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Sample records for 1st order reaction

  1. 1st- and 2nd-order motion and texture resolution in central and peripheral vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1995-01-01

    STIMULI. The 1st-order stimuli are moving sine gratings. The 2nd-order stimuli are fields of static visual texture, whose contrasts are modulated by moving sine gratings. Neither the spatial slant (orientation) nor the direction of motion of these 2nd-order (microbalanced) stimuli can be detected by a Fourier analysis; they are invisible to Reichardt and motion-energy detectors. METHOD. For these dynamic stimuli, when presented both centrally and in an annular window extending from 8 to 10 deg in eccentricity, we measured the highest spatial frequency for which discrimination between +/- 45 deg texture slants and discrimination between opposite directions of motion were each possible. RESULTS. For sufficiently low spatial frequencies, slant and direction can be discriminated in both central and peripheral vision, for both 1st- and for 2nd-order stimuli. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, at both retinal locations, slant discrimination is possible at higher spatial frequencies than direction discrimination. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, motion resolution decreases 2-3 times more rapidly with eccentricity than does texture resolution. CONCLUSIONS. (1) 1st- and 2nd-order motion scale similarly with eccentricity. (2) 1st- and 2nd-order texture scale similarly with eccentricity. (3) The central/peripheral resolution fall-off is 2-3 times greater for motion than for texture.

  2. Highly efficient -1st-order reflection in Littrow mounted dielectric double-groove grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kota; Iizuka, Hideo

    2013-06-01

    We show that in a silicon double-groove grating with two different groove widths per period attached on top of a semi-infinite SiO2 substrate, almost 100% reflectivity is achieved for the -1st-order reflection with an incident angle of 60° in the Littrow mounting condition. The modal analysis reveals that modes propagating in the upward and downward directions have nearly the same amplitudes at resonance. They are added constructively for the -1st-order reflection and destructively for the 0th-order reflection and the -1st-order and 0th-order transmission. The asymmetric structure with a dielectric material poses a unique feature as a four port device.

  3. Dynamics of the 1st order phase transition between the nuclear ordered phases of solid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takayoshi; Ito, Hideaki; Sasaki, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takao

    2005-08-01

    Dynamics of the 1st order phase transition between the U2D2 and the high field phases (HFP) was studied by field-cycling method between these phases by using ultra low temperature magnetic resonance imaging (ULT-MRI). Single Crystal of U2D2 3He was produced at the bottom of compressional cell in superfluid 3He-B at about 0.5 mK. Domain distribution in the U2D2 crystal was examined by ULT-MRI. We have measured the NMR signal intensity to extract the time-evolution of the HFP, after the static magnetic field was swept quickly through the critical field BC1 and was stayed at B=BC1+ΔB. The volume concentration of the U2D2 decreased exponentially in time during the early stage of the phase transition. The rate constant depended positively on ΔB. After the phase transition to the HFP was completed, the static field decreased through BC1 and was fixed at B=BC1-ΔB. The observed rate constant was similar to the value in the opposite direction with identical ΔB. This exponential evolution and ΔB dependence of its rate suggest that the early stage of the phase transition is controlled by the nucleation process.

  4. Hybrid distributed Raman amplification combining random fiber laser based 2nd-order and low-noise LD based 1st-order pumping.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Yuan, Cheng-Xu; Li, Jin; Yan, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Wei-Li; Wu, Han; Zhu, Ye-Yu; Peng, Fei

    2013-10-21

    A configuration of hybrid distributed Raman amplification (H-DRA), that is formed by incorporating a random fiber laser (RFL) based 2nd-order pump and a low-noise laser-diode (LD) based 1st-order pump, is proposed in this paper. In comparison to conventional bi-directional 1st-order DRA, the effective noise figure (ENF) is found to be lower by amount of 0 to 4 dB due to the RFL-based 2nd-order pump, depending on the on-off gain, while the low-noise 1st-order Raman pump is used for compensating the worsened signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the vicinity towards the far end of the fiber and avoiding the potential nonlinear impact induced by excess injection of pump power and suppressing the pump-signal relative intensity noise (RIN) transfer. As a result, the gain distribution can be optimized along ultra-long fiber link, due to combination of the 2nd-order RFL and low-noise 1st-order pumping, making the transmission distance be extended significantly. We utilized such a configuration to achieve ultra-long-distance distributed sensing based on Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA). A repeater-less sensing distance record of up to 154.4 km with 5 m spatial resolution and ~ ± 1.4 °C temperature uncertainty is successfully demonstrated.

  5. 1st Order Modeling of a SAW Delay Line using MathCAD(Registered)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    To aid in the development of SAW sensors for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring applications, a first order model of a SAW Delay line has been created using MathCadA. The model implements the Impulse Response method to calculate the frequency response, impedance, and insertion loss. This paper presents the model and the results from the model for a SAW delay line design. Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace vehicles requires rugged sensors having reduced volume, mass, and power that can be used to measure a variety of phenomena. Wireless systems are preferred when retro-fitting sensors onto existing vehicles [1]. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are capable of sensing: temperature, pressure, strain, chemical species, mass loading, acceleration, and shear stress. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. Passive wireless sensors have been developed using SAW technology. For these reasons new SAW sensors are being investigated for aerospace applications.

  6. All-optical 1st- and 2nd-order differential equation solvers with large tuning ranges using Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaisheng; Hou, Jie; Huang, Zhuyang; Cao, Tong; Zhang, Jihua; Yu, Yuan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-optical temporal computation scheme for solving 1st- and 2nd-order linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with tunable constant coefficients by using Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifiers (FP-SOAs). By changing the injection currents of FP-SOAs, the constant coefficients of the differential equations are practically tuned. A quite large constant coefficient tunable range from 0.0026/ps to 0.085/ps is achieved for the 1st-order differential equation. Moreover, the constant coefficient p of the 2nd-order ODE solver can be continuously tuned from 0.0216/ps to 0.158/ps, correspondingly with the constant coefficient q varying from 0.0000494/ps(2) to 0.006205/ps(2). Additionally, a theoretical model that combining the carrier density rate equation of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with the transfer function of the Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity is exploited to analyze the solving processes. For both 1st- and 2nd-order solvers, excellent agreements between the numerical simulations and the experimental results are obtained. The FP-SOAs based all-optical differential-equation solvers can be easily integrated with other optical components based on InP/InGaAsP materials, such as laser, modulator, photodetector and waveguide, which can motivate the realization of the complicated optical computing on a single integrated chip.

  7. Signal processing of MEMS gyroscope arrays to improve accuracy using a 1st order Markov for rate signal modeling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengyu; Xue, Liang; Chang, Honglong; Yuan, Guangmin; Yuan, Weizheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a signal processing technique to improve angular rate accuracy of the gyroscope by combining the outputs of an array of MEMS gyroscope. A mathematical model for the accuracy improvement was described and a Kalman filter (KF) was designed to obtain optimal rate estimates. Especially, the rate signal was modeled by a first-order Markov process instead of a random walk to improve overall performance. The accuracy of the combined rate signal and affecting factors were analyzed using a steady-state covariance. A system comprising a six-gyroscope array was developed to test the presented KF. Experimental tests proved that the presented model was effective at improving the gyroscope accuracy. The experimental results indicated that six identical gyroscopes with an ARW noise of 6.2 °/√h and a bias drift of 54.14 °/h could be combined into a rate signal with an ARW noise of 1.8 °/√h and a bias drift of 16.3 °/h, while the estimated rate signal by the random walk model has an ARW noise of 2.4 °/√h and a bias drift of 20.6 °/h. It revealed that both models could improve the angular rate accuracy and have a similar performance in static condition. In dynamic condition, the test results showed that the first-order Markov process model could reduce the dynamic errors 20% more than the random walk model.

  8. Signal Processing of MEMS Gyroscope Arrays to Improve Accuracy Using a 1st Order Markov for Rate Signal Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chengyu; Xue, Liang; Chang, Honglong; Yuan, Guangmin; Yuan, Weizheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a signal processing technique to improve angular rate accuracy of the gyroscope by combining the outputs of an array of MEMS gyroscope. A mathematical model for the accuracy improvement was described and a Kalman filter (KF) was designed to obtain optimal rate estimates. Especially, the rate signal was modeled by a first-order Markov process instead of a random walk to improve overall performance. The accuracy of the combined rate signal and affecting factors were analyzed using a steady-state covariance. A system comprising a six-gyroscope array was developed to test the presented KF. Experimental tests proved that the presented model was effective at improving the gyroscope accuracy. The experimental results indicated that six identical gyroscopes with an ARW noise of 6.2 °/√h and a bias drift of 54.14 °/h could be combined into a rate signal with an ARW noise of 1.8 °/√h and a bias drift of 16.3 °/h, while the estimated rate signal by the random walk model has an ARW noise of 2.4 °/√h and a bias drift of 20.6 °/h. It revealed that both models could improve the angular rate accuracy and have a similar performance in static condition. In dynamic condition, the test results showed that the first-order Markov process model could reduce the dynamic errors 20% more than the random walk model. PMID:22438734

  9. Seasonal variation in nutrient uptake in a 1st-order tributary of Lake Superior and implications for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, A. A.; Marcarelli, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In-stream biogeochemical cycling can control the timing and form of nutrients exported from watersheds to downstream ecosystems, and seasonal changes in light availability, discharge, temperature, or nutrient inputs may affect nutrient transformation and retention. Without an understanding of how in-stream biogeochemical cycling varies seasonally in snow-dominated regions it is uncertain how climate change will affect nutrient export to downstream ecosystems. Further compounding this uncertainty, few studies have examined in-stream nutrient processing during winter. Long-term monitoring (30 years) of climate and snowpack at Calumet watershed, a first order tributary of Lake Superior, has documented trends of increasing winter temperatures and greater snowmelt contributions to early season runoff. Identifying environmental variables that drive nutrient uptake is important because these observed trends may shift the timing of nutrient pulses relative to water temperatures and light availability. We hypothesized that ammonium (NH4) uptake velocity, a measure of nutrient uptake efficiency, would be greater in spring and fall due to increased light availability and nutrient pulses contributed by snowmelt in spring and leaf litter in fall. To test this hypothesis, we measured nutrient uptake velocity of ammonium (NH4) at 2-4 week intervals for one year in Calumet watershed by releasing inorganic nutrients (NH4Cl, KH2PO4) and a conservative tracer (rhodamine WT) into the stream and quantifying changes in nutrient and tracer concentrations along the stream reach. Canopy cover, ambient NH4 concentrations, stream water temperature, periphyton biomass, and discharge were also measured to identify which environmental covariates affected NH4 uptake velocities. The lowest NH4 uptake velocities were observed in winter (2.33 mm min-1) and summer months (2.03-2.08 mm min-1). Spring NH4 uptake velocities were variable: the greatest uptake velocities were observed following snowmelt

  10. Nonlinear random motion analysis of coupled heave-pitch motions of a spar platform considering 1st-order and 2nd-order wave loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuxiao; Tang, Yougang; Li, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we consider first- and second-order random wave loads and the effects of time-varying displacement volume and transient wave elevation to establish motion equations of the Spar platform's coupled heave-pitch. We generated random wave loads based on frequency-domain wave load transfer functions and the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) wave spectrum, designed program codes to solve the motion equations, and then simulated the coupled heave-pitch motion responses of the platform in the time domain. We then calculated and compared the motion responses in different sea conditions and separately investigated the effects of second-order random wave loads and transient wave elevation. The results show that the coupled heave-pitch motion responses of the platform are primarily dominated by wave height and the characteristic wave period, the latter of which has a greater impact. Second-order mean wave loads mainly affect the average heave value. The platform's pitch increases after the second-order low frequency wave loads are taken into account. The platform's heave is underestimated if the transient wave elevation term in the motion equations is neglected.

  11. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  12. The truncated Newton using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state method: a new approach for traveltime tomography without rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.

    2013-12-01

    named as the truncated Newton (TCN) (Métivier et al. 2012) with a more accurate estimation of the impact of the Hessian. We propose an efficient implementation for first-arrival traveltime tomography. In TCN, the model update Δm is obtained through the iterative resolution of the Newton linear system H Δm = - g. Based on a matrix-free conjugate gradient resolution, the iterative solver requires only the computation of the gradient and of Hessian-vector products. We propose a generalization of the computation of the gradient using the adjoint-state method that allows to consider receivers located anywhere. Then the Hessian-vector products are computed using an original formulation based on a 2nd-order adjoint-state method, at the cost of an additional forward modeling. The TCN algorithm is composed of two nested loops: an internal loop to compute Δm, and an external loop where a line search is performed to update the subsurface parameters. TCN thus considers locally the inversion of the traveltime data using an estimation of the full Hessian (both 1st and 2nd order terms) at an acceptable cost. Tomography with TCN is an improvement over the simple gradient-based adjoint-state tomography due to its good convergence property, to the better consideration of illumination, and is a promising tool for multi-parameter inversion as rescaling is given by the Hessian.

  13. Temporal Frequency Modulates Reaction Time Responses to First-Order and Second-Order Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Claire V.; Ledgeway, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal frequency and modulation depth on reaction times for discriminating the direction of first-order (luminance-defined) and second-order (contrast-defined) motion, equated for visibility using equal multiples of direction-discrimination threshold. Results showed that reaction times were heavily…

  14. A stochastic analysis of first-order reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gadgil, Chetan; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Othmer, Hans G

    2005-09-01

    A stochastic model for a general system of first-order reactions in which each reaction may be either a conversion reaction or a catalytic reaction is derived. The governing master equation is formulated in a manner that explicitly separates the effects of network topology from other aspects, and the evolution equations for the first two moments are derived. We find the surprising, and apparently unknown, result that the time evolution of the second moments can be represented explicitly in terms of the eigenvalues and projections of the matrix that governs the evolution of the means. The model is used to analyze the effects of network topology and the reaction type on the moments of the probability distribution. In particular, it is shown that for an open system of first-order conversion reactions, the distribution of all the system components is a Poisson distribution at steady state. Two different measures of the noise have been used previously, and it is shown that different qualitative and quantitative conclusions can result, depending on which measure is used. The effect of catalytic reactions on the variance of the system components is also analyzed, and the master equation for a coupled system of first-order reactions and diffusion is derived.

  15. A New Twist on the Iodine Clock Reaction: Determining the Order of a Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creary, Xavier; Morris, Karen M.

    1999-04-01

    The Landolt iodine clock reaction is a reliable and well-used chemistry demonstration owing to a variety of features: ease of solution preparation, striking color change indicating reaction completion, convenience in changing reaction "clock time", and effective dramatic presentation. The iodine clock reaction can also be used to illustrate the kinetic order of a reaction, and an overhead projector demonstration was developed three years ago for general chemistry classes at the University of Notre Dame showing this concept. This demonstration has been used successfully with consistent results since that time.

  16. Predictability and reduced order modeling in stochastic reaction networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, Habib N.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Sargsyan, Khachik

    2008-10-01

    Many systems involving chemical reactions between small numbers of molecules exhibit inherent stochastic variability. Such stochastic reaction networks are at the heart of processes such as gene transcription, cell signaling or surface catalytic reactions, which are critical to bioenergy, biomedical, and electrical storage applications. The underlying molecular reactions are commonly modeled with chemical master equations (CMEs), representing jump Markov processes, or stochastic differential equations (SDEs), rather than ordinary differential equations (ODEs). As such reaction networks are often inferred from noisy experimental data, it is not uncommon to encounter large parametric uncertainties in these systems. Further, a wide range of time scales introduces the need for reduced order representations. Despite the availability of mature tools for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis and reduced order modeling in deterministic systems, there is a lack of robust algorithms for such analyses in stochastic systems. In this talk, we present advances in algorithms for predictability and reduced order representations for stochastic reaction networks and apply them to bistable systems of biochemical interest. To study the predictability of a stochastic reaction network in the presence of both parametric uncertainty and intrinsic variability, an algorithm was developed to represent the system state with a spectral polynomial chaos (PC) expansion in the stochastic space representing parametric uncertainty and intrinsic variability. Rather than relying on a non-intrusive collocation-based Galerkin projection [1], this PC expansion is obtained using Bayesian inference, which is ideally suited to handle noisy systems through its probabilistic formulation. To accommodate state variables with multimodal distributions, an adaptive multiresolution representation is used [2]. As the PC expansion directly relates the state variables to the uncertain parameters, the formulation lends

  17. "Hard Science" for Gifted 1st Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGennaro, April

    2006-01-01

    "Hard Science" is designed to teach 1st grade gifted students accurate and high level science concepts. It is based upon their experience of the world and attempts to build a foundation for continued love and enjoyment of science. "Hard Science" provides field experiences and opportunities for hands-on discovery working beside experts in the field…

  18. Integrating reaction and analysis: investigation of higher-order reactions by cryogenic trapping

    PubMed Central

    Stockinger, Skrollan

    2013-01-01

    Summary A new approach for the investigation of a higher-order reaction by on-column reaction gas chromatography is presented. The reaction and the analytical separation are combined in a single experiment to investigate the Diels–Alder reaction of benzenediazonium-2-carboxylate as a benzyne precursor with various anthracene derivatives, i.e. anthracene, 9-bromoanthracene, 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde and 9-anthracenemethanol. To overcome limitations of short reaction contact times at elevated temperatures a novel experimental setup was developed involving a cooling trap to achieve focusing and mixing of the reactants at a defined spot in a fused-silica capillary. This trap functions as a reactor within the separation column in the oven of a gas chromatograph. The reactants are sequentially injected to avoid undefined mixing in the injection port. An experimental protocol was developed with optimized injection intervals and cooling times to achieve sufficient conversions at short reaction times. Reaction products were rapidly identified by mass spectrometric detection. This new approach represents a practical procedure to investigate higher-order reactions at an analytical level and it simultaneously provides valuable information for the optimization of the reaction conditions. PMID:24062850

  19. Order and localization in reaction-diffusion pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, David M.; Harrison, Lionel G.

    1995-02-01

    The present work is concerned with two aspects of pattern formation: pattern localization and degree of pattern order. In reaction-diffusion models, there are three major effects. These stem from the reaction terms, the diffusion terms and the presence or absence of precursor gradients. Global analysis of reaction terms at late stages of pattern formation is at present unavailable. Therefore, we study the effect of the diffusion terms and of precursor gradients with numerical solution in two models: the Brusselator and the Gierer-Meinhardt. Differences in response to changes in the diffusion terms and the precursor gradients are related to contrasts between the nonlinear kinetics of the two models. These models both have Hill coefficient 2; effects of higher cooperativities have recently been discussed by Hunding and Engelhardt [1].

  20. Sickle hemoglobin gelation. Reaction order and critical nucleus size.

    PubMed Central

    Behe, M J; Englander, S W

    1978-01-01

    Sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) gelation displays kinetics consistent with a rate-limiting nucleation step. The approximate size of the critical nucleus can be inferred from the order of the reaction with respect to Hb S activity, but determination of the reaction order is complicated by the fact that Hb S activity is substantially different from Hb S concentration at the high protein concentrations required for gelation. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments on Hb S gelation were designed to evaluate the relative activity coefficient of Hb S as a function of concentration. These experiments used non-Hb S proteins to mimic, and thus evaluate, the effect on activity coefficients of increasing Hb S concentration. At Hb S concentrations near 20% the change in Hb S activity coefficient generates two-thirds of the apparent dependence of nucleation rate on Hb S concentration. When this effect is explicitly accounted for, the nucleation reaction is seen to be approximately 10th-order with respect to effective number concentration of Hb S. The closeness of the reaction order to the number of strands in models of Hb S fibers suggests a nucleus close to the size of one turn of the Hb S fiber. These experiments introduce a new approach to the study of Hb S gelation, the equal activity isotherm, used here also to show that Hb S.Hb A (normal adult hemoglobin) hybrids do incorporate into growing nuclei and stable microtubules but that A.S hybridization is neutral with respect to promotion of Hb S nucleation and the sol-gel equilibrium. PMID:667302

  1. Aquifer Denitrification: Is it a Zero-Order or First-Order Reaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, S. F.

    2007-12-01

    Results from a network of 16 in situ mesocosms (ISMs) used to study aquifer denitrification at 5 sites in North Dakota and 4 sites in Minnesota (with 2 more installations planned for Iowa) are considered. At the Elk Valley aquifer (EVA) site in northeastern North Dakota, denitrification rates from six denitrification experiments were all better modeled as zero-order (0.16 +/- 0.05 mg nitrate-N/L/day), as determined by squared values of the linear correlation coefficient. Denitrification experiments at the other sites showed that denitrification was either below detection (< 0.01 mg nitrate-N/L/day) or was better modeled as a first-order reaction (0.00021/day to 0.0020/day), although squared values of the linear correlation coefficients for both rate models were nearly equal for some of the experiments. Not only were denitrification rates at the EVA site highest compared to the other sites in the ISM network, but sediment concentrations of electron donors at the EVA site were also greatest [ferrous iron about 0.3%, inorganic S (as pyrite) about 0.4%, organic C about 0.4%, weight basis]. These observations support the Michaelis- Menten model for reaction rates, which indicates that reaction rates will be zero-order when the substrate (electron donor) is abundant and first-order when the substrate availability is limited.

  2. Lock No. 1 St. Lucie Canal. Sector gates, internal struts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock No. 1- St. Lucie Canal. Sector gates, internal struts- nose beams. - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  3. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  4. Ruthenium indenylidene "1(st) generation" olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Cazin, Catherine S J

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords "1(st) generation" cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands.

  5. Ruthenium indenylidene “1st generation” olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite

    PubMed Central

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords “1st generation” cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands. PMID:26425210

  6. Ruthenium indenylidene "1(st) generation" olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Cazin, Catherine S J

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords "1(st) generation" cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands. PMID:26425210

  7. Ordering reactions in an Ni-25Mo-8Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Vasudevan, V.K.

    1996-04-01

    The transformations from short- to long-range order in Haynes{reg_sign} Alloy 242, a nominal Ni-25Mo-8Cr (in wt%) alloy, during isothermal aging at temperatures between 550 and 750 C are reported using microhardness measurements, and optical and transmission electron microscopy. Aging below the critical transformation temperature ({approximately} 775 C) led to considerable hardening; this hardening was associated with the formation of a very high volume fraction of Ni{sub 2} (Mo,Cr) domains/precipitates. The transformation from short- to long-range order was observed to proceed by a mechanism of continuous ordering at temperatures {le} 700 C, whereas at temperatures (750 C) close to the critical temperature a first order nucleation and growth mechanism appeared to be operative. The sequence of transformations are correlated with the associated diffraction effects and discussed in terms of theoretical formulations and experimental observations of other studies.

  8. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  9. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  10. ISS Update: 1st Annual ISS R&D Conference

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries talks by phone on Wednesday with Julie Robinson, ISS Program Scientist, about the 1st Annual International Space Station Research and Development Confere...

  11. 1st Baby Born with DNA from 3 Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_161176.html 1st Baby Born With DNA From 3 Parents Technique designed to help couples ... be born using a controversial technique that combines DNA from three people -- two women and a man. ...

  12. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Exondys 51 seems to fill unmet need for ... the first drug for a rare form of muscular dystrophy. Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) was granted accelerated approval to ...

  13. Effect of reactivity loss on apparent reaction order of burning char particles

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jeffrey J.; Shaddix, Christopher R.

    2010-03-15

    Considerable debate still exists in the char combustion community over the expected and observed reaction orders of carbon reacting with oxygen. In particular, very low values of the reaction order (approaching zero) are commonly observed in char combustion experiments. These observations appear to conflict with porous catalyst theory as first expressed by Thiele, which suggests that the apparent reaction order must be greater than 0.5. In this work, we propose that this conflict may be resolved by considering the decrease in char reactivity with burnout due to ash effects, thermal annealing, or other phenomena. Specifically, the influence of ash dilution of the available surface area on the apparent reaction order is explored. Equations describing the ash dilution effect are combined with a model for particle burnout based on single-film nth-order Arrhenius char combustion and yield an analytical expression for the effective reaction order. When this expression is applied for experimental conditions reflecting combustion of individual pulverized coal particles in an entrained flow reactor, the apparent reaction order is shown to be lower than the inherent char matrix reaction order, even for negligible extents of char conversion. As char conversion proceeds and approaches completion, the apparent reaction order drops precipitously past zero to negative values. Conversely, the inclusion of the ash dilution model has little effect on the char conversion profile or char particle temperature until significant burnout has occurred. Taken together, these results suggest that the common experimental observation of low apparent reaction orders during char combustion is a consequence of the lack of explicit modeling of the decrease in char reactivity with burnout. (author)

  14. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data. PMID:27237834

  15. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data.

  16. 1st HPV Test for Use with Preservative Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159789.html 1st HPV Test for Use With Preservative Fluid Human papillomavirus responsible for 70 percent of ... Roberts Friday, July 8, 2016 FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Roche's cobas HPV ...

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 1st Quarter FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A.

    2015-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (27 from the 1St Qtr FY-15 and 46 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 38 other issue reports (including nine not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions reported during the1st Qtr FY-15) identified at INL during the past 12 months.

  18. Design of experiments for zeroth and first-order reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Amo-Salas, Mariano; Martín-Martín, Raúl; Rodríguez-Aragón, Licesio J

    2014-09-01

    This work presents optimum designs for reaction rates experiments. In these experiments, time at which observations are to be made and temperatures at which reactions are to be run need to be designed. Observations are performed along time under isothermal conditions. Each experiment needs a fixed temperature and so the reaction can be measured at the designed times. For these observations under isothermal conditions over the same reaction a correlation structure has been considered. D-optimum designs are the aim of our work for zeroth and first-order reaction rates. Temperatures for the isothermal experiments and observation times, to obtain the most accurate estimates of the unknown parameters, are provided in these designs. D-optimum designs for a single observation in each isothermal experiment or for several correlated observations have been obtained. Robustness of the optimum designs for ranges of the correlation parameter and comparisons of the information gathered by different designs are also shown.

  19. Design of experiments for zeroth and first-order reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Amo-Salas, Mariano; Martín-Martín, Raúl; Rodríguez-Aragón, Licesio J

    2014-09-01

    This work presents optimum designs for reaction rates experiments. In these experiments, time at which observations are to be made and temperatures at which reactions are to be run need to be designed. Observations are performed along time under isothermal conditions. Each experiment needs a fixed temperature and so the reaction can be measured at the designed times. For these observations under isothermal conditions over the same reaction a correlation structure has been considered. D-optimum designs are the aim of our work for zeroth and first-order reaction rates. Temperatures for the isothermal experiments and observation times, to obtain the most accurate estimates of the unknown parameters, are provided in these designs. D-optimum designs for a single observation in each isothermal experiment or for several correlated observations have been obtained. Robustness of the optimum designs for ranges of the correlation parameter and comparisons of the information gathered by different designs are also shown. PMID:27535778

  20. Gravitational radiation reaction and balance equations to post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    1997-01-01

    Gravitational radiation reaction forces and balance equations are investigated to 3/2 post-Newtonian (1.5PN) order beyond the quadrupole approximation, corresponding to the 4PN order in the equations of motion of an isolated system. By matching a post-Newtonian solution for the gravitational field inside the system to a post-Minkowskian solution (obtained in a previous work) for the gravitational field exterior to the system, we determine the 1PN relativistic corrections to the ``Newtonian'' radiation reaction potential of Burke and Thorne. The 1PN reaction potential involves both scalar and vectorial components, with the scalar component depending on the mass-type quadrupole and octupole moments of the system, and the vectorial component depending in particular on the current-type quadrupole moment. In the case of binary systems, the 1PN radiation reaction potential has been shown elsewhere to yield consistent results for the 3.5PN approximation in the binary's equations of motion. Adding up the effects of tails, the radiation reaction is then written to 1.5PN order. In this paper, we establish the validity to 1.5PN order, for general systems, of the balance equations relating the losses of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum in the system to the corresponding fluxes in the radiation field far from the system.

  1. On Reaction Order of the Denaturation of Carp Muscle Proteins in KCI solution During Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Fuyuo; Miki, Hidemasa; Nishimoto, Jun-Ichi

    A kinetic analysis was made, in some details, of the published data showing the rates of denaturation of carp muscle actomyosin or myofibrils in the frozen KCI solution. The logarithm of protein solubility or ATPase activity were correlated by two straight lines with different slopes in plotting against storage time. However, the first-order rate constants decreased significantly with the storage time. When the reciprocals of protein solubility or activity were plotted against storage time, a straight line was obtained throughout the almost entire storage period. The second-order rate constants were reasonably constant for the storage period. The reaction order of denaturation was approximately 3/2 to 5/2, as estimated by the differential method from the denaturation curves. The facts indicate that the reaction of freeze-denaturation in KCI solution is not of first-order, but of around second-order. The applicability of the first-order and second-order rate constants as a measure in evaluating the variables effect on denaturation was discussed.

  2. Exploiting Photo-induced Reactions in Polymer Blends to Create Hierarchically Ordered, Defect-free Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Balazs, Anna [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

    2016-07-12

    Computer simulations reveal how photo-induced chemical reactions can be exploited to create long-range order in binary and ternary polymeric materials. The process is initiated by shining a spatially uniform light over a photosensitive AB binary blend, which undergoes both a reversible chemical reaction and phase separation. We then introduce a well-collimated, higher-intensity light source. Rastering this secondary light over the sample locally increases the reaction rate and causes formation of defect-free, spatially periodic structures. These binary structures resemble either the lamellar or hexagonal phases of microphase-separated di-block copolymers. We measure the regularity of the ordered structures as a function of the relative reaction rates for different values of the rastering speed and determine the optimal conditions for creating defect-free structures in the binary systems. We then add a non-reactive homo-polymer C, which is immiscible with both A and B. We show that this component migrates to regions that are illuminated by the secondary, higher-intensity light, allowing us to effectively write a pattern of C onto the AB film. Rastering over the ternary blend with this collimated light now leads to hierarchically ordered patterns of A, B, and C. The findings point to a facile, non-intrusive process for manufacturing high-quality polymeric devices in a low-cost, efficient manner.

  3. ["1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital" during the civil war].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G

    2014-04-01

    The article presents the documentary information about the founding, the establishment and early years of the 1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital - in the future - Mandryka Central Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. Presented the work of the Hospital during the dificult period of the Civil War, typhus epidemic, famine and devastation. Specified its staffing structure, command, medical and administrative staff, travel and accommodation till the moment of the deployment in the Silver Lane in Moscow. PMID:25051792

  4. The 1st All-Russian Workshop on Archaeoastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, Nikolai G.

    2007-08-01

    The 1st All-Russia Workshop on Archaeoastronomy “Astronomical and World-Outlook Meaning of the Archaeological Monuments of South Ural” was held on June 19-25, 2006, at the ground of the archaeological center “Arkaim” (Chelyabinsk Region). Besides about 30 talks, astronomical measurements were performed at two archaeological objects under intensive study: Arkaim Site (Bronze Epoch, XVIII-XVI c. B.C.) and tumuli “with whiskers” complex Kondurovsky (V-VIII c. A.D.). The promising character of the megalithic complex on the Vera Island (Lake Turgoyak) was stated.

  5. Turnover rate, reaction order, and elementary steps for the hydrodechlorination of chlorofluorocarbon compounds on palladium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Rioux, R.M.; Chen, N.; Ribeiro, F.H.

    2000-04-13

    The rates of hydrodechlorination catalyzed by Pd supported on carbon for four chlorofluorocarbons spanned a range of 7 orders of magnitude. The rates scaled up to the bond strength of the carbon-chlorine bond for the gas-phase reactant. This finding demonstrates that the rate-determining step involves the scission of the C-Cl bond and suggests, through Polanyi and linear free-energy relationships, that rates for other compounds can be estimated if the C-Cl bond strength is known. The reaction orders for the most abundant products are approximately first-order for the chlorine-containing compound, half-order in H{sub 2}, and inverse first-order in HCl. The reaction steps consistent with these orders include a rate-determining step involving the adsorption of the chlorofluorocarbon to a single site (which could be a single surface palladium atom) and equilibrated steps between gas-phase H{sub 2}, gas-phase HCl, and adsorbed hydrogen and chlorine atoms. The rates on the supported catalysts are comparable to the ones reported before on a Pd foil, indicating that the support does not play a role in the reaction. The product distribution is independent of conversion, implying that the various products are formed from a single visit of the reactant on the surface and not from readsorption of gas-phase products. The four compounds studied were chloropentafluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CF{sub 2}Cl), 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CFClH), 1,1-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CFCl{sub 2}), and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane (CF{sub 3}-CCl{sub 3}).

  6. Unified equation for access to rate constants of first-order reactions in dynamic and on-column reaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trapp, O

    2006-01-01

    A unified equation to evaluate elution profiles of reversible as well as irreversible (pseudo-) first-order reactions in dynamic chromatography and on-column reaction chromatography has been derived. Rate constants k1 and k(-1) and Gibbs activation energies are directly obtained from the chromatographic parameters (retention times tR(A) and tR(B) of the interconverting or reacting species A and B, the peak widths at half-height wA and wB, and the relative plateau height h(p)), the initial amounts A0 and B0 of the reacting species, and the equilibrium constant K(A/B). The calculation of rate constants requires only a few iterative steps without the need of performing a computationally extensive simulation of elution profiles. The unified equation was validated by comparison with a data set of 125,000 simulated elution profiles to confirm the quality of this equation by statistical means and to predict the minimal experimental requirements. Surprisingly, the recovery rate from a defined data set is on average 35% higher using the unified equation compared to the evaluation by iterative computer simulation.

  7. Modeling of atmospheric OH reaction rates using newly developed variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelj, Jernej; Pompe, Matevž

    2016-04-01

    A new variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index was used for development of structure-activity relationship for modeling reactivity of OH radical with alkanes and non-conjugated alkenes in the atmosphere. The proposed model is based on the assumptions that the total reaction rate can be obtained by summing all partial reaction rates and that all reaction sites are interrelated by influencing each other. The results suggest that these assumptions are justified. The model was compared with the EPA implemented model in the studied application domain and showed superior prediction capabilities. Further, optimized values of the weights that were used in our model permit some insight into mechanisms that govern the reaction OH + alkane/alkene. The most important conclusion is that the branching degree of the forming radical seems to play a major role in site specific reaction rates. Relative qualitative structural interpretation is possible, e.g. allylic site is suggested to be much more reactive than even tertiary sp3 carbon. Novel modeling software MACI, which was developed in our lab and is now available for research purposes, was used for calculations. Various variable topological indices that are again starting to be recognized because of their great potentials in simplicity, fast calculations, very good correlations and structural information, were implemented in the program.

  8. Is a proposed reaction mechanism free from unnecessary assumptions? Occam's razor applied in a mathematical way to complex first-order reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Göran; Linderberg, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Following Occam's principle, a proposed reaction mechanism should not contain assumptions about the existence of reactive intermediates and reaction paths that are unnecessary for a full description and interpretation of the available facts. A mechanism refers, in this paper, to a proposed reaction scheme or network that represents the reactions supposed to be going on in a complex reaction system with observable species as well as unobservable reactive intermediates. The scope is limited here to (pseudo) first-order reactions and the steady-state approximation is invoked in order to relate unknown mechanistic rate constants to experimentally determined ones, and, when available, theoretically calculated quantities. When the resulting, nonlinear system of equations admits a unique solution within a physically reasonable domain, it is concluded that the reaction mechanism fulfills Occam's principle. Otherwise, there are many or no solutions. No subjective or qualitative arguments enter the procedure and the outcome is not negotiable.

  9. Layered decomposition for the model order reduction of timescale separated biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Thomas P; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2014-09-01

    Biochemical reaction networks tend to exhibit behaviour on more than one timescale and they are inevitably modelled by stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. Singular perturbation is a well-established method for approximating stiff systems at a given timescale. Standard applications of singular perturbation partition the state variable into fast and slow modules and assume a quasi-steady state behaviour in the fast module. In biochemical reaction networks, many reactants may take part in both fast and slow reactions; it is not necessarily the case that the reactants themselves are fast or slow. Transformations of the state space are often required in order to create fast and slow modules, which thus no longer model the original species concentrations. This paper introduces a layered decomposition, which is a natural choice when reaction speeds are separated in scale. The new framework ensures that model reduction can be carried out without seeking state space transformations, and that the effect of the fast dynamics on the slow timescale can be described directly in terms of the original species.

  10. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  11. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-12-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  12. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering. PMID:26678797

  13. Fourier spectral method for higher order space fractional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindza, Edson; Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2016-11-01

    Evolution equations containing fractional derivatives can provide suitable mathematical models for describing important physical phenomena. In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate method for numerical solutions of space fractional reaction-diffusion equations. The proposed method is based on an exponential integrator scheme in time and the Fourier spectral method in space. The main advantages of this method are that it yields a fully diagonal representation of the fractional operator, with increased accuracy and efficiency, and a completely straightforward extension to high spatial dimensions. Although, in general, it is not obvious what role a high fractional derivative can play and how to make use of arbitrarily high-order fractional derivatives, we introduce them to describe fractional hyper-diffusions in reaction diffusion. The scheme justified by a number of computational experiments, this includes two and three dimensional partial differential equations. Numerical experiments are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Kinetics of Imidazole Catalyzed Ester Hydrolysis: Use of Buffer Dilutions to Determine Spontaneous Rate, Catalyzed Rate, and Reaction Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate kinetics experiment using buffer dilutions to determine spontaneous rate, catalyzed rate, and reaction order. The reaction utilized is hydrolysis of p-nitro-phenyl acetate in presence of imidazole, which has been shown to enhance rate of the reaction. (Author/JN)

  15. 1st Stage Separation Aerodynamics Of VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genito, M.; Paglia, F.; Mogavero, A.; Barbagallo, D.

    2011-05-01

    VEGA is an European launch vehicle under development by the Prime Contractor ELV S.p.A. in the frame of an ESA contract. It is constituted by four stages, dedicated to the scientific/commercial market of small satellites (300 ÷ 2500 kg) into Low Earth Orbits, with inclinations ranging from 5.2° up to Sun Synchronous Orbits and with altitude ranging from 300 to 1500 km. Aim of this paper is to present a study of flow field due to retro-rockets impingement during the 1st stage VEGA separation phase. In particular the main goal of the present work is to present the aerodynamic activities performed for the justification of the separation phase.

  16. Hydrodynamic theory of premixed flames: effects of stoichiometry, variable transport coefficients and arbitrary reaction orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, M.; Cui, C.; Bechtold, J. K.

    2003-07-01

    Based on a hydrodynamic length, which is typically larger than the nominal flame thickness, a premixed flame can be viewed as a surface of density discontinuity, advected and distorted by the flow. The velocities and the pressure suffer abrupt changes across the flame front that consist of Rankine Hugoniot jump conditions, to leading order, with corrections of the order of the flame thickness that account for transverse fluxes and accumulation. To complete the formulation, expressions for the flame temperature and propagation speed, which vary along the flame as a result of local non-uniformities in the flow field and of flame front curvature, are derived. Unlike previous studies that assumed a mixture consisting of a single deficient reactant, the present study uses a two-reactant scheme and thus considers mixtures whose compositions vary from lean to rich conditions. Furthermore, non-unity and general reaction orders are considered in an attempt to mimic a wider range of reaction mechanisms and, to better represent actual experimental conditions, all transport coefficients are allowed to depend arbitrarily on temperature. The present model, expressed in a coordinate-free form, is valid for flames of arbitrary shape propagating in general fluid flows, either laminar or turbulent.

  17. Unified semiclassical perturbation and infinite order sudden approximation, with application to the reaction path Hamiltonian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, William H.; Shi, Shenghua

    1981-09-01

    It is shown how two popular approximate dynamical models—the semiclassical perturbation (SCP) approximation and the infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation—can be combined in a consistent way that includes the correct features of both. Application of this unified SCP-IOS approximation to the reaction path Hamiltonian model of Miller, Handy, and Adam [J. Chem. Phys. 72, 99 (1980)] leads to extremely simple, explicit formulas for the reactive S matrix, product state distrubutions, etc., which can be readily applied to polyatomic systems. Initial numerical tests on a simple model problem indicate that the model is of useful accuracy.

  18. Flow injection analysis of ketoprofen based on the order transform second chemiluminescence reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yafeng; Cao, Guiping; Ge, Chuanqin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an order-transform-second-chemiluminescence (OTSCL) method combining the flow injection technique for the determination of ketoprofen. When ketoprofen solution was injected into the mixture after the end of the reaction of alkaline luminol and sodium periodate or sodium periodate solution was injected into the reaction mixture of ketoprofen and alkaline luminol, a new chemiluminescence (CL) reaction was initiated and strong CL signal was detected. A mechanism for the OTSCL has been proposed on the basis of the chemiluminescence kinetic characteristic, UV-visible absorption and chemiluminescent spectra. Under optimal experimental conditions, the CL response is proportional to the concentration of ketoprofen over the range of 2.0 × 10 -7 to 1.0 × 10 -5 mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9950 and a detection limit of 8.0 × 10 -9 mol/L (3 σ). The relative standard deviation for 11 repetitive determinations of 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L ketoprofen is 2.9%. The utility of this method was demonstrated by determining ketoprofen in pharmaceutical formulations without interference from its potential impurities.

  19. THEOS: The1st Thailand EO System and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peanvijarnpong, Chanchai

    Thailand has engaged in remote sensing satellite technological and scientific development many years since early 1980s. Thailand Landsat Station was established as a regional center of data processing and dissemination for Thai scientists for data applications. Over the years, GISTDA and Thai user community have been gaining technical experience and expertise in satellite data applications around the country such natural resources and environmental management, forest inventory, forest change detections, soil mapping, land-use and land cover mapping, crop type mapping, coastal shrimp farming, flood zone mapping, base mapping, water and drought management. The Government of Thailand realizes that remote sensing satellite technology is an important mechanism for social and economic development of the country. So the 1st Thailand Earth Observation System (THEOS) development program was approved by the Government since 2003. THEOS system is sub-synchronous satellite orbiting around the earth at 822 km. altitude same as SPOT satellites. It carries two imaging instruments; 2-m Panchromatic telescope with 22 km. swath width and 15-m resolution camera with four-multi-spectral band and 90-km swath wide. THEOS is scheduled to launch around March 2008. A number of technological and scientific activities has been implementing for Thailand and international scientific user community. Therefore THEOS is strong endorsement from the Government of Thailand on the value of remote sensing technology. This paper presents Thailand EO activities including THEOS System and its plans.

