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Sample records for 1s0-3p0 optical clock

  1. Observation of the 1S0-3P0 transition in atomic ytterbium for optical clocks and qubit arrays.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Cramer, Claire; Cook, Eryn; Nagourney, Warren; Fortson, E N

    2005-10-01

    We report an observation of the weak 6 1S0-6 3P0 transition in (171,173)Yb as an important step to establishing Yb as a primary candidate for future optical frequency standards, and to open up a new approach for qubits using the 1S0 and 3P0 states of Yb atoms in an optical lattice.

  2. Studies of Yb ^1S0 -- ^3P0 clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao

    2005-05-01

    We are exploring two quite different methods for observing the ultra-sharp 6s^2 ^1S0 -- 6s6p ^3P0 optical interval in atomic Yb, which is considered a primary candidate for future optical frequency standards [1].In the first method, we observe the 578 nm single photon transition allowed in the odd isotopes through internal hyperfine coupling of the nuclear spin.† We shine a 578 nm laser beam on cold Yb atoms held in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and detect a decrease in MOT fluorescence when the laser is resonant with the clock transition.† Our second approach is to use the even Yb isotopes, connecting the ^1S0 and ^3P0 states† by† a multi- photon transition [2]. Sharp electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption (EITA) resonance features appear when the photon frequencies combine to equal† the ^1S0 -- ^3P0 clock interval.† We will describe our initial studies of† 2 and 3 photon resonances in Yb, including Doppler-free 3 photon EITA. [1]S. G.† Porsev, A. Derevianko, E. N. Fortson, Phys. Rev. A 69, 021403(R)† (2004); H. Katori, in Proc. 6th Symposium Frequency Standards and Metrology, edited by P. Gill (World Scienti.c, Singapore, 2002), pp. 323-330 [2]Tao Hong, Claire Cramer, Warren Nagourney, E. N. Fortson, physics/0409051 and to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett.; Robin Santra, Ennio Arimondo, Tetsuya Ido, Crhis H. Greene, Jun Ye, physics/0411197

  3. Towards a Mg Lattice Clock: Observation of the 1S0-3P0 Transition and Determination of the Magic Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulosa, A. P.; Fim, D.; Zipfel, K. H.; Rühmann, S.; Sauer, S.; Jha, N.; Gibble, K.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Porsev, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    We optically excite the electronic state 3 s 3 p 3P0 in 24Mg atoms, laser cooled and trapped in a magic-wavelength lattice. An applied magnetic field enhances the coupling of the light to the otherwise strictly forbidden transition. We determine the magic wavelength, the quadratic magnetic Zeeman shift, and the transition frequency to be 468.46(21) nm, -206.6 (2.0 ) MHz /T2 , and 655 058 646 691(101) kHz, respectively. These are compared with theoretical predictions and results from complementary experiments. We also develop a high-precision relativistic structure model for magnesium, give an improved theoretical value for the blackbody radiation shift, and discuss a clock based on bosonic magnesium.

  4. Spectroscopy of the forbidden 1S0 -->3P0 transition on ultra-cold ytterbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dareau, Alexandre; Scholl, Matthias; Beaufils, Quentin; Döring, Daniel; Beugnon, Jérôme; Gerbier, Fabrice

    2015-05-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices are often considered a rich playground for emulating condensed matter systems, since they make it possible to engineer many-body Hamiltonians with tunable parameters. However, one missing feature is the ability to emulate orbital magnetism. Recent proposals for simulating orbital magnetism with neutral atoms rely on a state-dependent optical lattice with laser-driven hopping. Ytterbium, with its long lived metastable state (3P0), is a well-suited candidate for the implementation of such schemes. Addressing the forbidden transition between ytterbium ground (1S0) and meta-stable (3P0) states is experimentally challenging, and requires the use of a laser with stability close to the standards of atomic clocks. I will report on the building of a ultra-narrow laser locked on a high-finesse low-expansion cavity. I will then show how the absolute frequency of the cavity modes can be calibrated by performing high-resolution spectroscopy on molecular iodine, allowing us perform Doppler spectroscopy on the 1S0 -->3P0 transition of an ytterbium BEC.

  5. The NIM Sr Optical Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Q.; Li, Y.; Meng, F.; Lin, B.; Zang, E.; Sun, Z.; Fang, F.; Li, T.; Fang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    A 87Sr optical lattice clock is built at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM) of China. The atoms undergo two stages of laser cooling before being loaded into a horizontal optical lattice at the magic wavelength of 813 nm. After being interrogated by a narrow linewidth 698 nm clock laser pulse, the normalized excitation rate is measured to get the frequency error, which is then used to lock the clock laser to the ultra-narrow 1S0-3P0 clock transition. The total systematic uncertainty of the clock is evaluated to be 2.3 × 10-16, and the absolute frequency of the clock is measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.7(1.4) Hz with reference to the NIM5 cesium fountain.

  6. New limits on coupling of fundamental constants to gravity using 87Sr optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Blatt, S; Ludlow, A D; Campbell, G K; Thomsen, J W; Zelevinsky, T; Boyd, M M; Ye, J; Baillard, X; Fouché, M; Le Targat, R; Brusch, A; Lemonde, P; Takamoto, M; Hong, F-L; Katori, H; Flambaum, V V

    2008-04-11

    The 1S0-3P0 clock transition frequency nuSr in neutral 87Sr has been measured relative to the Cs standard by three independent laboratories in Boulder, Paris, and Tokyo over the last three years. The agreement on the 1 x 10(-15) level makes nuSr the best agreed-upon optical atomic frequency. We combine periodic variations in the 87Sr clock frequency with 199Hg+ and H-maser data to test local position invariance by obtaining the strongest limits to date on gravitational-coupling coefficients for the fine-structure constant alpha, electron-proton mass ratio mu, and light quark mass. Furthermore, after 199Hg+, 171Yb+, and H, we add 87Sr as the fourth optical atomic clock species to enhance constraints on yearly drifts of alpha and mu.

  7. Optical clocks and relativity.

    PubMed

    Chou, C W; Hume, D B; Rosenband, T; Wineland, D J

    2010-09-24

    Observers in relative motion or at different gravitational potentials measure disparate clock rates. These predictions of relativity have previously been observed with atomic clocks at high velocities and with large changes in elevation. We observed time dilation from relative speeds of less than 10 meters per second by comparing two optical atomic clocks connected by a 75-meter length of optical fiber. We can now also detect time dilation due to a change in height near Earth's surface of less than 1 meter. This technique may be extended to the field of geodesy, with applications in geophysics and hydrology as well as in space-based tests of fundamental physics.

  8. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  9. Pulsed Optically Pumped Rb clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micalizio, S.; Levi, F.; Godone, A.; Calosso, C. E.; François, B.; Boudot, R.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Gharavipour, M.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    INRIM demonstrated a Rb vapour cell clock based on pulsed optical pumping (POP) with unprecedented frequency stability performances, both in the short and in the medium-long term period. In the frame of a EMRP project, we are developing a new clock based on the same POP principle but adopting solutions aimed at reducing the noise sources affecting the INRIM clock. At the same time, concerning possible technological applications, particular care are devoted in the project to reduce the size and the weight of the clock, still keeping the excellent stability of the INRIM clock. The paper resumes the main results of this activity.

  10. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  11. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  12. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard. PMID:25734183

  13. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  14. Optical to microwave clock frequency ratios with a nearly continuous strontium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Bilicki, Sławomir; Bookjans, Eva; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Shi, Chunyan; Vallet, Grégoire; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Nicolodi, Daniele; Le Coq, Yann; Guéna, Jocelyne; Abgrall, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Bize, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Optical lattice clocks are at the forefront of frequency metrology. Both the instability and systematic uncertainty of these clocks have been reported to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the best microwave clocks. For this reason, a redefinition of the SI second based on optical clocks seems possible in the near future. However, the operation of optical lattice clocks has not yet reached the reliability that microwave clocks have achieved so far. In this paper, we report on the operation of a strontium optical lattice clock that spans several weeks, with more than 80% uptime. We make use of this long integration time to demonstrate a reproducible measurement of frequency ratios between the strontium clock transition and microwave Cs primary and Rb secondary frequency standards.

  15. The NIST 27 Al+ quantum-logic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrandt, David; Brewer, Samuel; Chen, Jwo-Sy; Hume, David; Hankin, Aaron; Huang, Yao; Chou, Chin-Wen; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2016-05-01

    Optical atomic clocks based on quantum-logic spectroscopy of the 1 S0 <--> 3 P0 transition in 27 Al+ have reached a systematic fractional frequency uncertainty of 8 . 0 ×10-18 , enabling table-top tests of fundamental physics as well as measurements of gravitational potential differences. Currently, the largest limitations to the accuracy are second order time dilation shifts due to the driven motion (i.e., micromotion) and thermal motion of the trapped ions. In order to suppress these shifts, we have designed and built new ion traps based on gold-plated, laser-machined diamond wafers with differential RF drive, and we have operated one of our clocks with the ions laser cooled to near the six mode motional ground state. We present a characterization of the time dilation shifts in the new traps with uncertainties near 1 ×10-18 . Furthermore, we describe a new protocol for clock comparison measurements based on synchronous probing of the two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators, which allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time and avoids the Dick effect. This work is supported by ARO, DARPA, and ONR.

  16. Nuclear spin effects in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun

    2007-08-15

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the effect of nuclear spin on the performance of optical lattice clocks. With a state-mixing theory including spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, we describe the origin of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition and the differential g factor between the two clock states for alkaline-earth-metal(-like) atoms, using {sup 87}Sr as an example. Clock frequency shifts due to magnetic and optical fields are discussed with an emphasis on those relating to nuclear structure. An experimental determination of the differential g factor in {sup 87}Sr is performed and is in good agreement with theory. The magnitude of the tensor light shift on the clock states is also explored experimentally. State specific measurements with controlled nuclear spin polarization are discussed as a method to reduce the nuclear spin-related systematic effects to below 10{sup -17} in lattice clocks.

  17. Orthometric height determination using optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, WenBin

    2013-04-01

    General relativity theory predicts that there exists a gravity frequency shift (gravitational red shift) if an electromagnetic signal propagates from one point to another point, and the frequency shift depends on the geopotential difference between these two points. Inversely, by measuring the gravity frequency shift between arbitrary two points we may determine the geopotential and consequently the orthometric height difference between these two points. To improve our previous investigations (Shen and Peng 2012), the present study provides further foundation of the optical-fiber frequency transfer approach (OFTA; Shen and Peng 2012) and describes in details how to determine the orthometric height between two points using optical clocks via optical fiber. Optical clocks have achieved a stability of 10E-17 to 10E-18. In another aspect, remote optical fiber communication (e.g. Predehl et al. 2012) demonstrates a frequency comparison accuracy at the level of 10E-18 (or better), which is equivalent to a height variation of 1cm. The quick development of time-frequency science, including the high-precise optical clocks, provides potential of determining the orthometric height between arbitrary two points which are connected by optical fiber. This study suggests that determining the orthometric height difference between two points using optical clocks via optical fiber frequency transfer communication technique is prospective and potential. The realization of the OFTA may greatly contribute to the unification of the world height system (WHS). This work was supported partly by the NSFC (grant No. 41174011), National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant No. 41210006, 41128003, 41021061, 40974015).

  18. The Sr optical lattice clock at JILA: A new record in atomic clock performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Travis; Bloom, Benjamin; Williams, Jason; Campbell, Sara; Bishof, Michael; Zhang, Xibo; Zhang, Wei; Bromley, Sarah; Hutson, Ross; McNally, Rees; Ye, Jun

    2014-05-01

    The exquisite control exhibited over quantum states of individual particles has revolutionized the field of precision measurement, as exemplified by highly accurate atomic clocks. Optical clocks have been the most accurate frequency standards for the better part of a decade, surpassing even the cesium microwave fountains upon which the SI second is based. Two classes of optical clocks have outperformed cesium: single-ion clocks and optical lattice clocks. Historically ion clocks have always been more accurate, and the precision of ion clocks and lattice clocks has been comparable. For years it has been unclear if lattice clocks can overcome key systematics and become more accurate than ion clocks. In this presentation I report the first lattice clock that has surpassed ion clocks in both precision and accuracy. These measurements represent a tenfold improvement in precision and a factor of 20 improvement in accuracy over the previous best lattice clock results. This work paves the way for a better realization of SI units, the development of more sophisticated quantum sensors, and precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature.

  19. Blackbody radiation shifts in optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail; Clark, Charles

    2012-03-01

    A review of recent theoretical calculations of blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts in optical atomic clocks is presented. We summarize previous results for monovalent ions that were obtained by a relativistic all-order single-double method, where all single and double excitations of the Dirac- Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. A recently developed method for accurate calculations of BBR shifts in divalent atoms is then presented. This approach combines the relativistic all-order method and the configuration interaction method, which provides for accurate treatment of correlation corrections in atoms with two valence electrons. Calculations of the BBR shifts in B+, Al+, and In+ have enabled us to reduce the present fractional uncertainties in the frequencies of their clock transitions as measured at room temperature: to 4 × 10-19 for Al+ and 10-18 for B+ and In+. These uncertainties approach recent estimates of the limits of precision of currently proposed optical atomic clocks. We discuss directions of future theoretical developments for reducing clock uncertainties resulting from blackbody radiation shifts.

  20. Blackbody radiation shifts in optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail; Clark, Charles

    2012-03-01

    A review of recent theoretical calculations of blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts in optical atomic clocks is presented. We summarize previous results for monovalent ions that were obtained by a relativistic all-order single-double method, where all single and double excitations of the Dirac- Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. A recently developed method for accurate calculations of BBR shifts in divalent atoms is then presented. This approach combines the relativistic all-order method and the configuration interaction method, which provides for accurate treatment of correlation corrections in atoms with two valence electrons. Calculations of the BBR shifts in B+, Al+, and In+ have enabled us to reduce the present fractional uncertainties in the frequencies of their clock transitions as measured at room temperature: to 4 × 10-19 for Al+ and 10-18 for B+ and In+. These uncertainties approach recent estimates of the limits of precision of currently proposed optical atomic clocks. We discuss directions of future theoretical developments for reducing clock uncertainties resulting from blackbody radiation shifts. PMID:22481777

  1. Optical system design for femtosecond-level synchronization of clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Laura C.; Swann, William C.; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Bergeron, Hugo; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Baumann, Esther; Cermak, Michael; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2016-03-01

    Synchronization of optical clocks via optical two-way time-frequency transfer across free-space links can result in time offsets between the two clocks below tens of femtoseconds over many hours. The complex optical system necessary to support such synchronization is described in detail here.

  2. Prospects for Optical Clocks with a Blue-Detuned Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.; Marmo, S. I.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.

    2009-02-13

    We investigated the properties of optical lattice clocks operated with a repulsive light-shift potential. The magic wavelength, where light-shift perturbation for the clock transition cancels, was experimentally determined to be 389.889(9) nm for {sup 87}Sr. The hyperpolarizability effects on the clock transition were investigated theoretically. With minimal trapping field perturbation provided by the blue-detuned lattice, the fractional uncertainty due to the hyperpolarizability effects was found to be 2x10{sup -19} in the relevant clock transition.

  3. Geopotential measurements with synchronously linked optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Tetsushi; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kuroishi, Yuki; Munekane, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Basara; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-10-01

    According to Einstein's theory of relativity, the passage of time changes in a gravitational field. On Earth, raising a clock by 1 cm increases its apparent tick rate by 1.1 parts in 1018, allowing chronometric levelling through comparison of optical clocks. Here, we demonstrate such geopotential measurements by determining the height difference of master and slave clocks separated by 15 km with an uncertainty of 5 cm. A subharmonic of the master clock laser is delivered through a telecom fibre to synchronously operate the distant clocks. Clocks operated under such phase coherence reject clock laser noise and facilitate proposals for linking clocks and interferometers. Taken over half a year, 11 measurements determine the fractional frequency difference between the two clocks to be 1,652.9(5.9) × 10-18, consistent with an independent measurement by levelling and gravimetry. Our system demonstrates a building block for an internet of clocks, which may constitute ‘quantum benchmarks’, serving as height references with dynamic responses.

  4. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael L; Koller, Andrew P; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-22

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s-wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p- and s-wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures. PMID:26849600

  5. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  6. Using a transportable optical clock for chronometric levelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Häfner, Sebastian; Herbers, Sofia; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Grosche, Gesine; Denker, Heiner; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-04-01

    With their supreme accuracy and precision, optical clocks and new methods of long distance frequency transfer can be used to determine height differences by measuring the gravitational red shift between two clocks. We are developing transportable optical clocks and optical fibre-based means for clock comparisons that can bridge distances of hundredths of kilometres without accumulation of measurement errors. In this talk, we will focus on the transportable strontium lattice clock we are developing and its first evaluation. Presently, we achieve a fractional frequency instability of 3 × 10-17 after 1000 s averaging time, which is equivalent to a height resolution of 30 cm. The first uncertainty evaluation of the system yielded 9 × 10-17. We expect rapid improvements to an uncertainty of few parts in 10-17. This clock will be connected via stabilized optical fibre links with other, stationary frequency standards. The measured red shifts will be compared with the ones calculated from potential differences derived with state of the art geodetic data and models. We will discuss the status of measurements of geodetic relevance with optical clocks and give an outlook on our next steps. This work is supported by QUEST, DFG (RTG 1729, CRC 1128), EU-FP7 (FACT) and EMRP (ITOC). The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union.

  7. Frequency comparison of optical lattice clocks beyond the Dick limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamoto, Masao; Takano, Tetsushi; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-05-01

    The supreme accuracy of atomic clocks relies on the universality of atomic transition frequencies. The stability of a clock, meanwhile, measures how quickly the clock's statistical uncertainties are reduced. The ultimate measure of stability is provided by the quantum projection noise, which improves as 1/√N by measuring N uncorrelated atoms. Quantum projection noise limited stabilities have been demonstrated in caesium clocks and in single-ion optical clocks, where the quantum noise overwhelms the Dick effect attributed to local oscillator noise. Here, we demonstrate a synchronous frequency comparison of two optical lattice clocks using 87Sr and 88Sr atoms, respectively, for which the Allan standard deviation reached 1 × 10-17 in an averaging time of 1,600 s by cancelling out the Dick effect to approach the quantum projection noise limit. The scheme demonstrates the advantage of using a large number (N ~ 1,000) of atoms in optical clocks and paves the way to investigating the inherent uncertainties of clocks and relativistic geodesy on a timescale of tens of minutes.

  8. Using a transportable optical clock for chronometric levelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe; Koller, Silvio; Grotti, Jacopo; Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Herbers, Sofia; Al-Masoudi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    With their supreme accuracy and precision, optical clocks in combination with new methods of long-distance frequency transfer can be used to determine height differences by measuring the gravitational red shift between two clocks without accumulation of measurement errors, as in classical levelling. We are developing transportable optical clocks for this purpose that will also serve for the technology development regarding optical clocks in Space and for international comparisons between optical clocks that cannot be linked with sufficient accuracy otherwise. In this talk we will focus on the transportable strontium lattice clock that we are developing and its first evaluation. Presently, we achieve a fractional frequency instability of 3 × 10^{-17} after 1000 s averaging time, which is equivalent to a height resolution of 30 cm. The first uncertainty evaluation of the system yielded 7 × 10^{-17}. We expect rapid improvements to an uncertainty of a few parts in 10^{17}. The clock is now located within a car trailer, which requires compact and rugged lasers systems and physics package. Special care has been taken in the design of the ultra-frequency stable interrogation laser that has to achieve fractional frequency instabilities of considerably below 10^{-15}. Typical laboratory constructions of the reference resonator system used to pre-stabilize the laser frequency are not compatible with the requirement of transportability. In an actual levelling campaign, this clock will be connected via a stabilized optical fibre link with another, stationary frequency standard. The measured gravitational red shift will be compared with the ones calculated from potential differences derived with state of the art geodetic data and models. We will discuss the status of measurements of geodetic relevance with optical clocks and give an outlook on our next steps. This work is supported by QUEST, DFG (RTG 1729, CRC 1128), EU-FP7 (FACT) and EMRP (ITOC). The EMRP is jointly funded

  9. Using optical clock to probe quantum many-body physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The progress of optical lattice clock has benefited greatly from the understanding of atomic interactions. At the same time, the precision of clock spectroscopy has been applied to explore many-body spin interactions including SU(N) symmetry. Our recent work on this combined front of quantum metrology and many-body physics includes the probe of spin-orbital physics in the lattice clock and the investigation of a Fermi degenerate gas of 105 87Sr atoms in a three-dimensional magic-wavelength optical lattice.

  10. Optical Square-Wave Clock Generation Based on an All-Optical Flip-Flop

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A.M.; Agrawal, G.P.; Maywar, D.N.

    2010-03-10

    We demonstrate optical square-wave clock generation based on an all-optical flip-flop. The bistable output power from a resonant-type semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is switched ON and OFF by modulating its input with its output via cross-gain modulation in a traveling-wave SOA. All active components are driven by dc currents, and the wavelength and clock frequency are selectable. A clock frequency of 3.5 MHz is demonstrated, limited by the time of flight between bulk optical components. Optical square-wave clock signals are promising for applications in photonic integrated circuits and all-optical signal processing.

  11. Automatic minimisation of micromotion in a 88Sr+ optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.

    2015-07-01

    Optical clocks based on narrow linewidth transitions in single cold ions confined in RF traps are being developed at a number of laboratories worldwide. For these ion clock systems, excess micromotion can cause both Stark and Doppler frequency shifts and also a degradation of frequency stability as a result of a reduced excitation rate to the clock transition. At NPL, we detect micromotion in our 88Sr+ optical clocks by observing the correlation between photon arrival times and the zero crossing of the RF trap drive signal. Recently, two nominally identical 88Sr+ optical clocks have been operated over several days and their frequencies compared against one another. During this time the dc voltages on the endcap and compensation voltage electrodes required to minimise the micromotion can change significantly, particularly following the loading of an ion. This paper describes an automatic method to monitor and minimise micromotion applicable to single ion clocks and which we demonstrate using our two NPL 88Sr+ ion clocks.

  12. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  13. A mercury optical lattice clock at LNE-SYRTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sarlo, L.; Favier, M.; Tyumenev, R.; Bize, S.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the development of an optical lattice clock based on mercury and the results obtained since the 7 th SFSM. We briefly present a new solution for the cooling laser system and an improved lattice trap that allows us to interrogate a few thousand atoms in parallel. This translates into a fractional short term stability of 1.2 x 10-15 at the clock frequency of 1.129 PHz.

  14. Rapid evaluation of time scale using an optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Hachisu, H.; Nakagawa, F.; Hanado, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of steering a time scale using an optical clock is investigated. Since the high stability of optical frequency standards enables rapid evaluation of the scale interval, the requirement for the continuous operation is mitigated. Numerical simulations with the input of real calibration data by a 87Sr lattice clock indicated that the calibrations once in two weeks maintain the time scale within 5 ns level using a currently available hydrogen maser at NICT. “Optical” steering of a time scale by the intermittent calibrations frees an optical frequency standard from being dedicated to the steering, enabling other applications using the same apparatus.

  15. Ultracold lanthanides: from optical clock to a quantum simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakova, G. A.; Golovizin, A. A.; Kalganova, E. S.; Sorokin, V. N.; Sukachev, D. D.; Tregubov, D. O.; Khabarova, K. Yu; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2016-02-01

    We review the current research on precision spectroscopy and quantum optics applications of laser-cooled lanthanides. We discuss the specific electronic structure of hollow atoms, which determine prospects for application in optical frequency standards and in quantum simulators based on spin interactions in optical lattices. Using the example of the thulium atom, we describe the specifics of laser cooling, optical lattice trapping techniques, and clock transition spectroscopy using spectrally narrow lasers.

  16. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  17. Micromagic Clock: Microwave Clock Based on Atoms in an Engineered Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-27

    We propose a new class of atomic microwave clocks based on the hyperfine transitions in the ground state of aluminum or gallium atoms trapped in optical lattices. For such elements magic wavelengths exist at which both levels of the hyperfine doublet are shifted at the same rate by the lattice laser field, canceling its effect on the clock transition. A similar mechanism for the magic wavelengths may work in microwave hyperfine transitions in other atoms which have the fine-structure multiplets in the ground state.

  18. Accurate Optical Lattice Clock with {sup 87}Sr Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Le Targat, Rodolphe; Baillard, Xavier; Fouche, Mathilde; Brusch, Anders; Tcherbakoff, Olivier; Rovera, Giovanni D.; Lemonde, Pierre

    2006-09-29

    We report a frequency measurement of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition of {sup 87}Sr atoms in an optical lattice clock. The frequency is determined to be 429 228 004 229 879(5) Hz with a fractional uncertainty that is comparable to state-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms in free fall. The two previous measurements of this transition were found to disagree by about 2x10{sup -13}, i.e., almost 4 times the combined error bar and 4 to 5 orders of magnitude larger than the claimed ultimate accuracy of this new type of clocks. Our measurement is in agreement with one of these two values and essentially resolves this discrepancy.

  19. Spin-orbit coupling in a strontium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Tobias; Bromley, Sarah; Kolkowitz, Shimon; Zhang, Xibo; Wall, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic gauge fields are a promising tool for creating complex Hamiltonians with ultracold neutral atoms that may mimic the fractional Quantum Hall effect and other topological states. A promising approach is to use spin-orbit coupling to treat an internal degree of freedom as an effective `synthetic' spatial dimension. Here, this synthetic dimension is comprised by the internal ground and excited states used for high-precision clock spectroscopy in a fermionic strontium optical lattice clock. We report on our progress towards this goal in a system where atoms tunnel through a 1D optical lattice during clock interrogation. We present measurements of the lattice band structure under varying Lamb-Dicke parameters and in a regime where s-wave collisions are expected to contribute density dependent frequency shifts.

  20. Synchronization of Distant Optical Clocks at the Femtosecond Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Sinclair, Laura C.; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Swann, William C.; Baumann, Esther; Bergeron, Hugo; Cermak, Michael; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2016-04-01

    The use of optical clocks or oscillators in future ultraprecise navigation, gravitational sensing, coherent arrays, and relativity experiments will require time comparison and synchronization over terrestrial or satellite free-space links. Here, we demonstrate full unambiguous synchronization of two optical time scales across a free-space link. The time deviation between synchronized time scales is below 1 fs over durations from 0.1 to 6500 s, despite atmospheric turbulence and kilometer-scale path length variations. Over 2 days, the time wander is 40 fs peak to peak. Our approach relies on the two-way reciprocity of a single-spatial-mode optical link, valid to below 225 attoseconds across a turbulent 4-km path. This femtosecond level of time-frequency transfer should enable optical networks using state-of-the-art optical clocks or oscillators.

  1. Trapped Ion Optical Clocks at NPL

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H. S.; Barwood, G. P.; Hosaka, K.; Klein, H. A.; Lea, S. N.; Walton, B. R.; Webster, S. A.; Gill, P.; Huang, G.; Stannard, A.

    2006-11-07

    Forbidden transitions in single laser-cooled trapped ions provide highly stable and accurate references for optical frequency standards. This paper describes recent progress on strontium and ytterbium ion optical frequency standards under development at NPL.

  2. Recent progress on the 27Al+ ion optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. T.; Yuan, W. H.; Zeng, X. Y.; Che, H.; Shi, X. H.; Deng, K.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.

    2016-06-01

    An aluminium ion optical clock is under development at Huazhong University of Science and Technology. The 25Mg+ ion is chosen as logic ion to sympathetically cool an Al+ ion and to detect its states. The 25Mg+ ion is cooled to the motional ground state through Raman sideband cooling as the first step for quantum logic spectroscopy. Ultra-stable lasers for the interrogation of the clock transition are developed. The instability of the laser beat frequency is 1.2 x 10-15 at 1 s, which is close to the thermal noise limit of the reference cavity.

  3. Optical Addressing And Clocking Of RAM's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Alan R.; Nixon, Robert H.; Bergman, Larry A.; Esener, Sadik

    1989-01-01

    Proposed random-access-memory (RAM) addressing system, in which memory linked optically to read/write logic circuits, greatly increases computer operating speed. System - comprises addressing circuits including numerous lasers as signal sources, numerous optical gates including optical detectors associated with memory cells, and holographic element to direct light signals to desired memory-cell locations - applied to high-capacity digital systems, supercomputers, and complex microcircuits.

  4. Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy of optical clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Oates, C. W.; Barber, Z. W.; Lemke, N. D.; Ludlow, A. D.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Riehle, F.

    2010-07-15

    We present nonstandard optical Ramsey schemes that use pulses individually tailored in duration, phase, and frequency to cancel spurious frequency shifts related to the excitation itself. In particular, the field shifts and their uncertainties can be radically suppressed (by two to four orders of magnitude) in comparison with the usual Ramsey method (using two equal pulses) as well as with single-pulse Rabi spectroscopy. Atom interferometers and optical clocks based on two-photon transitions, heavily forbidden transitions, or magnetically induced spectroscopy could significantly benefit from this method. In the latter case, these frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10{sup -17}. Moreover, our approach opens the door for high-precision optical clocks based on direct frequency comb spectroscopy.

  5. Ytterbium optical lattice clock with 10-18 level characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nathaniel; Sherman, Jeff; Beloy, Kyle; Hinkley, Nathan; Schioppo, Marco; Oates, Chris; Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    A recent comparison of two ytterbium-based optical lattice clocks at NIST demonstrated record stability of 1 . 6 parts in 1018 after 25,000s averaging. We report on measurements of the two primary systematic effects that shift the ultra-narrow clock transition, towards a reduction of the clock uncertainty to the 10-18 level. Uncertainty stemming from the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift is largely due to imprecise knowledge of the thermal environment surrounding the atoms. We detail the construction and operation of an in-vacuum, thermally-regulated radiation shield, which permits laser cooling and trapping while enabling an absolute temperature measurement with < 20 mK precision. Additionally, while operation of the optical lattice at the magic wavelength (λm) cancels the scalar Stark shift (since both clock states shift equally), higher-order vector and two-photon hyperpolarizability shifts remain. To evaluate these effects, as well as the polarizability away from λm, we implement a lattice buildup cavity around the atoms. The resulting twenty-fold enhancement of the lattice intensity provides a significant lever arm for precise measurement of these effects.

  6. Quantum engineering of atomic phase shifts in optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Almonacil, S.; de Clercq, E.; Ludlow, A. D.; Arimondo, E.

    2014-11-01

    Quantum engineering of time-separated Raman laser pulses in three-level systems is presented to produce an ultranarrow optical transition in bosonic alkali-earth clocks free from light shifts and with a significantly reduced sensitivity to laser parameter fluctuations. Based on a quantum artificial complex wave-function analytical model and supported by a full density-matrix simulation including a possible residual effect of spontaneous emission from the intermediate state, atomic phase shifts associated with Ramsey and hyper-Ramsey two-photon spectroscopy in optical clocks are derived. Various common-mode Raman frequency detunings are found in which the frequency shifts from off-resonant states are canceled, while their uncertainties at the 10-18 level of accuracy are strongly reduced.

  7. Stability improvements for the NIST Yb optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, R. J.; Schioppo, M.; McGrew, W. F.; Brown, R. C.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Beloy, K.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the fundamental limit given by quantum projection noise, optical lattice clocks require advanced laser stabilization techniques. The NIST ytterbium clock has benefited from several generations of extremely high finesse optical cavities, with cavity linewidths below 1 kHz. Characterization of the cavity drift rate has allowed compensation to the mHz/s level, improving the medium-term stability of the cavity. Based on recent measurements using Ramsey spectroscopy with synchronous interrogation, we report a fractional instability σy(1s) <=10-16 , dominated by atom number fluctuation noise. We also provide updates on our cryogenic sapphire cavity with a reduced thermal noise floor, which will improve our Dick-limited fractional instability at 1 s to below 10-16. Also at University of Colorado.

  8. Experimental realization of an optical second with strontium lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Le Targat, R; Lorini, L; Le Coq, Y; Zawada, M; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Gurov, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D G; Nagórny, B; Gartman, R; Westergaard, P G; Tobar, M E; Lours, M; Santarelli, G; Clairon, A; Bize, S; Laurent, P; Lemonde, P; Lodewyck, J

    2013-01-01

    Progress in realizing the SI second had multiple technological impacts and enabled further constraint of theoretical models in fundamental physics. Caesium microwave fountains, realizing best the second according to its current definition with a relative uncertainty of 2-4 × 10(-16), have already been overtaken by atomic clocks referenced to an optical transition, which are both more stable and more accurate. Here we present an important step in the direction of a possible new definition of the second. Our system of five clocks connects with an unprecedented consistency the optical and the microwave worlds. For the first time, two state-of-the-art strontium optical lattice clocks are proven to agree within their accuracy budget, with a total uncertainty of 1.5 × 10(-16). Their comparison with three independent caesium fountains shows a degree of accuracy now only limited by the best realizations of the microwave-defined second, at the level of 3.1 × 10(-16).

  9. Experimental realization of an optical second with strontium lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Le Targat, R; Lorini, L; Le Coq, Y; Zawada, M; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Gurov, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D G; Nagórny, B; Gartman, R; Westergaard, P G; Tobar, M E; Lours, M; Santarelli, G; Clairon, A; Bize, S; Laurent, P; Lemonde, P; Lodewyck, J

    2013-01-01

    Progress in realizing the SI second had multiple technological impacts and enabled further constraint of theoretical models in fundamental physics. Caesium microwave fountains, realizing best the second according to its current definition with a relative uncertainty of 2-4 × 10(-16), have already been overtaken by atomic clocks referenced to an optical transition, which are both more stable and more accurate. Here we present an important step in the direction of a possible new definition of the second. Our system of five clocks connects with an unprecedented consistency the optical and the microwave worlds. For the first time, two state-of-the-art strontium optical lattice clocks are proven to agree within their accuracy budget, with a total uncertainty of 1.5 × 10(-16). Their comparison with three independent caesium fountains shows a degree of accuracy now only limited by the best realizations of the microwave-defined second, at the level of 3.1 × 10(-16). PMID:23839206

  10. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  11. Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bishof, M.; Lin, Y.; Swallows, M. D.; Ye, J.; Rey, A. M.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2011-06-24

    We report the observation of resolved atomic interaction sidebands (ISB) in the {sup 87}Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional optical lattice. The ISB are a manifestation of the strong interactions that occur between atoms confined in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry and disappear when the confinement is relaxed along one dimension. The emergence of ISB is linked to the recently observed suppression of collisional frequency shifts. At the current temperatures, the ISB can be resolved but are broad. At lower temperatures, ISB are predicted to be substantially narrower and useful spectroscopic tools in strongly interacting alkaline-earth gases.

  12. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, A.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Kraus, C.V.; Martin, M.J.; Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J.; Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D.

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  13. Optical lattice clock with atoms confined in a shallow trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonde, Pierre; Wolf, Peter

    2005-09-15

    We study the trap depth requirement for the realization of an optical clock using atoms confined in a lattice. We show that site-to-site tunneling leads to a residual sensitivity to the atom dynamics hence requiring large depths [(50-100)E{sub r} for Sr] to avoid any frequency shift or line broadening of the atomic transition at the 10{sup -17}-10{sup -18} level. Such large depths and the corresponding laser power may, however, lead to difficulties (e.g., higher-order light shifts, two-photon ionization, technical difficulties) and therefore one would like to operate the clock in much shallower traps. To circumvent this problem we propose the use of an accelerated lattice. Acceleration lifts the degeneracy between adjacents potential wells which strongly inhibits tunneling. We show that using the Earth's gravity, much shallower traps (down to 5E{sub r} for Sr) can be used for the same accuracy goal.

  14. Clock recovery from 40 Gbps optical signal with optical phase-locked loop based on a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhon, Young Min; Ki, Ho Jin; Kim, Sun Ho

    2003-05-01

    10 GHz clock recovery from 40 Gbps optical time-division-multiplexed (OTDM) signal pulses is experimentally demonstrated using optical phase lock loop based on a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) with a local-reference-oscillator-free electronic feedback circuit. The clock pulse that was used as the control pulse had energy of 800 fJ and the SNR of the time-extracted 10 GHz RF signal to the side components was larger than 40 dB.

  15. Development of 171Yb optical lattice clock at KRISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jongchul; Park, Chang Yong; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Lee, Won-Kyu; Eon Park, Sang; Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum

    2012-06-01

    We measured the absolute frequency of the optical clock transition 1S0 (F = 1/2) - 3P0 (F = 1/2) of 171Yb atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice and it was determined to be 518 295 836 590 865.7 (9.2) Hz. The measured frequency was calibrated to the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by using an optical frequency comb of which frequency was phase-locked to a hydrogen maser as a flywheel oscillator traceable to the UTC. The magic wavelength was also measured as 394 798.48 (79) GHz. The results are in good agreement with two previous measurements of other institutes within the specified uncertainty of this work.

  16. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-09-15

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of {pi} between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts.

  17. Optical lattice polarization effects on hyperpolarizability of atomic clock transitions.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G

    2006-10-27

    The light-induced frequency shift due to hyperpolarizability (i.e., terms of second-order in intensity) is studied for a forbidden optical transition, J = 0 --> J = 0. A simple universal dependence on the field ellipticity is obtained. This result allows minimization of the second-order light shift with respect to the field polarization for optical lattices operating at a magic wavelength (at which the first-order shift vanishes). We show the possibility for the existence of a magic elliptical polarization, for which the second-order frequency shift vanishes. The optimal polarization of the lattice field can be either linear, circular, or magic elliptical. The obtained results could improve the accuracy of lattice-based atomic clocks.

