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  12. Frequency comb metrology with an optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Balskus, K; Schilt, S; Wittwer, V J; Brochard, P; Ploetzing, T; Jornod, N; McCracken, R A; Zhang, Z; Bartels, A; Reid, D T; Südmeyer, T

    2016-04-18

    We report on the first demonstration of absolute frequency comb metrology with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency comb. The synchronously-pumped OPO operated in the 1.5-µm spectral region and was referenced to an H-maser atomic clock. Using different techniques, we thoroughly characterized the frequency noise power spectral density (PSD) of the repetition rate frep, of the carrier-envelope offset frequency fCEO, and of an optical comb line νN. The comb mode optical linewidth at 1557 nm was determined to be ~70 kHz for an observation time of 1 s from the measured frequency noise PSD, and was limited by the stability of the microwave frequency standard available for the stabilization of the comb repetition rate. We achieved a tight lock of the carrier envelope offset frequency with only ~300 mrad residual integrated phase noise, which makes its contribution to the optical linewidth negligible. The OPO comb was used to measure the absolute optical frequency of a near-infrared laser whose second-harmonic component was locked to the F = 2→3 transition of the 87Rb D2 line at 780 nm, leading to a measured transition frequency of νRb = 384,228,115,346 ± 16 kHz. We performed the same measurement with a commercial fiber-laser comb operating in the 1.5-µm region. Both the OPO comb and the commercial fiber comb achieved similar performance. The measurement accuracy was limited by interferometric noise in the fibered setup of the Rb-stabilized laser. PMID:27137274

  13. Giant modification of atomic transition probabilities induced by a magnetic field: forbidden transitions become predominant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, Armen; Tonoyan, Ara; Hakhumyan, Grant; Papoyan, Aram; Mariotti, Emilio; Sarkisyan, David

    2014-05-01

    The magnetic field-induced giant modification of probabilities for seven components of 6S1/2, Fg = 3 → 6P3/2, Fe = 5 transition of the Cs D2 line, forbidden by selection rules, is observed experimentally for the first time. For the case of excitation with circularly polarized laser radiation, the probability of a Fg = 3, mF = -3 → Fe = 5, mF = -2 transition becomes the largest of 25 transitions of the Fg = 3 → Fe = 2,3,4,5 group in a wide-range magnetic field of 200-3200 G. Moreover, the modification is the largest among D2 lines of alkali metals. A half-wave-thick cell (the length along the beam propagation axis L = 426 nm) filled with Cs has been used in order to achieve sub-Doppler resolution, which allows the large number of atomic transitions that appear in the absorption spectrum to be separated when an external magnetic field is applied. For B > 3000 G the group of seven transitions Fg = 3 → Fe = 5 is completely resolved and is located at the high frequency level of Fg= 3 → Fe = 2,3,4 transitions. The applied theoretical model describes very well the experimental curves.

  14. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  15. Dynamical conductivity across the superconductor-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Mason; Loh, Yen Lee; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2013-03-01

    Thin superconducting films can exhibit a quantum phase transition from a superconductor to an insulator with increasing disorder. While the exact mechanism of the transition is not completely understood, there is strong evidence that it is bosonic in nature in some models and materials, with disorder acting to localize the superconducting pairs. Previous studies of bosonic models of the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) have focused almost entirely on criticality and dc properties at the transition. We go beyond these studies by calculating the dynamical conductivity of a disordered (2 +1)D XY model using quantum Monte Carlo simulations that capture the phase fluctuations driving the SIT. Our results obey standard sum rule constraints for the longitudinal and transverse current correlation functions and show a build-up of integrated spectral weight near the transition. We will discuss the low frequency spectral weight in terms of a possible intermediate bose-metal phase between the superconductor and insulator.

  16. The quark-hadron transition in cosmology and astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Olive, K A

    1991-03-01

    A transition from normal hadronic matter (such as protons and neutrons) to quark-gluon matter is expected at both high temperatures and densities. In physical situations, this transition may occur in heavy ion collisions, the early universe, and in the cores of neutron stars. Astrophysics and cosmology can be greatly affected by such a phase transition. With regard to the early universe, big bang nucleosynthesis, the theory describing the primordial origin of the light elements, can be affected by inhomogeneities produced during the transition. A transition to quark matter in the interior by neutron stars further enhances our uncertainties regarding the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and neutron star properties such as the maximum mass and rotation frequencies. PMID:17799279

  17. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Sato, Koji; Okamoto, Satoshi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Qiu, Z Q; Saitoh, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we show that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. We demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices. PMID:27573443

  18. A corrosion control manual for rail rapid transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. O.; Fitzgerald, J. F., II; Menke, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    In 1979, during the planning stage of the Metropolitan Dade County Transit System, the need was expressed for a corrosion control manual oriented to urban rapid transit system use. This manual responds to that need. The objective of the manual is to aid rail rapid transit agencies by providing practical solutions to selected corrosion problems. The scope of the manual encompasses corrosion problems of the facilities of rapid transit systems: structures and tracks, platforms and stations, power and signals, and cars. It also discusses stray electric current corrosion. Both design and maintenance solutions are provided for each problem. Also included are descriptions of the types of corrosion and their causes, descriptions of rapid transit properties, a list of corrosion control committees and NASA, DOD, and ASTM specifications and design criteria to which reference is made in the manual. A bibliography of papers and excerpts of reports and a glossary of frequency used terms are provided.