  20. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  1. Ordered Mesoporous Polymers for Biomass Conversions and Cross-Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fujian; Wu, Qin; Liu, Chen; Qi, Chenze; Huang, Kuan; Zheng, Anmin; Dai, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Amino group-functionalized, ordered mesoporous polymers (OMP-NH2 ) were prepared using a solvent-free synthesis by grinding mixtures of solid raw precursors (aminophenol, terephthaldehyde), using block copolymer templates, and curing at 140-180 °C. OMP-NH2 was functionalized with acidic sites and incorporated with palladium, giving multifunctional solid catalysts with large Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, abundant and ordered mesopores, good thermal stabilities, controllable concentrations, and good dispersion of active centers. The resultant solid catalysts showed excellent catalytic activities and good reusability in biomass conversions and cross-coupling reactions-much superior to those of various reported solid catalysts such as Amberlyst 15, SBA-15-SO3 H, and Pd/C and comparable to those of homogeneous catalysts such as heteropoly acid, HCl, and palladium acetate. A facile green approach was developed for the synthesis of ordered mesoporous polymeric solid catalysts with excellent activities for conversion of low-cost feedstocks into useful chemicals and clean biofuels. PMID:27529676

  2. Effect of first-order chemical reaction on gravitational instability in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Chan; Choi, Chang Kyun

    2014-11-01

    To understand the CO_{2} sequestration in the saline aquifer, the effect of a first-order chemical reaction on the onset of the buoyancy-driven instability in an isotropic reactive porous medium is analyzed theoretically. Under the linear stability theory, the stability equations are derived in the semi-infinite domain and they are solved with and without the quasi-steady-state approximation. We also considered the stability of the reactive system at a steady-state limit. The analysis for the steady-state case proposed that the onset of instability motion can occur during the transient period even if the system is stable at the steady state. Through the initial growth rate analysis the most unstable initial disturbance is determined, and it is found that initially the system is unconditionally stable regardless of the Damköhler number D_{a} and the Darcy-Rayleigh number Ra. Based on the results of the initial growth rate analysis, the direct numerical simulation is also conducted by using the Fourier pseudospectral method. The present theoretical and numerical analyses suggest that the chemical reaction makes the system stable and no convective motion can be expected for D_{a}/Ra^{2}>2.5×10^{-3}.

  3. 94. DETAIL, SAME BEAN AS ABOVE, MARKED 'PATENTED DEC. 1ST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. DETAIL, SAME BEAN AS ABOVE, MARKED 'PATENTED DEC. 1ST 1857' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. Organic Lecture Demonstrations of Common-Ion Effect, Ionizing Power of Solvents, and First-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danen, Wayne C.; Blecha, M. Therese, Sr.

    1982-01-01

    Background information and experimental procedures are provided for three lecture-demonstrations (involving hydrolysis of tetra-butyl chloride) illustrating: (1) common-ion or mass law effect; (2) effect of changing ionizing power of a solvent on a solvolysis reaction; and (3) collecting/plotting data to illustrate a first-order reaction.…

  5. Ordered mesoporous silica prepared by quiescent interfacial growth method - effects of reaction chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acidic interfacial growth can provide a number of industrially important mesoporous silica morphologies including fibers, spheres, and other rich shapes. Studying the reaction chemistry under quiescent (no mixing) conditions is important for understanding and for the production of the desired shapes. The focus of this work is to understand the effect of a number of previously untested conditions: acid type (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4), acid content, silica precursor type (TBOS and TEOS), and surfactant type (CTAB, Tween 20, and Tween 80) on the shape and structure of products formed under quiescent two-phase interfacial configuration. Results show that the quiescent growth is typically slow due to the absence of mixing. The whole process of product formation and pore structuring becomes limited by the slow interfacial diffusion of silica source. TBOS-CTAB-HCl was the typical combination to produce fibers with high order in the interfacial region. The use of other acids (HNO3 and H2SO4), a less hydrophobic silica source (TEOS), and/or a neutral surfactant (Tweens) facilitate diffusion and homogenous supply of silica source into the bulk phase and give spheres and gyroids with low mesoporous order. The results suggest two distinct regions for silica growth (interfacial region and bulk region) in which the rate of solvent evaporation and local concentration affect the speed and dimension of growth. A combined mechanism for the interfacial bulk growth of mesoporous silica under quiescent conditions is proposed. PMID:24237719

  6. Proceedings of the 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Edna; Robb, James A.; Stefanoff, Gustavo; Mellado, Robert Hunter; Coppola, Domenico; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Flores, Idhaliz

    2015-01-01

    The 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop took place on August 20th, 2014 in the Auditorium of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan Puerto Rico. The program for this 1-day, live workshop included lectures by three biobanking experts, followed by presentations from existing biobanks in Puerto Rico and audience discussion. The need for increasing biobanking expertise in Puerto Rico stems from the fact that Hispanics in general are underrepresented in the biobanks in existence in the US, which limits the research conducted specifically to understand the molecular differences in cancer cells compared to other better studied populations. In turn, this lack of information impairs the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our population. Dr. James Robb, M.D., F.C.A.P., consulting pathologist to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR), opened the workshop with a discussion on the basic aspects of the science of biobanking (e.g., what is a biobank; its goals and objectives; protocols and procedures) in his talk addressing the importance of banking tissues for advancing biomedical research. Next, Dr. Gustavo Stefanoff, from the Cancer Institutes Network of Latin America (RINC by its name in Spanish), explained the mission, objectives, and structure of the Network of Latin-American and Caribbean Biobanks (REBLAC by its name in Spanish), which despite limited resources and many challenges, currently accrue high quality human tissue specimens and data to support cancer research in the region. Dr. Robert Hunter-Mellado, Professor of Internal Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, followed with an examination of the ethical and regulatory aspects of biobanking tissues for future research, including informed consent of subjects; protection of human subjects rights; and balancing risks and benefit ratios. In the afternoon, the

  7. Psychiatric Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for 1st and 2nd Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell-Swanson, La Vonne; Frankenberger, William; Ley, Katie; Bowman, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the proportion of children in 1st and 2nd grade classes who were currently prescribed medication for psychotropic disorders. The study also examined the attitudes of 1st and 2nd grade teachers toward diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and use of psychiatric medication to treat children. Results of the current study indicate…

  8. The unified equation for the evaluation of degenerated first-order reactions in dynamic electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Oliver

    2006-08-01

    An analytical solution for the unified equation for degenerated (pseudo-) first-order reactions, e.g., enantiomerization processes, in dynamic CE is presented, and validated with a dataset of 31 250 elution profiles covering typical experimental parameters. The unified equation was applied to determine the enantiomerization barrier of the hypnotic glutarimide derivative thalidomide (Contergan(R)) by dynamic capillary electrokinetic chromatography (DEKC). The enantiomer separation of thalidomide was performed in an aqueous 50 mM sodium borate buffer at pH 9.3 in the presence of the chiral mobile phase additive carboxymethyl-beta-CD. Interconversion profiles featuring pronounced plateau formation were observed. Activation parameters DeltaH( not equal) and DeltaS( not equal) were obtained from temperature-dependent measurements between 20.0 and 37.5 degrees C in 2.5K steps. From the activation parameters the enantiomerization barrier of thalidomide at 37 degrees C under basic conditions were calculated to be DeltaG( not equal) = 93.2 kJ/mol. Comparison of the kinetic data with results obtained at pH 8.0 reveals the catalytic influence of the base on the enantiomerization barrier.

  9. The unified equation for the evaluation of first order reactions in dynamic electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Oliver

    2006-02-01

    The unified equation was validated for first order reactions in dynamic CE with a data set of 31 250 elution profiles. Comparison with the results from conventional iterative computer simulation revealed that the unified equation is superior in terms of success rate and precision. The unified equation was applied to determine the cis-trans isomerization rate constants of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril. The separation of the rotational cis-trans isomeric drug has been performed in an aqueous 66 mM citric acid/Tris buffer at pH 3.0 in a 50 cm polyacrylamide-coated fused-silica capillary. Interconversion profiles featuring pronounced plateau formation and peak broadening were observed. Activation parameters DeltaH not equal and DeltaS not equal were obtained from temperature-dependent measurements between 10 and 25 degrees C in 2.5 K steps. From the activation parameters the isomerization barriers of captopril at 37 degrees C under acidic conditions were calculated to be DeltaG not equal trans-->cis=90.6 kJ/mol and DeltaG not equal cis-->trans=84.6 kJ/mol. By comparison of the kinetic data with the results obtained under basic conditions (pH 9.3) a mechanism of isomerization could be proposed.

  10. The unified equation for the evaluation of degenerated first-order reactions in dynamic electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Oliver

    2006-08-01

    An analytical solution for the unified equation for degenerated (pseudo-) first-order reactions, e.g., enantiomerization processes, in dynamic CE is presented, and validated with a dataset of 31 250 elution profiles covering typical experimental parameters. The unified equation was applied to determine the enantiomerization barrier of the hypnotic glutarimide derivative thalidomide (Contergan(R)) by dynamic capillary electrokinetic chromatography (DEKC). The enantiomer separation of thalidomide was performed in an aqueous 50 mM sodium borate buffer at pH 9.3 in the presence of the chiral mobile phase additive carboxymethyl-beta-CD. Interconversion profiles featuring pronounced plateau formation were observed. Activation parameters DeltaH( not equal) and DeltaS( not equal) were obtained from temperature-dependent measurements between 20.0 and 37.5 degrees C in 2.5K steps. From the activation parameters the enantiomerization barrier of thalidomide at 37 degrees C under basic conditions were calculated to be DeltaG( not equal) = 93.2 kJ/mol. Comparison of the kinetic data with results obtained at pH 8.0 reveals the catalytic influence of the base on the enantiomerization barrier. PMID:16800031

  11. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m(2) g(-1)), a high mass activity (398 mA mg(-1)) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm(-2)), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst. PMID:27550737

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m2 g−1), a high mass activity (398 mA mg−1) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm−2), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst. PMID:27550737

  13. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  14. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m2 g‑1), a high mass activity (398 mA mg‑1) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm‑2), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst.

  15. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  16. The kinetics of the O2/CO2 reaction in molten carbonate - Reaction orders for O2 and CO2 on NiO. [in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnick, J.; Ross, P. N.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of the O2/CO2 reaction in molten carbonate is investigated using paste electrolytes and nickel sinter electrodes. A two-step approach to the determination of reaction orders is employed. First, exchange currents at various P(CO2) and P(O2) were measured using the low polarization method. Second, alpha(+) and alpha(-) values were obtained from the slope of the Allen-Hickling plot for current densities low enough so that concentration polarization within the electrode can be neglected. The reaction orders are + 1/4 in CO2 and + 5/8 in O2 in the cathodic direction, and - 3/4 in CO2 and + 1/8 in O2 in the anodic direction.

  17. Macroscopic lithotype characterisation of the 1st Middle-Polish (1st Lusatian) Lignite Seam in the Miocene of central Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widera, Marek

    2012-03-01

    The 1st Middle-Polish (1st Lusatian) Lignite Seam is exploited in open-cast mines in central Poland. A large number of lignite lithotypes, grouped in four lithotype associations, are distinguished: xylitic, detritic, xylo-detritic and detro-xylitic lithotype associations, which show various structures. Each lithotype association was produced under specific peat-forming environmental conditions. In the case of the lignite seams under study they represent all the main environments that are known from Neogene mires, i.e.: fen or open water, bush moor, wet forest swamp and dry forest swamp. For a simple and practical description in the field of both the lignite sections and borehole cores, a new codification for lignite lithotypes is proposed. It is based on the codification of clastic deposits (lithofacies). The practical value of the new lignite lithotype codification is examined in three vertical sections of the 1st Middle-Polish Lignite Seam.

  18. An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

  19. Charting an Alternate Pathway to Reaction Orders and Rate Laws in Introductory Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Criswell, Brett A.; McAllister, Nicole D.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Moore, Lamesha A.; Pierre, Michelle S.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction kinetics is an axiomatic topic in chemistry that is often addressed as early as the high school course and serves as the foundation for more sophisticated conversations in college-level organic, physical, and biological chemistry courses. Despite the fundamental nature of reaction kinetics, students can struggle with transforming their…

  20. Two-pion-exchange and other higher-order contributions to the pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Sato, T.; Myhrer, F.; Kubodera, K.

    2009-07-15

    Much effort has been invested on effective-field-theoretical studies of the near-threshold NN{yields}NN{pi} reactions and, in order to deal with the somewhat large three-momentum transfers involved, the momentum counting scheme (MCS) was proposed as an alternative to the usual Weinberg counting scheme. Given the fact that a quantitative explanation of the existing high-precision NN{yields}NN{pi} data requires a careful examination of higher chiral order contributions to the transition operator, we make a detailed numerical investigation of the convergence property of MCS for a pilot case of the pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction. Our study indicates that MCS is superior to the Weinberg scheme in identifying dominant higher order contributions to the NN{yields}NN{pi} reactions.

  1. The K⁻N→KΞ reaction in coupled channel chiral models up to next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Magas, V. K.; Ramos, A.; Feijoo, A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the meson-baryon interaction in S-wave in the strangeness S=-1 sector using a chiral unitary approach based on a next-to-leading order chiral SU(3) Lagrangian. We fit our model to the large set of experimental data in different two-body channels. We pay particular attention to the K⁻N→KΞ reaction, where the effect of the next-to-leading order terms in the Lagrangian are sufficiently large to be observed, since at tree level the cross section of this reaction is zero. For these channels we improve our approach by phenomenologically taking into account effects of the high spin hyperonic resonances.

  2. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  3. Texas Reports 1st U.S. Case of Zika from Travel to Another State

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160450.html Texas Reports 1st U.S. Case of Zika From Travel to Another State Resident had recently ... what appears to be the first case of Zika infection traveling across state lines, Texas health officials ...

  4. 45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Turn span from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Overall view, from S. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. BLOEDNER MONUMENT (32ND INDIANA, 1ST GERMAN MONUMENT), SECTION C, FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLOEDNER MONUMENT (32ND INDIANA, 1ST GERMAN MONUMENT), SECTION C, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF GERMAN TEXT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cave Hill National Cemetery, 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  7. U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years

    MedlinePlus

    ... 161792.html U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years March of Dimes' report finds ... United States increased in 2015 for the first time in eight years, and rates are especially high ...

  8. 28. ENGINE CLUSTER OF 1ST STAGE OF A SATURN I ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. ENGINE CLUSTER OF 1ST STAGE OF A SATURN I ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. VIEW SOUTH/SOUTHEAST LOOKING DOWN ON 2ND AQUEDUCT AND 1ST AQUEDUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH/SOUTHEAST LOOKING DOWN ON 2ND AQUEDUCT AND 1ST AQUEDUCT CASCADES TOWARDS FILTRATION PLANT AND LOS ANGELES RESERVOIR - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Cascades Structures, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 4. VIEW WEST, WEST SIDE, SHOWING CHANNELS 1ST AND 2ND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW WEST, WEST SIDE, SHOWING CHANNELS 1ST AND 2ND VERTICAL BRACED DOUBLE ANGLES, DIAGONAL BRACING AND CROSS BRACED RAILING - Thirty-Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning Rabbit River, Hamilton, Allegan County, MI

  11. 14. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, 1st floor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, 1st floor, crib area of building, showing electrical and plumbing cribs, wall and ceiling detail, looking S. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  12. 7. 1ST FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING DINING ROOM FIREPLACE (LEFT); ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 1ST FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING DINING ROOM FIREPLACE (LEFT); ENTRY SITTING ROOM FIREPLACE (RIGHT) AND LIVING ROOM (BACKGROUND). - Fort Riley, Building No. 4, 4 Barry Avenue, Riley, Riley County, KS

  13. Florida Reports 1st Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160151.html Florida Reports 1st Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S. 4 cases likely originated from ... apparently experiencing its first local outbreak of the Zika virus, with four human infections reported in South ...

  14. 62. Neg. No. F75A, Jun 18, 1930, INTERIORWAREHOUSE, 1ST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. Neg. No. F-75A, Jun 18, 1930, INTERIOR-WAREHOUSE, 1ST FLOOR, STORAGE OF AUTOMOBILE COMPONENTS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. MAGAZINE E30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE E-30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL LOOKING TO THE REAR OF THE MAGAZINE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 19. Detail of brick courses 116, back side, between 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail of brick courses 1-16, back side, between 1st and 2nd windows from the right - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  17. 20. Detail of brick courses 4675, back side, between 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of brick courses 46-75, back side, between 1st and 2nd windows from the right - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  18. If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study Chances just as high for women who go ... it really is a potent factor," said senior study author Laura Jelliffe-Pawlowski. She is associate director ...

  19. Analytical Solution for Multi-Species Contaminant Transport Subject to Sequential First-Order Decay Reactions in Finite Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transport equations governing the movement of multiple solutes undergoing sequential first-order decay reactions have relevance in analyzing a variety of subsurface contaminant transport problems. In this study, a one-dimensional analytical solution for multi-species transport is obtained for finite...

  20. Evaluating rates and yields of second-order, photoinitiated reactions under conditons of Gaussian-profile excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Cambron, R.T.; Zhu, X.R.; Harris, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Under conditions of Gaussian radial profile excitation, a mixed-order kinetic model is used to interpret the rates and yields of photoinitiated reactions. This model is used to determine the triplet-triplet annihilation rate constant for benzophenone in acetonitrile and anthracene at room temperature. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  2. Synthesis of ordered conjugated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polymers through polymerization reaction on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongping; Zhao, Huiling; Lu, Yan; Xiang, Feifei; Leng, Xinli; Liu, Xiaoqing; Song, Xin; Dong, Mingdong; Wang, Li

    2016-06-28

    One-dimensional π-conjugated polymer chains with variable lengths have been synthesized successfully via thermal polymerization reaction on the Au(111) surface. Such polymer chains form parallel arrays along specific directions according to the initial assembly orientations of the close-packed Br-BTTN precursors. PMID:27302478

  3. Toward efficiency in heterogeneous multispecies reactive transport modeling: A particle-tracking solution for first-order network reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernández-Garcia, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Modeling multispecies reactive transport in natural systems with strong heterogeneities and complex biochemical reactions is a major challenge for assessing groundwater polluted sites with organic and inorganic contaminants. A large variety of these contaminants react according to serial-parallel reaction networks commonly simplified by a combination of first-order kinetic reactions. In this context, a random-walk particle tracking method is presented. This method is capable of efficiently simulating the motion of particles affected by first-order network reactions in three-dimensional systems, which are represented by spatially variable physical and biochemical coefficients described at high resolution. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and location at a given time will be transformed into and moved to another species and location afterward. These probabilities are derived from the solution matrix of the spatial moments governing equations. The method is fully coupled with reactions, free of numerical dispersion and overcomes the inherent numerical problems stemming from the incorporation of heterogeneities to reactive transport codes. In doing this, we demonstrate that the motion of particles follows a standard random walk with time-dependent effective retardation and dispersion parameters that depend on the initial and final chemical state of the particle. The behavior of effective parameters develops as a result of differential retardation effects among species. Moreover, explicit analytic solutions of the transition probability matrix and related particle motions are provided for serial reactions. An example of the effect of heterogeneity on the dechlorination of organic solvents in a three-dimensional random porous media shows that the power-law behavior typically observed in conservative tracers breakthrough curves can be largely compromised by the

  4. Toward efficiency in heterogeneous multispecies reactive transport modeling: A particle-tracking solution for first-order network reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Modeling multi-species reactive transport in natural systems with strong heterogeneities and complex biochemical reactions is a major challenge for assessing groundwater polluted sites with organic and inorganic contaminants. A large variety of these contaminants react according to serial-parallel reaction networks commonly simplified by a combination of first-order kinetic reactions. In this context, a random-walk particle tracking method is presented. This method is capable of efficiently simulating the motion of particles affected by first-order network reactions in three-dimensional systems, which are represented by spatially variable physical and biochemical coefficients described at high resolution. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and location at a given time will be transformed into and moved to another species and location afterwards. These probabilities are derived from the solution matrix of the spatial moments governing equations. The method is fully coupled with reactions, free of numerical dispersion and overcomes the inherent numerical problems stemming from the incorporation of heterogeneities to reactive transport codes. In doing this, we demonstrate that the motion of particles follows a standard random walk with time-dependent effective retardation and dispersion parameters that depend on the initial and final chemical state of the particle. The behavior of effective parameters develops as a result of differential retardation effects among species. Moreover, explicit analytic solutions of the transition probability matrix and related particle motions are provided for serial reactions. An example of the effect of heterogeneity on the dechlorination of organic solvents in a three-dimensional random porous media shows that the power-law behavior typically observed in conservative tracers breakthrough curves can be largely compromised by the

  5. Analysis of gas absorption to a thin liquid film in the presence of a zero-order chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of the process of gas absorption to a thin liquid film adjacent to a horizontal rotating disk. The film is formed by the impingement of a controlled liquid jet at the center of the disk and subsequent radial spreading of liquid along the disk. The chemical reaction between the gas and the liquid film can be expressed as a zero-order homogeneous reaction. The process was modeled by establishing equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and species concentration and solving them analytically. A scaling analysis was used to determine dominant transport processes. Appropriate boundary conditions were used to solve these equations to develop expressions for the local concentration of gas across the thickness of the film and distributions of film height, bulk concentration, and Sherwood number along the radius of the disk. The partial differential equation for species concentration was solved using the separation of variables technique along with the Duhamel's theorem and the final analytical solution was expressed using confluent hypergeometric functions. Tables for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are presented for a number of reaction rate constants. A parametric study was performed using Reynolds number, Ekman number, and dimensionless reaction rate as parameters. At all radial locations, Sherwood number increased with Reynolds number (flow rate) as well as Ekman number (rate of rotation). The enhancement of mass transfer due to chemical reaction was found to be small when compared to the case of no reaction (pure absorption), but the enhancement factor was very significant when compared to pure absorption in a stagnant liquid film. The zero-order reaction processes considered in the present investigation included the absorption of oxygen in aqueous alkaline solutions of sodiumdithionite and rhodium complex catalyzed carbonylation of methanol. Present analytical results were compared to previous theoretical

  6. INL FY2014 1st Quarterly Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Loran Kinghorn

    2014-07-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2 “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 76 occurrence reports and over 16 other deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at the INL during the period of October 2013 through December 2013. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) operates the INL under contract DE AC 07 051D14517

  7. Dichlorination of (HDDA-Generated) Benzynes and a Protocol for Interrogating the Kinetic Order of Bimolecular Aryne Trapping Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Wang, Tao; Woods, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The efficient dichlorination of benzynes prepared by the hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reaction is reported. Cycloisomerization of a triyne substrate in the presence of dilithium tetrachlorocuprate is shown to provide dichlorinated products A by capture of the benzyne intermediate. A general strategy for discerning the kinetic order of an external aryne trapping agent is presented. It merely requires measurement of the competition between bimolecular vs. unimolecular trapping events (here, dichlorination vs. IMDA reaction to give A vs. B, respectively) as a function of the concentration of the trapping agent. PMID:24329102

  8. Low amplitude insult project: Structural analysis and prediction of low order reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scammon, R.J.; Browning, R.V.; Middleditch, J.; Dienes, J.K.; Haberman, K.S.; Bennett, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    The low velocity impact sensitivity of PBX 9501 has been investigated through a series of experiments based on the Steven Test targets and a set of Shear Impact experiments. The authors describe calculations done using DYNA2D, SPRONTO and DYNA3D to support these, and other, low amplitude insult experiments. The calculations allow them to study pressure and strain rate variables, to investigate structural aspects of the experiment, and to predict velocities required for reaction. Structural analyses have played an active role in this project beginning with the original target design and continuing through analyses of the experimental results. Alternative designs and various ideas for active instrumentation were examined as part of the experiment evolution process. Predictions of reaction are used to guide these design studies, even though the authors do not yet have enough experimental data to fully calibrate any of the models.

  9. 1st trimester miscarriage: four decades of study

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Philip John

    2015-01-01

    Miscarriage is a very common occurrence in humans. This paper sets out to present published data on research that has provided increased understanding of pregnancy failure. Clarification of definitions, exploring the range of failures from preclinical to later pregnancy losses, and the scientific tools employed to find information on the losses have been documented. What is now understood, which tools work best, and the associated limitations are all discussed. Early studies used cytogenetic methods and tissue culture to obtain results. Improvements in laboratory tools such as better tissue culture incubators, inverted microscopes, laminar flow hoods, improvements in culture media, all contributed to obtaining more results for patients. These studies demonstrated the significant contribution of unbalanced chromosomal karyotypes to pregnancy failure. Maternal age as a contributing factor in trisomy was clearly demonstrated. First trimester miscarriage exhibits very high cytogenetic abnormality; in contrast to very low rates in later losses. Combining data across all time periods of pregnancy will affect the significance of chromosomal error in the early pregnancy failures. Cytogenetic methods investigate whole genomes, and are considered to represent the standard against which new methods must be validated. New molecular genetic methods provide the opportunity to examine samples without the necessity of tissue culture. Techniques may be site-specific or whole genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), array-based CGH, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and quantitative fluorescent PCR (QF-PCR), have all been utilised. In comparison studies with classical/conventional cytogenetics, each newer method offers advantages and limitations. At the present time, a combined approach using conventional and molecular methods will elucidate the cause of miscarriage for

  10. National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems 1st Annual Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma; Swindell, Tina

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems (NIRPS) is a Government -wide initiative that seeks to ensure the resiliency of the Nation fs rocket propulsion community in order for the enterprise to remain vibrant and capable of providing reliable and affordable propulsion systems for the nation fs defense, civil and commercial needs. Recognizing that rocket propulsion is a multi-use technology that ensures the nation fs leadership in aerospace, the Government has a vested interest in maintaining this strategic capability through coordinated and synchronized acquisition programs and continual investments in research and development. NIRPS is a resource for collaboration and integration between all sectors of the U.S. propulsion enterprise, supporting policy development options, identifying technology requirements, and offering solutions that maximize national resources while ensuring that capability exists to meet future demand. NIRPS functions as a multi ]agency organization that our nation fs decision makers can look to for comprehensive information regarding all issues concerning the propulsion enterprise.

  11. Gold–promoted structurally ordered intermetallic palladium cobalt nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2014-11-06

    Considerable efforts to make palladium and palladium alloys active catalysts and a possible replacement for platinum have had a marginal success. Here, we report on a structurally ordered Au₁₀Pd₄₀Co₅₀ catalyst that exhibits comparable activity to conventional platinum catalysts in both acid and alkaline media. Electron microscopic techniques demonstrate that via addition of gold atoms PdCo nanoparticles undergo at elevated temperatures an atomic structural transition from core-shell to a rare intermetallic ordered structure with twin boundaries forming stable {111}, {110} and {100} facets. The superior stability of this catalyst compared to platinum after 10,000 potential cycles in alkaline media is attributed to the atomic structural order of PdCo nanoparticles along with protective effect of clusters of gold atoms on the surface. This strategy of making ordered palladium intermetallic alloy nanoparticles can be used in diverse heterogeneous catalysis where particle size and structural stability matters.

  12. Impact of magnetohydrodynamics in bidirectional flow of nanofluid subject to second order slip velocity and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the steady three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscous nanofluid. The flow is caused by a permeable stretching surface with second order velocity slip and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Water is treated as base fluid and copper as nanoparticle. An incompressible fluid fills the porous space. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of an applied magnetic field. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by using suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are derived. Impact of various pertinent parameters on the velocity, concentration and skin friction coefficient is discussed. Analysis of the obtained results shows that the flow field is influenced appreciably by the presence of velocity slip parameters. Also concentration distribution decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter.

  13. A higher-order numerical framework for stochastic simulation of chemical reaction systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this paper, we present a framework for improving the accuracy of fixed-step methods for Monte Carlo simulation of discrete stochastic chemical kinetics. Stochasticity is ubiquitous in many areas of cell biology, for example in gene regulation, biochemical cascades and cell-cell interaction. However most discrete stochastic simulation techniques are slow. We apply Richardson extrapolation to the moments of three fixed-step methods, the Euler, midpoint and θ-trapezoidal τ-leap methods, to demonstrate the power of stochastic extrapolation. The extrapolation framework can increase the order of convergence of any fixed-step discrete stochastic solver and is very easy to implement; the only condition for its use is knowledge of the appropriate terms of the global error expansion of the solver in terms of its stepsize. In practical terms, a higher-order method with a larger stepsize can achieve the same level of accuracy as a lower-order method with a smaller one, potentially reducing the computational time of the system. Results By obtaining a global error expansion for a general weak first-order method, we prove that extrapolation can increase the weak order of convergence for the moments of the Euler and the midpoint τ-leap methods, from one to two. This is supported by numerical simulations of several chemical systems of biological importance using the Euler, midpoint and θ-trapezoidal τ-leap methods. In almost all cases, extrapolation results in an improvement of accuracy. As in the case of ordinary and stochastic differential equations, extrapolation can be repeated to obtain even higher-order approximations. Conclusions Extrapolation is a general framework for increasing the order of accuracy of any fixed-step stochastic solver. This enables the simulation of complicated systems in less time, allowing for more realistic biochemical problems to be solved. PMID:23256696

  14. Gold–promoted structurally ordered intermetallic palladium cobalt nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2014-11-06

    Considerable efforts to make palladium and palladium alloys active catalysts and a possible replacement for platinum have had a marginal success. Here, we report on a structurally ordered Au₁₀Pd₄₀Co₅₀ catalyst that exhibits comparable activity to conventional platinum catalysts in both acid and alkaline media. Electron microscopic techniques demonstrate that via addition of gold atoms PdCo nanoparticles undergo at elevated temperatures an atomic structural transition from core-shell to a rare intermetallic ordered structure with twin boundaries forming stable {111}, {110} and {100} facets. The superior stability of this catalyst compared to platinum after 10,000 potential cycles in alkaline media is attributedmore » to the atomic structural order of PdCo nanoparticles along with protective effect of clusters of gold atoms on the surface. This strategy of making ordered palladium intermetallic alloy nanoparticles can be used in diverse heterogeneous catalysis where particle size and structural stability matters.« less

  15. Ammonia-treated Ordered Mesoporous Carbons as Catalytic Materials for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Je Seung; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Dai, Sheng

    2010-04-13

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have been considered as promising alternative power sources for many mobile and stationary applications. Compared to the fast hydrogen oxidation at the anode, the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode requires high-performance catalysts. Currently, platium (Pt) nanoparticles supported on high surface area carbons remain the best catalysts for ORR. However, both instability and high cost of Pt-based catalysts represent two main obstacles limiting the commercial applications of PEMFCs. The instability of supported Pt catalysts is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon support under operation conditions and the agglomation and detachment of Pt particles, leading to a decrease in catalytic surface areas. Development of corrosion resistant supports and enhancement of the interactions between Pt and supports are two strategies to improve the cathode long-term activity.

  16. Minimally Invasive Arthrodesis of 1st Metatarsophalangeal Joint for Hallux Rigidus.

    PubMed

    Sott, A H

    2016-09-01

    First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis plays a significant role in the management of symptomatic hallux rigidus/osteoarthritis of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. Several open and few percutaneous techniques have been described in the literature. This article describes and discusses a percutaneous technique that has been successfully used to achieve a pain-free stable and functional 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. All aspects of surgical indication and operative technique and details of patient-reported outcomes are presented with a referenced discussion. PMID:27524706

  17. First-order reactant in homogeneous turbulence before the final period of decay. [contaminant fluctuations in chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, P.; Patel, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for studying theoretically the concentration fluctuations of a dilute contaminate undergoing a first-order chemical reaction. The method is based on Deissler's (1958) theory for homogeneous turbulence for times before the final period, and it follows the approach used by Loeffler and Deissler (1961) to study temperature fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence. Four-point correlation equations are obtained; it is assumed that terms containing fifth-order correlation are very small in comparison with those containing fourth-order correlations, and can therefore be neglected. A spectrum equation is obtained in a form which can be solved numerically, yielding the decay law for the concentration fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence for the period much before the final period of decay.

  18. Path-integral calculations of heavy atom kinetic isotope effects in condensed phase reactions using higher-order Trotter factorizations.

    PubMed

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Azuri, Asaf; Major, Dan Thomas

    2012-02-01

    A convenient approach to compute kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in condensed phase chemical reactions is via path integrals (PIs). Usually, the primitive approximation is used in PI simulations, although such quantum simulations are computationally demanding. The efficiency of PI simulations may be greatly improved, if higher-order Trotter factorizations of the density matrix operator are used. In this study, we use a higher-order PI method, in conjunction with mass-perturbation, to compute heavy-atom KIE in the decarboxylation of orotic acid in explicit sulfolane solvent. The results are in good agreement with experiment and show that the mass-perturbation higher-order Trotter factorization provides a practical approach for computing condensed phase heavy-atom KIE.

  19. Power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-03-01

    The finite-time thermodynamic method based on probability analysis can more accurately describe various performance parameters of thermodynamic systems. Based on the relation between optimal efficiency and power output of a generalized Carnot heat engine with a finite high-temperature heat reservoir (heat source) and an infinite low-temperature heat reservoir (heat sink) and with the only irreversibility of heat transfer, this paper studies the problem of power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory, puts forward a model of the coupling heat engine which can be run periodically and obtains the effects of the finite-time thermodynamic characteristics of the coupling relation between chemical reaction and heat engine on the power optimization. The results show that the first order reaction kinetics model can use fuel more effectively, and can provide heat engine with higher temperature heat source to increase the power output of the heat engine. Moreover, the power fluctuation bounds of the chemically driven heat engine are obtained by using the probability analysis method. The results may provide some guidelines for the character analysis and power optimization of the chemically driven heat engines.

  20. The infinite-order-sudden method for light-heavy-light reactions: Application to D+HCl --> DCl+H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.; Drolshagen, Gerhard

    1982-05-01

    An infinite-order-sudden (IOS) theory for light-heavy-light reactions is applied to the D+HCl(v = 0, j)→DCl(v'?1, j')+H reaction. The results are compared with those obtained using a more accurate quantum-dynamical technique, the ESA-CSA method, in which the energy sudden approximation is used for the entrance channel, while the centrifugal sudden approximation is employed for the exit channel. The computations have been performed using LEPS and DIM potential energy surfaces. We obtain good agreement between the IOS and ESA-CSA results, not only for averaged quantities such as rate coefficients, but also for detailed vibrational-rotational reactive cross sections.

  1. Reaction chain modeling of denitrification reactions during a push-pull test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, A.; de Anna, P.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.

    2013-05-01

    Field quantitative estimation of reaction kinetics is required to enhance our understanding of biogeochemical reactions in aquifers. We extended the analytical solution developed by Haggerty et al. (1998) to model an entire 1st order reaction chain and estimate the kinetic parameters for each reaction step of the denitrification process. We then assessed the ability of this reaction chain to model biogeochemical reactions by comparing it with experimental results from a push-pull test in a fractured crystalline aquifer (Ploemeur, French Brittany). Nitrates were used as the reactive tracer, since denitrification involves the sequential reduction of nitrates to nitrogen gas through a chain reaction (NO3- → NO2- → NO → N2O → N2) under anaerobic conditions. The kinetics of nitrate consumption and by-product formation (NO2-, N2O) during autotrophic denitrification were quantified by using a reactive tracer (NO3-) and a non-reactive tracer (Br-). The formation of reaction by-products (NO2-, N2O, N2) has not been previously considered using a reaction chain approach. Comparison of Br- and NO3- breakthrough curves showed that 10% of the injected NO3- molar mass was transformed during the 12 h experiment (2% into NO2-, 1% into N2O and the rest into N2 and NO). Similar results, but with slower kinetics, were obtained from laboratory experiments in reactors. The good agreement between the model and the field data shows that the complete denitrification process can be efficiently modeled as a sequence of first order reactions. The 1st order kinetics coefficients obtained through modeling were as follows: k1 = 0.023 h- 1, k2 = 0.59 h- 1, k3 = 16 h- 1, and k4 = 5.5 h- 1. A next step will be to assess the variability of field reactivity using the methodology developed for modeling push-pull tracer tests.

  2. ATP binds to proteasomal ATPases in pairs with distinct functional effects implying an ordered reaction cycle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David M.; Fraga, Hugo; Reis, Christian; Kafri, Galit; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2011-01-01

    In the eukaryotic 26S proteasome, the 20S particle is regulated by six AAA ATPase subunits, and in archaea by a homologous ring complex, PAN. To clarify the role of ATP in proteolysis, we studied how nucleotides bind to PAN. Although PAN has six identical subunits it binds ATPs in pairs, and its subunits exhibit three conformational states with high, low, or no affinity for ATP. When PAN binds two ATPγS molecules, or two ATPγS plus two ADP molecules it is maximally active in binding protein substrates, associating with the 20S particle, and promoting 20S gate-opening. However, binding of four ATPγS molecules reduces these functions. The 26S proteasome shows similar nucleotide dependence. These findings imply an ordered cyclical mechanism in which two ATPase subunits bind ATP simultaneously and dock into the 20S. These results can explain how these hexameric ATPases interact with and “wobble” on top of the heptameric 20S proteasome. PMID:21335235

  3. 130. Post1911. Photograph labeled, 'SEASON 1913. CAPTAIN, 1st MATE, SUPT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. Post-1911. Photograph labeled, 'SEASON 1913. CAPTAIN, 1st MATE, SUPT AND STOREKEEPER, A.P. ASS'N CANNERY, SHIP STAR OF ALASKA.' View forward from mizzenmast, post side. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, viewed from W. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of postcard ca. 1900. Copy owned and made by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Shows two-span steel truss, built by Phoenix Bridge Co. in 1878. Negative copied by: Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. 48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, view from N. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  7. 49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Top of pier and underside of w end of turn span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  8. The Student View of 1st Year Laboratory Work in the Biosciences--Score Gamma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Mike; Gibson, Alan; Hughes, Ian; Sayers, Gill; Todd, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Students registered on 1st year bioscience courses in 9 universities were surveyed for their views on the laboratory classes they were taking. Returns were obtained from 695 (70%). Student views were varied, some viewing particular features of laboratory classes as "good" while others viewed the same features as "bad". Students identified as the…

  9. How Many Attempts Until Success in Some Core 1st. Year Disciplines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Graça Leão; Andrade e Silva, João; Lopes, Margarida Chagas

    2012-01-01

    Due to a general development in education brought about by democracy, Portugal has witnessed tremendous development in Higher Education (HE) since the beginning of the 1980s. Nevertheless, the percentage of graduates among the Portuguese population still ranks far below most European countries. This is why academic performance in HE 1st cycle…

  10. First-Generation College Students' 1st-Year College Experiences: Challenges Attending a Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) face challenges when switching from high school to college and during their 1st-year in college. Additionally, FGCS may have difficulty understanding the steps required to prepare for and enroll in postsecondary education. The social capital theory examines support of social, academic, and cultural networks…

  11. 24. OVERALL OF 1st FLOOR OF MILL NO. 1. PALLETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. OVERALL OF 1st FLOOR OF MILL NO. 1. PALLETS HELD CLOTH IN STORAGE IN LATE 20th CENTURY. IRON POSTS IN LEFT DISTANCE FRONTED CLOTH BINS. HISTORIAN LEEANN LANDS IN BACKGROUND WITH LIGHT. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  12. 77 FR 22574 - Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Washington has...

  13. The Course of Psychological Disorders in the 1st Year After Cancer Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Maria; Henry, Jane L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid anxiety, depressive, and substance use disorders over the first 12-month period following a cancer diagnosis. Individuals recently diagnosed with 1st onset head and neck or lung malignancy were assessed for ASD within…

  14. Perceptual Narrowing of Linguistic Sign Occurs in the 1st Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephanie Baker; Fais, Laurel; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Werker, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    Over their 1st year of life, infants' "universal" perception of the sounds of language narrows to encompass only those contrasts made in their native language (J. F. Werker & R. C. Tees, 1984). This research tested 40 infants in an eyetracking paradigm and showed that this pattern also holds for infants exposed to seen language--American Sign…

  15. Requirement of copper for 1st-log growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Como, S.A.; Valerio, V.; Nickless, S.; Connelly, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Routine evaluation of the role of copper (Cu) in the growth of various mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae disclosed an unexpected effect of Cu on the fermentative first-log growth. The authors subsequent studies are attempting to ascertain the nature and significance of this observation. Cells are grown on glucose in a supplemented minimal media at 29/sup 0/C for 48-72 hrs. using New Brunswick incubator shaking at 200 rpm. Cu concentration was varied by addition of Cu salts or bathocuproine disulfonate (BC), a highly specific Cu chelator. Samples were removed periodically from flasks and dry weights were determined. Growth curve plots of normal yeasts grown in the presence of 1mM to 38mM Cu showed little variation in the expected 1st log; diauxi; 2nd log; stationary phase picture. However, in the presence of BC growth rate in the 1st log was significantly slowed and as expected 2nd log growth was essentially stopped. The low 1st log growth rate could be titrated to normal (+Cu) levels by increments of added Cu but not by added iron. The effect was not seen when Rho-minus strains were used nor when growth was followed under anaerobic conditions. Results to date implicate a mitochondrial protein, oxygen and copper in the 1st log growth of S Cerevisiae. The character of the protein agent and the possible contribution of cytochrome oxidase activity to the lst log growth are being evaluated.

  16. Amplification of enantiomeric excess, mirror-image symmetry breaking and kinetic proofreading in Soai reaction models with different oligomeric orders.

    PubMed

    Micheau, Jean-Claude; Coudret, Christophe; Cruz, José-Manuel; Buhse, Thomas

    2012-10-14

    A comprehensive kinetic analysis of three prototypical autocatalytic cycle models based on the absolute asymmetric Soai reaction is presented. The three models, which can give rise to amplification of enantiomeric excess and mirror-image symmetry breaking, vary by their monomeric, dimeric or trimeric order of the assumed catalytic species. Our numerical approach considered the entire chiral combinatorics of the diastereomeric interactions in the models as well as the multiplicity of coupled reversible reactions without applying fast equilibration or quasi-steady state approximations. For the simplest monomeric model, an extensive range of parameters was explored employing a random grid parameter scanning method that revealed the influence of the parameter values on the product distribution, the reaction-time, the attenuation or amplification of enantiomeric excess as well as on the presence or absence of mirror-image symmetry breaking. A symmetry breaking test was imposed on the three models showing that an increase in the catalytic oligomer size from one to three leads to a higher tolerance to poorer chiral recognition between the diastereoisomers and identifies the greater impact of the diastereoisomeric energy difference over an imperfect stereoselectivity in the catalytic step. This robustness is understood as a particular case of so-called kinetic proofreading in asymmetric autocatalysis.

  17. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE PAGES

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore » deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  18. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  19. Amplification of enantiomeric excess, mirror-image symmetry breaking and kinetic proofreading in Soai reaction models with different oligomeric orders.