  18. Frequency ratios of optical lattice clocks at the 17th decimal place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-05-01

    Optical lattice clocks benefit from a low quantum-projection noise by simultaneously interrogating a large number of atoms, which are trapped in an optical lattice tuned to the ``magic wavelength'' to largely cancel out light shift perturbation in the clock transition. About a thousand atoms enable the clocks to achieve 10-18 instability in a few hours of operation, allowing intensive investigation and control of systematic uncertainties. As optical lattice clocks have reached inaccuracies approaching 10-18, it is now the uncertainty of the SI second (~ 10-16) itself that restricts the measurement of the absolute frequencies of such optical clocks. Direct comparisons of optical clocks are, therefore, the only way to investigate and utilize their superb performance beyond the SI second. In this presentation, we report on frequency comparisons of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium (87 Sr), ytterbium (171 Yb) and mercury (199 Hg) atoms. By referencing cryogenic Sr clocks, we determine frequency ratios, νYb/νSr and νHg/νSr, of a cryogenic Yb clock and a Hg clock with uncertainty at the mid 10-17 level. Such ratios provide an access to search for temporal variation of the fundamental constants. We also present remote comparisons between cryogenic Sr clocks located at RIKEN and the University of Tokyo over a 30-km-long phase-stabilized fiber link. The gravitational red shift Δν /ν0 ~ 1.1× 10-18 Δh cm-1 reads out the height difference of Δh ~ 15 m between the two clocks with uncertainty of 5 cm, which demonstrates a step towards relativistic geodesy. ERATO, JST.

  19. Al+ Optical Clocks for Fundamental Physics and Geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, James Chin-wen

    2011-07-13

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ “quantum-logic” clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37±17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant.

  20. Al+ optical clocks for fundamental physics, geodesy, and quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen

    2011-05-01

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ ``quantum-logic'' clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6 ×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37 +/- 17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4 ×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant. This work is done in collaboration with D. B. Hume, M. J. Thorpe, D. J. Wineland, and T. Rosenband. Work supported by ONR, AFOSR, DARPA, NSA, and IARPA.

  1. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, S.; Schiller, S.; Pramod, M. S.; Smith, L.; Singh, Y.; He, W.; Viswam, S.; Świerad, D.; Hughes, J.; Bongs, K.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Vogt, S.; Bize, S.; Lodewyck, J.; Le Targat, R.; Holleville, D.; Venon, B.; Gill, P.; Barwood, G.; Hill, I. R.; Ovchinnikov, Y.; Kulosa, A.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.-M.; Stuhler, J.; Kaenders, W.

    2016-04-01

    The ESA mission "Space Optical Clock" project aims at operating an optical lattice clock on the ISS in approximately 2023. The scientific goals of the mission are to perform tests of fundamental physics, to enable space-assisted relativistic geodesy and to intercompare optical clocks on the ground using microwave and optical links. The performance goal of the space clock is less than 1 × 10-17 uncertainty and 1 × 10-15 τ-1/2 instability. Within an EU-FP7-funded project, a strontium optical lattice clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performances are instability below 1 × 10-15 τ-1/2 and fractional inaccuracy 5 × 10-17. For the design of the clock, techniques and approaches suitable for later space application are used, such as modular design, diode lasers, low power consumption subunits, and compact dimensions. The Sr clock apparatus is fully operational, and the clock transition in 88Sr was observed with linewidth as small as 9 Hz.

  2. Four-wave mixing for clock recovery of phase modulated optical OFDM superchannel.

    PubMed

    Power, Mark J; Jia, Wei; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J; Gunning, Fatima C Garcia

    2014-03-24

    We simulate and experimentally demonstrate a novel all-optical clock recovery technique for a BPSK OFDM superchannel. Four-wave mixing in SOAs is used to strip the modulation from the superchannel sub-carriers, two of which are filtered and beat together in a photodiode to recover the clock.

  3. Is the time right for a redefinition of the second by optical atomic clocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Given the dramatic rate of progress in optical atomic clocks over the last decade, this paper presents the current state of play, and considers the possibilities, implications and timescales for a potential redefinition of the SI second in terms of an optical reference transition. In particular, the question of choice of a future standard is addressed, together with the requirements to accurately compare realisations of such standards, both for clocks local to, and remote from each other. Current performances of various optical clock systems are examined and possibilities for moving beyond potential limitations by alternative strategies are outlined.

  4. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  5. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, H.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.

    2008-02-08

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ''new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10{sup -18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  6. Collisional Losses, Decoherence, and Frequency Shifts in Optical Lattice Clocks with Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lisdat, Ch.; Winfred, J. S. R. Vellore; Middelmann, T.; Riehle, F.; Sterr, U.

    2009-08-28

    We have quantified collisional losses, decoherence and the collision shift in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock on the highly forbidden transition {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} at 698 nm with bosonic {sup 88}Sr. We were able to distinguish two loss channels: inelastic collisions between atoms in the upper and lower clock state and atoms in the upper clock state only. Based on the measured coefficients, we determine the operation parameters at which a 1D-lattice clock with {sup 88}Sr shows no degradation due to collisions on the fractional uncertainty level of 10{sup -16}.

  7. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  8. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2014-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, we can robustly generate such entanglement and surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement. Supported by DARPA QUASAR and NSERC.

  9. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2015-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, it is possible to robustly generate such entanglement and therefore surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement.

  10. An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B J; Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Campbell, S L; Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Bromley, S L; Ye, J

    2014-02-01

    Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit.

  11. An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B J; Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Campbell, S L; Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Bromley, S L; Ye, J

    2014-02-01

    Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit. PMID:24463513

  12. Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, Andrew D.; Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Foreman, Seth M.; Blatt, Sebastian; Notcutt, Mark; Ido, Tetsuya; Ye Jun

    2006-01-27

    With ultracold {sup 87}Sr confined in a magic wavelength optical lattice, we present the most precise study (2.8 Hz statistical uncertainty) to date of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} optical clock transition with a detailed analysis of systematic shifts (19 Hz uncertainty) in the absolute frequency measurement of 429 228 004 229 869 Hz. The high resolution permits an investigation of the optical lattice motional sideband structure. The local oscillator for this optical atomic clock is a stable diode laser with its hertz-level linewidth characterized by an octave-spanning femtosecond frequency comb.

  13. All-optical clock recovery, photonic balancing, and saturated asymmetric filtering for fiber optic communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Earl Ryan

    In this dissertation I investigated a multi-channel and multi-bit rate all-optical clock recovery device. This device, a birefringent Fabry-Perot resonator, had previously been demonstrated to simultaneously recover the clock signal from 10 wavelength channels operating at 10 Gb/s and one channel at 40 Gb/s. Similar to clock signals recovered from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator, the clock signal from the birefringent resonator suffers from a bit pattern effect. I investigated this bit pattern effect for birefringent resonators numerically and experimentally and found that the bit pattern effect is less prominent than for clock signals from a conventional Fabry-Perot resonator. I also demonstrated photonic balancing which is an all-optical alternative to electrical balanced detection for phase shift keyed signals. An RZ-DPSK data signal was demodulated using a delay interferometer. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer then counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. This process created a differential signal which used all the signal power present in two consecutive symbols. I showed that this scheme could provide an optical alternative to electrical balanced detection by reducing the required OSNR by 3 dB. I also show how this method can provide amplitude regeneration to a signal after modulation format conversion. In this case an RZ-DPSK signal was converted to an amplitude modulation signal by the delay interferometer. The resulting amplitude modulated signal is degraded by both the amplitude noise and the phase noise of the original signal. The two logically opposite outputs from the delay interferometer again counter-propagated in a saturated SOA. Through limiting amplification and noise modulation this scheme provided amplitude regeneration and improved the Q-factor of the demodulated signal by 3.5 dB. Finally I investigated how SPM provided by the SOA can provide a method to reduce the in-band noise of a communication signal. The

  14. Observation and cancellation of a perturbing dc stark shift in strontium optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Zawada, Michal; Lorini, Luca; Gurov, Mikhail; Lemonde, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a dc Stark frequency shift at the 10-(13) level by comparing two strontium optical lattice clocks. This frequency shift arises from the presence of electric charges trapped on dielectric surfaces placed under vacuum close to the atomic sample. We show that these charges can be eliminated by shining UV light on the dielectric surfaces, and characterize the residual dc Stark frequency shift on the clock transition at the 10-(18) level by applying an external electric field. This study shows that the dc Stark shift can play an important role in the accuracy budget of lattice clocks, and should be duly taken into account.

  15. Controlling dipole-dipole frequency shifts in a lattice-based optical atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.E.; Lukin, M.D.; Ye Jun

    2004-02-01

    Motivated by the ideas of using cold alkaline-earth atoms trapped in an optical lattice for realization of optical atomic clocks, we investigate theoretically the perturbative effects of atom-atom interactions on a clock transition frequency. These interactions are mediated by the dipole fields associated with the optically excited atoms. We predict resonancelike features in the frequency shifts when constructive interference among atomic dipoles occur. We theoretically demonstrate that by fine tuning the coherent dipole-dipole couplings in appropriately designed lattice geometries, the undesirable frequency shifts can be greatly suppressed.

  16. p-Wave Cold Collisions in an Optical Lattice Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-09-02

    We study ultracold collisions in fermionic ytterbium by precisely measuring the energy shifts they impart on the atoms' internal clock states. Exploiting Fermi statistics, we uncover p-wave collisions, in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes. With the higher density afforded by two-dimensional lattice confinement, we demonstrate that strong interactions can lead to a novel suppression of this collision shift. In addition to reducing the systematic errors of lattice clocks, this work has application to quantum information and quantum simulation with alkaline-earth atoms.

  17. Optical lattice polarization effects on magnetically induced optical atomic clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Oates, C. W.

    2007-08-15

    We derive the frequency shift for a forbidden optical transition J=0{yields}J{sup '}=0 caused by the simultaneous actions of an elliptically polarized lattice field and a static magnetic field. We find that a simple configuration of lattice and magnetic fields leads to a cancellation of this shift to first order in lattice intensity and magnetic field. In this geometry, the second-order lattice intensity shift can be minimized as well by use of optimal lattice polarization. Suppression of these shifts could considerably enhance the performance of the next generation of atomic clocks.

  18. Frequency ratio measurement of 171Yb and 87Sr optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Tanabe, Takehiko; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2014-04-01

    The frequency ratio of the (1)S(0)(F = 1/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 1/2) clock transition in (171)Yb and the (1)S(0)(F = 9/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 9/2) clock transition in (87)Sr is measured by an optical-optical direct frequency link between two optical lattice clocks. We determined the ratio (ν(Yb)/ν(Sr)) to be 1.207 507 039 343 341 2(17) fractional standard uncertainty of 1.4 × 10(-15) [corrected]. The measurement uncertainty of the frequency ratio is smaller than that obtained from absolute frequency measurements using the International Atomic Time (TAI) link. The measured ratio agrees well with that derived from the absolute frequency measurement results obtained at NIST and JILA, Boulder, CO using their Cs-fountain clock. Our measurement enables the first international comparison of the frequency ratios of optical clocks. The measured frequency ratio will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures for a discussion related to the redefinition of the second.

  19. Frequency ratio measurement of 171Yb and 87Sr optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Tanabe, Takehiko; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2014-04-01

    The frequency ratio of the (1)S(0)(F = 1/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 1/2) clock transition in (171)Yb and the (1)S(0)(F = 9/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 9/2) clock transition in (87)Sr is measured by an optical-optical direct frequency link between two optical lattice clocks. We determined the ratio (ν(Yb)/ν(Sr)) to be 1.207 507 039 343 341 2(17) fractional standard uncertainty of 1.4 × 10(-15) [corrected]. The measurement uncertainty of the frequency ratio is smaller than that obtained from absolute frequency measurements using the International Atomic Time (TAI) link. The measured ratio agrees well with that derived from the absolute frequency measurement results obtained at NIST and JILA, Boulder, CO using their Cs-fountain clock. Our measurement enables the first international comparison of the frequency ratios of optical clocks. The measured frequency ratio will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures for a discussion related to the redefinition of the second. PMID:24718165

  20. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks.

  1. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks. PMID:26274639

  2. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  3. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atoms: A candidate for optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukachev, D.; Fedorov, S.; Tolstikhina, I.; Tregubov, D.; Kalganova, E.; Vishnyakova, G.; Golovizin, A.; Kolachevsky, N.; Khabarova, K.; Sorokin, V.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the 169Tm atom at the wavelength of 1.14 μ m as a candidate for a two-dimensional-optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =7 /2 ) and [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =5 /2 ) in the spectral range from 250 to 1200 nm, we find a "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at 807 nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at 1.14 μ m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to 8 ×10-17 in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than 5 ×10-18 in fractional units. By direct excitation of the 1.14 μ m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole trap, we set the lower limit for the lifetime of the upper clock level [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =5 /2 ) of 112 ms which corresponds to a natural spectral linewidth narrower than 1.4 Hz. The polarizability of the Tm ground state was measured by the excitation of parametric resonances in the optical dipole trap at 532 nm.

  4. Trapped ion 88Sr+ optical clock systematic uncertainties - AC Stark shift determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwood, GP; Huang, G.; King, SA; Klein, HA; Gill, P.

    2016-06-01

    A recent comparison between two trapped-ion 88Sr+ optical clocks at the UK. National Physical Laboratory demonstrated agreement to 4 parts in 1017. One of the uncertainty contributions to the optical clock absolute frequency arises from the blackbody radiation shift which in turn depends on uncertainty in the knowledge of the differential polarisability between the two clocks states. Whilst a recent NRC measurement has determined the DC differential polarisability to high accuracy, there has been no experimental verification to date of the dynamic correction to the DC Stark shift. We report a measurement of the scalar AC Stark shift at 1064 nm with measurements planned at other wavelengths. Our preliminary result using a fibre laser at 1064 nm agrees with calculated values to within ∼3%.

  5. Magnetic-dipole transitions in highly charged ions as a basis of ultraprecise optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Derevianko, A

    2014-12-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions as a basis of an optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy. We consider a range of possibilities, including M1 transitions between clock levels of the same fine-structure and hyperfine-structure manifolds. In highly charged ions these transitions lie in the optical part of the spectra and can be probed with lasers. The most direct advantage of our proposal comes from the low degeneracy of clock levels and the simplicity of atomic structure in combination with negligible quadrupolar shift. We demonstrate that such clocks can have projected fractional accuracies below the 10^{-20}-10^{-21} level for all common systematic effects, such as blackbody radiation, Zeeman, ac-Stark, and quadrupolar shifts.

  6. Cold-collision-shift cancellation and inelastic scattering in a Yb optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, A. D.; Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Quemener, G.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-11-15

    Recently, p-wave cold collisions were shown to dominate the density-dependent shift of the clock transition frequency in a {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clock. Here we demonstrate that by operating such a system at the proper excitation fraction, the cold-collision shift is canceled below the 5x10{sup -18} fractional frequency level. We report inelastic two-body loss rates for {sup 3} P{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} and {sup 1} S{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2 {sup 171}Yb system are relevant for high-performance optical clocks as well as strongly interacting systems for quantum information and quantum simulation applications.

  7. New Limits on Coupling of Fundamental Constants to Gravity Using {sup 87}Sr Optical Lattice Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blatt, S.; Ludlow, A. D.; Campbell, G. K.; Thomsen, J. W.; Zelevinsky, T.; Boyd, M. M.; Ye, J.; Baillard, X.; Fouche, M.; Le Targat, R.; Brusch, A.; Lemonde, P.; Takamoto, M.; Hong, F.-L.; Katori, H.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2008-04-11

    The {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition frequency {nu}{sub Sr} in neutral {sup 87}Sr has been measured relative to the Cs standard by three independent laboratories in Boulder, Paris, and Tokyo over the last three years. The agreement on the 1x10{sup -15} level makes {nu}{sub Sr} the best agreed-upon optical atomic frequency. We combine periodic variations in the {sup 87}Sr clock frequency with {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and H-maser data to test local position invariance by obtaining the strongest limits to date on gravitational-coupling coefficients for the fine-structure constant {alpha}, electron-proton mass ratio {mu}, and light quark mass. Furthermore, after {sup 199}Hg{sup +}, {sup 171}Yb{sup +}, and H, we add {sup 87}Sr as the fourth optical atomic clock species to enhance constraints on yearly drifts of {alpha} and {mu}.

  8. Magnetic-dipole transitions in highly charged ions as a basis of ultraprecise optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Derevianko, A

    2014-12-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions as a basis of an optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy. We consider a range of possibilities, including M1 transitions between clock levels of the same fine-structure and hyperfine-structure manifolds. In highly charged ions these transitions lie in the optical part of the spectra and can be probed with lasers. The most direct advantage of our proposal comes from the low degeneracy of clock levels and the simplicity of atomic structure in combination with negligible quadrupolar shift. We demonstrate that such clocks can have projected fractional accuracies below the 10^{-20}-10^{-21} level for all common systematic effects, such as blackbody radiation, Zeeman, ac-Stark, and quadrupolar shifts. PMID:25526127

  9. Accuracy budget of the 88Sr optical atomic clocks at KL FAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzewicz, Czesław; Bober, Marcin; Morzyński, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Masłowski, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a detailed accuracy budget of two independent strontium optical lattice clocks at the National Laboratory FAMO (KL FAMO) probed with a single shared ultra-narrow laser. The combined instability of the two frequency standards was 7× {10}-17 after 105s of averaging.

  10. All-optical pulse data generation in a semiconductor optical amplifier gain controlled by a reshaped optical clock injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yu, Kun-Chieh

    2006-05-01

    Wavelength-maintained all-optical pulse data pattern transformation based on a modified cross-gain-modulation architecture in a strongly gain-depleted semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is investigated. Under a backward dark-optical-comb injection with 70% duty-cycle reshaping from the received data clock at 10GHz, the incoming optical data stream is transformed into a pulse data stream with duty cycle, rms timing jitter, and conversion gain of 15%, 4ps, and 3dB, respectively. The high-pass filtering effect of the gain-saturated SOA greatly improves the extinction ratio of data stream by 8dB and reduces its bit error rate to 10-12 at -18dBm.

  11. Paper Laser: a step towards a time scale generation from an ensemble of optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C. A.; de Carlos, E.; Lopez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a simple and innovative technique to combine n optical frequencies with the aim to produce a virtual laser with superior metrological characteristics is introduced. The algorithms to combine a number of clocks to produce a virtual clock, which is also referred as paper clock, are well known. An example of this is the statistical generation of the UTC time scale by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) using a recursive algorithm (ALGOS). A similar algorithm to combine n optical frequencies, all of them with same nominal value, to produce a “paper laser” whose frequency is known through its difference with respect to the optical frequencies of the ensemble is proposed here. As a demonstration of this, three optical frequencies stabilized to the D2 Cs-133 line, all of them with similar frequency stability were experimentally combined. A paper laser has been produced during hours whose frequency stability is about 3-1/2 times with respect to the original optical frequencies. This technique can be applied to combine ultra-stable optical frequencies to produce a paper laser that can be materialized by correcting one of the real optical frequencies of the ensemble. The robustness and stability of a paper laser is very attractive to produce a time scale from its operation.

  12. Engineering Stark Potentials for Precision Measurements: Optical Lattice Clock and Electrodynamic Surface Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Takamoto, Masao; Hachisu, Hidekazu; Fujiki, Jun; Higashi, Ryoichi; Yasuda, Masami; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    2005-05-05

    Employing the engineered electric fields, we demonstrate novel platforms for precision measurements with neutral atoms. (1) Applying the light shift cancellation technique, atoms trapped in an optical lattice reveal 50-Hz-narrow optical spectrum, yielding nearly an order of magnitude improvement over existing neutral-atom-based clocks. (2) Surface Stark trap has been developed to manipulate scalar atoms that are intrinsically robust to decoherence.

  13. Recent progress in optically-pumped cesium beam clock at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Zhou, S.; Wan, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, long-life, and low-drift cesium beam clock is investigated at Peking University, where the atoms are magnetic-state selected and optically detected. Stability close to that of the best commercial cesium clocks has been achieved from 10 to 105 s. As previously shown, the short-term stability is determined by atomic shot noise or laser frequency noise. The stabilizations of microwave power and C-field improve the long-term stability, with the help of a digital servo system based on field-programmable gate array.

  14. Magic wavelength to make optical lattice clocks insensitive to atomic motion.

    PubMed

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E Yu; Ovsiannikov, V D

    2009-10-01

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  15. Magic Wavelength to Make Optical Lattice Clocks Insensitive to Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E. Yu.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2009-10-09

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  16. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  17. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ovsiannikov, Vitali D.; Derevianko, Andrei; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-08-26

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10{sup -16} accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10{sup -18}.

  18. Rydberg spectroscopy in an optical lattice: blackbody thermometry for atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Ovsiannikov, Vitali D; Derevianko, Andrei; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-08-26

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10(-16) accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10(-18).

  19. Analysis of the blackbody-radiation shift in an ytterbium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi-Lin; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2016-10-01

    We accurately evaluate the blackbody-radiation shift in a 171Yb optical lattice clock by utilizing temperature measurement and numerical simulation. In this work. three main radiation sources are considered for the blackbody-radiation shift, including the heated atomic oven, the warm vacuum chamber, and the room-temperature vacuum windows. The temperatures on the outer surface of the vacuum chamber are measured during the clock operation period by utilizing seven calibrated temperature sensors. Then we infer the temperature distribution inside the vacuum chamber by numerical simulation according to the measured temperatures. Furthermore, we simulate the temperature variation around the cold atoms while the environmental temperature is fluctuating. Finally, we obtain that the total blackbody-radiation shift is -1.289(7) Hz with an uncertainty of 1.25 × 10-17 for our 171Yb optical lattice clock. The presented method is quite suitable for accurately evaluating the blackbody-radiation shift of the optical lattice clock in the case of lacking the sensors inside the vacuum chamber. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11134003), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA123401), and the Shanghai Excellent Academic Leaders Program of China (Grant No. 12XD1402400).

  20. Development of a prototype compact fibre frequency synthesiser for mobile femtosecond optical clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Pivtsov, V S; Korel', I I; Koliada, N A; Farnosov, S A; Denisov, V I; Nyushkov, B N

    2014-06-30

    A prototype compact fibre frequency synthesiser based on a femtosecond erbium fibre laser and an original hybrid highly nonlinear fibre is developed and preliminarily studied. This synthesiser will ensure an extremely low relative instability of synthesised frequencies (down to 10{sup -17}) with the use of a corresponding optical standard and will be used in mobile optical clocks. The realised frequency stabilisation principle makes the synthesiser universal and allows it to transfer the frequency stability of various types of optical standards to the synthesised radio- and optical frequencies. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Extended Coherence Time on the Clock Transition of Optically Trapped Rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Kleine Buening, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.; Klempt, C.; Arlt, J.; Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Rosenbusch, P.; Piechon, F.

    2011-06-17

    Optically trapped ensembles are of crucial importance for frequency measurements and quantum memories but generally suffer from strong dephasing due to inhomogeneous density and light shifts. We demonstrate a drastic increase of the coherence time to 21 s on the magnetic field insensitive clock transition of {sup 87}Rb by applying the recently discovered spin self-rephasing [C. Deutsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 020401 (2010)]. This result confirms the general nature of this new mechanism and thus shows its applicability in atom clocks and quantum memories. A systematic investigation of all relevant frequency shifts and noise contributions yields a stability of 2.4x10{sup -11{tau}-1/2}, where {tau} is the integration time in seconds. Based on a set of technical improvements, the presented frequency standard is predicted to rival the stability of microwave fountain clocks in a potentially much more compact setup.

  2. Frequency Ratio of (199)Hg and (87)Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-12

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a (199)Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a (87)Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of 7.2×10(-17) for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be νHg/νSr=2.629 314 209 898 909 60(22) with a fractional uncertainty of 8.4×10(-17), which is smaller than the uncertainty of the realization of the International System of Units (SI) second, i.e., the SI limit.

  3. Observation and cancellation of a perturbing dc stark shift in strontium optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Zawada, Michal; Lorini, Luca; Gurov, Mikhail; Lemonde, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a dc Stark frequency shift at the 10-(13) level by comparing two strontium optical lattice clocks. This frequency shift arises from the presence of electric charges trapped on dielectric surfaces placed under vacuum close to the atomic sample. We show that these charges can be eliminated by shining UV light on the dielectric surfaces, and characterize the residual dc Stark frequency shift on the clock transition at the 10-(18) level by applying an external electric field. This study shows that the dc Stark shift can play an important role in the accuracy budget of lattice clocks, and should be duly taken into account. PMID:22481773

  4. Frequency Ratio of (199)Hg and (87)Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-12

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a (199)Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a (87)Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of 7.2×10(-17) for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be νHg/νSr=2.629 314 209 898 909 60(22) with a fractional uncertainty of 8.4×10(-17), which is smaller than the uncertainty of the realization of the International System of Units (SI) second, i.e., the SI limit. PMID:26196788

  5. All-optical clock recovery from 10-Gb/s NRZ data and NRZ to RZ format conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lina; Yan, Yumei; Zhou, Yunfeng; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2006-01-01

    A non-return-to-zero (NRZ) to pseudo-return-to-zero (PRZ) converter consisting of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) is proposed, by which the enhancement of clock frequency component and clock-to-data suppression ratio of the NRZ data are evidently achieved. All-optical clock recovery from NRZ data at 10 Gb/s is successfully demonstrated with the proposed NRZ-to-PRZ converter and a mode-locked SOA fiber laser. Furthermore, NRZ-to-RZ format conversion of 10 Gb/s is realized by using the recovered clock as the control light of terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD), which further proves that the proposed clock recovery scheme is applicable.

  6. Highly reliable optical system for a rubidium space cold atom clock.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Sun, Yanguang; Wang, Bin; Xia, Wenbing; Qu, Qiuzhi; Xiang, Jingfeng; Dong, Zuoren; Lü, Desheng; Liu, Liang

    2016-05-01

    We describe a highly reliable optical system designed for a rubidium space cold atom clock (SCAC), presenting its design, key technologies, and optical components. All of the optical and electronic components are integrated onto an optimized two-sided 300  mm×290  mm×30  mm optical bench. The compact optical structure and special thermal design ensure that the optical system can pass all of the space environmental qualification tests including both thermal vacuum and mechanical tests. To verify its performance, the optical system is carefully checked before and after each test. The results indicate that this optical system is suitably robust for the space applications for which the rubidium SCAC was built. PMID:27140378

  7. Phase-coherent frequency comparison of optical clocks using a telecommunication fiber link.

    PubMed

    Schnatz, Harald; Terra, Osama; Predehl, Katharina; Feldmann, Thorsten; Legero, Thomas; Lipphardt, Burghard; Sterr, Uwe; Grosche, Gesine; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W; Udem, Thomas; Lu, Zehuang H; Wang, Li J; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Friebe, Jan; Pape, Andrè; Rasel, Ernst-M; Riedmann, Mathias; Wübbena, Temmo

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the performance of 2 "dark fibers" of a commercial telecommunication fiber link for a remote comparison of optical clocks. These fibers establish a network in Germany that will eventually link optical frequency standards at PTB with those at the Institute of Quantum Optics (IQ) at the Leibniz University of Hanover, and the Max Planck Institutes in Erlangen (MPL) and Garching (MPQ). We demonstrate for the first time that within several minutes a phase coherent comparison of clock lasers at the few 10(-15) level can also be accomplished when the lasers are more than 100 km apart. Based on the performance of the fiber link to the IQ, we estimate the expected stability for the link from PTB to MPQ via MPL that bridges a distance of approximately 900 km.

  8. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, T.; Derevianko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We predict the possibility of ‘triply magic’ optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the {}1{{{S}}}0 and {}3{{{P}}}0 clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  9. Frequency Comparison of Two (40)Ca(+) Optical Clocks with an Uncertainty at the 10(-17) Level.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Guan, H; Liu, P; Bian, W; Ma, L; Liang, K; Li, T; Gao, K

    2016-01-01

    Based upon an over-one-month frequency comparison of two (40)Ca(+) optical clocks, the frequency difference between the two clocks is measured to be 3.2×10(-17) with a measurement uncertainty of 5.5×10(-17), considering both the statistic (1.9×10(-17)) and the systematic (5.1×10(-17)) uncertainties. This is the first performance of a (40)Ca(+) clock better than that of Cs fountains. A fractional stability of 7×10(-17) in 20,000 s of averaging time is achieved. The evaluation of the two clocks shows that the shift caused by the micromotion in one of the two clocks limits the uncertainty of the comparison. By carefully compensating the micromotion, the absolute frequency of the clock transition is measured to be 411 042 129 776 401.7(1.1) Hz.

  10. Frequency Comparison of Two (40)Ca(+) Optical Clocks with an Uncertainty at the 10(-17) Level.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Guan, H; Liu, P; Bian, W; Ma, L; Liang, K; Li, T; Gao, K

    2016-01-01

    Based upon an over-one-month frequency comparison of two (40)Ca(+) optical clocks, the frequency difference between the two clocks is measured to be 3.2×10(-17) with a measurement uncertainty of 5.5×10(-17), considering both the statistic (1.9×10(-17)) and the systematic (5.1×10(-17)) uncertainties. This is the first performance of a (40)Ca(+) clock better than that of Cs fountains. A fractional stability of 7×10(-17) in 20,000 s of averaging time is achieved. The evaluation of the two clocks shows that the shift caused by the micromotion in one of the two clocks limits the uncertainty of the comparison. By carefully compensating the micromotion, the absolute frequency of the clock transition is measured to be 411 042 129 776 401.7(1.1) Hz. PMID:26799015

  11. Clock Shifts of Optical Transitions in Ultracold Atomic Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zhenhua; Pethick, C. J.

    2010-01-08

    We calculate the shift, due to interatomic interactions, of an optical transition in an atomic Fermi gas trapped in an optical lattice, as in recent experiments of Campbell et al.[Science 324, 360 (2009)]. Using a pseudospin formalism to describe the density matrix of atoms, we derive a Bloch equation which incorporates both spatial inhomogeneity of the probe laser field and interatomic interactions. Expressions are given for the frequency shift as a function of pulse duration, detuning of the probe laser, and the spatial dependence of the electric field of the probe beam. In the low temperature semiclassical regime, we find that the magnitude of the shift is proportional to the temperature.

  12. Measurement of gravitational time delay using drag-free spacecraft and an optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bender, Peter L.; Hall, John L.; Ye, Jun; Diddams, Scott A.; Jefferts, Steven R.; Newbury, Nathan; Oates, Chris; Dolesi, Rita; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Improved accuracy in measurement of the gravitational time delay of electromagnetic waves passing by the sun may be achieved with two drag-free spacecraft, one with a stable clock and laser transmitter and one with a high-stability transponder. We consider one spacecraft near the Earth-Sun L1 point with an advanced optical clock, and the transponder on a second satellite, which has a 2 year period orbit and eccentricity e = 0.37. Superior conjunctions will occur at aphelion 1, 3, and 5 years after launch of the second spacecraft. The measurements can be made using carrier phase comparisons on the laser beam that would be sent to the distant spacecraft and then transponded back. Recent development of clocks based on optical transitions in cooled and trapped ions or atoms indicate that a noise spectral amplitude of about 5 × 10-15/ at frequencies down to at least 1 microhertz can be achieved in space-borne clocks. An attractive candidate is a clock based on a single laser-cooled Yb+ trapped ion. Both spacecraft can be drag-free at a level of 1×10-13m/s2/ at frequencies down to at least 1 microhertz. The corresponding requirement for the LISA gravitational wave mission is 3 × 10-15m/s2/ at frequencies down to 10-4 Hz, and Gravitational Reference Sensors have been developed to meet this goal. They will be tested in the LISA Pathfinder mission, planned by ESA for flight in 2011. The requirements to extend the performance to longer times are mainly thermal. The achievable accuracy for determining the PPN parameter γ is about 1 × 10-8.

  13. A compact, high-performance all optical atomic clock based on telecom lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John H.; Lemke, Nathan D.; Phelps, Gretchen R.; Martin, Kyle W.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss an optical atomic clock based on a two-photon transition at 778 nm in rubidium. In particular, we discuss the fundamental limitations to the short-term stability of a system based on a commercial C-band telecom laser as opposed to a near infrared laser. We show that this system is fundamentally capable of besting a hydrogen MASER in frequency stability and size.

  14. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for (40)Ca(+) optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10(-15) frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled (40)Ca(+) ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10(-14)) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two (40)Ca(+) ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  15. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for (40)Ca(+) optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10(-15) frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled (40)Ca(+) ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10(-14)) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two (40)Ca(+) ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results. PMID:27370440

  16. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for 40Ca+ optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10-15 frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled 40Ca+ ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10-14) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two 40Ca+ ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  17. Measurement of the Gravitational Time Delay Using Drag-Free Spacecraft and an Optical Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bender, P.; Hall, J. L.; Ye, J.; Diddams, S.; Jefferts, S.; Newbury, N.; Oates, C.; Dolesi, R.; Stefano, V.; Weber, W. J.

    2009-05-01

    Much improved accuracy in measurement of changes in the gravitational time delay of electromagnetic waves passing by the sun may be achieved with two drag-free spacecraft, one with a stable clock and laser transmitter and one with an high-stability transponder. We consider one spacecraft near the Earth-Sun L-1 point with an advanced optical clock, and the transponder on a second satellite, which has a 2 year period orbit, with eccentricity e=0.37. Then superior conjunctions will occur at aphelion 1, 3, and 5 years after launch of the second spacecraft. The measurements can be made using carrier phase comparisons on the laser beam that would be sent to the distant spacecraft and then transponded back. With the recent development of clocks based on optical transitions in cooled and trapped ions or atoms, it appears that a noise spectral amplitude of about 5x10-15/sqrt(Hz) at frequencies down to at least 1 microhertz can be achieved in space-borne clocks. An attractive candidate is a clock based on a single laser-cooled Yb+ trapped ion, with a transition wavelength of 435 nm. Clocks based on trapped Sr+ and Al+ ions and Sr atoms in an optical lattice also have shown close to the desired performance at frequencies above 10-4 Hz. The other main requirement is that both spacecraft be drag-free at a level of 1x10-13 m/s2/sqrt(Hz) at frequencies down to at least 1 microhertz. The corresponding requirement for the LISA gravitational wave mission is 3x10-15 m/s2/sqrt(Hz) at frequencies down to 10-4 Hz, and Gravitational Reference Sensors have been developed to meet this goal. They will be tested in the LISA Pathfinder mission, planned by ESA for flight in 2011. The requirements to extend the performance to longer times are mainly thermal. The achievable accuracy for determining the PPN parameter gamma appears to be about 1x10-8.

  18. Comparison of two independent Sr optical clocks with 1×10(-17) stability at 10(3) s.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, T L; Martin, M J; Williams, J R; Bloom, B J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Campbell, S L; Ye, J

    2012-12-01

    Many-particle optical lattice clocks have the potential for unprecedented measurement precision and stability due to their low quantum projection noise. However, this potential has so far never been realized because clock stability has been limited by frequency noise of optical local oscillators. By synchronously probing two ^{87}Sr lattice systems using a laser with a thermal noise floor of 1×10(-15), we remove classically correlated laser noise from the intercomparison, but this does not demonstrate independent clock performance. With an improved optical oscillator that has a 1×10(-16) thermal noise floor, we demonstrate an order of magnitude improvement over the best reported stability of any independent clock, achieving a fractional instability of 1×10(-17) in 1000 s of averaging time for synchronous or asynchronous comparisons. This result is within a factor of 2 of the combined quantum projection noise limit for a 160 ms probe time with ~10(3) atoms in each clock. We further demonstrate that even at this high precision, the overall systematic uncertainty of our clock is not limited by atomic interactions. For the second Sr clock, which has a cavity-enhanced lattice, the atomic-density-dependent frequency shift is evaluated to be -3.11×10(-17) with an uncertainty of 8.2×10(-19).

  19. Comparison of two independent Sr optical clocks with 1×10(-17) stability at 10(3) s.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, T L; Martin, M J; Williams, J R; Bloom, B J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Campbell, S L; Ye, J

    2012-12-01

    Many-particle optical lattice clocks have the potential for unprecedented measurement precision and stability due to their low quantum projection noise. However, this potential has so far never been realized because clock stability has been limited by frequency noise of optical local oscillators. By synchronously probing two ^{87}Sr lattice systems using a laser with a thermal noise floor of 1×10(-15), we remove classically correlated laser noise from the intercomparison, but this does not demonstrate independent clock performance. With an improved optical oscillator that has a 1×10(-16) thermal noise floor, we demonstrate an order of magnitude improvement over the best reported stability of any independent clock, achieving a fractional instability of 1×10(-17) in 1000 s of averaging time for synchronous or asynchronous comparisons. This result is within a factor of 2 of the combined quantum projection noise limit for a 160 ms probe time with ~10(3) atoms in each clock. We further demonstrate that even at this high precision, the overall systematic uncertainty of our clock is not limited by atomic interactions. For the second Sr clock, which has a cavity-enhanced lattice, the atomic-density-dependent frequency shift is evaluated to be -3.11×10(-17) with an uncertainty of 8.2×10(-19). PMID:23368177

  20. Slot clock recovery in optical PPM communication systems with avalanche photodiode photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli

    1989-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct-detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector output waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase-locked loop. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (wavelength = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode photodetector. The system used Q = 4 PPM signaling and operated at a source data rate of 25 Mbits/s. The mathematical model developed to compute the rms phase error of the recovered clock is shown to be in good agreement with results of actual measurements of phase errors. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no significant degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6th at a received optical signal energy of 55 detected photons per information bit.

