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Sample records for 1st week group

  1. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  2. What Do 1st Year Japanese EFL Students Learn by Preparing and Presenting a Group Work Oriented Oral Presentation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leichsenring, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This small-scale qualitative study aimed at identifying factors and the extent of their influence upon the learning experiences of first year Japanese undergraduate students in a group work oriented oral presentation using English as their second language (ESL). Research findings were obtained from students through their participation in written…

  3. [Quantitative makeup of the gastrointestinal flora of piglets in the 1st 2 weeks of life. 2. The development of the gastrointestinal flora in primary specific-pathogen-free piglets].

    PubMed

    Schulze, F; Bocklisch, H; Kielstein, P; Schimmel, D; Sattler, H G

    1980-01-01

    Quantitative germ flora analyses were applied to 22 SPF piglets, aged between four hours and 14 days, to follow up the development of their gastro-intestinal flora. The development of a fairly stable gastro-intestinal flora was delayed. Escherichia coli strains were isolated from SPF piglets which had died following diarrhoea and septicaemia, but they did not fall in those E. coli sero-groups known for pathogenicity to swine. The outcome of raising was greatly stabilised and amounted to about 70 per cent by administration of something between 80 ml and 100 ml of radiation-sterilised sow colostrum.

  4. Reclaiming the Maiden: Use of Archetypes in a 6-Week Women's Empowerment Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anneliese; Hofsess, Christy D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a 6-week, semi-structured group counseling experience for university women students (undergraduate and graduate) from diverse backgrounds exploring archetypes and using group empowerment skills. Theoretical perspectives on women's empowerment groups and the use of archetypes in counseling are discussed as…

  5. Taming the Anxious Mind: An 8-Week Mindfulness Meditation Group at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an eight-week mindfulness meditation-based group that took place at a university counseling center. The group is patterned after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Group members are taught…

  6. "Hard Science" for Gifted 1st Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGennaro, April

    2006-01-01

    "Hard Science" is designed to teach 1st grade gifted students accurate and high level science concepts. It is based upon their experience of the world and attempts to build a foundation for continued love and enjoyment of science. "Hard Science" provides field experiences and opportunities for hands-on discovery working beside experts in the field…

  7. Lock No. 1 St. Lucie Canal. Sector gates, internal struts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock No. 1- St. Lucie Canal. Sector gates, internal struts- nose beams. - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  8. Macroscopic lithotype characterisation of the 1st Middle-Polish (1st Lusatian) Lignite Seam in the Miocene of central Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widera, Marek

    2012-03-01

    The 1st Middle-Polish (1st Lusatian) Lignite Seam is exploited in open-cast mines in central Poland. A large number of lignite lithotypes, grouped in four lithotype associations, are distinguished: xylitic, detritic, xylo-detritic and detro-xylitic lithotype associations, which show various structures. Each lithotype association was produced under specific peat-forming environmental conditions. In the case of the lignite seams under study they represent all the main environments that are known from Neogene mires, i.e.: fen or open water, bush moor, wet forest swamp and dry forest swamp. For a simple and practical description in the field of both the lignite sections and borehole cores, a new codification for lignite lithotypes is proposed. It is based on the codification of clastic deposits (lithofacies). The practical value of the new lignite lithotype codification is examined in three vertical sections of the 1st Middle-Polish Lignite Seam.

  9. WMS-III Logical Memory performance after a two-week delay in temporal lobe epilepsy and control groups.

    PubMed

    Bell, Brian D

    2006-11-01

    Conventional memory assessment may fail to identify memory dysfunction that is characterized by intact recall for a relatively brief period but rapid forgetting thereafter. This study assessed immediate memory and retention after 30-minute and two-week delays in a control group (n = 25) and a group of individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, n = 25). For raw free recall, thematic unit, and recognition memory scores from the Wechsler Memory Scale-3rd ed. (WMS-III) Logical Memory (LM) subtest, there were no group x trial interactions and the TLE group performed significantly worse than the controls on all trials. At the individual level, none of the patients (0%) demonstrated isolated free recall impairment at the two-week delay when raw scores were analyzed, and one patient (4%) but also five controls (20%) did so when percent retention scores were examined. In summary, TLE patients did not demonstrate disproportionate forgetting over two weeks on a widely used story memory test.