  19. Spin-current probe for phase transition in an insulator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N’Diaye, Alpha T.; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Sato, Koji; Okamoto, Satoshi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; et al

    2016-08-30

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of the central topics of magnetism and condensed matter science. Experimentally, the spin fluctuation is found transcribed onto scattering intensity in the neutron-scattering process, which is represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility and maximized at phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and therefore it can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy. However, large facilities such as a nuclear reactor are necessary. Here we present that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop microprobe for spin transition; spin current is amore » flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin excitation. Additionally, we demonstrate detection of antiferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency-dependent spin-current transmission measurements, which provides a versatile probe for phase transition in an electric manner in minute devices.« less

  20. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  1. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  2. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  3. Carbon Isotopic Excursions Associated with the Mid-Pleistocene Transition and the Mid-Brunhes Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. M.; Bill, N. S.; Clark, P. U.; Pisias, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    During the last 2 Myr, the climate system experienced two major transitions in variability: the mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), which represents a shift from dominant low-amplitude 41-kyr frequencies to dominant high-amplitude 100-kyr frequencies, and the mid-Brunhes Transition (MBT), which represents an increase in the amplitude of the 100-kyr frequency. While the MPT and MBT are typically identified in the benthic marine δ18O stack, their expression in other components of the climate system is less clear. Pleistocene δ13C records have been used to characterize climate and ocean circulation changes in response to orbital forcing, but these studies have used either a limited number of records or stacked data sets, which have the potential to bias the variability from the large number of young records. Here we present those existing δ13C data sets (n=18) that completely span these transitions. We use empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) on these continuous data sets rather than stacking, allowing the determination of the dominant modes of variability and characterization of the time-frequency variation during the last 2 Myr. Our results identify two substantial carbon isotopic excursions. The first is a pronounced negative excursion during the MPT (~900 ka, MIS 23) that stands out as the strongest minimum in the last 2 Myr (previously identified from five records by Raymo et al., 1997). Corresponding ɛNd data from the South Atlantic suggest a strong weakening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation through the MIS 23 interglacial associated with this excursion. The second is a robust positive excursion ~530 ka (MIS 13), prior to the MBT (MIS 11), which stands out as the strongest maximum in the last 2 Myr. Possible causes of these excursions will be discussed.

  4. Dynamic Land Surface Classifcations using Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H.; Tian, Y.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface emissivity in microwave frequencies is critical to the remote sensing of soil moisture, precipitation, and vegetation. Different land surfaces have different spectral signatures in the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Their spatial and temporal behaviors are also highly variable. These properties are yet not well understood in microwave frequencies, despite their capability in detecting water-related variables in the atmosphere and land surface. A classification scheme was developed to stratify the Earth's land surfaces based on their seasonally dynamic microwave signatures. An unsupervised clustering approach was used identify and distinguish data groupings along two microwave based indicies. Land surface data clusters were mapped to determine their spatial relationships to known land cover groupings. Differences in land surface clusters were analyzed in their spatial consistency and their direction and magnitude of land surface change. It was found that vegetation and topography were the predominant contributors to change between seasons. Land surface extremes of sandy desert and closed canopy tropical forest displayed minimal intra-annual variability while transitional zones, such as the Sahel and North American temperate forests, exhibited the most variability. Distinct microwave signatures varied between seasons along a latittudinal gradient. Overall variability in land surface types increased at high lattitudes. This classification will help inform research studies maniputlating the microwave frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum to better characterize land surface dynamics, and will be very useful in the validation of radiative transfer models and quantification of uncertainty in global precipitation monitoring.

  5. Frequency mixer having ferromagnetic film

    DOEpatents

    Khitun, Alexander; Roshchin, Igor V.; Galatsis, Kosmas; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-03-29

    A frequency conversion device, which may include a radiofrequency (RF) mixer device, includes a substrate and a ferromagnetic film disposed over a surface of the substrate. An insulator is disposed over the ferromagnetic film and at least one microstrip antenna is disposed over the insulator. The ferromagnetic film provides a non-linear response to the frequency conversion device. The frequency conversion device may be used for signal mixing and amplification. The frequency conversion device may also be used in data encryption applications.

  6. Frequency Stabilization of High-Power 3.3 μm CW Laser with a Frequency Comb System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuma, Susumu; Momose, Takamasa

    2010-06-01

    %TEXT OF YOUR ABSTRACT The development of optical frequency combs has enabled a broad range of lasers to be stabilized. In this study, we have developed a system to stabilize high-power CW mid-infrared (MIR) radiation at 3.3 μm using a NIR-VIS frequency comb. The mid-infrared radiation at 3.3 μm were generated as an idler of a CW OPO laser pumped by a 1.064 μm fibre laser. To stabilize the MIR radiation with a frequency comb system in 450 nm to 1.25 μm range, the pump frequency at 1.064 μm and the sum frequency of the MIR radiation and the pump radiation were locked simultaneously to the comb laser. The sum frequency of the MIR and pump radiations was generated in a PPLN crystal. With this technique, we have successfully obtained a width of better than 50 kHz at 3.3 μm with a power of more than 1 W. The stability is currently limited by the response of the PZT in an OPO cavity. Further improvement is underway. The stabilized MIR radiation at 3.3 μm can be used as a source for ultra-high-resolution spectroscopy of vibration-rotation transitions of molecules. Especially, it may be used to decrease the frequency uncertainty of the ν_3 F_2(2) component of the P(7) transition of CH_4, which is one of the optical frequency standards recommended by CIPM. Another application of frequency stabilized MIR radiation is to build-up MIR radiation in a cavity for optical manipulation and trapping of cold molecules we have proposed in New. J. Phys. 11. 055023 (2009).