  1. Optical pumping and readout of bismuth hyperfine states in silicon for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, K.; Szech, M.; Dluhy, P.; Salvail, J.Z.; Morse, K.J.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N.V.; Nötzel, N.; Litvinenko, K.L.; Murdin, B.N.; Thewalt, M.L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The push for a semiconductor-based quantum information technology has renewed interest in the spin states and optical transitions of shallow donors in silicon, including the donor bound exciton transitions in the near-infrared and the Rydberg, or hydrogenic, transitions in the mid-infrared. The deepest group V donor in silicon, bismuth, has a large zero-field ground state hyperfine splitting, comparable to that of rubidium, upon which the now-ubiquitous rubidium atomic clock time standard is based. Here we show that the ground state hyperfine populations of bismuth can be read out using the mid-infrared Rydberg transitions, analogous to the optical readout of the rubidium ground state populations upon which rubidium clock technology is based. We further use these transitions to demonstrate strong population pumping by resonant excitation of the bound exciton transitions, suggesting several possible approaches to a solid-state atomic clock using bismuth in silicon, or eventually in enriched 28Si. PMID:25990870

  2. Magic radio-frequency dressing of nuclear spins in high-accuracy optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2012-11-30

    A Zeeman-insensitive optical clock atomic transition is engineered when nuclear spins are dressed by a nonresonant radio-frequency field. For fermionic species as (87)Sr, (171)Yb, and (199)Hg, particular ratios between the radio-frequency driving amplitude and frequency lead to "magic" magnetic values where a net cancelation of the Zeeman clock shift and a complete reduction of first-order magnetic variations are produced within a relative uncertainty below the 10(-18) level. An Autler-Townes continued fraction describing a semiclassical radio-frequency dressed spin is numerically computed and compared to an analytical quantum description including higher-order magnetic field corrections to the dressed energies.

  3. Magic radio-frequency dressing of nuclear spins in high-accuracy optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2012-11-30

    A Zeeman-insensitive optical clock atomic transition is engineered when nuclear spins are dressed by a nonresonant radio-frequency field. For fermionic species as (87)Sr, (171)Yb, and (199)Hg, particular ratios between the radio-frequency driving amplitude and frequency lead to "magic" magnetic values where a net cancelation of the Zeeman clock shift and a complete reduction of first-order magnetic variations are produced within a relative uncertainty below the 10(-18) level. An Autler-Townes continued fraction describing a semiclassical radio-frequency dressed spin is numerically computed and compared to an analytical quantum description including higher-order magnetic field corrections to the dressed energies. PMID:23368116

  4. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Martin, M J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems arise in many areas of physics, but their complexity generally precludes exact solutions to their dynamics. We explored a strongly interacting two-level system formed by the clock states in (87)Sr as a laboratory for the study of quantum many-body effects. Our collective spin measurements reveal signatures of the development of many-body correlations during the dynamical evolution. We derived a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, severely distorted lineshapes, and correlated spin noise. These investigations open the door to further explorations of quantum many-body effects and entanglement through use of highly coherent and precisely controlled optical lattice clocks. PMID:23929976

  5. Frequency Comparison of [Formula: see text] Ion Optical Clocks at PTB and NPL via GPS PPP.

    PubMed

    Leute, J; Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Christian; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; King, S A; Godun, R M; Jones, J M; Margolis, H S; Whibberley, P B; Wallin, A; Merimaa, M; Gill, P; Peik, E

    2016-07-01

    We used precise point positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled [Formula: see text] ions operated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), U.K. and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. At both institutes, an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator which is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the (2)S1/2(F=0)-(2)D3/2(F=2) electric quadrupole transition in [Formula: see text] via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS-link measurements, we extrapolate the fractional frequency difference over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS-link instability. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS-link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using the extrapolation scheme with the smallest combined uncertainty, we find a fractional frequency difference [Formula: see text] of -1.3×10(-15) with a combined uncertainty of 1.2×10(-15) for a total measurement time of 67 h. This result is consistent with an agreement of the frequencies realized by both optical clocks and with recent absolute frequency measurements against caesium fountain clocks within the corresponding uncertainties.

  6. Frequency Comparison of [Formula: see text] Ion Optical Clocks at PTB and NPL via GPS PPP.

    PubMed

    Leute, J; Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Christian; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; King, S A; Godun, R M; Jones, J M; Margolis, H S; Whibberley, P B; Wallin, A; Merimaa, M; Gill, P; Peik, E

    2016-07-01

    We used precise point positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled [Formula: see text] ions operated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), U.K. and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. At both institutes, an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator which is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the (2)S1/2(F=0)-(2)D3/2(F=2) electric quadrupole transition in [Formula: see text] via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS-link measurements, we extrapolate the fractional frequency difference over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS-link instability. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS-link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using the extrapolation scheme with the smallest combined uncertainty, we find a fractional frequency difference [Formula: see text] of -1.3×10(-15) with a combined uncertainty of 1.2×10(-15) for a total measurement time of 67 h. This result is consistent with an agreement of the frequencies realized by both optical clocks and with recent absolute frequency measurements against caesium fountain clocks within the corresponding uncertainties. PMID:26863657

  7. Femtosecond Er3+ fiber laser for application in an optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, M. A.; Kireev, A. N.; Tausenev, A. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Tyurikov, D. A.; Shelkovikov, A. S.

    2007-11-01

    The main elements needed for the realization of a compact femtosecond methane optical clock are developed and studied. A femtosecond laser system on an Er3+ fiber ( λ = 1.55 μm) contains an oscillator, an amplifier, and a fiber with a relatively high nonlinearity in which the supercontinuum radiation is generated in the range 1 2 μm. In the supercontinuum spectrum, the fragments separated by an interval that is close to the methane-optical reference frequency ( λ = 3.39 μm) exhibit an increase in intensity. The supercontinuum radiation is converted into the difference frequency in a nonlinear crystal to the range of the methane-reference frequency ( λ = 3.3 3.5 μm), so that the frequency components of the transformed spectrum have sufficient intensities for the subsequent frequency-phase stabilization with respect to the methane reference. A system that stabilizes the pulse repetition rate of the femtosecond Er3+ laser is also employed. Thus, the repetition rate of the ultrashort pulses of the femtosecond fiber laser is locked to the methane reference. The pulse repetition rate is compared with the standard second. Thus, the scheme of an optical clock is realized.

  8. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  9. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.; Taichenachev, Alexey V.; Yudin, Valery I.

    2010-01-15

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to approx =25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Radio frequency phototube and optical clock: High resolution, high rate and highly stable single photon timing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Margaryan, Amur

    2011-10-01

    A new timing technique for single photons based on the radio frequency phototube and optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb generator is proposed. The technique has a 20 ps resolution for single photons, is capable of operating with MHz frequencies and achieving 10 fs instability level.

  11. Self-stabilizing optical clock pulse-train generator using SOA and saturable absorber for asynchronous optical packet processing.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel, self-stabilizing optical clock pulse-train generator for processing preamble-free, asynchronous optical packets with variable lengths. The generator is based on an optical loop that includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and a high-extinction spin-polarized saturable absorber (SA), with the loop being self-stabilized by balancing out the gain and absorption provided by the SOA and SA, respectively. The optical pulse train is generated by tapping out a small portion of a circulating seed pulse. The convergence of the generated pulse energy is enabled by the loop round-trip gain function that has a negative slope due to gain saturation in the SOA. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of the SOA is effectively suppressed by the SA, and a backward optical pulse launched into the SOA enables overcoming the carrier-recovery speed mismatch between the SOA and SA. Without external control for the loop gain, a stable optical pulse train consisting of more than 50 pulses with low jitter is generated from a single 10-ps seed optical pulse even with a variation of 10 dB in the seed pulse intensity. PMID:23669927

  12. Construction and preliminary tests of a laser optically pumped cesium jet atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arditi, M.; Picque, J.-L.

    1980-06-01

    The design and preliminary operational test results of an atomic clock based on an optically pumped cesium jet utilizing laser pumping and optical detection are presented. The apparatus consists of a tunable CW monomode GaAs semiconductor laser diode emitting in the vicinity of the cesium D2 resonance line at 852.1 nm which creates a population splitting between the hyperfine Zeeman sublevels F equals 3, mF equals 0 and F equals 4, mF equals 0 of the ground state of a jet of cesium atoms; the microwave resonance is detected through a change in the intensity of laser-induced fluorescence produced by the 9192-MHz excitation of a resonant cavity. The observed Ramsey spectrum for a clock with a resonant cavity 22.5 cm long is shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical curve for the mean transition probability, and measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the frequency standard indicating an accuracy on the order of 10 to the -11th are reported.

  13. Connecting the Raman and EIT physics for a 88Sr high-accuracy optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2005-05-01

    Atomic systems based on a three-level λ configuration offer interesting spectroscopic properties associated to the production of a coherence between the two lower states. Under laser excitation by two lasers, dressed and probe, the Raman peak and the electromagnetically induced transparency dip appear when the difference between the laser frequencies matches the energy separation between the lower states of the λ system. That difference stabilized to an atomic splitting can be used as an optical clock. An application to ^88Sr atoms in an optical lattice was proposed in (1). The coherent coupling between the 5s^2 ^1S0 ground state and the first excited state, 5s5p ^3P0 is mediated by the broad second excited 5s5p ^1P1 state, exploiting the electromagnetically induced transparency. The effective linewidth of the clock transition can be chosen at will by adjusting the intensity of the dressed laser. (1) R. Santra, E. Arimondo,T. Ido, C. H. Greene, and Jun Ye, arXiv:physics/0411197 (2004).

  14. Solitons Beyond Binary: Possibility of Fibre-Optic Transmission of Two Bits per Clock Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, Philipp; Hause, Alexander; Mitschke, Fedor

    2012-11-01

    Optical telecommunication employs light pulses travelling down optical fibres; in a binary format logical Ones and Zeroes are represented by the presence or absence of a light pulse in a given time slot, respectively. The fibre's data-carrying capacity must keep up with increasing demand, but for binary coding it now approaches its limit. Alternative coding schemes beyond binary are currently hotly debated; the challenge is to mitigate detrimental effects from the fibre's nonlinearity. Here we provide proof-of-principle that coding with solitons and soliton molecules allows to encode two bits of data per clock period. Solitons do not suffer from nonlinearity, rather, they rely on it; this endows them with greater robustness. However, they are universally considered to be restricted to binary coding. With that notion now refuted, it is warranted to rethink future systems.

  15. Improved Absolute Frequency Measurement of the 171Yb Optical Lattice Clock towards a Candidate for the Redefinition of the Second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Kohno, Takuya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Onae, Atsushi; Suzuyama, Tomonari; Amemiya, Masaki; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate an improved absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0–3P0 clock transition at 578 nm in 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The clock laser linewidth is reduced to ≈2 Hz by phase-locking the laser to an ultrastable neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nm through an optical frequency comb with an intracavity electrooptic modulator to achieve a high servo bandwidth. The absolute frequency is determined as 518 295 836 590 863.1(2.0) Hz relative to the SI second, and will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures.

  16. Frequency ratio of two optical clock transitions in 171Yb+ and constraints on the time variation of fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    Godun, R M; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; Jones, J M; King, S A; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Szymaniec, K; Lea, S N; Bongs, K; Gill, P

    2014-11-21

    Singly ionized ytterbium, with ultranarrow optical clock transitions at 467 and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of 6×10(-16). Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a threefold improvement in the constraint on the time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ/μ=0.2(1.1)×10(-16)  yr(-1), along with an improved constraint on time variation of the fine structure constant, α/α=-0.7(2.1)×10(-17)  yr(-1). PMID:25479482

  17. Compact Yb+ optical atomic clock project: design principle and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroûte, Clément; Souidi, Maël; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Millo, Jacques; Saleh, Khaldoun; Bigler, Emmanuel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Giordano, Vincent; Kersalé, Yann

    2016-06-01

    We present the design of a compact optical clock based on the 2 S 1/2→2 D 3/2 435.5 nm transition in 171 Yb+. The ion trap will be based on a micro-fabricated circuit, with surface electrodes generating a trapping potential to localize a single Yb ion a few hundred μm from the electrodes. We present our trap design as well as simulations of the resulting trapping pseudo-potential. We also present a compact, multi-channel wavelength meter that will permit the frequency stabilization of the cooling, repumping and clear-out lasers at 369.5 nm, 935.2 nm and 638.6 nm needed to cool the ion. We use this wavelength meter to characterize and stabilize the frequency of extended cavity diode lasers at 369.5 nm and 638.6 nm.

  18. Multipolar theory of blackbody radiation shift of atomic energy levels and its implications for optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, Sergey G.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2006-08-15

    Blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the {sup 3}P{sub 0}-{sup 1}S{sub 0} clock transition in the divalent atoms Mg, Ca, Sr, and Yb are evaluated. The dominant electric-dipole contributions are computed using accurate relativistic many-body techniques of atomic structure. At room temperatures, the resulting uncertainties in the E1 BBR shifts are large and substantially affect the projected 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy of the optical-lattice-based clocks. A peculiarity of these clocks is that the characteristic BBR wavelength is comparable to the {sup 3}P fine-structure intervals. To evaluate relevant M1 and E2 contributions, a theory of multipolar BBR shifts is developed. The resulting corrections, although presently masked by the uncertainties in the E1 contribution, are required at the 10{sup -18} accuracy goal.

  19. Real-time simulation clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennington, Donald R. (Inventor); Crawford, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a clock for synchronizing operations within a high-speed, distributed data processing network. The clock is actually a distributed system comprising a central clock and multiple site clock interface units (SCIUs) which are connected by means of a fiber optic star network and which operate under control of separate clock software. The presently preferred embodiment is a part of the flight simulation system now in current use at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  20. Real-time simulation clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, Donald R.; Crawford, Daniel J.

    1990-04-01

    The invention is a clock for synchronizing operations within a high-speed, distributed data processing network. The clock is actually a distributed system comprising a central clock and multiple site clock interface units (SCIUs) which are connected by means of a fiber optic star network and which operate under control of separate clock software. The presently preferred embodiment is a part of the flight simulation system now in current use at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Frequency ratio of Al+ and Hg+ single-ion optical clocks; metrology at the 17th decimal place.

    PubMed

    Rosenband, T; Hume, D B; Schmidt, P O; Chou, C W; Brusch, A; Lorini, L; Oskay, W H; Drullinger, R E; Fortier, T M; Stalnaker, J E; Diddams, S A; Swann, W C; Newbury, N R; Itano, W M; Wineland, D J; Bergquist, J C

    2008-03-28

    Time has always had a special status in physics because of its fundamental role in specifying the regularities of nature and because of the extraordinary precision with which it can be measured. This precision enables tests of fundamental physics and cosmology, as well as practical applications such as satellite navigation. Recently, a regime of operation for atomic clocks based on optical transitions has become possible, promising even higher performance. We report the frequency ratio of two optical atomic clocks with a fractional uncertainty of 5.2 x 10(-17). The ratio of aluminum and mercury single-ion optical clock frequencies nuAl+/nuHg+ is 1.052871833148990438(55), where the uncertainty comprises a statistical measurement uncertainty of 4.3 x 10(-17), and systematic uncertainties of 1.9 x 10(-17) and 2.3 x 10(-17) in the mercury and aluminum frequency standards, respectively. Repeated measurements during the past year yield a preliminary constraint on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant alpha of alpha/alpha = (-1.6+/-2.3) x 10(-17)/year.

  2. Direct Excitation of the Forbidden Clock Transition in Neutral {sup 174}Yb Atoms Confined to an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Z.W.; Hoyt, C.W.; Oates, C.W.; Hollberg, L.; Taichenachev, A.V.; Yudin, V.I.

    2006-03-03

    We report direct single-laser excitation of the strictly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition in {sup 174}Yb atoms confined to a 1D optical lattice. A small ({approx}1.2 mT) static magnetic field was used to induce a nonzero electric dipole transition probability between the clock states at 578.42 nm. Narrow resonance linewidths of 20 Hz (FWHM) with high contrast were observed, demonstrating a resonance quality factor of 2.6x10{sup 13}. The previously unknown ac Stark shift-canceling (magic) wavelength was determined to be 759.35{+-}0.02 nm. This method for using the metrologically superior even isotope can be easily implemented in current Yb and Sr lattice clocks and can create new clock possibilities in other alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Mg and Ca.

  3. High accuracy correction of blackbody radiation shift in an optical lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Middelmann, Thomas; Falke, Stephan; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2012-12-28

    We have determined the frequency shift that blackbody radiation is inducing on the 5s2 (1)S0-5s5p (3)P0 clock transition in strontium. Previously its uncertainty limited the uncertainty of strontium lattice clocks to 1×10(-16). Now the uncertainty associated with the blackbody radiation shift correction translates to a 5×10(-18) relative frequency uncertainty at room temperature. Our evaluation is based on a measurement of the differential dc polarizability of the two clock states and on a modeling of the dynamic contribution using this value and experimental data for other atomic properties. PMID:23368558

  4. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  5. Lattice-Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the 10{sup -17} Level

    SciTech Connect

    Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Lecallier, A.; Millo, J.; Lemonde, P.; Lorini, L.; Burt, E. A.; Zawada, M.

    2011-05-27

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential in a Sr lattice clock by comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching 5x10{sup -17} after a 1 h integration time. We put the first experimental upper bound on the multipolar M1 and E2 interactions, significantly smaller than the recently predicted theoretical upper limit, and give a 30-fold improved upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability. Finally, we report on the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a Sr lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbations will not affect the clock accuracy down to the 10{sup -17} level, even for lattices as deep as 150 recoil energies.

  6. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-06-15

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 {mu}m). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of {approx_equal}10{sup -4} Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by {>=} 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 {mu}m.

  7. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  8. All-optical clock recovery based on simultaneous external injection-locking and self-seeding of a Fabry-Perot laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohui; Wai, Ping Kong A.; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa Yaw; Qureshi, Khurram K.

    2011-02-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a novel, simple, and low cost method for all-optical clock recovery based on the switching between two injection-locked longitudinal modes in a dc-biased multi-quantum-well Fabry-Perot laser diode (FP-LD). The dc biased FP-LD is simultaneously injection-locked by a return-to-zero data signal at one of the longitudinal modes of the FP-LD and self-seeded at another longitudinal mode by using a uniform fiber Bragg grating as a feedback component. The powers and detunes of the data signal and self-seeding signal are chosen such that self-seeding is realized in the FP-LD only when data signal power is low. Clock signals of data streams at different data rates can be obtained by tuning the optical delay line in the external self-seeding loop. We have demonstrated all-optical clock recovery at 10 GHz. The pulse width, time-bandwidth product, side mode suppression ration, root mean square timing jitter, and average power of the recovered clock signals are 50 ps, 0.5, 50 dB, 248 fs, and 3.6 dBm, respectively. Clock recovery is possible at wavelength within the gain band of the FP-LD. We also find and explore in the experiment the influence of detune between the external data signal and the nearest FP-LD longitudinal mode to the recovered clock.

  9. All-optical clock recovery for 100 Gb/s RZ-OOK signal after 25km transmission using a dual-mode beating DBR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liqiang; Pan, Biwei; Lu, Dan; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2014-11-01

    All-optical clock recovery (AOCR) for 100 Gb/s RZ-OOK signal is demonstrated by using a dualmode beating DBR laser. Based on the injection-locking of the DBR (distributed Bragg reflector) laser, a 100-GHz optical clock is recovered. Timing jitter (<1 ps) derived from both phase noise and power fluctuation is measured by an optical sampling oscilloscope (OSO). Furthermore, clock recovery is also realized for the 100 Gb/s signal after 25 km transmission. After the 25-km SMF (5- dB loss) transmission, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signal drops from 18 dB to 5.2 dB. The dependence of the timing jitter on the input power is investigated. The lowest timing jitter of 665 fs is realized when the input power is 3 dBm.

  10. A compact microchip atomic clock based on all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold trapped Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, D. M.; Zozulya, A.; Anderson, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock that uses all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. The interrogation scheme, which combines electromagnetically induced transparency with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields, can achieve an atomic shot-noise-level performance better than 10^{-13}/sqrt{tau} for 106 atoms. A two-color Mach-Zehnder interferometer can detect a 100-pW probe beam at the optical shot-noise level using conventional photodetectors. This measurement scheme is nondestructive and therefore can be used to increase the operational duty cycle by reusing the trapped atoms for multiple clock cycles. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2×10-14. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of cycle time and power consumption.

  11. Selection and amplification of a single optical frequency comb mode for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical clock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Yin, Mojuan; Kong, Dehuan; Xu, Qinfang; Zhang, Shougang; Chang, Hong

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we report on the active filtering and amplification of a single mode from an optical femtosecond laser comb with mode spacing of 250 MHz by optical injection of two external-cavity diode lasers operating in cascade to build a narrow linewidth laser for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical lattice clock. Despite the low injection of individual comb mode of approximately 50 nW, a single comb line at 689 nm could be filtered and amplified to reach as high as 10 mW with 37 dB side mode suppression and a linewidth of 240 Hz. This method could be applied over a broad spectral band to build narrow linewidth lasers for various applications.

  12. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  13. A monolithically integrated dual-mode laser for photonic microwave generation and all-optical clock recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liqiang; Zhou, Daibing; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a monolithically integrated dual-mode laser (DML) with narrow-beat-linewidth and wide-beat-tunability. Using a monolithic DFB laser subjected to amplified feedback, photonic microwave generation of up to 45 GHz is obtained with higher than 15 GHz beat frequency tunability. Thanks to the high phase correlation of the two modes and the narrow mode linewidth, a RF linewidth of lower than 50 kHz is measured. Simulations are also carried out to illustrate the dual-mode beat characteristic. Furthermore, using the DML, an all-optical clock recovery for 40  Gbaud NRZ-QPSK signals is demonstrated. Timing jitter of lower than 363 fs (integrated within a frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 GHz) is obtained.

  14. FROM STABLE LASERS TO OPTICAL-FREQUENCY CLOCKS:. Merging the UltraFast and the UltraStable, for a New Epoch of Optical Frequency Measurements, Standards, & Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. L.; Ye, J.; Ma, L.-S.; Peng, J.-L.; Notcutt, M.; Jost, J. D.; Marian, A.

    2002-04-01

    This is a report on behalf of the World Team of Stable Laser and Optical Frequency Measurement Enthusiasts, even if most detailed illustrations draw mainly from our work at JILA. Specifically we trace some of the key ideas that have led from the first stabilized lasers, to frequency measurement up to 88 THz using frequency chains, revision of the Definition of the Metre, extension of coherent frequency chain technology into the visible, development of a vast array of stabilized lasers, and finally the recent explosive growth of direct frequency measurement capability in the visible using fs comb techniques. We present our recent work showing a Molecular Iodine-based Optical Clock which delivers, over a range of time scales, rf output at a stability level basically equivalent to the RF stability prototype, the Hydrogen Maser. We note the bifurcation between single-ion-based clocks - likely to be the stability/reproducibility ultimate winners in the next generation - and simpler systems based on gas cells, which can have impressive stabilities but may suffer from a variety of reproducibility-limiting processes. Active Phase-Lock synchronization of independent fs lasers allows sub-fs timing control. Copies of related works in our labs may be found/obtained at our website .

  15. Spin squeezing in a Rydberg lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Gil, L I R; Mukherjee, R; Bridge, E M; Jones, M P A; Pohl, T

    2014-03-14

    We theoretically demonstrate a viable approach to spin squeezing in optical lattice clocks via optical dressing of one clock state to a highly excited Rydberg state, generating switchable atomic interactions. For realistic experimental parameters, these interactions are shown to generate over 10 dB of squeezing in large ensembles within a few microseconds and without degrading the subsequent clock interrogation. PMID:24679291

  16. Cascaded optical fiber link using the internet network for remote clocks comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodo, Nicola; Quintin, Nicolas; Stefani, Fabio; Wiotte, Fabrice; Camisard, Emilie; Chardonnet, Christian; Santarelli, Giorgio; Amy-Klein, Anne; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Lopez, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    We report a cascaded optical link of 1100 km for ultra-stable frequency distribution over an Internet fiber network. The link is composed of four spans for which the propagation noise is actively compensated. The robustness and the performance of the link are ensured by five fully automated optoelectronic stations, two of them at the link ends, and three deployed on the field and connecting the spans. This device coherently regenerates the optical signal with the heterodyne optical phase locking of a low-noise laser diode. Optical detection of the beat-note signals for the laser lock and the link noise compensation are obtained with stable and low-noise fibered optical interferometer. We show 3.5 days of continuous operation of the noise-compensated 4-span cascaded link leading to fractional frequency instability of 4x10-16 at 1-s measurement time and 1x10-19 at 2000 s. This cascaded link was extended to 1480-km with the same performance. This work is a significant step towards a sustainable wide area ultra-stable optical frequency distribution and comparison network at a very high level of performance.

  17. Widely tunable monolithic dual-mode laser for W-band photonic millimeter-wave generation and all-optical clock recovery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Biwei; Guo, Lu; Zhang, Limeng; Lu, Dna; Huo, Li; Lou, Caiyun; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2016-04-10

    We demonstrate a monolithic dual-mode amplified feedback laser for photonic millimeter-wave generation and all-optical clock recovery. Dual-mode lasing with beating frequency around 100 GHz was realized by using a single-mode distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a short feedback cavity that was integrated by simple quantum-well intermixing technology. By tuning the bias currents of the laser sections, the beating-frequency can be continuously tuned from 75 to 109 GHz, almost covering the entire W-band (75-110 GHz). Furthermore, by using this device, an all-optical clock recovery for 100 Gbit/s return-to-zero on-off-keying signal was achieved with a timing jitter of 301 fs.

  18. Scintillation and optical properties of Pb-doped YCa 4O(BO 3) 3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yokota, Yuui; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro; Totsuka, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Chani, Valery; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2011-10-01

    This communication reports optical properties and radiation responses of Pb 2+ 0.5 and 1.0 mol%-doped YCa 4O(BO 3) 3 (YCOB) single crystals grown by the micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method for neutron scintillator applications. The crystals had no impurity phases according to the results of X-ray powder diffraction. These Pb 2+-doped crystals demonstrated blue-light luminescence at 330 nm because of Pb 2+1S 0- 3P 0,1 transition in the photoluminescence spectra. The main emission decay component was determined to be about 250-260 ns under 260 nm excitation wavelength. When irradiated by a 252Cf source, the relative light yield of 0.5% Pb 2+-doped crystal was about 300 ph/n that was determined using the light yield of a reference Li-glass scintillator.

  19. Design and performance of clock-recovery GaAs ICs for high-speed optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Yuhki; Sano, Eiichi; Nakamura, Makoto; Ishihara, Noboru; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Takashi

    1993-05-01

    Design and performance of clock-recovery GaAs ICs are presented. Four kinds of ICs were developed: a limiting amplifier, a tuning amplifier, a rectifier, and a differentiator. The cascaded limiting amplifier together with a tuning amplifier achieved a 58-dB gain and a 10-degree phase deviation with 20-dB input dynamic range at 10 GHz. A clock-recovery circuit successfully extracts a low-jitter 10-GHz clock signal of 1-dBm constant power from 10-Gb/s NRZ pseudorandom bit streams using a pulse pattern generator.

  20. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a {sup 87}Sr optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-11-15

    We observe two-body loss of {sup 3} P{sub 0} {sup 87}Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 {mu}K that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the {sup 1} S{sub 0}-{sup 3} P{sub 0} transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  1. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  2. Absolute measurement of the 1S0 − 3P0 clock transition in neutral 88Sr over the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optic link

    PubMed Central

    Morzyński, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Krehlik, Przemysław; Śliwczyński, Łukasz; Lipiński, Marcin; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Dunst, Piotr; Garus, Michał; Lisak, Daniel; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Radzewicz, Czesław; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We report a stability below 7 × 10−17 of two independent optical lattice clocks operating with bosonic 88Sr isotope. The value (429 228 066 418 008.3(1.9)syst (0.9)stat Hz) of the absolute frequency of the 1S0 – 3P0 transition was measured with an optical frequency comb referenced to the local representation of the UTC by the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optical link. The result was verified by series of measurements on two independent optical lattice clocks and agrees with recommendation of Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. PMID:26639347

  3. Absolute measurement of the 1S0 - 3P0 clock transition in neutral 88Sr over the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optic link.

    PubMed

    Morzyński, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Krehlik, Przemysław; Śliwczyński, Łukasz; Lipiński, Marcin; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Dunst, Piotr; Garus, Michał; Lisak, Daniel; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Radzewicz, Czesław; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2015-01-01

    We report a stability below 7 × 10(-17) of two independent optical lattice clocks operating with bosonic (88)Sr isotope. The value (429 228 066 418 008.3(1.9)(syst) (0.9)(stat) Hz) of the absolute frequency of the (1)S(0) - (3)P(0) transition was measured with an optical frequency comb referenced to the local representation of the UTC by the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optical link. The result was verified by series of measurements on two independent optical lattice clocks and agrees with recommendation of Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. PMID:26639347

  4. Clock Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1988-01-01

    A science unit on clocks demonstrates the need to control variables to obtain reliable results from an experiment. Two activities, one for beginners and one for advanced students, are included. Directions for making a sundial are offered. (MT)

  5. Zero-dead-time operation of interleaved atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, G W; Takase, K; Wu, X; Deslauriers, L; Roy, S; Kasevich, M A

    2013-10-25

    We demonstrate a zero-dead-time operation of atomic clocks. This clock reduces sensitivity to local oscillator noise, integrating as nearly 1/τ whereas a clock with dead time integrates as 1/τ(1/2) under identical conditions. We contend that a similar scheme may be applied to improve the stability of optical clocks.

  6. Zero-dead-time operation of interleaved atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, G W; Takase, K; Wu, X; Deslauriers, L; Roy, S; Kasevich, M A

    2013-10-25

    We demonstrate a zero-dead-time operation of atomic clocks. This clock reduces sensitivity to local oscillator noise, integrating as nearly 1/τ whereas a clock with dead time integrates as 1/τ(1/2) under identical conditions. We contend that a similar scheme may be applied to improve the stability of optical clocks. PMID:24206471

  7. Observation and Absolute Frequency Measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} Optical Clock Transition in Neutral Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, C.W.; Barber, Z.W.; Oates, C.W.; Fortier, T.M.; Diddams, S.A.; Hollberg, L.

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at {approx}70 {mu}K in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in {sup 171}Yb (F=1/2) is 518 295 836 591.6{+-}4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in {sup 173}Yb (F=5/2) is 518 294 576 847.6{+-}4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10{sup 6}-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be {approx}10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice.

  8. A high-speed photonic clock and carrier regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Lutes, G.

    1995-01-01

    As data communications rates climb toward 10 Gbits/s, clock recovery and synchronization become more difficult, if not impossible, using conventional electronic circuits. The high-speed photonic clock regenerator described in this article may be more suitable for such use. This photonic regenerator is based on a previously reported photonic oscillator capable of fast acquisition and synchronization. With both electrical and optical clock inputs and outputs, the device is easily interfaced with fiber-optic systems. The recovered electrical clock can be used locally and the optical clock can be used anywhere within a several kilometer radius of the clock/carrier regenerator.

  9. Subkilohertz comparison of the single-ion optical-clock 2S1/2-2D5/2 transition in two 88Sr+ traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Clarke, R. B. M.

    1999-05-01

    A simultaneous observation of the optical-clock 2S1/2-2D5/2 transition at 674 nm, in two separately trapped single 88Sr+ ions, is reported. Two nominally identical miniature rf Paul traps were used together with a 674-nm sideband-injection-locked extended-cavity diode laser. This ``slave'' laser was optically phase locked about 650 MHz away from a ``master'' diode laser, which was itself locked to a high-finesse, ultra-low-expansion (ULE) cavity. The ULE cavity was temperature-stabilized and suspended in an evacuated enclosure, and provided an ``optical flywheel'' reference standard with a relative drift rate of better than 1 part in 1011 per hour. The difference between center frequencies of the single 88Sr+-ion 674-nm (445-THz) transition multiplet in two traps was 120(90) Hz (one standard uncertainty). Thus the two trap center frequencies agree to 3 parts in 1013.

  10. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  11. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I.

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  12. Highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions as promising optical clock candidates for probing variations of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    Transitions among the first three low-lying states in the highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions are found to be strongly forbidden with wavelengths in the optical regime. By determining their energy levels, lifetimes, and other spectroscopic properties that are decisive quantities for estimating dominant systematics due to stray electromagnetic interactions in an experiment, we demonstrate that it can be possible to measure frequencies of the lowest forbidden transitions below a 10-19 precision level in the above ions, and hence, they seem to be suitable for frequency standards. We employ a sophisticated relativistic coupled cluster method to carry out calculations of these properties of the above states involving 4 f - and 5 s -core orbitals. We also found, by estimating their relativistic sensitivity coefficients, that these clock transitions can be highly sensitive to the tiny drift in the fine-structure constant αe. Consequently, a clock based on one of these ions, particularly Pt+17, could be used for corroborating the hypothesis of temporal and spatial variation in αe.

  13. Systematic Effects in Atomic Fountain Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibble, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    We describe recent advances in the accuracies of atomic fountain clocks. New rigorous treatments of the previously large systematic uncertainties, distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing, and background gas collisions, enabled these advances. We also discuss background gas collisions of optical lattice and ion clocks and derive the smooth transition of the microwave lensing frequency shift to photon recoil shifts for large atomic wave packets.

  14. Molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Ho, Simon Y W

    2016-05-23

    In the 1960s, several groups of scientists, including Emile Zuckerkandl and Linus Pauling, had noted that proteins experience amino acid replacements at a surprisingly consistent rate across very different species. This presumed single, uniform rate of genetic evolution was subsequently described using the term 'molecular clock'. Biologists quickly realised that such a universal pacemaker could be used as a yardstick for measuring the timescale of evolutionary divergences: estimating the rate of amino acid exchanges per unit of time and applying it to protein differences across a range of organisms would allow deduction of the divergence times of their respective lineages (Figure 1). PMID:27218841

  15. Evaluation of trap-induced systematic frequency shifts for a multi-ion optical clock at the 10‑19 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J.; Burgermeister, T.; Kalincev, D.; Kiethe, J.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the short-term stability of trapped-ion optical clocks, we are developing a frequency standard based on 115In+ / 172Yb+ Coulomb crystals. For this purpose, we have developed scalable segmented Paul traps which allow a high level of control for multiple ion ensembles. In this article, we detail on our recent results regarding the reduction of the leading sources of frequency uncertainty introduced by the ion trap: 2nd-order Doppler shifts due to micromotion and the heating of secular motion, as well as the black-body radiation shift due to warming of the trap. We show that the fractional frequency uncertainty due to each of these effects can be reduced to well below 10-19.

  16. Evaluation of trap-induced systematic frequency shifts for a multi-ion optical clock at the 10-19 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J.; Burgermeister, T.; Kalincev, D.; Kiethe, J.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the short-term stability of trapped-ion optical clocks, we are developing a frequency standard based on 115In+ / 172Yb+ Coulomb crystals. For this purpose, we have developed scalable segmented Paul traps which allow a high level of control for multiple ion ensembles. In this article, we detail on our recent results regarding the reduction of the leading sources of frequency uncertainty introduced by the ion trap: 2nd-order Doppler shifts due to micromotion and the heating of secular motion, as well as the black-body radiation shift due to warming of the trap. We show that the fractional frequency uncertainty due to each of these effects can be reduced to well below 10-19.

  17. s-Wave collisional frequency shift of a fermion clock.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Eric L; Zhang, Yi; Stites, Ronald W; Gibble, Kurt; O'Hara, Kenneth M

    2013-04-19

    We report an s-wave collisional frequency shift of an atomic clock based on fermions. In contrast to bosons, the fermion clock shift is insensitive to the population difference of the clock states, set by the first pulse area in Ramsey spectroscopy, θ(1). The fermion shift instead depends strongly on the second pulse area θ(2). It allows the shift to be canceled, nominally at θ(2)=π/2, but correlations perturb the null to slightly larger θ(2). The frequency shift is relevant for optical lattice clocks and increases with the spatial inhomogeneity of the clock excitation field, naturally larger at optical frequencies. PMID:23679589

  18. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  19. Sr+ single-ion clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubé, P.; Madej, A. A.; Jian, B.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluated uncertainty of the 88Sr+ ion optical clock has decreased by several orders of magnitude during the last 15 years, currently reaching a level of 1.2 x 10-17. In this paper, we review the methods developed to control very effectively the largest frequency shifts that once were the main sources of uncertainty for the 88Sr+ single-ion clock. These shifts are the micromotion shifts, the electric quadrupole shift and the blackbody radiation shift. With further improvements to the evaluation of the systematic shifts, especially the blackbody radiation shift, it is expected that the total uncertainty of the single-ion clock transition frequency will reach the low 10-18 level in the near future.