    PubMed

    Micheau, Jean-Claude; Coudret, Christophe; Cruz, José-Manuel; Buhse, Thomas

    2012-10-14

    A comprehensive kinetic analysis of three prototypical autocatalytic cycle models based on the absolute asymmetric Soai reaction is presented. The three models, which can give rise to amplification of enantiomeric excess and mirror-image symmetry breaking, vary by their monomeric, dimeric or trimeric order of the assumed catalytic species. Our numerical approach considered the entire chiral combinatorics of the diastereomeric interactions in the models as well as the multiplicity of coupled reversible reactions without applying fast equilibration or quasi-steady state approximations. For the simplest monomeric model, an extensive range of parameters was explored employing a random grid parameter scanning method that revealed the influence of the parameter values on the product distribution, the reaction-time, the attenuation or amplification of enantiomeric excess as well as on the presence or absence of mirror-image symmetry breaking. A symmetry breaking test was imposed on the three models showing that an increase in the catalytic oligomer size from one to three leads to a higher tolerance to poorer chiral recognition between the diastereoisomers and identifies the greater impact of the diastereoisomeric energy difference over an imperfect stereoselectivity in the catalytic step. This robustness is understood as a particular case of so-called kinetic proofreading in asymmetric autocatalysis. PMID:22914796

  20. Cell-free protein synthesis in a microchamber revealed the presence of an optimum compartment volume for high-order reactions.

    PubMed

    Okano, Taiji; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-06-20

    The application of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to chemistry and biochemistry allows various reactions to be performed in microscale compartments. Here, we aimed to use the glass microchamber to study the compartment size dependency of the protein synthesis, one of the most important reactions in the cell. By encapsulating the cell-free protein synthesis system with different reaction orders in femtoliter microchambers, chamber size dependency of the reaction initiated with a constant copy number of DNA was investigated. We were able to observe the properties specific to the high order reactions in microcompartments with high precision and found the presence of an optimum compartment volume for a high-order reaction using real biological molecules.

  1. First- and Second-Order Stimuli Reaction Time Measures Are Highly Sensitive to Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Piponnier, Jean-Claude; Forget, Robert; Gagnon, Isabelle; McKerral, Michelle; Giguère, Jean-François; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2016-01-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has subtle effects on several brain functions that can be difficult to assess and follow up. We investigated the impact of mTBI on the perception of sine-wave gratings defined by first- and second-order characteristics. Fifteen adults diagnosed with mTBI were assessed at 15 days, 3 months, and 12 months postinjury. Fifteen matched controls followed the same testing schedule. Reaction times (RTs) for flicker detection and motion direction discrimination were measured. Stimulus contrast of first- and second-order patterns was equated to control for visibility, and correct-response RT means, standard deviations (SDs), medians, and interquartile ranges (IQRs) were calculated. The level of symptoms was also evaluated to compare it to RT data. In general in mTBI, RTs were longer, and SDs as well as IQRs larger, than those of controls. In addition, mTBI participants' RTs to first-order stimuli were shorter than those to second-order stimuli, and SDs as well as IQRs larger for first- than for second-order stimuli in the motion condition. All these observations were made over the three sessions. The level of symptoms observed in mTBI was higher than that of control participants, and this difference did also persist up to 1 year after the brain injury, despite an improvement. The combination of RT measures with particular stimulus properties is a highly sensitive method for measuring mTBI-induced visuomotor anomalies and provides a fine probe of the underlying mechanisms when the brain is exposed to mild trauma.

  2. Gravitational radiation reaction in the equations of motion of compact binaries to 3.5 post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissanke, Samaya; Blanchet, Luc

    2005-03-01

    We compute the radiation-reaction force on the orbital motion of compact binaries to the 3.5 post-Newtonian (3.5PN) approximation, i.e. one PN order beyond the dominant effect. The method is based on a direct PN iteration of the near-zone metric and equations of motion of an extended isolated system, using appropriate 'asymptotically matched' flat-spacetime retarded potentials. The formalism is subsequently applied to binary systems of point particles, with the help of the Hadamard self-field regularization. Our result is the 3.5PN acceleration term in a general harmonic coordinate frame. Restricting the expression to the centre-of-mass frame, we find perfect agreement with the result derived in a class of coordinate systems by Iyer and Will using the energy and angular-momentum balance equations.

  3. Effect of 1st-trimester loss on restoration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Elkas, J C; Cunningham, D S

    1995-01-01

    This randomized prospective study was conducted to determine the length of time required for re-establishment of the reproductive axis following a 1st-trimester spontaneous abortion. The spontaneous gonadotropin secretion was significantly depressed during the first menstrual cycle after pregnancy loss, while the estradiol levels had normalized. Provocative testing revealed blunted gonadotropin release in the first menstrual cycle with return to normal during the first menstrual cycle after a spontaneous abortion. Endometrial biopsy specimens were also abnormal during the first menstrual cycle with normal histological characteristics by the second menstrual cycle. Therefore, restoration of the hypothalamic-pituitary- ovarian axis after a 1st-trimester loss is achieved within two menstrual cycles, as determined by return of normal pituitary function.

  4. 44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Detail from Camille Drie's map: A Bird's Eye View of Columbus, Mississippi ca. 1875-76. Shows M&O RR bridge before the Phoenix Bridge Co. erected iron truss spans in 1878. Credit: Photostat of map in Lowndes Co. Public Library Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of photo 1900. Shows 1878 M&O RR bridge. The steamboat, 'Gopher,' in foreground, was an archeological survey vessel from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Published in Art in Mississippi (1901). Credit: Copied from print in Lowndes Co. Public Library by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. 46. NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, 1st FLOOR, BELOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, 1st FLOOR, BELOW PICKER AND CLOTH ROOM AREA. FUNCTION OF THIS SPACE UNKNOWN AT PRESENT. NOTE THAT EYE BEAM REPLACES ORIGINAL WALL OF 1892 PICKER HOUSE. CENTER (OR LEFT) DOOR IS ENTRY TO MILL NO. 2. RIGHT DOOR IS ENTRY TO 1892 NAPPER ROOM. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  7. 7. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, ELECTRICAL 1ST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, ELECTRICAL 1ST AND 2ND FLOOR PLANS, SHEET 10 of 11, DRAWING NO. 35-03-05 SF 5/1677, U.S. Army Engineer District, Detroit, Corps of Engineers, 9 June, 1959, on file Selfridge Base Museum. - Selfridge Field, Building No. 1041, West of E Street, north of D Street, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  8. Ordered mesoporous boron-doped carbons as metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Bo, Xiangjie; Guo, Liping

    2013-02-21

    Ordered mesoporous boron-doped carbons (BOMCs) were prepared by co-impregnation and carbonization of sucrose and 4-hydroxyphenylboronic acid into SBA-15 silica template. Nitrogen sorption, small angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that BOMCs possess highly ordered mesoporous structure, uniform pore size distribution, and high surface area. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrates that B atoms can be successfully doped into the framework of OMCs. Due to the desirable characteristics of BOMCs, BOMCs are highly active, cheap, and selective metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution. Although B content is a key factor in determining ORR activity, the ORR activity of BOMCs is also dependent on the surface area. The high surface area of BOMCs facilitates the exposure of the active sites for ORR. BOMCs may be further exploited as potentially efficient and inexpensive metal-free ORR catalysts with good long-term stability in alkaline solution. PMID:23318553

  9. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the ‘nanocasting’ technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C.

  10. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the 'nanocasting' technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C.

  11. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the 'nanocasting' technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C. PMID:27668508

  12. Attentional bias toward low-intensity stimuli: an explanation for the intensity dissociation between reaction time and temporal order judgment?

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, P; Verleger, R

    2000-09-01

    If two stimuli need different times to be processed, this difference should in principle be reflected both by response times (RT) and by judgments of their temporal order (TOJ). However, several dissociations have been reported between RT and TOJ, e.g., RT is more affected than TOJ when stimulus intensity decreases. One account for these dissociations is to assume differences in the allocation of attention induced by the two tasks. To test this hypothesis, different distributions of attention were induced in the present study between two stimulus positions (above and below fixation). Only bright stimuli appeared in one position and either bright or dim stimuli in the other. In the two RT experiments, participants had to respond to every stimulus appearing in one of the two positions. Reaction times to bright stimuli were faster when they appeared in the position where dim stimuli were likely to occur. This finding suggests that the allocation of attention was adapted to the asymmetrical arrangement of stimuli, not suggested by explicit instruction. In the two TOJ experiments, the temporal order of stimuli appearing in the two positions had to be judged. Although bright stimuli appearing at the bright-and-dim location were judged to be earlier, this effect was small and insignificant. Further, the intensity dissociation between RT and TOJ was insensitive to random vs blockwise presentations of intensities, therefore was not modified by attentional preferences. Thus, asymmetrical arrangement of stimuli has an impact on the allocation of attention, but only in the RT task. Therefore dissociations between TOJ and response times cannot be accounted for by an attentional bias in the TOJ task but probably by different use of temporal information in the two tasks.

  13. RETURN TO DIVISION IA FOOTBALL FOLLOWING A 1ST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT DORSAL DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Chad; Zarzour, Hap; Moorman, Claude T.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Although rare in occurrence, a dorsal dislocation of the 1st metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint has been successfully treated using surgical and/or non-operative treatment. No descriptions of conservative intervention following a dorsal dislocation of the MTP joint in an athlete participating in a high contact sport are present in the literature. Objectives. The purpose of this case report is to describe the intervention and clinical reasoning during the rehabilitative process of a collegiate football player diagnosed with a 1st MTP joint dorsal dislocation. The plan of care and return to play criteria used for this athlete are presented. Case Description. The case involved a 19-year-old male Division IA football player, who suffered a traumatic dorsal dislocation of the 1st MTP joint during practice. The dislocation was initially treated on-site by closed reduction. Non-operative management included immobilization, therapeutic exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, manual treatment, modalities, prophylactic athletic taping, gait training, and a sport specific progression program for full return to Division IA football. Outcomes. Discharge from physical therapy occurred after six weeks of treatment. At discharge, no significant deviations existed during running, burst, and agility related drills. At a six-month follow-up, the patient reported full return to all football activities including contact drills without restrictions. Discussion. This case describes an effective six-week rehabilitation intervention for a collegiate football player who sustained a traumatic great toe dorsal dislocation. Further study is suggested to evaluate the intervention strategies and timeframe for return to contact sports. PMID:21589669

  14. 13C MAS NMR evidence for a homogeneously ordered environment of tyrosine M210 in reaction centres of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shochat, S.; Gast, P.; Hoff, A. J.; Boender, G. J.; van Leeuwen, S.; van Liemt, W. B. S.; Vijgenboom, E.; Raap, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    1995-01-01

    The initial electron transfer time in the photosynthetic reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is highly sensitive to the replacement of tyrosine M210 by a tryptophan residue. Low-temperature magic angle spinning 13C NMR is used to study Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant reaction centres that are labelled with [4'- 13C]tyrosine. The response of (M)Y210 in R26 is assigned unambiguously to the most upfield narrow signal (linewidth 34 Hz) at σi = 152.2 ppm, in the region where non-hydrogen bonded tyrosine signals are expected. From the comparison with the signal of labelled R26 it follows that the chemical environment of the (M)Y210 label is unique. The Y(M)210 is in a structurally and electrostatically homogeneous region on the sensitivity scale of the MAS NMR technique. The environment of M210 is structurally stable and the observation of a narrow line shows that the (M)Y210 side chain can be considered static with respect to rotational diffusion on time scales as long as 10 -2s. The narrow signals from the remaining labels in the protein interior for the 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant are remarkably similar to those observed for R26. Using a commonly accepted ratio of 150 ppm shift per positive charge equivalent for aromatic carbons, the chemical shift differences between mutant and R26 translate into small variations of the order of 10 -3 electronic equivalents of charge polarization. Also the linewidths are similar, except for a narrow response at σi = 156.4 ppm that sharpens slightly in the (M)Y210W mutant. Thus, the influence of the (M)Y210W mutation on the global electrostatic properties and structure of the protein, as probed by the tyrosine labels, is minimal. This strongly argues against an explanation of slow and non-exponential electron transfer kinetics in the (M)Y210W RC in terms of loss of structural integrity upon mutation. In contrast, the NMR results strongly support current opinions that (M)Y210 contributes to the fine-tuning of the

  15. Autopsy as a tool for learning gross anatomy during 1st year MBBS

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Parmod Kumar; Gupta, Monika; Kaur, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Embalmed cadavers are the primary tool for teaching anatomy. However, difficulties are encountered due to changed color/texture of organs, hardening of tissues, and smell of formaldehyde. To overcome these difficulties, dissections on a fresh human body were shown to the 1st year MBBS students, and their perception was noted. Materials and Methods: After taking universal precautionary measures, postmortem dissections were shown to students on voluntary donated bodies in the dissection hall, in addition to the traditional teaching on embalmed cadavers. Feedback was taken from students and faculty regarding the utility of these sessions. Results: Better appreciation of texture, orientation, location, and relations of organs in fresh body, integration of teaching, awareness of the process and laws related to body donations were the outcomes of the study. However, the smell and sight of blood was felt to be nauseating by some students, and some students were worried about the spread of infectious diseases. Conclusions: Visualizing single fresh body dissection during 1st year professional MBBS is recommended either on medicolegal autopsy or on voluntarily-donated bodies. PMID:27563594

  16. Understanding abnormal potential behaviors at the 1st charge in Li2S cathode material for rechargeable Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yongjo; Kang, Byoungwoo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, electrochemical behaviors of Li2S such as a large potential barrier at the beginning of the 1st charging process and a continuous increase in potential to ∼4 V during the rest of this process were understood through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and electrochemical evaluations for a full utilization of Li2S. The large potential barrier to the 1st charge in Li2S can be caused by the presence of insulating oxidized products (Li2SO3 or Li2SO4-like structures) on the surface; simple surface etching can remove them and thereby reduce the potential barrier. Even though the potential barrier was substantially reduced, the electrochemical activity of Li2S might not be improved due to the continuous increase in potential. This increase in potential was related to the polarization caused by the Li2S-conversion reaction; the polarization can affect the utilization of Li2S in subsequent cycles. We speculate that the increase in potential is related to the decomposition of oxidized products such as Li2CO3-like or Li2O-like structures on the surface of the Li2S particles. These findings indicate that the full utilization of Li2S can be achieved by controlling their surface characteristics, especially the surface oxidation products. PMID:27426215

  17. Local slope, hillslope length and upslope unstable area as 1st order controls on co-seismic landslide hazard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milledge, D.; Densmore, A. L.; Petley, D. N.; Bellugi, D. G.; Li, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many communities in mountainous areas have limited access to and/or understanding of co-seismic landslide hazard maps. Furthermore these maps rarely provide the information that a community seeks: Where is safest? How big could the landslide be? Geomorphic intuition suggests that: 1) on the ridges one is less likely to be hit by a landslide than elsewhere in the landscape; 2) hazard increases with the amount of upslope unstable area; 3) longer slopes contain more candidate landslides and are also capable of producing larger landslides thus they constitute a more severe hazard. These observations could help communities in siting infrastructure or making earthquake plans but have not, to our knowledge, been tested against past landslide inventories. Co-seismic landslide models make no attempt to predict landslide size and focus on initiation, ignoring the runout which is critical in the slope length control on hazard. Here we test our intuitive hypotheses using an inventory of co-seismic landslides from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The inventory is mapped from high-resolution remote imagery using an automated algorithm and manual delineation and does not distinguish between source and runout zones. Discretizing the study area into 30 m cells we define landslide hazard as the probability that a cell is within a mapped landslide polygon (p(ls)). We find that p(ls) increases rapidly with increasing slope and upslope area. Locations with low local slope (<10˚) or upslope area (<900 m2/m) have p(ls) less than one third of the areal average. The joint p(ls) conditional on local slope and upslope area identifies long steep slopes as particularly hazardous and ridges (where slope and upslope area are both low) as particularly low hazard. Examining the slope lengths associated with each landslide in the inventory we find that hillslope length sets an upper limit on landslide size but that its influence on the detailed size distribution is more difficult to untangle. Finally, we combine local slope and upslope unstable area in a simple mechanistic rule-based model of landslide runout hazard and test its ability to predict p(ls). Our findings support the intuitive view that long steep slopes are among the most hazardous locations while ridges are the least hazardous locations in terms of co-seismic landslides.

  18. EDITORIAL: The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jack Jiqui; Fang, Fengzhou

    2009-05-01

    Nanomanufacturing is an emerging technology in the field of synthesis of nanomaterials, manufacture of nanodevices, nanosystems and the relevant characterization technologies, and will greatly impact our society and environment: speeding up scientific discovery, technological development, improving healthcare and living standards and slowing down the exhaustion of energy resources, to name but few. The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) was held on the 13-16 July 2008 in Singapore in conjunction with ThinFilm2008 (The 4th International Conference on Technological Advances of Thin Films & Surface Coatings). Approximately 140 delegates from all over the world have participated in the conference and presented their latest discoveries and technological developments. The main focuses of the conference were modern nanomanufacturing by laser machining, focused ion beam fabrication, nano/micro-molding/imprinting, nanomaterial synthesis and characterization, nanometrology and nano/microsystems fabrication and characterization. There was also great interest in applications of nanomanufacturing technologies in traditional areas such as free form machining, polishing and grinding with nano-scale precision and the smoothness of surfaces of objects, and applications in space exploration, military and medicine. This special issue is devoted to NanoMan2008 with a collection of 9 invited talks presented at the conference, covering all the topics of nanomanufacturing technology and development. These papers have been upgraded by the authors with new results and discoveries since the preparation of the conference manuscripts, hence presenting the latest developments. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all the delegates who attended the conference and made the conference successful, and to the authors who contributed papers to this special issue. Thanks also go to the conference committee for their efforts and devotion to the conference. We

  19. Perceptual narrowing of linguistic sign occurs in the 1st year of life.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephanie Baker; Fais, Laurel; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Werker, Janet F

    2012-01-01

    Over their 1st year of life, infants'"universal" perception of the sounds of language narrows to encompass only those contrasts made in their native language (J. F. Werker & R. C. Tees, 1984). This research tested 40 infants in an eyetracking paradigm and showed that this pattern also holds for infants exposed to seen language-American Sign Language (ASL). Four-month-old, English-only, hearing infants discriminated an ASL handshape distinction, while 14-month-old hearing infants did not. Fourteen-month-old ASL-learning infants, however, did discriminate the handshape distinction, suggesting that, as in heard language, exposure to seen language is required for maintenance of visual language discrimination. Perceptual narrowing appears to be a ubiquitous learning mechanism that contributes to language acquisition. PMID:22277043

  20. Meeting report for the 1st skin microbiota workshop, boulder, CO October 15-16 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Skin Microbiota Workshop, Boulder, CO, held on October 15th-16th 2012. The workshop was arranged to bring Department of Defense personnel together with experts in microbial ecology, human skin physiology and anatomy, and computational techniques for interrogating the microbiome to define research frontiers at the intersection of these important areas. The workshop outlined a series of questions and created several working groups to address those questions, specifically to promote interdisciplinary activity and potential future collaboration. The US Army provided generous grant support and the meeting was organized and hosted by the University of Colorado at Boulder. A primary forward vision of the meeting was the importance of understanding skin microbial communities to improve the health and stealth of US Army warfighters.

  1. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M; Le Péchoux, C; Postmus, P E; Sorensen, J B; Felip, E

    2011-09-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through discussion at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement in SCLC is reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update.

  2. 4th generation of the 1st level surface detector trigger in the Pierre Auger Observator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.

    The proposal of a new 4th generation of the Front-End with the advanced 1st level triggers for the Infill Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory and for the Auger North is described. Newest FPGA chips offer much higher capacity of logic registers and memories, as well as DSP blocks. The calibration channel, previously supported by an external dual-port RAM, has been fully implemented into FPGA chip, through a large internal memory. In turn DSP blocks allowed on implementation of much more sophisticated spectral trigger algorithms. A single chip simplified board design, newer architecture of FPGA reduced resouces utilization and power consumption. Higher sampling in the new Front- End in comparison with previous 40 MHz designs as well as free resources for new detection algotithms can be a good platform for CR radio detection technique at Auger enhancing a duty cycle for the detection of UHECR’s.

  3. [The 1st International Youth Ecologist Forum in China, 2009: a review].

    PubMed

    Xiong, You-cai; Xiong, Jun-lan; Li, Pu-fang; Li, Zhi-hua; Kong, Hai-yan; Wang, Shao-ming

    2011-04-01

    To promote the communication and cooperation between Chinese and overseas youth ecologists, a conference entitled "The 1st International Young Ecologist Forum" was held at Lanzhou University in June 29-30, 2009. This conference was organized by outstanding overseas ecologists and hosted by Lanzhou University. The presentations covered broad areas of ecology, including plant-soil interactions, structure and function of regional ecosystems, ecological security and ecological planning, global change ecology, and environmental sustainability, demonstrating that the development of China ecology is gradually from traditional basic research transforming into applied research. The presentations also reflected in some extent the development characteristics, evolution direction, and distribution pattern of China ecological research. China ecological research has gradually formed four centers, the Northeast, North, Northwest, and Southeast China, and each of them has its definite regional characteristics. Some suggestions about the organization form and future planning of the forum were put forward.

  4. Using a CBL Unit, a Temperature Sensor, and a Graphing Calculator to Model the Kinetics of Consecutive First-Order Reactions as Safe In-Class Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Russo, Deborah A.; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Schuman, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of Calculator-Based Laboratory (CBL) technology, the graphing calculator, and the cooling and heating of water to model the behavior of consecutive first-order reactions is presented, where B is the reactant, I is the intermediate, and P is the product for an in-class demonstration. The activity demonstrates the spontaneous and consecutive…

  5. Dichlorination of (hexadehydro-Diels-Alder generated) benzynes and a protocol for interrogating the kinetic order of bimolecular aryne trapping reactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Wang, Tao; Woods, Brian P; Hoye, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The efficient dichlorination of benzynes prepared by the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction is reported. Cycloisomerization of a triyne substrate in the presence of dilithium tetrachlorocuprate is shown to provide dichlorinated products A by capture of the benzyne intermediate. A general strategy for discerning the kinetic order of an external aryne trapping agent is presented. It merely requires measurement of the competition between bimolecular vs unimolecular trapping events (here, dichlorination vs intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reaction to give A vs B, respectively) as a function of the concentration of the trapping agent.

  6. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  7. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gömze, László A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of materials and their rheological behaviors during their manufacturing processes and in their applications in many cases can help to increase the efficiency and competitiveness not only of the finished goods and products but the organizations and societies also. The more scientific supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive products with better thermal, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive knowledge, materials, equipment and technology processes. The idea to organize in Hungary the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials we have received from prospective scientists, physicists, chemists, mathematicians and engineers from Asia, Europe, North and South America including India, Korea, Russia, Turkey, Estonia, France, Italy, United Kingdom, Chile, Mexico and USA. The goals of ic-rmm1 the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials are the following: • Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of modeling and measurements of rheological properties and behavior of materials under processing and applications. • Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. • Promote the communication between the scientists of different disciplines, nations, countries and continents. The international conference ic-rmm1 provides a platform among the leading international scientists, researchers, PhD students and engineers for discussing recent achievements in measurement, modeling and application of rheology in materials technology and materials science of liquids, melts, solids, crystals and amorphous structures. Among the major fields of interest are the influences of material structures, mechanical stresses temperature and deformation speeds on rheological and physical properties, phase transformation of

  8. Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds: A new view on the causes of the zero order of the reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Paseka, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The hydrogenation of maleic acid has been studied as a model hydrogenation of unsaturated double-bond compounds in aqueous and alcoholic 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions. The curves of hydrogenation uptake time and catalyst potential time show that as the reaction proceeds the degree of surface coverage by the organic substance decreases with the logarithm of its bulk concentration. The kinetic equation derived for the reaction indicates that the decrease in the surface coverage is offset by a change in the catalyst potential or in the chemical potential of adsorbed hydrogen, resulting in a constant hydrogenation rate and zero-order reaction with respect to the unsaturated compound.

  9. The photoinitiated reaction pathway of full-length cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 monitored over 12 orders of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Anna F E; Hardman, Samantha J O; Kutta, Roger J; Greetham, Gregory M; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2014-06-20

    The coupling of photochemistry to protein chemical and structural change is crucial to biological light-activated signaling mechanisms. This is typified by cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs), members of the phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors that exhibit a high degree of spectral diversity, collectively spanning the entire visible spectrum. CBCRs utilize a basic E/Z isomerization of the bilin chromophore as the primary step in their photocycle, which consists of reversible photoconversion between two photostates. Despite intense interest in these photoreceptors as signal transduction modules a complete description of light-activated chemical and structural changes has not been reported. The CBCR Tlr0924 contains both phycocyanobilin and phycoviolobilin chromophores, and these two species photoisomerize in parallel via spectrally and kinetically equivalent intermediates before the second step of the photoreaction where the reaction pathways diverge, the loss of a thioether linkage to a conserved cysteine residue occurs, and the phycocyanobilin reaction terminates in a red-absorbing state, whereas the phycoviolobilin reaction proceeds more rapidly to a final green-absorbing state. Here time-resolved visible transient absorption spectroscopy (femtosecond to second) has been used, in conjunction with time-resolved IR spectroscopy (femtosecond to nanosecond) and cryotrapping techniques, to follow the entire photoconversion of the blue-absorbing states to the green- and red-absorbing states of the full-length form of Tlr0924 CBCR. Our analysis shows that Tlr0924 undergoes an unprecedented long photoreaction that spans from picoseconds to seconds. We show that the thermally driven, long timescale changes are less complex than those reported for the red/far-red photocycles of the related phytochrome photoreceptors. PMID:24817121

  10. First Order Chemical Reaction Effects on Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate with Variable Mass Diffusion in the Presence of Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthucumaraswamy, R.; Lakshmi, C. S.

    2015-05-01

    Effects of transfer of mass and free convection on the flow field of an incompressible viscous fluid past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass diffusion are studied. Results for velocity, concentration, temperature are obtained by solving governing equations using the Laplace transform technique. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing values of the chemical reaction parameter or radiation parameter. But the trend is just reversed with respect to the time parameter. The skin friction is also studied.

  11. Identifying 1st instar larvae for three forensically important blowfly species using "fingerprint" cuticular hydrocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hannah E; Adam, Craig D; Drijfhout, Falko P

    2014-07-01

    Calliphoridae are known to be the most forensically important insects when it comes to establishing the minimum post mortem interval (PMImin) in criminal investigations. The first step in calculating the PMImin is to identify the larvae present to species level. Accurate identification which is conventionally carried out by morphological analysis is crucial because different insects have different life stage timings. Rapid identification in the immature larvae stages would drastically cut time in criminal investigations as it would eliminate the need to rear larvae to adult flies to determine the species. Cuticular hydrocarbon analysis on 1st instar larvae has been applied to three forensically important blowflies; Lucilia sericata, Calliphora vicina and Calliphora vomitoria, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). The results show that each species holds a distinct "fingerprint" hydrocarbon profile, allowing for accurate identification to be established in 1-day old larvae, when it can be challenging to apply morphological criteria. Consequently, this GC-MS based technique could accelerate and strengthen the identification process, not only for forensically important species, but also for other entomological samples which are hard to identify using morphological features.

  12. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence. PMID:26334946

  13. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence.

  14. The U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope 1st Catalog (URAT1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Finch, Charlie T.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; DiVittorio, Mike; Harris, Hugh C.; Rafferty, Ted; Wieder, Gary; Eric Ferguson, Chris Kilian, Albert Rhodes, Mike Schultheis

    2015-01-01

    The 1st USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog (URAT1) is about tobe released. It contains accurate positions (typically 10 to 30 mas std.error) of 220 million stars, mainly on the northern hemisphere. Propermotions were obtained for 85% of these stars utilizing the 2MASS as 1stepoch. URAT1 is supplemented by 2MASS and APASS photometry. The URAT1catalog was derived from 2 years of operations (April 2012 to April 2014)of the USNO "redlens" astrograph with its 474 Mpx 4-shooter camera at theNaval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) in a joint effort betweenUSNO's Astrometry Department and NOFS. Due to a combination of longexposures and short exposures with objective grating, URAT1 observationscover the large 3 to 18.5 magnitude range in a single 680-750 nm bandpass.The catalog properties are presented together with a brief summary ofobservations and reductions methods. URAT1 has on average about 4-timesthe number of stars per square degree and is 4-times more accurate thanUCAC4. URAT1 will serve as the currently most accurate astrometric anddeep photometric optical reference star catalog until the delivery ofthe Gaia catalog.

  15. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  16. 1st paleomagnetic investigation of Nubia Sandstone at Kalabsha, south Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, R.; Khashaba, A.; El-Hemaly, I. A.; Takla, E. M.; Abdel Aal, E.; Odah, H.

    2016-06-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: the 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 °N, 32.75 °E). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with α95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 82.8 °N and Long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with α95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 78.3 °N and Long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at Lat. = 80.5 °N and Long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind magnetic components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  17. Wind-US Results for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis; Dippold, Vance, III; Georgiadis, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    This presentation contains Wind-US results presented at the 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The The workshop was organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Air Breathing Propulsion Propulsion Systems Integration Technical Committee with the purpose of assessing the accuracy of computational computational fluid dynamics for air breathing propulsion applications. Attendees included representatives from representatives from government, industry, academia, and commercial software companies. Participants were were encouraged to explore and discuss all aspects of the simulation process including the effects of mesh type and mesh type and refinement, solver numerical schemes, and turbulence modeling. The first set of challenge cases involved computing the thrust and discharge coefficients for a series of convergent convergent nozzles for a range of nozzle pressure ratios between 1.4 and 7.0. These configurations included a included a reference axisymmetric nozzle as well as 15deg , 25deg , and 40deg conical nozzles. Participants were also asked also asked to examine the plume shock structure for two cases where the 25deg conical nozzle was bifurcated by a bifurcated by a solid plate. The final test case was a serpentine inlet diffuser with an outlet to inlet area ratio of 1.52 ratio of 1.52 and an offset of 1.34 times the inlet diameter. Boundary layer profiles, wall static pressure, and total and total pressure at downstream rake locations were examined.

  18. 78 FR 47698 - Notice to all Interested Parties of the Termination of the Receivership of 10183, 1st American...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION Notice to all Interested Parties of the Termination of the Receivership of 10183, 1st American State Bank of Minnesota Hancock, MN Notice is hereby given that the Federal Deposit...

  19. Laying a Foundation for Lifelong Learning: Case Studies of E-Assessment in Large 1st-Year Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about noncompletion and the quality of the 1st-year student experience have been linked to recent changes in higher education such as modularisation, increased class sizes, greater diversity in the student intake and reduced resources. Improving formative assessment and feedback processes is seen as one way of addressing academic failure,…

  20. 78 FR 7781 - Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special elections. SUMMARY: South Carolina...

  1. Bills to Increase Employment Opportunities through the Youth Conservation Corps and Other Means, 95th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This packet contains nine Senate bills and eight House bills from the 95th Congress, 1st session, all dealing with various means of increasing employment opportunities. Most of the bills deal with the creation of new jobs or with programs for job training, counseling, or placement. Seven of the bills constitute amendments to the Youth Conservation…

  2. Jordanian Kindergarten and 1st-Grade Teachers' Beliefs about Child-Based Dimensions of School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Oliemat, Enass

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten and 1st-grade teachers regarding six child-based dimensions of school readiness: academic knowledge, basic thinking skills, socioemotional maturity, physical well-being and motor development, self-discipline, and communication skills. Questionnaires were used to collect…

  3. Maternal Sleep-Related Cognitions and Infant Sleep: A Longitudinal Study from Pregnancy through the 1st Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikotzky, Liat; Sadeh, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Infant sleep is a major source of concern for many parents. The aims of this longitudinal study were to assess: (a) the development of sleep patterns among infants, (b) the development of maternal cognitions regarding infant sleep, and (c) the relations between these domains during the 1st year of life. Eighty-five mothers were recruited during…

  4. Addressing the Effects of Reciprocal Teaching on the Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary of 1st-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Eliana; Osana, Helena P.; Venkatesh, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Adapted Reciprocal Teaching (ART) on the receptive and expressive flight-word vocabulary of 1st-grade students. During ART, classroom interactions produced narrative contexts within which students assumed responsibility for applying new flight words in personally meaningful ways. Students in the control group…

  5. Radiative corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ reactions to all orders in. cap alpha. using the renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1983-01-01

    Renormalization group technique is used to improve the accuracy of the lowest order radiative corrections in QED. The exponentiation of infrared terms comes automatically. It also leads to exponentiation of the vertex functions. It predicts the existence of conversion of photons into pairs and the result agrees with the Kroll-Wada relation. Kinoshita-Lee-Nauenberg cancellation of mass singularities occurs to all order in ..cap alpha.. in leading log approximation in the final state if we sum over all the final states. Higher order corrections to the order ..cap alpha../sup 3/ asymmetry is shown to be small. The results are used to derive useful formulas for the radiative corrections to processes such as e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/, e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/..gamma.., e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. hadron continuum, e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. very narrow resonance such as phi, and e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. not very narrow resonance such as Z/sup 0/.

  6. PREFACE: 1st Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science 2013 (LPBMS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi

    2014-04-01

    From 29-31 August 2013, the 1st International Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science, LPBMS 2013, took place in the Tsukuba International Congress Center in the city of Tsukuba, Japan. The conference was a continuation of the international series Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS), which started in 1994. The last one, SRMS-7, was held in Oxford UK 11-14 July 2010, where the International Advisory Committee (IAC) recommended the conference be enlarged to incorporate Materials Research from Neutron, Muon, and Slow Positron Sources, as well as the science emerging from Synchrotron Light Sources. The conference brought together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experience from the physics, chemistry and engineering communities. The topics covered in the LPBMS2013 include strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism and magnetic materials, soft matter, interface and surface defects, catalysts, biomaterials, and ceramics. In the 3-day scientific program, the conference consisted of 9 plenary talks, 33 invited talks, 20 oral presentations, and 126 poster presentations. We are pleased to publish the proceedings of the LPBMS2013 in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. This volume contains 58 papers representing the work that was presented and discussed at the conference. We hope that this volume will promote further development of this interdisciplinary materials research emerging from synchrotron light, neutron, muon, and slow positron sciences. Finally, we would like to thank the International Advisory Committee (Chair: Professor G N Greaves), sponsors, all the participants and contributors for making possible this international meeting of researchers. Reiji Kumai & Youichi Murakami Conference photograph Details of the program and organizing committees are available in the pdf

  7. Foreword to Selected presentations from the 1st European Hip Sport Meeting.

    PubMed

    Dallari, Dante; Ribas, Manuel

    2016-05-14

    Recent years have witnessed a growing number of people practising sports both at professional and amateur level. This trend led to a progressive rise in the incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic hip damage. The treatment of hip disease in subjects practising sports is a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon. The evaluation of patients, in particular those of young age with high functional demands, is inevitably complex and should be performed with a multidisciplinary approach; from a surgical point of view, it is essential to carefully assess whether the indication is towards conservative surgery or hip replacement surgery. The advent of arthroscopic surgery in recent years has allowed us to improve our knowledge of hip joint diseases, such as femoroacetabular impingement that is typical of sports and overuse activity. A correct and early diagnosis of the disease can direct the patient promptly to a conservative surgical treatment that could reduce the progression of degenerative pathology. However, when the joint is permanently damaged, the only reliable solution remains prosthetic surgery, leading to a series of issues that the orthopaedic surgeon should be able to master, leading to a thoughtful decision on, for example, which implant to use, which biomaterials, which surgical approach or which sport to practise after surgery. This supplement contains selected contributions stemming from the work performed by internationally recognised experts in the field and presented during the 1st European Hip Sport Meeting held in Bologna on May 19th, 20th, 2016 that we had the honour to co-chair. We hope that these contributions will help the orthopaedic surgeon, the sports physician and physiotherapist in their day-to-day practice, and will help in fulfilling our ultimate aim to improve the knowledge of the hip pathology related to sports and overuse activities. PMID:27174057

  8. Patterns of Irregular Burials in Western Europe (1st-5th Century A.D.)

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marco; Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Knüsel, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Irregular burials (IB—burials showing features that contrast with the majority of others in their geographic and chronological context) have been the focus of archaeological study because of their relative rarity and enigmatic appearance. Interpretations of IB often refer to supposed fear of the dead or to social processes taking place in time-specific contexts. However, a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of IB for various geographical contexts is still lacking, a fact that hampers any discussion of these burials on a larger scale. Methods Here, we collected a bibliographic dataset of 375 IB from both Britain and Continental Europe, altogether spanning a time period from the 1st to the 5th century AD. Each burial has been coded according to ten dichotomous variables, further analyzed by means of chi-squared tests on absolute frequencies, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Results Even acknowledging the limits of this study, and in particular the bias represented by the available literature, our results point to interesting patterns. Geographically, IB show a contrast between Britain and Continental Europe, possibly related to historical processes specific to these regions. Different types of IB (especially prone depositions and depositions with the cephalic extremity displaced) present a series of characteristics and associations between features that permit a more detailed conceptualization of these occurrences from a socio-cultural perspective that aids to elucidate their funerary meaning. Conclusions and Significance Altogether, the present work stresses the variability of IB, and the need to contextualize them in a proper archaeological and historical context. It contributes to the discussion of IB by providing a specific geographic and chronological frame of reference that supports a series of hypotheses about the cultural processes possibly underlying their occurrence. PMID:26115408

  9. Computational Simulations of Convergent Nozzles for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were completed for a series of convergent nozzles in participation of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The simulations were performed using the Wind-US flow solver. Discharge and thrust coefficients were computed for four axisymmetric nozzles with nozzle pressure ratios (NPR) ranging from 1.4 to 7.0. The computed discharge coefficients showed excellent agreement with available experimental data; the computed thrust coefficients captured trends observed in the experimental data, but over-predicted the thrust coefficient by 0.25 to 1.0 percent. Sonic lines were computed for cases with NPR >= 2.0 and agreed well with experimental data for NPR >= 2.5. Simulations were also performed for a 25 deg. conic nozzle bifurcated by a flat plate at NPR = 4.0. The jet plume shock structure was compared with and without the splitter plate to the experimental data. The Wind-US simulations predicted the shock structure well, though lack of grid resolution in the plume reduced the sharpness of the shock waves. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and Detached Eddy Simulations (DES) were performed at NPR = 1.6 for the 25 deg conic nozzle with splitter plate. The simulations predicted vortex shedding from the trailing edge of the splitter plate. However, the vortices of URANS and DES solutions appeared to dissipate earlier than observed experimentally. It is believed that a lack of grid resolution in the region of the vortex shedding may have caused the vortices to break down too soon

  10. New Insight into the Reaction Mechanism for Exceptional Capacity of Ordered Mesoporous SnO2 Electrodes via Synchrotron-Based X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunchul; Park, Gwi Ok; Kim, Yunok; Muhammad, Shoaib; Yoo, Jaeseung; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Lee, Byungju; Kang, Kisuk; Kim, Hansu; Kim, Ji Man; Yoon, WonSub

    2014-11-25

    Tin oxide-based materials, operating via irreversible conversion and reversible alloying reaction, are promising lithium storage materials due to their higher capacity. Recent studies reported that nanostructured SnO2 anode provides higher capacity beyond theoretical capacity based on the alloying reaction mechanism; however, their exact mechanism remains still unclear. Here, we report the detailed lithium storage mechanism of an ordered mesoporous SnO2 electrode material. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy reveal that some portion of Li2O decomposes upon delithiation and the resulting oxygen reacts with Sn to form the SnOx phase along with dealloying of LixSn, which are the main reasons for unexpected high capacity of an ordered mesoporous SnO2 material. This finding will not only be helpful in a more complete understanding of the reaction mechanism of Sn-based oxide anode materials but also will offer valuable guidance for developing new anode materials with abnormal high capacity for next generation rechargeable batteries

  11. Reaction rate reconstruction from biomass concentration measurement in bioreactors using modified second-order sliding mode algorithms.

    PubMed

    De Battista, Hernán; Picó, Jesús; Garelli, Fabricio; Navarro, José Luis

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of unknown signals in bioreactors using sliding observers. Particular attention is drawn to estimate the specific growth rate of microorganisms from measurement of biomass concentration. In a recent article, notions of high-order sliding modes have been used to derive a growth rate observer for batch processes. In this paper we generalize and refine these preliminary results. We develop a new observer with a different error structure to cope with other types of processes. Furthermore, we show that these observers are equivalent, under coordinate transformations and time scaling, to the classical super-twisting differentiator algorithm, thus inheriting all its distinctive features. The new observers' family achieves convergence to time-varying unknown signals in finite time, and presents the best attainable estimation error order in the presence of noise. In addition, the observers are robust to modeling and parameter uncertainties since they are based on minimal assumptions on bioprocess dynamics. In addition, they have interesting applications in fault detection and monitoring. The observers performance in batch, fed-batch and continuous bioreactors is assessed by experimental data obtained from the fermentation of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae on glucose.

  12. TEOS reaction rates on SiO{sub 2} at 1000K: Zero-order dependence on hydroxyl coverage and implications for reactions with three-membered siloxane rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    We have determined key kinetic parameters for the reaction of TEOS (tetraethylorthosilicate) on SiO{sub 2}. This was accomplished under conditions (20 to 500 mTorr at 1000 K) that pertain directly to TEOS-based CVD (chemical vapor deposition) processes. TEOS reactions were carried out using deuterated silanols (SiOD) on the initial SiO{sub 2} surface. This allowed FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) measurements to distinguish the consumption of SiOD by TEOS from the concurrent formation of SiOH which results from TEOS decomposition at 1000 K. While SiOD consumption did exhibit a first-order dependence on SiOD coverage, SiOH formation exhibited a zero-order dependence on the total coverage of hydroxyl groups. This suggests that reactions with hydroxyl groups alone can not account for all of the TEOS decomposition reactions at 1000 K. Since the low coverage of two-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 2}) rings was consumed during the initial TEOS exposure, siloxane (Si-O-Si) bridges in three-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 3}) rings may be the additional species responsible for the constant rate of TEOS decomposition. However, it is not conclusive that this type of site-specific mechanism controls the chemistry. The data may also be explained with a site-independent mechanism in which intramolecular decomposition of TEOS on the surface provides a common rate-determining step for subsequent consumption of hydroxyls and siloxane bridges on SiO{sub 2}. Regardless of the specific mechanism, our results predict that deposition rates will be insensitive to the relative coverages of siloxane bridges and hydroxyls on SiO{sub 2}. Therefore, a precise knowledge of the coverages of these species on SiO{sub 2} is not essential for modeling thermal TEOS decomposition rates.