  7. Venus Transit 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Odenwald, S. F.

    2002-09-01

    December 6th, 1882 was the last transit of the planet Venus across the disk of the sun. It was heralded as an event of immense interest and importance to the astronomical community as well as the public at large. There have been only six such occurrences since Galileo first trained his telescope on the heavens in 1609 and on Venus in 1610 where he concluded that Venus had phases like the moon and appeared to get larger and smaller over time. Many historians consider this the final nail in the coffin of the Ptolemaic, Earth centered solar system. In addition, each transit has provided unique opportunities for discovery such as measurement and refinement of the astronomical unit, calculation of longitudes on the earth, and detection of Venus' atmosphere. The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum in partnership with the Solar System Exploration Forum, DPS, and a number of NASA space missions is developing plans for an international education program centered around the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. The transit will be visible in its entirety from Europe and partially from the East Coast of the United States. We will use a series of robotic observatories including the Telescopes In Education network distributed in latitude to provide observations of the transit that will allow middle and high school students to calculate the A.U. through application of parallax. We will also use Venus transit as a probe of episodes in American history (e.g. 1769: revolutionary era, 1882: post civil war era, and 2004: modern era). Museums and planetariums in the US and Europe will offer real time viewing of the transit and conduct educational programs through professional development seminars, public lectures, and planetarium shows. We are interested in soliciting advice from the research community to coordinate professional research interests with this program.

  8. FREQUENCY STABILIZING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Anderson, O.A.

    1960-05-01

    An electronic control circuit is described in which a first signal frequency is held in synchronization with a second varying reference signal. The circuit receives the first and second signals as inputs and produces an output signal having an amplitude dependent upon rate of phase change between the two signals and a polarity dependent on direction of the phase change. The output may thus serve as a correction signal for maintaining the desired synchronization. The response of the system is not dependent on relative phase angle between the two compared signals. By having practically no capacitance in the circuit, there is minimum delay between occurrence of a phase shift and a response in the output signal and therefore very fast synchronization is effected.

  9. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.; Davis, Laura E.; Webb, Mark

    1992-01-01

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  10. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  11. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the −1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  12. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  13. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  14. Instantaneous Frequency Attribute Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Margrave, G. F.; Ben Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The instantaneous seismic data attribute provides a different means of seismic interpretation, for all types of seismic data. It first came to the fore in exploration seismology in the classic paper of Taner et al (1979), entitled " Complex seismic trace analysis". Subsequently a vast literature has been accumulated on the subject, which has been given an excellent review by Barnes (1992). In this research we will compare two different methods of computation of the instantaneous frequency. The first method is based on the original idea of Taner et al (1979) and utilizes the derivative of the instantaneous phase of the analytic signal. The second method is based on the computation of the power centroid of the time-frequency spectrum, obtained using either the Gabor Transform as computed by Margrave et al (2011) or the Stockwell Transform as described by Stockwell et al (1996). We will apply both methods to exploration seismic data and the DPRK events recorded in 2006 and 2013. In applying the classical analytic signal technique, which is known to be unstable, due to the division of the square of the envelope, we will incorporate the stabilization and smoothing method proposed in the two paper of Fomel (2007). This method employs linear inverse theory regularization coupled with the application of an appropriate data smoother. The centroid method application is straightforward and is based on the very complete theoretical analysis provided in elegant fashion by Cohen (1995). While the results of the two methods are very similar, noticeable differences are seen at the data edges. This is most likely due to the edge effects of the smoothing operator in the Fomel method, which is more computationally intensive, when an optimal search of the regularization parameter is done. An advantage of the centroid method is the intrinsic smoothing of the data, which is inherent in the sliding window application used in all Short-Time Fourier Transform methods. The Fomel technique

  15. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  16. On the frequency and amplitude spectrum and the fluctuations at the output of a communication receiver.

    PubMed

    Planat, M; Eckert, C

    2000-01-01

    A mixer cascaded with a low-pass filter is the basic piece of any communication receiver. The frequency and amplitude fluctuations of beat signals recorded at the output of the mixer plus filter set-up are investigated experimentally and explained on the basis of number theory in relation to the Riemann problem concerning the distribution of prime numbers. The frequency of the beat signal is obtained from a diophantine approximation of the frequency ratio of the input oscillators. The amplitude is defined globally from the position of resolved fractions with respect to an equally spaced graduation. Time series analysis methods show that frequency fluctuations present a transition from white frequency noise to 1/f frequency noise close to resonance; the latter is compatible with an underlying fractal attractor. The same transition is observed in the case of time series computed from continued fraction expansions. PMID:18238658

  17. Spin waves and collisional frequency shifts of a trapped-atom clock.

    PubMed

    Maineult, Wilfried; Deutsch, Christian; Gibble, Kurt; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2012-07-13

    We excite spin waves with spatially inhomogeneous Ramsey pulses and study the resulting frequency shifts of a chip-scale atomic clock of trapped 87Rb. The density-dependent frequency shifts of the hyperfine transition simulate the s-wave collisional frequency shifts of fermions, including those of optical lattice clocks. As the spin polarizations oscillate in the trap, the frequency shift reverses and it depends on the area of the second Ramsey pulse, exhibiting a predicted beyond mean-field frequency shift. Numerical and analytic models illustrate these observed behaviors. PMID:23030137