  20. Extended ultrahigh-Q-cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhenda; Liang, Wei; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Lim, Jinkang; Burkhart, Jan; McDonald, Mickey; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Matsko, Andrey B; Maleki, Lute; Wong, Chee Wei

    2015-06-01

    We report on a study of a 698 nm extended cavity semiconductor laser with intracavity narrowband optical feedback from a whispering gallery mode resonator. This laser comprises an ultrahigh-Q (>10(10)) resonator supporting stimulated Rayleigh scattering, a diffraction grating wavelength preselector, and a reflective semiconductor amplifier. Single longitudinal mode lasing is characterized with sub-kilohertz linewidth and a 9 nm coarse tuning range. The laser has a potential application for integration with the 1S0-3P0 strontium transition to create compact precision atomic clocks. PMID:26030566

  1. A Coherent Free Space Optical Link for Long Distance Clock Comparison, Navigation, and Communication: The Mini-Doll Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djerroud, K.

    2010-10-01

    We describe the realization of a 5 km free space coherent optical link thro ugh the turbulent atmosphere between a telescope and a ground target. We present the phase noise of the link, limited mainly by atmospheric turbulence and mechanical vibrations of the telescope and the target. We discuss the implications of our results for applications, with particular emphasis on optical Doppler ranging to satellites and long distance frequency transfer.

  2. Towards Self-Clocked Gated OCDMA Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, S.; Osadola, T.; Glesk, I.

    2013-02-01

    A novel incoherent OCDMA receiver with incorporated all-optical clock recovery for self-synchronization of a time gate for the multi access interferences (MAI) suppression and minimizing the effect of data time jitter in incoherent OCDMA system was successfully developed and demonstrated. The solution was implemented and tested in a multiuser environment in an out of the laboratory OCDMA testbed with two-dimensional wavelength-hopping time-spreading coding scheme and OC-48 (2.5 Gbp/s) data rate. The self-clocked all-optical time gate uses SOA-based fibre ring laser optical clock, recovered all-optically from the received OCDMA traffic to control its switching window for cleaning the autocorrelation peak from the surrounding MAI. A wider eye opening was achieved when the all-optically recovered clock from received data was used for synchronization if compared to a static approach with the RF clock being generated by a RF synthesizer. Clean eye diagram was also achieved when recovered clock is used to drive time gating.

  3. A Coherent Free Space Optical Link for Long Distance Clock Comparison, Navigation, and Communication: The Mini-Doll Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Deppo, V.; Naletto, G.; Cremonese, G.; Calamai, L.; Paolinetti, R.; Debei, S.; Flamini, E.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper the adopted optical design solution for the Stereo Channel of the imaging system SIMBIOSYS for the BepiColombo ESA mission to Mercury is presented. The optical design of the camera together with its performance, expressed in terms of optical quality, tolerance and stray-light analysis, are fully described. The main scientific camera objective is the tridimensional global mapping of the entire surface of Mercury with a scale factor of 50 m per pixel at periherm. Five different spectral bands are foreseen, a panchromatic and four intermediate bands, in the range between 410 and 930 nm. The Stereo Channel consists of two sub-channels looking at ±20° from nadir direction, which share the detector and most of the optical components. The field of view of each channel is 4.8° × 5.3° with a scale factor of 22"/pixel. The chosen modified Schmidt configuration guarantees an optimal aberration balancing over all the field of view and all the wavelength range; in addition the technical solution chosen for the filter manufacturing, i.e. single substrate with stripe-butted filters, allows to further optimize chromatic aberration. For stray-light suppression, an efficient baffling system, able to well separate the two optical paths over the common optical elements, has been designed and an appropriate 'filter masking' has been foreseen to cope with ghosts and cross talk between adjacent filter stripes. The tolerance analysis shows that manufacturing, alignment and stability tolerances are rather relaxed. Thus concluding, the analysis of the global optical performance of the camera assures that the scientific requirements are optimally fulfilled.

  4. The Pendulum Clock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The development and function of the pendulum clock is discussed from a historical perspective. Computations for the period of and forces acting on a pendulum are presented. The remarkable workmanship of early clock makers is described. (CW)

  5. VLBI clock synchronization. [for atomic clock rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential accuracy of VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) for clock epoch and rate comparisons was demonstrated by results from long- and short-baseline experiments. It was found that atomic clocks at widely separated sites (several thousand kilometers apart) can be synchronized to within several nanoseconds from a few minutes of VLBI observations and to within one nanosecond from several hours of observations.

  6. Conveyor-belt clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N.C.; Lloyd, Seth

    2004-10-01

    A protocol for synchronizing distant clocks is proposed that does not rely on the arrival times of the signals which are exchanged, and an optical implementation based on coherent-state pulses is described. This protocol is not limited by any dispersion that may be present in the propagation medium through which the light signals are exchanged. Possible improvements deriving from the use of quantum-mechanical effects are also addressed.

  7. Ultra-precision geometrical measurement technique based on a statistical random phase clock combined with acoustic-optical deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, Peter; Stiblert, Lars; Mattsson, Lars

    2010-12-01

    Mask writers and large area measurements systems are key systems for production of large liquid crystal displays (LCD) and image devices. With position tolerances in the sub-µm range over square meter sized masks, the metrology challenges are indeed demanding. Most systems used for this type of measurement rely on a microscope camera imaging system, provided with a charge coupled device, a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor or a time delay and integration sensor to transform the optical image to a digital gray-level image. From this image, processing algorithms are used to extract information such as location of edges. The drawback of this technique is the vast amount of data captured but never used. This paper presents a new approach for ultra-high-precision lateral measurement at nm-levels of chrome/glass patterns separated by centimeters, so called registration marks, on masks used for the LCD manufacturing. Registration specifications demand a positioning accuracy <200 nm and critical dimensions, i.e. chrome line widths, which need to be accurate in the 80 nm range. This accuracy has to be achieved on glass masks of 2.4 × 1.6 m2 size. Our new measurement method is based on nm-precise lateral scanning of a focused laser beam combined with statistical random phase sampling of the reflected signal. The precise scanning is based on an extremely accurate time measuring device controlling an acousto optic deflector crystal. The method has been successfully applied in measuring the 4 µm pitch of reference gratings at standard deviations σ of 0.5 nm and registration marks separated by several cm at standard deviations of 23 nm.

  8. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Jonathan D.; Beloy, Kyle; Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-03-15

    A scheme is presented for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a 'magic' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency - to maintain clock accuracy - while an open-shell J=1/2 'head' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent 'Archimedes' screw' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of the vanishing vector polarizability of the scalar, J=0, clock states of bosonic isotopes of divalent atoms. The on-site interactions between the clock atoms and the head atom are used to engineer entanglement and for clock readout.

  9. ^87Sr Clock Comparisons at JILA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; Nicholson, Travis; Bloom, Benjamin; Campbell, Sara; Martin, Michael; Swallows, Matthew; Bishof, Michael; Ye, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Great advances are being realized with optical lattice clocks, where spectroscopy at optical frequencies and large ensembles of neutral atoms combine to offer extremely high frequency precision and stability. Recent results from the Strontium 87 optical atomic clock at JILA have demonstrated that strong interactions among fermions confined in a two-dimensional (2D) optical lattice suppress the collisional frequency shift and its uncertainty to the level of 10-17 [1]. We report on the progress of a second optical lattice clock at JILA, in which fermionic ^87Sr atoms are confined in a lattice potential derived from optical buildup cavities to provide strong confinement over a very large volume in one, two, and three dimensional lattices. Intercomparisons of the two clocks at JILA will be used to explore in greater detail the physics governing the transition shifts and uncertainties in our two ^87Sr optical lattice systems and will provide a significant improvement of our systematic errors.[4pt] [1] M D. Swallows et al. Science, 331, 1043 (2011)

  10. Doppler-Free Spectroscopy of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} Optical Clock Transition in Laser-Cooled Fermionic Isotopes of Neutral Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, M.; Chicireanu, R.; Dawkins, S. T.; Magalhaes, D. V.; Mandache, C.; Le Coq, Y.; Clairon, A.; Bize, S.

    2008-10-31

    We report direct laser spectroscopy of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition at 265.6 nm in fermionic isotopes of neutral mercury in a magneto-optical trap. Measurements of the frequency against the LNE-SYRTE primary reference using an optical frequency comb yield 1 128 575 290 808.4{+-}5.6 kHz in {sup 199}Hg and 1 128 569 561 139.6{+-}5.3 kHz in {sup 201}Hg. The uncertainty, allowed by the observation of the Doppler-free recoil doublet, is 4 orders of magnitude lower than previous indirect determinations. Mercury is a promising candidate for future optical lattice clocks due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation.

  11. Clock genes and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Patricia A; Yang, Xiaoming; Hrushesky, William J M

    2009-12-01

    Period genes ( Per2, Per1) are essential circadian clock genes. They also function as negative growth regulators. Per2 mutant mice show de novo and radiation-induced epithelial hyperplasia, tumors, and an abnormal DNA damage response. Human tumors show Period gene mutations or decreased expression. Other murine clock gene mutations are not associated with a tumor prone phenotype. Shift work and nocturnal light exposure are associated with circadian clock disruption and with increased cancer risk. The mechanisms responsible for the connection between the circadian clock and cancer are not well defined. We propose that circadian disruption per se is not uniformly tumor promoting and the mechanisms for tumor promotion by specific circadian clock disturbances will differ dependent upon the genes and pathways involved. We propose that Period clock gene mutations promote tumorigenesis by unique molecular pathways. Per2 and Per1 modulate beta-catenin and cell proliferation in colon and non-colon cancer cells. Per2 mutation increases intestinal beta-catenin levels and colon polyp formation. Per2 mutation also increases Apc(Min/+)-mediated intestinal and colonic polyp formation. Intestinal tumorigenesis per se may also alter clock function as a result of increased beta-catenin destabilizing PER2 protein. Levels and circadian rhythm of PER2 in Apc(Min/+) mouse intestine are markedly decreased, and selective abnormalities in intestinal clock gene and clock-controlled gene expression are seen. We propose that tumor promotion by loss of PERIOD clock proteins is unique to these clock genes as a result of altered beta-catenin signaling and DNA damage response. PERIOD proteins may offer new targets for cancer prevention and control.

  12. Continuous Nondemolition Measurement of the Cs Clock Transition Pseudospin

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhury, Souma; Smith, Greg A.; Schulz, Kevin; Jessen, Poul S.

    2006-02-03

    We demonstrate a weak continuous measurement of the pseudospin associated with the clock transition in a sample of Cs atoms. Our scheme uses an optical probe tuned near the D{sub 1} transition to measure the sample birefringence, which depends on the z component of the collective pseudospin. At certain probe frequencies the differential light shift of the clock states vanishes, and the measurement is nonperturbing. In dense samples the measurement can be used to squeeze the collective clock pseudospin and has the potential to improve the performance of atomic clocks and interferometers.

  13. Feeding and circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Lissia; Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes at least a dozen of genes directly involved in the regulation of the feedback loops constituting the circadian clock. The circadian system is built up on a multitude of oscillators organized according to a hierarchical model in which neurons of the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus may drive the central circadian clock and all the other somatic cells may possess the molecular components allowing tissues and organs to constitute peripheral clocks. Suprachiasmatic neurons are driving the central circadian clock which is reset by lighting cues captured and integrated by the melanopsin cells of the retina and define the daily rhythms of locomotor activity and associated physiological regulatory pathways like feeding and metabolism. This central clock entrains peripheral clocks which can be synchronized by non-photic environmental cues and uncoupled from the central one depending on the nature and the strength of the circadian signal. The human circadian clock and its functioning in central or peripheral tissues are currently being explored to increase the therapeutic efficacy of timed administration of drugs or radiation, and to offer better advice on lighting and meal timing useful for frequent travelers suffering from jet lag and for night workers' comfort. However, the molecular mechanism driving and coordinating the central and peripheral clocks through a wide range of synchronizers (lighting, feeding, physical or social activities) remains a mystery.

  14. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  15. BUGS system clock distributor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Thomas M.

    1991-11-01

    A printed circuit board which will provide external clocks and precisely measure the time at which events take place was designed for the Bristol University Gas Spectrometer (BUGS). The board, which was designed to interface both mechanically and electrically to the Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) system, has been named the BUGS system clock control. The board's design and use are described.

  16. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  17. BUGS system clock distributor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Thomas M.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit board which will provide external clocks and precisely measure the time at which events take place was designed for the Bristol University Gas Spectrometer (BUGS). The board, which was designed to interface both mechanically and electrically to the Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) system, has been named the BUGS system clock control. The board's design and use are described.

  18. A Novel Photonic Clock and Carrier Recovery Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve; Lutes, George; Maleki, Lute

    1996-01-01

    As data communication rates climb toward ten Gb/s, clock recovery and synchronization become more difficult, if not impossible, using conventional electronic circuits. We present in this article experimental results of a high speed clock and carrier recovery using a novel device called a photonic oscillator that we recently developed in our laboratory. This device is capable of recovering clock signals up to 70 GHz. To recover the clock, the incoming data is injected into the photonic oscillator either through the optical injection port or the electrical injection port. The free running photonic oscillator is tuned to oscillate at a nominal frequency equal to the clock frequency of the incoming data. With the injection of the data, the photonic oscillator will be quickly locked to clock frequency of the data stream while rejecting other frequency components associated with the data. Consequently, the output of the locked photonic oscillator is a continuous periodical wave synchronized with the incoming data or simply the recovered clock. We have demonstrated a clock to spur ratio of more than 60 dB of the recovered clock using this technique. Similar to the clock recovery, the photonic oscillator can be used to recover a high frequency carrier degraded by noise and an improvement of about 50 dB in signal-to-noise ratio was demonstrated. The photonic oscillator has both electrical and optical inputs and outputs and can be directly interfaced with a photonic system without signal conversion. In addition to clock and carrier recovery, the photonic oscillator can also be used for (1) stable high frequency clock signal generation, (2) frequency multiplication, (3) square wave and comb frequency generation, and (4) photonic phase locked loop.

  19. Lutetium +: A better clock candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Kyle; Paez, Eduardo; Haciyev, Elnur; Arifin, Arifin; Cazan, Radu; Barrett, Murray

    2015-05-01

    With the extreme precision now reached by optical clocks it is reasonable to consider redefinition of the frequency standard. In doing so it is important to look beyond the current best-case efforts and have an eye on future possibilities. We will argue that singly ionized Lutetium is a strong candidate for the next generation of optical frequency standards. Lu + has a particularly narrow optical transition in combination with several advantageous properties for managing systematic uncertainties compared to the other atomic species. We summarize these properties and our specific strategies for managing the uncertainties due to external perturbations. Finally, we present the status of our ongoing experiments with trapped Lu +, including the results of precision measurements of its atomic structure.

  20. Improving OFDR spatial resolution by reducing external clock sampling error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bowen; Liu, Kun; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Du, Yang

    2016-03-01

    Utilizing an auxiliary interferometer to produce external clock signals as the data acquirement clock is widely used to compensate the nonlinearity of the tunable laser source (TLS) in optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). However, this method is not always accurate because of the large optical length difference of both arms in the auxiliary interferometer. To investigate the deviation, we study the source and influence of the external clock sampling error in OFDR system. Based on the model, we find that the sampling error declines with the increase of the TLS's optical frequency tuning rate. The spatial resolution can be as high as 4.8 cm and the strain sensing location accuracy can be up to 0.15 m at the measurement length of 310 m under the minimum sampling error with the optical frequency tuning rate of 2500 GHz/s. Hence, the spatial resolution can be improved by reducing external clock sampling error in OFDR system.

  1. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  2. Small Mercury Ion Clock for On-board Spacecraft Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang; Le, Thanh; Hamell, R.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert

    2004-01-01

    I.Small Ion Clock Approach and Heritage: a) No lasers, uwave cavities, cryogenics, atomic beams, etc. b) Ions are electrically shuttled between separate optical and microwave traps. II. Each trap is optimized for its task: quadrupole for optical state selection; multi-pole for microwave clock. a) Very good stability shown in USNO. Timescale running "open loop." III. "Open loop" operation means no self-measurements of frequency offsets: (Zeeman, ion temperature,... etc.) a) Fewer parts and procedures, produces stable output continuously. IV. Ion clock is not so sensitive to temperature fluctuations a) Measured u:nshielded temperature coefficient of few 10(exp -15) per C. b) No bulky temperature isolation needed.

  3. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  4. Resetting Biological Clocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, Arthur T.

    1975-01-01

    Reports on experiments conducted on two biological clocks, in organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms, which indicate that biological oscillation can be arrested by a single stimulus of a definite strength delivered at the proper time. (GS)

  5. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity, respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous - whose rates are related by a non-constant function beta sub a - is demonstrated. The cosmological character of beta sub a is also discussed.

  6. N+CPT clock resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Crescimanno, M.; Hohensee, M.

    2008-12-15

    In a typical compact atomic time standard a current modulated semiconductor laser is used to create the optical fields that interrogate the atomic hyperfine transition. A pair of optical sidebands created by modulating the diode laser become the coherent population trapping (CPT) fields. At the same time, other pairs of optical sidebands may contribute to other multiphoton resonances, such as three-photon N-resonance [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043817 (2002)]. We analyze the resulting joint CPT and N-resonance (hereafter N+CPT) analytically and numerically. Analytically we solve a four-level quantum optics model for this joint resonance and perturbatively include the leading ac Stark effects from the five largest optical fields in the laser's modulation comb. Numerically we use a truncated Floquet solving routine that first symbolically develops the optical Bloch equations to a prescribed order of perturbation theory before evaluating. This numerical approach has, as input, the complete physical details of the first two excited-state manifolds of {sup 87}Rb. We test these theoretical approaches with experiments by characterizing the optimal clock operating regimes.

  7. Recent progress of neutral mercury lattice clock in SIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R. C.; Fu, X. H.; Liu, K. K.; Gou, W.; Sun, J. F.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Neutral mercury atom is one of good candidates of optical lattice clock. Due to its large atomic number, mercury atom is insensitive to black body radiation, which is the severe limitation for the development of optical clocks. However, the challenge of neutral mercury lattice clock is the requirement of high power deep-UV lasers, especially for both the cooling laser and the lattice laser. Here, we report the recent progress of neutral mercury lattice clock in SIOM, including the development for laser cooling of mercury atom and the cooling laser system with fiber laser amplifier. We have realized the magneto-optical trap of mercury atoms and measured the parameters of cold mercury atoms. A home-made external cavity diode laser works as a seed laser for a room temperature 1014.8 nm fiber laser amplifier. A new efficient frequency-doubling cavity from 1015 nm to 507 nm has been developed.

  8. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science.

    PubMed

    Lisdat, C; Grosche, G; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J-L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Le Targat, R; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P-E

    2016-08-09

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10(-17) via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10(-17) is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second.

  9. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science

    PubMed Central

    Lisdat, C.; Grosche, G.; Quintin, N.; Shi, C.; Raupach, S.M.F.; Grebing, C.; Nicolodi, D.; Stefani, F.; Al-Masoudi, A.; Dörscher, S.; Häfner, S.; Robyr, J.-L.; Chiodo, N.; Bilicki, S.; Bookjans, E.; Koczwara, A.; Koke, S.; Kuhl, A.; Wiotte, F.; Meynadier, F.; Camisard, E.; Abgrall, M.; Lours, M.; Legero, T.; Schnatz, H.; Sterr, U.; Denker, H.; Chardonnet, C.; Le Coq, Y.; Santarelli, G.; Amy-Klein, A.; Le Targat, R.; Lodewyck, J.; Lopez, O; Pottie, P.-E.

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10−17 via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10−17 is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second. PMID:27503795

  10. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisdat, C.; Grosche, G.; Quintin, N.; Shi, C.; Raupach, S. M. F.; Grebing, C.; Nicolodi, D.; Stefani, F.; Al-Masoudi, A.; Dörscher, S.; Häfner, S.; Robyr, J.-L.; Chiodo, N.; Bilicki, S.; Bookjans, E.; Koczwara, A.; Koke, S.; Kuhl, A.; Wiotte, F.; Meynadier, F.; Camisard, E.; Abgrall, M.; Lours, M.; Legero, T.; Schnatz, H.; Sterr, U.; Denker, H.; Chardonnet, C.; Le Coq, Y.; Santarelli, G.; Amy-Klein, A.; Le Targat, R.; Lodewyck, J.; Lopez, O.; Pottie, P.-E.

    2016-08-01

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10-17 via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10-17 is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second.

  11. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science.

    PubMed

    Lisdat, C; Grosche, G; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J-L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Le Targat, R; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P-E

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10(-17) via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10(-17) is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second. PMID:27503795

  12. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  13. Variable frequency microprocessor clock generator

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, C.N.

    1989-04-04

    A microprocessor-based system is described comprising: a digital central microprocessor provided with a clock input and having a rate of operation determined by the frequency of a clock signal input thereto; memory means operably coupled to the central microprocessor for storing programs respectively including a plurality of instructions and addressable by the central microprocessor; peripheral device operably connected to the central microprocessor, the first peripheral device being addressable by the central microprocessor for control thereby; a system clock generator for generating a digital reference clock signal having a reference frequency rate; and frequency rate reduction circuit means connected between the clock generator and the clock input of the central microprocessor for selectively dividing the reference clock signal to generate a microprocessor clock signal as an input to the central microprocessor for clocking the central microprocessor.

  14. Quantum Algorithmic Readout in Multi-Ion Clocks.

    PubMed

    Schulte, M; Lörch, N; Leroux, I D; Schmidt, P O; Hammerer, K

    2016-01-01

    Optical clocks based on ensembles of trapped ions promise record frequency accuracy with good short-term stability. Most suitable ion species lack closed transitions, so the clock signal must be read out indirectly by transferring the quantum state of the clock ions to cotrapped logic ions of a different species. Existing methods of quantum logic readout require a linear overhead in either time or the number of logic ions. Here we describe a quantum algorithmic readout whose overhead scales logarithmically with the number of clock ions in both of these respects. The scheme allows a quantum nondemolition readout of the number of excited clock ions using a single multispecies gate operation which can also be used in other areas of ion trap technology such as quantum information processing, quantum simulations, metrology, and precision spectroscopy. PMID:26799016

  15. Quantum primordial standard clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Wang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we point out and study a generic type of signals existing in the primordial universe models, which can be used to model-independently distinguish the inflation scenario from alternatives. These signals are generated by massive fields that function as standard clocks. The role of massive fields as standard clocks has been realized in previous works. Although the existence of such massive fields is generic, the previous realizations require sharp features to classically excite the oscillations of the massive clock fields. Here, we point out that the quantum fluctuations of massive fields can actually serve the same purpose as the standard clocks. We show that they are also able to directly record the defining property of the scenario type, namely, the scale factor of the primordial universe as a function of time a(t), but through shape-dependent oscillatory features in non-Gaussianities. Since quantum fluctuating massive fields exist in any realistic primordial universe models, these quantum primordial standard clock signals are present in any inflation models, and should exist quite generally in alternative-to-inflation scenarios as well. However, the amplitude of such signals is very model-dependent.

  16. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-06-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  17. Room 103, transom woodwork and original clock. All clocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Room 103, transom woodwork and original clock. All clocks are driven by a common signal. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. "Round-the-Clock" Surgical Access to the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Gardner, Paul A; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Tormenti, Matthew J; Stefko, S Tonya; Snyderman, Carl H; Maroon, Joseph C

    2015-02-01

    Objective To describe an algorithm to guide surgeons in choosing the most appropriate approach to orbital pathology. Methods A review of 12 selected illustrative cases operated on at the neurosurgical department of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center over 3 years from 2009 to 2011 was performed. Preoperative coronal magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography views were compared using a "clock model" of the orbit with its center at the optic nerve. The rationale for choosing an external, endoscopic, or combined approach is discussed for each case. Results Using the right orbit for demonstration of the clock model, the medial transconjunctival approach provides access to the anterior orbit from 1 to 6 o'clock; endoscopic endonasal approaches provide access to the mid and posterior orbit and orbital apex from 1 to 7 o'clock. The lateral micro-orbitotomy gives access to the orbit from 8 to 10 o'clock. The frontotemporal craniotomy with orbital osteotomy accesses the orbit from 9 to 1 o'clock; addition of a zygomatic osteotomy to this extends access from 6 to 8 o'clock. Conclusions Combined, the approaches described provide 360 degrees of access to the entire orbit with the choice of the optimal approach guided primarily by the avoidance of crossing the plane of the optic nerve.

  19. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  20. Tutorial: Clock and Clock Systems Performance Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, David W.

    1996-01-01

    This tutorial contains basic material - familiar to many. This will be used as a foundation upon which we will build - bringing forth some new material and equations that have been developed especially for this tutorial. These will provide increased understanding toward parameter estimation of clock and clock system's performance. There is a very important International Telecommunications Union (ITU) handbook being prepared at this time which goes much further than this tutorial has time to do. I highly recommend it as an excellent resource document. The final draft is just now being completed, and it should be ready late in 1996. It is an outstanding handbook; Dr. Sydnor proposed to the ITU-R several years ago, and is the editor with my assistance. We have some of the best contributors in the community from around the world who have written the ten chapters in this handbook. The title of the handbook is 'Selection and use of Precise Frequency and Time Systems'. It will be available from the ITU secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland, but NAVTEC Seminars also plans to be a distributor.

  1. Superradiance on the millihertz linewidth strontium clock transition

    PubMed Central

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Winchester, Matthew N.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Laser frequency noise contributes a significant limitation to today’s best atomic clocks. A proposed solution to this problem is to create a superradiant laser using an optical clock transition as its gain medium. This laser would act as an active atomic clock and would be highly immune to the fluctuations in reference cavity length that limit today’s best lasers. We demonstrate and characterize superradiant emission from the millihertz linewidth clock transition in an ensemble of laser-cooled 87Sr atoms trapped within a high-finesse optical cavity. We measure a collective enhancement of the emission rate into the cavity mode by a factor of more than 10,000 compared to independently radiating atoms. We also demonstrate a method for seeding superradiant emission and observe interference between two independent transitions lasing simultaneously. We use this interference to characterize the relative spectral properties of the two lasing subensembles. PMID:27757423

  2. An atomic clock with 10(-18) instability.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, N; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Schioppo, M; Lemke, N D; Beloy, K; Pizzocaro, M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2013-09-13

    Atomic clocks have been instrumental in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Timekeeping precision at 1 part in 10(18) enables new timing applications in relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests of physics beyond the standard model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both using spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of 1.6 × 10(-18) after only 7 hours of averaging.

  3. An atomic clock with 10(-18) instability.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, N; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Schioppo, M; Lemke, N D; Beloy, K; Pizzocaro, M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2013-09-13

    Atomic clocks have been instrumental in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Timekeeping precision at 1 part in 10(18) enables new timing applications in relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests of physics beyond the standard model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both using spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of 1.6 × 10(-18) after only 7 hours of averaging. PMID:23970562

  4. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Richard B.

    2007-05-01

    A fluorescent clock reaction is described that is based on the principles of the Landolt iodine reaction but uses the potent fluorescence quenching properties of triiodide to abruptly extinguish the ultraviolet fluorescence of optical brighteners present in liquid laundry detergents. The reaction uses easily obtained household products. One variation illustrates the sequential steps and mechanisms of the reaction; other variations maximize the dramatic impact of the demonstration; and a variation that uses liquid detergent in the Briggs Rauscher reaction yields a striking oscillating luminescence. The iodine fluorescence quenching clock reaction can be used in the classroom to explore not only the principles of redox chemistry and reaction kinetics, but also the photophysics of fluorescent pH probes and optical quenching.

  5. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  6. Clocks in algae.

    PubMed

    Noordally, Zeenat B; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-01-20

    As major contributors to global oxygen levels and producers of fatty acids, carotenoids, sterols, and phycocolloids, algae have significant ecological and commercial roles. Early algal models have contributed much to our understanding of circadian clocks at physiological and biochemical levels. The genetic and molecular approaches that identified clock components in other taxa have not been as widely applied to algae. We review results from seven species: the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Ostreococcus tauri, and Acetabularia spp.; the dinoflagellates Lingulodinium polyedrum and Symbiodinium spp.; the euglenozoa Euglena gracilis; and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The relative simplicity, experimental tractability, and ecological and evolutionary diversity of algal systems may now make them particularly useful in integrating quantitative data from "omic" technologies (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics) with computational and mathematical methods.

  7. Synchronization of clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2012-08-01

    In this report we recall the famous Huygens’ experiment which gave the first evidence of the synchronization phenomenon. We consider the synchronization of two clocks which are accurate (show the same time) but have pendula with different masses. It has been shown that such clocks hanging on the same beam can show the almost complete (in-phase) and almost antiphase synchronizations. By almost complete and almost antiphase synchronization we defined the periodic motion of the pendula in which the phase shift between the displacements of the pendula is respectively close (but not equal) to 0 or π. We give evidence that almost antiphase synchronization was the phenomenon observed by Huygens in XVII century. We support our numerical studies by considering the energy balance in the system and showing how the energy is transferred between the pendula via oscillating beam allowing the pendula’s synchronization. Additionally we discuss the synchronization of a number of different pendulum clocks hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. It has been shown that after a transient, different types of synchronization between pendula can be observed; (i) the complete synchronization in which all pendula behave identically, (ii) pendula create three or five clusters of synchronized pendula. We derive the equations for the estimation of the phase differences between phase synchronized clusters. The evidence, why other configurations with a different number of clusters are not observed, is given.

  8. Foucault pendulum ``wall clock''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, H. Richard

    1995-01-01

    Details are given for the construction of a 70-cm-long Foucault pendulum to be mounted on the wall, and for a simple modification that will make it display local clock time. The possibility of having a Foucault pendulum of such short length is the result of finding new or improved ways of reducing four perturbing effects that become more severe as the length is decreased. They relate to: precession due to ellipticity in the motion, the drive system for maintaining the amplitude, the means of limiting the growth of ellipticity, and the method of gripping the suspending wire at the top. With those improvements, successful Foucault operation was attained in pendulums as short as 15 cm, support to center of bob. Following that severe test, the length for the ``wall clock'' was set at a conservative 70 cm. At that length it is highly reliable, and accurate to within 2% when timed for the full revolution. Uniformity in rate when comparing different intervals of azimuth is of course less. A simple method of making the pendulum read local time is described. Two clocks, one in the author's office and one at home, have been in continuous operation for more than ten years.

  9. Measurement of Magic Wavelengths for the ^{40}Ca^{+} Clock Transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Huang, Yao; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yong-Bo; Li, Cheng-Bin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of magic wavelengths and determine the ratio of oscillator strengths for a single trapped ion. For the first time, two magic wavelengths near 396 nm for the ^{40}Ca^{+} clock transition are measured simultaneously with high precision. By tuning the applied laser to an intermediate wavelength between transitions 4s_{1/2}→4p_{1/2} and 4s_{1/2}→4p_{3/2}, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, with the measured magic wavelengths, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths with a deviation of less than 0.5%. Our experimental method may be applied to measure magic wavelengths for other ion clock transitions. Promisingly, the measurement of these magic wavelengths paves the way to building all-optical trapped ion clocks. PMID:26196619

  10. Measurement of Magic Wavelengths for the ^{40}Ca^{+} Clock Transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Huang, Yao; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yong-Bo; Li, Cheng-Bin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of magic wavelengths and determine the ratio of oscillator strengths for a single trapped ion. For the first time, two magic wavelengths near 396 nm for the ^{40}Ca^{+} clock transition are measured simultaneously with high precision. By tuning the applied laser to an intermediate wavelength between transitions 4s_{1/2}→4p_{1/2} and 4s_{1/2}→4p_{3/2}, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, with the measured magic wavelengths, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths with a deviation of less than 0.5%. Our experimental method may be applied to measure magic wavelengths for other ion clock transitions. Promisingly, the measurement of these magic wavelengths paves the way to building all-optical trapped ion clocks.

  11. Circadian clocks in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Clock gene expression has been observed in tissues of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Whereas the contribution of hypothalamic oscillators to the timing of reproductive biology is well known, the role of peripheral oscillators like those in the ovary is less clear. Circadian clocks in the ovary might play a role in the timing of ovulation. Disruption of the clock in ovarian cells or desynchrony between ovarian clocks and circadian oscillators elsewhere in the body may contribute to the onset and progression of various reproductive pathologies. In this paper, we review evidence for clock function in the ovary across a number of species and offer a novel perspective into the role of this clock in normal ovarian physiology and in diseases that negatively affect fertility.

  12. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  13. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  14. Incentive theory III: Adaptive clocks.

    PubMed

    Killeen, P R

    1984-01-01

    Incentive theory is extended to address the phenomenon of autoshaping. To do so, it is necessary to permit the speed of the animal's internal clock to vary with rates of reinforcement; clock speed is the basis for the animal's calculations of reinforcement densities. This notion of an "adaptive clock" is consistent with other effects, such as the partial-reinforcement extinction effect, and permits us to deal with the various experimental manipulations that are found in autoshaping experiments from a unified perspective.

  15. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  16. Comparative studies of dipole polarizabilities in Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Ra{sup +} and their applications to optical clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2009-12-15

    Static dipole polarizabilities are calculated in the ground and metastable states of Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +} and Ra{sup +} using the relativistic coupled-cluster method. Trends of the electron correlation effects are investigated in these atomic ions. We also estimate the Stark and black-body radiation shifts from these results for these systems for the transitions proposed for the optical frequency standards and compare them with available experimental data.

  17. A Light Clock Satisfying the Clock Hypothesis of Special Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The design of the FMEL, a floor-mirrored Einstein-Langevin "light clock", is introduced. The clock provides a physically intuitive manner to calculate and visualize the time dilation effects for a spatially extended set of observers (an accelerated "frame") undergoing unidirectional acceleration or observers on a rotating cylinder of constant…

  18. Master/slave clock arrangement for providing reliable clock signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, Duane L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The outputs of two like frequency oscillators are combined to form a single reliable clock signal, with one oscillator functioning as a slave under the control of the other to achieve phase coincidence when the master is operative and in a free-running mode when the master is inoperative so that failure of either oscillator produces no effect on the clock signal.

  19. Digital processing clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Tthe digital processing clock SG 1157/U is described. It is compatible with the PTTI world where it can be driven by an external cesium source. Built-in test equipment shows synchronization with cesium through 1 pulse per second. It is built to be expandable to accommodate future time-keeping needs of the Navy as well as any other time ordered functions. Examples of this expandibility are the inclusion of an unmodulated XR3 time code and the 2137 modulate time code (XR3 with 1 kHz carrier).

  20. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  1. Einstein’s Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-09-09

    One of the most non-intuitive physics theories ever devised is Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity, which claim such crazy-sounding things as two people disagreeing on such familiar concepts as length and time. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln shows that every single day particle physicists prove that moving clocks tick more slowly than stationary ones. He uses an easy to understand example of particles that move for far longer distances than you would expect from combining their velocity and stationary lifetime.

  2. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  3. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  4. Low-power, miniature {sup 171}Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Schwindt, P. D. D.; Partner, H.; Prestage, J. D.; Kellogg, J. R.; Yu, N.

    2012-12-17

    We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped {sup 171}Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm{sup 3} ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes <300 mW. The fractional frequency instability of the miniature Yb{sup +} clock reaches the 10{sup -14} range after a few days of integration.

  5. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, A.; Obreshkov, B.; Dzuba, V. A.

    2009-09-25

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  6. Mapping out atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Derevianko, A; Obreshkov, B; Dzuba, V A

    2009-09-25

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  7. Laser Ranging Experiment on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Clocks and Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Rowlands, D. D.; McGarry, J.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Torrence, M. H.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Sun, X.; Zagwodzki, T. W.; Cavanaugh, J. F.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate ranges from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft Laser Ranging (LR) system supplement the precision orbit determination (POD) of LRO. LRO is tracked by ten LR stations from the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), using H-maser, GPS steered Rb, and Cs standard oscillators as reference clocks. The LR system routinely makes one-way range measurements via laser time-of-flight from Earth to LRO. Uplink photons are received by a telescope mounted on the high-gain antenna on LRO , transferred through a fiber optic cable to the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), and timed-tagged by the spacecraft clock. The range from the LR Earth station to LRO is derived from paired outgoing and received times. Accurate ranges can only be obtained after solving for both the spacecraft and ground station clock errors. The drift rate and aging rate of the LRO clock are calculated from data provided by the primary LR station, NASA's Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging System (NGSLR) in Greenbelt, Maryland. The results confirm the LRO clock oscillator mid to long term stability measured during ground testing. These rates also agree well with those determined through POD. Simultaneous and near-simultaneous ranging to LRO from multiple LR stations in America, Europe, and Australia has been successfully achieved within a 10 hour window. Data analysis of these ranging experiments allows for precision modeling of the clock behaviors of each LR ground station and characterization of the station ground fire times.

  8. Electronics for the pulsed rubidium clock: design and characterization.

    PubMed

    Calosso, Claudio E; Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Bertacco, Elio K; Levi, Filippo

    2007-09-01

    Pulsing the different operation phases of a vapor-cell clock (optical pumping, interrogation, and detection) has been recognized as one of the most effective techniques to reduce light shift and then to improve the stability perspectives of vapor cell clocks. However, in order to take full advantage of the pulsed scheme, a fast-gated electronics is required, the times involved being of the order of milliseconds. In this paper we describe the design and the implementation of the electronics that synchronizes the different phases of the clock operation, as well as of the electronics that is mainly devoted to the thermal stabilization of the clock physics package. We also report some characterization measurements, including a measurement of the clock frequency stability. In particular, in terms of Allan deviation, we measured a frequency stability of 1.2 x 10(-12) tao(-1/2) for averaging times up to tao = 10(5) s, a very interesting result by itself and also for a possible space application of such a clock.

  9. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  10. Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift.