  13. Platypus chain reaction: directional and ordered meiotic pairing of the multiple sex chromosome chain in Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Daish, Tasman; Casey, Aaron; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes are phylogenetically and phenotypically unique animals with an unusually complex sex chromosome system that is composed of ten chromosomes in platypus and nine in echidna. These chromosomes are alternately linked (X1Y1, X2Y2, ...) at meiosis via pseudoautosomal regions and segregate to form spermatozoa containing either X or Y chromosomes. The physical and epigenetic mechanisms involved in pairing and assembly of the complex sex chromosome chain in early meiotic prophase I are completely unknown. We have analysed the pairing dynamics of specific sex chromosome pseudoautosomal regions in platypus spermatocytes during prophase of meiosis I. Our data show a highly coordinated pairing process that begins at the terminal Y5 chromosome and completes with the union of sex chromosomes X1Y1. The consistency of this ordered assembly of the chain is remarkable and raises questions about the mechanisms and factors that regulate the differential pairing of sex chromosomes and how this relates to potential meiotic silencing mechanisms and alternate segregation. PMID:19874721

  14. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research 2011 (ICMER2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Rosli

    2012-09-01

    The year 2010 represented a significant milestone in the history of the Mechanical Engineering community with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (National Conference in Mechanical Engineering for Research, 1st and 2nd NCMER) at Universiti Malaysia Pahang on 26-27 May and 3-4 December 2010. The conferences attracted a large number of delegates from different premier academic and research institutions in the country to participate and share their research experiences at the conference. The International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2011) followed on from the first and second conferences due to good support from researchers. The ICMER 2011 is a good platform for researchers and postgraduate students to present their latest finding in research. The conference covers a wide range of topics including the internal combustion engine, machining processes, heat and mass transfer, fuel, biomechanical analysis, aerodynamic analysis, thermal comfort, computational techniques, design and simulation, automotive transmission, optimization techniques, hybrid electric vehicles, engine vibration, heat exchangers, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, green energy, vehicle dynamics renewable energy, combustion, design, product development, advanced experimentation techniques, to name but a few. The international conference has helped to bridge the gap between researchers working at different institutions and in different countries to share their knowledge and has helped to motivate young scientists with their research. This has also given some clear direction for further research from the deliberations of the conference. Several people have contributed in different ways to the success of the conference. We thank the keynote speakers and all authors of the contributed papers, for the cooperation rendered to us in the publication of the CD conference proceedings. In particular, we would like to place on record our

  15. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja Syed, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    The 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies (ICSICCST-2013), took place in Karachi, Pakistan, from 24-26 June 2013. It was organized by Indus University, Karachi, in collaboration with HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi. More than 80 abstracts were submitted to the conference and were double blind-reviewed by an international scientific committee. The topics of the Conference were: Video, Image & Voice Sensing Sensing for Industry, Environment, and Health Automation and Controls Laser Sensors and Systems Displays for Innovative Applications Emerging Technologies Unmanned, Robotic, and Layered Systems Sensing for Defense, Homeland Security, and Law Enforcement The title of the conference, 'Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies' is very apt in capturing the main issues facing the industry of Pakistan and the world. We believe the sensing industry, particularly in Pakistan, is currently at a critical juncture of its development. The future of the industry will depend on how the industry players choose to respond to the challenge of global competition and opportunities arising from strong growth in the Asian region for which we are pleased to note that the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues with an international perspective. This will certainly assist industry players to make informed decisions in shaping the future of the industry. The conference gathered qualified researchers from developed countries like USA, UK, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, China, South Korea and Malaysia etc whose expertise resulting from the research can be drawn upon to build an exploitable area of new technology that has potential Defense, Homeland Security, and Military applicability. More than 250 researchers/students attended the event and made the event great success as the turnout was 100%. An exceptional line-up of speakers spoke at the occasion. We want

  16. Effects of the April 1st, 2014 GLONASS Outage on GNSS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Romero, I.; D'Anastasio, E.

    2014-12-01

    The use of multi-constellation GNSS receivers has been assumed as a way to increase system integrity both by increased coverage during normal operations and failover redundancy in the event of a constellation failure. At approximately 21:00 UTC on April 1st the entire GLONASS constellation was disrupted as illegal ephemeris uploaded to each satellite took effect simultaneously. The outage continued for more than 10 hours. While ephemeris were incorrect, pseudoranges were correctly broadcast on both L1 and L2 and carrier phases were not affected; in the best case, GNSS receivers could be expected to continue to track all signals including GLONASS and at the worst to continue to track GPS and other constellations. It became clear to operators of the GeoNet network in New Zealand that the majority of their 79 GLONASS-enabled receivers experienced total tracking failures. Further detailed analysis of data from these and 315 additional GLONASS-enabled stations worldwide showed that receiver tracking behavior was affected for most receiver brands and models, both for GLONASS and GPS. Findings regarding the impacts of the GLONASS outage on receiver behavior will be highlighted. We use data recorded by GLONASS enabled global sites for the days during, preceding and following the outage to evaluate the impact of the outage on tracking and positioning performance. We observe that for some receiver types the onboard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) failed to ignore the incorrect messages, resulting in degraded GLONASS and GPS tracking and in some cases complete tracking failures and significant data loss. In addition, many of the receivers with clock steering enabled showed outliers in their receiver clock bias estimates that also coincided with the outage. Our results show in detail how different brands, configurations, and distributions of receivers were affected to varying extents, but no common factors are apparent. This event shows that many manufacturers

  17. Teachers' Spatial Anxiety Relates to 1st-and 2nd-Graders' Spatial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Elizabeth A.; Ramirez, Gerardo; Beilock, Sian L.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers' anxiety about an academic domain, such as math, can impact students' learning in that domain. We asked whether this relation held in the domain of spatial skill, given the importance of spatial skill for success in math and science and its malleability at a young age. We measured 1st-and 2nd-grade teachers' spatial anxiety…

  18. Application of the Zero-Order Reaction Rate Model and Transition State Theory to predict porous Ti6Al4V bending strength.

    PubMed

    Reig, L; Amigó, V; Busquets, D; Calero, J A; Ortiz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Porous Ti6Al4V samples were produced by microsphere sintering. The Zero-Order Reaction Rate Model and Transition State Theory were used to model the sintering process and to estimate the bending strength of the porous samples developed. The evolution of the surface area during the sintering process was used to obtain sintering parameters (sintering constant, activation energy, frequency factor, constant of activation and Gibbs energy of activation). These were then correlated with the bending strength in order to obtain a simple model with which to estimate the evolution of the bending strength of the samples when the sintering temperature and time are modified: σY=P+B·[lnT·t-ΔGa/R·T]. Although the sintering parameters were obtained only for the microsphere sizes analysed here, the strength of intermediate sizes could easily be estimated following this model. PMID:24364968

  19. Application of the Zero-Order Reaction Rate Model and Transition State Theory to predict porous Ti6Al4V bending strength.

    PubMed

    Reig, L; Amigó, V; Busquets, D; Calero, J A; Ortiz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Porous Ti6Al4V samples were produced by microsphere sintering. The Zero-Order Reaction Rate Model and Transition State Theory were used to model the sintering process and to estimate the bending strength of the porous samples developed. The evolution of the surface area during the sintering process was used to obtain sintering parameters (sintering constant, activation energy, frequency factor, constant of activation and Gibbs energy of activation). These were then correlated with the bending strength in order to obtain a simple model with which to estimate the evolution of the bending strength of the samples when the sintering temperature and time are modified: σY=P+B·[lnT·t-ΔGa/R·T]. Although the sintering parameters were obtained only for the microsphere sizes analysed here, the strength of intermediate sizes could easily be estimated following this model.

  20. Educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop on 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M A; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Harfush, L A; Navarro-Zarza, J E; Canoso, J J; Cruz-Domínguez, P; Vargas, A; Hernández-Díaz, C; Chiapas-Gasca, K; Camacho-Galindo, J; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Kalish, R A

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop in 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. First-year rheumatology fellows (N = 17) and a convenience sample of 1st-year orthopedic fellows (N = 14) from Mexico City in the 9th month of training participated in the study. The pre- and the post- workshop tests included the same 20 questions that had to be answered by identification or demonstration of relevant anatomical items. The questions, arranged by anatomical regions, were asked in five dynamic stations. Overall, the 31 participants showed an increase of correct answers, from a median of 6 (range 1 to 12) in the pre-workshop test, to a median of 14 (range 7 to 19) in the post-workshop test. In the pre-workshop test, the correct median answers were 7 (range 2 to 12) in the orthopedic fellows and 5 (range 1 to 10) in the rheumatology fellows (p = 0.297). Corresponding scores in the post-workshop were 15 (range 10 to 19) and 12 (range 7 to 18) (p = 0.026) showing a significant difference favoring the orthopedic group. Our clinical anatomy workshop was efficacious, in the short term, as a teaching instrument for 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. The post-workshop scores, although significantly improved in both groups, particularly in the orthopedic fellows, were still suboptimal. Further refinements of our workshop might yield better results.

  1. Gene-Environment Interaction Effects on the Development of Immune Responses in the 1st Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoffjan, Sabine; Nicolae, Dan; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Roberg, Kathy; Evans, Michael; Mirel, Daniel B.; Steiner, Lori; Walker, Karen; Shult, Peter; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Gern, James E.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Ober, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that results from both genetic and environmental risk factors. Children attending day care in the 1st year of life have lower risks for developing asthma, although the mechanism for this “day care” effect is largely unknown. We investigated the interactions between day care exposure in the 1st 6 mo of life and genotypes for 72 polymorphisms at 45 candidate loci and their effects on cytokine response profiles and on the development of atopic phenotypes in the 1st year of life in the Childhood Onset of Asthma (COAST) cohort of children. Six interactions (at four polymorphisms in three loci) with “day care” that had an effect on early-life immune phenotypes were significant at P<.001. The estimated false-discovery rate was 33%, indicating that an estimated four P values correspond to true associations. Moreover, the “day care” effect at some loci was accounted for by the increased number of viral infections among COAST children attending day care, whereas interactions at other loci were independent of the number of viral infections, indicating the presence of additional risk factors associated with day care environment. This study identified significant gene-environment interactions influencing the early patterning of the immune system and the subsequent development of asthma and highlights the importance of considering environmental risk factors in genetic analyses. PMID:15726497

  2. Synthesis of carbon supported ordered tetragonal pseudo-ternary Pt2M‧M″ (M = Fe, Co, Ni) nanoparticles and their activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh T.; Wakabayashi, Ryo H.; Yang, Minghui; Abruña, Héctor D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2015-04-01

    Alloying Pt with 3d transition metals has attracted much attention due to their reduced Pt content and reports of enhanced electrocatalytic activity for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. However, synthesizing ordered nanocrystalline intermetallics in the sub-10 nm range can be challenging. Here, we report on the co-reduction synthesis of ordered ternary Pt-base transition metal intermetallics with particle sizes in the regime of 3-5 nm. Since differences in the activity of PtM (M = Fe, Co, Ni) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been reported, we explored their combinations: Pt2FeCo, Pt2FeNi, and Pt2CoNi. These ternary intermetallic nanoparticles crystallized in P4/mmm space group upon annealing in a protective KCl matrix. The electrocatalysts were prepared by dispersing these intermetallics onto a carbon support using ethylene glycol and various sonication techniques. A combination of analytical techniques including powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, electron microscopy and electrochemical methods have been used in this study. The oxygen reduction reaction activity and stability of the catalysts were tested in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.1 M H2SO4 using cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. The correlations between the composition, structure, morphology and activity of the intermetallics have been established and are discussed.

  3. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    more recent pollution. The concept and format of the 1st PAGES YSM worked very well, and

  4. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    more recent pollution. The concept and format of the 1st PAGES YSM worked very well, and created a high degree of enthusiasm and stimulation among the participants (as is demonstrated by this special issue). The 2nd YSM is therefore firmly planned to take place in 2013, back-to-back with the 4th PAGES OSM. Crucial and gratefully acknowledged contributions to the success of the YSM were made by the numerous co-sponsors (see logos below), who provided the financial basis for the YSM and supported the attendance of many early-career researchers from various parts of the world. Furthermore, we cordially thank all reviewers for shaping this proceeding issue with their insightful and helpful reviews. Conference photograph

  5. A highly efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction: phosphorus and nitrogen co-doped hierarchically ordered porous carbon derived from an iron-functionalized polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengwei; Zhong, Hexiang; Li, Xianfeng; Yao, Lan; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-01-01

    Heteroatom-doped carbon materials have shown respectable activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. However, the performances of these materials are not satisfactory for energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. Here, we demonstrate a new type of phosphorus and nitrogen co-doped hierarchically ordered porous carbon (PNHOPC) derived from an iron-functionalized mesoporous polymer through an evaporation-induced self-assembly process that simultaneously combines the carbonization and nitrogen doping processes. The soft template and the nitrogen doping process facilitate the formation of the hierarchically ordered structure for the PNHOPC. The catalyst possesses a large surface area (1118 cm2 g-1) and a pore volume of 1.14 cm3 g-1. Notably, it exhibits excellent ORR catalytic performance, superior stability and methanol tolerance in acidic electrolytes, thus making the catalyst promising for fuel cells. The correlations between the unique pore structure and the nitrogen and phosphorus configuration of the catalysts with high catalytic activity are thoroughly investigated.Heteroatom-doped carbon materials have shown respectable activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. However, the performances of these materials are not satisfactory for energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. Here, we demonstrate a new type of phosphorus and nitrogen co-doped hierarchically ordered porous carbon (PNHOPC) derived from an iron-functionalized mesoporous polymer through an evaporation-induced self-assembly process that simultaneously combines the carbonization and nitrogen doping processes. The soft template and the nitrogen doping process facilitate the formation of the hierarchically ordered structure for the PNHOPC. The catalyst possesses a large surface area (1118 cm2 g-1) and a pore volume of 1.14 cm3 g-1. Notably, it exhibits excellent ORR catalytic performance, superior stability and methanol tolerance in acidic

  6. Mixtures of l-Amino Acids as Reaction Medium for Formation of Iron Nanoparticles: The Order of Addition into a Ferrous Salt Solution Matters

    PubMed Central

    Šišková, Karolína M.; Machala, Libor; Tuček, Jiři; Kašlík, Josef; Mojzeš, Peter; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Owing to Mössbauer spectroscopy, an advanced characterization technique for iron-containing materials, the present study reveals previously unknown possibilities using l-amino acids for the generation of magnetic particles. Based on our results, a simple choice of the order of l-amino acids addition into a reaction mixture containing ferrous ions leads to either superparamagnetic ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide particles, or magnetically strong Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles after chemical reduction. Conversely, when ferric salts are employed with the addition of selected l-amino acids, only Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles are observed, regardless of the addition order. We explain this phenomenon by a specific transient/intermediate complex formation between Fe2+ and l-glutamic acid. This type of complexation prevents ferrous ions from spontaneous oxidation in solutions with full air access. Moreover, due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy we show that the functional groups of l-amino acids are not destroyed during the borohydride-induced reduction. These functionalities can be further exploited for (i) attachment of l-amino acids to the as-prepared magnetic particles, and (ii) for targeted bio- and/or environmental applications where the surface chemistry needs to be tailored and directed toward biocompatible species. PMID:24071943

  7. Fabrication of PdCo Bimetallic Nanoparticles Anchored on Three-Dimensional Ordered N-Doped Porous Carbon as an Efficient Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hairong; Tang, Jing; Gong, Hao; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tao; He, Jianping; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-08-17

    PdCo bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) anchored on three-dimensional (3D) ordered N-doped porous carbon (PdCo/NPC) were fabricated by an in situ synthesis. Within this composite, N-doped porous carbon (NPC) with an ordered mesoporous structure possesses a high surface area (659.6 m(2) g(-1)), which can facilitate electrolyte infiltration. NPC also acts as a perfect 3D conductive network, guaranteeing fast electron transport. In addition, homogeneously distributed PdCo alloy NPs (∼15 nm) combined with the doping of the N element can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Due to the structural and material superiority, although the weight percentage of PdCo NPs (∼8 wt%) is much smaller than that of commercial Pt/C (20 wt%), the PdCo/NPC catalyst exhibits similar excellent electrocatalytic activity; however, its superior durability and methanol-tolerance ability of the ORR are as great as those of commercial Pt/C in alkaline media.

  8. Fabrication of PdCo Bimetallic Nanoparticles Anchored on Three-Dimensional Ordered N-Doped Porous Carbon as an Efficient Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hairong; Tang, Jing; Gong, Hao; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tao; He, Jianping; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-08-17

    PdCo bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) anchored on three-dimensional (3D) ordered N-doped porous carbon (PdCo/NPC) were fabricated by an in situ synthesis. Within this composite, N-doped porous carbon (NPC) with an ordered mesoporous structure possesses a high surface area (659.6 m(2) g(-1)), which can facilitate electrolyte infiltration. NPC also acts as a perfect 3D conductive network, guaranteeing fast electron transport. In addition, homogeneously distributed PdCo alloy NPs (∼15 nm) combined with the doping of the N element can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Due to the structural and material superiority, although the weight percentage of PdCo NPs (∼8 wt%) is much smaller than that of commercial Pt/C (20 wt%), the PdCo/NPC catalyst exhibits similar excellent electrocatalytic activity; however, its superior durability and methanol-tolerance ability of the ORR are as great as those of commercial Pt/C in alkaline media. PMID:27441490

  9. BMI differences in 1st and 2nd generation immigrants of Asian and European origin to Australia.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Katharina; Hollingsworth, Bruce; Morgan, Lawrie

    2011-01-01

    We estimate assimilation of immigrants' body mass index (BMI) to the host population of Australia over one generation, conducting separate analyses for immigrants from 7 regions of Europe and Asia. We use quantile regressions to allow for differing impact of generational status across 19 quantiles of BMI from under-weight to morbidly obese individuals. We find that 1st generation South European immigrants have higher, and South and East Asian immigrants have lower BMI than Australians, but have assimilated to the BMI of their hosts in the 2nd generation. There are no or only small BMI differences between Australians and 1st and 2nd generation immigrants from East Europe, North-West Europe, Middle East and Pacific regions. We conclude that both upward and downward assimilation in some immigrant groups is most likely caused by factors which can change over one generation (such as acculturation), and not factors which would take longer to change (such as genetics). Our results suggest that public health policies targeting the lifestyles of well educated Asian immigrants may be effective in preventing BMI increase in this subgroup.

  10. Attitudes towards General Practice: a comparative cross-sectional survey of 1st and 5th year medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kruschinski, Carsten; Wiese, Birgitt; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Positive attitudes towards General Practice can be understood as a prerequisite for becoming a General Practitioner (GP) and for collaboration with GPs later on. This study aimed to assess attitudes of medical students at the beginning and the end of medical school. Methods: A total of 160 1st year students at Hannover Medical School were surveyed. Their attitudes were compared to those of 287 5th year students. Descriptive, bi- and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate influences of year of study and gender. Results: Year of study and gender both were associated with the attitudes towards General Practice. The interest in General Practice and patient-orientation (communication, care of older patients with chronic diseases) was higher in 1st year students compared to more advanced students. Female students valued such requirements more than male students, the differences in attitudes between the years of study being more pronounced in male students. Conclusion: Despite some limitations caused by the cross-sectional design, the attitudes towards General Practice competencies changed to their disadvantage during medical school. This suggests a formative influence of the strategies used in medical education. Educational strategies, however, could be used to bring about a change of attitudes in the other direction. PMID:23255966

  11. A global reaction route mapping-based kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Izaac; Irle, Stephan; Page, Alister J

    2016-07-14

    We propose a new on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method that is based on exhaustive potential energy surface searching carried out with the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) algorithm. Starting from any given equilibrium state, this GRRM-KMC algorithm performs a one-step GRRM search to identify all surrounding transition states. Intrinsic reaction coordinate pathways are then calculated to identify potential subsequent equilibrium states. Harmonic transition state theory is used to calculate rate constants for all potential pathways, before a standard KMC accept/reject selection is performed. The selected pathway is then used to propagate the system forward in time, which is calculated on the basis of 1st order kinetics. The GRRM-KMC algorithm is validated here in two challenging contexts: intramolecular proton transfer in malonaldehyde and surface carbon diffusion on an iron nanoparticle. We demonstrate that in both cases the GRRM-KMC method is capable of reproducing the 1st order kinetics observed during independent quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations using the density-functional tight-binding potential. PMID:27421395

  12. A global reaction route mapping-based kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Izaac; Irle, Stephan; Page, Alister J.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method that is based on exhaustive potential energy surface searching carried out with the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) algorithm. Starting from any given equilibrium state, this GRRM-KMC algorithm performs a one-step GRRM search to identify all surrounding transition states. Intrinsic reaction coordinate pathways are then calculated to identify potential subsequent equilibrium states. Harmonic transition state theory is used to calculate rate constants for all potential pathways, before a standard KMC accept/reject selection is performed. The selected pathway is then used to propagate the system forward in time, which is calculated on the basis of 1st order kinetics. The GRRM-KMC algorithm is validated here in two challenging contexts: intramolecular proton transfer in malonaldehyde and surface carbon diffusion on an iron nanoparticle. We demonstrate that in both cases the GRRM-KMC method is capable of reproducing the 1st order kinetics observed during independent quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations using the density-functional tight-binding potential.

  13. [Radioimmunologic determination of plasmatic triiodothyronine. Verification of operative parameters; 1st clinical results].

    PubMed

    Dotti, C

    1975-06-01

    .01 e + 0.08, n = 10, r = 0.999 for ANS and f = 1.08 e -- 1.64, n = 9, r = 0.995 for Merth, implying a practically quantitative recovery in both cases. Thyroxine (T4) cross reaction study has been undertaken under a quite new optics re-calculating the regression lines -- equations of the T3 recovery in the presence of added T4; in that case, the following equations are valid: f = 1.05 e + 0,13, n = 10, r = 0.992 for ANS and f = 1.07 e + 2.26, n = 18, r = 0,985 for Merth. Reducing the maximum added T4 to 1 ng/tube, the cross reaction can be considered as negligible. T3 levels for normal subjects are finally reported: 1.50 +/- 0.80, n= 37 for ANS and 1.40 +/- 0.68, n = 40 for Merth (ng T3/ml, means +/- 2SD). PMID:1223940

  14. Developing semianalytical solutions for multispecies transport coupled with a sequential first-order reaction network under variable flow velocities and dispersion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Heejun

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a semianalytical method to solve the multispecies reactive solute transport equation coupled with a sequential first-order reaction network under spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients. This method employs the generalized integral transform technique and general linear transformation method by Clement (2001) to transform the set of coupled multispecies reactive transport equations into a set of independent uncoupled equations and to solve these independent equations for spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients, as well as for a temporally varying inlet concentration. The proposed semianalytical solution is compared against previously published analytical solutions of Srinivasan and Clement (2008b) and van Genuchten (1985). An example is used to show application of the solution to a hypothetical multilayered medium. The solution of proposed approach is also compared with a numerical solution using the 2DFATMIC (Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals Model). Three scenarios are illustrated to show the capabilities of the proposed semianalytical method to deal with aquifer heterogeneity and transient situations. We also show a practical implementation of the solution to an actual field, single-well push-pull test example designed to obtain the concentration distribution of reactants consumed and products formed at the end of the injection phase.

  15. Impact of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the 1st millennium AD in a comprehensive climate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastian; Zorita, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The climate of the 1st millennium AD shows some remarkable differences compared to the last millennium concerning variation in external forcings. Together with an orbitally induced increased solar insolation during the northern hemisphere summer season and a general lack of strong solar minima, the frequency and intensity of large tropical and extratropical eruptions is decreased. Here we present results of a new climate simulation carried out with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM-P forced with variations in orbital, solar, volcanic and greenhouse gas variations and land use changes for the last 2,100 years. The atmospheric model has a horizontal resolution of T63 (approx. 125x125 km) and therefore also allows investigations of regional-to-continental scale climatic phenomena. The volcanic forcing was reconstructed based on a publication by Sigl et al. (2013) using the sulfate records of the NEEM and WAIS ice cores. To obtain information on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) these sulfate records were scaled to an established reconstruction from Crowley and Unterman (2010), which is also a standard forcing in the framework of CMIP5/PMIP3. A comparison between the newly created data set with the Crowley and Unterman dataset reveals that the new reconstruction shows in general weaker intensities, especially of the large tropical outbreaks and fewer northern hemispheric small-to-medium scale eruptions. However, the general pattern in the overlapping period is similar. A hypothesis that can be tested with the simulation is whether the reduced volcanic intensity of the 1st millennium AD contributed to the elevated temperature levels over Europe, evident within a new proxy-based reconstruction. On the other hand, the few but large volcanic eruptions, e.g. the 528 AD event, also induced negative decadal-scale temperature anomalies. Another interesting result of the simulation relates to the 79 AD eruption of the Vesuvius, which caused the collapse of the city of

  16. 77 FR 39215 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Countervailing Duty Orders; Policy Bulletin, 63 FR 18871 (April 16, 1998). The Notice of Initiation of Five-Year... Investigations Lemon Juice from Argentina (A-357-818) (1st Sally Gannon Review). (202) 482-0162 Lemon Juice...

  17. A decadal gridded hyperspectral infrared record for climate Sep 1st 2002--Aug 31st 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David Raymond

    We present a gridded Fundamental Decadal Data Record (FDDR) of Brightness Temperatures (BT) from the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) from ten years of hyperspectral Infrared Radiances onboard the NASA EOS Aqua satellite. Although global surface temperature data records are available for over 130 years, it was not until 1978 when the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) was the first instrument series to reliably monitor long-term trends of the upper atmosphere. AIRS, operational on September 1, 2002 is the first successful hyperspectral satellite weather instrument of more than 1 year, and provides a 10 year global hyperspectral IR radiance data record. Our contribution was to prepare a gridded decadal data record of climate resolution from the AIRS Outgoing Longwave Spectrum (OLS). In order to do this, we developed a robust software infrastructure "Gridderama" using large multivariate array storage to facilitate this multi-terabyte parallel data processing task while ensuring integrity, tracking provenance, logging errors, and providing extensive visualization. All of our data, code, logs and visualizations are freely available online and browsable via a real-time "Data Catalog" interface. We show that these global all-sky trends are consistent with the expected radiative forcings from an increase in greenhouse gasses. We have also measured high global correlations with the GISS global surface air temperatures as well as high regional anticorrelations with the NOAA ONI index of El Niño phase. In addition, we have performed inter-annual inter-comparisons with the Moderate Resolution Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua satellite to examine the relative consistency of their calibrations. The comparisons of the two instruments for the 4µ spectral channels (between 3.9µ and 4.1µ) indicate an inter-annual warming of 0.13K per decade of AIRS more than MODIS. This decadal relative drift is small compared to inter-annual variability but on the order of

  18. Improving conversion yield of fermentable sugars into fuel ethanol in 1st generation yeast-based production processes.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2015-06-01

    Current fuel ethanol production using yeasts and starch or sucrose-based feedstocks is referred to as 1st generation (1G) ethanol production. These processes are characterized by the high contribution of sugar prices to the final production costs, by high production volumes, and by low profit margins. In this context, small improvements in the ethanol yield on sugars have a large impact on process economy. Three types of strategies used to achieve this goal are discussed: engineering free-energy conservation, engineering redox-metabolism, and decreasing sugar losses in the process. Whereas the two former strategies lead to decreased biomass and/or glycerol formation, the latter requires increased process and/or yeast robustness.

  19. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event

    PubMed Central

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R⊙. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona. PMID:25685432

  20. Levels of innate immune factors in preterm and term mothers' breast milk during the 1st month postpartum.

    PubMed

    Trend, Stephanie; Strunk, Tobias; Lloyd, Megan L; Kok, Chooi Heen; Metcalfe, Jessica; Geddes, Donna T; Lai, Ching Tat; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A; Simmer, Karen; Currie, Andrew

    2016-04-14

    There is a paucity of data on the effect of preterm birth on the immunological composition of breast milk throughout the different stages of lactation. We aimed to characterise the effects of preterm birth on the levels of immune factors in milk during the 1st month postpartum, to determine whether preterm milk is deficient in antimicrobial factors. Colostrum (days 2-5 postpartum), transitional milk (days 8-12) and mature milk (days 26-30) were collected from mothers of extremely preterm (<28 weeks of gestation, n 15), very preterm (28-<32 weeks of gestation, n 15), moderately preterm (32-<37 weeks of gestation, n 15) and term infants (37-41 weeks of gestation, n 15). Total protein, lactoferrin, secretory IgA, soluble CD14 receptor (sCD14), transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), α defensin 5 (HD5), β defensins 1 (HBD1) and 2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, interferon-γ, TNF-α and lysozyme (LZ) were quantified in milk. We examined the effects of lactation stage, gestational age, volume of milk expressed, mode of delivery, parity and maternal infection on milk immune factor concentrations using repeated-measures regression analysis. The concentrations of all factors except LZ and HD5 decreased over the 1st month postpartum. Extremely preterm mothers had significantly higher concentrations of HBD1 and TGF-β2 in colostrum than term mothers did. After controlling for other variables in regression analyses, preterm birth was associated with higher concentrations of HBD1, LZ and sCD14 in milk samples. In conclusion, preterm breast milk contains significantly higher concentrations of some immune proteins than term breast milk.

  1. Experience from the 1st Year running a Massive High Quality Videoconferencing Service for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Joao; Baron, Thomas; Bompastor, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    In the last few years, we have witnessed an explosion of visual collaboration initiatives in the industry. Several advances in video services and also in their underlying infrastructure are currently improving the way people collaborate globally. These advances are creating new usage paradigms: any device in any network can be used to collaborate, in most cases with an overall high quality. To keep apace with this technology progression, the CERN IT Department launched a service based on the Vidyo product. This new service architecture introduces Adaptive Video Layering, which dynamically optimizes the video for each endpoint by leveraging the H.264 Scalable Video Coding (SVC)-based compression technology. It combines intelligent AV routing techniques with the flexibility of H.264 SVC video compression, in order to achieve resilient video collaboration over the Internet, 3G and WiFi. We present an overview of the results that have been achieved after this major change. In particular, the first year of operation of the CERN Vidyo service will be described in terms of performance and scale: The service became part of the daily activity of the LHC collaborations, reaching a monthly usage of more than 3200 meetings with a peak of 750 simultaneous connections. We also present some key features such as the integration with CERN Indico. LHC users can now join a Vidyo meeting either from their personal computer or a CERN videoconference room simply from an Indico event page, with the ease of a single click. The roadmap for future improvements, service extensions and core infrastructure tendencies such as cloud based services and virtualization of system components will also be discussed. Vidyo's strengths allowed us to build a universal service (it is accessible from PCs, but also videoconference rooms, traditional phones, tablets and smartphones), developed with 3 key ideas in mind: ease of use, full integration and high quality.

  2. Assessment of the orbits from the 1st IGS reprocessing campaign (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Gendt, G.; Nischan, T.; Ray, J.

    2009-12-01

    combinations for the years 2000 to 2007 can be used as a measure of the quality improvement of the reprocessed combined orbits. Whereas the historic IGS orbits show differences between the ACs and the combined orbits on the order of 3 to 4 cm in 2000, the reprocessed IGS orbits have differences of 1 to 1.5 cm in 2000, nearly the same quality as in recent years. With a similar improvement in the clock solutions, more precise PPP results can be obtained for the past years. Also, the scale, rotation and translation Helmert transformation parameters for each of the individual AC orbits have improved by at least a factor of two in 2000, which will give more consistent orbits over time, and thus better PPP derived station position time series.

  3. Report of the 1st meeting of the "Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISAER)".

    PubMed

    Druml, Christiane; Singer, Ernst A; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The European Directive 2001/20/EC ("Clinical Trials Directive") was aimed at simplifying and harmonising European clinical research. The directive's attempt represents an important step because many European Member States lack national laws that specifically address details of research, but the goal has been only partly achieved. For academic investigators doing national or multi-national research the new European law and the requirements following its implementation are likely to have the opposite effect. Some areas seem to be of particular concern: trial sponsorship, the ethical review process, the participation of patients who are temporarily not able to consent in clinical trials, in particular the informed consent process, an accepted European registry for all clinical trials, insurance and pharmacovigilance. Furthermore there are fundamental problems of the conduct of clinical trials that could have been foreseen at the time of implementation of the new law, which are impeding academic basic clinical research. The bureaucratic burden for academic investigators has tremendously increased without representing any contribution to patients' safety or to the scientific value of research. Furthermore some large European academic trials cannot be conducted anymore due to the new regulations. This result in a reduction in the number of trials and additionally in a reduction in the number of patients enrolled in a study. European research and thus European patients will suffer from the loss of potential benefits of research. The Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISEAR) brings together leading stakeholders from academic research groups and interested parties from industry, international organisations and regulatory authorities to focus on the issues of concern regarding the organisational and funding of academic clinical research in order to improve the development and use of medicines in Europe. The first step of the initiative was a meeting held

  4. Social and moral norm differences among Portuguese 1st and 6th year medical students towards their intention to comply with hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Magda S; Mearns, Kathryn; Silva, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines social and moral norms towards the intention to comply with hand hygiene among Portuguese medical students from 1st and 6th years (N = 175; 121 from the 1st year, 54 from the 6th year). The study extended the theory of planned behaviour theoretical principles and hypothesised that both subjective and moral norms will be the best predictors of 1st and 6th year medical students' intention to comply with hand hygiene; however, these predictors ability to explain intention variance will change according to medical students' school year. Results indicated that the subjective norm, whose referent focuses on professors, is a relevant predictor of 1st year medical students' intention, while the subjective norm that emphasises the relevance of colleagues predicts the intentions of medical students from the 6th year. In terms of the moral norm, 6th year students' intention is better predicted by a norm that interferes with compliance; whereas intentions from 1st year students are better predicted by a norm that favours compliance. Implications of the findings highlight the importance of role models and mentors as key factors in teaching hand hygiene in medical undergraduate curricula. PMID:22111788

  5. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTION OF NITRO-POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: EFFECT BY SOLVENT AND STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Gernerique; Smith, Keonia; Chornes, Ashley; Harris, Tracy; Honeysucker, Tiffany; Dasary, Suman Raj; Yu, Hongtao

    2010-01-01

    Photochemical degradation of 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, 2,7-dinitrofluorene, 6-nitrochrysene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, 5-nitroacenaphthene, and 9-nitroanthracene were examined in CHCl3, CH2Cl2, DMF, DMF/H2O (80/20), CH3CN, or CH3CN/H2O (80/20). The degradation follows mostly the 1st order kinetics; but a few follow 2nd order kinetics or undergo self-catalysis. The photodegradation rates follow the order: CHCl3 > CH2Cl2 > DMF > DMF/H2O > CH3CN > CH3CN/H2O. DMF is an exceptional solvent because 3 of the 7 compounds undergo self-catalytic reaction. 9-Nitroanthracene, which has a perpendicular nitro group, is the fastest, while the more compact 1-nitropyrene and 3-nitrofluoranthene, are the slowest degrading compounds. PMID:21170286

  6. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTION OF NITRO-POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: EFFECT BY SOLVENT AND STRUCTURE.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Gernerique; Smith, Keonia; Chornes, Ashley; Harris, Tracy; Honeysucker, Tiffany; Dasary, Suman Raj; Yu, Hongtao

    2010-12-01

    Photochemical degradation of 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, 2,7-dinitrofluorene, 6-nitrochrysene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, 5-nitroacenaphthene, and 9-nitroanthracene were examined in CHCl(3), CH(2)Cl(2), DMF, DMF/H(2)O (80/20), CH(3)CN, or CH(3)CN/H(2)O (80/20). The degradation follows mostly the 1(st) order kinetics; but a few follow 2(nd) order kinetics or undergo self-catalysis. The photodegradation rates follow the order: CHCl(3) > CH(2)Cl(2) > DMF > DMF/H(2)O > CH(3)CN > CH(3)CN/H(2)O. DMF is an exceptional solvent because 3 of the 7 compounds undergo self-catalytic reaction. 9-Nitroanthracene, which has a perpendicular nitro group, is the fastest, while the more compact 1-nitropyrene and 3-nitrofluoranthene, are the slowest degrading compounds. PMID:21170286

  7. Generalized semi-analytical solutions to multispecies transport equation coupled with sequential first-order reaction network with spatially or temporally variable transport and decay coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Heejun

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical procedure for solving coupled the multispecies reactive solute transport equations, with a sequential first-order reaction network on spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients involving distinct retardation factors. This proposed approach was developed to overcome the limitation reported by Suk (2013) regarding the identical retardation values for all reactive species, while maintaining the extensive capability of the previous Suk method involving spatially variable or temporally variable coefficients of transport, general initial conditions, and arbitrary temporal variable inlet concentration. The proposed approach sequentially calculates the concentration distributions of each species by employing only the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). Because the proposed solutions for each species' concentration distributions have separable forms in space and time, the solution for subsequent species (daughter species) can be obtained using only the GITT without the decomposition by change-of-variables method imposing the limitation of identical retardation values for all the reactive species by directly substituting solutions for the preceding species (parent species) into the transport equation of subsequent species (daughter species). The proposed solutions were compared with previously published analytical solutions or numerical solutions of the numerical code of the Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (2DFATMIC) in three verification examples. In these examples, the proposed solutions were well matched with previous analytical solutions and the numerical solutions obtained by 2DFATMIC model. A hypothetical single-well push-pull test example and a scale-dependent dispersion example were designed to demonstrate the practical application of the proposed solution to a real field problem.

  8. Reanalysis of Rate Data for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 → C2H6 Using Revised Cross Sections and a Linearized Second-Order Master Equation.

    PubMed

    Blitz, M A; Green, N J B; Shannon, R J; Pilling, M J; Seakins, P W; Western, C M; Robertson, S H

    2015-07-16

    Rate coefficients for the CH3 + CH3 reaction, over the temperature range 300-900 K, have been corrected for errors in the absorption coefficients used in the original publication ( Slagle et al., J. Phys. Chem. 1988 , 92 , 2455 - 2462 ). These corrections necessitated the development of a detailed model of the B̃(2)A1' (3s)-X̃(2)A2″ transition in CH3 and its validation against both low temperature and high temperature experimental absorption cross sections. A master equation (ME) model was developed, using a local linearization of the second-order decay, which allows the use of standard matrix diagonalization methods for the determination of the rate coefficients for CH3 + CH3. The ME model utilized inverse Laplace transformation to link the microcanonical rate constants for dissociation of C2H6 to the limiting high pressure rate coefficient for association, k∞(T); it was used to fit the experimental rate coefficients using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to minimize χ(2) calculated from the differences between experimental and calculated rate coefficients. Parameters for both k∞(T) and for energy transfer ⟨ΔE⟩down(T) were varied and optimized in the fitting procedure. A wide range of experimental data were fitted, covering the temperature range 300-2000 K. A high pressure limit of k∞(T) = 5.76 × 10(-11)(T/298 K)(-0.34) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained, which agrees well with the best available theoretical expression.

  9. Diffusion-driven blow-up in a reaction-diffusion model for n(≥1)th-order autocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olwoch, J.; Needham, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a model, isothermal, autocatalytic chemical reaction scheme based on the n (icons/Journals/Common/ge" ALT="ge" ALIGN="TOP"/> 1)th-order autocatalytic step, Aicons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/> B at rate kabn , where a and b are the concentrations of reactant A and autocatalyst B , respectively, and k is the rate constant. We examine the evolution which occurs when a quantity of the autocatalyst B is introduced locally into an expanse of the reactant A , which is initially at uniform concentration. In addition, the molecular diffusivity of B , say DB , is very much smaller than that of reactant A , say DA , so that DB /DA <<1. We concentrate on the case when DB /DA icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/> 0. Under these conditions, single-point blowup occurs in the concentration of the autocatalyst B as ticons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/> icons/Journals/Common/infty" ALT="infty" ALIGN="TOP"/> , when 1icons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/> nicons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/> 2, and in finite t , when n >2. We develop both small- and large-time asymptotic solutions for the cases 12, with the cases of n = 1 and 2 having been studied in detail by Billingham J and Needham D J 1991 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 336 497-539. Finally, we discuss the situation when DB /DA is small but finite, i.e. 0

  10. First- and second-order contrast sensitivity functions reveal disrupted visual processing following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Daniel P; Reynaud, Alexandre; Ruiz, Tatiana; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Hess, Robert; Farivar, Reza

    2016-05-01

    Vision is disrupted by traumatic brain injury (TBI), with vision-related complaints being amongst the most common in this population. Based on the neural responses of early visual cortical areas, injury to the visual cortex would be predicted to affect both 1(st) order and 2(nd) order contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs)-the height and/or the cut-off of the CSF are expected to be affected by TBI. Previous studies have reported disruptions only in 2(nd) order contrast sensitivity, but using a narrow range of parameters and divergent methodologies-no study has characterized the effect of TBI on the full CSF for both 1(st) and 2(nd) order stimuli. Such information is needed to properly understand the effect of TBI on contrast perception, which underlies all visual processing. Using a unified framework based on the quick contrast sensitivity function, we measured full CSFs for static and dynamic 1(st) and 2(nd) order stimuli. Our results provide a unique dataset showing alterations in sensitivity for both 1(st) and 2(nd) order visual stimuli. In particular, we show that TBI patients have increased sensitivity for 1(st) order motion stimuli and decreased sensitivity to orientation-defined and contrast-defined 2(nd) order stimuli. In addition, our data suggest that TBI patients' sensitivity for both 1(st) order stimuli and 2(nd) order contrast-defined stimuli is shifted towards higher spatial frequencies.