  18. Comparison of resonance frequencies of major atomic lines in 398-423 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Katsunari; Hizawa, Nagisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Kaori; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated spectroscopy of Ca, Rb, In, K, Ga, and Yb atomic lines in 398-423 nm. Using an etalon of an ultralow-expansion coefficient, we have determined ratios of the resonance frequencies of these atoms. The etalon has small group-delay-dispersion mirrors to be an accurate frequency reference over a wavelength span of a few tens of nanometer. The etalon resonance frequencies are calibrated with accurately known transition frequencies of Ca at 423 nm and Rb at 422 nm. Based on this calibration, the absolute frequencies are also determined for some atomic lines with smaller uncertainties than earlier reports.

  19. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  20. Transition from Collisionless to Collisional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Prateek Sharma; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert

    2003-07-24

    Recent calculations by Quataert et al. (2002) found that the growth rates of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma can differ significantly from those calculated using MHD. This can be important in hot accretion flows around compact objects. In this paper, we study the transition from the collisionless kinetic regime to the collisional MHD regime, mapping out the dependence of the MRI growth rate on collisionality. A kinetic closure scheme for a magnetized plasma is used that includes the effect of collisions via a BGK operator. The transition to MHD occurs as the mean free path becomes short compared to the parallel wavelength 2*/k(sub)||. In the weak magnetic field regime where the Alfven and MRI frequencies w are small compared to the sound wave frequency k(sub)||c(sub)0, the dynamics are still effectively collisionless even if omega << v, so long as the collision frequency v << k(sub)||c(sub)0; for an accretion flow this requires n less than or approximately equal to *(square root of b). The low collisionality regime not only modifies the MRI growth rate, but also introduces collisionless Landau or Barnes damping of long wavelength modes, which may be important for the nonlinear saturation of the MRI.

  1. RTGs on Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassoulas, John; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    Transit, the US Navy's Navigation Satellite System was conceived at the Applied Physics Laboratory in 1957 by observing the Doppler shift while tracking Sputnik I. As spacecraft development proceeded there was concern about the ability of batteries to maintain the hermetic seal over a 5-year operational life requirement; therefore, alternate energy sources were investigated. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) concept was pursued and resulted in the launch of SNAP 3s, providing partial power on both Transit 4A and 4B. SNAP 9s provided full power on three Transit 5BNs. All launches occurred in the early 1960s. When the U.S. conducted the high altitude nuclear test from Johnson Island, several spacecraft were lost due to artificial enhancement of charged particles in the Earth's magnetosphere resulting in rapid degradation of solar cell power production. This led to the decision to have both an RTG and Solar cell/battery design for Transit power systems; hence, a new RTG design, with a separable heat source and radiative coupling to the thermoelectric elements, was flown on TRIAD. This pioneering effort provided the impetus for future RTGs on interplanetary spacecraft. This paper describes the origin and purpose of the Transit program and provides details on the five satellites in that program that were powered by the first American RTGs used in space. The rationale and some of the challenges inherent in that use are also described.

  2. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  3. Broadband high-resolution X-ray frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaletto, Stefano M.; Harman, Zoltán; Ott, Christian; Buth, Christian; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2014-07-01

    Optical frequency combs have had a remarkable impact on precision spectroscopy. Enabling this technology in the X-ray domain is expected to result in wide-ranging applications, such as stringent tests of astrophysical models and quantum electrodynamics, a more sensitive search for the variability of fundamental constants, and precision studies of nuclear structure. Ultraprecise X-ray atomic clocks may also be envisaged. In this work, an X-ray pulse-shaping method is proposed to generate a comb in the absorption spectrum of an ultrashort high-frequency pulse. The method employs an optical-frequency-comb laser, manipulating the system's dipole response to imprint a comb on an excited transition with a high photon energy. The described scheme provides higher comb frequencies and requires lower optical-comb peak intensities than currently explored methods, preserves the overall width of the optical comb, and may be implemented using currently available X-ray technology.

  4. Combination frequencies in high-amplitude δ Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Short-cadence observations of δ Scuti stars in the Kepler field are used to investigate the physical nature of high-amplitude δ Scuti stars (HADS). Although it is often mentioned that HADS are transition objects between classical Cepheids and δ Scuti stars, neither ground-based or space-based observations support this view. It is found that HADS occur randomly within the instability strip. The possibility that HADS may be defined by the presence of combination frequencies is discussed. There is a weak tendency for the number of combination frequencies to increase with increasing amplitude of the parent frequencies. However, even stars with very low amplitudes may have detectable combination frequencies. Very few parent modes have a period ratio appropriate to first-overtone and fundamental radial modes. It appears that a high amplitude, in itself, is not useful as a distinguishing feature of δ Scuti stars.