  10. Consequences for Piglet Performance of Group Housing Lactating Sows at One, Two, or Three Weeks Post-Farrowing

    PubMed Central

    Thomsson, Ola; Sjunnesson, Ylva; Magnusson, Ulf; Eliasson-Selling, Lena; Wallenbeck, Anna; Bergqvist, Ann-Sofi

    2016-01-01

    Housing lactating sows with piglets in a multi-suckling pen from around 14 days post-farrowing is common practice in Swedish organic piglet production. However, nursing-suckling interaction is less frequent in multi-suckling pens than in individual farrowing pens, thus affecting piglet performance, e.g., piglet growth. Moreover, piglet mortality is higher in systems using multi-suckling pens. Three management routines whereby lactating sows with piglets were moved from individual farrowing pens to multi-suckling pens at one, two, or three weeks post-farrowing were compared in terms of nursing-suckling interaction and piglet performance. Correlations between nursing-suckling interaction, piglet performance, and piglet mortality were also examined. In total, 43 Yorkshire sows with piglets were included in the study. Nursing-suckling interaction and all piglet performance parameters except piglet mortality did not differ between management routines. Piglet mortality in the individual farrowing pens did not differ between management routines, but piglet mortality in the multi-suckling pen was lower (P<0.05) when piglets were group housed at three weeks compared with one week post-farrowing. Overall piglet mortality was positively correlated with mortality in the multi-suckling pen for piglets group housed at one week (r = 0.61: P<0.05) and at two weeks post-farrowing (r = 0.62: P<0.05) but not for piglets group housed at three weeks post-farrowing. In conclusion, overall piglet mortality could be reduced if sows and piglets are group housed at three weeks post-farrowing and piglet survival the first week post-farrowing is improved. PMID:27258149

  11. Consequences for Piglet Performance of Group Housing Lactating Sows at One, Two, or Three Weeks Post-Farrowing.

    PubMed

    Thomsson, Ola; Sjunnesson, Ylva; Magnusson, Ulf; Eliasson-Selling, Lena; Wallenbeck, Anna; Bergqvist, Ann-Sofi

    2016-01-01

    Housing lactating sows with piglets in a multi-suckling pen from around 14 days post-farrowing is common practice in Swedish organic piglet production. However, nursing-suckling interaction is less frequent in multi-suckling pens than in individual farrowing pens, thus affecting piglet performance, e.g., piglet growth. Moreover, piglet mortality is higher in systems using multi-suckling pens. Three management routines whereby lactating sows with piglets were moved from individual farrowing pens to multi-suckling pens at one, two, or three weeks post-farrowing were compared in terms of nursing-suckling interaction and piglet performance. Correlations between nursing-suckling interaction, piglet performance, and piglet mortality were also examined. In total, 43 Yorkshire sows with piglets were included in the study. Nursing-suckling interaction and all piglet performance parameters except piglet mortality did not differ between management routines. Piglet mortality in the individual farrowing pens did not differ between management routines, but piglet mortality in the multi-suckling pen was lower (P<0.05) when piglets were group housed at three weeks compared with one week post-farrowing. Overall piglet mortality was positively correlated with mortality in the multi-suckling pen for piglets group housed at one week (r = 0.61: P<0.05) and at two weeks post-farrowing (r = 0.62: P<0.05) but not for piglets group housed at three weeks post-farrowing. In conclusion, overall piglet mortality could be reduced if sows and piglets are group housed at three weeks post-farrowing and piglet survival the first week post-farrowing is improved.

  12. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  13. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  14. ISS Update: 1st Annual ISS R&D Conference

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries talks by phone on Wednesday with Julie Robinson, ISS Program Scientist, about the 1st Annual International Space Station Research and Development Confere...

  15. 1st Baby Born with DNA from 3 Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_161176.html 1st Baby Born With DNA From 3 Parents Technique designed to help couples ... be born using a controversial technique that combines DNA from three people -- two women and a man. ...

  16. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Exondys 51 seems to fill unmet need for ... the first drug for a rare form of muscular dystrophy. Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) was granted accelerated approval to ...

  17. 14 Week Group Counselling Proposal for Increasing Self-Esteem in Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Katherine; Mills, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    This psychoeducational counselling group is designed to explore the many facets of the emerging female adolescent identity and foster a high level of self-esteem. According to Powell (2004) adolescence is a time, and even more so for females, which can be marked by many identity conflicts and low levels of self-esteem. As such, this 14 week…

  18. 1st HPV Test for Use with Preservative Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159789.html 1st HPV Test for Use With Preservative Fluid Human papillomavirus responsible for 70 percent of ... Roberts Friday, July 8, 2016 FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Roche's cobas HPV ...

  19. RETURN TO DIVISION IA FOOTBALL FOLLOWING A 1ST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT DORSAL DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Chad; Zarzour, Hap; Moorman, Claude T.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Although rare in occurrence, a dorsal dislocation of the 1st metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint has been successfully treated using surgical and/or non-operative treatment. No descriptions of conservative intervention following a dorsal dislocation of the MTP joint in an athlete participating in a high contact sport are present in the literature. Objectives. The purpose of this case report is to describe the intervention and clinical reasoning during the rehabilitative process of a collegiate football player diagnosed with a 1st MTP joint dorsal dislocation. The plan of care and return to play criteria used for this athlete are presented. Case Description. The case involved a 19-year-old male Division IA football player, who suffered a traumatic dorsal dislocation of the 1st MTP joint during practice. The dislocation was initially treated on-site by closed reduction. Non-operative management included immobilization, therapeutic exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, manual treatment, modalities, prophylactic athletic taping, gait training, and a sport specific progression program for full return to Division IA football. Outcomes. Discharge from physical therapy occurred after six weeks of treatment. At discharge, no significant deviations existed during running, burst, and agility related drills. At a six-month follow-up, the patient reported full return to all football activities including contact drills without restrictions. Discussion. This case describes an effective six-week rehabilitation intervention for a collegiate football player who sustained a traumatic great toe dorsal dislocation. Further study is suggested to evaluate the intervention strategies and timeframe for return to contact sports. PMID:21589669