  11. Volume 1, 1st Edition, Multiscale Tailoring of Highly Active and Stable Nanocomposite Catalysts, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Veser, Goetz

    2009-08-31

    Nanomaterials have gained much attention as catalysts since the discovery of exceptional CO oxidation activity of nanoscale gold by Haruta. However, many studies avoid testing nanomaterials at the high-temperatures relevant to reactions of interest for the production of clean energy (T > 700°C). The generally poor thermal stability of catalytically active noble metals has thus far prevented significant progress in this area. We have recently overcome the poor thermal stability of nanoparticles by synthesizing a platinum barium-hexaaluminate (Pt-BHA) nanocomposite which combines the high activity of noble metal nanoparticles with the thermal stability of hexaaluminates. This Pt-BHA nanocomposite demonstrates excellent activity, selectivity, and long-term stability in CPOM. Pt-BHA is anchored onto a variety of support structures in order to improve the accessibility, safety, and reactivity of the nanocatalyst. Silica felts prove to be particularly amenable to this supporting procedure, with the resulting supported nanocatalyst proving to be as active and stable for CPOM as its unsupported counterpart. Various pre-treatment conditions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in removing residual surfactant from the active nanoscale platinum particles. The size of these particles is measured across a wide temperature range, and the resulting “plateau” of stability from 600-900°C can be linked to a particle caging effect due to the structure of the supporting ceramic framework. The nanocomposites are used to catalyze the combustion of a dilute methane stream, and the results indicate enhanced activity for both Pt-BHA as well as ceria-doped BHA, as well as an absence of internal mass transfer limitations at the conditions tested. In water-gas shift reaction, nanocomposite Pt-BHA shows stability during prolonged WGS reaction and no signs of deactivation during start-up/shut-down of the reactor. The chemical and thermal stability, low molecular weight, and

  12. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  13. Frontline nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: results from the European ENEST1st study

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, A; Rosti, G; Cross, N C P; Steegmann, J L; le Coutre, P; Ossenkoppele, G; Petrov, L; Masszi, T; Hellmann, A; Griskevicius, L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Rea, D; Coriu, D; Brümmendorf, T H; Porkka, K; Saglio, G; Gastl, G; Müller, M C; Schuld, P; Di Matteo, P; Pellegrino, A; Dezzani, L; Mahon, F-X; Baccarani, M; Giles, F J

    2016-01-01

    The Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials as First-Line Treatment (ENEST1st) study included 1089 patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. The rate of deep molecular response (MR4 (BCR-ABL1⩽0.01% on the International Scale or undetectable BCR-ABL1 with ⩾10 000 ABL1 transcripts)) at 18 months was evaluated as the primary end point, with molecular responses monitored by the European Treatment and Outcome Study network of standardized laboratories. This analysis was conducted after all patients had completed 24 months of study treatment (80.9% of patients) or discontinued early. In patients with typical BCR-ABL1 transcripts and ⩽3 months of prior imatinib therapy, 38.4% (404/1052) achieved MR4 at 18 months. Six patients (0.6%) developed accelerated or blastic phase, and 13 (1.2%) died. The safety profile of nilotinib was consistent with that of previous studies, although the frequencies of some nilotinib-associated adverse events were lower (for example, rash, 21.4%). Ischemic cardiovascular events occurred in 6.0% of patients. Routine monitoring of lipid and glucose levels was not mandated in the protocol. These results support the use of frontline nilotinib, particularly when achievement of a deep molecular response (a prerequisite for attempting treatment-free remission in clinical trials) is a treatment goal. PMID:26437782

  14. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  15. Embryonic development of chicken (Gallus Gallus Domesticus) from 1st to 19th day-ectodermal structures.

    PubMed

    Toledo Fonseca, Erika; De Oliveira Silva, Fernanda Menezes; Alcântara, Dayane; Carvalho Cardoso, Rafael; Luís Franciolli, André; Sarmento, Carlos Alberto Palmeira; Fratini, Paula; José Piantino Ferreira, Antônio; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-12-01

    Birds occupy a prominent place in the Brazilian economy not only in the poultry industry but also as an animal model in many areas of scientific research. Thus the aim of this study was to provide a description of macro and microscopic aspects of the ectoderm-derived structures in chicken embryos / fetuses poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) from 1st to 19th day of incubation. 40 fertilized eggs, from a strain of domestic chickens, with an incubation period of 2-19 days were subjected to macroscopic description, biometrics, light, and scanning microscopy. All changes observed during the development were described. The nervous system, skin and appendages and organs related to vision and hearing began to be identified, both macro and microscopically, from the second day of incubation. The vesicles from the primitive central nervous system-forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain-were identified on the third day of incubation. On the sixth day of incubation, there was a clear vascularization of the skin. The optic vesicle was first observed fourth day of development and on the fifth day there was the beginning of the lens formation. Although embryonic development is influenced by animal line as well as external factors such as incubation temperature, this paper provides a chronological description for chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) during its embryonic development. PMID:24019213

  16. 1st Quarter Transportation Report FY 2015: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Louis

    2015-02-20

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 1st quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report include minor volumes of non-radioactive classified waste/material that were approved for disposal (non-radioactive classified or nonradioactive classified hazardous). Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to rounding conventions for volumetric conversions from cubic meters to cubic feet.

  17. A collaborative study to establish the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus for nucleic acid amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jacqueline F; Heath, Alan B; Minor, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the performance of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays presents a significant problem in the diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Here we describe a collaborative study to evaluate the suitability of candidate reference materials to harmonize HCMV viral load measurements in a wide range of NAT assays. Candidate materials comprised lyophilized Merlin virus, liquid Merlin virus, liquid AD169 virus, and purified HCMV Merlin DNA cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. Variability in the laboratory mean HCMV concentrations determined for virus samples across the different assays was 2 log10. Variability for the purified DNA sample was higher (>3 log10). The agreement between laboratories was markedly improved when the potencies of the liquid virus samples were expressed relative to the lyophilized virus candidate. In contrast, the agreement between laboratories for the purified DNA sample was not improved. Results indicated the suitability of the lyophilized Merlin virus preparation as the 1st WHO International Standard for HCMV for NAT. It was established in October 2010, with an assigned potency of 5 × 10(6) International Units (IU) (NIBSC code 09/162). It is intended to be used to calibrate secondary references, used in HCMV NAT assays, in IU. PMID:27179913

  18. Embryonic development of chicken (Gallus Gallus Domesticus) from 1st to 19th day-ectodermal structures.

    PubMed

    Toledo Fonseca, Erika; De Oliveira Silva, Fernanda Menezes; Alcântara, Dayane; Carvalho Cardoso, Rafael; Luís Franciolli, André; Sarmento, Carlos Alberto Palmeira; Fratini, Paula; José Piantino Ferreira, Antônio; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-12-01

    Birds occupy a prominent place in the Brazilian economy not only in the poultry industry but also as an animal model in many areas of scientific research. Thus the aim of this study was to provide a description of macro and microscopic aspects of the ectoderm-derived structures in chicken embryos / fetuses poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) from 1st to 19th day of incubation. 40 fertilized eggs, from a strain of domestic chickens, with an incubation period of 2-19 days were subjected to macroscopic description, biometrics, light, and scanning microscopy. All changes observed during the development were described. The nervous system, skin and appendages and organs related to vision and hearing began to be identified, both macro and microscopically, from the second day of incubation. The vesicles from the primitive central nervous system-forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain-were identified on the third day of incubation. On the sixth day of incubation, there was a clear vascularization of the skin. The optic vesicle was first observed fourth day of development and on the fifth day there was the beginning of the lens formation. Although embryonic development is influenced by animal line as well as external factors such as incubation temperature, this paper provides a chronological description for chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) during its embryonic development.

  19. Child gender and weight status moderate the relation of maternal feeding practices to body esteem in 1st grade children.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Lenka H; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Harrist, Amanda W; Topham, Glade; Page, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of body dissatisfaction development is critical for minimizing adverse effects of poor body esteem on eating behaviors, self-esteem, and overall health. Research has examined body esteem and its correlates largely in pre-adolescents and adolescents; however, important questions remain about factors influencing body esteem of younger children. The main purpose of this study was to test moderation by children's gender and weight status of the relation of maternal controlling feeding practices to 1st graders' body esteem. The Body Esteem Scale (BES) and anthropometric measurements were completed during one-on-one child interviews at school. Mothers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (restriction, monitoring, concern, self-assessed maternal weight). A total of 410 mother/child dyads (202 girls) participated. Percent of children classified as overweight (BMI-for-age ≥85th) was: girls - 29%; boys - 27%. Gender moderated the relation between restriction and body esteem (β = -.140, p = .05), with maternal restriction predicting body esteem in girls but not boys. The hypothesized three-way interaction among gender, child weight status, and monitoring was confirmed. Monitoring was significantly inversely related to body esteem only for overweight/obese girls (b = -1.630). The moderating influence of gender or gender and weight status on the link between maternal feeding practices and body esteem suggests the importance of body esteem interventions for girls as early as first grade. PMID:25624022

  20. Synthesis of nanomagnetic fluids and their UV spectrophotometric response with aliphatic organic acids and 1st tier dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Shivani R.; Singh, Man

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of Magnetic nanoparticles were made using coprecipitation method on mixing Fe+3 and Fe+2 in 2:1 ratio with aqueous 8M NaOH which on heating at 90°C for 2 h has yielded 85% magnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs), characterized by XRD, VSM, SEM, and HR-TEM. The formic acid (FA), oxalic acid (OA) and citric acid (CA), the series of aliphatic organic acids along with Trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridimethyl malonate (TTDMM), trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridiethyl malonate (TTDEM), trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridipropyl malonate (TTDPM), trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridibutyl malonate (TTDBM) and trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridihexyl malonate (TTDHM) 1st tier dendrimers were used separately for preparing nanomagnetic fluid. From 25 to 150 µM MNPs at an interval of 25 µM were dispersed in 150 µM of acids and dendrimers separately with DMSO. UV-VIS spectrophotometry showed a maximum MNPs dispersion with TTDMM against others and found to be most stable nanomagnetic fluid on account of capping type mechanism of acids.

  1. Child gender and weight status moderate the relation of maternal feeding practices to body esteem in 1st grade children.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Lenka H; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Harrist, Amanda W; Topham, Glade; Page, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of body dissatisfaction development is critical for minimizing adverse effects of poor body esteem on eating behaviors, self-esteem, and overall health. Research has examined body esteem and its correlates largely in pre-adolescents and adolescents; however, important questions remain about factors influencing body esteem of younger children. The main purpose of this study was to test moderation by children's gender and weight status of the relation of maternal controlling feeding practices to 1st graders' body esteem. The Body Esteem Scale (BES) and anthropometric measurements were completed during one-on-one child interviews at school. Mothers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (restriction, monitoring, concern, self-assessed maternal weight). A total of 410 mother/child dyads (202 girls) participated. Percent of children classified as overweight (BMI-for-age ≥85th) was: girls - 29%; boys - 27%. Gender moderated the relation between restriction and body esteem (β = -.140, p = .05), with maternal restriction predicting body esteem in girls but not boys. The hypothesized three-way interaction among gender, child weight status, and monitoring was confirmed. Monitoring was significantly inversely related to body esteem only for overweight/obese girls (b = -1.630). The moderating influence of gender or gender and weight status on the link between maternal feeding practices and body esteem suggests the importance of body esteem interventions for girls as early as first grade.

  2. Case Study of Severe Lightning Activity Prior to and During the Outbreak of the June 1st Greenbelt Tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, B. H.; Badesha, S.; Shishineh, A.; Adams, N. H.

    2012-12-01

    Surges in lightning activity have been known to be associated with the outbreak of tornado activity. We present a case study of a tornado that touched down near Greenbelt Maryland during the evening of June 1st 2012. Preceding the tornado touchdown, two single point lightning detection systems, a Boltek LD-250 and Vaisala SA20, recorded very high lightning activity rates. An electric field mill (EFM) was also making measurements and recorded large, rapid amplitude oscillations in the vertical electric fields. These electric field oscillations quickly subsided after the initial tornado touchdown. The lightning activity also generated significant RF interference in the S-band dish antenna operated at the Applied Physics Laboratory. It was somewhat surprising that the lightning activity produced enough radiation at these frequencies to cause measured levels of interference which could potentially impair satellite communications. Our interpretation of the EFM data is that intensive vertical forcing and rotation in the thunderstorm during the tornado formation caused the observed rapid electric field oscillations. At the same time, the vertical mixing in the storm caused a surge in lightning activity rates recorded by the Boltek and Vaisala sensors. Following the tornado touchdown, there was a rapid decrease in the lightning rates from the sensors. The EFM oscillations also abruptly ceased and went to a more normal slow-varying pattern typically observed during other thunderstorms without associated tornado activity. It is suggested that a network of field mills could provide realtime warning of imminent tornado activity.

  3. Role of histidine 46 in the hydrolysis and the reverse transphosphorylation reaction of RNase Rh from Rhizopus niveus.

    PubMed

    Irie, M; Ohgi, K; Iwama, M; Koizumi, M; Sasayama, E; Harada, K; Yano, Y; Udagawa, J; Kawasaki, M

    1997-05-01

    In order to study the reaction mechanism of RNase Rh from Rhizopus niveus, the rates of cleavage of four 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides by mutant enzymes of RNase Rh, H46F, H109F, E105Q, and K108L were measured. H46F is virtually inactive towards cyclic nucleotides, but H109F hydrolyzed these substrates at 0.7-4.5% of the rates of the native RNase Rh. The other mutants hydrolyzed 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides at 15-20% of the rates of the native enzyme. Relative enzymatic activities towards four cyclic nucleotides of H109F in the hydrolysis reaction (2nd step) were much higher than in the transphosphorylation reaction (the 1st step). In the presence of a 13-fold excess of uridine, H109F catalyzed the transphosphorylation reaction of 2',3'-cyclic AMP (A>p) to ApU. However, this reaction was not catalyzed by H46F mutant or native RNase Rh. These results showed that His46 is crucial to the hydrolysis reaction, and to the reversed reaction of the transphosphorylation reaction. We suggest that His46 in RNase Rh plays a major role in these reactions by acting as a base catalyst to activate water and the 5'-hydroxyl group of nucleosides, respectively.

  4. Effects of first-order correction to eikonal approximation in the analysis of {sup 9}Be({sup 15}C,{sup 14}C + n){sup 9}Be stripping reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Kharab, R.; Singh, R. M.

    2015-09-15

    We have studied the effects of the first-order correction to the eikonal approximation for {sup 9}Be({sup 15}C,{sup 14}C + n){sup 9}Be stripping reactions at 54A MeV incident energy and have found that the correction term slightly changes the tail of the longitudinal momentum distribution of the core fragment.

  5. The Impact of Gender-Fair versus Gender-Stereotyped Basal Readers on 1st-Grade Children's Gender Stereotypes: A Natural Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karniol, Rachel; Gal-Disegni, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Israeli 1st-grade children in two different schools in the same neighborhood who were using either a gender-stereotyped or a gender-fair basal reader were asked to judge for a series of female-stereotyped, male-stereotyped, and gender-neutral activities whether they were characteristic of females, of males, or of both. Children using the…

  6. Moving beyond the Lone Scientist: Helping 1st-Grade Students Appreciate the Social Context of Scientific Work Using Stories about Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkawy, Azza

    2009-01-01

    While several studies have documented young children's (K-2) stereotypic views of scientists and scientific work, few have examined students' views of the social nature of scientific work and the strategies effective in broadening these views. The purpose of this study is to examine how stories about scientists influence 1st-grade students' views…

  7. Diagnostic Online Assessment of Basic IT Skills in 1st-Year Undergraduates in the Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieber, Vivien

    2009-01-01

    Attitude, experience and competence (broadly covered by the European Computer Driving Licence syllabus) in information technology (IT) were assessed in 846 1st-year Medical Sciences Division undergraduates (2003-06) at the start of their first term. Online assessments delivered during induction workshops were presented as an opportunity for…

  8. Kinetics, Reaction Orders, Rate Laws, and Their Relation to Mechanisms: A Hands-On Introduction for High School Students Using Portable Spectrophotometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Jack M.; Curry, Sarah M.; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Teaching complex chemistry concepts such as kinetics using inquiry-based learning techniques can be challenging in a high school classroom setting. Access to expensive laboratory equipment such as spectrometers is typically limited and most reaction kinetics experiments have been designed for advanced placement (AP) or first-year undergraduate…

  9. Shedding new light on ZnCl2-mediated addition reactions of Grignard reagents to ketones: structural authentication of key intermediates and diffusion-ordered NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Alvarez, Pablo; McCall, Matthew D; Nuttall, Lorraine; Kennedy, Alan R; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-04-11

    Building on recent advances in synthesis showing that the addition of inorganic salts to Grignard reagents can greatly enhance their performance in alkylation reactions to ketones, this study explores the reactions of EtMgCl with benzophenone in the presence of stoichiometric or catalytic amounts of ZnCl(2) with the aim of furthering the understanding of the role and constitution of the organometallic species involved in these transformations. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of three molar equivalents of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) led to the isolation and characterisation (X-ray crystallography and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy) of novel magnesium "zinc-rich" zincate [{(THF)(6)Mg(2)Cl(3)}(+){Zn(2)Et(5)}(-)] (1), whose complicated constitution in THF solutions was assessed by variable-temperature (1)H DOSY NMR studies. Compound 1 reacted with one equivalent of benzophenone to yield magnesium magnesiate [{(THF)(6)Mg(2)Cl(3)}(+){Mg(2)(OC(Et)Ph(2))(2)Cl(3)(THF)}(-)] (3), whose structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. (1)H NMR monitoring of this reaction showed two equivalents of ZnEt(2) formed as a co-product, which together with the "magnesium only constitution" of 3 provides experimental insights into how zinc can be efficiently recycled in these reactions, and therefore used catalytically. The chemoselectivity of this reaction can be rationalised in terms of the synergic effect of magnesium and zinc and contrasts with the results obtained when benzophenone was allowed to react with EtMgCl in the absence of ZnCl(2), where the reduction of the ketone takes place preferentially. The reduction product [{(THF)(5)Mg(3)Cl(4){OC(H)Ph(CF(3))}(2)] (4) obtained from the reaction of EtMgCl with 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone was established by X-ray crystallography and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C and (19)F) NMR spectroscopy. Compounds 3 and 4 exhibit new structural motifs in magnesium chemistry having MgCl(2) integrated within their constitution, which highlights

  10. New approaches for improving the production of the 1st and 2nd generation ethanol by yeast.

    PubMed

    Kurylenko, Olena; Semkiv, Marta; Ruchala, Justyna; Hryniv, Orest; Kshanovska, Barbara; Abbas, Charles; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn; Sibirny, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Increase in the production of 1st generation ethanol from glucose is possible by the reduction in the production of ethanol co-products, especially biomass. We have developed a method to reduce biomass accumulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the manipulation of the intracellular ATP level due to overexpression of genes of alkaline phosphatase, apyrase or enzymes involved in futile cycles. The strains constructed accumulated up to 10% more ethanol on a cornmeal hydrolysate medium. Similar increase in ethanol accumulation was observed in the mutants resistant to the toxic inhibitors of glycolysis like 3-bromopyruvate and others. Substantial increase in fuel ethanol production will be obtained by the development of new strains of yeasts that ferment sugars of the abundant lignocellulosic feedstocks, especially xylose, a pentose sugar. We have found that xylose can be fermented under elevated temperatures by the thermotolerant yeast, Hansenula polymorpha. We combined protein engineering of the gene coding for xylose reductase (XYL1) along with overexpression of the other two genes responsible for xylose metabolism in yeast (XYL2, XYL3) and the deletion of the global transcriptional activator CAT8, with the selection of mutants defective in utilizing ethanol as a carbon source using the anticancer drug, 3-bromopyruvate. Resulted strains accumulated 20-25 times more ethanol from xylose at the elevated temperature of 45°C with up to 12.5 g L(-1) produced. Increase in ethanol yield and productivity from xylose was also achieved by overexpression of genes coding for the peroxisomal enzymes: transketolase (DAS1) and transaldolase (TAL2), and deletion of the ATG13 gene. PMID:26619255

  11. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization international standards for human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and type 18 DNA.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dianna E; Baylis, Sally A; Padley, David; Heath, Alan B; Ferguson, Morag; Pagliusi, Sonia R; Quint, Wim G; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-06-15

    A World Health Organization collaborative study was conducted to evaluate candidate international standards for human papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16 DNA (NIBSC code 06/202) and HPV Type 18 DNA (NIBSC code 06/206) for use in the amplification and detection steps of nucleic acid-based assays. The freeze-dried candidate international standards were prepared from bulk preparations of cloned plasmid containing full-length HPV-16 or HPV-18 genomic DNA. Nineteen laboratories from 13 countries participated in the study using a variety of commercial and in-house quantitative and qualitative assays. The data presented here indicate that, upon freeze-drying, there is no significant loss in potency for the candidate HPV-18 DNA and a slight loss in potency for the candidate HPV-16 DNA; although this is likely not scientifically relevant when assay precision is considered. In general, the individual laboratory mean estimates for each study sample were grouped +/- approximately 2 log(10) around the theoretical HPV DNA concentration of the reconstituted ampoule (1 x 10(7) HPV genome equivalents/mL). The agreement between laboratories is improved when potencies are made relative to the candidate international standards, demonstrating their utility in harmonizing amplification and detection steps of HPV-16 and -18 DNA assays. Degradation studies indicate that the candidate international standards are extremely stable and suitable for long-term use. Based on these findings, the candidate standards were established as the 1st WHO international standards for HPV-16 DNA and HPV-18 DNA, each with a potency of 5 x 10(6) international units (IU) per ampoule or 1 x 10(7) IU mL(-1) when reconstituted as directed.

  12. Cognitive-based approach in teaching 1st year Physics for Life Sciences, including Atmospheric Physics and Climate Change components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelina, S. V.

    2009-12-01

    Most 1st year students who take the service course in Physics - Physics for Life Sciences - in Australia encounter numerous problems caused by such factors as no previous experience with this subject; general perception that Physics is hard and only very gifted people are able to understand it; lack of knowledge of elementary mathematics; difficulties encountered by lecturers in teaching university level Physics to a class of nearly 200 students with no prior experience, diverse and sometime disadvantageous backgrounds, different majoring areas, and different learning abilities. As a result, many students either drop, or fail the subject. In addition, many of those who pass develop a huge dislike towards Physics, consider the whole experience as time wasted, and spread this opinion among their peers and friends. The above issues were addressed by introducing numerous changes to the curriculum and modifying strategies and approaches in teaching Physics for Life Sciences. Instead of a conventional approach - teaching Physics from simple to complicated, topic after topic, the students were placed in the world of Physics in the same way as a newborn child is introduced to this world - everything is seen all the time and everywhere. That created a unique environment where a bigger picture and all details were always present and interrelated. Numerous concepts of classical and modern physics were discussed, compared, and interconnected all the time with “Light” being a key component. Our primary field of research is Atmospheric Physics, in particular studying the atmospheric composition and structure using various satellite and ground-based data. With this expertise and also inspired by an increasing importance of training a scientifically educated generation who understands the challenges of the modern society and responsibilities that come with wealth, a new section on environmental physics has been developed. It included atmospheric processes and the greenhouse

  13. Why are sec-alkylperoxyl bimolecular self-reactions orders of magnitude faster than the analogous reactions of tert-alkylperoxyls? The unanticipated role of CH hydrogen bond donation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richmond; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Ingold, K U; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-08-24

    High-level ab initio calculations are used to identify the mechanism of secondary (and primary) alkylperoxyl radical termination and explain why their reactions are much faster than their tertiary counterparts. Contrary to existing literature, the decomposition of both tertiary and non-tertiary tetroxides follows the same asymmetric two-step bond cleavage pathway to form a caged intermediate of overall singlet multiplicity comprising triplet oxygen and two alkoxyl radicals. The alpha hydrogen atoms of non-tertiary species facilitate this process by forming unexpected CHO hydrogen bonds to the evolving O2. For non-tertiary peroxyls, subsequent alpha hydrogen atom transfer then yields the experimentally observed non-radical products, ketone, alcohol and O2, whereas for tertiary species, this reaction is precluded and cage escape of the (unpaired) alkoxyl radicals is a likely outcome with important consequences for autoxidation. PMID:27511438

  14. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) study of N(2D) + H2O reaction paths on D1 and D0 potential energy surfaces: Direct and roaming pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    We report reaction paths starting from N(2D) + H2O for doublet spin states, D0 and D1. The potential energy surfaces are explored in an automated fashion using the global reaction route mapping strategy. The critical points and reaction paths have been fully optimized at the complete active space second order perturbation theory level taking all valence electrons in the active space. In addition to direct dissociation pathways that would be dominant, three roaming processes, two roaming dissociation, and one roaming isomerization: (1) H2ON → H-O(H)N → H-HON → NO(2Π) + H2, (2) cis-HNOH → HNO-H → H-HNO → NO + H2, (3) H2NO → H-HNO → HNO-H → trans-HNOH, are confirmed on the D0 surface.

  15. Creating Research-Rich Learning Experiences and Quantitative Skills in a 1st Year Earth Systems Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. L.; Eggins, S.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are creating a 1st year Earth Systems course at the Australian National University that is built around research-rich learning experiences and quantitative skills. The course has top students including ≤20% indigenous/foreign students; nonetheless, students' backgrounds in math and science vary considerably posing challenges for learning. We are addressing this issue and aiming to improve knowledge retention and deep learning by changing our teaching approach. In 2013-2014, we modified the weekly course structure to a 1hr lecture; a 2hr workshop with hands-on activities; a 2hr lab; an assessment piece covering all face-to-face activities; and a 1hr tutorial. Our new approach was aimed at: 1) building student confidence with data analysis and quantitative skills through increasingly difficult tasks in science, math, physics, chemistry, climate science and biology; 2) creating effective learning groups using name tags and a classroom with 8-person tiered tables; 3) requiring students to apply new knowledge to new situations in group activities, two 1-day field trips and assessment items; 4) using pre-lab and pre-workshop exercises to promote prior engagement with key concepts; 5) adding open-ended experiments to foster structured 'scientific play' or enquiry and creativity; and 6) aligning the assessment with the learning outcomes and ensuring that it contains authentic and challenging southern hemisphere problems. Students were asked to design their own ocean current experiment in the lab and we were astounded by their ingenuity: they simulated the ocean currents off Antarctica; varied water density to verify an equation; and examined the effect of wind and seafloor topography on currents. To evaluate changes in student learning, we conducted surveys in 2013 and 2014. In 2014, we found higher levels of student engagement with the course: >~80% attendance rates and >~70% satisfaction (20% neutral). The 2014 cohort felt that they were more competent in writing

  16. PREFACE: 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    Dear Colleagues, 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on March 25 - 27, 2014 at St. Petersburg Academic University - Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim to introduce young scientists with actual problems and major advances in physics and technology. The keynote speakers were: Mikhail Glazov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Vladimir Dubrovskii (Saint Petersburg Academic University RAS, Russia) Alexey Kavokin (University of Southampton, United Kingdom and St. Petersburg State University, Russia) Vladimir Korenev (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Sergey Kukushkin (Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering RAS, Russia) Nikita Pikhtin (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia and "Elfolum" Ltd., Russia) Dmitry Firsov (Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Russia) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. Sufficiently large number of participants with more than 160 student attendees from all over the world allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for the fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers basing on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year's School and Conference is supported by SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics), OSA (The Optical Society), St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University and by Skolkovo Foundation. It is a continuation of the annual schools and

  17. Free-Radical Triggered Ordered Domino Reaction: An Approach to C-C Bond Formation via Selective Functionalization of α-Hydroxyl-(sp(3))C-H in Fluorinated Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengbao; Hang, Zhaojia; Liu, Zhong-Quan

    2016-09-16

    A free-radical mediated highly ordered radical addition/cyclization/(sp(3))C-C(sp(3)) formation domino reaction is developed. Three new C-C bonds are formed one by one in a mixed system. Furthermore, it represents the first example of cascade C-C bond formation via selective functionalization of α-hydroxyl-C(sp(3))-H in fluorinated alcohols.

  18. 1st principle simulations of ions in water solutions: Bond structure and chemistry in the hydration shells of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weare, John

    2012-02-01

    Methods of direct simulation (Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics) have provided new insights into the structure and dynamics of electrolyte solutions. However, these methods are limited by the difficulty of developing reliable ion-solvent and solvent-solvent potential interactions in the highly perturbed hydration region. To model the interactions in this region methods of simulation that are based on the direct on the fly solution to the electronic Schr"odinger equation (ab-initio molecular dynamics, AIMD) are being developed. However, 1st principle methods have their own problems because the solution to the electronic structure problem is intractable unless rather uncontrolled approximations are made (e.g. density functional theory, DFT) and there is high computational cost to the solution to the Schr"odinger equation. To test the accuracy of AIMD methods we have directly simulated the XAFS spectra for a series of transition metal ions Ca^2+, Cr^3+, Mn^2+, Fe^3+, Co^2+, Ni^2+, Cu^2+, and Zn^2+. Despite DFT's well know deficiencies, the agreement between the calculated XAFS spectra and the data is almost quantitative for these test ions. This agreement supports the extension of the interpretation well beyond that of the usual XAFS analysis to include higher-order multiple scattering signals in the XAFS spectra, which provide a rigorous probe of the first shell distances and disorders. Less well resolved features of the spectra can still be analyzed and are related to 2nd shell structure. The combination of XAFS measurements and the parameter free AIMD method leads to new insights into the hydration structure of these ions. While strictly local DFT +gga provides excellent agreement with data, the addition of exact exchange seems to provide slightly better structural agreement. The computational complexity of these calculations requires the development of simulation tools that scale to high processor number on massively parallel supercomputers. Our present algorithm

  19. Extraordinary induction heating effect near the first order Curie transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, M. R.; Selomulya, C.; Sandeman, K. G.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-10-01

    While materials with a 1st order Curie transition (TC) are known for the magnetic cooling effect due to the reversibility of their large entropy change, they also have a great potential as a candidate material for induction heating where a large loss power is required under a limited alternating magnetic field. We have carried out a proof-of-concept study on the induction heating effect in 1st order ferromagnetic materials where the temperature is self-regulated at TC. LaFe11.57Si1.43H1.75, a well-known magnetocaloric material, was employed in this study because TC of this compound (319 K) resides in the ideal temperature range for hyperthermia treatment of cancerous cells. It is found that the hysteresis loss of LaFe11.57Si1.43H1.75 increases dramatically near TC due to the magnetic phase coexistence associated with the 1st order magnetic transition. The spontaneous magnetization (Ms) shows a very abrupt decrease from 110 Am2kg-1 at 316 K to zero at 319 K. This large Ms immediately below TC along with the enhanced irreversibility of the hysteresis curve result in a specific absorption rate as large as 0.5 kWg-1 under a field of 8.8 kAm-1 at 279 kHz. This value is nearly an order of magnitude larger than that observed under the same condition for conventional iron oxide-based materials. Moreover, the large heating effect is self-regulated at the 1st order TC (319 K). This proof-of-concept study shows that the extraordinary heating effect near the 1st order Curie point opens up a novel alloy design strategy for large, self-regulated induction heating.

  20. Insertion and [beta]-hydride elimination reactions of ruthenium/zirconium complexes containing C[sub 2] bridges with bond orders of 1, 2, and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, F.R.; Bullock, R.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Carbon dioxide inserts into the Zr-C bond of Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[double bond]CHZrClCp[sub 2], producing the carboxylate complex Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[double bond]CHCO[sub 2]ZrClCp[sub 2]. An [eta][sup 2]-iminoacyl insertion product, Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]Ru-C[triple bond]C-C(N[sub t]Bu)ZrClCp[sub 2], results from insertion of [sup t]BuNC into the Zr-C bond of the dimetalloalkyne complex Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]Ru-C[triple bond]C-ZrClCp[sub 2]. The reaction of Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]ZrClCp[sub 2] with high concentrations of [sup t]BuNC also produces an [eta][sup 2]-iminoacyl insertion product, Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]C(N[sup t]Bu)ZrClCp[sub 2]. At low concentrations of [sup t]BuNC, a competing reaction is [beta]-hydride elimination from Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]ZrClCp[sub 2] to give Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[double bond]CH[sub 2] and Cp[sub 2]Zr(H)Cl, which is trapped by [sup t]BuNC under these conditions to give Cp[sub 2]ZrCl([eta][sup 2]-[sup t]BuN[double bond]CH). The reaction of benzophenone with Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]ZrClCp[sub 2] gives the insertion product Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]CPh[sub 2]OZrClCp[sub 2]. [beta]-Hydride elimination is also observed from Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]RuCH[double bond]CHZrClCp[sub 2]; in the presence of excess [sup n]BuC[triple bond]CH, the products are Cp(PMe[sub 3])[sub 2]Ru-C[triple bond]C-H and the zirconium vinyl complex Cp[sub 2]Zr(Cl)CH[double bond]CH[sup n]Bu. 25 refs.

  1. 1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on processes and skills for education in cardiology in Brazil--executive summary.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcos Roberto de; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Köhler, Ilmar; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Schneider, Jamil Cherem; Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ferreira, João Fernando Monteiro; Morais, Nelson Siqueira de

    2012-02-01

    This article summarizes the "1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on Processes and Skills for Education in Cardiology in Brazil," which can be found in full at: . The guideline establishes the education time required in Internal Medicine and Cardiology with Specialization through theoretical and practical training. These requirements must be available at the center forming Specialists in Cardiology and the Cardiology contents.

  2. The 1st European Summer School on 'proteomic basics'--the students view. 12-18 August, 2007 Kloster Neustift, Brixen/Bressanone, South Tyrol, Italy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Emily S; Little, Samantha J

    2008-01-01

    Fifty postgraduate and postdoctoral delegates from all over Europe attended the week-long '1st European Summer School on Proteomic Basics' in Kloster Neustift in the Italian South Tyrol in August 2007. Invited proteomics experts gave tutorial lectures on Proteomics techniques with an emphasis on sample preparation, protein separation and purification in the first of an annual series of Proteomics Summer Schools funded by the EU and the Volkswagen Stiftung.

  3. The 1st European Summer School on 'proteomic basics'--the students view. 12-18 August, 2007 Kloster Neustift, Brixen/Bressanone, South Tyrol, Italy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Emily S; Little, Samantha J

    2008-01-01

    Fifty postgraduate and postdoctoral delegates from all over Europe attended the week-long '1st European Summer School on Proteomic Basics' in Kloster Neustift in the Italian South Tyrol in August 2007. Invited proteomics experts gave tutorial lectures on Proteomics techniques with an emphasis on sample preparation, protein separation and purification in the first of an annual series of Proteomics Summer Schools funded by the EU and the Volkswagen Stiftung. PMID:18203275

  4. Formation of ordered films of axially bridged aluminum phthalocyanine [(tBu)4PcAl]2O via magnetic field-induced reaction.

    PubMed

    Basova, Tamara; Berezin, Aleksei; Nadolinny, Vladimir; Peisert, Heiko; Chassé, Thomas; Banimuslem, Hikmat; Hassan, Aseel

    2013-11-28

    The μ-(oxo)bis[tetra-tert-butylphthalocyaninato] aluminum(III) [(tBu)4PcAl]2O films with the crystallites oriented preferably in one direction were obtained via chemical transformation of tetra-tert-butylsubstituted chloroaluminum(III) phthalocyanine (tBu)4PcAlCl film upon its annealing in magnetic field. A comparative analysis of the influence of post-deposition annealing process without and under applied magnetic field of 1 T, on the orientation and morphology of (tBu)4PcAlCl and [(tBu)4PcAl]2O films, has been carried out by the methods of UV-vis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopies, XRD as well as atomic force microscopy. The formation of [(tBu)4PcAl]2O films with elongated crystallites having preferential orientation was observed upon heating of the films in magnetic field while annealing without magnetic field under the same conditions does not demonstrate any effect on the structure and morphology of these films. The reasons of the sensitivity of this reaction to the presence of such magnetic field is discussed and studied by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:24289372

  5. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  6. Maximizing Employment through Research. Proceedings of the Annual Research Utilization Conference (1st, Mississippi State, Mississippi, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Martha, Ed.

    These proceedings consist of seven papers and four reaction papers that were presented at a conference designed for administrative and management personnel from agencies and programs providing education and rehabilitation services to blind persons. Included in the volume are the following papers: "Introduction to Rehabilitation Research," by…

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of the distal movement of maxillary 1st molars in patients fitted with mini-implant-aided trans-palatal arches

    PubMed Central

    Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Sajedi, Ahmad; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate three-dimensional molar displacement after distalization via miniscrews and a horizontal modification of the trans-palatal-arch (TPA). Methods The subjects in this clinical trial were 26 Class II patients. After the preparation of a complete set of diagnostic records, miniscrews were inserted between the maxillary 2nd premolar and 1st molar on the palatal side. Elastic modules connected to the TPA exerting an average force of 150-200 g/side parallel to the occlusal plane were applied. Cone-beam computed tomography was utilized to evaluate the position of the miniscrews relative to the adjacent teeth and maxillary sinus, and the direction of force relative to molar furcation. The distances from the central point of the incisive papilla to the mesiopalatal cusps of the 1st maxillary molars and the distances between the mesiopalatal cusps of the left and right molars were measured to evaluate displacement of the maxillary molars on the horizontal plane. Interocclusal space was used to evaluate vertical changes. Results Mean maxillary 1st molar distalization was 2.3 ± 1.1 mm, at a rate of 0.4 ± 0.2 mm/month, and rotation was not significant. Intermolar width increased by 2.9 ± 1.8 mm. Molars were intruded relative to the neighboring teeth, from 0.1 to 0.8 mm. Conclusions Distalization of molars was possible without extrusion, using the appliance investigated. The intrusive component of force reduced the rate of distal movement. PMID:26445718

  8. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from high-order accurate numerical simulations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, S.; Schiemenz, A. R.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.; Hesthaven, J.

    2013-12-01

    The style and mode of melt migration in the mantle are important to the interpretation of basalts erupted on the surface. Both grain-scale diffuse porous flow and channelized melt migration have been proposed. To better understand the mechanisms and consequences of melt migration in a heterogeneous mantle, we have undertaken a numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling and viscously deformable mantle where solubility of pyroxene increases upwards. Our setup is similar to that described in [1], except we use a larger domain size in 2D and 3D and a new numerical method. To enable efficient simulations in 3D through parallel computing, we developed a high-order accurate numerical method for the magma dynamics problem using discontinuous Galerkin methods and constructed the problem using the numerical library deal.II [2]. Linear stability analyses of the reactive dissolution problem reveal three dynamically distinct regimes [3] and the simulations reported in this study were run in the stable regime and the unstable wave regime where small perturbations in porosity grows periodically. The wave regime is more relevant to melt migration beneath the mid-ocean ridges but computationally more challenging. Extending the 2D simulations in the stable regime in [1] to 3D using various combinations of sustained perturbations in porosity at the base of the upwelling column (which may result from a viened mantle), we show the geometry and distribution of dunite channel and high-porosity melt channels are highly correlated with inflow perturbation through superposition. Strong nonlinear interactions among compaction, dissolution, and upwelling give rise to porosity waves and high-porosity melt channels in the wave regime. These compaction-dissolution waves have well organized but time-dependent structures in the lower part of the simulation domain. High-porosity melt channels nucleate along nodal lines of the porosity waves, growing downwards. The wavelength scales

  9. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) study of N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2}O reaction paths on D{sub 1} and D{sub 0} potential energy surfaces: Direct and roaming pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-10-21

    We report reaction paths starting from N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2}O for doublet spin states, D{sub 0} and D{sub 1}. The potential energy surfaces are explored in an automated fashion using the global reaction route mapping strategy. The critical points and reaction paths have been fully optimized at the complete active space second order perturbation theory level taking all valence electrons in the active space. In addition to direct dissociation pathways that would be dominant, three roaming processes, two roaming dissociation, and one roaming isomerization: (1) H{sub 2}ON → H–O(H)N → H–HON → NO({sup 2}Π) + H{sub 2}, (2) cis-HNOH → HNO–H → H–HNO → NO + H{sub 2}, (3) H{sub 2}NO → H–HNO → HNO–H → trans-HNOH, are confirmed on the D{sub 0} surface.

  10. The role of reduction extent of graphene oxide in the photocatalytic performance of Ag/AgX (X = Cl, Br)/rGO composites and the pseudo-second-order kinetics reaction nature of the Ag/AgBr system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiyin; Ran, Chenxin; Wang, Minqiang; Li, Le; Sun, Zhongwang; Yao, Xi

    2016-07-21

    Although reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based photocatalyst composites have been intensively developed during the past few years, the influence of reduction extent of rGO on the photocatalytic performance of the rGO-based composite has virtually not been investigated due to some technical limitations, such as the poor water dispersibility of rGO and low reduction selectivity of the hydrothermal method, which make it difficult to control the reduction extent of rGO in these composites. Herein, we used a facile room-temperature method to synthesize Ag/AgX (X = Cl, Br)/rGO photocatalyst composites as a model to study the effect of reduction extent of rGO on the photocatalytic performance of the photocatalyst. It was found that the photocatalytic activities of both Ag/AgCl/PrGO and Ag/AgBr/PrGO systems had an optimized threshold of the reduction extent of photoreduced GO (PrGO). More importantly, due to the different conductive band values of AgCl and AgBr, the optimized thresholds in the two systems were at different PrGO reduction extents, based on which we proposed that the favorable energy band matching between AgX and PrGO in the two systems played a crucial role in obtaining high photocatalysis performance. Besides, the photocatalytic reaction of the Ag/AgBr based system was confirmed to be a pseudo-second-order kinetics reaction rather than pseudo-first-order kinetics reaction. The new insights presented in this work provided useful information on the design and development of a more sophisticated photocatalyst, and can also be applied to many other applications. PMID:27332751

  11. Moral Judgment and Its Relation to Second-Order Theory of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Genyue; Xiao, Wen S.; Killen, Melanie; Lee, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that moral judgment and 1st-order theory of mind abilities are related. What is not known, however, is how 2nd-order theory of mind is related to moral judgment. In the present study, we extended previous findings by administering a morally relevant theory of mind task (an accidental transgressor) to 4- to 7-year-old…

  12. Weather Education. Proceedings of the International Conference on School and Popular Meteorological Education (1st, Oxford, England, July 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, J. M., Ed.

    The First International Conference on School and Popular Meteorological Education was designed to: (1) examine the need for the general public to be educated in science and mathematics in order to live in today's high technological society; (2) note special attributes that meteorology possesses as a vehicle to teach science and mathematics to all…

  13. COERC 2002: Appreciating Scholarship. Proceedings of the Annual College of Education Research Conference (1st, Miami, Florida, April 27, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Sarah M., Ed.; Rocco, Tonette S., Ed.

    This conference was designed to offer a view to novice scholars of what scholarship is and provide insights on how to share knowledge with others. The keynote speech by Lisa Delpit, "The Role of Scholarship," is not included in this volume. Other conference papers, presented in alphabetical order by first author, include: (1) "Social Studies in…

  14. Current practice of epidemiology in Africa: highlights of the 3rd conference of the African epidemiological association and 1st conference of the Cameroon society of epidemiology, Yaoundé, Cameroon, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Nkwescheu, Armand Seraphin; Fokam, Joseph; Tchendjou, Patrice; Nji, Akindeh; Ngouakam, Hermann; Andre, Bita Fouda; Joelle, Sobngwi; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Akinroye, Kingsley; Mbacham, Wilfred; Colizzi, Vittorio; Leke, Rose; Victora, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    As the study of disease occurrence and health indicators in human populations, Epidemiology is a dynamic field that evolves with time and geographical context. In order to update African health workers on current epidemiological practices and to draw awareness of early career epidemiologists on concepts and opportunities in the field, the 3rd African Epidemiology Association and the 1st Cameroon Society of Epidemiology Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice of Epidemiology in Africa: Stakes, Challenges and Perspectives», the conference attracted close to five hundred guest and participants from all continents. The two main programs were the pre-conference course for capacity building of African Early Career epidemiologists, and the conference itself, providing a forum for scientific exchanges on recent epidemiological concepts, encouraging the use of epidemiological methods in studying large disease burden and neglected tropical diseases; and highlighting existing opportunities. PMID:26523191

  15. Perceived Partner Reactions to Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer: Impact on Psychosocial and Psychosexual Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimberly, Sarah R.; Carver, Charles S.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Harris, Suzanne D.; Antoni, Michael H.