  5. Precision frequency measurement of visible intercombination lines of strontium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Cancio, P; Drullinger, R; Giusfredi, G; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Toninelli, C; Tino, G M

    2003-12-12

    We report the direct frequency measurement of the visible 5s(2) 1S0-5s5p 3P1 intercombination line of strontium that is considered a possible candidate for a future optical-frequency standard. The frequency of a cavity-stabilized laser is locked to the saturated fluorescence in a thermal Sr atomic beam and is measured with an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through a global positioning system signal. The 88Sr transition is measured to be at 434 829 121 311 (10) kHz. We measure also the 88Sr-86Sr isotope shift to be 163 817.4 (0.2) kHz. PMID:14683113

  6. Terahertz spectroscopy of deuterated formaldehyde using a frequency multiplication chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, Roman A.; Margulès, Laurent; Huet, Thérèse R.

    2015-11-01

    The rotational spectra of deuterated formaldehyde HDCO and D2CO were recorded between 1.1 and 1.52 THz in order to benchmark new terahertz frequency multiplication chain used in the Lille spectrometer. Important spectrometer parameters such as sensitivity, measurement accuracy, and harmonic composition of the radiation source have been tested using the newly measured spectra. For each of the main deuterated isotopic species of formaldehyde the existent datasets from high resolution measurements were augmented by more than 300 new distinct transition frequencies. Most of these frequencies were measured with an accuracy better than 30 kHz. In addition, the high sensitivity of the spectrometer provided by the new frequency multiplication chain allowed observation, assignment and analysis of 13C, 17O, 18O, and 13C18O isotopic species of HDCO and D2CO. For some of these isotopologues the rotational parameters were determined for the first time.

  7. Frequency- and time-resolved coherence transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Mark A; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Mathew, Nathan A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2007-02-22

    Frequency-domain two-color triply vibrational enhanced four-wave mixing using a new phase-matching geometry discriminates against coherent multidimensional spectral features created solely by radiative transitions, spectrally resolves pathways with different numbers of coherence transfer steps, and temporally resolves modulations created by interference between coherence transfer pathways. Coherence transfer is a nonradiative transition where a superposition of quantum states evolves to a different superposition. The asymmetric and symmetric C[triple bond]O stretching modes of rhodium(I) dicarbonyl acetylacetonate are used as a model system for coherence transfer. A simplified theoretical model based on Redfield theory is used to describe the experimental results. PMID:17300169

  8. Search for Temporal Variations in Alpha Using a Yb^+ Optical Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peik, Ekkehard

    2008-05-01

    Optical frequency standards based on forbidden transitions of trapped and laser-cooled ions have now achieved significantly higher stability and also greater accuracy than primary cesium clocks. At PTB we investigate an optical clock based on the electric quadrupole transition S1/2- D3/2 at 688 THz in the ^171Yb^+ ion and have shown that the frequencies realized in two independent ion traps agree to within a few parts in 10^16. Results from a sequence of precise measurements of the absolute transition frequency are now available that cover a period of seven years. Combined with data obtained at NIST on the quadrupole transition in Hg^+, this allows to derive a model-independent limit for a temporal drift of the fine structure constant alpha. We prepare to observe the electric-octupole transition S1/2- F7/2 of Yb^+ at 642 THz with sub-hertz resolution. This narrow-linewidth reference transition promises a reduced quantum-noise limited instability of the single-ion optical clock. The ratio of the 688 THz and 642 THz reference frequencies can be measured as a dimensionless number with a femtosecond laser frequency comb, independent from the realization of the SI second with cesium clocks. Repeated measurements of this quantity permit to search for temporal variations of alpha with increased sensitivity.

  9. Frequency sensitivity for video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Guiwon; Lee, Jonghwa; Lee, Chulhee

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the frequency sensitivity of the human visual system, which reacts differently at different frequencies in video coding. Based on this observation, we used different quantization steps for different frequency components in order to explore the possibility of improving coding efficiency while maintaining perceptual video quality. In other words, small quantization steps were used for sensitive frequency components while large quantization steps were used for less sensitive frequency components. We performed subjective testing to examine the perceptual video quality of video sequences encoded by the proposed method. The experimental results showed that a reduction in bitrate is possible without causing a decrease in perceptual video quality.

  10. Frequency-bin entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Olislager, L.; Emplit, P.; Nguyen, A. T.; Massar, S.; Merolla, J.-M.; Huy, K. Phan

    2010-07-15

    A monochromatic laser pumping a parametric down-conversion crystal generates frequency-entangled photon pairs. We study this experimentally by addressing such frequency-entangled photons at telecommunication wavelengths (around 1550 nm) with fiber-optics components such as electro-optic phase modulators and narrow-band frequency filters. The theory underlying our approach uses the notion of frequency-bin entanglement. Our results show that the phase modulators address coherently up to eleven frequency bins, leading to an interference pattern which can violate by more than five standard deviations a Bell inequality adapted to our setup.

  11. Evaluation of stress wave propagation through rock mass using a modified dominate frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. F.; Wu, Z. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of stress wave propagation through rock mass using a modified dominate frequency method. The effective velocity and transmission coefficient of stress wave propagation through rock mass with different joint stiffnesses are investigated. The results are validated by the theoretical method and the effects of incident frequency on the calculation accuracy are discussed. The results show that the modified dominate frequency method can be used to predict the effective velocity when the frequency of stress waves is within the low frequency range or high frequency range. However, the error cannot be ignored when the frequency is in the transitional frequency range. On the other hand, the modified dominate frequency method can be used to predict the transmission coefficient when the frequency of stress wave is within the low frequency range or optimal frequency range. However, the error cannot be ignored when the wave is within the high frequency range, which approaches 40% when the frequency is sufficiently large. Finally, the optimal stiffness-frequency relationship for the maximum calculation errors of effective velocity and the minimum calculation errors of transmission coefficient are proposed.