    PubMed

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Okhapkin, M V; Bagayev, S N; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Huntemann, N; Mehlstäubler, T E; Riehle, F

    2011-07-15

    We develop a concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift and its fluctuations can be suppressed by 1-3 orders of magnitude independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies ν1 and ν2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a "synthetic" frequency ν(syn) ∝ (ν1 - ε12ν2) largely immune to the blackbody radiation shift. For example, in the case of 171Yb+ it is possible to create a synthetic-frequency-based clock in which the fractional blackbody radiation shift can be suppressed to the level of 10(-18) in a broad interval near room temperature (300±15  K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies ν1 and ν2, where the frequency ν(syn) is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum.

  11. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:22877658

  12. Clock controls angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lasse Dahl; Cao, Yihai

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control multiple physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development in mammals and development of various human diseases. We have recently, in a developing zebrafish embryonic model, discovered that the circadian oscillation controls developmental angiogenesis. Disruption of crucial circadian regulatory genes, including Bmal1 and Period2, results in marked impairment or enhancement of vascular development in zebrafish. At the molecular level, we show that the circadian regulator Bmal1 directly targets the promoter region of the vegf gene in zebrafish, leading to an elevated expression of VEGF. These findings can reasonably be extended to developmental angiogenesis in mammals and even pathological angiogenesis in humans. Thus, our findings, for the first time, shed new light on mechanisms that underlie circadian clock-regulated angiogenesis. PMID:23324349

  13. A Superfluid Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    The performance of clocks is limited by the characteristics of the underlying oscillator. Both the quality factor of the oscillator and the signal-to-noise ratio for the resonator state measurement are important. A superfluid helium Helmholtz resonator operating at approx.100mK temperatures has the potential of maintaining frequency stability of 5x10(exp -15)/t(exp 1/2) on the time scale of a few months. The high dynamic range of lossless SQUID position displacement measurement, and low losses associated with the superfluid flow, combined with high mechanical stability of cryogenic assemblies, contribute to the projected stability. Low overall mass of the assembly allows for multiple stages of vibration isolation.

  14. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  15. Clock Genes in Glia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are periodic patterns in biological processes that allow the organisms to anticipate changes in the environment. These rhythms are driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in vertebrates. At a molecular level, circadian rhythms are regulated by the so-called clock genes, which oscillate in a periodic manner. The protein products of clock genes are transcription factors that control their own and other genes’ transcription, collectively known as “clock-controlled genes.” Several brain regions other than the SCN express circadian rhythms of clock genes, including the amygdala, the olfactory bulb, the retina, and the cerebellum. Glia cells in these structures are expected to participate in rhythmicity. However, only certain types of glia cells may be called “glial clocks,” since they express PER-based circadian oscillators, which depend of the SCN for their synchronization. This contribution summarizes the current information about clock genes in glia cells, their plausible role as oscillators and their medical implications. PMID:27666286

  16. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  17. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms.

    PubMed

    Kómár, P; Topcu, T; Kessler, E M; Derevianko, A; Vuletić, V; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles. PMID:27541452

  18. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kómár, P.; Topcu, T.; Kessler, E. M.; Derevianko, A.; Vuletić, V.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  19. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms.

    PubMed

    Kómár, P; Topcu, T; Kessler, E M; Derevianko, A; Vuletić, V; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  20. Synchronization of clocks through 12 km of strongly turbulent air over a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Laura C.; Swann, William C.; Bergeron, Hugo; Baumann, Esther; Cermak, Michael; Coddington, Ian; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Juarez, Juan C.; Khader, Isaac; Petrillo, Keith G.; Souza, Katherine T.; Dennis, Michael L.; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate real-time, femtosecond-level clock synchronization across a low-lying, strongly turbulent, 12-km horizontal air path by optical two-way time transfer. For this long horizontal free-space path, the integrated turbulence extends well into the strong turbulence regime corresponding to multiple scattering with a Rytov variance up to 7 and with the number of signal interruptions exceeding 100 per second. Nevertheless, optical two-way time transfer is used to synchronize a remote clock to a master clock with femtosecond-level agreement and with a relative time deviation dropping as low as a few hundred attoseconds. Synchronization is shown for a remote clock based on either an optical or microwave oscillator and using either tip-tilt or adaptive-optics free-space optical terminals. The performance is unaltered from optical two-way time transfer in weak turbulence across short links. These results confirm that the two-way reciprocity of the free-space time-of-flight is maintained both under strong turbulence and with the use of adaptive optics. The demonstrated robustness of optical two-way time transfer against strong turbulence and its compatibility with adaptive optics is encouraging for future femtosecond clock synchronization over very long distance ground-to-air free-space paths.

  1. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  2. The cyanobacterial clock and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal; Rust, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the simplest known circadian clock, which presents a unique opportunity to study how rhythms are generated and how input signals from the environment reset the clock time. The kaiABC locus forms the core of the oscillator, and the remarkable ability to reconstitute oscillations using purified KaiABC proteins has allowed researchers to study mechanism using the tools of quantitative biochemistry. Autotrophic cyanobacteria experience major shifts in metabolism following a light-dark transition, and recent work suggests that input mechanisms that couple the day-night cycle to the clock involve energy and redox metabolites acting directly on clock proteins. We offer a summary of the current state of knowledge in this system and present a perspective for future lines of investigation.

  3. Physical Time and Thermal Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    In this paper I discuss the concept of time in physics. I consider the thermal time hypothesis and I claim that thermal clocks and atomic clocks measure different physical times, whereby thermal time and relativistic time are not compatible with each other. This hypothesis opens the possibility of a new foundation of the theory of physical time, and new perspectives in theoretical and philosophical researches.

  4. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  5. Physical Time and Thermal Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    In this paper I discuss the concept of time in physics. I consider the thermal time hypothesis and I claim that thermal clocks and atomic clocks measure different physical times, whereby thermal time and relativistic time are not compatible with each other. This hypothesis opens the possibility of a new foundation of the theory of physical time, and new perspectives in theoretical and philosophical researches.

  6. A new trapped ion atomic clock based on 201Hg+.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2010-03-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy has been performed on the ground-state hyperfine transitions in trapped (201)Hg+ ions as part of a program to investigate the viability of (201)Hg+ for clock applications. Part of the spectroscopy work was directed at magnetic-field-sensitive hyperfine lines with delta m(F) = 0, which allow accurate Doppler-free measurement of the magnetic field experienced by the trapped ions. Although it is possible to measure Doppler-free magnetic-field-sensitive transitions in the commonly used clock isotope, (199)Hg+, it is more difficult. In this paper, we discuss how this (199)Hg+ feature may be exploited to produce a more stable clock or one requiring less magnetic shielding in environments with magnetic field fluctuations far in excess of what is normally found in the laboratory. We have also determined that in discharge-lamp-based trapped mercury ion clocks, the optical pumping time for (201)Hg+ is about 3 times shorter than that of (199)Hg+ This can be used to reduce dead time in the interrogation cycle for these types of clocks, thereby reducing the impact of local oscillator noise aliasing effects.

  7. Progress Toward a Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2009-01-01

    There was an update on the subject of two previous NASA Tech Briefs articles: Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock (NPO-43075), Vol. 32, No. 5 (May 2008), page 63; and Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock (NPO-42919), Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 62. To recapitulate: A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump maintains the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a neon buffer gas. There was progress in the development of the clock, with emphasis on the design, fabrication, pump-down, and bake-out of the vacuum tube (based on established practice in the travelingwave- tube-amplifier industry) and the ability of the tube to retain a vacuum after a year of operation. Other developments include some aspects of the operation of mercury-vapor source (a small appendage oven containing HgO) so as to maintain the optimum low concentration of mercury vapor, and further efforts to miniaturize the vacuum and optical subsystems to fit within a volume of 2 L.

  8. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  9. Circadian clock proteins and immunity.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne M; Bellet, Marina M; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2014-02-20

    Immune parameters change with time of day and disruption of circadian rhythms has been linked to inflammatory pathologies. A circadian-clock-controlled immune system might allow an organism to anticipate daily changes in activity and feeding and the associated risk of infection or tissue damage to the host. Responses to bacteria have been shown to vary depending on time of infection, with mice being more at risk of sepsis when challenged ahead of their activity phase. Studies highlight the extent to which the molecular clock, most notably the core clock proteins BMAL1, CLOCK, and REV-ERBα, control fundamental aspects of the immune response. Examples include the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer regulating toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression and repressing expression of the inflammatory monocyte chemokine ligand (CCL2) as well as REV-ERBα suppressing the induction of interleukin-6. Understanding the daily rhythm of the immune system could have implications for vaccinations and how we manage infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  10. Biological clocks: mechanisms and developments.

    PubMed

    Nongkynrih, P; Sharma, V K

    1992-05-15

    Almost all organisms ranging from unicellular protists to mammals were found to show biological rhythms. Many workers have performed various kinds of experiment to understand the mechanism as well as to find the origin of the clock responsible for these rhythms. However, there is no doubt about the existence of a biologically controlled clock in almost all organisms; yet its origin and mechanism still remain a mystery. Many theories have been put forward to explain the mechanism of these biological clocks and it seems that the cell membrane may play a key role. The existence of a very high electric field of the order of 10(5) V cm-1 across the cell membrane may have some role in the mechanism of the biological clock. Of all the factors which have the effects on biological rhythms, light and temperature are found to be the most common. Also, the study of these biological clocks can help to solve the sleeping problems of international travellers and shift workers as well as to improve diagnosis, cure and prevention from diseases.

  11. A tale of a clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, A. W.

    2001-09-01

    A computer model has been constructed of a long case clock standing on a resilient surface, or within a case of impaired shear stiffness, whereby the head of the clock rocks in response to the swinging of its pendulum. The equations of motion are written in matrix form, and are solved by matrix inversion. The model accounts for the tendency of such a clock to stop when its driving weight has descended to about the level of the bob of the pendulum. The model predicts that the lengthening of the suspension of the weight by insertion of a link would permit the clock to run on until the weight becomes grounded. It also predicts that use of the chiming weight as a resonant absorber, by hanging it from a tuned suspension of fixed length, not only allows such a clock to run for the full term of a wind, but improves the constancy of its rate. The effects of a link, and of the resonant absorber, have been verified experimentally.

  12. Synchronous clock stopper for microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A synchronous clock stopper circuit for inhibiting clock pulses to a microprocessor in response to a stop request signal, and for reinstating the clock pulses in response to a start request signal thereby to conserve power consumption of the microprocessor when used in an environment of limited power. The stopping and starting of the microprocessor is synchronized, by a phase tracker, with the occurrences of a predetermined phase in the instruction cycle of the microprocessor in which the I/O data and address lines of the microprocessor are of high impedance so that a shared memory connected to the I/O lines may be accessed by other peripheral devices. The starting and stopping occur when the microprocessor initiates and completes, respectively, an instruction, as well as before and after transferring data with a memory. Also, the phase tracker transmits phase information signals over a bus to other peripheral devices which signals identify the current operational phase of the microprocessor.

  13. Clocks, Metabolism, and the Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dan; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2012-01-01

    Many behaviors and physiological activities in living organisms display circadian rhythms, allowing them to anticipate and prepare for the diurnal changes in the living environment. In this way, metabolic processes are aligned with the periodic environmental changes and behavioral cycles, such as the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles. Disturbances of this alignment significantly increase the risk of metabolic diseases. Meanwhile, the circadian clock receives signals from the environment and feedback from metabolic pathways, and adjusts its activity and function. Growing evidence connects the circadian clock with epigenomic regulators. Here we review the recent advances in understanding the crosstalk between the circadian clock and energy metabolism through epigenomic programming and transcriptional regulation. PMID:22841001

  14. Circadian clocks and cell division

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to some kinds of cancer. The core mechanism underlying the circadian clockwork has been thought to be a transcription and translation feedback loop (TTFL), but recent evidence from studies with cyanobacteria, synthetic oscillators and immortalized cell lines suggests that the core circadian pacemaking mechanism that gates cell division in mammalian cells could be a post-translational oscillator (PTO). PMID:20890114

  15. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  16. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  17. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock. PMID:24099911

  18. Optimized multiparty quantum clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Av, Radel; Exman, Iaakov

    2011-07-15

    A multiparty protocol for distributed quantum clock synchronization has been claimed to provide universal limits on the clock accuracy, viz., that accuracy monotonically decreases with the number n of party members. But this is only true for synchronization when one limits oneself to W states. This work shows that the usage of Z (Symmetric Dicke) states, a generalization of W states, results in improved accuracy, having a maximum when Left-Floor n/2 Right-Floor of its members have their qubits with a |1> eigenstate.

  19. Acting with the Clock: Clocking Practices in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses intra-actions that take place among humans and non-human others--the physical world, the materials--in early childhood education's everyday practices. Her object of study is the clock. Specifically, she provides an example of what it might mean to account for the intra-activity of the material-discursive…

  20. Single-transistor-clocked flip-flop

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Peiyi; Darwish, Tarek; Bayoumi, Magdy

    2005-08-30

    The invention provides a low power, high performance flip-flop. The flip-flop uses only one clocked transistor. The single clocked transistor is shared by the first and second branches of the device. A pulse generator produces a clock pulse to trigger the flip-flop. In one preferred embodiment the device can be made as a static explicit pulsed flip-flop which employs only two clocked transistors.

  1. Microwave Cavity Clocks On Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. a.; Nissen, J. A.; Wang, S.; Stricker, D. A.; Avaloff, D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the status of a microwave cavity clock experiment to perform improved tests of Local Position Invariance and Lorentz Invariance on the International Space Station in conjunction with atomic clocks. Significant improvements over present bounds are expected in both cases. The oscillators can also be used to enhance the performance of atomic clocks at short time scales for other experiments.

  2. Quasars as very-accurate clock synchronizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Quasars can be employed to synchronize global data communications, geophysical measurements, and atomic clocks. It is potentially two to three orders of magnitude better than presently-used Moon-bounce system. Comparisons between quasar and clock pulses are used to develop correction or synchronization factors for station clocks.

  3. Biological clocks: riding the tides.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-10-21

    Animals with habitats in the intertidal zone often display biological rhythms that coordinate with both the tidal and the daily environmental cycles. Two recent studies show that the molecular components of the biological clocks mediating tidal rhythms are likely different from the phylogenetically conserved components that mediate circadian (daily) rhythms.

  4. Cannabinoids excite circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Goycolea, Claudio; Obrietan, Karl; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2010-07-28

    Cannabinoids, the primary active agent in drugs of abuse such as marijuana and hashish, tend to generate a distorted sense of time. Here we study the effect of cannabinoids on the brain's circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), using patch clamp and cell-attached electrophysiological recordings, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. The SCN showed strong expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1R, as detected with RT-PCR. SCN neurons, including those using GABA as a transmitter, and axons within the SCN, expressed CB1R immunoreactivity. Behaviorally, cannabinoids did not alter the endogenous free-running circadian rhythm in the mouse brain, but did attenuate the ability of the circadian clock to entrain to light zeitgebers. In the absence of light, infusion of the CB1R antagonist AM251 caused a modest phase shift, suggesting endocannabinoid modulation of clock timing. Interestingly, cannabinoids had no effect on glutamate release from the retinohypothalamic projection, suggesting a direct action of cannabinoids on the retinohypothalamic tract was unlikely to explain the inhibition of the phase shift. Within the SCN, cannabinoids were excitatory by a mechanism based on presynaptic CB1R attenuation of axonal GABA release. These data raise the possibility that the time dissociation described by cannabinoid users may result in part from altered circadian clock function and/or entrainment to environmental time cues. PMID:20668190

  5. Biological Clocks: Riding the Tides

    PubMed Central

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    Animals with habitats in the intertidal zone often display biological rhythms that coordinate with both the tidal and the daily environmental cycles. Two recent studies show that the molecular components of the biological clocks mediating tidal rhythms are likely different from the phylogenetically conserved components that mediate circadian (daily) rhythms. PMID:24156810

  6. Analysis of a magnetically trapped atom clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kadio, D.; Band, Y. B.

    2006-11-15

    We consider optimization of a rubidium atom clock that uses magnetically trapped Bose condensed atoms in a highly elongated trap, and determine the optimal conditions for minimum Allan variance of the clock using microwave Ramsey fringe spectroscopy. Elimination of magnetic field shifts and collisional shifts are considered. The effects of spin-dipolar relaxation are addressed in the optimization of the clock. We find that for the interstate interaction strength equal to or larger than the intrastate interaction strengths, a modulational instability results in phase separation and symmetry breaking of the two-component condensate composed of the ground and excited hyperfine clock levels, and this mechanism limits the clock accuracy.

  7. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  8. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis. PMID:23221775

  9. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Lee, Choogon

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators. PMID:26617050

  10. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S; Lee, Choogon

    2015-11-30

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators.

  11. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10‑16 at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm3 and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm3. The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10‑10/g, 5.8 × 10‑10/g and 3.1 × 10‑10/g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s2 is the standard gravitational acceleration.

  12. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications

    PubMed Central

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10−16 at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm3; and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm3. The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10−10/g, 5.8 × 10−10/g and 3.1 × 10−10/g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s2 is the standard gravitational acceleration. PMID:27667640

  13. Genomic clocks and evolutionary timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair Hedges, S.; Kumar, Sudhir

    2003-01-01

    For decades, molecular clocks have helped to illuminate the evolutionary timescale of life, but now genomic data pose a challenge for time estimation methods. It is unclear how to integrate data from many genes, each potentially evolving under a different model of substitution and at a different rate. Current methods can be grouped by the way the data are handled (genes considered separately or combined into a 'supergene') and the way gene-specific rate models are applied (global versus local clock). There are advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches, and the optimal method has not yet emerged. Fortunately, time estimates inferred using many genes or proteins have greater precision and appear to be robust to different approaches.

  14. Atomic clocks for astrophysical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recently developed atomic hydrogen masers have achieved stability well into the 10 to the -16th domain for averaging time intervals beyond 1000 sec and that further improvements are in prospect. These devices are highly adaptable for space use in very high precision measurements of angle through Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and of range and range-rate through Doppler techniques. Space missions that will use these clocks for measuring the sun's gravity field distribution and for testing gravitation and relativity (a project that will include a search for pulsed low-frequency gravitational waves) are discussed. Estimates are made of system performance capability, and the accuracy capability of relativistic measurements is evaluated in terms of the results from the 1976 NASA/SAO spaceborne clock test of the Einstein Equivalence Principle.

  15. The LASSO experiment. [clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serene, B.

    1979-01-01

    An international coordinated experimental assessment of a system which promises to provide a synchronization of clocks bound to time and frequency standard laboratories, with an accuracy of one nanosecond using existing or near ground-based laser stations via a geostationary satellite (SIRIO-2) is detailed. The system performance and the technical details concerning the on-board equiment, the ground segment, and the operational configuration are discussed. Finally, the future prospects of the LASSO experiment and possible implementations are examined together.

  16. Atomic Clock Based on Opto-Electronic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan

    2005-01-01

    A proposed highly accurate clock or oscillator would be based on the concept of an opto-electronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized to an atomic transition. Opto-electronic oscillators, which have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, generate signals at frequencies in the gigahertz range characterized by high spectral purity but not by longterm stability or accuracy. On the other hand, the signals generated by previously developed atomic clocks are characterized by long-term stability and accuracy but not by spectral purity. The proposed atomic clock would provide high spectral purity plus long-term stability and accuracy a combination of characteristics needed to realize advanced developments in communications and navigation. In addition, it should be possible to miniaturize the proposed atomic clock. When a laser beam is modulated by a microwave signal and applied to a photodetector, the electrical output of the photodetector includes a component at the microwave frequency. In atomic clocks of a type known as Raman clocks or coherent-population-trapping (CPT) clocks, microwave outputs are obtained from laser beams modulated, in each case, to create two sidebands that differ in frequency by the amount of a hyperfine transition in the ground state of atoms of an element in vapor form in a cell. The combination of these sidebands produces a transparency in the population of a higher electronic level that can be reached from either of the two ground-state hyperfine levels by absorption of a photon. The beam is transmitted through the vapor to a photodetector. The components of light scattered or transmitted by the atoms in the two hyperfine levels mix in the photodetector and thereby give rise to a signal at the hyperfine- transition frequency. The proposed atomic clock would include an OEO and a rubidium- or cesium- vapor cell operating in the CPT/Raman regime (see figure). In the OEO portion of this atomic clock, as in a typical prior OEO, a

  17. An epigenetic clock controls aging.

    PubMed

    Mitteldorf, Josh

    2016-02-01

    We are accustomed to treating aging as a set of things that go wrong with the body. But for more than twenty years, there has been accumulating evidence that much of the process takes place under genetic control. We have seen that signaling chemistry can make dramatic differences in life span, and that single molecules can significantly affect longevity. We are frequently confronted with puzzling choices the body makes which benefit neither present health nor fertility nor long-term survival. If we permit ourselves a shift of reference frame and regard aging as a programmed biological function like growth and development, then these observations fall into place and make sense. This perspective suggests that aging proceeds under control of a master clock, or several redundant clocks. If this is so, we may learn to reset the clocks with biochemical interventions and make an old body behave like a young body, including repair of many of the modes of damage that we are accustomed to regard as independent symptoms of the senescent phenotype, and for which we have assumed that the body has no remedy.

  18. What starts an internal clock?

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Holder, M D

    1984-07-01

    Five experiments with rats investigated under what conditions a stimulus is timed by the internal clock used in time-discrimination procedures. In Experiments 1-4, we trained rats to time one stimulus (e.g., light) and then asked whether they timed a stimulus from another modality (e.g., sound). The second stimulus was treated in three ways: exposed (presented alone), paired with food, and extinguished. Experiments 1 and 2 used the peak procedure, similar to a discrete-trial fixed-interval schedule, and paired the treated stimulus with food using instrumental training; Experiments 3 and 4 used a psychophysical choice procedure and paired the treated stimulus with food using classical conditioning. All four experiments found that there was cross-modal transfer of the time discrimination after pairing, but not after exposure or extinction. This suggests that the rat's internal clock timed the treated stimulus after pairing, but not after exposure or extinction. Experiment 5 tested a theory of extinction based on the results of Experiments 1-4; the results suggested that the decline of responding observed in extinction is not due to changes in timing. The main conclusion is that the internal clock apparently times stimuli with signal value (associative strength) and does not time stimuli without signal value.

  19. An epigenetic clock controls aging.

    PubMed

    Mitteldorf, Josh

    2016-02-01

    We are accustomed to treating aging as a set of things that go wrong with the body. But for more than twenty years, there has been accumulating evidence that much of the process takes place under genetic control. We have seen that signaling chemistry can make dramatic differences in life span, and that single molecules can significantly affect longevity. We are frequently confronted with puzzling choices the body makes which benefit neither present health nor fertility nor long-term survival. If we permit ourselves a shift of reference frame and regard aging as a programmed biological function like growth and development, then these observations fall into place and make sense. This perspective suggests that aging proceeds under control of a master clock, or several redundant clocks. If this is so, we may learn to reset the clocks with biochemical interventions and make an old body behave like a young body, including repair of many of the modes of damage that we are accustomed to regard as independent symptoms of the senescent phenotype, and for which we have assumed that the body has no remedy. PMID:26608516

  20. Design principles underlying circadian clocks.

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. A.; Shulgin, B. V.; Salazar, D.; Millar, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental problem for regulatory networks is to understand the relation between form and function: to uncover the underlying design principles of the network. Circadian clocks present a particularly interesting instance, as recent work has shown that they have complex structures involving multiple interconnected feedback loops with both positive and negative feedback. While several authors have speculated on the reasons for this, a convincing explanation is still lacking.We analyse both the flexibility of clock networks and the relationships between various desirable properties such as robust entrainment, temperature compensation, and stability to environmental variations and parameter fluctuations. We use this to argue that the complexity provides the flexibility necessary to simultaneously attain multiple key properties of circadian clocks. As part of our analysis we show how to quantify the key evolutionary aims using infinitesimal response curves, a tool that we believe will be of general utility in the analysis of regulatory networks. Our results suggest that regulatory and signalling networks might be much less flexible and of lower dimension than their apparent complexity would suggest. PMID:16849158

  1. Systematic evaluation of an atomic clock at 2 × 10(-18) total uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, T L; Campbell, S L; Hutson, R B; Marti, G E; Bloom, B J; McNally, R L; Zhang, W; Barrett, M D; Safronova, M S; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Ye, J

    2015-04-21

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. Here we take an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Our (87)Sr optical lattice clock now achieves fractional stability of 2.2 × 10(-16) at 1 s. With this improved stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, reducing many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as those in the lattice ac Stark shift, the atoms' thermal environment and the atomic response to room-temperature blackbody radiation. Our combined measurements have reduced the total uncertainty of the JILA Sr clock to 2.1 × 10(-18) in fractional frequency units.

  2. Systematic evaluation of an atomic clock at 2 × 10(-18) total uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, T L; Campbell, S L; Hutson, R B; Marti, G E; Bloom, B J; McNally, R L; Zhang, W; Barrett, M D; Safronova, M S; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Ye, J

    2015-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. Here we take an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Our (87)Sr optical lattice clock now achieves fractional stability of 2.2 × 10(-16) at 1 s. With this improved stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, reducing many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as those in the lattice ac Stark shift, the atoms' thermal environment and the atomic response to room-temperature blackbody radiation. Our combined measurements have reduced the total uncertainty of the JILA Sr clock to 2.1 × 10(-18) in fractional frequency units. PMID:25898253

  3. Systematic evaluation of an atomic clock at 2 × 10−18 total uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, T.L.; Campbell, S.L.; Hutson, R.B.; Marti, G.E.; Bloom, B.J.; McNally, R.L.; Zhang, W.; Barrett, M.D.; Safronova, M.S.; Strouse, G.F.; Tew, W.L.; Ye, J.

    2015-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. Here we take an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Our 87Sr optical lattice clock now achieves fractional stability of 2.2 × 10−16 at 1 s. With this improved stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, reducing many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as those in the lattice ac Stark shift, the atoms' thermal environment and the atomic response to room-temperature blackbody radiation. Our combined measurements have reduced the total uncertainty of the JILA Sr clock to 2.1 × 10−18 in fractional frequency units. PMID:25898253

  4. Recent Developments in Microwave Ion Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    We review the development of microwave-frequency standards based on trapped ions. Following two distinct paths, microwave ion clocks have evolved greatly in the last twenty years since the earliest Paul-trap-based units. Laser-cooled ion frequency standards reduce the second-order Doppler shift from ion micromotion and thermal secular motion achieving good signal-to-noise ratios via cycling transitions where as many as ~10^8 photons per second per ion may be scattered. Today, laser-cooled ion standards are based on linear Paul traps which hold ions near the node line of the trapping electric field, minimizing micromotion at the trapping-field frequency and the consequent second-order Doppler frequency shift. These quadrupole (radial) field traps tightly confine tens of ions to a crystalline single-line structure. As more ions are trapped, space charge forces some ions away from the node-line axis and the second-order Doppler effect grows larger, even at negligibly small secular temperatures. Buffer-gas-cooled clocks rely on large numbers of ions, typically ~10^7, optically pumped by a discharge lamp at a scattering rate of a few photons per second per ion. To reduce the second-order Doppler shift from space charge repulsion of ions from the trap node line, novel multipole ion traps are now being developed where ions are weakly bound with confining fields that are effectively zero through the trap interior and grow rapidly near the trap electrode ``walls''.

  5. A Clock Directly Linking Time to a Particle's Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shau-Yu; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Estey, Brian; English, Damon; Brown, Justin M.; Hohensee, Michael A.; Müller, Holger

    2013-02-01

    Historically, time measurements have been based on oscillation frequencies in systems of particles, from the motion of celestial bodies to atomic transitions. Relativity and quantum mechanics show that even a single particle of mass m determines a Compton frequency ω0 = mc2/ℏ, where c is the speed of light and ℏ is Planck's constant h divided by 2π. A clock referenced to ω0 would enable high-precision mass measurements and a fundamental definition of the second. We demonstrate such a clock using an optical frequency comb to self-reference a Ramsey-Bordé atom interferometer and synchronize an oscillator at a subharmonic of ω0. This directly demonstrates the connection between time and mass. It allows measurement of microscopic masses with 4 × 10-9 accuracy in the proposed revision to SI units. Together with the Avogadro project, it yields calibrated kilograms.

  6. A clock directly linking time to a particle's mass.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shau-Yu; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Estey, Brian; English, Damon; Brown, Justin M; Hohensee, Michael A; Müller, Holger

    2013-02-01

    Historically, time measurements have been based on oscillation frequencies in systems of particles, from the motion of celestial bodies to atomic transitions. Relativity and quantum mechanics show that even a single particle of mass m determines a Compton frequency ω(0) = mc(2)/[formula: see text] where c is the speed of light and [formula: see text] is Planck's constant h divided by 2π. A clock referenced to ω(0) would enable high-precision mass measurements and a fundamental definition of the second. We demonstrate such a clock using an optical frequency comb to self-reference a Ramsey-Bordé atom interferometer and synchronize an oscillator at a subharmonic of ω(0.) This directly demonstrates the connection between time and mass. It allows measurement of microscopic masses with 4 × 10(-9) accuracy in the proposed revision to SI units. Together with the Avogadro project, it yields calibrated kilograms. PMID:23306441

  7. Constructive polarization modulation for coherent population trapping clock

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Peter Danet, Jean-Marie; Holleville, David; Clercq, Emeric de; Guérandel, Stéphane

    2014-12-08

    We propose a constructive polarization modulation scheme for atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT). In this scheme, the polarization of a bichromatic laser beam is modulated between two opposite circular polarizations to avoid trapping the atomic populations in the extreme Zeeman sublevels. We show that if an appropriate phase modulation between the two optical components of the bichromatic laser is applied synchronously, the two CPT dark states which are produced successively by the alternate polarizations add constructively. Measured CPT resonance contrasts up to 20% in one-pulse CPT and 12% in two-pulse Ramsey-CPT experiments are reported, demonstrating the potential of this scheme for applications to high performance atomic clocks.

  8. A clock directly linking time to a particle's mass.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shau-Yu; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Estey, Brian; English, Damon; Brown, Justin M; Hohensee, Michael A; Müller, Holger

    2013-02-01

    Historically, time measurements have been based on oscillation frequencies in systems of particles, from the motion of celestial bodies to atomic transitions. Relativity and quantum mechanics show that even a single particle of mass m determines a Compton frequency ω(0) = mc(2)/[formula: see text] where c is the speed of light and [formula: see text] is Planck's constant h divided by 2π. A clock referenced to ω(0) would enable high-precision mass measurements and a fundamental definition of the second. We demonstrate such a clock using an optical frequency comb to self-reference a Ramsey-Bordé atom interferometer and synchronize an oscillator at a subharmonic of ω(0.) This directly demonstrates the connection between time and mass. It allows measurement of microscopic masses with 4 × 10(-9) accuracy in the proposed revision to SI units. Together with the Avogadro project, it yields calibrated kilograms.

  9. Diversity of Human Clock Genotypes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoying; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The molecular clock consists of a number of genes that form transcriptional and post-transcriptional feedback loops, which function together to generate circadian oscillations that give rise to circadian rhythms of our behavioral and physiological processes. Genetic variations in these clock genes have been shown to be associated with phenotypic effects in a repertoire of biological processes, such as diurnal preference, sleep, metabolism, mood regulation, addiction, and fertility. Consistently, rodent models carrying mutations in clock genes also demonstrate similar phenotypes. Taken together, these studies suggest that human clock-gene variants contribute to the phenotypic differences observed in various behavioral and physiological processes, although to validate this requires further characterization of the molecular consequences of these polymorphisms. Investigating the diversity of human genotypes and the phenotypic effects of these genetic variations shall advance our understanding of the function of the circadian clock and how we can employ the clock to improve our overall health. PMID:23899594

  10. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  11. Future Laser-Cooled Microwave Clock Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibble, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    Limitations to the performance of laser-cooled earth and space-based Cs clocks will be critically discussed. The most significant limitation to the stability and accuracy of laser-cooled atomic clocks is the frequency shift due to cold collisions. Because of it, laser-cooled Cs clocks must be operated at low density and this implies that space based Cs clock performance will not be significantly better than earth based. To regain some of the high accuracy and stability lost to the low density, clocks can be designed to multiply launch (or juggle) atoms. Clocks based on other atoms, in particular Rb-87 or possibly Rb-85, may have much smaller cold collision frequency shifts and therefore be capable of higher stability and accuracy, especially in a space environment.

  12. 29 CFR 785.48 - Use of time clocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., that they do not engage in any work. Their early or late clock punching may be disregarded. Minor... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of time clocks. 785.48 Section 785.48 Labor Regulations... clocks. (a) Differences between clock records and actual hours worked. Time clocks are not required....

  13. 29 CFR 785.48 - Use of time clocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., that they do not engage in any work. Their early or late clock punching may be disregarded. Minor... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of time clocks. 785.48 Section 785.48 Labor Regulations... clocks. (a) Differences between clock records and actual hours worked. Time clocks are not required....

  14. 29 CFR 785.48 - Use of time clocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., that they do not engage in any work. Their early or late clock punching may be disregarded. Minor... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of time clocks. 785.48 Section 785.48 Labor Regulations... clocks. (a) Differences between clock records and actual hours worked. Time clocks are not required....

  15. 29 CFR 785.48 - Use of time clocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., that they do not engage in any work. Their early or late clock punching may be disregarded. Minor... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of time clocks. 785.48 Section 785.48 Labor Regulations... clocks. (a) Differences between clock records and actual hours worked. Time clocks are not required....

  16. 29 CFR 785.48 - Use of time clocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., that they do not engage in any work. Their early or late clock punching may be disregarded. Minor... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of time clocks. 785.48 Section 785.48 Labor Regulations... clocks. (a) Differences between clock records and actual hours worked. Time clocks are not required....

  17. The plant circadian clock looks like a traditional Japanese clock rather than a modern Western clock

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Yamashino, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle adaptation to seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature is a major determinant of the ecological success behind the widespread domestication of flowering plants. The circadian clock plays a role in the underlying mechanism for adaptation through generating endogenous rhythms that allow plants to adapt and adjust to both the 24 h diurnal rotation and 365 d seasonal revolution. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the circadian clock tracks seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature is a longstanding subject in the field. Recently, we have begun to understand the question of how the light and ambient temperature signals feed into the circadian clock transcriptional circuitry in day-night cycles in order to track seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature.1-4 Our results collectively indicate that the evening complex (EC) nighttime repressor consisting of LUX-ELF3-ELF4 plays a crucial role in this respect. Here, we discuss about these recent studies to add further implications. PMID:26382718

  18. The chlorate-iodine clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, André P; Faria, Roberto B

    2005-12-28

    A clock reaction produced by mixing chlorate and iodine solutions in perchloric acid media is reported. This is the first example of a clock reaction using chlorate as a reagent. Increasing chlorate and acid concentration reduces the induction period. Changing the initial iodine concentration does not affect the length of the induction period. The discovery of this clock reaction opens the possibility that a new family of oscillation reactions can be built using chlorate as reagent. PMID:16366551

  19. The Square Light Clock and Special Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, J. Ronald; Amiri, Farhang

    2012-01-01

    A thought experiment that includes a square light clock is similar to the traditional vertical light beam and mirror clock, except it is made up of four mirrors placed at a 45[degree] angle at each corner of a square of length L[subscript 0], shown in Fig. 1. Here we have shown the events as measured in the rest frame of the square light clock. By…

  20. Suppressing Loss of Ions in an Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An improvement has been made in the design of a compact, highly stable mercury- ion clock to suppress a loss of ions as they are transferred between the quadrupole and higher multipole ion traps. Such clocks are being developed for use aboard spacecraft for navigation and planetary radio science. The modification is also applicable to ion clocks operating on Earth: indeed, the success of the modification has been demonstrated in construction and operation of a terrestrial breadboard prototype of the compact, highly stable mercury-ion clock. Selected aspects of the breadboard prototype at different stages of development were described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The following background information is reviewed from previous articles: In this clock as in some prior ion clocks, mercury ions are shuttled between two ion traps, one a 16- pole linear radio-frequency trap, while the other is a quadrupole radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a 202Hg lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at approximately 40.507 GHz. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling that would otherwise be caused by collisions between clock atoms and the wall of a gas cell. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave-resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. This is similar to the operation of an atomic beam clock, except that with ions the beam can be halted and reversed as ions are shuttled back and forth between the two traps. When the two traps are driven at the same radio frequency, the strength of confinement can be reduced near the junction between the two traps, depending upon the relative phase of the RF voltage used to operate each of the two traps, and

  1. Experimental validation of clock synchronization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Graham, R. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to validate mathematically derived clock synchronization theories and their associated algorithms through experiment. Two theories are considered, the Interactive Convergence Clock Synchronization Algorithm and the Midpoint Algorithm. Special clock circuitry was designed and built so that several operating conditions and failure modes (including malicious failures) could be tested. Both theories are shown to predict conservative upper bounds (i.e., measured values of clock skew were always less than the theory prediction). Insight gained during experimentation led to alternative derivations of the theories. These new theories accurately predict the behavior of the clock system. It is found that a 100 percent penalty is paid to tolerate worst-case failures. It is also shown that under optimal conditions (with minimum error and no failures) the clock skew can be as much as three clock ticks. Clock skew grows to six clock ticks when failures are present. Finally, it is concluded that one cannot rely solely on test procedures or theoretical analysis to predict worst-case conditions.