    2005-01-01

    Two studies examined breast cancer patients' perceptions of their partners' reactions to their diagnosis and treatment as influences on 3 aspects of patients' well-being: psychosexual adjustment, emotional distress, and marital satisfaction. Study 1, cross-sectional, indicated that partner initiation of sex, frequency of sex, a positive 1st sexual…

  16. Specialty preferences of 1st year medical students in a Saudi Medical School – Factors affecting these choices and the influence of gender

    PubMed Central

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Qureshi, Habib; Al Wadani, Fahad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: In recent years there has been a growing appreciation of the issues of career preference in medicine as it affects student learning and academic performance. Various factors influence the specialty choices of medical students. Some specialties tend to attract students more than others. One possible consequence of this would be a mismatch between health needs and specialist numbers in the region. This study investigated the career preferences of 1st year medical students in a Saudi medical school and to assess factors affecting these choices. Materials and Methods: The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out on the 1st year undergraduate students in the college of medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A total of 109 students (57 female and 52 males) responded to the questionnaire which was initially administered to all the students of the 1st year – A total of 120 students (response rate was 90.8%). A mixed method approach was used and qualitative data from open-ended questions were analyzed based on thematic analysis. Results: The top choices were general surgery, internal medicine, and pediatrics. Among female students; the top specialty choices were: General surgery (23%), pediatrics (18%), and dermatology (15%). Among the male students; the top choices were: General surgery (54%) and internal medicine (23%). Of the total, 57% of the students agreed or strongly agreed that primary aptitude was the main factor affecting the choice. Only 31% felt that there was a significant influence of role model, 48% felt that the advice of others – peers and family, would be a factor influencing their choices, and 53% agreed that specialty choice would influence their future learning patterns. Males were more likely to choose a specialty based on actual aptitude for the specialty, financial rewards, and scope for research; and this gender difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Surgery was the top-choice in both genders

  17. Effect of milk feed source, frequency of feeding and age at turnout on calf performance, live-weight at mating and 1st lactation milk production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Female calves (n = 108) were assigned to 6 cold milk feeding treatments in two experiments for a 70-day period. Live-weight (LW) was measured weekly, with an additional LW taken at day 410 and post-calving for animals in experiment 1. In Experiment 1, the effect of feeding frequency and age of turnout to pasture on calf performance and 1st lactation milk yields were evaluated. The whole milk (WM) feeding treatments applied were (i) once daily feeding (OD), (ii) twice daily feeding (TD), (iii) OD feeding, outdoors at 38 days (ODO). In Experiment 2, the effects of feeding milk replacer (MR) as opposed to WM and age of turnout to pasture on calf performance were evaluated. The treatments applied were (i) OD feeding with WM (OD), (ii) OD feeding with milk replacer (MR) (ODMR), (iii) OD feeding with MR, outdoors at 38 days (ODMRO). Experiment 1: There were no differences (P > 0.05) in LW or average daily gain between TD and OD calves at day 80 or 410. ODO calves had lower LW at day 80 as compared to OD or TD (P < 0.001). Calf LW at day 80 was 86, 89 and 85 kg and at day 410 was 304, 309 and 316 kg for OD, TD and ODO, respectively. Milk feeding frequency or time of calf turnout had no effect on LW post calving, milk composition or 1st lactation milk yields. Experiment 2: Total LW at day 80 was higher (P < 0.05) for ODMR compared to OD or ODMRO calves. Calf LW was 87, 95, and 88 kg for OD, ODMR and ODMRO, respectively. However, LW at day 410 did not differ between treatments. This study showed that while some differences were observed in calf LW at day 80, these differences had no effect on LW at day 410 or 1st lactation milk yield. It can be concluded that calves can be successfully reared when fed OD with WM or MR, indoors and when turned out to pasture at 38 days of age. PMID:23078871

  18. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important. PMID:16531404

  19. Joint U.S./Japan Conference on Adaptive Structures, 1st, Maui, HI, Nov. 13-15, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K. (Editor); Fanson, James L. (Editor); Miura, Koryo (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume of adaptive structures discusses the development of control laws for an orbiting tethered antenna/reflector system test scale model, the sizing of active piezoelectric struts for vibration suppression on a space-based interferometer, the control design of a space station mobile transporter with multiple constraints, and optimum configuration control of an intelligent truss structure. Attention is given to the formulation of full state feedback for infinite order structural systems, robustness issues in the design of smart structures, passive piezoelectric vibration damping, shape control experiments with a functional model for large optical reflectors, and a mathematical basis for the design optimization of adaptive trusses in precision control. Topics addressed include approaches to the optimal adaptive geometries of intelligent truss structures, the design of an automated manufacturing system for tubular smart structures, the Sandia structural control experiments, and the zero-gravity dynamics of space structures in parabolic aircraft flight.

  20. The transient nature of 2nd-order stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Hess, Robert F; Wilcox, Laurie M

    2008-05-01

    There are currently two competing dichotomies used to describe how local stereoscopic information is processed by the human visual system. The first is in terms of the type of the spatial filtering operations used to extract relevant image features prior to stereoscopic analysis (i.e. 1st- vs 2nd-order stereo; [Hess, R. F., & Wilcox, L. M. (1994). Linear and non-linear filtering in stereopsis. Vision Research, 34, 2431-2438]). The second is in terms of the temporal properties of the mechanisms used to process stereoscopic information (i.e. sustained vs transient stereo; [Schor, C. M., Edwards, M., & Pope, D. R. (1998). Spatial-frequency and contrast tuning of the transient-stereopsis system. Vision Research, 38(20), 3057-3068]). Here we compare the dynamics of 1st- and 2nd-order stereopsis using several types of stimuli and find a clear dissociation in which 1st-order stimuli exhibit sustained properties while 2nd-order patterns show more transient properties. Our results and analyses unify and simplify two complimentary bodies of work. PMID:18407312

  1. The transient nature of 2nd-order stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Hess, Robert F; Wilcox, Laurie M

    2008-05-01

    There are currently two competing dichotomies used to describe how local stereoscopic information is processed by the human visual system. The first is in terms of the type of the spatial filtering operations used to extract relevant image features prior to stereoscopic analysis (i.e. 1st- vs 2nd-order stereo; [Hess, R. F., & Wilcox, L. M. (1994). Linear and non-linear filtering in stereopsis. Vision Research, 34, 2431-2438]). The second is in terms of the temporal properties of the mechanisms used to process stereoscopic information (i.e. sustained vs transient stereo; [Schor, C. M., Edwards, M., & Pope, D. R. (1998). Spatial-frequency and contrast tuning of the transient-stereopsis system. Vision Research, 38(20), 3057-3068]). Here we compare the dynamics of 1st- and 2nd-order stereopsis using several types of stimuli and find a clear dissociation in which 1st-order stimuli exhibit sustained properties while 2nd-order patterns show more transient properties. Our results and analyses unify and simplify two complimentary bodies of work.

  2. Spatial epidemiology in zoonotic parasitic diseases: insights gained at the 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health in Lijiang, China, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Lv, Shan; Yang, Guo-Jing; Kristensen, Thomas K; Bergquist, N Robert; Utzinger, Jürg; Malone, John B

    2009-01-01

    The 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health was convened in Lijiang, Yunnan province, People's Republic of China from 8 to 9 September, 2007. The objective was to review progress made with the application of spatial techniques on zoonotic parasitic diseases, particularly in Southeast Asia. The symposium featured 71 presentations covering soil-transmitted and water-borne helminth infections, as well as arthropod-borne diseases such as leishmaniasis, malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The work made public at this occasion is briefly summarized here to highlight the advances made and to put forth research priorities in this area. Approaches such as geographical information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing (RS), including spatial statistics, web-based GIS and map visualization of field investigations, figured prominently in the presentation. PMID:19193214

  3. JANNAF 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S.; Becker, Dorothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Volume I, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 24 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meeting held jointly with the 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered include: a Keynote Address on Future Combat Systems, a review of the new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on Hyper-X propulsion development and verification; GTX airbreathing launch vehicles; Hypersonic technology development, including program overviews, fuels for advanced propulsion, ramjet and scramjet research, hypersonic test medium effects; and RBCC engine design and performance, and PDE and UCAV advanced and combined cycle engine technologies.

  4. [State of the reproductive systemin in male rats of 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and exposed to electromagnetic radiation (897 MHz) during embryogenesis and postnatal development].

    PubMed

    Vereshchako, G G; Chueshova, N V; Gorokh, G A; Naumov, A D

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation from cellular phone (897 MHz, daily 8 h/day) in male rats of the 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and subjected to prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation of the range of mobile communications during ontogeny and postnatal development were studied. It has been found that irradiation causes a decrease in the number of births of animals, changing the sex ratio towards the increase in the number of males. It had a significant impact on the reproductive system of males, accelerating their sexual development, revealed at the age of two months. Radiation from cell phones led to significant disproportions in the cell number at different stages of spermatogenesis. It increased the number of mature spermatozoa which decreased viability.

  5. [State of the reproductive systemin in male rats of 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and exposed to electromagnetic radiation (897 MHz) during embryogenesis and postnatal development].

    PubMed

    Vereshchako, G G; Chueshova, N V; Gorokh, G A; Naumov, A D

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation from cellular phone (897 MHz, daily 8 h/day) in male rats of the 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and subjected to prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation of the range of mobile communications during ontogeny and postnatal development were studied. It has been found that irradiation causes a decrease in the number of births of animals, changing the sex ratio towards the increase in the number of males. It had a significant impact on the reproductive system of males, accelerating their sexual development, revealed at the age of two months. Radiation from cell phones led to significant disproportions in the cell number at different stages of spermatogenesis. It increased the number of mature spermatozoa which decreased viability. PMID:25764821

  6. Understanding Stress-Related Behavioral Phenotypes: Report from the 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International “Stress and Behavior” Conference

    PubMed Central

    LaPorte, J. L.; Klimenko, V. M.; Kalueff, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    The 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International Multidisciplinary Neuroscience and Biopsychiatry Conference on Stress and Behavior were held in St. Petersburg, Russia, during May 9–20, 2008. The summer school gathered 30 talented young scientists from 15 countries worldwide, and was dedicated to different topics of behavioral neuroscience. Many interactive courses were provided on neuropharmacology, animal phenotyping, and biopsychology. The conference's excellent scientific and social program attracted almost 500 delegates from 40 countries from many areas of stress research. The eclectic interaction between medical doctors, basic scientists, psychologists, and students made for a productive and collaborative environment, which contributed greatly to the success of the school and conference.

  7. Variation of the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field in Portugal in the 1st millennium BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Burakov, K. S.

    2009-07-01

    The study of magnetization of the ceramic material from 21 archeological monuments of Portugal (the Evora province), dated archeologically from the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age has been carried out. For the purpose of more detailed timing of the material from the monuments the method of ceramic age dating on the basis of its porosity has been used. In order to take into account the distorted factors in the determination of the parameters of the ancient geomagnetic field with the aim of the maximal approximation to the actual values the diagnostic features of magnetite weathering have been considered and the level of weathering of the magnetic fraction in the ceramics from archeological monuments has been determined. The data of geomagnetic field-strength variation in the time interval of the 12th century BC to the beginning of the Common Era have been obtained. The field-strength at this time interval varied in the range of 60-90 micro Tesla with the maximal values in the 9th, 8th, and the second half of the 5th to the beginning of the 4th century BC. In addition, the timing of the ceramic material from the urns of the megalithic complex Monte de Tera of the Evora province has been clarified.

  8. Preparing for introduction of a dengue vaccine: recommendations from the 1st Dengue v2V Asia-Pacific Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sai Kit; Burke, Donald; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Chong, Chee Keong; Coudeville, Laurent; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Hanna, Jeffrey; Lang, Jean; Lee, Han Lim; Leo, Yee Sin; Luong, Chan Quang; Mahoney, Richard; McBride, John; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge; Ng, Lee Ching; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Ooi, Eng Eong; Shepard, Donald; Smit, Jaco; Teyssou, Rémy; Thomas, Laurent; Torresi, Joseph; Vasconcelos, Pedro; Wirawan, Dewa Nyoman; Yoksan, Sutee

    2011-11-28

    Infection with dengue virus is a major public health problem in the Asia-Pacific region and throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Vaccination represents a major opportunity to control dengue and several candidate vaccines are in development. Experts in dengue and in vaccine introduction gathered for a two day meeting during which they examined the challenges inherent to the introduction of a dengue vaccine into the national immunisation programmes of countries of the Asia-Pacific. The aim was to develop a series of recommendations to reduce the delay between vaccine licensure and vaccine introduction. Major recommendations arising from the meeting included: ascertaining and publicising the full burden and cost of dengue; changing the perception of dengue in non-endemic countries to help generate global support for dengue vaccination; ensuring high quality active surveillance systems and diagnostics; and identifying sustainable sources of funding, both to support vaccine introduction and to maintain the vaccination programme. The attendees at the meeting were in agreement that with the introduction of an effective vaccine, dengue is a disease that could be controlled, and that in order to ensure a vaccine is introduced as rapidly as possible, there is a need to start preparing now.

  9. Superacid Catalyzed Coal Conversion Chemistry. 1st and 2nd Quarterly Technical Progress Reports, September 1, 1983-March 30, 1984.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Olah, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    In our laboratories we have previously developed a mild coal conversion process. This involves the use of a superacid system consisting of HF and BF{sub 3} in presence of hydrogen and/or a hydrogen donor solvent. In order to understand the chemistry involved in the process of depolymerization of coal by the HF:BF{sub 3}:H{sub 2} system we are carrying out a systematic study of a number of coal model compounds. The model compounds selected for present study have two benzene rings connected with various bridging units such as alkylidene, ether, sulfide etc. From studies so far carried out it appears that high pyridine extractibilities achieved by treating coal at temperature below 100 degrees C results from the cleavage of bridges such as present in bibenzyl, diphenyl methane, dibenzyl ether, dibenzyl sulfide etc. On the other hand the increased cyclohexane extractibility and distillability observed at relatively higher temperatures and hydrogen pressures reflects the hydrogenation and cleavage of the aromatic backbone in coal structure similar to what is seen in the conversion of model compounds such as biphenyl, diphenyl ether, diphenyl sulfide, anthracene, etc.

  10. Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer in flexible flatfoot deformity improves talo-1st metatarsal-Index, clinical outcome and pedographic parameter.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus (LO) and flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) transfer to the navicular is one option for the treatment of flexible flatfoot deformity (FD). The aim of the study was to analyse the amount of correction and clinical outcome including pedographic assessment. In a prospective consecutive non-controlled clinical followup study, all patients with FD that were treated with LO and FDL from September 1st 2006 to August 31st, 2009 were included. Assessment was performed before surgery and at 2-year-followup including clinical examination (with staging of posterior tibialis insufficiency) weight bearing radiographs (Talo-1st metatarsal angles (TMT)), pedography (increased midfoot contact area and force) and Visual Analogue Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS FA). 112 feet in 102 patients were analysed (age, 57.6 (13-82), 42% male). In 12 feet (9%) wound healing delay without further surgical measures was registered. All patients achieved full weight bearing during the 7th postoperative week. Until followup, revision surgery was done in 3 patients (fusion calcaneocuboid joint (n=2), correction triple arthrodesis (n=1)). 101 feet (90%) completed 2-year-followup. TMT dorsoplantar/lateral/Index and VAS FA scores were increased, and posterior tibialis insufficiency stage, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage were decreased (each p<.05). All relevant parameters (stage of posterior tibialis insufficiency, TMT angles and Index, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage, VAS FA) were improved 2 years after LO and FDL transfer to the navicular in FD. The complication rate was low. This method allows safe and predictable correction.

  11. Construction and 1st Experiment of the 500-meter and 1000-meter DC Superconducting Power Cable in Ishikari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Ivanov, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Chikumoto, N.; Koshiduka, H.; Hayashi, K.; Sawamura, T.

    Ishikari project constructs two lines. The length of the Line 1 is 500 m, and connects the photovoltaic cell to the internet-data center. The other line is 1 km length, and it is a test facility and called Line 2. The structures of the cable systems are not same to test their performance. The construction was started from 2014 in the field, the Line 1 was completed in May 2015, and it was cooled down and do the current experiment, and warmed up. The Line 2 is almost complete in October 2015. It will be tested in November and December, 2015. In order to reduce the stress of the cable induced by the thermal expansion and contraction, we adopted the way of the helical deformation of the cable. The force of the cable is reduced to 1/3 of an usual cable test. Because the cryogenic pipes are welded in the field and we cannot use the baking of the vacuum chamber of the cryogenic pipe, a new vacuum pumping method was proposed and tested for the cryogenic pipe. Since the straight pipes are used to compose the cryogenic pipe, the pressure drop of the circulation would be 1/100 of the corrugated pipe in the present condition, and it is suitable for longer cable system. The heat leak of the cryogenic pipe is ∼1.4W/m including the cable pipe's and the return pipe's. The heat leak of the current lead is ∼30W/kA in the test bench. Finally the current of 6kA/3 sec and the current of 5kA/15 min were achieved in Line 1. The reduction of heat leak will be a major subject of the longer cable system. The cost of the construction will be almost twice higher than that of the copper and aluminum over-head line with the iron tower in the present Japan. The cost construction of the over-head line is an average value, and depends on the newspaper.

  12. Climate, people, fire and vegetation: new insights into vegetation dynamics in the Eastern Mediterranean since the 1st century AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J.; Paulissen, E.; Kaniewski, D.; Poblome, J.; De Laet, V.; Verstraeten, G.; Waelkens, M.

    2012-08-01

    Ottoman times. The pollen data reveals that the old model of a fast rise in Pinus pollen after the end of the Beyşehir Occupation Phase is not necessarily accurate. The notion of high Pinus pollen percentages indicating an open landscape incapable of countering the influx of pine pollen is also deemed unrealistic. While multiple fires occurred in the region through time, they were never a major influence on vegetation dynamics and were mostly linked to increased abundance of pine forests, rather than the presence of human impact or of specifically wet or dry environmental conditions. While this study reveals much new information concerning the impact of climate change and human occupation on the environment, more studies from SW turkey are required in order to properly quantify the range of the observed phenomena and the magnitude of their impacts.

  13. PREFACE: 1st METECH workshop - From deep-sea to coastal zones: Methods and Techniques for studying Palaeoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga-Pires, C.; St-Onge, G.

    2008-10-01

    Reconstructing past climate and past ocean circulation demands the highest possible precision and accuracy which urges the scientific community to look at different sediment records such as the ones from coastal zones to deep-sea with a more complete set of technical and methodological tools. However, the information given by each tool varies in precision, accuracy and in significance according to their environmental settings. It is therefore essential to compare tools. With that in mind, and as part of the International year of Planet Earth, a workshop entitled `From deep-sea to coastal zones: Methods and Techniques for studying palaeoenvironments' took place in Faro (Portugal), from 25-29 February 2008 in order to: present several methods and techniques that can be used for studying sediments from deep-sea to coastal zones, namely for reconstructing palaeoenvironments in order to document past climatic changes and short to long-term environmental processes; allow cross experience between different fields and specialties, either from deep-sea to coastal zones or from micropaleontology to geochemistry; give the opportunity to students from different universities and countries to attend the workshop; publish a special volume on the presented methods and techniques during the workshop. The workshop was organized in four non-parallel sessions dealing with the use of micropaleontology, isotopes, biogeochemistry and sedimentology, as tools for palaeoenvironmental studies. The present IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science proceedings reflect this organization and papers are published in each theme. The papers are either short reviews or case studies and are highlighted below. The remains of microorganisms found in sediments are the main proxies used in micropaleontological studies. However, the link between fossilized remains and their living origin is not easy to reconstruct only based on the geologic/sedimentary record. Accordingly, Barbosa presents a

  14. Climate, people, fire and vegetation: new insights into vegetation dynamics in the Eastern Mediterranean since the 1st century AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J.; Paulissen, E.; Kaniewski, D.; Poblome, J.; De Laet, V.; Verstraeten, G.; Waelkens, M.

    2013-01-01

    times. The pollen data reveal that a fast rise in Pinus pollen after the end of the Beyşehir Occupation Phase need not always occur. The notion of high Pinus pollen percentages indicating an open landscape incapable of countering the influx of pine pollen is also deemed unrealistic. While multiple fires occurred in the region through time, extended fire periods, as had occurred during the Bronze Age and Beyşehir Occupation Phase, did not occur, and no signs of local fire activity were observed. Fires were never a major influence on vegetation dynamics. While no complete overview of post-BO Phase fire events can be presented, the available data indicates that fires in the vicinity of Gravgaz may have been linked to anthropogenic activity in the wider surroundings of the marsh. Fires in the vicinity of Bereket appeared to be linked to increased abundance of pine forests. There was no link with specifically wet or dry environmental conditions at either site. While this study reveals much new information concerning the impact of climate change and human occupation on the environment, more studies from SW Turkey are required in order to properly quantify the range of the observed phenomena and the magnitude of their impacts.

  15. Aqueous-phase chemistry and bactericidal effects from an air discharge plasma in contact with water: evidence for the formation of peroxynitrite through a pseudo-second-order post-discharge reaction of H2O2 and HNO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, P.; Dolezalova, E.; Sisrova, I.; Clupek, M.

    2014-02-01

    The formation of transient species (OH·, NO2·, NO radicals) and long-lived chemical products (O3, H2O2, NO_{3}^{-} , NO_{2}^{-} ) produced by a gas discharge plasma at the gas-liquid interface and directly in the liquid was measured in dependence on the gas atmosphere (20% oxygen mixtures with nitrogen or with argon) and pH of plasma-treated water (controlled by buffers at pH 3.3, 6.9 or 10.1). The aqueous-phase chemistry and specific contributions of these species to the chemical and biocidal effects of air discharge plasma in water were evaluated using phenol as a chemical probe and bacteria Escherichia coli. The nitrated and nitrosylated products of phenol (4-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitrosophenol) in addition to the hydroxylated products (catechol, hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone) evidenced formation of NO2·, NO· and OH· radicals and NO+ ions directly by the air plasma at the gas-liquid interface and through post-discharge processes in plasma-activated water (PAW) mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOOH). Kinetic study of post-discharge evolution of H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} in PAW has demonstrated excellent fit with the pseudo-second-order reaction between H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} . The third-order rate constant k = 1.1 × 103 M-2 s-1 for the reaction NO_{2}^{-} +H_{2}O_{2}+H^{+}\\to ONOOH+H_{2}O was determined in PAW at pH 3.3 with the rate of ONOOH formation in the range 10-8-10-9 M s-1. Peroxynitrite chemistry was shown to significantly participate in the antibacterial properties of PAW. Ozone presence in PAW was proved indirectly by pH-dependent degradation of phenol and detection of cis,cis-muconic acid, but contribution of ozone to the inactivation of bacteria by the air plasma was negligible.

  16. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components (PFMC-13) jointly organized with the 1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science (FEMaS-1) was held in Rosenheim (Germany) on 9-13 May 2011. PFMC-13 is a successor of the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003 ten 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. Then it was time for a change and redefinition of the scope of the symposium to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution in the field. Under the new name (PFMC-11), the workshop was first organized in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany and PFMC-12 took place in Jülich in 2009. Initially starting in 1985 with about 40 participants as a 1.5 day workshop, the event has continuously grown to about 220 participants at PFMC-12. Due to the joint organization with FEMaS-1, PFMC-13 set a new record with more than 280 participants. The European project Fusion Energy Materials Science, FEMaS, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), organizes and stimulates cooperative research activities which involve large-scale research facilities as well as other top-level materials characterization laboratories. Five different fields are addressed: benchmarking experiments for radiation damage modelling, the application of micro-mechanical characterization methods, synchrotron and neutron radiation-based techniques and advanced nanoscopic analysis based on transmission electron microscopy. All these fields need to be exploited further by the fusion materials community for timely materials solutions for a DEMO reactor. In order to integrate these materials research fields, FEMaS acted as a co-organizer for the 2011 workshop and successfully introduced a number of participants from research labs and universities into the PFMC community. Plasma-facing materials experience particularly hostile conditions as they are

  17. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Platon, Alexandru; Datye, Abhaya K.; Vohs, John M.; Wang, Yong; Palo, Daniel R.

    2008-03-07

    Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were studied for water-gas-shift (WGS), methanol steam reforming, and reverse-water-gas-shift (RWGS) reactions. WGS activity was found to be dependent on the Pd:Zn ratio with a maximum activity obtained at approximately 0.50, which was comparable to that of a commercial Pt-based catalyst. The catalyst stability was demonstrated for 100 hours time-on-stream at a temperature of 3600C without evidence of metal sintering. WGS reaction rates were approximately 1st order with respect to CO concentration, and kinetic parameters were determined to be Ea = 58.3 kJ mol-1 and k0 = 6.1x107 min-1. During methanol steam reforming, the CO selectivities were observed to be lower than the calculated equilibrium values over a range of temperatures and steam/carbon ratios studied while the reaction rate constants were approximately of the same magnitude for both WGS and methanol steam reforming. These results indicate that although Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 are active WGS catalysts, WGS is not involved in methanol steam reforming. RWGS rate constants are on the order of about 20 times lower than that of methanol steam reforming, suggesting that RWGS reaction could be one of the sources for small amount of CO formation in methanol steam reforming.

  18. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  19. [Cytarabine and skin reactions in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Grille, Sofía; Guadagna, Regina; Boada, Matilde; Irigoin, Victoria; Stevenazzi, Mariana; Guillermo, Cecilia; Díaz, Lilián

    2013-01-01

    Cytarabine is an antimetabolite used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has many adverse effects as: myelosuppression, toxic reactions involving central nervous system, liver, gastrointestinal tract, eyes or skin. Dermatologic toxicity is often described as rare; nevertheless there are differences in the reported frequency. We performed a retrospective study including all AML treated with chemotherapy that involved cytarabine between 1st July of 2006 and 1st July of 2012; 46 patients were included with a median age of 55 years. The overall incidence of skin reactions was 39% (n = 18). Sex, age, history of atopy, history of drug reactions, or dose of cytarabine used, were not associated with them. Skin reactions were observed from 2 to 8 days after treatment started. Considering injury degree: 27.8% had grade 1, 38.9% grade 2 and 33.3% grade 3. We did not find any injury grade 4 or death associated with skin toxicity. As for the type of injury: 55.6% presented macules, 22.2% papules and 22.2% erythema. Lesions distribution was diffuse in 52% of patients, acral in 39.3%, and at flexural level in 8.7%. Adverse cutaneous reactions secondary to the administration of cytarabine are frequent in our service and include some cases with severe involvement. Although these reactions usually resolve spontaneously, they determine an increased risk of infection and a compromise of the patient quality of life.

  20. Molecular cloning, functional characterization and expression of potato (Solanum tuberosum) 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 1 (StDXS1) in response to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Maria Antonia; Soliman, Atta; Li, Genyi; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Ayele, Belay T; Daayf, Fouad

    2016-02-01

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the initial step of the plastidial 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (DOXP-MEP) pathway involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. In this study, we cloned the complete cDNA of potato DXS gene that was designated StDXS1. StDXS1 cDNA encodes for 719 amino acid residues, with MW of 77.8 kDa, and is present in one copy in the potato genome. Phylogenetic analysis and protein sequence alignments assigned StDXS1 to a group with DXS homologues from closely related species and exhibited homodomain identity with known DXS proteins from other plant species. Late blight symptoms occurred in parallel with a reduction in StDXS1 transcript levels, which may be associated with the levels of isoprenoids that contribute to plant protection against pathogens. Subcellular localization indicated that StDXS1 targets the chloroplasts where isoprenoids are synthesized. Arabidopsis expressing StDXS1 showed a higher accumulation of carotenoids and chlorophyll as compared to wild type controls. Lower levels of ABA and GA were detected in the transgenic DXS lines as compared to control plants, which reflected on higher germination rates of the transgenic DXS lines. No changes were detected in JA or SA contents. Selected downstream genes in the DOXP-MEP pathway, especially GGPPS genes, were up-regulated in the transgenic lines.

  1. Report on: "The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in ASEAN Countries, April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand".

    PubMed

    Hattasingh, Weerawan; Pengsaa, Krisana; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2016-03-01

    The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Countries Group (WNIPVC-ASEAN) held a meeting on April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand under the auspices of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the World Health Organization (WHO). Reports on the current status and initiatives of the national immunization program (NIP) in each ASEAN countries that attended were presented. These reports along with survey data collected from ministries of health in ASEAN countries NIPs demonstrate that good progress has been made toward the goal of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). However, some ASEAN countries have fragile health care systems that still have insufficient vaccine coverage of some basic EPI antigens. Most ASEAN countries still do not have national coverage of some new and underused vaccines, and raising funds for the expansion of NIPs is challenging. Also, there is insufficient research into disease burden of vaccine preventable diseases and surveillance. Health care workers must advocate NIPs to government policy makers and other stakeholders as well as improve research and surveillance to achieve the goals of the GVAP.

  2. Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions: Extracts from Volume I, Diffusion and Slowing Down of Neutrons: Chapter I. Elementary Theory of Neutron Diffusion. Chapter II. Second Order Diffusion Theory. Chapter III. Slowing Down of Neutrons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1951-05-15

    The large scale release of nuclear energy in a uranium fission chain reaction involves two essentially distinct physical phenomena. On the one hand there are the individual nuclear processes such as fission, neutron capture, and neutron scattering. These are essentially quantum mechanical in character, and their theory is non-classical. On the other hand, there is the process of diffusion -- in particular, diffusion of neutrons, which is of fundamental importance in a nuclear chain reaction. This process is classical; insofar as the theory of the nuclear chain reaction depends on the theory of neutron diffusion, the mathematical study of chain reactions is an application of classical, not quantum mechanical, techniques.

  3. First and second-order-motion perception after focal human brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Matthew; Nawrot, Mark; Sparks, JonDavid; Dawson, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Perception of visual motion includes a 1st-order mechanism sensitive to luminance changes and a 2nd-order motion mechanism sensitive to contrast changes. We studied neural substrates for these motion types in 142 subjects with visual cortex lesions, 68 normal controls and 28 brain lesion controls. On 1st-order motion, the visual cortex lesion group performed significantly worse than normal controls overall and in each hemifield, but 2nd-order motion did not differ. Only 1 individual showed a selective 2nd-order motion deficit. Motion deficits were seen with lesions outside the small occipitotemporal region thought to contain a human homolog of motion processing area MT (V5), suggesting that many areas of human brain process visual motion. PMID:18440580

  4. Effects of long-duration space flights on characteristics of the vertical gaze fixation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tomilovskaya, E S; Berger, M; Gerstenbrand, F; Kozlovskaya, I B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine effects of long-duration exposure to weightlessness on characteristics of the vertical gaze fixation reaction (GFR). The subjects were to perform the target acquisition task on visual stimuli that appeared at a distance of 16 deg. up- and down from the primary position in a random order. Experiments were performed before launch, during flight and after landing. Before flight time of gaze fixation reaction did not exceed 650 ms. During space flight (SF) it extended up to 900-1000 ms and more. The velocities of head movement in space decreased, but the velocities of eye counterrotation decreased to a lesser degree. This difference resulted in sharp increase of vertical vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) gain (up to 4.3 values in one of the cosmonauts) during the 1st month of flight; further it decreased reaching the values of 0.5-0.7 on the 5th month of SF. After landing vertical VOR gain increased greatly again. These results in the vertical axis are in agreement with the data of Kozlovskaya et al., which showed in experiments with monkeys that horizontal VOR gain increased together with redundant inadequate responses of vestibular nucleus on vestibular stimulation and that in the course of adaptation to these conditions central nervous system inhibited vestibular input from the motor control system.

  5. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  6. Source Process of the Solomon Islands Earthquake of April 1st, 2007 (Mw8.1) Based on SAR Data and its Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, M.; Kato, T.; Furuya, M.; Ochi, T.; Miyazaki, S.; Aoki, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data to derive the crustal deformation due to the Solomon Islands earthquake (Mw8.1) that occurred on April 1st, 2007. Three tracks that cover the source areas were used and the image data taken before and after the earthquake were processed to make interferograms. Then, we examined the obtained interferograms if the previous two source models that were obtained by seismic wave form inversion analyses could reproduce them. However, none of the models were able to reproduce the crustal deformations derived from the SAR data analysis. Then, we tried to construct a source model that explains the observed crustal deformations well. We considered some geophysical data to constrain the source geometry; the multichannel reflection data and observed vertical deformations using coral reef survey. Considering these lines of evidence, we introduced two possible source geometries; one is single-segment model that assumes only shallow-dipping (10 deg.) main thrust ruptured, and the other is two-segment model that assumes both a high angle spray fault of 30 degree dip and the main thrust fault slipped. The comparison of models based on inversion analyses suggested that the two-segment model would be preferable. This result suggests that the Solomon Islands earthquake would be the first observed earthquake on a steeply dipping splay fault that ruptured off the main converging plate boundary. If this is the case, this earthquake might provide us with an important clue for understanding the mechanisms of land formation such as landward titling of the coastal terraces.

  7. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics & 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38) and the 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics (IWTCP-1). Both the conference and the workshop were held from 29 July to 1 August 2013 in Pullman hotel, Da Nang, Vietnam. The IWTCP-1 was a new activity of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society (VTPS) organized in association with the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38), the most well-known annual scientific forum dedicated to the dissemination of the latest development in the field of theoretical physics within the country. The IWTCP-1 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). The overriding goal of the IWTCP is to provide an international forum for scientists and engineers from academia to share ideas, problems and solution relating to the recent advances in theoretical physics as well as in computational physics. The main IWTCP motivation is to foster scientific exchanges between the Vietnamese theoretical and computational physics community and world-wide scientists as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. About 110 participants coming from 10 countries participated in the conference and the workshop. 4 invited talks, 18 oral contributions and 46 posters were presented at the conference. In the workshop we had one keynote lecture and 9 invited talks presented by international experts in the fields of theoretical and computational physics, together with 14 oral and 33 poster contributions. The proceedings were edited by Nguyen Tri Lan, Trinh Xuan Hoang, and Nguyen Ai Viet. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the conference and the workshop successful. Nguyen Ai Viet Chair of NCTP-38 and IWTCP-1

  8. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  9. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a…

  10. The first-order giant neurons of the giant fiber system in the squid: electrophysiological and ultrastructural observations.

    PubMed

    Pozzo-Miller, L D; Moreira, J E; Llinás, R R

    1998-06-01

    The giant fiber system controlling mantle contraction used for jet propulsion in squid consists of two sets of three giant neurons organized in tandem. The somata of the 1st- and 2nd-order giant cells are located in the brain, while the perikarya of the 3rd-order giant cells are encountered in the stellate ganglia of the mantle. The somata and dendrites of one fused pair of 1st-order giant cells are thought to receive synaptic input from the eye, statocyst, skin proprioceptors, and supraesophageal lobes. To define the cellular properties for integration of such an extensive synaptic load, especially given its diversity, intracellular recordings and electron microscopic observations were performed on 1st-order giant cells in an isolated head preparation. Spontaneous bursts of action potentials and spikes evoked by extracellular stimulation of the brachial lobe were sensitive to the Na+ channel blocker TTX. Action potentials were also abolished by recording with microelectrodes containing the membrane impermeant, use dependent Na+ channel blocker QX-314. The small action potential amplitude and the abundant synaptic input imply that the spike initiation zone is remotely located from the recording site. The high spontaneous activity in the isolated head preparation, as well as the presence of synaptic junctions resembling inhibitory synapses, suggest; that afferent synapses on 1st-order giant neurons might represent the inhibitory control of the giant fiber system. The characterization of the electroresponsive properties of the 1st-order giant neurons will provide a description of the single cell integrative properties that trigger the rapid jet propulsion necessary for escape behavior in squid.

  11. Mathematics at matriculation level as an indicator of success or failure in the 1st year of the Veterinary Nursing Diploma at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria.

    PubMed

    Botha, A E; McCrindle, C M E; Owen, J H

    2003-12-01

    Mathematics at matriculation level (Grade 12) is one of the subjects required for admission to the Veterinary Nursing Diploma in the Faculty at Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria. The present study shows that there is no statistically significant relationship between the grade of mathematics at matriculation level and the success or failure in the 1st year of study. There is, however, a statistical difference in the adjusted mark obtained for mathematics at matriculation level between the groups that passed and failed the 1st year of the veterinary nursing course. The results of this research are not consistent with other research which showed that secondary school mathematics results are not a significant factor in tertiary education. It is recommended that selection criteria for veterinary nurses should in future still include mathematics, but that cognisance should be taken of the mark obtained and students with higher marks (above 57%) given preference.

  12. Counterbalancing for Serial Order Carryover Effects in Experimental Condition Orders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Reactions of neural, psychological, and social systems are rarely, if ever, independent of previous inputs and states. The potential for serial order carryover effects from one condition to the next in a sequence of experimental trials makes counterbalancing of condition order an essential part of experimental design. Here, a method is proposed…

  13. Representation of linear orders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D A; Kim, J O; Sudevan, P

    1984-01-01

    Two binary classification tasks were used to explore the associative structure of linear orders. In Experiment 1, college students classified English letters as targets or nontargets, the targets being consecutive letters of the alphabet. The time to reject nontargets was a decreasing function of the distance from the target set, suggesting response interference mediated by automatic associations from the target to the nontarget letters. The way in which this interference effect depended on the placement of the boundaries between the target and nontarget sets revealed the relative strengths of individual interletter associations. In Experiment 2, students were assigned novel linear orders composed of letterlike symbols and asked to classify pairs of symbols as being adjacent or nonadjacent in the assigned sequence. Reaction time was found to be a joint function of the distance between any pair of symbols and the relative positions of those symbols within the sequence. The effects of both distance and position decreased systematically over 6 days of practice with a particular order, beginning at a level typical of unfamiliar orders and converging on a level characteristic of familiar orders such as letters and digits. These results provide an empirical unification of two previously disparate sets of findings in the literature on linear orders, those concerning familiar and unfamiliar orders, and the systematic transition between the two patterns of results suggests the gradual integration of a new associative structure.

  14. The gaseous explosive reaction at constant pressure : the reaction order and reaction rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1931-01-01

    The data given in this report covers the explosive limits of hydrocarbon fuels. Incidental to the purpose of the investigation here reported, the explosive limits will be found to be expressed for the condition of constant pressure, in the fundamental terms of concentrations (partial pressures) of fuel and oxygen.

  15. To observe the intensity of the inflammatory reaction caused by neonatal urine and meconium on the intestinal wall of rats in order to understand etiology of intestinal damage in gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Samala, Devdas S.; Parelkar, Sandesh V.; Sanghvi, Beejal V.; Vageriya, Natasha L.; Paradkar, Bhupesh A.; Kandalkar, Bhuvaneshwari M.; Sathe, Pragati A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this experimental study was to observe the intensity of the inflammatory reaction caused by neonatal urine and meconium on the intestinal wall of rats to better understand etiology of intestinal damage in gastroschisis. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 adult Wistar rats were used as experimental models to simulate the effect of exposed bowel in cases of gastroschisis. The peritoneal cavity of the rats was injected with substances which constitute human amniotic fluid to study the effect on the bowel. Sterile urine and meconium were obtained from newborn humans. The rats were divided into four groups according to the material to be injected. In Group I (Control group) 3 mL of distilled water was injected, in Group II (Urine group) 3 mL of neonatal urine was injected, in Group III (Meconium group) 5% meconium suspension was injected, while in Group IV, a combination of 5% meconium suspension and urine was injected. A total of 3mL solution was injected into the right inferior quadrant twice a day for 5 days. The animals were sacrificed on the 6th day by a high dose of thiopentone sodium. A segment of small bowel specimen was excised, fixed in paraffin, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis for determination of the degree of inflammatory reaction in the intestinal wall. All pathology specimens were studied by the same pathologist. Results: The maximum bowel damage was seen in Group II (Urine group) in the form of serositis, severe enteritis, parietal necrosis, and peeling. A lesser degree of damage was observed in Group III (Meconium group) as mild enteritis (mild lymphoid hyperplasia). The least damage was seen in Group IV (Combination of meconium and urine) and Group I (Control group). Conclusion: The intraabdominal injection of neonatal human urine produces significant inflammatory reactions in the intestinal wall of rats. PMID:24604977

  16. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components (PFMC-13) jointly organized with the 1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science (FEMaS-1) was held in Rosenheim (Germany) on 9-13 May 2011. PFMC-13 is a successor of the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003 ten 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. Then it was time for a change and redefinition of the scope of the symposium to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution in the field. Under the new name (PFMC-11), the workshop was first organized in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany and PFMC-12 took place in Jülich in 2009. Initially starting in 1985 with about 40 participants as a 1.5 day workshop, the event has continuously grown to about 220 participants at PFMC-12. Due to the joint organization with FEMaS-1, PFMC-13 set a new record with more than 280 participants. The European project Fusion Energy Materials Science, FEMaS, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), organizes and stimulates cooperative research activities which involve large-scale research facilities as well as other top-level materials characterization laboratories. Five different fields are addressed: benchmarking experiments for radiation damage modelling, the application of micro-mechanical characterization methods, synchrotron and neutron radiation-based techniques and advanced nanoscopic analysis based on transmission electron microscopy. All these fields need to be exploited further by the fusion materials community for timely materials solutions for a DEMO reactor. In order to integrate these materials research fields, FEMaS acted as a co-organizer for the 2011 workshop and successfully introduced a number of participants from research labs and universities into the PFMC community. Plasma-facing materials experience particularly hostile conditions as they are

  17. [Peculiarities of tissue reactions during resorption of biodegradable suture materials].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, I V; Maĭborodin, I V; Shevela, A I; Barannik, M I; Manaev, A A; Brombin, A I; Maĭborodina, V I

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of the surrounding tissues to the implantation of biodegradable suture materials (plain catgut threads, DemeTECH polyglactin 910, Surgilactin--polyglactin 910) into the subcutaneous adipose tissue of rats, was studied using light microscopy 1, 2, 6 and 12 months after grafting. It was shown that the tissue reactions to implantation of different biodegradable suture materials followed the general pattern characteristic of wound healing and foreign body reaction. By the first month of observation, in all the animal groups, the stage of traumatic perifocal inflammation was replaced by a proliferative phase with the new growth of the blood vessels and connective tissue. In all the animal groups, there was a trend to reduction of productive inflammation activity from the 1st month till the 12th month. By the 12th month the total degeneration of the material with full recovery of structure of surrounding tissues (restitution) was recorded only after the implantation of polyglactin 910 (DemeTECH).