  12. DNA binding site characterization by means of Rényi entropy measures on nucleotide transitions.

    PubMed

    Perera, A; Vallverdu, M; Claria, F; Soria, J M; Caminal, P

    2008-06-01

    In this work, parametric information-theory measures for the characterization of binding sites in DNA are extended with the use of transitional probabilities on the sequence. We propose the use of parametric uncertainty measures such as Rényi entropies obtained from the transition probabilities for the study of the binding sites, in addition to nucleotide frequency-based Rényi measures. Results are reported in this work comparing transition frequencies (i.e., dinucleotides) and base frequencies for Shannon and parametric Rényi entropies for a number of binding sites found in E. Coli, lambda and T7 organisms. We observe that the information provided by both approaches is not redundant. Furthermore, under the presence of noise in the binding site matrix we observe overall improved robustness of nucleotide transition-based algorithms when compared with nucleotide frequency-based method. PMID:18556261

  13. HLA-A, B and DR in Caucasians with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Saunders, P H; Anderson, S A; Stogdill, V D; Lamm, D L

    1983-11-01

    When HLA-A, B and DR antigens in Caucasian patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder were compared with controls, no significant alterations in antigen frequencies were found. PMID:6581580

  14. Precision measurements and applications of femtosecond frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason

    2002-05-01

    The merging of femtosecond (fs) laser physics with the field of optical f requency metrology over recent years has had a profound impact on both di sciplines. Precision control of the broad frequency bandwidth from fs la sers has enabled new areas of exploration in ultrafast physics and revolu tionized optical frequency measurement and precision spectroscopy. Most recently, the transition frequency of the length standard at 514.7 nm,^ 127I2 P(13) 43-0 a3 has been measured in our lab with an improvement of more than 100 times in precision. Interesting molecular dynamics and s tructure are being explored using absolute frequency map of molecular tra nsitions over a large wavelength range. The iodine transition at 532 nm h as been used to establish an optical atomic clock with a fs comb providin g both an RF standard with stability comparable to the best atomic clocks and millions of optical frequencies across the visible and near IR spect rum, each stable to the Hz level. Work is presently underway to directly compare the iodine optical clocks at JILA with the Hg and Ca optical cloc ks currently being refined at NIST via a direct optical fiber link. A wi dely tunable single frequency laser in combination with a fs comb has bee n employed to realize an optical frequency synthesizer. Frequency combs of two independent ultrafast lasers have been coherently locked, enablin g several different avenues of application such as synthesis of arbitrary waveforms, coherent control of quantum systems, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. This talk will review these recent accompl ishments from our lab and discuss plans for further improving the control and precision of fs laser based measurements. te

  15. Mid-infrared frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliesser, Albert; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W.

    2012-07-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that emit a broad spectrum of discrete, evenly spaced narrow lines whose absolute frequency can be measured to within the accuracy of an atomic clock. Their development in the near-infrared and visible domains has revolutionized frequency metrology while also providing numerous unexpected opportunities in other fields such as astronomy and attosecond science. Researchers are now exploring how to extend frequency comb techniques to the mid-infrared spectral region. Versatile mid-infrared frequency comb generators based on novel laser gain media, nonlinear frequency conversion or microresonators promise to significantly expand the applications of frequency combs. In particular, novel approaches to molecular spectroscopy in the 'fingerprint region', with dramatically improved precision, sensitivity, recording time and/or spectral bandwidth may lead to new discoveries in the various fields relevant to molecular science.

  16. Line-Shape Transition of Collision Broadened Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, H.; Katzenellenbogen, N.; Grischkowsky, D.

    1995-02-01

    Using the newly developed technique of THz time-domain spectroscopy, we have measured the far-wing absorption line profile of the ensemble of collision broadened ground state rotational lines of methylchloride vapor out to more than 200 linewidths from resonance, corresponding to frequency offsets as much as 5× the resonant frequency. On these far wings the measured absorption is approximately an order of magnitude less than that predicted by the van Vleck-Weisskopf theory. Our observations show that at higher frequencies a transition occurs from the regime of the van Vleck-Weisskopf theory to the regime of the Lorentz theory.

  17. Gravitational waves from the cosmological QCD transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão Roque, V. R. C.; Roque, G. Lugones o.; Lugones, G.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the minimum fluctuations in the cosmological QCD phase transition that could be detectable by the eLISA/NGO gravitational wave observatory. To this end, we performed several hydrodynamical simulations using a state-of-the-art equation of state derived from lattice QCD simulations. Based on the fact that the viscosity per entropy density of the quark gluon plasma obtained from heavy-ion collision experiments at the RHIC and the LHC is extremely small, we considered a non-viscous fluid in our simulations. Several previous works about this transition considered a first order transition that generates turbulence which follows a Kolmogorov power law. We show that for the QCD crossover transition the turbulent spectrum must be very different because there is no viscosity and no source of continuous energy injection. As a consequence, a large amount of kinetic energy accumulates at the smallest scales. From the hydrodynamic simulations, we have obtained the spectrum of the gravitational radiation emitted by the motion of the fluid, finding that, if typical velocity and temperature fluctuations have an amplitude Δ v /c ≳ 10-2 and/or Δ T/T_c ≳ 10-3, they would be detected by eLISA/NGO at frequencies larger than ˜ 10-4 Hz.