  2. Song I-Yeong's Armillary Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Yong Sam

    In 1669 (the 10th year of the reign of King Hyeonjong), Song I-Yeong (宋以穎, 1619-1692), who was a professor of astronomy at Gwansanggam (Bureau of Astronomy), developed the armillary clock which uses the weight power system of an alarm clock. The armillary clock is a unique astronomical clock that combines the traditional armillary sphere of Joseon and the principle of a Western alarm clock. Song I-Yeong's armillary clock was repaired in 1687-1688 according to the records, and since then not much is known about the history of the armillary clock. After many years, in the early 1930s which was the Japanese colonial era, Inchon (仁村) Kim Seong-Su (金性洙, 1891-1955) purchased the armillary clock at the Insa-dong antique street and donated to the Korea University Museum of the present time (designated as National Treasure No. 230 in 1985). Currently, the armillary clock is not in operation because some of the parts are damaged or lost.

  3. TURNING BACK THE CLOCK: INFERRING THE HISTORY OF THE EIGHT O'CLOCK ARC

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Papovich, Casey; Rudnick, Gregory; Egami, Eiichi; Rieke, Marcia J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Rigby, Jane R.

    2009-07-20

    We present the results from an optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic study of the ultraviolet-luminous z = 2.73 galaxy, the 8 o'clock arc. Due to gravitational lensing, this galaxy is magnified by a factor of {mu} > 10, allowing in-depth measurements which are usually unfeasible at such redshifts. In the optical spectra, we measured the systemic redshift of the galaxy, z = 2.7322{+-} 0.0012, using stellar photospheric lines. This differs from the redshift of absorption lines in the interstellar medium, z = 2.7302 {+-} 0.0006, implying gas outflows on the order of 160 km s{sup -1}. With H- and K-band NIR spectra, we have measured nebular emission lines of H{alpha}, H{beta}, H{gamma}, [N II], and [O III], which have a redshift z = 2.7333 {+-} 0.0001, consistent with the derived systemic redshift. From the Balmer decrement, we measured the dust extinction in this galaxy to be A{sub 5500} = 1.17 {+-} 36 mag. Correcting the H{alpha} line flux for dust extinction as well as the assumed lensing factor, we measure a star formation rate (SFR) of {approx}270 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, which is higher than {approx}85% of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2-3. Using combinations of all detected emission lines, we find that the 8 o'clock arc has a gas-phase metallicity of {approx}0.8 Z{sub sun}, showing that enrichment at high redshift is not rare, even in blue, star-forming galaxies. Studying spectra from two of the arc components separately, we find that one component dominates both the dust extinction and SFR, although the metallicities between the two components are similar. We derive the mass via stellar population modeling, and find that the arc has a total stellar mass of {approx}4.2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, which falls on the mass-metallicity relation at z {approx} 2. Finally, we estimate the total gas mass, and find it to be only {approx}12% of the stellar mass, implying that the 8 o'clock arc is likely nearing the end of a starburst.

  4. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-11-15

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology.

  5. Gigabit Ethernet Asynchronous Clock Compensation FIFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duhachek, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Clock compensation for Gigabit Ethernet is necessary because the clock recovered from the 1.25 Gb/s serial data stream has the potential to be 200 ppm slower or faster than the system clock. The serial data is converted to 10-bit parallel data at a 125 MHz rate on a clock recovered from the serial data stream. This recovered data needs to be processed by a system clock that is also running at a nominal rate of 125 MHz, but not synchronous to the recovered clock. To cross clock domains, an asynchronous FIFO (first-in-first-out) is used, with the write pointer (wprt) in the recovered clock domain and the read pointer (rptr) in the system clock domain. Because the clocks are generated from separate sources, there is potential for FIFO overflow or underflow. Clock compensation in Gigabit Ethernet is possible by taking advantage of the protocol data stream features. There are two distinct data streams that occur in Gigabit Ethernet where identical data is transmitted for a period of time. The first is configuration, which happens during auto-negotiation. The second is idle, which occurs at the end of auto-negotiation and between every packet. The identical data in the FIFO can be repeated by decrementing the read pointer, thus compensating for a FIFO that is draining too fast. The identical data in the FIFO can also be skipped by incrementing the read pointer, which compensates for a FIFO draining too slowly. The unique and novel features of this FIFO are that it works in both the idle stream and the configuration streams. The increment or decrement of the read pointer is different in the idle and compensation streams to preserve disparity. Another unique feature is that the read pointer to write pointer difference range changes between compensation and idle to minimize FIFO latency during packet transmission.

  6. Deregulation of the circadian clock constitutes a significant factor in tumorigenesis: a clockwork cancer. Part I: clocks and clocking machinery

    PubMed Central

    Uth, Kristin; Sleigh, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Many physiological processes occur in a rhythmic fashion, consistent with a 24-h cycle. The central timing of the day/night rhythm is set by a master clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (a tiny region in the hypothalamus), but peripheral clocks exist in different tissues, adjustable by cues other than light (temperature, food, hormone stimulation, etc.), functioning autonomously to the master clock. Presence of unrepaired DNA damage may adjust the circadian clock so that the phase in which checking for damage and DNA repair normally occurs is advanced or extended. The expression of many of the genes coding for proteins functioning in DNA damage-associated response pathways and DNA repair is directly or indirectly regulated by the core clock proteins. Setting up the normal rhythm of the circadian cycle also involves oscillating changes in the chromatin structure, allowing differential activation of various chromatin domains within the 24-h cycle. PMID:26019503

  7. Tectonic blocks and molecular clocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales have mainly used fossils for calibrating molecular clocks, though fossils only really provide minimum clade age constraints. In their place, phylogenetic trees can be calibrated by precisely dated geological events that have shaped biogeography. However, tectonic episodes are protracted, their role in vicariance is rarely justified, the biogeography of living clades and their antecedents may differ, and the impact of such events is contingent on ecology. Biogeographic calibrations are no panacea for the shortcomings of fossil calibrations, but their associated uncertainties can be accommodated. We provide examples of how biogeographic calibrations based on geological data can be established for the fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent: (i) for the uplift of the Isthmus of Panama, (ii) the separation of New Zealand from Gondwana, and (iii) for the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Biogeographic and fossil calibrations are complementary, not competing, approaches to constraining molecular clock analyses, providing alternative constraints on the age of clades that are vital to avoiding circularity in investigating the role of biogeographic mechanisms in shaping modern biodiversity. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325840

  8. Single electron relativistic clock interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushev, P. A.; Cole, J. H.; Sholokhov, D.; Kukharchyk, N.; Zych, M.

    2016-09-01

    Although time is one of the fundamental notions in physics, it does not have a unique description. In quantum theory time is a parameter ordering the succession of the probability amplitudes of a quantum system, while according to relativity theory each system experiences in general a different proper time, depending on the system's world line, due to time dilation. It is therefore of fundamental interest to test the notion of time in the regime where both quantum and relativistic effects play a role, for example, when different amplitudes of a single quantum clock experience different magnitudes of time dilation. Here we propose a realization of such an experiment with a single electron in a Penning trap. The clock can be implemented in the electronic spin precession and its time dilation then depends on the radial (cyclotron) state of the electron. We show that coherent manipulation and detection of the electron can be achieved already with present day technology. A single electron in a Penning trap is a technologically ready platform where the notion of time can be probed in a hitherto untested regime, where it requires a relativistic as well as quantum description.

  9. Temperature influences in receiver clock modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Meindl, Michael; Rothacher, Markus; Schoenemann, Erik; Enderle, Werner

    2016-04-01

    In Precise Point Positioning (PPP), hardware delays at the receiver site (receiver, cables, antenna, …) are always difficult to be separated from the estimated receiver clock parameters. As a result, they are partially or fully contained in the estimated "apparent" clocks and will influence the deterministic and stochastic modelling of the receiver clock behaviour. In this contribution, using three years of data, the receiver clock corrections of a set of high-precision Hydrogen Masers (H-Masers) connected to stations of the ESA/ESOC network and the International GNSS Service (IGS) are firstly characterized concerning clock offsets, drifts, modified Allan deviations and stochastic parameters. In a second step, the apparent behaviour of the clocks is modelled with the help of a low-order polynomial and a known temperature coefficient (Weinbach, 2013). The correlations between the temperature and the hardware delays generated by different types of antennae are then analysed looking at daily, 3-day and weekly time intervals. The outcome of these analyses is crucial, if we intend to model the receiver clocks in the ground station network to improve the estimation of station-related parameters like coordinates, troposphere zenith delays and ambiguities. References: Weinbach, U. (2013) Feasibility and impact of receiver clock modeling in precise GPS data analysis. Dissertation, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.

  10. "Molecular Clock" Analogs: A Relative Rates Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Although molecular clock theory is a commonly discussed facet of evolutionary biology, undergraduates are rarely presented with the underlying information of how this theory is examined relative to empirical data. Here a simple contextual exercise is presented that not only provides insight into molecular clocks, but is also a useful exercise for…

  11. Fast Clock Recovery for Digital Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tell, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit extracts clock signal from random non-return-to-zero data stream, locking onto clock within one bit period at 1-gigabitper-second data rate. Circuit used for synchronization in opticalfiber communications. Derives speed from very short response time of gallium arsenide metal/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's).

  12. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  13. A blind circadian clock in cavefish reveals that opsins mediate peripheral clock photoreception.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Nicola; Frigato, Elena; Vallone, Daniela; Fröhlich, Nadine; Lopez-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Foà, Augusto; Berti, Roberto; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2011-09-01

    The circadian clock is synchronized with the day-night cycle primarily by light. Fish represent fascinating models for deciphering the light input pathway to the vertebrate clock since fish cell clocks are regulated by direct light exposure. Here we have performed a comparative, functional analysis of the circadian clock involving the zebrafish that is normally exposed to the day-night cycle and a cavefish species that has evolved in perpetual darkness. Our results reveal that the cavefish retains a food-entrainable clock that oscillates with an infradian period. Importantly, however, this clock is not regulated by light. This comparative study pinpoints the two extra-retinal photoreceptors Melanopsin (Opn4m2) and TMT-opsin as essential upstream elements of the peripheral clock light input pathway. PMID:21909239

  14. Direct detection of the 229Th nuclear clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B.; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Trautmann, Norbert G.; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2016-05-01

    Today’s most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of 229Th (denoted 229mTh). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for 229mTh2+. More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard.

  15. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  16. Direct detection of the (229)Th nuclear clock transition.

    PubMed

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E; Trautmann, Norbert G; Thirolf, Peter G

    2016-05-01

    Today's most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of (229)Th (denoted (229m)Th). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for (229m)Th(2+). More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard. PMID:27147026

  17. Direct detection of the (229)Th nuclear clock transition.

    PubMed

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E; Trautmann, Norbert G; Thirolf, Peter G

    2016-05-01

    Today's most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of (229)Th (denoted (229m)Th). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for (229m)Th(2+). More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard.

  18. High-precision atomic clocks with highly charged ions: Nuclear-spin-zero f12-shell ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Derevianko, A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2012-11-01

    Optical atomic clocks using highly charged ions hold an intriguing promise of metrology at the 19th significant figure. Here we study transitions within the 4f12 ground-state electronic configuration of highly charged ions. We consider isotopes lacking hyperfine structure and show that the detrimental effects of coupling of electronic quadrupole moments to the gradients of a trapping electric field can be effectively reduced by using specially chosen virtual clock transitions. The estimated systematic fractional clock accuracy is shown to be below 10-19.

  19. The Ozone-Iodine-Chlorate Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Monteiro, Emily V.; Pereira, Juliano R. T.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  20. The ozone-iodine-chlorate clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Monteiro, Emily V; Pereira, Juliano R T; Faria, Roberto B

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  1. Double-modulation CPT cesium compact clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Peter; Mejri, Sinda; Tricot, Francois; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Boudot, Rodolphe; de Clercq, Emeric; Guérandel, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Double-modulation coherent population trapping (CPT) is based on a synchronous modulation of Raman phase and laser polarization, which allows the atomic population to accumulate in a common dark state. The high contrast signal obtained on the clock transition with a relative compact and robust laser system is interesting as basis of a high performance microwave clock. Here we study the parameters of a double-modulation CPT Cs clock working in cw mode. The optimal polarization modulation frequency and cell temperature for maximum contrast of clock transition are investigated. The parameters of the detection are also studied. With the optimal parameters, we observe a CPT signal with contrast of 10% and linewidth of 492 Hz, which is well suited for implementing a cw atomic clock.

  2. Measurement of time by quantum clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Asher

    1980-07-01

    A clock is a dynamical system which passes through a succession of states at constant time intervals. If coupled to another system, it can measure the duration of a physical process and even keep a permanent record of it, such as in a time-of-flight experiment or in observing the lifetime of an unstable atom. A clock can also be used to control the duration of a process, e.g., the precession of a spin in a magnetic field which is turned on and off at prescribed times. This article shows how to construct time-independent Hamiltonians describing these possible uses of a quantum clock. As expected, a good time resolution entails a large energy exchange between the clock and the other system, thereby modifying the evolution of the latter. This evolution may even be halted by using a clock which is too precise (this is the quantum analog of Zeno's paradox).

  3. The ozone-iodine-chlorate clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Monteiro, Emily V; Pereira, Juliano R T; Faria, Roberto B

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions.

  4. Expression of clock proteins in developing tooth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago D; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Papagerakis, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation suggest that enamel and dentin formation is under circadian control. Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with periods of 24h that control diverse physiological and metabolic processes. Mammalian clock genes play a key role in synchronizing circadian functions in many organs. However, close to nothing is known on clock genes expression during tooth development. In this work, we investigated the expression of four clock genes during tooth development. Our results showed that circadian clock genes Bmal1, clock, per1, and per2 mRNAs were detected in teeth by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry showed that clock protein expression was first detected in teeth at the bell stage (E17), being expressed in EOE and dental papilla cells. At post-natal day four (PN4), all four clock proteins continued to be expressed in teeth but with different intensities, being strongly expressed within the nucleus of ameloblasts and odontoblasts and down-regulated in dental pulp cells. Interestingly, at PN21 incisor, expression of clock proteins was down-regulated in odontoblasts of the crown-analogue side but expression was persisting in root-analogue side odontoblasts. In contrast, both crown and root odontoblasts were strongly stained for all four clock proteins in first molars at PN21. Within the periodontal ligament (PDL) space, epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM) showed the strongest expression among other PDL cells. Our data suggests that clock genes might be involved in the regulation of ameloblast and odontoblast functions, such as enamel and dentin protein secretion and matrix mineralization.

  5. Laser Technology in Commercial Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwak, R.

    2006-05-01

    Commercial atomic frequency standards (AFS) are deployed in diverse civilian, military, and aerospace applications, ranging from high-precision measurement and calibration to navigation, communications and, of course, timekeeping. Currently, commercially available AFS include magnetically-selected cesium beam frequency standards and hydrogen masers and lamp-pumped rubidium oscillators. Despite the revolution in atomic physics and laboratory-scale AFS brought about by the advent of the tunable laser in the early 1970s, commercial AFS invariably rely on more conventional atomic physics technology developed in the 1950s. The reason for this lack of advancement of commercial AFS technology is the relatively poor reliability and environmental sensitivity of narrow-linewidth single-mode laser sources at atomic resonance wavelengths. Over the past 8 years, Symmetricom, in collaboration with laser manufacturers, has developed specialized laser sources for commercial AFS applications. These laser devices, optimized for high spectral purity and long-term reliability, will enable a new generation of commercial AFS. This talk will briefly describe two laser-based atomic frequency standard development programs at Symmetricom. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock, two orders of magnitude smaller and lower power than any commercial AFS, will enable atomic timing accuracy in portable battery-powered applications. The Optically-Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard, under development for deployment onboard the GPS-III satellite constellation, will provide enhanced short-term stability and longer lifetime compared to magnetically-selected cesium beam AFS.

  6. Precision Measurements with a Molecular Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew; McDonald, Mickey; McGuyer, Bart; Iwata, Geoffrey; Apfelbeck, Florian; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2015-05-01

    We report on recent results obtained with photoassociated Sr2 molecules confined in a lattice. Sr2 has a range of electronically excited bound states which are readily accessible with optical wavelengths using the narrow 1S0->3P1 intercombination line. As in Nat. Phys. 11, 32, we measure the lifetimes of the narrow, deeply-bound subradiant states in the 1g (1S0+3P1 dissociative limit) potential, allowing for coherent control of molecules and a comparison with theoretical predictions of the lifetimes and transition strengths of these states. Next, we study ultracold photodissociation of Sr2 molecules through abortion of one and two photons near the atomic intercombination line. This allows us to observe the vector character of transition elements through the angular dissociation pattern and to directly measure barrier heights in the excited state potentials. Finally, as shown in PRL 114, 023001, we demonstrate that in a non-magic lattice, a narrow transition can be used to measure the trapped gas temperature through the linewidth of the spectral feature corresponding to the carrier transitions. We use this technique to measure the temperature of Sr2 molecules to 10x higher precision than with standard techniques. We discuss future prospects with this molecular lattice clock. Funding from NIST, ARO, and NSF IGERT.

  7. Time clock requirements for hospital physicians.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Chen; Vilnai-Yavetz, Iris; Rafaeli, Anat; Zemel, Moran

    2016-06-01

    An agreement negotiated following a doctors' strike in 2011 introduced a requirement that physicians in Israel's public hospitals clock in and out when starting and leaving work. The press reported strong negative reactions to this policy and predicted doctors deserting hospitals en masse. This study examines physicians' reactions toward the clock-in/clock-out policy 6 months after its implementation, and assesses the relationship between these reactions and aspects of their employment context. 676 physicians in 42 hospitals responded to a survey assessing doctor's reactions toward the clock, hospital policy makers, and aspects of their work. Reactions to the clock were generally negative. Sense of calling correlated positively with negative reactions to the clock, and the latter correlated positively with quit intentions. However, overall, respondents reported a high sense of calling and low quit intentions. We suggest that sense of calling buffers and protects physicians from quit intentions. Differences in reactions to the clock were associated with different employment characteristics, but sense of calling did not vary by hospital size or type or by physicians' specialty. The findings offer insights into how physicians' working environment affects their reactions to regulatory interventions, and highlight medical professionalism as buffering reactions to unpopular regulatory policies. PMID:27142179

  8. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Laura E.; Hopwood, Thomas W.; Dickson, Suzanna H.; Walker, Amy L.; Loudon, Andrew S. I.; Ray, David W.; Bechtold, David A.; Gibbs, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    There is strong diurnal variation in the symptoms and severity of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, disruption of the circadian clock is an aggravating factor associated with a range of human inflammatory diseases. To investigate mechanistic links between the biological clock and pathways underlying inflammatory arthritis, mice were administered collagen (or saline as a control) to induce arthritis. The treatment provoked an inflammatory response within the limbs, which showed robust daily variation in paw swelling and inflammatory cytokine expression. Inflammatory markers were significantly repressed during the dark phase. Further work demonstrated an active molecular clock within the inflamed limbs and highlighted the resident inflammatory cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), as a potential source of the rhythmic inflammatory signal. Exposure of mice to constant light disrupted the clock in peripheral tissues, causing loss of the nighttime repression of local inflammation. Finally, the results show that the core clock proteins cryptochrome (CRY) 1 and 2 repressed inflammation within the FLSs, and provide novel evidence that a CRY activator has anti-inflammatory properties in human cells. We conclude that under chronic inflammatory conditions, the clock actively represses inflammatory pathways during the dark phase. This interaction has exciting potential as a therapeutic avenue for treatment of inflammatory disease.—Hand, L. E., Hopwood, T. W., Dickson, S. H., Walker, A. L., Loudon, A. S. I., Ray, D. W., Bechtold, D. A., Gibbs, J. E. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27488122

  9. Circadian clock system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoshitaka; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-02-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that functions as a central circadian oscillator in a variety of nonmammalian vertebrates. In many cases, the pineal gland retains photic input and endocrinal-output pathways both linked tightly to the oscillator. This contrasts well with the mammalian pineal gland equipped only with the output of melatonin production that is subject to neuronal regulation by central circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Molecular studies on animal clock genes were performed first in Drosophila and later developed in rodents. More recently, clock genes such as Per, Cry, Clock, and Bmal have been found in a variety of vertebrate clock structures including the avian pineal gland. The profiles of the temporal change of the clock gene expression in the avian pineal gland are more similar to those in the mammalian SCN rather than to those in the mammalian pineal gland. Avian pineal gland and mammalian SCN seem to share a fundamental molecular framework of the clock oscillator composed of a transcription/translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. The circadian time-keeping mechanism also requires several post-translational events, such as protein translocation and degradation processes, in which protein phosphorylation plays a very important role for the stable 24-h cycling of the oscillator and/or the photic-input pathway for entrainment of the clock. PMID:11890455

  10. THE MOLECULAR CLOCK AS A METABOLIC RHEOSTAT

    PubMed Central

    Perelis, Mark; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Bass, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks are biologic oscillators present in all photosensitive species that produce 24-hour cycles in the transcription of rate-limiting metabolic enzymes in anticipation of the light-dark cycle. In mammals, the clock drives energetic cycles to maintain physiologic constancy during the daily switch in behavioral (sleep/wake) and nutritional (fasting/feeding) states. A molecular connection between circadian clocks and tissue metabolism was first established with the discovery that 24-hour transcriptional rhythms are cell-autonomous and self-sustained in most tissues and comprise a robust temporal network throughout the body. A major window in understanding how the clock is coupled to metabolism was opened with discovery of metabolic syndrome pathologies in multi-tissue circadian mutant mice including susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Using conditional transgenesis and dynamic metabolic testing we have pinpointed tissue-specific roles of the clock in energy and glucose homeostasis, with our most detailed understanding of this process in endocrine pancreas. Here we review evidence for dynamic regulation of insulin secretion and oxidative metabolic functions by the clock transcription pathway to regulate homeostatic responses to feeding and fasting. These studies indicate that clock transcription is a determinant of tissue function and provide a reference for understanding molecular pathologies linking circadian desynchrony to metabolic disease. PMID:26332974

  11. [Molecular mechanisms of circadian clock functioning].

    PubMed

    Karbovskyĭ, L L; Minchenko, D O; Garmash, Ia A; Minchenko, O G

    2011-01-01

    Most physiological processes of all organisms are rhythmic with a period of about 24 h and are generated by an endogenous biological CLOCK present in all cells. However, there is also a central CLOCK--the primary circadian pacemaker which is localized in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the mammalian hypothalamus. Factors of groups Period (PER1, PER2 and PER3), BMAL (BMAL1 and BMAL2), CRYptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) as well as some other factors are the components of this circadian CLOCK system. Some of these genes contain E-box sequences and their expression is regulated by a transcription factor complex CLOCK-BMAL1. The enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of circadian gene products are also the components of circadian CLOCK system. These enzymes define CLOCK's work and determine the duration of circadian biorhythm and functional state of the whole organism. The most important of these enzymes are casein kinase-1epsilon and -1delta. We have analysed data about the interconnection between the circadian CLOCK system, cell cycle, and cancerogenesis as well as about the sensitivity of circadian gene expression to the action of toxic agents and nanomaterials.

  12. Time clock requirements for hospital physicians.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Chen; Vilnai-Yavetz, Iris; Rafaeli, Anat; Zemel, Moran

    2016-06-01

    An agreement negotiated following a doctors' strike in 2011 introduced a requirement that physicians in Israel's public hospitals clock in and out when starting and leaving work. The press reported strong negative reactions to this policy and predicted doctors deserting hospitals en masse. This study examines physicians' reactions toward the clock-in/clock-out policy 6 months after its implementation, and assesses the relationship between these reactions and aspects of their employment context. 676 physicians in 42 hospitals responded to a survey assessing doctor's reactions toward the clock, hospital policy makers, and aspects of their work. Reactions to the clock were generally negative. Sense of calling correlated positively with negative reactions to the clock, and the latter correlated positively with quit intentions. However, overall, respondents reported a high sense of calling and low quit intentions. We suggest that sense of calling buffers and protects physicians from quit intentions. Differences in reactions to the clock were associated with different employment characteristics, but sense of calling did not vary by hospital size or type or by physicians' specialty. The findings offer insights into how physicians' working environment affects their reactions to regulatory interventions, and highlight medical professionalism as buffering reactions to unpopular regulatory policies.

  13. The molecular clock as a metabolic rheostat.

    PubMed

    Perelis, M; Ramsey, K M; Bass, J

    2015-09-01

    Circadian clocks are biologic oscillators present in all photosensitive species that produce 24-h cycles in the transcription of rate-limiting metabolic enzymes in anticipation of the light-dark cycle. In mammals, the clock drives energetic cycles to maintain physiologic constancy during the daily switch in behavioural (sleep/wake) and nutritional (fasting/feeding) states. A molecular connection between circadian clocks and tissue metabolism was first established with the discovery that 24-h transcriptional rhythms are cell-autonomous and self-sustained in most tissues and comprise a robust temporal network throughout the body. A major window in understanding how the clock is coupled to metabolism was opened with discovery of metabolic syndrome pathologies in multi-tissue circadian mutant mice including susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Using conditional transgenesis and dynamic metabolic testing, we have pinpointed tissue-specific roles of the clock in energy and glucose homeostasis, with our most detailed understanding of this process in endocrine pancreas. Here, we review evidence for dynamic regulation of insulin secretion and oxidative metabolic functions by the clock transcription pathway to regulate homeostatic responses to feeding and fasting. These studies indicate that clock transcription is a determinant of tissue function and provide a reference for understanding molecular pathologies linking circadian desynchrony to metabolic disease.

  14. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  15. Microfabricated chip-scale rubidium plasma light source for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; de Rooij, Nico F; Shea, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    We present the microfabrication and characterization of a low-power, chip-scale Rb plasma light source, designed for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration is used to ignite a Rb plasma in a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell on which external indium electrodes were deposited. The device is electrically driven at frequencies between 1 and 36 MHz, and emits 140 μW of stable optical power while coupling less than 6 mW of electrical power to the discharge cell. Optical powers of up to 15 and 9 μW are emitted on the Rb D2 and D1 lines, respectively. Continuous operation of the light source for several weeks has been demonstrated, showing its capacity to maintain stable optical excitation of Rb atoms in chip-scale double-resonance atomic clocks.

  16. Microfabricated chip-scale rubidium plasma light source for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; de Rooij, Nico F; Shea, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    We present the microfabrication and characterization of a low-power, chip-scale Rb plasma light source, designed for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration is used to ignite a Rb plasma in a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell on which external indium electrodes were deposited. The device is electrically driven at frequencies between 1 and 36 MHz, and emits 140 μW of stable optical power while coupling less than 6 mW of electrical power to the discharge cell. Optical powers of up to 15 and 9 μW are emitted on the Rb D2 and D1 lines, respectively. Continuous operation of the light source for several weeks has been demonstrated, showing its capacity to maintain stable optical excitation of Rb atoms in chip-scale double-resonance atomic clocks. PMID:22481778

  17. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  18. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  19. Linear unbiased prediction of clock errors.

    PubMed

    Shmaliy, Yuriy S

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new formula for linear unbiased prediction of the local clock timescales. To predict future errors over all the measurement data, a new gain is derived for the p-step ramp unbiased finite impulse response (FIR) predictor. We then show that this gain gives the best linear unbiased fit suitable for forming the prediction vector. The predictor proposed is consistent with linear regression and best linear unbiased estimator. Applications are given for a crystal clock and the USNO Master Clock.

  20. Model of a mechanical clock escapement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, David; Wagner, John; Volk, Eugene

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical tower clock originated in Europe during the 14th century to sound hourly bells and later display hands on a dial. An important innovation was the escapement mechanism, which converts stored energy into oscillatory motion for fixed time intervals through the pendulum swing. Previous work has modeled the escapement mechanism in terms of inelastic and elastic collisions. We derive and experimentally verify a theoretical model in terms of impulsive differential equations for the Graham escapement mechanism in a Seth Thomas tower clock. The model offers insight into the clock's mechanical behavior and the functionality of the deadbeat escapement mechanism.

  1. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  2. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  3. Mutations in the circadian gene CLOCK in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alhopuro, Pia; Björklund, Mikael; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Turunen, Mikko; Tuupanen, Sari; Biström, Mia; Niittymäki, Iina; Lehtonen, Heli J; Kivioja, Teemu; Launonen, Virpi; Saharinen, Juha; Nousiainen, Kari; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Nuorva, Kyösti; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Järvinen, Heikki; Orntoft, Torben; Arango, Diego; Lehtonen, Rainer; Karhu, Auli; Taipale, Jussi; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2010-07-01

    The circadian clock regulates daily variations in physiologic processes. CLOCK acts as a regulator in the circadian apparatus controlling the expression of other clock genes, including PER1. Clock genes have been implicated in cancer-related functions; in this work, we investigated CLOCK as a possible target of somatic mutations in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancers. Combining microarray gene expression data and public gene sequence information, we identified CLOCK as 1 of 790 putative novel microsatellite instability (MSI) target genes. A total of 101 MSI colorectal carcinomas (CRC) were sequenced for a coding microsatellite in CLOCK. The effect of restoring CLOCK expression was studied in LS180 cells lacking wild-type CLOCK by stably expressing GST-CLOCK or glutathione S-transferase empty vector and testing the effects of UV-induced apoptosis and radiation by DNA content analysis using flow cytometry. Putative novel CLOCK target genes were searched by using ChIP-seq. CLOCK mutations occurred in 53% of MSI CRCs. Restoring CLOCK expression in cells with biallelic CLOCK inactivation resulted in protection against UV-induced apoptosis and decreased G(2)-M arrest in response to ionizing radiation. Using ChIP-Seq, novel CLOCK-binding elements were identified near DNA damage genes p21, NBR1, BRCA1, and RAD50. CLOCK is shown to be mutated in cancer, and altered response to DNA damage provides one plausible mechanism of tumorigenesis.

  4. Spin waves and collisional frequency shifts of a trapped-atom clock.

    PubMed

    Maineult, Wilfried; Deutsch, Christian; Gibble, Kurt; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2012-07-13

    We excite spin waves with spatially inhomogeneous Ramsey pulses and study the resulting frequency shifts of a chip-scale atomic clock of trapped 87Rb. The density-dependent frequency shifts of the hyperfine transition simulate the s-wave collisional frequency shifts of fermions, including those of optical lattice clocks. As the spin polarizations oscillate in the trap, the frequency shift reverses and it depends on the area of the second Ramsey pulse, exhibiting a predicted beyond mean-field frequency shift. Numerical and analytic models illustrate these observed behaviors. PMID:23030137

  5. The dynamic Allan Variance IV: characterization of atomic clock anomalies.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2015-05-01

    The number of applications where precise clocks play a key role is steadily increasing, satellite navigation being the main example. Precise clock anomalies are hence critical events, and their characterization is a fundamental problem. When an anomaly occurs, the clock stability changes with time, and this variation can be characterized with the dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). We obtain the DAVAR for a series of common clock anomalies, namely, a sinusoidal term, a phase jump, a frequency jump, and a sudden change in the clock noise variance. These anomalies are particularly common in space clocks. Our analytic results clarify how the clock stability changes during these anomalies.

  6. The dynamic Allan Variance IV: characterization of atomic clock anomalies.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2015-05-01

    The number of applications where precise clocks play a key role is steadily increasing, satellite navigation being the main example. Precise clock anomalies are hence critical events, and their characterization is a fundamental problem. When an anomaly occurs, the clock stability changes with time, and this variation can be characterized with the dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). We obtain the DAVAR for a series of common clock anomalies, namely, a sinusoidal term, a phase jump, a frequency jump, and a sudden change in the clock noise variance. These anomalies are particularly common in space clocks. Our analytic results clarify how the clock stability changes during these anomalies. PMID:25965674

  7. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    PubMed Central

    Zantke, Juliane; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Arboleda, Enrique; Lohs, Claudia; Schipany, Katharina; Hallay, Natalia; Straw, Andrew D.; Todo, Takeshi; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian) clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly) clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function. PMID:24075994

  8. The epigenetic language of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Sahar, Saurabh; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic control, which includes DNA methylation and histone modifications, leads to chromatin remodeling and regulated gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin constitutes a critical interface of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, and how these are interpreted by the cell to generate permissive or silenced states for transcription. CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Here we will discuss the evidence demonstrating that chromatin remodeling is at the crossroads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and cellular proliferation. PMID:23604474

  9. Spacetime and Quantum Propagation From Digital Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, Garnet. N.

    2013-09-01

    Minkowski spacetime predates quantum mechanics and is frequently regarded as an extension of the classical paradigm of Newtonian physics, rather than a harbinger of quantum mechanics. By inspecting how discrete clocks operate in a relativistic world we show that this view is misleading. Discrete relativistic clocks implicate classical spacetime provided a continuum limit is taken in such a way that successive ticks of the clock yield a smooth worldline. The classical picture emerges but does so by confining unitary propagation into spacetime regions between ticks that have zero area in the continuum limit. Clocks allowed a continuum limit that does not force inter-event intervals to zero, satisfy the Dirac equation. This strongly suggests that the origin of quantum propagation is to be found in the shift from Newton's absolute time to Minkowski's frame dependent time and is ultimately relativistic in origin.

  10. Biological clocks and the practice of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous biological clocks enable living species to acquire some independence in relation to time. They improve the efficiency of biological systems, by allowing them to anticipate future constraints on major physyological systems and cell energy metabolism. The temporal organization of a giwen biological function can be impaired in its coordination with astronomical time or with other biological function. There are also external conditions that influence biological clocks. This temporal organization is complex, and it is possible that a series of psychiatric disorders and syndromes involve primary or secondary changes in biological clocks: seasonal and other mood disorders, premenstrual syndromes, social jet lag, free-running rhythms, and several sleep disorders are among them. In this review, we describe the main concepts relevant to chronobiology and explore the relevance of knowledge about biological clocks to the clinical practice of psychiatry PMID:17969862

  11. Phase measurement system using a dithered clock

    DOEpatents

    Fairley, C.R.; Patterson, S.R.

    1991-05-28

    A phase measurement system is disclosed which measures the phase shift between two signals by dithering a clock signal and averaging a plurality of measurements of the phase differences between the two signals. 8 figures.

  12. Avian circadian organization: a chorus of clocks.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  13. Clock jitter generator with picoseconds resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Goran; Stojčev, Mile; Nikolić, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    The clock is one of the most critical signals in any synchronous system. As CMOS technology has scaled, supply voltages have dropped chip power consumption has increased and the effects of jitter due to clock frequency increase have become critical and jitter budget has become tighter. This article describes design and development of low-cost mixed-signal programmable jitter generator with high resolution. The digital technique is used for coarse-grain and an analogue technique for fine-grain clock phase shifting. Its structure allows injection of various random and deterministic jitter components in a controllable and programmable fashion. Each jitter component can be switched on or off. The jitter generator can be used in jitter tolerance test and jitter transfer function measurement of high-speed synchronous digital circuits. At operating system clock frequency of 220 MHz, a jitter with 4 ps resolution can be injected.

  14. Thermoplasticity in the plant circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    James, Allan B.; Syed, Naeem Hasan; Brown, John W. S.; Nimmo, Hugh G.

    2012-01-01

    In the March 2012 issue of The Plant Cell we describe extensive alternative splicing (AS) of Arabidopsis circadian clock genes. Notably these distinct post-transcriptional events associate with different steady-state temperatures and also with plants undergoing temperature transitions leading us to propose that temperature-associated AS is an additional mechanism involved in the operation and control of the plant circadian clock. Here we show that temperature associated AS also extends to REVEILLE 8 (RVE8), demonstrating a hitherto unrecognized link between the expression of this clock associated gene and temperature. Finally we discuss our observations of the plastic nature of clock gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in the context of the ongoing fascination of how plants respond to temperature. PMID:22902701

  15. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  16. Deep Space Atomic Clock Ticks Toward Success

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Todd Ely, principal investigator for NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spotlights the paradigm-busting innovations now in development to revol...

  17. Method and system for downhole clock synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-11-28

    A method and system for use in synchronizing at least two clocks in a downhole network are disclosed. The method comprises determining a total signal latency between a controlling processing element and at least one downhole processing element in a downhole network and sending a synchronizing time over the downhole network to the at least one downhole processing element adjusted for the signal latency. Electronic time stamps may be used to measure latency between processing elements. A system for electrically synchronizing at least two clocks connected to a downhole network comprises a controlling processing element connected to a synchronizing clock in communication over a downhole network with at least one downhole processing element comprising at least one downhole clock. Preferably, the downhole network is integrated into a downhole tool string.

  18. Cesium clocks keep the world on time

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, H.

    1985-09-01

    The development of timekeeping systems based on the natural resonance of cesium atoms is reviewed. The design of a typical cesium clock using a frequency lock servo is described. Some common applications of cesium beam frequency and time reference systems are discussed, including Navstar GPS navigation referencing; military satellite communications; and measurements of relative gravitational effects. The possibility of increasing timekeeping accuracies using improved cesium clock designs is evaluated.

  19. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows.

    PubMed

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds.Figure 1Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler.

  20. Reduced Kalman Filters for Clock Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the author's work ontimescales based on Kalman filters that act upon the clock comparisons. The natural Kalman timescale algorithm tends to optimize long-term timescale stability at the expense of short-term stability. By subjecting each post-measurement error covariance matrix to a non-transparent reduction operation, one obtains corrected clocks with improved short-term stability and little sacrifice of long-term stability.