  18. Sympathetic reaction tests and analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricardson, D. E.; Bowman, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The critical separation distances for explosive reactions of a solid rocket propellant were measured. Explosive reactions included low order explosion, low order detonation, and high order detonation. The effects of sample size, shape, damage and temperature on sympathetic reaction were determined experimentally. The sympathetic detonation of small cubes of solid rocket propellant was modelled numerically, using the Eulerian reactive hydrodynamic code 2DE with Forest Fire burn rates. The model was applied to cubes of 2.54 - 7.62 cm (1 - 3 in.), with agreement between calculated and experimental results.

  19. The Hospital Microbiome Project: Meeting Report for the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project Workshop on sampling design and building science measurements, Chicago, USA, June 7th-8th 2012

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Alverdy, John; An, Gary; Coleman, Maureen; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Green, Jessica; Keegan, Kevin; Kelley, Scott T.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Kociolek, Larry; Levin, Hal; Landon, Emily; Olsiewski, Paula; Knight, Rob; Siegel, Jeffrey; Weber, Stephen; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project workshop held on June 7th-8th, 2012 at the University of Chicago, USA. The workshop was arranged to determine the most appropriate sampling strategy and approach to building science measurement to characterize the development of a microbial community within a new hospital pavilion being built at the University of Chicago Medical Center. The workshop made several recommendations and led to the development of a full proposal to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as well as to the creation of the Hospital Microbiome Consortium. PMID:23961316

  20. X-ray diffraction study on ordered, disordered and reconstituted intercellular lipid lamellar structure in stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Hatta, I; Ohta, N; Ban, S; Tanaka, H; Nakata, S

    2001-02-15

    From small angle X-ray diffraction for the stratum corneum of hairless mouse, it was obtained that in the normal stratum corneum, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd order diffraction peaks for the intercellular lipid lamellar structure appear at 13.8, 6.87 and 4.59 nm, respectively and also a broad hump for the 4th order reflection appears as observed by the previous researchers. In the damaged stratum corneum prepared by the treatment of sodium dodecyl sulfate, these small-angle diffraction peaks disappear and only the broad maxima remain around the 1st, 2nd and 3rd order diffraction peaks. These facts indicate that in the normal stratum the lamellar structure is ordered and in the damaged stratum corneum the lamellar structure is disordered. Furthermore, in the reconstituted lamellar structure obtained by immersing into the dilute suspension of the mixture of ceramide 3, cholesterol and stearic acid, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd order diffraction peaks reappear at 13.3, 6.67 and 4.44 nm, respectively. This fact indicates that the reorganization of the ordered lamellar structure takes place by adding the mixture to the damaged stratum corneum. PMID:11254216

  1. 1st, 2nd and 3rd Generation Implementations of an eLearning Design: Re-Use from Postgraduate Law to Block/Online Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Sarah; Brewer, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of postgraduate students who were time poor and unable to regularly attend face-to-face classes, one lecturer in the Faculty Law at the University of Wollongong (UOW) sought the assistance of a Learning Designer to redesign the Postgraduate Practical Legal Training (PLT) program into a flexible blended learning format,…

  2. FY-2015 FES (Fusion and Energy Sciences) Joint Research Target: Final Report for the Period October 1st, 2014, through September 30th, 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Holcomb, C.; Wallace, G.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Scott, S. D.; Solomon, W.

    2015-09-30

    Annual JRT-15 Target: Conduct experiments and analysis to quantify the impact of broadened current and pressure profiles on tokamak plasma confinement and stability. Broadened pressure profiles generally improve global stability but can also affect transport and confinement, while broadened current profiles can have both beneficial and adverse impacts on confinement and stability. This research will examine a variety of heating and current drive techniques in order to validate theoretical models of both the actuator performance and the transport and global stability response to varied heating and current drive deposition.

  3. Pseudo-first-order reaction of chemically and biologically formed green rusts with HgII and C₁₅H₁₅N₃O₂: effects of pH and stabilizing agents (phosphate, silicate, polyacrylic acid, and bacterial cells).

    PubMed

    Remy, P-Ph; Etique, M; Hazotte, A A; Sergent, A-S; Estrade, N; Cloquet, C; Hanna, K; Jorand, F P A

    2015-03-01

    The kinetics of Hg(II) and methyl red (MR) reduction by hydroxycarbonate green rust (GR1) and by hydroxysulfate green rust (GR2) were studied in the presence of naturally occurring organic and inorganic ligands (phosphate, polyacrylic acid, bacterial cells, silicate). The reducing ability of biogenic hydroxycarbonate green rust (GR1bio), obtained after microbial reduction of lepidocrocite by Shewanella putrefaciens, was also investigated and compared to those of chemically synthesized GR1 and GR2 (GR1ab and GR2ab). Pseudo first-order rate constants (kobs) of Hg(II) reduction (at pH 7.0, 8.2, and 9.5) and MR reduction (at pH 7.0) were determined and were normalized to the structural Fe(II) content of GRs (kFeII) and to the estimated concentration of surface Fe(II) sites (kS). The kS values ranged from 0.3 L mmol(-1) min(-1) to 43 L mmol(-1) min(-1) for the Hg reduction, and from 0.007 L mmol(-1) min(-1) to 3.4 L mmol(-1) min(-1) for the MR reduction. No significant discrepancy between GRab and GRbio was observed in term of reactivity. However, the reduction kinetics of MR was generally slower than the Hg(II) reduction kinetics for all tested GRs. While a slight difference in Hg(II) reduction rate was noted whatever the pH values (7.0, 8.2, or 9.5), the reduction of MR was significantly affected in the presence of ligands. A decrease by a factor of 2-200, depending on the type of ligand used, was observed. These data give new insights into the reactivity of GRs in the presence of co-occurring organic and inorganic ligands, and have major implications in the characterization of contaminated systems as well as water treatment processes. PMID:25543237

  4. Pseudo-first-order reaction of chemically and biologically formed green rusts with HgII and C₁₅H₁₅N₃O₂: effects of pH and stabilizing agents (phosphate, silicate, polyacrylic acid, and bacterial cells).

    PubMed

    Remy, P-Ph; Etique, M; Hazotte, A A; Sergent, A-S; Estrade, N; Cloquet, C; Hanna, K; Jorand, F P A

    2015-03-01

    The kinetics of Hg(II) and methyl red (MR) reduction by hydroxycarbonate green rust (GR1) and by hydroxysulfate green rust (GR2) were studied in the presence of naturally occurring organic and inorganic ligands (phosphate, polyacrylic acid, bacterial cells, silicate). The reducing ability of biogenic hydroxycarbonate green rust (GR1bio), obtained after microbial reduction of lepidocrocite by Shewanella putrefaciens, was also investigated and compared to those of chemically synthesized GR1 and GR2 (GR1ab and GR2ab). Pseudo first-order rate constants (kobs) of Hg(II) reduction (at pH 7.0, 8.2, and 9.5) and MR reduction (at pH 7.0) were determined and were normalized to the structural Fe(II) content of GRs (kFeII) and to the estimated concentration of surface Fe(II) sites (kS). The kS values ranged from 0.3 L mmol(-1) min(-1) to 43 L mmol(-1) min(-1) for the Hg reduction, and from 0.007 L mmol(-1) min(-1) to 3.4 L mmol(-1) min(-1) for the MR reduction. No significant discrepancy between GRab and GRbio was observed in term of reactivity. However, the reduction kinetics of MR was generally slower than the Hg(II) reduction kinetics for all tested GRs. While a slight difference in Hg(II) reduction rate was noted whatever the pH values (7.0, 8.2, or 9.5), the reduction of MR was significantly affected in the presence of ligands. A decrease by a factor of 2-200, depending on the type of ligand used, was observed. These data give new insights into the reactivity of GRs in the presence of co-occurring organic and inorganic ligands, and have major implications in the characterization of contaminated systems as well as water treatment processes.

  5. Post waterflood CO2 miscible flood in light oil fluvial - dominated deltaic reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 30, 1994. 1st Quarter, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-15

    Production is averaging about 450 BOPD for the quarter. The fluctuation was primarily due to a temporary shutdown of CO{sub 2} delivery and maturing of the first WAG cycle. CO{sub 2} and water injection were reversed again in order to optimize changing yields and water cuts in the producing wells. Measured BHP was close to the anticipated value. A limited CO{sub 2} volume of 120 MMCF was injected to stimulate well Kuhn No. 6 to test the Huff-Puff process, since the well did not respond to CO{sub 2} injection from the main reservoir. The well will be placed on February 1, 1995. Total CO{sub 2} injection averaged this quarter about 8.8 MMCFD, including 3.6 MMCFD purchased CO{sub 2} from Cardox. The stratigraphy of the sand deposits is also discussed.

  6. Mycosis fungoides patient accompanied actinic keratosis, actinic keratosis with squamous cell carcinoma transformation, and porokeratosis after NBUVB therapy – 1st case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-jie; Abdul-fattah, Bilal; Qu, Xiao-ying; Wang, Cui-yan; Wang, Xia; Ran, Yi; Lai, Ting; Chen, Si-yuan; Huang, Chang-zheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Narrowband ultraviolet B light (NBUVB) is used increasingly in treating MF because of its good toleration and well-established management. Concerns: To discuss the risk factors and underlying pathogenic factors in the patients with secondary skin diseases after NBUVB therapy. Methods: We report in details the first case of a patient with MF accompanied with actinic keratosis (AK), AK with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation and porokeratosis after NBUVB therapy. Meanwhile, Sequence variants in tumor suppressor p53 gene in the patient's specimens were detected. A literature search of the key word “narrowband ultraviolet B light ”and “side effects” was performed on PubMed, 14 cases of this entity were found. A total of 15 patients including our case were reviewed in this study and meaningful conclusion could be drawn. Outcomes: The mean age at diagnosis of secondary skin dermatoses after NBUVB therapy was 62.08 years with a male to female ratio of 2:1. The cases were reported more in Europeans than in Asians (2.75:1), and the Fitzpatrick skin type was mainly Ito III (12/15). The mean cumulative number and cumulative dose of UVB treatments were 43.71 and 42, 400 (mJ/cm2), respectively. There was a positive relationship between Fitzpatrick skin type and cumulative dose of UVB treatments. Among the secondary skin diseases after NBUVB treatment, 12 were tumors, 2 were non-tumorous dermatoses. Only our patient presented with both. By polymerase chain reaction-single nucleotide polymorphism (PCR-SNP) analysis, C–G mutation of exon 4 of p53 was found in AK and MF specimens in our patient. Conclusion: To our knowledge, our case is the first MF patient accompanied with AK, AK with SCC transformation and Porokeratosis after NBUVB treatment. Lower Fitzpatrick skin type may be the risk factor of secondary skin diseases after NBUVB treatment. PMID

  7. All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD).

    PubMed

    Killgrove, Kristina; Montgomery, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Migration within the Roman Empire occurred at multiple scales and was engaged in both voluntarily and involuntarily. Because of the lengthy tradition of classical studies, bioarchaeological analyses must be fully contextualized within the bounds of history, material culture, and epigraphy. In order to assess migration to Rome within an updated contextual framework, strontium isotope analysis was performed on 105 individuals from two cemeteries associated with Imperial Rome-Casal Bertone and Castellaccio Europarco-and oxygen and carbon isotope analyses were performed on a subset of 55 individuals. Statistical analysis and comparisons with expected local ranges found several outliers who likely immigrated to Rome from elsewhere. Demographics of the immigrants show men and children migrated, and a comparison of carbon isotopes from teeth and bone samples suggests the immigrants may have significantly changed their diet. These data represent the first physical evidence of individual migrants to Imperial Rome. This case study demonstrates the importance of employing bioarchaeology to generate a deeper understanding of a complex ancient urban center. PMID:26863610

  8. All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD)

    PubMed Central

    Killgrove, Kristina; Montgomery, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Migration within the Roman Empire occurred at multiple scales and was engaged in both voluntarily and involuntarily. Because of the lengthy tradition of classical studies, bioarchaeological analyses must be fully contextualized within the bounds of history, material culture, and epigraphy. In order to assess migration to Rome within an updated contextual framework, strontium isotope analysis was performed on 105 individuals from two cemeteries associated with Imperial Rome—Casal Bertone and Castellaccio Europarco—and oxygen and carbon isotope analyses were performed on a subset of 55 individuals. Statistical analysis and comparisons with expected local ranges found several outliers who likely immigrated to Rome from elsewhere. Demographics of the immigrants show men and children migrated, and a comparison of carbon isotopes from teeth and bone samples suggests the immigrants may have significantly changed their diet. These data represent the first physical evidence of individual migrants to Imperial Rome. This case study demonstrates the importance of employing bioarchaeology to generate a deeper understanding of a complex ancient urban center. PMID:26863610

  9. Structural and electronic trends for five coordinate 1(st) row transition metal complexes: Mn(ii) to Zn(ii) captured in a bis(iminopyridine) framework.

    PubMed

    Jurca, Titel; Ouanounou, Sarah; Shih, Wei-Chih; Ong, Tiow-Gan; Yap, Glenn P A; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge; Richeson, Darrin

    2016-09-28

    The preparation and characterization of a series of divalent 3d transition metal complexes supported by a tridentate planar bis(iminopyridine) ligand are reported. The complexes {2,6-[PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]N(tBu2C6H3)]2C5H3N}MBr2 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn), 1-6, were characterized by single crystal X-ray structural studies revealing complexes with pentacoordinate distorted square pyramidal coordination environments. This assembly of complexes provided a unique array for examining the relationship between experimental structure and computed electronic structure. While experimental structural features basically correlated with the Irving-Williams series, some clear deviations were rationalized through the computational analysis. A balance of bis(imino)pyridine/metal with bonding/antibonding π interactions was used to explain the divergent directions of Fe(ii)-N and Co(ii)-N bond lengths. Similarly, orbital details were used to justify the opposing change in Cu-Brap and Cu-Brbas bond lengths. Furthermore, computational analysis provided a unique method to document a surprising low bond order for the M-N bonds of bis(imino)pyridine ligand in this series. PMID:27539867

  10. All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD).

    PubMed

    Killgrove, Kristina; Montgomery, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Migration within the Roman Empire occurred at multiple scales and was engaged in both voluntarily and involuntarily. Because of the lengthy tradition of classical studies, bioarchaeological analyses must be fully contextualized within the bounds of history, material culture, and epigraphy. In order to assess migration to Rome within an updated contextual framework, strontium isotope analysis was performed on 105 individuals from two cemeteries associated with Imperial Rome-Casal Bertone and Castellaccio Europarco-and oxygen and carbon isotope analyses were performed on a subset of 55 individuals. Statistical analysis and comparisons with expected local ranges found several outliers who likely immigrated to Rome from elsewhere. Demographics of the immigrants show men and children migrated, and a comparison of carbon isotopes from teeth and bone samples suggests the immigrants may have significantly changed their diet. These data represent the first physical evidence of individual migrants to Imperial Rome. This case study demonstrates the importance of employing bioarchaeology to generate a deeper understanding of a complex ancient urban center.

  11. A novel Van91 I polymorphism in the 1st intron of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor gene and its effect on the urinary cAMP response to PTH.

    PubMed

    Heishi, M; Tazawa, H; Matsuo, T; Saruta, T; Hanaoka, M; Tsukamoto, Y

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to identify a parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor gene polymorphism in a healthy Japanese population. All known 13 introns of this gene were amplified by PCR, except the 1st intron, which was amplified by the long-PCR method. No restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were detected by BsmI or XbaI in any of these introns. Twenty-one other restriction enzymes (Hind III, Bgl II, Sty I, Pvu II, Eco81 I, Van91 I, BstX I, Sse8387 I, EcoR I, BamH I, Mbo II, Tth111 I, PshA I, Eam1105 I, Not I, Srf I, Bgl I, Fok I, Sfi I, Apa I, Taq I) were tested on the 1st intron. Furthermore, digestion by Van911 (CCANNNNNTGG) identified a single, two-allele polymorphism with a fragment of approximately 3.5 kb (V allele) or a fragment of 3.1 and 0.4 kb (v allele). The frequency of the Van91 I polymorphism in 106 healthy Japanese volunteers was 77.4% for type vv, 19.8% for type Vv and 2.8% for type VV. In addition, the urinary cAMP response to exogenous [1-34]PTH was studied in 17 healthy volunteers and found to be significantly greater in persons with type Vv than type vv (p<0.05). In conclusion, the Van91 I polymorphism of the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene can be used to study the role of polymorphism in various disorders involving PTH or PTHrP. PMID:10784412

  12. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies against CMP-N-Acetylneuraminate-beta-galactosamide-alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase 1 (ST3Gal-I) Recombinant Protein Expressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anuj Kumar; Kaur, Parvinder; Patil, Harshada; Kadam, Pallavi; Bhanushali, Paresh B; Chugh, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is one of the major hallmarks of cancer with altered gene expression signatures of sialyltransferases. ST3Gal-I, a sialyltransferase, is known to play a crucial role in sialylation of T antigen in bladder cancer and it has reported elevated expression in breast carcinogenesis with increased tumor progression stages. The aim of the current study is to develop new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human ST3Gal-I and evaluate their diagnostic potential. We developed a repertoire of stable hybridoma cell lines producing high-affinity IgG antibodies against recombinant human ST3Gal-I, expressed in E. coli BL21-DE3 strain. In order to demonstrate the diagnostic value of the mAbs, various clones were employed for the immunohistochemistry analysis of ST3Gal-I expression in cancerous tissues. Antibodies generated by 7E51C83A10 clone demonstrated a strong and specific fluorescence staining in breast cancer tissue sections and did not exhibit significant background in fibroadenoma sections. In conclusion, the mAbs raised against recombinant ST3Gal-I recognize cellular ST3Gal-I and represent a promising diagnostic tool for the immunodetection of ST3Gal-I expressing cells. Specific-reactivity of clone 7E51C83A10 mAbs towards ST3Gal-I was also confirmed by immunoblotting. Therefore, our observations warrant evaluation of ST3Gal-I as a potential marker for cancer diagnosis at larger scale. PMID:26783462

  13. Rapid Equilibrium-Ordered Enzyme Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Thomas R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) characteristic initial velocity behavior (considering the five-step reaction sequence for rapid equilibrium-order bisubstrate mechanisms); (2) dead-end inhibition; (3) inhibition by single products; and (4) an activator as a leading reactant. (JN)

  14. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from OMS'05, the 1st Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2006-07-01

    OMS'05 is the first international conference wholly dedicated to optical microsystems. It was organized by the European Optical Society (EOS) in the frame of its international topical meeting activity and was held in Italy, September 2005, amidst the wonderful scenery of the Island of Capri. A possible definition of an optical microsystem is a complex system, able to perform one or more sensing and actuation functions, where optical devices are integrated in a smart way with electronic, mechanical and sensing components by taking advantage of the progress in micro- and nano-technologies. The increasing interest in this field arises from the expected applications that would significantly improve the quality of life. The list of possibilities offered by the optical microsystem enabling technologies is very long and seems to increase day by day. We are not only thinking about the next generation of optical telecommunication networks and computers, but also about low-cost, compact microsystems for environmental monitoring, in order to improve safety in the avionic and automotive fields, medical diagnostics and proteomic/genomic studies, or just finding general applications in several industrial fields. The goal of the conference was to involve scientists and young researchers from the main public and private laboratories, giving them the opportunity to present new scientific results and compare their know-how in the exciting and emerging field of optical microsystems. We believe that we succeeded in this. More than 200 scientists from all over the world attended the conference. We had more than 100 oral presentations and approximately 20 from the keynote lectures and invited speeches. It was an opportunity to define the most recent progress carried out in the field and to outline the possible road-map leading to the expected results in the industrial and social fields. We strongly believe that research and technology are closely interconnected at present and cannot

  15. Conscientiousness and reactions to psychological contract breach: a longitudinal field study.

    PubMed

    Orvis, Karin A; Dudley, Nicole M; Cortina, Jose M

    2008-09-01

    The authors examined the role of employee conscientiousness as a moderator of the relationships between psychological contract breach and employee behavioral and attitudinal reactions to the breach. They collected data from 106 newly hired employees within the 1st month of employment (Time 1), 3 months later (Time 2), and 8 months after Time 1 (Time 3) to observe the progression through contract development, breach, and reaction. Results suggest that conscientiousness is a significant moderator for 4 of the 5 contract breach-employee reaction relationships examined (turnover intentions, organizational loyalty, job satisfaction, and 1 of 2 facets of job performance). Specifically, employees who were lower in conscientiousness had more negative reactions to perceived breach with respect to turnover intentions, organizational loyalty, and job satisfaction. In contrast, employees who were higher in conscientiousness reduced their job performance to a greater degree in response to contract breach. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:18808236

  16. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  17. Anionic cross-coupling reaction of alpha-metallated alkenyl sulfoximines and alkenyl sulfoximines with cuprates featuring a 1,2-metal-ate rearrangement of sulfoximine-substituted higher order alkenyl cuprates and an alpha-metallation of alkenyl sulfoximines by cuprates.

    PubMed

    Gais, Hans-Joachim; Rao, C Venkateshwar; Loo, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    (E)- and (Z)-configured alpha-lithioalkenyl sulfoximines, which are available through lithiation of the corresponding alkenyl sulfoximines, undergo a anionic cross-coupling reaction (ACCR) with organocuprates with formation of the corresponding alkenyl cuprates and sulfinamide. The alkenyl cuprates can be trapped by electrophiles. The ACCR presumably proceeds via the formation of a higher-order sulfoximine-substituted alkenyl cuprate, which undergoes a 1,2-metal-ate rearrangement whereby the sulfoximine group acts as the nucleofuge. The parent (E)- and (Z)-configured alkenyl sulfoximines suffer upon treatment with an organocuprate a deprotonation at the alpha-position with formation of the corresponding alpha-cuprioalkenyl sulfoximines. These derivatives also enter into a similar ACCR with organocuprates. The ACCR of sulfoximines substituted homoallylic alcohols allows a stereoselective access to enantio- and diastereopure substituted homoallylic alcohols. PMID:18543268

  18. [Nalmefene and Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome: Analysis of the Global Pharmacovigilance Database for Adverse Drug Reactions].

    PubMed

    Dahmke, Hendrike; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Weiler, Stefan

    2015-10-14

    Nalmefene (Selincro®) is a selective opioid receptor antagonist, licensed in April 2014 in Switzerland for the reduction of alcohol consumption in adults with a high drinking risk level. 200 reports of adverse drug reactions of nalmefene have been documented worldwide in the WHO global pharmacovigilance database between 7th March 1997 to 1st March 2015. In 21 cases (10,5%) nalmefene and an opioid were administered concomitantly, causing withdrawal symptoms. Until now, the regional pharmacovigilance center in Zurich received four cases of nalmefene combined with opioids. This combination should be avoided.

  19. Dewarless Logging Tool - 1st Generation

    SciTech Connect

    HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

    2000-08-01

    This report focuses on Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications without the need for heat shielding. One of the mechanisms for failure in conventional downhole tools is temperature. They can only survive a limited number of hours in high temperature environments. For the first time since the evolution of integrated circuits, components are now commercially available that are qualified to 225 C with many continuing to work up to 300 C. These components are primarily based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology. Sandia has developed and tested a simple data logger based on this technology that operates up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to only 250 C without thermal protection. An actual well log to 240 C without shielding is discussed. The first prototype high-temperature tool measures pressure and temperature using a wire-line for power and communication. The tool is based around the HT83C51 microcontroller. A brief discussion of the background and status of the High Temperature Instrumentation program at Sandia, objectives, data logger development, and future project plans are given.

  20. Elementary Science Guide -- 1st Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieland, Anne; And Others

    Presented is a resource book to be used with instructional kits for elementary school science students, grade 1. The individual units at this grade level are based on curriculum which has been developed by the National Science Foundation in the 1960s and revised to meet student and teacher identified needs in Anchorage, Alaska. Four units are…

  1. MERIS 1st Year: early calibration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwart, Steven; Bourg, Ludovic; Huot, Jean-Paul

    2004-02-01

    Envisat is ESA's environmental research satellite launched on 1 March 2002. It carries a suit of sensors offering opportunities for a broad range of scientific research and applications. The calibration results from the first year of operation of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) will be presented, including in-flight verification and radiometric, spectral and geometric characterization of the instrument. Radiometric calibration using the on-board diffuser will be discussed and comparison with vicarious calibration results over desert sites or well-characterized marine sites will be presented. The image quality will be assessed, and improvements resulting from the in-flight characterization will be presented.

  2. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken on May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered during the missions 'first light' milestone, and shows celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The objects shown represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period. The radial streaks at the edge of the image are due to stars reflecting from the near ultraviolet detector window.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  3. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet -50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the two channels of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 50 celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The reddish objects represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period, while bluish objects were detected over a 3-minute period by the camera's far ultraviolet channel. Deeper imaging may confirm the apparent existence in this field of galaxy pairs and triplets or individual star formation regions in single galaxies.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  4. GALEX 1st Light Far Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the far ultraviolet channel of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 400 celestial objects, appearing in blue, detected over a 3-minute, 20-second period in the constellation Hercules.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  5. 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad: 1st International Conference held in San Francisco, California, May 2012 and 2nd International Conference held in Indianapolis, Indiana, May 2013.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Mary Jane; Nattiv, Aurelia; Joy, Elizabeth; Misra, Madhusmita; Williams, Nancy I; Mallinson, Rebecca J; Gibbs, Jenna C; Olmsted, Marion; Goolsby, Marci; Matheson, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: (1) low energy availability with or without disordered eating, (2) menstrual dysfunction and (3) low bone mineral density. Female athletes often present with one or more of the three Triad components, and an early intervention is essential to prevent its progression to serious endpoints that include clinical eating disorders, amenorrhoea and osteoporosis. This consensus statement represents a set of recommendations developed following the 1st (San Francisco, California, USA) and 2nd (Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) International Symposia on the Female Athlete Triad. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for physicians, athletic trainers and other healthcare providers for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of the Female Athlete Triad and to provide clear recommendations for return to play. The 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad expert panel has proposed a risk stratification point system that takes into account magnitude of risk to assist the physician in decision-making regarding sport participation, clearance and return to play. Guidelines are offered for clearance categories, management by a multidisciplinary team and implementation of treatment contracts. This consensus paper has been endorsed by the Female Athlete Triad Coalition, an International Consortium of leading Triad researchers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine. PMID:24463911

  6. Effects of cocaine on simple reaction times and sensory thresholds in baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Hienz, R D; Spear, D J; Bowers, D A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of chronic, daily administration of cocaine on auditory and visual reaction times and thresholds were studied in baboons. Single intramuscular injections of cocaine hydrochloride (0.1 to 5.6 mg/kg) were given once daily for periods of 10 to 25 days, and were followed immediately by psychophysical tests designed to assess cocaine's effects on simple reaction times as on auditory and visual threshold functions. Consistent reductions in reaction times were frequently observed over the cocaine dose range of 0.32 to 1.0 mg/kg; at higher doses, either decreases or increases in reaction times were observed, depending upon the animal. Lowered reaction times generally occurred immediately following the 1st day's cocaine injection, and continued through all subsequent days during the dose administration period, suggesting little development of tolerance or sensitivity to these reaction-time effects. Reaction-time decreases showed a U-shaped dose-effect function. The greatest decreases in reaction times occurred from 0.32 to 1.0 mg/kg, and produced an average reaction-time decrease of 10 to 12%. Concurrently measured auditory and visual thresholds showed no systematic changes as a function of cocaine dose. Pausing was observed during performance of the psychophysical tasks, with the length of total session pause times being directly related to cocaine dose. PMID:8169572

  7. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  8. Silicon-based sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  9. Silicon-based sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Carrano, A.V.; Balch, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber is described that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis. 32 figs.

  10. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  11. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  12. 78 FR 54234 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Polyethylene Terephthalate (Pet) Film from Dana Mermelstein (202) Brazil (A-351-841) (1st Review). 482-1391.... Lightweight Thermal Paper from China (A-570-920) David Goldberger (202) (1st Review). 482-4136. Lightweight Thermal Paper from Germany (A-428- David Goldberger (202) 840) (1st Review). 482-4136....

  13. A Computer Simulated Experiment in Complex Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, J. C.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation experiment in which physical chemistry students can determine all of the kinetic parameters of a reaction, such as order of the reaction with respect to each reagent, forward and reverse rate constants for the overall reaction, and forward and reverse activation energies. (MLH)

  14. Results of Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty Using 36 mm Femoral Heads on 1st Generation Highly Cross Linked Polyethylene in Patients 50 Years and Less with Minimum Five Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Kee; Kim, Hee-soo; Nam, Jun-Ho; Chae, Seung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the clinical and radiographic midterm results of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a 36 mm diameter femoral head on 1st generation highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) in patients 50 years and less with minimum five year follow-up. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 31 patients (41 hips) aged 50 years and less underwent primary THA with a 36 mm diameter femoral head on HXLPE between 2004 and 2010. Clinical follow-ups included specific measurements like modified Harris hip scores (HHS) and Merle d'Aubigne and Postel score. For radiologic evaluations, together with position of acetabular cup at six weeks later of postoperation, we separately calculated the penentrations of femoral head into polyethylene liners during postoperation and one year later check-ups, and during one year later check-ups and final check-ups. Results There were no major complications except for one case of dislocation. Average modified HHS at final follow-up was 88 (81-98), and Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scores were more than 15. Mean acetabular cup inclination and anteversion were 45.81°(36.33°-54.91°) and 13.26°(6.72°-27.71°), respectively. Average femoral head penetration of steady-state wear rate determined using radiographs taken at one-year postoperatively and at latest follow-up was 0.042±0.001 mm/year. Conclusion Based on minimum 5 years clinical results, we think 36 mm metal head coupling with HXLPE as the good alternate articulation surface when planning THA for patients aged 50 years and less. PMID:27536648

  15. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  16. Entropy Generation in a Chemical Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, E. N.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analysed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first-order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A…

  17. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  18. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks. PMID:25723751

  19. Clinical Pearls: Leprosy Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jane; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-09-01

    Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur in the setting of Mycobacterium leprae infection. Precipitants of reactions can be pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic. Both type 1 and type 2 reactions typically occur before and during leprosy treatment but may also occur after treatment has been completed. Reactions cause morbidity due to nerve damage, and prompt corticosteroid therapy is warranted to minimize nerve damage due to reactions.

  20. Multicomponent reactions of cyclobutanones.

    PubMed

    Pirrung, Michael C; Wang, Jianmei

    2009-04-17

    Cyclobutanones are essentially unknown as reactants in isonitrile-based multicomponent reactions. Ugi reactions of cyclobutanone and Passerini reactions of tetramethylcyclobutane-1,3-dione have been performed in this work. These reactions are significantly enhanced by being conducted in water, a subject of recent interest whose basis is still in question but whose effects are beyond doubt. The Ugi reaction of cyclobutanone has been used in a brief synthesis of an aspartame analogue.

  1. Light in elementary biological reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Villy

    2000-09-01

    Light plays an important role in biology. In this review we discuss several processes and systems where light triggers a biological response, i.e. photosynthesis, vision, photoreceptors. For these functions Nature has chosen simple elementary chemical reactions, which occur in highly specialized and organized structures. The high efficiency and specificity of these reactions make them interesting for applications in light energy conversion and opto-electronics. In order to emphasize the synergism in studies of natural and synthetic systems we will discuss a few of each kind, with similar functions. In all cases light triggers a rapid sequence of events, which makes ultrafast spectroscopy an ideal tool to disentangle reaction mechanisms and dynamics.

  2. First-order inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  3. First-order inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result if inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models.

  4. Electroweak meson production reaction in the nucleon resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Toru

    2015-10-15

    We report on our recent study of the the neutrino-nucleon reaction in the nucleon resonance region. The dynamical reaction model of meson production reaction on the nucleon for the pion and photon induced reaction has been developed in order to investigate the spectrum of nucleon excited state. We have extended this model in order to describe the weak meson production reactions with the πN, ηN, KΛ, KΣ and ππN final states. We also studied the role of the final state interaction in the photon and the neutrino induced pion production reaction on the deuteron around the Δ(1232) resonance region.

  5. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules. PMID:26871190

  6. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  7. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  8. Infants Communicate in Order to Be Understood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Gerlind; Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Infants intentionally communicate with others from before their 1st birthday. But there is some question about how they understand the communicative process. Do they understand that for their request to work the recipient must both understand the request and be cooperatively disposed to fulfill it? On the basis of the study by Shwe and Markman…

  9. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  10. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  11. New archaeomagnetic data recovered from the study of celtiberic remains from central Spain (Numantia and Ciadueña, 3rd-1st centuries BC). Implications on the fidelity of the Iberian paleointensity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Catanzariti, G.; Jimeno, A.; Campuzano, S. A.; Benito-Batanero, J. P.; Tabernero-Galán, C.; Roperch, P.

    2016-11-01

    Variations of geomagnetic field in the Iberian Peninsula prior to roman times are poorly constrained. Here we report new archaeomagnetic results from four ceramic collections and two combustion structures recovered in two pre-roman (celtiberic) archaeological sites in central Spain. The studied materials have been dated by archaeological evidences and supported by five radiocarbon dates. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that the characteristic remanent manetization (ChRM) is carried by a low coercivity magnetic phase with Curie temperatures of 530-575 °C, most likely Ti-poor titanomagnetite/titanomaghemite. Archaeointensity determinations were carried out by using the classical Thellier-Thellier protocol including tests and corrections for magnetic anisotropy and cooling rate dependency. Two magnetic behaviours were depicted during the laboratory treatment. Black potsherds and poor heated samples from the kilns, presented two magnetization components, alterations or curved Arai plots and were therefore rejected. In contrast, well heated specimens (red ceramic fragments and well heated samples from the kilns) show one single well defined component of magnetization going through the origin and linear Arai plots providing successful archaeointensity determinations. The effect of anisotropy of the thermoremanent magnetization (ATRM) on paleointensity analysis was systematically investigated obtaining very high ATRM corrections on fine pottery specimens. In some cases, differences between the uncorrected and ATRM corrected paleointensity values reached up to 86 %. The mean intensity values obtained from three selected set of samples were 64.3 ± 5.8 μT; 56.8 ± 3.8 and 56.7 ± 4.6 μT (NUS2, CI2 and CIA, respectively), which contribute to better understand the evolution of the palaeofield intensity in central Iberia during the 3rd-1st centuries BC. The direction of the field at first century BC has also been determined from oriented samples from CIA kilns (D = 357

  12. Infant temperament: stability by age, gender, birth order, term status, and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Marc H; Putnick, Diane L; Gartstein, Maria A; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Auestad, Nancy; O'Connor, Deborah L

    2015-01-01

    Two complementary studies focused on stability of infant temperament across the 1st year and considered infant age, gender, birth order, term status, and socioeconomic status (SES) as moderators. Study 1 consisted of 73 mothers of firstborn term girls and boys queried at 2, 5, and 13 months of age. Study 2 consisted of 335 mothers of infants of different gender, birth order, term status, and SES queried at 6 and 12 months. Consistent positive and negative affectivity factors emerged at all time points across both studies. Infant temperament proved stable and robust across gender, birth order, term status, and SES. Stability coefficients for temperament factors and scales were medium to large for shorter (< 9 months) interassessment intervals and small to medium for longer (> 10 months) intervals.

  13. Modeling the enzyme kinetic reaction.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2015-09-01

    The Enzymatic control reactions model was presented within the scope of fractional calculus. In order to accommodate the usual initial conditions, the fractional derivative used is in Caputo sense. The methodologies of the three analytical methods were used to derive approximate solution of the fractional nonlinear system of differential equations. Two methods use integral operator and the other one uses just an integral. Numerical results obtained exhibit biological behavior of real world problem.

  14. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  15. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  16. Complete Sequence of pEC012, a Multidrug-Resistant IncI1 ST71 Plasmid Carrying bla CTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an Avian Escherichia coli ST117 Strain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu-Shan; Zong, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Li; Du, Xiang-Dang; Huang, Hui; Zhong, Xing-Hao; Hu, Gong-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A 139,622-bp IncI1 ST71 conjugative plasmid pEC012 from an avian Escherichia coli D-ST117 strain was sequenced, which carried five IS26-bracketed resistance modules: IS26-fosA3-orf1-orf2-Δorf3-IS26, IS26-fip-ΔISEcp1-bla CTX-M-65-IS903D-iroN-IS26, IS26-ΔtnpR-bla TEM-1-rmtB-IS26, IS26-oqxAB-IS26, and IS26-floR-aac(3)-IV-IS26. The backbone of pEC012 was similar to that of several other IncI1 ST71 plasmids: pV408, pM105, and pC271, but these plasmids had different arrangements of multidrug resistance region. In addition, the novel ISEc57 element was identified, which is in the IS21 family. The stepwise emergence of multi-resistance regions demonstrated the accumulation of different resistance determinants through homologous recombination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a multidrug-resistant IncI1 ST71 plasmid carrying bla CTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an avian E. coli ST117 strain. PMID:27486449

  17. Complete Sequence of pEC012, a Multidrug-Resistant IncI1 ST71 Plasmid Carrying blaCTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an Avian Escherichia coli ST117 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yu-Shan; Zong, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Li; Du, Xiang-Dang; Huang, Hui; Zhong, Xing-Hao; Hu, Gong-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A 139,622-bp IncI1 ST71 conjugative plasmid pEC012 from an avian Escherichia coli D-ST117 strain was sequenced, which carried five IS26-bracketed resistance modules: IS26-fosA3-orf1-orf2-Δorf3-IS26, IS26-fip-ΔISEcp1-blaCTX-M-65-IS903D-iroN-IS26, IS26-ΔtnpR-blaTEM-1-rmtB-IS26, IS26-oqxAB-IS26, and IS26-floR-aac(3)-IV-IS26. The backbone of pEC012 was similar to that of several other IncI1 ST71 plasmids: pV408, pM105, and pC271, but these plasmids had different arrangements of multidrug resistance region. In addition, the novel ISEc57 element was identified, which is in the IS21 family. The stepwise emergence of multi-resistance regions demonstrated the accumulation of different resistance determinants through homologous recombination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a multidrug-resistant IncI1 ST71 plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an avian E. coli ST117 strain. PMID:27486449

  18. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Shiga toxin gene (stx1)-positive Escherichia coli O91:H14 carrying blaCTX-M-15 on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid isolated from a human patient in Germany.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Mardjan; Bettge-Weller, Gudrun; Fruth, Angelika; Uphoff, Helmut; Pfeifer, Yvonne

    2015-05-01

    In 2011, the Shiga toxin- and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 caused a serious outbreak of gastroenteritis in Germany. This strain carried bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid. During screening of individuals at risk for acquisition of the epidemic E. coli O104:H4, we isolated another ESBL-producing and Shiga toxin-positive E. coli belonging to serotype O91:H14 from feces of a human patient. Interestingly, the patient also carried a further ESBL-producing but Shiga toxin-negative E. coli. Both strains harbored bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid, which was indistinguishable regarding size and plasmid restriction pattern from the plasmid of the epidemic E. coli O104:H4 strain. The patient had traveled to India 6 months prior to the isolation of the E. coli strains. This is the first report of an ESBL-producing, Shiga toxin-positive E. coli of serogroup O91. Our data suggest a high propensity of the IncI1-ST31 plasmid to spread in the human and/or animal population.

  19. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  20. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  1. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  2. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  3. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  4. After order 636

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.G.

    1995-02-01

    Through its Order 636, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) completed a restructuring of the natural gas industry. The order severed the last links in the chain linking gas producers to pipeline companies to local gas distribution companies (LDCs) to customers. Before Order 636 took effect, many predicted electric power generation, particularly by cogenerators and independent power producers (IPPs), would be a major growth area for natural gas. In fact, what Order 636 has shown is, that timing is everything, and that it`s difficult to sort out the effect of one agent of change when many others are at work.

  5. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  6. Stability of sharp reaction fronts in porous rocks and implications for non-sharp reaction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangen, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The flow of reactive fluids in the subsurface, like for instance acids, may create reaction fronts. A sharp reaction front is an idealization of the narrow zone where the reaction takes place. Narrow reaction zones are studied with a one-component reaction transport model, where a first order reaction changes the porosity. The porosity field is coupled to the permeability field, where an increasing porosity leads to an increasing permeability. Therefore, the reaction has a feed-back on the flow field. We have derived 1D approximate solutions for the change in concentration and porosity across the reaction zone. These solutions are used to derive a condition for reaction fronts to be narrow. The condition gives a minimum reaction rate necessary for 90% of the reaction to be restricted to the given area. Sharp fronts are idealizations of narrow fronts that are more amendable for analytical treatment. A condition has recently been derived for the stability of sharp reaction fronts in homogeneous porous medium using linear stability analysis. The condition gives that a perturbation of a flat reaction front of any wave-length becomes unstable if the permeability behind the front increases. The front instability grows faster for short wave lengths than for long wave lengths. Similarly, the perturbations of the front will die out if the permeability behind the front decreases, and short wave length perturbations will die out faster than long wave length perturbations. It is a condition that applies for both 2D and 3D porous media. Numerical experiments are shown that demonstrate the front stability criterion, when the fronts are narrow, but not sharp. The sharp front approximation turns out to be useful for the interpretation of reactions that are not sufficiently fast to give narrow reaction zones, when the reaction alters the porosity- and the permeability fields. Dissolution is an important example of reactions that increase the porosity and therefore the permeability

  7. Bioregions and World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakthrough, 1985

    1985-01-01

    What bioregions can do to contribute to world order and security is discussed in this newsletter. A bioregion is defined as an identifiable geographical area of interacting life-systems that is relatively self-sustaining in the ever-renewing processes of nature. Articles included are: "Bioregionalism and World Order" (Gerald Mische); "Bioregions:…

  8. Milestoning without a Reaction Coordinate

    PubMed Central

    Májek, Peter; Elber, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Milestoning is a method for calculating kinetics and thermodynamics of long time processes typically not accessible for straightforward Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In the Milestoning approach, the system of interest is partitioned into cells by dividing hypersurfaces (Milestones) and transitions are computed between nearby hypersurfaces. Kinetics and thermodynamics are derived from the statistics of these transitions. The original Milestoning work concentrated on systems in which a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or an order parameter could be identified. In many biomolecular processes the reaction proceeds via multiple channels or following more than a single order parameter. A description based on a one-dimensional reaction coordinate may be insufficient. In the present paper we introduce a variation that overcomes this limitation. Following the ideas of Vanden-Eijnden and Venturoli on Voronoi cells that avoid the use of an order parameter (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 194101), we describe another way to “Milestone” systems without a reaction coordinate. We examine the assumptions of the Milestoning calculations of mean first passage times (MFPT) and describe strategies to weaken these assumptions. The method described in this paper, Directional Milestoning, arranges hypersurfaces in higher dimensions that “tag” trajectories such that efficient calculations can be done and at the same time the assumptions required for exact calculations of MFPTs are satisfied approximately. In the original Milestoning papers trajectories are initiated from an equilibrium set of conformations. Here a more accurate distribution, that mimics the first hitting point distribution, is used. We demonstrate the usage of Directional Milestoning in conformational transitions of alanine dipeptide (in vacuum and in aqueous solution) and compare the correctness, efficiency, and statistical stability of the method with exact MD and with a related method. PMID:20596240

  9. Narcissism and birth order.

    PubMed

    Eyring, W E; Sobelman, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the relationship between birth-order position and the development of narcissism, while refining research and theory. The relationship between birth-order status and narcissism was examined with a sample of 79 undergraduate students (55 women and 24 men). These subjects were placed in one of the four following birth-order categories of firstborn, second-born, last-born, and only children. These categories were chosen given their significance in Adlerian theory. Each subject completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and a demographic inventory. Based on psychodynamic theory, it was hypothesized that firstborn children were expected to score highest, but statistical significance was not found for an association between narcissism and birth order. Further research is urged to investigate personality theory as it relates to parenting style and birth order.