  18. Phase transitions in least-effort communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopenko, Mikhail; Ay, Nihat; Obst, Oliver; Polani, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    We critically examine a model that attempts to explain the emergence of power laws (e.g., Zipf's law) in human language. The model is based on the principle of least effort in communications—specifically, the overall effort is balanced between the speaker effort and listener effort, with some trade-off. It has been shown that an information-theoretic interpretation of this principle is sufficiently rich to explain the emergence of Zipf's law in the vicinity of the transition between referentially useless systems (one signal for all referable objects) and indexical reference systems (one signal per object). The phase transition is defined in the space of communication accuracy (information content) expressed in terms of the trade-off parameter. Our study explicitly solves the continuous optimization problem, subsuming a recent, more specific result obtained within a discrete space. The obtained results contrast Zipf's law found by heuristic search (that attained only local minima) in the vicinity of the transition between referentially useless systems and indexical reference systems, with an inverse-factorial (sub-logarithmic) law found at the transition that corresponds to global minima. The inverse-factorial law is observed to be the most representative frequency distribution among optimal solutions.

  19. Electric probe for spin transition and fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N'diaye, Alpha T.; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Sato, Koji; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslov; Qiu, Z. Q.; Saitoh, Eiji

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of central topics of magnetism and condense matter science. To probe them, neutron scatterings have been used as powerful tools. A part of neutrons injected into a sample is scattered by spin fluctuation inside the sample. This process transcribes the spin fluctuation onto scattering intensity, which is commonly represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility of the sample and is maximized at magnetic phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and it thus can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy: an advantage of neutrons, although large facilities such as a nuclear reactor is necessary. Here we show that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop micro probe for spin fluctuation and transition; not only a neutron beam, spin current is also a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin fluctuation in a sample. We demonstrate detection of anti-ferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency dependent spin-current transmission measurements.

  20. Scatterometer Observes Extratropical Transition of Pacific Typhoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wen-Qing; Dunbar, R. Scott

    1997-01-01

    From September 15 to 25, 1996, NASA's scatterometer (NSCAT) monitored the evolution of twin typhoons-Violet and Tom-as they moved north from the western tropical Pacific, acquiring features of mid-latitude storms. The typhoons developed frontal structures, increased asymmetry, and dry air was introduced into their cores. Violet hit Japan, causing death and destruction, and Tom merged with a mid-latitude trough and evolved into a large extratropical storm with gale-force winds. We understand relatively little about the extratropical transition of tropical cyclones because of the complex thermodynamics involved, but we do know that the mid-latitude storms resulting from tropical cyclones usually generate strong winds and heavy precipitation. Since the transition usually occurs over the ocean, few measurements have been made. The transition is a fascinating science problem, but it also has important economic consequences. The transition occurs over the busiest trans-ocean shipping lanes, and when the resulting storms hit land, they usually devastate populated areas. NSCAT was successfully launched into a near-polar, sunsynchronous orbit on the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) in August 1996 from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. NSCAT's six antennas send microwave pulses at a frequency of 14 GHz to the Earth's surface and measure the backscatter.

  1. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  2. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  3. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  4. Nonlinear low frequency water waves in a cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency excitations - Part I: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajun, Wang; Chunyan, Zhou; Li, Junbao; Shen, Song; Li, Min; Liu, Xijun

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on nonlinear low frequency gravity water waves in a partially filled cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency horizontal excitations. The characteristics of natural frequencies and mode shapes of the water-shell coupled system are discussed. The boundaries for onset of gravity waves are measured and plotted by curves of critical excitation force magnitude with respect to excitation frequency. For nonlinear water waves, the time history signals and their spectrums of motion on both water surface and shell are recorded. The shapes of water surface are also measured using scanning laser vibrometer. In particular, the phenomenon of transitions between different gravity wave patterns is observed and expressed by the waterfall graphs. These results exhibit pronounced nonlinear properties of shell-fluid coupled system.

  5. [Transition in diabetology].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, M; Elowe-Gruau, E; Dwyer, A; Aquarone, M-P; Unal, S; Jornayvaz, F R; Perrenoud, L; Gastaldi, G; Castellsague, M; Dirlewanger, M; Schwitzgebel, V M

    2015-02-18

    For patients with type I diabetes, transition from pediatric to adult care is a challenge due to complex treatment requirements and the physical, psychological and social changes of adolescence. Members of the care team must recognize that while these emerging adults need to develop self-management skills, this may conflict at times with the developmentally appropriate desire for increasing autonomy. The role of nursing in coordinating a successful transition is critical for maintaining continuity of patient-centered care that responds to the specific needs of these young adults. PMID:25915986

  6. Network Observability Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jianhui; Motter, Adilson E.

    2012-12-01

    In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a network observability transition, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network’s community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to “observability attacks.” Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

  7. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  8. Negative refraction with low absorption using Raman transitions with magnetoelectric coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2010-07-15

    We suggest a scheme for obtaining negative refraction that does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same transition frequency. The key idea of the scheme is to obtain a strong electric response by using far-off-resonant Raman transitions. We propose to use a pair of electric-dipole Raman transitions and utilize magneto-electric cross coupling to achieve a negative index of refraction without requiring negative permeability. The interference of the two Raman transitions allows tunable negative refraction with low absorption.