  1. {sup 87}Sr Lattice Clock with Inaccuracy below 10{sup -15}

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Martin M.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Foreman, Seth M.; Ido, Tetsuya; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ye Jun

    2007-02-23

    Aided by ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy, the overall systematic uncertainty of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock resonance for lattice-confined {sup 87}Sr has been characterized to 9x10{sup -16}. This uncertainty is at a level similar to the Cs-fountain primary standard, while the potential stability for the lattice clocks exceeds that of Cs. The absolute frequency of the clock transition has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 874.0(1.1) Hz, where the 2.5x10{sup -15} fractional uncertainty represents the most accurate measurement of a neutral-atom-based optical transition frequency to date.

  2. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light–dark cycles (‘entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN—the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system. PMID:21119632

  3. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A A; Pedrazzoli, M; Koike, B D V; Tufik, S

    2010-01-01

    The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats) in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively) were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively). Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  4. Adipose Clocks: Burning the Midnight Oil.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Emma; Lamia, Katja A

    2015-10-01

    Circadian clocks optimize the timing of physiological processes in synchrony with daily recurring and therefore predictable changes in the environment. Until the late 1990s, circadian clocks were thought to exist only in the central nervous systems of animals; elegant studies in cultured fibroblasts and using genetically encoded reporters in Drosophila melanogaster and in mice showed that clocks are ubiquitous and cell autonomous. These findings inspired investigations of the advantages construed by enabling each organ to independently adjust its function to the time of day. Studies of rhythmic gene expression in several organs suggested that peripheral organ clocks might play an important role in optimizing metabolic physiology by synchronizing tissue-intrinsic metabolic processes to cycles of nutrient availability and energy requirements. The effects of clock disruption in liver, pancreas, muscle, and adipose tissues support that hypothesis. Adipose tissues coordinate energy storage and utilization and modulate behavior and the physiology of other organs by secreting hormones known as "adipokines." Due to behavior- and environment-driven diurnal variations in supply and demand for chemical and thermal energy, adipose tissues might represent an important peripheral location for coordinating circadian energy balance (intake, storage, and utilization) over the whole organism. Given the complexity of adipose cell types and depots, the sensitivity of adipose tissue biology to age and diet composition, and the plethora of known and yet-to-be-discovered adipokines and lipokines, we have just begun to scratch the surface of understanding the role of circadian clocks in adipose tissues.

  5. The Neurospora circadian clock: simple or complex?

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Pedersen, D; Crosthwaite, S K; Lakin-Thomas, P L; Merrow, M; Økland, M

    2001-01-01

    The fungus Neurospora crassa is being used by a number of research groups as a model organism to investigate circadian (daily) rhythmicity. In this review we concentrate on recent work relating to the complexity of the circadian system in this organism. We discuss: the advantages of Neurospora as a model system for clock studies; the frequency (frq), white collar-1 and white collar-2 genes and their roles in rhythmicity; the phenomenon of rhythmicity in null frq mutants and its implications for clock mechanisms; the study of output pathways using clock-controlled genes; other rhythms in fungi; mathematical modelling of the Neurospora circadian system; and the application of new technologies to the study of Neurospora rhythmicity. We conclude that there may be many gene products involved in the clock mechanism, there may be multiple interacting oscillators comprising the clock mechanism, there may be feedback from output pathways onto the oscillator(s) and from the oscillator(s) onto input pathways, and there may be several independent clocks coexisting in one organism. Thus even a relatively simple lower eukaryote can be used to address questions about a complex, networked circadian system. PMID:11710976

  6. The aging biological clock in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Case, Mary E; Griffith, James; Dong, Wubei; Tigner, Ira L; Gaines, Kimberly; Jiang, James C; Jazwinski, S Michal; Arnold, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The biological clock affects aging through ras-1 (bd) and lag-1, and these two longevity genes together affect a clock phenotype and the clock oscillator in Neurospora crassa. Using an automated cell-counting technique for measuring conidial longevity, we show that the clock-associated genes lag-1 and ras-1 (bd) are true chronological longevity genes. For example, wild type (WT) has an estimated median life span of 24 days, while the double mutant lag-1, ras-1 (bd) has an estimated median life span of 120 days for macroconidia. We establish the biochemical function of lag-1 by complementing LAG1 and LAC1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with lag-1 in N. crassa. Longevity genes can affect the clock as well in that, the double mutant lag-1, ras-1 (bd) can stop the circadian rhythm in asexual reproduction (i.e., banding in race tubes) and lengthen the period of the frequency oscillator to 41 h. In contrast to the ras-1 (bd), lag-1 effects on chronological longevity, we find that this double mutant undergoes replicative senescence (i.e., the loss of replication function with time), unlike WT or the single mutants, lag-1 and ras-1 (bd). These results support the hypothesis that sphingolipid metabolism links aging and the biological clock through a common stress response PMID:25535564

  7. Signal processing in cellular clocks.

    PubMed

    Forger, Daniel B

    2011-03-15

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(t), either two variables of a model or two experimentally measured time courses. We show how s(t) can be decomposed into two parts, the first being a function of r(t), and the second the derivative of a function of r(t). Geometric principles are then derived that can be used to understand when oscillations appear in biochemical feedback loops, the period of these oscillations, and their time course. Specific examples of this theory are provided that show how certain networks are prone or not prone to oscillate, how individual biochemical processes affect the period, and how oscillations in one chemical species can be deduced from oscillations in other parts of the network.

  8. Hydrogen Maser Clock (HMC) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hydrogen Maser Clock (HMC) project was originally conceived to fly on a reflight of the European Space Agency (ESA) free flying platform, the European Recoverable Carrier (EURECA) that had been launched into space and recovered by NASA's Space Transportation System (STS). A Phase B study for operation of HMC as one of the twelve EURECA payload components was begun in July 1991, and completed a year later. Phase C/D of HMC began in August 1992 and continued into early 1995. At that time ESA decided not to refly EURECA, leaving HMC without access to space. Approximately 80% of the flight support electronics are presently operating the HMC's physics package in a vacuum tank at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and are now considered to be well-tested flight electronics. The package will continue to be operated until the end of 1997 or until a flight opportunity becomes avaiable. Appendices: letters and trip report; proceedings of the symposium on frequency standards and metrology; milli-celsius-stability thermal control for an orbiting frequency standard.

  9. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  10. Al-free active region laser diodes at 894 nm for compact Cesium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Bandel, N.; Bébé Manga Lobé, J.; Garcia, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Lecomte, M.; Drisse, O.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Time-frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks optically pumped is a promising area that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of laser diodes that are used for atomic pumping. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for earth applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. We are in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852nm (D2 line). The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and larger spectral separation between lines in the 894nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "dark states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be insensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894nm wavelength is grounded on our previous results for 852nm DFB. Thus, we show our first results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well broad-area lasers (100μm width, with lengths ranging from 2mm to 4mm), for further DFB operation at 894nm. We obtained low internal losses below 2cm-1, the external differential efficiency is 0.49W/A with uncoated facets and a low threshold current density of 190A/cm², for 2mm lasers at 20°C.

  11. [The biological clock in health and illness].

    PubMed

    El-Ad, Baruch

    2006-06-01

    The biological clock in mammals is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The combined output of multiple neuronal cellular oscillators determines the master circadian rhythm, which paces the myriad periodic functions of the organism, including, to a certain degree, the sleep-wake rhythm. The intrinsic master circadian rhythm, which is slightly longer than 24 hours, is synchronized daily to the extrinsic 24-hour day by the entrainment process, governed mainly by exposure to the environmental light at specific times. The pineal hormone melatonin is a specific and sensitive marker of the circadian clock activity, and its secretion is tightly coupled to the output of the biological clock and the circadian phase. Chronobiology is a young scientific discipline which deals with research of the biological clocks and its implication to the clinical medicine. Circadian rhythm disorders are manifest mainly as inappropriate sleep-wake timing, and patients complain about various combinations of insomnia or excessive sleepiness at inappropriate times. Treatment of circadian rhythm disorders by sleeping pills or wake-promoting agents, without taking chronobiological considerations into account, may be futile, or even detrimental to a patient's well-being. The current issue of "Harefuah" includes a review by Doljansky and Dagan, which exemplifies the chronobiological approach to sleep-wake rhythm disturbances in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Adoption of this approach to other disorders of the circadian clock may benefit care of patients. PMID:16838899

  12. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  13. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity. PMID:20712885

  14. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes.

    PubMed

    Zanquetta, Melissa M; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Monteiro, Maria Beatriz; Villares, Sandra Mf

    2010-08-16

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity.

  15. Optical data latch

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  16. Evolutionary links between circadian clocks and photoperiodic diapause in insects.

    PubMed

    Meuti, Megan E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda-Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock's essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion.

  17. Raman transitions between hyperfine clock states in a magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naber, J. B.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; Hubert, T.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.

    2016-07-01

    We present our experimental investigation of an optical Raman transition between the magnetic clock states of 87Rb in an atom chip magnetic trap. The transfer of atomic population is induced by a pair of diode lasers which couple the two clock states off-resonantly to an intermediate state manifold. This transition is subject to destructive interference of two excitation paths, which leads to a reduction of the effective two-photon Rabi frequency. Furthermore, we find that the transition frequency is highly sensitive to the intensity ratio of the diode lasers. Our results are well described in terms of light shifts in the multilevel structure of 87Rb. The differential light shifts vanish at an optimal intensity ratio, which we observe as a narrowing of the transition linewidth. We also observe the temporal dynamics of the population transfer and find good agreement with a model based on the system's master equation and a Gaussian laser beam profile. Finally, we identify several sources of decoherence in our system, and discuss possible improvements.

  18. Susceptibility of Redundant Versus Singular Clock Domains Implemented in SRAM-Based FPGA TMR Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present the challenges that arise when using redundant clock domains due to their clock-skew. Radiation data show that a singular clock domain (DTMR) provides an improved TMR methodology for SRAM-based FPGAs over redundant clocks.

  19. Models of the Primordial Standard Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Wang, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Oscillating massive fields in the primordial universe can be used as Standard Clocks. The ticks of these oscillations induce features in the density perturbations, which directly record the time evolution of the scale factor of the primordial universe, thus if detected, provide a direct evidence for the inflation scenario or the alternatives. In this paper, we construct a full inflationary model of primordial Standard Clock and study its predictions on the density perturbations. This model provides a full realization of several key features proposed previously. We compare the theoretical predictions from inflation and alternative scenarios with the Planck 2013 temperature data on Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and identify a statistically marginal but interesting candidate. We discuss how future CMB temperature and polarization data, non-Gaussianity analysis and Large Scale Structure data may be used to further test or constrain the Standard Clock signals.

  20. Central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system of mammals is composed of a hierarchy of oscillators that function at the cellular, tissue, and systems levels. A common molecular mechanism underlies the cell-autonomous circadian oscillator throughout the body, yet this clock system is adapted to different functional contexts. In the central suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, a coupled population of neuronal circadian oscillators acts as a master pacemaker for the organism to drive rhythms in activity and rest, feeding, body temperature, and hormones. Coupling within the SCN network confers robustness to the SCN pacemaker, which in turn provides stability to the overall temporal architecture of the organism. Throughout the majority of the cells in the body, cell-autonomous circadian clocks are intimately enmeshed within metabolic pathways. Thus, an emerging view for the adaptive significance of circadian clocks is their fundamental role in orchestrating metabolism.

  1. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  2. Biogeographic calibrations for the molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y. W.; Tong, K. Jun; Foster, Charles S. P.; Ritchie, Andrew M.; Lo, Nathan; Crisp, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular estimates of evolutionary timescales have an important role in a range of biological studies. Such estimates can be made using methods based on molecular clocks, including models that are able to account for rate variation across lineages. All clock models share a dependence on calibrations, which enable estimates to be given in absolute time units. There are many available methods for incorporating fossil calibrations, but geological and climatic data can also provide useful calibrations for molecular clocks. However, a number of strong assumptions need to be made when using these biogeographic calibrations, leading to wide variation in their reliability and precision. In this review, we describe the nature of biogeographic calibrations and the assumptions that they involve. We present an overview of the different geological and climatic events that can provide informative calibrations, and explain how such temporal information can be incorporated into dating analyses. PMID:26333662

  3. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  4. Circadian clock: linking epigenetics to aging.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Solis, Ricardo; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by an intrinsic cellular mechanism that controls a large array of physiological and metabolic processes. There is erosion in the robustness of circadian rhythms during aging, and disruption of the clock by genetic ablation of specific genes is associated with aging-related features. Importantly, environmental conditions are thought to modulate the aging process. For example, caloric restriction is a very strong environmental effector capable of delaying aging. Intracellular pathways implicating nutrient sensors, such as SIRTs and mTOR complexes, impinge on cellular and epigenetic mechanisms that control the aging process. Strikingly, accumulating evidences indicate that these pathways are involved in both the modulation of the aging process and the control of the clock. Hence, innovative therapeutic strategies focused at controlling the circadian clock and the nutrient sensing pathways might beneficially influence the negative effects of aging. PMID:25033025

  5. Quantum clock: A critical discussion on spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burderi, Luciano; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Iaria, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    We critically discuss the measure of very short time intervals. By means of a Gedankenexperiment, we describe an ideal clock based on the occurrence of completely random events. Many previous thought experiments have suggested fundamental Planck-scale limits on measurements of distance and time. Here we present a new type of thought experiment, based on a different type of clock, that provide further support for the existence of such limits. We show that the minimum time interval Δ t that this clock can measure scales as the inverse of its size Δ r . This implies an uncertainty relation between space and time: Δ r Δ t >G ℏ/c4, where G , ℏ, and c are the gravitational constant, the reduced Planck constant, and the speed of light, respectively. We outline and briefly discuss the implications of this uncertainty conjecture.

  6. Clock shifts in the Unitary Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Richard; Man, Jay; Lopes, Raphael; Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Clock shifts are interaction-induced changes in the transition frequency between atomic spin states. So-called because of their importance as systematic errors in atomic clocks, they reveal details of both the interaction energy within a gas and the particle correlations. In this work, we employ a RF-injection technique to rapidly project a thermal Bose gas into the unitary regime on a timescale much shorter than three-body losses. Working with a two-state system, one of which exhibits strong intrastate interactions, we carry out Ramsey spectroscopy to extract the variation in the clock shift across a Feshbach resonance. Thanks to the relationship between these shifts and particle correlations, we use our measurements to infer the contact as a function of both interaction strength and degeneracy. This quantity plays a central role in the many-body physics of strongly correlated systems, offering a link between few-body and thermodynamic behaviour.

  7. Biogeographic calibrations for the molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Tong, K Jun; Foster, Charles S P; Ritchie, Andrew M; Lo, Nathan; Crisp, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Molecular estimates of evolutionary timescales have an important role in a range of biological studies. Such estimates can be made using methods based on molecular clocks, including models that are able to account for rate variation across lineages. All clock models share a dependence on calibrations, which enable estimates to be given in absolute time units. There are many available methods for incorporating fossil calibrations, but geological and climatic data can also provide useful calibrations for molecular clocks. However, a number of strong assumptions need to be made when using these biogeographic calibrations, leading to wide variation in their reliability and precision. In this review, we describe the nature of biogeographic calibrations and the assumptions that they involve. We present an overview of the different geological and climatic events that can provide informative calibrations, and explain how such temporal information can be incorporated into dating analyses.

  8. Rat retina shows robust circadian expression of clock and clock output genes in explant culture

    PubMed Central

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Malan, André; Sandu, Cristina; Jaeger, Catherine; Cipolla-Neto, José; Hicks, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Circadian rhythms are central to vision and retinal physiology. A circadian clock located within the retina controls various rhythmic processes including melatonin synthesis in photoreceptors. In the present study, we evaluated the rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock output genes in retinal explants maintained for several days in darkness. Methods Retinas were dissected from Wistar rats, either wild-type or from the Per1-luciferase transgenic line housed under a daily 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle (LD12/12), and put in culture at zeitgeber time (ZT) 12 on semipermeable membranes. Explants from wild-type rats were collected every 4 h over 3 days, and total RNA was extracted, quantified, and reverse transcribed. Gene expression was assessed with quantitative PCR, and the periodicity of the relative mRNA amounts was assessed with nonlinear least squares fitting to sine wave functions. Bioluminescence in explants from Per1-luciferase rats was monitored for several days under three different culture protocols. Results Rhythmic expression was found for all studied clock genes and for clock downstream targets such as c-fos and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) genes. Clock and output genes cycled with relatively similar periods and acrophases (peaks of expression during subjective night, except c-fos, which peaked around the end of the subjective day). Data for Per1 were confirmed with bioluminescence monitoring, which also permitted culture conditions to be optimized to study the retina clock. Conclusions Our work shows the free-running expression profile of multiple clock genes and potential clock targets in mammalian retinal explants. This research further strengthens the notion that the retina contains a self-sustained oscillator that can be functionally characterized in organotypic culture. PMID:24940028

  9. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system. PMID:25613754

  10. Quantum clock synchronization with a single qudit.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-23

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system.

  11. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system.

  12. The Large Water-Clock of Amphiaraeion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E.; Manimanis, V. N.; Katsiotis, M.; Mantarakis, P.

    2010-07-01

    A very well preserved ancient water-clock exists at the Amphiaraeion, in Oropos, Greece. The Amphiaraeion, sanctuary of the mythical oracle and deified healer Amphiaraus, was active from the pre-classic period until the 5th Century A.D. In such a place the measurement of time, both day and night, was a necessity. Therefore, time was kept with both a conical sundial and a water-clock in the shape of a fountain, which, according to the archaeologists, dates to the 4th Century B.C.

  13. Real clocks and the Zeno effect

    SciTech Connect

    Egusquiza, Inigo L.; Garay, Luis J.

    2003-08-01

    Real clocks are not perfect. This must have an effect in our predictions for the behavior of a quantum system, an effect for which we present a unified description, encompassing several previous proposals. We study the relevance of clock errors in the Zeno effect and find that generically no Zeno effect can be present (in such a way that there is no contradiction with currently available experimental data). We further observe that, within the class of stochasticities in time addressed here, there is no modification in emission line shapes.

  14. Water-Powered Astronomical Clock Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The construction of water-powered astronomical instruments was a long tradition of instrument making that started in the second century AD with Zhang Heng's water-powered celestial globe. The technology reached a peak when, in the eleventh century, Su Song and his team constructed the Water-Powered Astronomical Clock Tower which combined the armillary sphere, the celestial globe, and the time-keeping mechanism into a large automatic structure. Su Song's instrument contained a mechanism for controlling the water-powered movements of its wheels that amounts to an "escapement mechanism" for a mechanical clock. A new reconstruction of the mechanism is introduced in this chapter.

  15. Using GLONASS signal for clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouzhva, Yuri G.; Gevorkyan, Arvid G.; Bogdanov, Pyotr P.; Ovchinnikov, Vitaly V.

    1994-01-01

    Although in accuracy parameters GLONASS is correlated with GPS, using GLONASS signals for high-precision clock synchronization was, up to the recent time, of limited utility due to the lack of specialized time receivers. In order to improve this situation, in late 1992 the Russian Institute of Radionavigation and Time (RMT) began to develop a GLONASS time receiver using as a basis the airborne ASN-16 receiver. This paper presents results of estimating user clock synchronization accuracy via GLONASS signals using ASN-16 receiver in the direct synchronization and common-view modes.

  16. A relativistic analysis of clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The relativistic conversion between coordinate time and atomic time is reformulated to allow simpler time calculations relating analysis in solar-system barycentric coordinates (using coordinate time) with earth-fixed observations (measuring earth-bound proper time or atomic time.) After an interpretation of terms, this simplified formulation, which has a rate accuracy of about 10 to the minus 15th power, is used to explain the conventions required in the synchronization of a world wide clock network and to analyze two synchronization techniques-portable clocks and radio interferometry. Finally, pertinent experiment tests of relativity are briefly discussed in terms of the reformulated time conversion.

  17. The sympathy of two pendulum clocks: beyond Huygens' observations.

    PubMed

    Peña Ramirez, Jonatan; Olvera, Luis Alberto; Nijmeijer, Henk; Alvarez, Joaquin

    2016-03-29

    This paper introduces a modern version of the classical Huygens' experiment on synchronization of pendulum clocks. The version presented here consists of two monumental pendulum clocks--ad hoc designed and fabricated--which are coupled through a wooden structure. It is demonstrated that the coupled clocks exhibit 'sympathetic' motion, i.e. the pendula of the clocks oscillate in consonance and in the same direction. Interestingly, when the clocks are synchronized, the common oscillation frequency decreases, i.e. the clocks become slow and inaccurate. In order to rigorously explain these findings, a mathematical model for the coupled clocks is obtained by using well-established physical and mechanical laws and likewise, a theoretical analysis is conducted. Ultimately, the sympathy of two monumental pendulum clocks, interacting via a flexible coupling structure, is experimentally, numerically, and analytically demonstrated.

  18. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  19. The sympathy of two pendulum clocks: beyond Huygens' observations.

    PubMed

    Peña Ramirez, Jonatan; Olvera, Luis Alberto; Nijmeijer, Henk; Alvarez, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a modern version of the classical Huygens' experiment on synchronization of pendulum clocks. The version presented here consists of two monumental pendulum clocks--ad hoc designed and fabricated--which are coupled through a wooden structure. It is demonstrated that the coupled clocks exhibit 'sympathetic' motion, i.e. the pendula of the clocks oscillate in consonance and in the same direction. Interestingly, when the clocks are synchronized, the common oscillation frequency decreases, i.e. the clocks become slow and inaccurate. In order to rigorously explain these findings, a mathematical model for the coupled clocks is obtained by using well-established physical and mechanical laws and likewise, a theoretical analysis is conducted. Ultimately, the sympathy of two monumental pendulum clocks, interacting via a flexible coupling structure, is experimentally, numerically, and analytically demonstrated. PMID:27020903

  20. Timescale algorithms combining cesium clocks and hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakiron, Lee A.

    1992-01-01

    The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) atomic timescale, formerly based on an ensemble of cesium clocks, is now produced by an ensemble of cesium clocks and hydrogen masers. In order to optimize stability and reliability, equal clock weighting has been replaced by a procedure reflecting the relative, time-varying noise characteristics of the two different types of clocks. Correlation of frequency drift is required, and residual drift is avoided by the eventual complete deweighting of the masers.

  1. Orientation-Dependent Entanglement Lifetime in a Squeezed Atomic Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.; Vuletic, Vladan

    2010-06-25

    We study experimentally the application of a class of entangled states, squeezed spin states, to the improvement of atomic-clock precision. In the presence of anisotropic noise, the entanglement lifetime is strongly dependent on squeezing orientation. We measure the Allan deviation spectrum of a clock operated with a phase-squeezed input state. For averaging times up to 50 s the squeezed clock achieves a given precision 2.8(3) times faster than a clock operating at the standard quantum limit.

  2. Clocking Femtosecond X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Mills, D M; Pahl, R; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Lowney, D P; MacPhee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Calleman, C; Huldt, G; der Spoel, D v; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Hastings, J B

    2004-10-08

    The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) produces the brightest ultrafast x-ray pulses in the world, and is the first to employ compressed femtosecond electron bunches for the x-ray source. Both SPPS and future X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL's) will use precise measurements of individual electron bunches to time the arrival of x-ray pulses for time-resolved experiments. At SPPS we use electro-optic sampling (EOS) to perform these measurements. Here we present the first results using this method. An ultrafast laser pulse (135 fs) passes through an electro-optic crystal adjacent to the electron beam. The refractive index of the crystal is distorted by the strong electromagnetic fields of the ultra-relativistic electrons, and this transient birefringence is imprinted on the laser polarization. A polarizer decodes this signal, producing a time-dependent image of the compressed electron bunch. Our measurements yield the relative timing between an ultrafast optical laser and an ultrafast x-ray pulse to within 60 fs, making it possible to use the SPPS to observe atomic-scale ultrafast dynamics initiated by laser-matter interaction.

  3. Status of the atomic fountain clock at the National Research Council of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Alcock, J.; Jian, B.; Gertsvolf, M.; Bernard, J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the rapid advances in optical frequency standards, caesium fountain clocks retain a critical role as the most accurate primary frequency standards available. At the National Research Council Canada, we are working to develop a second generation caesium fountain clock. Work is currently underway to improve several systems of FCs1, such as the laser system and microwave local oscillator, which will be incorporated into its refurbished version, FCs2. In addition, we have added an optical pumping stage which has increased the detected atom number by over a factor of six. In collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), we are planning on replacing the physics package of FCs1. We will report on several recent improvements to FCs1, along with our progress in the development of FCs2.

  4. Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) clock program: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennant, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) program status are discussed and plans for ensuring the long term continuation of the program are presented. Performance of GPS clocks is presented in terms of on orbit data as portrayed by GPS master control station kalman filter processing. The GPS Clock reliability program is reviewed in depth and future plans fo the overall clock program are published.

  5. Evolutionary Links Between Circadian Clocks and Photoperiodic Diapause in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Megan E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda–Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock’s essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion. PMID:23615363

  6. Superradiance on the mHz linewidth clock transition in 87Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcia, Matthew; Winchester, Matthew; Cline, Julia; Thompson, James

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, I will discuss our recent experimental explorations of superradiant emission from the mHz linewidth clock transition in an ensemble of cold 87 Sr atoms confined within a high-finesse optical cavity. Recent proposals suggest that superradiant lasers based on such dipole-forbidden transitions in alkaline earth atoms could achieve linewidths below the current state of the art, with reduced sensitivity to environmental perturbations.

  7. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address.

  8. Biochemical basis for the biological clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Pletcher, Jake; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Lian-Ying; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    NADH oxidases at the external surface of plant and animal cells (ECTO-NOX proteins) exhibit stable and recurring patterns of oscillations with potentially clock-related, entrainable, and temperature-compensated period lengths of 24 min. To determine if ECTO-NOX proteins might represent the ultradian time keepers (pacemakers) of the biological clock, COS cells were transfected with cDNAs encoding tNOX proteins having a period length of 22 min or with C575A or C558A cysteine to alanine replacements having period lengths of 36 or 42 min. Here we demonstrate that such transfectants exhibited 22, 36, or 40 to 42 h circadian patterns in the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a common clock-regulated protein, in addition to the endogenous 24 h circadian period length. The fact that the expression of a single oscillatory ECTO-NOX protein determines the period length of a circadian biochemical marker (60 X the ECTO-NOX period length) provides compelling evidence that ECTO-NOX proteins are the biochemical ultradian drivers of the cellular biological clock.

  9. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25310406

  10. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  11. Tick Tock, a Vitamin C Clock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity that uses supermarket chemicals to perform a clock reaction in which the endpoint is signaled by an abrupt change in the appearance from colorless to blue-black. This activity can be used to explore reaction kinetics and the effect of reactant concentrations on the apparent rate of reaction. (DDR)

  12. European plans for new clocks in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leschiutta, Sigfrido M.; Tavella, Patrizia

    1995-01-01

    An outline of the future European space research program where precise clocks are necessary is presented, pointing out how space applications are posing impressive requirements as regards clock mass, power, ruggedness, long life, accuracy and, in some cases, spectral purity. The material presented was gathered in some laboratories; useful information was obtained from the Space Agencies of France (CNES), Germany (DARA) and Italy (ASI), but the bulk is coming from a recent exercise promoted inside ESA (the European Space Agency) and aimed to prefigure space research activities at the beginning of the next millennium. This exercise was called Horizon 2000 plus; the outcomings were summarized in two reports, presented by ESA in may 1994. Precise clocks and time measurements are needed not only for deep-space or out-ward space missions, but are essential tools also for Earth oriented activities. In this latter field, the European views and needs were discussed in October 1994, in a meeting organized by ESA and devoted to Earth Observation problems. By a scrutiny of these reports, an analysis was performed on the missions requiring a precise clock on board and the driving requirements were pointed out, leading to a survey of the necessary PTTI developments that, to some extent, are in the realm of possibility but that pose serious challenges. In this report the use of frequency standards in the satellite navigation systems is not considered.

  13. Clock Synchronization for Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis Robles, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, more so generally than in other types of distributed systems, clock synchronization is crucial since by having this service available, several applications such as media access protocols, object tracking, or data fusion, would improve their performance. In this dissertation, we propose a set of algorithms to achieve…

  14. The mammalian retina as a clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  15. Current Status of the Molecular Clock Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Molecular genetics is a rapidly changing field with new developments almost from day to day. One interesting hypothesis that has come from everyone's ability to sequence proteins and/or genes is that of the molecular clock. This hypothesis postulates that homologous sequences of DNA and thus macro molecules evolve at a constant and invariable rate…

  16. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies.

  17. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  18. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, A; Perreau-Lenz, S; Buijs, R M

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each of which is dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock producing a coherent output that is able to time all the different daily changes in behavior and physiology. We investigated which anatomical connections and neurotransmitters are used by the biological clock to control the daily release pattern of a number of hormones. The picture that emerged shows projections contacting target neurons in the medial hypothalamus surrounding the SCN. The activity of these pre-autonomic and neuro-endocrine target neurons is controlled by differentially timed waves of, among others, vasopressin, GABA, and glutamate release from SCN terminals. Together our data indicate that, with regard to the timing of their main release period within the light-dark (LD) cycle, at least 4 subpopulations of SCN neurons should be discerned. The different subgroups do not necessarily follow the phenotypic differences among SCN neurons. Thus, different subgroups can be found within neuron populations containing the same neurotransmitter. Remarkably, a similar distinction of 4 differentially timed subpopulations of SCN neurons was recently also discovered in experiments determining the temporal patterns of rhythmicity in individual SCN neurons by way of the electrophysiology or clock gene expression. Moreover, the specialization of the SCN may go as far as a single body structure; i.e., the SCN seems to contain neurons that specifically target the liver, pineal, and adrenal. PMID:16687294

  19. Clock gene variants differentiate mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika Paulina; Pawlak, Joanna Maria; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Moczko, Jerzy; Wilkosc, Monika; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Zaremba, Dorota; Hauser, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in clock-related genes were hypothesized to be involved to in the susceptibility of mood disorders MD (both unipolar (UPD) and bipolar (BPD) disorders). In our work we investigated role of gene variants form four core period proteins: CLOCK, ARNTL, TIM and PER3. The total sample comprised from 744 mood disorders inpatients (UPD = 229, BPD = 515) and 635 healthy voluntary controls. The 42 SNPs from four genes of interest were genotyped. We used single polymorphisms, haplotypes, SNPs interactions and prediction analysis using classical statistical and machine learning methods. We observed association between two polymorphisms of CLOCK (rs1801260 and rs11932595) with BPDII and two polymorphisms of TIM (rs2291739, rs11171856) with UPD. We also detected ARNTL haplotype variant (rs1160996C/rs11022779G/rs1122780T) to be associated with increased risk of MD, BPD (both types). We established significant epistatic interaction between PER3 (rs2172563) and ARNTL (rs4146388 and rs7107287) in case of BPD. Additionally relation between PER3 (rs2172563) and CLOCK (rs1268271 and rs3805148) appeared in case of UPD. Classification and Regression Trees (C and RT) showed significant predictive value for 10 polymorphisms in all analyzed genes. However we failed to obtain model with sufficient predictive power. During analyses of sleep disturbances sample, we found carriers of homozygote variants (ARNTL: rs11022778 TT, rs1562438 TT, rs1982350 AA and PER3: rs836755 CC) showing more frequent falling asleep difficulties when compare to other genotypes carriers. Our study suggested a putative role of the CLOCK, TIM, ARNTL and PER3 and polymorphisms in MD susceptibility. In our analyses we showed association of specific gene variants with particular types of MD. We also confirmed necessity of performing separate analyzes for BPD and UPD patients. Comprehensive statistical approach is required even with individual symptoms analyses.

  20. Maximum likelihood molecular clock comb: analytic solutions.

    PubMed

    Chor, Benny; Khetan, Amit; Snir, Sagi

    2006-04-01

    Maximum likelihood (ML) is increasingly used as an optimality criterion for selecting evolutionary trees, but finding the global optimum is a hard computational task. Because no general analytic solution is known, numeric techniques such as hill climbing or expectation maximization (EM), are used in order to find optimal parameters for a given tree. So far, analytic solutions were derived only for the simplest model--three taxa, two state characters, under a molecular clock. Four taxa rooted trees have two topologies--the fork (two subtrees with two leaves each) and the comb (one subtree with three leaves, the other with a single leaf). In a previous work, we devised a closed form analytic solution for the ML molecular clock fork. In this work, we extend the state of the art in the area of analytic solutions ML trees to the family of all four taxa trees under the molecular clock assumption. The change from the fork topology to the comb incurs a major increase in the complexity of the underlying algebraic system and requires novel techniques and approaches. We combine the ultrametric properties of molecular clock trees with the Hadamard conjugation to derive a number of topology dependent identities. Employing these identities, we substantially simplify the system of polynomial equations. We finally use tools from algebraic geometry (e.g., Gröbner bases, ideal saturation, resultants) and employ symbolic algebra software to obtain analytic solutions for the comb. We show that in contrast to the fork, the comb has no closed form solutions (expressed by radicals in the input data). In general, four taxa trees can have multiple ML points. In contrast, we can now prove that under the molecular clock assumption, the comb has a unique (local and global) ML point. (Such uniqueness was previously shown for the fork.).

  1. Circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) central and peripheral tissues: influence of different lighting and feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Leandro S; Serrano, Ignacio; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco J; López-Olmeda, Jose F

    2016-08-01

    The present research aimed to investigate the existence of clock gene expression rhythms in tilapia, their endogenous origin, and how light and feeding cycles synchronize these rhythms. In the first experiment, two groups of fish were kept under an LD cycle and fed at two different time points: in the middle of the light (ML) or in the middle of the dark (MD) phase. In the second experiment, fish fed at ML was fasted and kept under constant lighting (LL) conditions for 1 day. In both experiments, the samples from central (optic tectum and hypothalamus) and peripheral (liver) tissues were collected every 3 h throughout a 24 h cycle. The expression levels of clock genes bmal1a, clock1, per1b, cry2a, and cry5 were analyzed by quantitative PCR. All the clock genes analyzed in brain regions showed daily rhythms: clock1, bmal1a, and cry2a showed the acrophase approximately at the end of the light phase (ZT 8:43-11:22 h), whereas per1b and cry5 did so between the end of the dark phase and the beginning of the light phase, respectively (ZT 21:16-4:00 h). These rhythms persisted under constant conditions. No effect of the feeding time was observed in the brain. In the liver, however, the rhythms of clock1 and cry5 were influenced by feeding, and a shift was observed in the MD fish group (ZT 3:58 h for clock1 and 11:20 h for cry5). This study provides the first insights into the molecular clock of tilapia, a very important fish species for aquaculture. It also reveals the endogenous origin of clock gene rhythms and the ability of feeding time to shift the phase in some clock genes in the peripheral, but not the central, oscillator. PMID:27085855

  2. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  3. Field operations with cesium clocks in HF navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, E. H.; Clayton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Networks of HF phase comparison marine navigation stations employing cesium clocks are discussed. The largest permanent network is in the Gulf of Mexico where some fourteen base stations are continuously active and others are activated as needed. These HF phase comparison systems, which operate on a single transmission path, require a clock on the mobile unit as well. Inventory consists of upwards of 70 clocks from two different manufacturers. The maintenance of this network as an operating system requires a coordinated effort involving clock preparation, clock environment control, station performance monitoring and field service.

  4. Suppression of Clock Shifts at Magnetic-Field-Insensitive Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K. J.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We show that it is possible to significantly reduce rank 2 tensor shifts of a clock transition by operating at a judiciously chosen magnetic-field-insensitive point. In some cases shifts are almost completely eliminated making the transition an effective J =0 to J =0 candidate. This significantly improves the feasibility of a recent proposal for clock operation with large ion crystals. For such multi-ion clocks, geometric constraints and selection rules naturally divide clock operation into two categories based on the orientation of the magnetic field. We discuss the limitations imposed on each type and how calibrations might be carried out for clock operation.

  5. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  6. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter; Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong; Gu, Sihong

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  7. Circadian and ultradian rhythms of clock gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the temporal order of physiology and behavior is primarily regulated by the circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Rhythms are generated in cells by an auto-regulatory transcription/translation feedback loop, composed of several clock genes and their protein products. Taking advantage of bioluminescence reporters, we have succeeded in continuously monitoring the expression of clock gene reporters Per1-luc, PER2::LUC and Bmal1-ELuc in the SCN of freely moving mice for up to 3 weeks in constant darkness. Bioluminescence emitted from the SCN was collected with an implanted plastic optical fiber which was connected to a cooled photomultiplier tube. We found robust circadian rhythms in the clock gene expression, the phase-relation of which were the same as those observed ex vivo. The circadian rhythms were superimposed by episodic bursts which had ultradian periods of approximately 3.0 h. Episodic bursts often accompanied activity bouts, but stoichiometric as well as temporal analyses revealed no causality between them. Clock gene expression in the SCN in vivo is regulated by the circadian pacemaker and ultradian rhythms of unknown origin. PMID:26194231

  8. Molecular-clock methods for estimating evolutionary rates and timescales.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Duchêne, Sebastián

    2014-12-01

    The molecular clock presents a means of estimating evolutionary rates and timescales using genetic data. These estimates can lead to important insights into evolutionary processes and mechanisms, as well as providing a framework for further biological analyses. To deal with rate variation among genes and among lineages, a diverse range of molecular-clock methods have been developed. These methods have been implemented in various software packages and differ in their statistical properties, ability to handle different models of rate variation, capacity to incorporate various forms of calibrating information and tractability for analysing large data sets. Choosing a suitable molecular-clock model can be a challenging exercise, but a number of model-selection techniques are available. In this review, we describe the different forms of evolutionary rate heterogeneity and explain how they can be accommodated in molecular-clock analyses. We provide an outline of the various clock methods and models that are available, including the strict clock, local clocks, discrete clocks and relaxed clocks. Techniques for calibration and clock-model selection are also described, along with methods for handling multilocus data sets. We conclude our review with some comments about the future of molecular clocks.