  10. Court Ordered Desegregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reber, Sarah J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the court ordered desegregation plans, on trends in segregation and white flight, are estimated. The effect of availability of school districts and other factors on the white flight across districts is also mentioned.

  11. ASDC Order Tools

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2012-04-17

    ... users to search our data holdings without logging in to the system. The user, however, must log in before ordering the data. ... Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor II (ACRIM II) Total Solar Irradiance Data Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) data (Selected ...

  12. 'Good palliative care' orders.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, I

    1993-01-01

    A Select Committee of the Parliament of South Australia, considering revisions to legislation governing care of the dying, did not support allowing doctors to assist suicide. They recommended that no liability attach to the provision of reasonable palliative care which happens to shorten life. The Committee affirmed the suggestion that positive open orders to provide 'good palliative care' should replace 'do not resuscitate' orders. PMID:7506978

  13. Noncanonical reactions of flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a "molecular scaffold" in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  14. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  15. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜eαt with α proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  16. Order and disorder in irreversible decay processes.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Jonathan W; Flynn, Shane W; Green, Jason R

    2015-02-14

    Dynamical disorder motivates fluctuating rate coefficients in phenomenological, mass-action rate equations. The reaction order in these rate equations is the fixed exponent controlling the dependence of the rate on the number of species. Here, we clarify the relationship between these notions of (dis)order in irreversible decay, n A → B, n = 1, 2, 3, …, by extending a theoretical measure of fluctuations in the rate coefficient. The measure, Jn-Ln (2)≥0, is the magnitude of the inequality between Jn, the time-integrated square of the rate coefficient multiplied by the time interval of interest, and Ln (2), the square of the time-integrated rate coefficient. Applying the inequality to empirical models for non-exponential relaxation, we demonstrate that it quantifies the cumulative deviation in a rate coefficient from a constant, and so the degree of dynamical disorder. The equality is a bound satisfied by traditional kinetics where a single rate constant is sufficient. For these models, we show how increasing the reaction order can increase or decrease dynamical disorder and how, in either case, the inequality Jn-Ln (2)≥0 can indicate the ability to deduce the reaction order in dynamically disordered kinetics.

  17. [Tattoo skin reactions: Management and treatment algorithm].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N

    2016-01-01

    So-called "allergic" reactions to ink or colouring agents constitute the main current complication associated with tattoos that lead individuals to consult. However, general practitioners are frequently at a loss about how to manage such complications. In order to assist clinicians in their daily practice, we propose an update of the modes of managing allergic reactions to tattoos, and we offer a therapeutic scale and a decision-making algorithm.

  18. [Tattoo skin reactions: Management and treatment algorithm].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N

    2016-01-01

    So-called "allergic" reactions to ink or colouring agents constitute the main current complication associated with tattoos that lead individuals to consult. However, general practitioners are frequently at a loss about how to manage such complications. In order to assist clinicians in their daily practice, we propose an update of the modes of managing allergic reactions to tattoos, and we offer a therapeutic scale and a decision-making algorithm. PMID:27181822

  19. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  20. Immune reaction to propanidid.

    PubMed

    Christmas, D

    1984-05-01

    An adverse reaction to the intravenous anaesthetic agent propanidid is described in which the main features were hypotension, facial erythema, and abdominal pain. Changes in serum complement levels and differential white cell counts indicate that this was an immune reaction mediated by the classical complement pathway. The immune reaction apparently involved antibodies other than those of the IgE (reagin) class, and circumstantial evidence suggests that it was specific to propanidid rather than to the entire formulation or to Cremophor EL.

  1. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    PubMed

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.'

  2. Arguments from Developmental Order

    PubMed Central

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article1, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind – getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged ‘philosophy of development.’ PMID:27242648

  3. Birth Order and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Risal, Ajay; Tharoor, Hema

    2012-01-01

    Context: Ordinal position the child holds within the sibling ranking of a family is related to intellectual functioning, personality, behavior, and development of psychopathology. Aim: To study the association between birth order and development of psychopathology in patients attending psychiatry services in a teaching hospital. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Retrospective file review of three groups of patients was carried out. Patient-related variables like age of onset, birth order, family type, and family history of mental illness were compared with psychiatry diagnosis (ICD-10) generated. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 13; descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. Results: Mean age of onset of mental illness among the adult general psychiatry patients (group I, n = 527) was found to be 33.01 ± 15.073, while it was 11.68 ± 4.764 among the child cases (group II, n = 47) and 26.74 ± 7.529 among substance abuse cases (group III, n = 110). Among group I patients, commonest diagnosis was depression followed by anxiety and somatoform disorders irrespective of birth order. Dissociative disorders were most prevalent in the first born child (36.7%) among group II patients. Among group III patients, alcohol dependence was maximum diagnosis in all birth orders. Conclusions: Depression and alcohol dependence was the commonest diagnosis in adult group irrespective of birth order. PMID:24479023

  4. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  5. Reaction of communities to impulse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshagiri, B. V.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the reaction of communities to impulse noise, a sociological survey was conducted in three communities in Ontario, Canada. The dominant industrial noise in these locations is due to drop forging operations. Nearly 600 completed interviews were recorded. Detailed sound level measurements were carried out in the areas surveyed. The results clearly indicate the extent of adverse reaction to the forging noise. This research has been compared with the reaction of the respondents to traffic noise prevailing in their communities. Regression lines are presented showing the relationship between the percent of people disturbed by the forging noise and the sound level of the impulses.

  6. Reaction-diffusion in the NEURON simulator.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Robert A; Hines, Michael L; Lytton, William W

    2013-01-01

    In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics) on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON's Reaction-Diffusion (rxd) module in Python provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy's sparse linear algebra library. PMID:24298253

  7. Fractional diffusion equations coupled by reaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzi, E. K.; Menechini Neto, R.; Tateishi, A. A.; Lenzi, M. K.; Ribeiro, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the behavior for a set of fractional reaction-diffusion equations that extend the usual ones by the presence of spatial fractional derivatives of distributed order in the diffusive term. These equations are coupled via the reaction terms which may represent reversible or irreversible processes. For these equations, we find exact solutions and show that the spreading of the distributions is asymptotically governed by the same the long-tailed distribution. Furthermore, we observe that the coupling introduced by reaction terms creates an interplay between different diffusive regimes leading us to a rich class of behaviors related to anomalous diffusion.

  8. Binomial moment equations for stochastic reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2011-04-15

    A highly efficient formulation of moment equations for stochastic reaction networks is introduced. It is based on a set of binomial moments that capture the combinatorics of the reaction processes. The resulting set of equations can be easily truncated to include moments up to any desired order. The number of equations is dramatically reduced compared to the master equation. This formulation enables the simulation of complex reaction networks, involving a large number of reactive species much beyond the feasibility limit of any existing method. It provides an equation-based paradigm to the analysis of stochastic networks, complementing the commonly used Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:21568538

  9. Finite order variational bicomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitolo, Raffaele

    1999-01-01

    The theory of variational bicomplexes was established at the end of the seventies by several authors [2, 17, 23, 26, 29-32]. The idea is that the operations which take a Lagrangian into its Euler-Lagrange morphism [9, 10, 12, 24] and an Euler-Lagrange morphism into its Helmholtz' conditions of local variationality [1-3, 7, 11, 13, 18, 27] are morphisms of a (long) exact sheaf sequence. This viewpoint overcomes several problems of Lagrangian formulations in mechanics and field theories [21, 28]. To avoid technical difficulties variational bicomplexes were formulated over the space of infinite jets of a fibred manifold. But in this formalism the information relative to the order of the jet where objects are defined is lost.We refer to the recent formulation of variational bicomplexes on finite order jet spaces [13]. Here, a finite order variational sequence is obtained by quotienting the de Rham sequence on a finite order jet space with an intrinsically defined sub-sequence, whose choice is inspired by the calculus of variations. It is important to find an isomorphism of the quotient sequence with a sequence of sheaves of ‘concrete’ sections of some vector bundle. This task has already been faced locally [22, 25] and intrinsically [33] in the case of one independent variable.In this paper, we give an intrinsic isomorphism of the variational sequence (in the general case of n independent variables) with a sequence which is made by sheaves of forms on a jet space of minimal order. This yields new natural solutions to problems like the minimal order Lagrangian corresponding to a locally variational Euler-Lagrange morphism and the search of variationally trivial Lagrangians. Moreover, we give a new intrinsic formulation of Helmholtz' local variationality conditions, proving the existence of a new intrinsic geometric object which, for an Euler-Lagrange morphism, plays a role analogous to that of the momentum of a Lagrangian.

  10. Electrochemical Li Topotactic Reaction in Layered SnP3 for Superior Li-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Wan; Park, Cheol-Min

    2016-01-01

    The development of new anode materials having high electrochemical performances and interesting reaction mechanisms is highly required to satisfy the need for long-lasting mobile electronic devices and electric vehicles. Here, we report a layer crystalline structured SnP3 and its unique electrochemical behaviors with Li. The SnP3 was simply synthesized through modification of Sn crystallography by combination with P and its potential as an anode material for LIBs was investigated. During Li insertion reaction, the SnP3 anode showed an interesting two-step electrochemical reaction mechanism comprised of a topotactic transition (0.7–2.0 V) and a conversion (0.0–2.0 V) reaction. When the SnP3-based composite electrode was tested within the topotactic reaction region (0.7–2.0 V) between SnP3 and LixSnP3 (x ≤ 4), it showed excellent electrochemical properties, such as a high volumetric capacity (1st discharge/charge capacity was 840/663 mA h cm−3) with a high initial coulombic efficiency, stable cycle behavior (636 mA h cm−3 over 100 cycles), and fast rate capability (550 mA h cm−3 at 3C). This layered SnP3 anode will be applicable to a new anode material for rechargeable LIBs. PMID:27775090

  11. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  12. The Birth Order Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajonc, R. B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the controversy of the relationship between birth order and intellectual performance through a detailed evaluation of the confluence model which assumes that the rate of intellectual growth is a function of the intellectual environment within the family and associated with the special circumstances of last children. (CM)

  13. Word Order in Klamath.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Karen

    The word order in Klamath, a Penutian language of southern Oregon, has been described as almost completely "free". The language is examined in terms of the effect of the relative topicality of arguments on their position preceding or following the verb. The database used for this study consisted of seven Klamath texts from Barker (1963): five…

  14. Education and World Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The impact on educational analysis of mainstream international relations (IR) theories is yet to realize its full potential. The problem of education in relation to the construction of world order is considered in relation to core developments in IR theory since the Second World War. In particular, the global architecture of education is seen as a…

  15. Land and World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mische, Patricia, Ed.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The papers in this publication discuss the land and how what happens to the land affects us. The publication is one in a series of monographs that examine the linkages between local and global concerns and explore alternative world futures. Examples of topics discussed in the papers follow. The paper "Land and World Order" examines implications of…

  16. Higher-order Multiples.

    PubMed

    Stone, Joanne; Kohari, Katherine S

    2015-09-01

    Higher-order multiple gestations have increased since the advent of advanced reproductive technologies. These pregnancies present unique risks to both mothers and fetuses. It is imperative that early diagnosis of chronicity be determined and that proper counseling is performed, so patients understand the risks, evaluation, and management needed.

  17. Order, topology and preference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sertel, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some standard order-related and topological notions, facts, and methods are brought to bear on central topics in the theory of preference and the theory of optimization. Consequences of connectivity are considered, especially from the viewpoint of normally preordered spaces. Examples are given showing how the theory of preference, or utility theory, can be applied to social analysis.

  18. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  19. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  20. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  1. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  2. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  3. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  4. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  5. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-14

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Caratheodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Caratheodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point. PMID:18345872

  7. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Carathéodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Carathéodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point.

  8. Biochemical reaction engineering for redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Wandrey, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions are still a challenge for biochemical engineers. A personal view for the development of this field is given. Cofactor regeneration was an obstacle for quite some time. The first technical breakthrough was achieved with the system formate/formate dehydrogenase for the regeneration of NADH2. In cases where the same enzyme could be used for chiral reduction as well as for cofactor regeneration, isopropanol as a hydrogen source proved to be beneficial. The coproduct (acetone) can be removed by pervaporation. Whole-cell reductions (often yeast reductions) can also be used. By proper biochemical reaction engineering, it is possible to apply these systems in a continuous way. By cloning a formate dehydrogenase and an oxidoreductase "designer bug" can be obtained where formate is used instead of glucose as the hydrogen source. Complex sequences of redox reactions can be established by pathway engineering with a focus on gene overexpression or with a focus on establishing non-natural pathways. The success of pathway engineering can be controlled by measuring cytosolic metabolite concentrations. The optimal exploitation of such systems calls for the integrated cooperation of classical and molecular biochemical engineering.

  9. Developmental strategy of the endoparasite Xenos vesparum (strepsiptera, Insecta): host invasion and elusion of its defense reactions.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Fabio; Giusti, Fabiola; Beani, Laura; Dallai, Romano

    2007-07-01

    To successfully complete its endoparasitic development, the strepsipteran Xenos vesparum needs to elude the defense mechanisms of its host, the wasp Polistes dominulus. SEM and TEM observations after artificial infections allow us to outline the steps of this intimate host-parasite association. Triungulins, the mobile 1st instar larvae of this parasite, are able to "softly" overcome structural barriers of the larval wasp (cuticle and epidermis) without any traumatic reaction at the entry site, to reach the hemocoel where they settle. The parasite molts 48 h later to a 2nd instar larva, which moves away from the 1st instar exuvium, molts twice more without ecdysis (a feature unique to Strepsiptera) and pupates, if male, or develops into a neotenic female. Host encapsulation involves the abandoned 1st larval exuvium, but not the living parasite. In contrast to the usual process of encapsulation, it occurs only 48 h after host invasion or later, and without any melanization. In further experiments, first, we verified Xenos vesparum's ability to reinfect an already parasitized wasp larva. Second, 2nd instar larvae implanted in a new host did not evoke any response by hemocytes. Third, we tested the efficiency of host defense mechanisms by implanting nylon filaments in control larval wasps, excluding any effect due the dynamic behavior of a living parasite; within a few minutes, we observed the beginning of a typical melanotic encapsulation plus an initial melanization in the wound site. We conclude that the immune response of the wasp is manipulated by the parasite, which is able to delay and redirect encapsulation towards a pseudo-target, the exuvia of triungulins, and to elude hemocyte attack through an active suppression of the immune defense and/or a passive avoidance of encapsulation by peculiar surface chemical properties. PMID:17437299

  10. High-order random Raman lasing in a PM fiber with ultimate efficiency and narrow bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Babin, Sergey A; Zlobina, Ekaterina A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Podivilov, Evgeniy V

    2016-01-01

    Random Raman lasers attract now a great deal of attention as they operate in non-active turbid or transparent scattering media. In the last case, single mode fibers with feedback via Rayleigh backscattering generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam. However, such fiber lasers have rather poor spectral and polarization properties, worsening with increasing power and Stokes order. Here we demonstrate a linearly-polarized cascaded random Raman lasing in a polarization-maintaining fiber. The quantum efficiency of converting the pump (1.05 μm) into the output radiation is almost independent of the Stokes order, amounting to 79%, 83%, and 77% for the 1(st) (1.11 μm), 2(nd) (1.17 μm) and 3(rd) (1.23 μm) order, respectively, at the polarization extinction ratio >22 dB for all orders. The laser bandwidth grows with increasing order, but it is almost independent of power in the 1-10 W range, amounting to ~1, ~2 and ~3 nm for orders 1-3, respectively. So, the random Raman laser exhibits no degradation of output characteristics with increasing Stokes order. A theory adequately describing the unique laser features has been developed. Thus, a full picture of the cascaded random Raman lasing in fibers is shown. PMID:26940082

  11. Simplification of high order polynomial calibration model for fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liandong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Weishi; Pan, Chengliang; Xia, Haojie

    2016-10-01

    In fringe projection profilometry systems, high order polynomial calibration models can be employed to improve the accuracy. However, it is not stable to fit a high order polynomial model with least-squares algorithms. In this paper, a novel method is presented to analyze the significance of each polynomial term and simplify the high order polynomial calibration model. Term significance is evaluated by comparing the loading vector elements of the first few principal components which are obtained with the principal component analysis, and trivial terms are identified and neglected from the high order polynomial calibration model. As a result, the high order model is simplified with significant improvement of computation stability and little loss of reconstruction accuracy. An interesting finding is that some terms of 0 and 1st order, as well as some high order terms related to the image direction that is vertical to the phase change direction, are trivial terms for this specific problem. Experimental results are shown to validate of the proposed method.

  12. High-order random Raman lasing in a PM fiber with ultimate efficiency and narrow bandwidth

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Sergey A.; Zlobina, Ekaterina A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.

    2016-01-01

    Random Raman lasers attract now a great deal of attention as they operate in non-active turbid or transparent scattering media. In the last case, single mode fibers with feedback via Rayleigh backscattering generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam. However, such fiber lasers have rather poor spectral and polarization properties, worsening with increasing power and Stokes order. Here we demonstrate a linearly-polarized cascaded random Raman lasing in a polarization-maintaining fiber. The quantum efficiency of converting the pump (1.05 μm) into the output radiation is almost independent of the Stokes order, amounting to 79%, 83%, and 77% for the 1st (1.11 μm), 2nd (1.17 μm) and 3rd (1.23 μm) order, respectively, at the polarization extinction ratio >22 dB for all orders. The laser bandwidth grows with increasing order, but it is almost independent of power in the 1–10 W range, amounting to ~1, ~2 and ~3 nm for orders 1–3, respectively. So, the random Raman laser exhibits no degradation of output characteristics with increasing Stokes order. A theory adequately describing the unique laser features has been developed. Thus, a full picture of the cascaded random Raman lasing in fibers is shown. PMID:26940082

  13. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  14. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  15. Fauna Europaea - Orthopteroid orders.

    PubMed

    Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Bohn, Horst; Haas, Fabian; Willemse, Fer; de Jong, Yde

    2016-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The "Orthopteroid orders" is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups. It contains series of mostly well-known insect orders: Embiodea (webspinners), Dermaptera (earwigs), Phasmatodea (walking sticks), Orthoptera s.s. (grasshoppers, crickets, bush-crickets) and Dictyoptera with the suborders Mantodea (mantids), Blattaria (cockroaches) and Isoptera (termites). For the Orthopteroid orders, data from 35 families containing 1,371 species are included in this paper.

  16. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  17. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  18. Fauna Europaea - Orthopteroid orders.

    PubMed

    Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Bohn, Horst; Haas, Fabian; Willemse, Fer; de Jong, Yde

    2016-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The "Orthopteroid orders" is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups. It contains series of mostly well-known insect orders: Embiodea (webspinners), Dermaptera (earwigs), Phasmatodea (walking sticks), Orthoptera s.s. (grasshoppers, crickets, bush-crickets) and Dictyoptera with the suborders Mantodea (mantids), Blattaria (cockroaches) and Isoptera (termites). For the Orthopteroid orders, data from 35 families containing 1,371 species are included in this paper. PMID:27660531

  19. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  20. An Ion Chamber Dedicated to Carbon NEXAFS: Removal of High-Order X-Rays and Reliable Flux Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.-J.; Yang, Y.-W.; Lee, Kaidee

    2007-02-02

    The difficulty of performing a reliable carbon NEXAFS measurement for thin films and adsorbate systems has long been recognized. The difficulty is typically related to lower S/B, carbon buildup in beamline optics, dirty mesh, presence of the high-order x-rays, etc. To alleviate the experimental difficulty, we have constructed an intensity-monitoring ion chamber situated between the beamline and sample chamber. The ion chamber is filled with argon up to a working pressure of 10-3 Torr and terminated with 0.1 {mu}m thick Ti foils at both ends. Titanium foils and the filled argon gas effectively remove the high-order x-rays. Consequently, the data are acquired with predominant 1st-order x-rays and thus free of the aforementioned interference, leading to a more reliable data analysis.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  2. Dislocation sources in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.; Mecking, H.

    1996-09-01

    An overview on the current understanding of dislocation sources and multiplication mechanisms is made for ordered intermetallic alloys of the L1{sub 2}, B2, and D0{sub 19} structures. In L1{sub 2} alloys, a large disparity of edge/screw segments in their relative mobility reduces the efficiency of a Frank-Read Type multiplication mechanism. In Fe-40%Al of the B2 structure, a variety of dislocation sources are available for <111> slip, including ones resulting from condensation of thermal vacancies. In NiAl with the relatively high APB energy, <100> dislocations may result from the dislocation decomposition reactions, the prismatic punching out from inclusion particles, and/or steps and coated layers of the surface. Internal interfaces often provide sites for dislocation multiplication, e.g., grain boundaries, sub-boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Ga, NiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al, and antiphase domain boundaries in Ti{sub 3}Al. As for the crack tip as a dislocation source, extended SISFs trailed by super-Shockley partials emanating form the cracks in Ni{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Ti are discussed in view of a possible toughening mechanism.

  3. Between order and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutchfield, James P.

    2012-01-01

    What is a pattern? How do we come to recognize patterns never seen before? Quantifying the notion of pattern and formalizing the process of pattern discovery go right to the heart of physical science. Over the past few decades physics' view of nature's lack of structure--its unpredictability--underwent a major renovation with the discovery of deterministic chaos, overthrowing two centuries of Laplace's strict determinism in classical physics. Behind the veil of apparent randomness, though, many processes are highly ordered, following simple rules. Tools adapted from the theories of information and computation have brought physical science to the brink of automatically discovering hidden patterns and quantifying their structural complexity.

  4. Higher order Bezier circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Jin

    1993-01-01

    Rational Bezier and B-spline representations of circles have been heavily publicized. However, all the literature assumes the rational Bezier segments in the homogeneous space are both planar and (equivalent to) quadratic. This creates the illusion that circles can only be achieved by planar and quadratic curves. Circles that are formed by higher order rational Bezier curves which are nonplanar in the homogeneous space are shown. The problem of whether it is possible to represent a complete circle with one Bezier curve is investigated. In addition, some other interesting properties of cubic Bezier arcs are discussed.

  5. Layerwise reaction at a buried interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.A.; DeVries, B. ); Robinson, I.K.; Eng, P.J. )

    1992-10-26

    X-ray diffraction was used to monitor the {ital in} {ital situ} reaction of Pd deposited on Si(111) at room temperature. An ordered silicide forms spontaneously beneath a poorly ordered overlayer. It is commensurate and strained at low coverage, but relaxes to an unstrained state above a critical thickness of 18 A. During both phases of growth sustained intensity oscillations are seen that correspond to a layerwise consumption of the substrate at the buried interface.

  6. The Easy Guide to Accredited Degrees through Correspondence. Earn Your Associates, Bachelors, Masters or Ph.D. from Accredited Colleges and Universities across the United States, While You Study at Home. 1st Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taji, Nancy Lydia

    This guide lists 24 accredited colleges and universities that offer degrees through correspondence courses. The colleges and universities are listed in alphabetical order. Each listing includes the following: name of the institution, a short history, the regional accrediting body by which it is accredited, a brief introduction about how each…

  7. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  8. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  9. Contact reactions to food.

    PubMed

    Killig, Claudia; Werfel, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to foods, spices, and food additives can occur both in occupational and nonoccupational settings in those who grow, handle, prepare, or cook food. Because spices are also utilized in cosmetics and perfumes, other exposures are encountered that can result in adverse cutaneous reactions. This article describes the reaction patterns that can occur upon contact with foods, including irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. The ingestion of culprit foods by sensitized individuals can provoke a generalized eczematous rash, referred to as systemic contact dermatitis. Other contact reactions to food include contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis provoked by high-molecular-weight food proteins often encountered in patients with atopic dermatitis. Phototoxic and photoallergic contact dermatitis are also considered.

  10. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  11. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons.

  12. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  13. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  14. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle. PMID:16722770

  15. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  16. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  17. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  18. Gas-phase chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P. K.; Chatha, J. P. S.; Vohra, K. G.

    1983-08-01

    Chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes such as linallol, geraniol, d-limonene and α-pinene have been studied in the gas phase at low pressures. Methylglyoxal phosphorescence has been observed in the first two reactions. Emissions from HCHO( 1A 2) and glyoxal ( 3A u) are observed in the reaction of ozone with d-limonene and formation of excited glyoxal is found to be first order in ozone. The reaction of ozone with β-pinene gives rise to emission from a α-dicarbonyl compound and this is found to be first order in ozone. The mechanisms for the formation of excited species are proposed.

  19. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  20. Localization protected quantum order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Many body localization occurs in isolated quantum systems, usually with strong disorder, and is marked by absence of dissipation, absence of thermal equilibration, and a memory of the initial conditions that survives in local observables for arbitrarily long times. The many body localized regime is a non-equilibrium, strongly disordered, non-self averaging regime that presents a new frontier for quantum statistical mechanics. In this talk, I point out that there exists a vast zoo of correlated many body localized states of matter, which may be classified using familiar notions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. I will point out that in the many body localized regime, spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur even at high energy densities in one dimensional systems, and topological order can occur even without a bulk gap. I will also discuss the phenomenology of imperfectly isolated many body localized systems, which are weakly coupled to a heat bath. I will conclude with a brief discussion of how these phenomena may best be detected in experiments. Collaborators: David Huse, S.L. Sondhi, Arijeet Pal, Vadim Oganesyan, A.C. Potter, Sarang Gopalakrishnan, S. Johri, R.N. Bhatt.

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction.

    PubMed

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye. The reaction occurred not only at the site of the tattoos (eyebrows and eyelash lines), but also in non-tattooed skin (bilateral malar cheeks).Methods and MaterialsWe reviewed PubMed for the following terms: cosmetic, dye, granuloma, granulomatous, lichenoid, lymphocytic, perivascular, pigment, pseudolymphoma, reaction, and tattoo. We also reviewed papers containing these terms and their references.ResultsHistopathologic examination of the left eyebrow and left cheek punch biopsies showed predominantly a perivascular lymphocytic reaction secondary to exogenous tattoo pigment.ConclusionsPerivascular lymphocytic reaction is an uncommonly described complication of tattooing. Our patient had an atypical presentation since she had no prior tattoos, became symptomatic only a few days after the procedure, reacted to black dye, and involved skin both within and outside the confines of the tattoos. Her symptoms and lesions resolved after treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. PMID:27617722

  3. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  4. Crystal blocking in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    del Campo, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal blocking technique, used to measure very short lifetime (10/sup -18/ sec), was developed during the 1960's primarily in connection with the study of the channeling effect. Early blocking lifetime measurements involved light ion resonance reactions yielding typical lifetime values down to the order of 10/sup -17/ sec. Recently, studies of heavy-ion induced fission and fusion have extended the technique into the 10/sup -18/ to 10/sup -19/ sec scale. In this work measurements of fusion for /sup 16/O + Ge and deep inelastic reactions for /sup 28/Si + Ge are presented for bombarding energies around 8 nucleon. Also measurements of the projectile fragmenatation of 44 MeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar + Ge are discussed. In all reactions studied the presence of particle evaporation is the dominant mechanism that determines the reaction times of about 10/sup -18/ sec extracted with the blocking technique. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  6. Order without design.

    PubMed

    Kurakin, Alexei

    2010-04-14

    Experimental reality in molecular and cell biology, as revealed by advanced research technologies and methods, is manifestly inconsistent with the design perspective on the cell, thus creating an apparent paradox: where do order and reproducibility in living systems come from if not from design? I suggest that the very idea of biological design (whether evolutionary or intelligent) is a misconception rooted in the time-honored and thus understandably precious error of interpreting living systems/organizations in terms of classical mechanics and equilibrium thermodynamics. This error, introduced by the founders and perpetuated due to institutionalization of science, is responsible for the majority of inconsistencies, contradictions, and absurdities plaguing modern sciences, including one of the most startling paradoxes - although almost everyone agrees that any living organization is an open nonequilibrium system of continuous energy/matter flow, almost everyone interprets and models living systems/organizations in terms of classical mechanics, equilibrium thermodynamics, and engineering, i.e., in terms and concepts that are fundamentally incompatible with the physics of life. The reinterpretation of biomolecules, cells, organisms, ecosystems, and societies in terms of open nonequilibrium organizations of energy/matter flow suggests that, in the domain of life, order and reproducibility do not come from design. Instead, they are natural and inevitable outcomes of self-organizing activities of evolutionary successful, and thus persistent, organizations co-evolving on multiple spatiotemporal scales as biomolecules, cells, organisms, ecosystems, and societies. The process of self-organization on all scales is driven by economic competition, obeys empirical laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, and is facilitated and, thus, accelerated by memories of living experience persisting in the form of evolutionary successful living organizations and their constituents.

  7. Birth order and myopia

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; McMahon, George; Northstone, Kate; Mandel, Yossi; Kaiserman, Igor; Stone, Richard A.; Lin, Xiaoyu; Saw, Seang Mei; Forward, Hannah; Mackey, David A.; Yazar, Seyhan; Young, Terri L.; Williams, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An association between birth order and reduced unaided vision (a surrogate for myopia) has been observed previously. We examined the association between birth order and myopia directly in 4 subject groups. Methods Subject groups were participants in 1) the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC; UK; age 15 years; N=4,401), 2) the Singapore Cohort Study of Risk Factors for Myopia (SCORM; Singapore; age 13 years; N=1,959), 3) the Raine Eye Health Study (REHS; Australia; age 20 years; N=1,344), and 4) Israeli Defense Force recruitment candidates (IDFC; Israel; age 16-22 years; N=888,277). Main outcome: Odds ratio (OR) for myopia in first born versus non-first born individuals after adjusting for potential risk factors. Results The prevalence of myopia was numerically higher in first-born versus non-first-born individuals in all study groups, but the strength of evidence varied widely. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) were: ALSPAC, 1.31 (1.05-1.64); SCORM, 1.25 (0.89-1.77); REHS, 1.18 (0.90-1.55); IDFC, 1.04 (1.03-1.06). In the large IDFC sample, the effect size was greater (a) for the first born versus fourth or higher born comparison than for the first born versus second/third born comparison (P<0.001) and (b) with increasing myopia severity (P<0.001). Conclusions Across all studies, the increased risk of myopia in first born individuals was low (OR <1.3). Indeed, only the studies with >4000 participants provided strong statistical support for the association. The available evidence suggested the relationship was independent of established risk factors such as time outdoors/reading, and thus may arise through a different causal mechanism. PMID:24168726

  8. Search for the First-Order Liquid-to-Liquid Phase Transition in Low-Temperature Confined Water by Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the alpha-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  9. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  10. An extension of first order limit language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2014-06-01

    The study on cutting and pasting of DNA molecules under the framework of Formal Language Theory has led to the mathematical modelling of splicing system. The output of splicing system is the splicing language which can be categorized into three types: adult or inert persistent, transient and limit language. In the biological point of view, limit language is predicted to appear after the reaction of DNA molecules and enzyme with the existence of appropriate ligase reached the equilibrium state. In this research, the second order limit language is investigated. It is defined as the distinct language after splicing occurs among the resulting splicing language of the first order splicing language. Besides that, the characteristics of second order limit language are observed based on the properties of the crossing sites of the rules such as left or right context and palindromic via Y-G approach. The results lead to some examples and theorems which are presented in this paper.

  11. 48 CFR 53.216-1 - Delivery orders and orders under basic ordering agreements (OF 347).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under basic ordering agreements (OF 347). 53.216-1 Section 53.216-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Delivery orders and orders under basic ordering agreements (OF 347). OF 347, Order for Supplies or Services. OF 347, prescribed in 53.213(f), (or an approved agency form) may be used to place orders...

  12. A characterization of the two-step reaction mechanism of phenol decomposition by a Fenton reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, Cristian; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Osorio, Edison; Villaseñor, Jorge; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Phenol is one of the worst contaminants at date, and its degradation has been a crucial task over years. Here, the decomposition process of phenol, in a Fenton reaction, is described. Using scavengers, it was observed that decomposition of phenol was mainly influenced by production of hydroxyl radicals. Experimental and theoretical activation energies (Ea) for phenol oxidation intermediates were calculated. According to these Ea, phenol decomposition is a two-step reaction mechanism mediated predominantly by hydroxyl radicals, producing a decomposition yield order given as hydroquinone > catechol > resorcinol. Furthermore, traces of reaction derived acids were detected by HPLC and GS-MS.

  13. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron–induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  14. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  15. An Experiment To Demonstrate How a Catalyst Affects the Rate of a Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copper, Christine L.; Koubeck, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Describes a chemistry experiment that allows students to calculate rates of reaction, orders of reaction, and activation energies. The activity demonstrates that to increase a reaction's rate, a catalyst need only provide any additional pathway for the reaction, not necessarily a pathway having lower activation energy. (WRM)

  16. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens.

  17. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  18. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  19. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Dogra, A; Minocha, Y C; Kaur, S

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly shaving creams caused more reaction as compared to other cosmetics. Overall incidence of contact allergic dermatitis seen was 3.3% with patients own cosmetics. Patch testing was also done with the basic ingredients and showed positive results in few cases where casual link could be established. It is recommended that labeling of the cosmetics should be done to help the dermatologists and the patients to identify the causative allergen in cosmetic preparation.

  20. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  1. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  2. Resilience in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, J. H.

    1999-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems with zero-flux Neumann boundaries are widely used to model various kinds of interaction in, for example, the scientific fields of ecology, biology, chemistry, medicine and industry. The physical systems within these fields are often known to be (conditionally or unconditionally) resilient with respect to shocks, disturbances or catastrophies in the immediate environment. In order to be good mathematical models of such situations the reaction-diffusion systems must have the same resilient or asymptotic behaviour as that of the physical situation. Three fundamentally different kinds of reaction terms are usually distinguished according to the entry signs of the reaction Jacobian: mutualism, mixed (predator-prey) interaction and competition. The asymptotic stability (in the Poincare sense) of mutualistic systems has already been studied extensively, but the results cannot be generalized (globally) to the other two fundamental types, which are not order-preserving. A partial (local) generalization is, however given here for these two types, involving simple Jacobian inequalities and knowledge (often prompted by the underlying physical situation) of invariant sets in solution space. The return time of resilient systems and the approach rate of asymptotically stable solutions are also estimated. Key words: reaction-diffusion system; competition; resilience; asymptotic stability.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  5. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  6. Clinical experience and results of treatment with suprofen in pediatrics. 1st communication: Suprofen dosage for children/An open and a double-blind study with suprofen syrup.

    PubMed

    Weippl, G; Michos, N; Bolla, K; Stocker, H

    1985-01-01

    The antipyretic effect of single doses of alpha-methyl-4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)-phenyl acetic acid (suprofen, Suprol) syrup, administered at dose levels of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7.5, and 10 mg/kg b.w., was tested in a randomized double-blind and a subsequent open study. The test populations consisted of 100 children in the double-blind study and 40 patients in the open test (20 subjects/group). The patients' age ranged from 2 to 12 years; the lowest initial rectal temperature was 39.0 degrees C. The treatment groups were homogeneous as to demographic data. The temperature was reduced in all treatment groups. In the double-blind study the mean value dropped under the subfebrile threshold of 38.0 degrees C only in the group on 5 mg/kg and remained then constant for up to 6 h following administration. No sufficient antipyretic effect was obtained with lower doses. The results of the additional open study with doses of 7.5 and 10 mg/kg indicated good antipyretic effect. This effect was not, however, superior to that obtained with 5 mg/kg. Pulse and respiratory rates returned to normal within 1.5 h following administration, except in patients on 1 mg/kg. A total of 10 patients, homogeneously distributed in the treatment groups, experienced vomiting as an adverse reaction. Short-term hypotonia was seen in one subject on 7.5 mg/kg. The results obtained show that single doses of suprofen upward of 5 mg/kg b.w. exert satisfactory, long-lasting, antipyretic effect on children. PMID:3911961

  7. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... order; DNR; DNR order; Advance care directive - DNR; Health care agent - DNR; Health care proxy - DNR; End-of-life - DNR; Living ... medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ...

  8. Techniques used to study the DNA polymerase reaction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A minimal reaction pathway for DNA polymerases was established over 20 years ago using chemical quench methods. Since that time there has been considerable interest in noncovalent steps in the reaction pathway, conformational changes involving the polymerase or its DNA substrate that may play a role in substrate specificity. Fluorescence-based assays have been devised in order to study these conformational transitions and the results obtained have added new detail to the reaction pathway. PMID:19665596

  9. Accessing reaction rate constants in on-column reaction chromatography: an extended unified equation for reaction educts and products with different response factors.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Oliver; Bremer, Sabrina; Weber, Sven K

    2009-11-01

    An extension of the unified equation of chromatography to directly access reaction rate constants k(1) of first-order reaction in on-column chromatography is presented. This extended equation reflects different response factors in the detection of the reaction educt and product which arise from structural changes by elimination or addition, e.g., under pseudo-first-order reaction conditions. The reaction rate constants k(1) and Gibbs activation energies DeltaG(double dagger) of first-order reactions taking place in a chromatographic system can be directly calculated from the chromatographic parameters, i.e., retention times of the educt E and product P (t(R)(A) and t(R)(B)), peak widths at half height (w(A) and w(B)), the relative plateau height (h(p)) of the conversion profile, and the individual response factors f(A) and f(B). The evaluation of on-column reaction gas chromatographic experiments is exemplified by the evaluation of elution profiles obtained by ring-closing metathesis reaction of N,N-diallytrifluoroacetamide in presence of Grubbs second-generation catalyst, dissolved in polydimethylsiloxane (GE SE 30).

  10. Radiation Reaction and Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James

    2007-07-11

    In recent years high power high irradiance lasers of peta-watt order have been or are under construction. In addition, in the next 10 years lasers of unprecedented powers, exa-watt, could be built If lasers such as these are focused to very small spot sizes, extremely high laser irradiances will be achieved. When electrons interact with such a laser, they become highly relativistic over very short time and spatial scales. Usually the motion of an electron under the influence of electromagnetic fields is influenced to a small extent by radiation emission from acceleration. However, under such violent acceleration the amount of radiation emitted by electrons can become so large that significant damping of the electron motion by the emission of this radiation can occur. In this lecture note we will study this problem of radiation reaction by first showing how the equations of motion are obtained. Then, we will examine the problems with such equations and what approximations are made. We will specifically examine the effects of radiation reaction on the Thomson scattering of radiation from counter-streaming laser pulses and high energy electrons through the numerical integration of the equations of motion. We will briefly address the fundamental physics, which can be addressed by using such high irradiance lasers interacting with high energy electrons.

  11. 49 CFR 453.3 - Detention orders and other orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Detention orders and other orders. 453.3 Section 453.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY SAFETY APPROVAL OF CARGO CONTAINERS CONTROL AND ENFORCEMENT § 453.3 Detention orders and other orders. (a) The terms of...

  12. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Products at Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the evidence for LENR occurring on or very near to the surface of materials. Several types of experimental indications for LENR surface reactions have been reported and will be reviewed. LENR result in two types of products, energy and the appearance of new elements. The level of instantaneous power production can be written as the product of four factors: (1) the total area of the surface on which the reactions can occur, (2) the fraction of the area that is active at any time, (3) the reaction rate, that is, the number of reactions per unit active area per second, and (4) the energy produced per reaction. Each of these factors, and their limits, are reviewed. A graphical means of relating these four factors over their wide variations has been devised. The instantaneous generation of atoms of new elements can also be written as the product of the first three factors and the new elemental mass produced per reaction. Again, a graphical means of presenting the factors and their results over many orders of magnitude has been developed.

  13. Time-Ordered Product Expansions for Computational Stochastic Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The time-ordered product framework of quantum field theory can also be used to understand salient phenomena in stochastic biochemical networks. It is used here to derive Gillespie’s Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) for chemical reaction networks; consequently, the SSA can be interpreted in terms of Feynman diagrams. It is also used here to derive other, more general simulation and parameter-learning algorithms including simulation algorithms for networks of stochastic reaction-like processes operating on parameterized objects, and also hybrid stochastic reaction/differential equation models in which systems of ordinary differ-ential equations evolve the parameters of objects that can also undergo stochastic reactions. Thus, the time-ordered product expansion (TOPE) can be used systematically to derive simulation and parameter-fitting algorithms for stochastic systems. PMID:23735739

  14. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  15. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  16. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  17. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  18. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Gendler, E

    1987-06-01

    Adverse reactions to cosmetics can be irritant or allergic and are most often caused by fragrances or preservatives. Preservatives include formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, and parabens. Other agents that cause allergy are paraphenylenediamine in hair dyes and toluene sulfonamide formaldehyde resin in nail polishes.

  19. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  20. Family reaction to homicide.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A N

    1975-04-01

    This pilot study identifies a two-phased syndrome experienced by families of homicide victims. The crisis phase consists of an acute grief process, including immediate reactions to the homicide, the funeral details, and police investigations. The long-term reorganization phase includes the psychological issues of bereavement and the socio-legal issues of the criminal justice process. PMID:1146971