  9. Ramsey patterns for multiquantum transitions in fountain experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McColm, D. |

    1996-12-01

    Ramsey patterns for radio-frequency multiquantum transitions among Zeeman levels of the ground state of thallium, cesium, and francium have been calculated. The narrowing of these patterns observed earlier by Gould is predicted to occur only when both static electric and magnetic fields are present. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Career Transitions and Career Success in the "New" Career Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudzikowski, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The "new" career, most notably the boundaryless career, is associated with high career mobility, which is in turn associated with employability and career success of individuals. The current study examined how frequency, form (organisational, horizontal or vertical) and impact (objective career success) of career transitions have changed across…

  11. Autonomous Rubidium Clock Weak Frequency Jump Detector for Onboard Navigation Satellite System.

    PubMed

    Khare, Akshay; Arora, Rajat; Banik, Alak; Mehta, Sanjay D

    2016-02-01

    Frequency jumps are common in rubidium frequency sources. They affect the estimation of user position in navigational satellite systems. These jumps must be detected and corrected immediately as they have direct impact on the navigation system integrity. A novel weak frequency jump detector is proposed based on a Kalman filter with a multi-interval approach. This detector can be applied for both "sudden" and "slow" frequency transitions. In this detection method, noises of clock data are reduced by Kalman filtering, for accurate estimation of jump size with less latency. Analysis on in-orbit rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS) phase telemetry data shows that the detector can be used for fast detection and correction of weak frequency jumps. Furthermore, performance comparison of different existing frequency jump detection techniques with the proposed detector is discussed. A multialgorithm-based strategy is proposed depending on the jump size and latency for onboard navigation satellites having RAFS as the primary frequency source. PMID:26685233

  12. High frequency alternating current chip nano calorimeter with laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shoifet, E.; Schick, C.; Chua, Y. Z.; Huth, H.

    2013-07-15

    Heat capacity spectroscopy at frequencies up to 100 kHz is commonly performed by thermal effusivity measurements applying the 3ω-technique. Here we show that AC-calorimetry using a thin film chip sensor allows for the measurement of frequency dependent heat capacity in the thin film limit up to about 1 MHz. Using films thinner than the thermal length of the thermal wave (∼1 μm) at such frequencies is advantageous because it provides heat capacity alone and not in combination with other quantities like thermal conductivity, at least on a qualitative basis. The used calorimetric sensor and the sample are each less than 1 μm thick. For high frequency AC-calorimetry, high cooling rates at very small temperature differences are required. This is realized by minimizing the heated spot to the size of the on chip thermocouple (3 × 6 μm{sup 2}). A modulated laser beam shaped and positioned by a glass fiber is used as the heat source. The device was used to measure the complex heat capacity in the vicinity of the dynamic glass transition (structural relaxation) of poly(methyl methacrylate). Combining different calorimeters finally provides data between 10{sup −3} Hz and 10{sup 6} Hz. In this frequency range the dynamic glass transition shifts about 120 K.

  13. Flood frequency in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Records of peak discharge at 183 sites were used to study flood frequency in Alaska. The vast size of Alaska, its great ranges of physiography, and the lack of data for much of the State precluded a comprehensive analysis of all flood determinants. Peak stream discharges, where gaging-station records were available, were analyzed for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year average-recurrence intervals. A regional analysis of the flood characteristics by multiple-regression methods gave a set of equations that can be used to estimate floods of selected recurrence intervals up to 50 years for any site on any stream in Alaska. The equations relate floods to drainage-basin characteristics. The study indicates that in Alaska the 50-year flood can be estimated from 10-year gaging- station records with a standard error of 22 percent whereas the 50-year flood can be estimated from the regression equation with a standard error of 53 percent. Also, maximum known floods at more than 500 gaging stations and miscellaneous sites in Alaska were related to drainage-area size. An envelope curve of 500 cubic feet per second per square mile covered all but 2 floods in the State.

  14. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  15. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  16. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  17. Progress in Spectroscopy of the 1S–3S Transition in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Galtier, Sandrine Fleurbaey, Hélène; Thomas, Simon; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François; Nez, François

    2015-09-15

    We report the latest advances in the Doppler-free spectroscopy of the 1S–3S transition in hydrogen. A new continuous ultra-violet source has been developed and delivers a power level of 15 mW. With this setup, the statistical uncertainty on the 1S–3S transition frequency measurement is 2.2 kHz. Combined with the 1S–2S frequency, absolute accuracy at that level would significantly enlighten the proton radius puzzle.

  18. Carrier Tunneling in High-Frequency Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ganichev, S.D.; Ziemann, E.; Gleim, T.; Prettl, W.; Ganichev, S.D.; Yassievich, I.N.; Perel, V.I.; Wilke, I.; Haller, E.E.

    1998-03-01

    An enhancement of tunnel ionization of deep impurities in semiconductors in an alternating field as compared to static fields has been observed. The transition between the quasistatic and the high-frequency regime is determined by the tunneling time. For the case of deep impurities this is the time of redistribution of the defect vibrational system which depends strongly on temperature and the impurity structure. A theory of tunnel ionization of deep impurities by high-frequency fields has been developed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Operational frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency stabilities under operational conditions of several commercially available rubidium and cesium frequency standards were determined from experimental data for frequency averaging times from 10 to the 7th power s and are presented in table and graph form. For frequency averaging times between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power s, the rubidium standards tested have a stability of between 10 to the minus 12th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 12th power, while the cesium standards have a stability of between 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 13th power.

  20. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.