  9. The sympathy of two pendulum clocks: beyond Huygens’ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Ramirez, Jonatan; Olvera, Luis Alberto; Nijmeijer, Henk; Alvarez, Joaquin

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a modern version of the classical Huygens’ experiment on synchronization of pendulum clocks. The version presented here consists of two monumental pendulum clocks—ad hoc designed and fabricated—which are coupled through a wooden structure. It is demonstrated that the coupled clocks exhibit ‘sympathetic’ motion, i.e. the pendula of the clocks oscillate in consonance and in the same direction. Interestingly, when the clocks are synchronized, the common oscillation frequency decreases, i.e. the clocks become slow and inaccurate. In order to rigorously explain these findings, a mathematical model for the coupled clocks is obtained by using well-established physical and mechanical laws and likewise, a theoretical analysis is conducted. Ultimately, the sympathy of two monumental pendulum clocks, interacting via a flexible coupling structure, is experimentally, numerically, and analytically demonstrated.

  10. Pressure sensitivity of the vapor-cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Iyanu, Gebriel; Wang, He; Camparo, James

    2009-06-01

    Although atomic clocks have very low levels of frequency instability, they are nonetheless sensitive (albeit slightly) to various environmental parameters, including temperature, power supply voltage, and dc magnetic fields. In the terrestrial environment, however, atmospheric pressure (i.e., the air's molecular density) is not generally included in this list, because the air's density variations near the surface of the earth will typically have a negligible effect on the clock's performance. The situation is different, however, for clocks onboard satellites like Galileo, where manufacturing and testing are done at atmospheric pressure, while operation is in vacuum. The pressure sensitivity of atomic clocks, in particular vapor-cell atomic clocks, can therefore be of significance. Here, we discuss some of the ways in which changes in atmospheric pressure affect vapor-cell atomic clocks, and we demonstrate that, for one device, the pressure-sensitivity traces back to a pressure-induced change in the temperature of the clock's filter and resonance cells.

  11. The sympathy of two pendulum clocks: beyond Huygens’ observations

    PubMed Central

    Peña Ramirez, Jonatan; Olvera, Luis Alberto; Nijmeijer, Henk; Alvarez, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a modern version of the classical Huygens’ experiment on synchronization of pendulum clocks. The version presented here consists of two monumental pendulum clocks—ad hoc designed and fabricated—which are coupled through a wooden structure. It is demonstrated that the coupled clocks exhibit ‘sympathetic’ motion, i.e. the pendula of the clocks oscillate in consonance and in the same direction. Interestingly, when the clocks are synchronized, the common oscillation frequency decreases, i.e. the clocks become slow and inaccurate. In order to rigorously explain these findings, a mathematical model for the coupled clocks is obtained by using well-established physical and mechanical laws and likewise, a theoretical analysis is conducted. Ultimately, the sympathy of two monumental pendulum clocks, interacting via a flexible coupling structure, is experimentally, numerically, and analytically demonstrated. PMID:27020903

  12. Controlling the Cyanobacterial Clock by Synthetically Rewiring Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Lambert, Guillaume; Bernat, Kevin; Rust, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks are oscillatory systems and allow organisms to anticipate rhythmic changes in the environment. Several studies have shown that circadian clocks are connected to metabolism, but it is not generally clear whether metabolic signaling is one voice among many that influence the clock, or whether metabolic cycling is the major clock synchronizer. To address this question in cyanobacteria, we used a synthetic biology approach to make normally autotrophic cells capable of growth on exogenous sugar. This allowed us to manipulate metabolism independently from the light and dark. We found that feeding sugar to cultures blocked the clock-resetting effect of a dark pulse. Further, in the absence of light, the clock efficiently synchronizes to metabolic cycles driven by rhythmic feeding. We conclude that metabolic activity, independent of its source, is the primary clock driver in cyanobacteria. PMID:26686627

  13. Circadian expression of clock and putative clock-controlled genes in skeletal muscle of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ian P G; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    To identify circadian patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle, adult male zebrafish were acclimated for 2 wk to a 12:12-h light-dark photoperiod and then exposed to continuous darkness for 86 h with ad libitum feeding. The increase in gut food content associated with the subjective light period was much diminished by the third cycle, enabling feeding and circadian rhythms to be distinguished. Expression of zebrafish paralogs of mammalian transcriptional activators of the circadian mechanism (bmal1, clock1, and rora) followed a rhythmic pattern with a ∼24-h periodicity. Peak expression of rora paralogs occurred at the beginning of the subjective light period [Zeitgeber time (ZT)07 and ZT02 for roraa and rorab], whereas the highest expression of bmal1 and clock paralogs occurred 12 h later (ZT13-15 and ZT16 for bmal and clock paralogs). Expression of the transcriptional repressors cry1a, per1a/1b, per2, per3, nr1d2a/2b, and nr1d1 also followed a circadian pattern with peak expression at ZT0-02. Expression of the two paralogs of cry2 occurred in phase with clock1a/1b. Duplicated genes had a high correlation of expression except for paralogs of clock1, nr1d2, and per1, with cry1b showing no circadian pattern. The highest expression difference was 9.2-fold for the activator bmal1b and 51.7-fold for the repressor per1a. Out of 32 candidate clock-controlled genes, only myf6, igfbp3, igfbp5b, and hsf2 showed circadian expression patterns. Igfbp3, igfbp5b, and myf6 were expressed in phase with clock1a/1b and had an average of twofold change in expression from peak to trough, whereas hsf2 transcripts were expressed in phase with cry1a and had a 7.2-fold-change in expression. The changes in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes observed during continuous darkness were also observed at similar ZTs in fish exposed to a normal photoperiod in a separate control experiment. The role of circadian clocks in regulating muscle maintenance and growth are discussed

  14. The prospects for optically bistable devices in digital optical circuits for a simple optical finite state machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. Desmond; Walker, Andrew C.; Wherrett, Brian S.; Tooley, Frank A. P.

    The physical principles underlying logic decision making and communication for both optics and electronics are reviewed. Research directions towards demonstration machines are indicated using the experimentally proven properties of bistable memories, logic gates, and optical transphasors. Results demonstrating a restoring optical logic, a 'lock and clock' architecture, and a simple finite-state machine are presented.

  15. Cloning, tissue expression pattern and daily rhythms of Period1, Period2, and Clock transcripts in the flatfish Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Robles, Águeda J; Whitmore, David; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pendón, Carlos; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2012-07-01

    An extensive network of endogenous oscillators governs vertebrate circadian rhythmicity. At the molecular level, they are composed of a set of clock genes that participate in transcriptional-translational feedback loops to control their own expression and that of downstream output genes. These clocks are synchronized with the environment, although entrainment by external periodic cues remains little explored in fish. In this work, partial cDNA sequences of clock genes representing both positive (Clock) and negative (Period1, Period2) elements of the molecular feedback loops were obtained from the nocturnal flatfish Senegalese sole, a relevant species for aquaculture and chronobiology. All of the above genes exhibited high identities with their respective teleost clock genes, and Per-Arnt-Sim or basic helix-loop-helix binding domains were recognized in their primary structure. They showed a widespread distribution through the animal body and some of them displayed daily mRNA rhythms in central (retina, optic tectum, diencephalon, and cerebellum) and peripheral (liver) tissues. These rhythms were most robust in retina and liver, exhibiting marked Period1 and Clock daily oscillations in transcript levels as revealed by ANOVA and cosinor analysis. Interestingly, expression profiles were inverted in retina and optic tectum compared to liver. Such differences suggest the existence of tissue-dependent zeitgebers for clock gene expression in this species (i.e., light for retina and optic tectum and feeding time for liver). This study provides novel insight into the location of the molecular clocks (central vs. peripheral) and their different phasing and synchronization pathways, which contributes to better understand the teleost circadian systems and its plasticity.

  16. Network news: prime time for systems biology of the plant circadian clock truncated form of the title: Plant circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whole-transcriptome analyses have established that the plant circadian clock regulates virtually every plant biological process and most prominently hormonal and stress response pathways. Systems biology efforts have successfully modeled the plant central clock machinery and an iterative process of model refinement and experimental validation has contributed significantly to the current view of the central clock machinery. The challenge now is to connect this central clock to the output pathways for understanding how the plant circadian clock contributes to plant growth and fitness in a changing environment. Undoubtedly, systems approaches will be needed to integrate and model the vastly increased volume of experimental data in order to extract meaningful biological information. Thus, we have entered an era of systems modeling, experimental testing, and refinement. This approach, coupled with advances from the genetic and biochemical analyses of clock function, is accelerating our progress towards a comprehensive understanding of the plant circadian clock network. PMID:20889330

  17. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    , exploited as a useful tool at room temperature and higher, are greatly enhanced at low energy. For example, collisional spin transfer from one species of polarized atoms to another has long been a useful method for polarizing a sample of atoms where no other means was available. Because optical pumping cannot be used to polarize the nuclear spin of Xe-129 or He-3 (for use in nmr imaging of the lungs), the nuclear spins are polarized via collisions with an optically pumped Rb vapor in a cell containing both gases. In another case, a spin polarized thermal Cs beam was used to polarize the hyperfine states of trapped He(+)-3 ions in order to measure their hyperfine clock transition frequency. The absence of an x-ray light source to optically pump the ground state of the He(+)-3 ion necessitated this alternative state preparation. Similarly, Cd(+) and Sr(+) ions were spin-oriented via collisions in a cell with optically pumped Rb vapor. Resonant RF spin changing transitions in the ground state of the ions were detected by changes in the Rb resonance light absorption. Because cold collision spin exchange rates scale with temperature as T(sup -1/2) this technique is expected to be a far more powerful tool than the room temperature counterpart. This factor of 100 or more enhancement in spin exchange reaction rates at low temperatures is the basis for a novel trapped ion clock where laser cooled neutrals will cool, state select and monitor the ion clock transition. The advantage over conventional direct laser cooling of trapped ions is that the very expensive and cumbersome UV laser light sources, required to excite the ionic cooling transition, are effectively replaced by simple diode lasers.

  18. Metabolism and the circadian clock converge.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Supporting Family Awareness with the Whereabouts Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellen, Abigail; Taylor, Alex S.; Kaye, Joseph ‘Jofish'; Brown, Barry; Izadi, Shahram

    We report the results of a field trial of a situated awareness device for families called the “Whereabouts Clock”. The Clock displays the location of family members using cellphone data as one of four privacy-preserving, deliberately coarse-grained categories ( HOME, WORK, SCHOOL or ELSEWHERE). The results show that awareness of others through the Clock supports not only family communication and coordination but also more emotive aspects of family life such as reassurance, connectedness, identity and social touch. We discuss how the term “awareness” means many things in practice and highlight the importance of designing not just for family activities, but in order to support the emotional, social and even moral aspects of family life.

  20. Millisecond pulsars - Nature's most stable clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joseph H., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    The author describes the role pulsars might play in time and frequency technology. Millisecond pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars: spherical flywheels some 20 km in diameter, 1.4 times as massive as the Sun, and spinning as fast as several thousand radians per second. Radio noise generated in a pulsar's magnetosphere by a highly beamed process is detectable over interstellar distances, as a periodic sequence of pulses similar to the ticks of an excellent clock. High-precision comparisons between pulsar time and terrestrial atomic time show that over intervals of several years, some millisecond pulsars have fractional stabilities comparable to those of the best atomic clocks. The author briefly reviews the physics of pulsars, discusses the techniques of pulsar timing measurements, and summarizes the results of careful studies of pulsar stabilities.

  1. The Large Built Water Clock Of Amphiaraeion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E.; Katsiotis, M.; Manimanis, V. N.; Mantarakis, P.

    A very well preserved ancient water clock was discovered during excavations at the Amphiaraeion, in Oropos, Greece. The Amphiaraeion, a famous religious and oracle center of the deified healer Amphiaraus, was active from the pre-classic period until the replacement of the ancient religion by Christianity in the 5th Century A.D.. The foretelling was supposedly done through dreams sent by the god to the believers sleeping in a special gallery. In these dreams the god suggesting to them the therapy for their illness or the solution to their problems. The patients, then threw coins into a spring of the sanctuary. In such a place, the measurement of time was a necessity. Therefore, time was kept with both a conical sundial and a water clock in the form of a fountain. According to archeologists, the large built structure that measured the time for the sanctuary dates from the 4th Century B.C.

  2. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies.

  3. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology.

  4. Optimal Implementations for Reliable Circadian Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival through synchronizing with the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. We find by using a phase model with multiple inputs that achieving the maximal limit of regularity and entrainability entails many inherent features of the circadian mechanism. At the molecular level, we demonstrate the role sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. At the behavioral level, the optimal phase-response curve inevitably contains a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. We reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments entrained by two types of periodic light pulses. Our results indicate that circadian clocks are designed optimally for reliable clockwork through evolution.

  5. Molecular Clocks and the Human Condition

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, G.A.; Yang, G; Paschos, G.K.; Liang, X.; Skarke, C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular clockworks knit together diverse biological networks and compelling evidence from model systems infers their importance in metabolism, immunological and cardiovascular function. Despite this and the diurnal variation in many aspects of human physiology and the phenotypic expression of disease, our understanding of the role and importance of clock function and dysfunction in humans is modest. There are tantalizing hints of connection across the translational divide and some correlative evidence of gene variation and human disease but most of what we know derives from forced desynchrony protocols in controlled environments. We now have the ability to monitor quantitatively ex vivo or in vivo the genome, metabolome, proteome and microbiome of humans in the wild. Combining this capability, with the power of mobile telephony and the evolution of remote sensing affords a new opportunity for deep phenotyping, including the characterization of diurnal behavior and the assessment of the impact of the clock on approved drug function. PMID:26332979

  6. Population clocks: motor timing with neural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buonomano, Dean V.; Laje, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of sensory and motor processing will require elucidation of the mechanisms by which the brain tells time. Open questions relate to whether timing relies on dedicated or intrinsic mechanisms and whether distinct mechanisms underlie timing across scales and modalities. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the notion that neural circuits are intrinsically capable of sensory timing on short scales, few general models of motor timing have been proposed. For one class of models, population clocks, it is proposed that time is encoded in the time-varying patterns of activity of a population of neurons. We argue that population clocks emerge from the internal dynamics of recurrently connected networks, are biologically realistic and account for many aspects of motor timing. PMID:20889368

  7. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology. PMID:26550871

  8. Developmental alcohol and circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Earnest, D J; Chen, W J; West, J R

    2001-01-01

    Studies in rats found that alcohol exposure during the early postnatal period, particularly during the brain-growth-spurt period, can result in cell loss in various brain regions and persistent behavioral impairments. Some investigators have speculated that the body's internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain, may also be affected by developmental alcohol exposure. For example, alcohol-induced damage to the SCN cells and their function could result in disturbances of the circadian timekeeping function, and these disturbances might contribute to the behavioral impairments and affective disorders observed in people prenatally exposed to alcohol. Preliminary findings of studies conducted in rats suggest that developmental alcohol exposure may indeed interfere with circadian clock function as evidenced by a shortened circadian sleep-wake cycle and changes in the release of certain brain chemicals (i.e., neuropeptides) by SCN cells. PMID:11584552

  9. The suprachiasmatic nuclei as a seasonal clock.

    PubMed

    Coomans, Claudia P; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) contains a central clock that synchronizes daily (i.e., 24-h) rhythms in physiology and behavior. SCN neurons are cell-autonomous oscillators that act synchronously to produce a coherent circadian rhythm. In addition, the SCN helps regulate seasonal rhythmicity. Photic information is perceived by the SCN and transmitted to the pineal gland, where it regulates melatonin production. Within the SCN, adaptations to changing photoperiod are reflected in changes in neurotransmitters and clock gene expression, resulting in waveform changes in rhythmic electrical activity, a major output of the SCN. Efferent pathways regulate the seasonal timing of breeding and hibernation. In humans, seasonal physiology and behavioral rhythms are also present, and the human SCN has seasonally rhythmic neurotransmitter levels and morphology. In summary, the SCN perceives and encodes changes in day length and drives seasonal changes in downstream pathways and structures in order to adapt to the changing seasons.

  10. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies. PMID:27104983

  11. Molecular clock on a neutral network.

    PubMed

    Raval, Alpan

    2007-09-28

    The number of fixed mutations accumulated in an evolving population often displays a variance that is significantly larger than the mean (the overdispersed molecular clock). By examining a generic evolutionary process on a neutral network of high-fitness genotypes, we establish a formalism for computing all cumulants of the full probability distribution of accumulated mutations in terms of graph properties of the neutral network, and use the formalism to prove overdispersion of the molecular clock. We further show that significant overdispersion arises naturally in evolution when the neutral network is highly sparse, exhibits large global fluctuations in neutrality, and small local fluctuations in neutrality. The results are also relevant for elucidating aspects of neutral network topology from empirical measurements of the substitution process.

  12. Metabolic and Nontranscriptional Circadian Clocks: Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rey, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cellular timekeeping mechanisms that coordinate behavior and physiology around the 24-h day in most living organisms. Misalignment of an organism’s clock with its environment is associated with long-term adverse fitness consequences, as exemplified by the link between circadian disruption and various age-related diseases in humans. Current eukaryotic models of the circadian oscillator rely on transcription/translation feedback loop mechanisms, supplemented with accessory cytosolic loops that connect them to cellular physiology. However, there is mounting evidence questioning the absolute necessity of transcription-based oscillators for circadian rhythmicity, supported by the recent discovery of oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins, which persist even in the absence of transcription. A more fundamental mechanism based on metabolic cycles could thus underlie circadian transcriptional and cytosolic rhythms, thereby promoting circadian oscillations to integral properties of cellular metabolism. PMID:24606143

  13. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P < 0.0001) in CLL patients as compared to healthy controls. When expression of these genes was compared between shift-workers and non-shift-workers within the CLL group, the expression was found more aberrant in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers. However, this difference was found statistically significant for Myc and Cyclin D1 only (P < 0.05). Serum melatonin levels were found significantly low (P < 0.0001) in CLL subjects as compared to healthy controls whereas melatonin levels were found still lower in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers within CLL group (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that aberrant expression of circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are

  14. Light and the human circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the field's pioneers, and the astonishing finding that circadian rhythms continue a self-sustained oscillation in constant conditions has become central to our understanding of entrainment.Here, we argue that we have to rethink these initial circadian dogmas to fully understand the circadian programme and how it entrains. Light is also the prominent zeitgeber for the human clock, as has been shown experimentally in the laboratory and in large-scale epidemiological studies in real life, and we hypothesise that social zeitgebers act through light entrainment via behavioural feedback loops (zeitnehmer). We show that human entrainment can be investigated in detail outside of the laboratory, by using the many 'experimental' conditions provided by the real world, such as daylight savings time, the 'forced synchrony' imposed by the introduction of time zones, or the fact that humans increasingly create their own light environment. The conditions of human entrainment have changed drastically over the past 100 years and have led to an increasing discrepancy between biological and social time (social jetlag). The increasing evidence that social jetlag has detrimental consequences for health suggests that shift-work is only an extreme form of circadian misalignment, and that the majority of the population in the industrialised world suffers from a similarly 'forced synchrony'.

  15. Circadian clock mutation disrupts estrous cyclicity and maintenance of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brooke H; Olson, Susan Losee; Turek, Fred W; Levine, Jon E; Horton, Teresa H; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2004-08-10

    Classic experiments have shown that ovulation and estrous cyclicity are under circadian control and that surgical ablation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) results in estrous acyclicity in rats. Here, we characterized reproductive function in the circadian Clock mutant mouse and found that the circadian Clock mutation both disrupts estrous cyclicity and interferes with the maintenance of pregnancy. Clock mutant females have extended, irregular estrous cycles, lack a coordinated luteinizing hormone (LH) surge on the day of proestrus, exhibit increased fetal reabsorption during pregnancy, and have a high rate of full-term pregnancy failure. Clock mutants also show an unexpected decline in progesterone levels at midpregnancy and a shortened duration of pseudopregnancy, suggesting that maternal prolactin release may be abnormal. In a second set of experiments, we interrogated the function of each level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in order to determine how the Clock mutation disrupts estrous cyclicity. We report that Clock mutants fail to show an LH surge following estradiol priming in spite of the fact that hypothalamic levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary release of LH, and serum levels of estradiol and progesterone are all normal in Clock/Clock females. These data suggest that Clock mutants lack an appropriate circadian daily-timing signal required to coordinate hypothalamic hormone secretion. Defining the mechanisms by which the Clock mutation disrupts reproductive function offers a model for understanding how circadian genes affect complex physiological systems.

  16. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  17. A Compact Model for the Complex Plant Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    De Caluwé, Joëlle; Xiao, Qiying; Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Gonze, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the daily variations of their environment. The plant clock is an intricate network of interlocked feedback loops, in which transcription factors regulate each other to generate oscillations with expression peaks at specific times of the day. Over the last decade, mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand the inner workings of the clock in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Those efforts have produced a number of models of ever increasing complexity. Here, we present an alternative model that combines a low number of equations and parameters, similar to the very earliest models, with the complex network structure found in more recent ones. This simple model describes the temporal evolution of the abundance of eight clock gene mRNA/protein and captures key features of the clock on a qualitative level, namely the entrained and free-running behaviors of the wild type clock, as well as the defects found in knockout mutants (such as altered free-running periods, lack of entrainment, or changes in the expression of other clock genes). Additionally, our model produces complex responses to various light cues, such as extreme photoperiods and non-24 h environmental cycles, and can describe the control of hypocotyl growth by the clock. Our model constitutes a useful tool to probe dynamical properties of the core clock as well as clock-dependent processes. PMID:26904049

  18. A Compact Model for the Complex Plant Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    De Caluwé, Joëlle; Xiao, Qiying; Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Gonze, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the daily variations of their environment. The plant clock is an intricate network of interlocked feedback loops, in which transcription factors regulate each other to generate oscillations with expression peaks at specific times of the day. Over the last decade, mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand the inner workings of the clock in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Those efforts have produced a number of models of ever increasing complexity. Here, we present an alternative model that combines a low number of equations and parameters, similar to the very earliest models, with the complex network structure found in more recent ones. This simple model describes the temporal evolution of the abundance of eight clock gene mRNA/protein and captures key features of the clock on a qualitative level, namely the entrained and free-running behaviors of the wild type clock, as well as the defects found in knockout mutants (such as altered free-running periods, lack of entrainment, or changes in the expression of other clock genes). Additionally, our model produces complex responses to various light cues, such as extreme photoperiods and non-24 h environmental cycles, and can describe the control of hypocotyl growth by the clock. Our model constitutes a useful tool to probe dynamical properties of the core clock as well as clock-dependent processes. PMID:26904049

  19. Cs vapor microcells with Ne-He buffer gas mixture for high operation-temperature miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Maurice, V; Fouilland, B; Gorecki, C; Boudot, R

    2015-07-13

    We report on the characterization of Cs vapor microfabricated cells filled with a Ne-He buffer gas mixture using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is found to be canceled at the first order around a so-called inversion temperature higher than 80°C whose value depends on the buffer gas partial pressure ratio. This buffer gas mixture could be well-adapted for the development of miniature atomic clocks devoted to be used in specific applications such as defense and avionic systems with high operating temperature environment (typically higher than 85°C). This solution suggests an alternative to buffer gas mixtures generally used in optically-pumped vapor cell atomic clocks.

  20. 5-Gb/s 0.18-μm CMOS 2:1 multiplexer with integrated clock extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changchun, Zhang; Zhigong, Wang; Si, Shi; Peng, Miao; Ling, Tian

    2009-09-01

    A 5-Gb/s 2:1 MUX (multiplexer) with an on-chip integrated clock extraction circuit which possesses the function of automatic phase alignment (APA), has been designed and fabricated in SMIC's 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The chip area is 670 × 780 μm2. At a single supply voltage of 1.8 V, the total power consumption is 112 mW with an input sensitivity of less than 50 mV and an output single-ended swing of above 300 mV. The measurement results show that the IC can work reliably at any input data rate between 1.8 and 2.6 Gb/s with no need for external components, reference clock, or phase alignment between data and clock. It can be used in a parallel optic-fiber data interconnecting system.

  1. Cs vapor microcells with Ne-He buffer gas mixture for high operation-temperature miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Maurice, V; Fouilland, B; Gorecki, C; Boudot, R

    2015-07-13

    We report on the characterization of Cs vapor microfabricated cells filled with a Ne-He buffer gas mixture using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is found to be canceled at the first order around a so-called inversion temperature higher than 80°C whose value depends on the buffer gas partial pressure ratio. This buffer gas mixture could be well-adapted for the development of miniature atomic clocks devoted to be used in specific applications such as defense and avionic systems with high operating temperature environment (typically higher than 85°C). This solution suggests an alternative to buffer gas mixtures generally used in optically-pumped vapor cell atomic clocks. PMID:26191895

  2. Clock distribution system for digital computers

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Robert H.; Loomis, Jr., Herschel H.

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for eliminating, in each clock distribution amplifier of a clock distribution system, sequential pulse catch-up error due to one pulse "overtaking" a prior clock pulse. The apparatus includes timing means to produce a periodic electromagnetic signal with a fundamental frequency having a fundamental frequency component V'.sub.01 (t); an array of N signal characteristic detector means, with detector means No. 1 receiving the timing means signal and producing a change-of-state signal V.sub.1 (t) in response to receipt of a signal above a predetermined threshold; N substantially identical filter means, one filter means being operatively associated with each detector means, for receiving the change-of-state signal V.sub.n (t) and producing a modified change-of-state signal V'.sub.n (t) (n=1, . . . , N) having a fundamental frequency component that is substantially proportional to V'.sub.01 (t-.theta..sub.n (t) with a cumulative phase shift .theta..sub.n (t) having a time derivative that may be made uniformly and arbitrarily small; and with the detector means n+1 (1.ltoreq.n

  3. Clock gene evolution and functional divergence.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Eran; Last, Kim S; Olive, Peter J W; Kyriacou, C P

    2004-10-01

    In considering the impact of the earth's changing geophysical conditions during the history of life, it is surprising to learn that the earth's rotational period may have been as short as 4 h, as recently as 1900 million years ago (or 1.9 billion years ago). The implications of such figures for the origin and evolution of clocks are considerable, and the authors speculate on how this short rotational period might have influenced the development of the "protoclock" in early microorganisms, such as the Cyanobacteria, during the geological periodsin which they arose and flourished. They then discuss the subsequent duplication of clock genes that took place around and after the Cambrian period, 543 million years ago, and its consequences. They compare the relative divergences of the canonical clock genes, which reveal the Per family to be the most rapidly evolving. In addition, the authors use a statistical test to predict which residues within the PER and CRY families may have undergone functional specialization.

  4. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber. PMID:25167146

  5. Metrological characterization of custom-designed 894.6 nm VCSELs for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gruet, F; Al-Samaneh, A; Kroemer, E; Bimboes, L; Miletic, D; Affolderbach, C; Wahl, D; Boudot, R; Mileti, G; Michalzik, R

    2013-03-11

    We report on the characterization and validation of custom-designed 894.6 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), for use in miniature Cs atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The laser relative intensity noise (RIN) is measured to be 1 × 10(-11) Hz(-1) at 10 Hz Fourier frequency, for a laser power of 700 μW. The VCSEL frequency noise is 10(13) · f(-1) Hz(2)/Hz in the 10 Hz < f < 10(5) Hz range, which is in good agreement with the VCSEL’s measured fractional frequency instability (Allan deviation) of ≈ 1 × 10(-8) at 1 s, and also is consistent with the VCSEL’s typical optical linewidth of 20-25 MHz. The VCSEL bias current can be directly modulated at 4.596 GHz with a microwave power of -6 to +6 dBm to generate optical sidebands for CPT excitation. With such a VCSEL, a 1.04 kHz linewidth CPT clock resonance signal is detected in a microfabricated Cs cell filled with Ne buffer gas. These results are compatible with state-of-the-art CPT-based miniature atomic clocks exhibiting a short-term frequency instability of 2-3 × 10(-11) at τ = 1 s and few 10(-12) at τ = 10(4) s integration time..

  6. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  7. Metrological characterization of custom-designed 894.6 nm VCSELs for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gruet, F; Al-Samaneh, A; Kroemer, E; Bimboes, L; Miletic, D; Affolderbach, C; Wahl, D; Boudot, R; Mileti, G; Michalzik, R

    2013-03-11

    We report on the characterization and validation of custom-designed 894.6 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), for use in miniature Cs atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The laser relative intensity noise (RIN) is measured to be 1 × 10(-11) Hz(-1) at 10 Hz Fourier frequency, for a laser power of 700 μW. The VCSEL frequency noise is 10(13) · f(-1) Hz(2)/Hz in the 10 Hz < f < 10(5) Hz range, which is in good agreement with the VCSEL’s measured fractional frequency instability (Allan deviation) of ≈ 1 × 10(-8) at 1 s, and also is consistent with the VCSEL’s typical optical linewidth of 20-25 MHz. The VCSEL bias current can be directly modulated at 4.596 GHz with a microwave power of -6 to +6 dBm to generate optical sidebands for CPT excitation. With such a VCSEL, a 1.04 kHz linewidth CPT clock resonance signal is detected in a microfabricated Cs cell filled with Ne buffer gas. These results are compatible with state-of-the-art CPT-based miniature atomic clocks exhibiting a short-term frequency instability of 2-3 × 10(-11) at τ = 1 s and few 10(-12) at τ = 10(4) s integration time.. PMID:23482148

  8. DFB-ridge laser diodes at 894 nm for Cesium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bandel, N.; Garcia, M.; Lecomte, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Driss, O.; Parrilaud, O.; Krakowski, M.; Gruet, F.; Matthey, R.; Mileti, G.

    2016-02-01

    Time and frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Optically pumped compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks are a promising approach that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of the laser diodes that are used. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for ground applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. III-V Lab is in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894 nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852 nm (D2 line). LTF-Unine is in charge of their spectral characterisation. The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to the D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and a larger spectral separation between lines in the 894 nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "idle states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1 MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be less sensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894 nm wavelength is grounded on III-V Lab results for 852 nm DFB. We show here results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well Ridge DFB lasers. We obtain the D1 Cs line (894.4 nm) at 67°C and 165 mA (optical power of 40 mW) with a high side mode suppression ratio. The wavelength evolution with temperature and current are respectively 0.06 nm/K and 0.003 nm/mA. The laser linewidth is less than 1 MHz. The Relative Intensity Noise (RIN) and the frequency noise are respectively less than 10-12 Hz-1 @ f >= 10 Hz and 109 Hz2/Hz @ f >= 10 Hz.

  9. Integrated physics package of a chip-scale atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Liang; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Lu-Bing; Long, Liang; Wu, Ya-Ming

    2014-07-01

    The physics package of a chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) has been successfully realized by integrating vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), neutral density (ND) filter, λ/4 wave plate, 87Rb vapor cell, photodiode (PD), and magnetic coil into a cuboid metal package with a volume of about 2.8 cm3. In this physics package, the critical component, 87Rb vapor cell, is batch-fabricated based on MEMS technology and in-situ chemical reaction method. Pt heater and thermistors are integrated in the physics package. A PTFE pillar is used to support the optical elements in the physics package, in order to reduce the power dissipation. The optical absorption spectrum of 87Rb D1 line and the microwave frequency correction signal are successfully observed while connecting the package with the servo circuit system. Using the above mentioned packaging solution, a CSAC with short-term frequency stability of about 7 × 10-10 τ-1/2 has been successfully achieved, which demonstrates that this physics package would become one promising solution for the CSAC.

  10. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic {sup 173}Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  11. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic 173Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  12. 3.4 GHz composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator for miniaturized atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Artieda, Alvaro; Muralt, Paul

    2011-06-27

    Triple layer SiO{sub 2}/AlN/SiO{sub 2} composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (TFBARs) were studied for applications in atomic clocks. The TFBAR's were tuned to 3.4 GHz, corresponding to half the hyperfine splitting of the ground state of rubidium {sup 87}Rb atoms. The quality factor (Q) was equal to 2300 and the temperature coefficient of the resonance frequency f{sub r} amounted to 1.5 ppm/K. A figure of merit Qf{sub r} of {approx} 0.8 x 10{sup 13} Hz and a thickness mode coupling factor of 1% were reached. Such figures are ideal for frequency sources in an oscillator circuit that tracks the optical signal in atomic clocks.

  13. Ytterbium in quantum gases and atomic clocks: van der Waals interactions and blackbody shifts.

    PubMed

    Safronova, M S; Porsev, S G; Clark, Charles W

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the C(6) coefficients of Yb-Yb, Yb-alkali, and Yb-group II van der Waals interactions with 2% uncertainty. The only existing experimental result for such quantities is for the Yb-Yb dimer. Our value, C(6)=1929(39) a.u., is in excellent agreement with the recent experimental determination of 1932(35) a.u. We have also developed a new approach for the calculation of the dynamic correction to the blackbody radiation shift. We have calculated this quantity for the Yb 6s(2) (1)S(0)-6s6p (3)P(0)(o) clock transition with 3.5% uncertainty. This reduces the fractional uncertainty due to the blackbody radiation shift in the Yb optical clock at 300 K to the 10(-18) level.

  14. Ytterbium in quantum gases and atomic clocks: van der Waals interactions and blackbody shifts.

    PubMed

    Safronova, M S; Porsev, S G; Clark, Charles W

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the C(6) coefficients of Yb-Yb, Yb-alkali, and Yb-group II van der Waals interactions with 2% uncertainty. The only existing experimental result for such quantities is for the Yb-Yb dimer. Our value, C(6)=1929(39) a.u., is in excellent agreement with the recent experimental determination of 1932(35) a.u. We have also developed a new approach for the calculation of the dynamic correction to the blackbody radiation shift. We have calculated this quantity for the Yb 6s(2) (1)S(0)-6s6p (3)P(0)(o) clock transition with 3.5% uncertainty. This reduces the fractional uncertainty due to the blackbody radiation shift in the Yb optical clock at 300 K to the 10(-18) level. PMID:23368178

  15. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  16. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf 12+ to U 34+, which have the 4 f 12 configuration of valence electrons, the Ir 17+ ion, which has a hole in almost filled 4 f subshell, the Ho 14+, Cf 15+, Es 17+ and Es 16+ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, α (α = e2/hbar c). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to α-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  17. Doubly Magic Optical Trapping for Cs Atom Hyperfine Clock Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, A. W.; Saffman, M.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze doubly magic trapping of Cs hyperfine transitions including previously neglected contributions from the ground state hyperpolarizability and the interaction of the laser light and a static magnetic field. Extensive numerical searches do not reveal any doubly magic trapping conditions for any pair of hyperfine states. However, including the hyperpolarizability reveals light intensity insensitive traps for a wide range of wavelengths at specific intensities. We then investigate the use of bichromatic trapping light fields. Deploying a bichromatic scheme, we demonstrate doubly magic red and blue detuned traps for pairs of states separated by one or two single photon transitions.

  18. Estimating the stability of N clocks with correlations.

    PubMed

    Torcaso, F; Ekstrom, C R; Burt, E A; Matsakis, D N

    2000-01-01

    Estimation of an atomic clock's frequency stability, separate from its reference, is often done using a three-cornered hat procedure. A major requirement for the success of this method is that clocks be uncorrelated. If this requirement is not satisfied, the three-cornered hat procedure can lead to misleading or even negative variance estimates. Others have considered this problem and developed an analysis that allows for the possibility of cross correlation between clocks. We have extended and applied these ideas to obtain mathematically consistent frequency stability estimates on atomic clock data from the U.S. Naval Observatory. In addition, we derived an expression for the clock weights that produce a minimum variance combination of clocks in the presence of correlations.

  19. The Effects of Clock Drift on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Khaled S.; Vanelli, C. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    All clocks drift by some amount, and the mission clock on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is no exception. The mission clock on both MER rovers drifted significantly since the rovers were launched, and it is still drifting on the Opportunity rover. The drift rate is temperature dependent. Clock drift causes problems for onboard behaviors and spacecraft operations, such as attitude estimation, driving, operation of the robotic arm, pointing for imaging, power analysis, and telecom analysis. The MER operations team has techniques to deal with some of these problems. There are a few techniques for reducing and eliminating the clock drift, but each has drawbacks. This paper presents an explanation of what is meant by clock drift on the rovers, its relationship to temperature, how we measure it, what problems it causes, how we deal with those problems, and techniques for reducing the drift.

  20. Inexpensive programmable clock for a 12-bit computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive programmable clock was built for a digital PDP-12 computer. The instruction list includes skip on flag; clear the flag, clear the clock, and stop the clock; and preset the counter with the contents of the accumulator and start the clock. The clock counts at a rate determined by an external oscillator and causes an interrupt and sets a flag when a 12-bit overflow occurs. An overflow can occur after 1 to 4096 counts. The clock can be built for a total parts cost of less than $100 including power supply and I/O connector. Slight modification can be made to permit its use on larger machines (16 bit, 24 bit, etc.) and logic level shifting can be made to make it compatible with any computer.