  20. ["1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital" during the civil war].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G

    2014-04-01

    The article presents the documentary information about the founding, the establishment and early years of the 1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital - in the future - Mandryka Central Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. Presented the work of the Hospital during the dificult period of the Civil War, typhus epidemic, famine and devastation. Specified its staffing structure, command, medical and administrative staff, travel and accommodation till the moment of the deployment in the Silver Lane in Moscow. PMID:25051792

  1. The 1st All-Russian Workshop on Archaeoastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, Nikolai G.

    2007-08-01

    The 1st All-Russia Workshop on Archaeoastronomy “Astronomical and World-Outlook Meaning of the Archaeological Monuments of South Ural” was held on June 19-25, 2006, at the ground of the archaeological center “Arkaim” (Chelyabinsk Region). Besides about 30 talks, astronomical measurements were performed at two archaeological objects under intensive study: Arkaim Site (Bronze Epoch, XVIII-XVI c. B.C.) and tumuli “with whiskers” complex Kondurovsky (V-VIII c. A.D.). The promising character of the megalithic complex on the Vera Island (Lake Turgoyak) was stated.

  2. 1st Stage Separation Aerodynamics Of VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genito, M.; Paglia, F.; Mogavero, A.; Barbagallo, D.

    2011-05-01

    VEGA is an European launch vehicle under development by the Prime Contractor ELV S.p.A. in the frame of an ESA contract. It is constituted by four stages, dedicated to the scientific/commercial market of small satellites (300 ÷ 2500 kg) into Low Earth Orbits, with inclinations ranging from 5.2° up to Sun Synchronous Orbits and with altitude ranging from 300 to 1500 km. Aim of this paper is to present a study of flow field due to retro-rockets impingement during the 1st stage VEGA separation phase. In particular the main goal of the present work is to present the aerodynamic activities performed for the justification of the separation phase.

  3. THEOS: The1st Thailand EO System and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peanvijarnpong, Chanchai

    Thailand has engaged in remote sensing satellite technological and scientific development many years since early 1980s. Thailand Landsat Station was established as a regional center of data processing and dissemination for Thai scientists for data applications. Over the years, GISTDA and Thai user community have been gaining technical experience and expertise in satellite data applications around the country such natural resources and environmental management, forest inventory, forest change detections, soil mapping, land-use and land cover mapping, crop type mapping, coastal shrimp farming, flood zone mapping, base mapping, water and drought management. The Government of Thailand realizes that remote sensing satellite technology is an important mechanism for social and economic development of the country. So the 1st Thailand Earth Observation System (THEOS) development program was approved by the Government since 2003. THEOS system is sub-synchronous satellite orbiting around the earth at 822 km. altitude same as SPOT satellites. It carries two imaging instruments; 2-m Panchromatic telescope with 22 km. swath width and 15-m resolution camera with four-multi-spectral band and 90-km swath wide. THEOS is scheduled to launch around March 2008. A number of technological and scientific activities has been implementing for Thailand and international scientific user community. Therefore THEOS is strong endorsement from the Government of Thailand on the value of remote sensing technology. This paper presents Thailand EO activities including THEOS System and its plans.

  4. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  5. 94. DETAIL, SAME BEAN AS ABOVE, MARKED 'PATENTED DEC. 1ST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. DETAIL, SAME BEAN AS ABOVE, MARKED 'PATENTED DEC. 1ST 1857' - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Meeting report for the 1st skin microbiota workshop, boulder, CO October 15-16 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Skin Microbiota Workshop, Boulder, CO, held on October 15th-16th 2012. The workshop was arranged to bring Department of Defense personnel together with experts in microbial ecology, human skin physiology and anatomy, and computational techniques for interrogating the microbiome to define research frontiers at the intersection of these important areas. The workshop outlined a series of questions and created several working groups to address those questions, specifically to promote interdisciplinary activity and potential future collaboration. The US Army provided generous grant support and the meeting was organized and hosted by the University of Colorado at Boulder. A primary forward vision of the meeting was the importance of understanding skin microbial communities to improve the health and stealth of US Army warfighters.

  7. Educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop on 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M A; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Harfush, L A; Navarro-Zarza, J E; Canoso, J J; Cruz-Domínguez, P; Vargas, A; Hernández-Díaz, C; Chiapas-Gasca, K; Camacho-Galindo, J; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Kalish, R A

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop in 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. First-year rheumatology fellows (N = 17) and a convenience sample of 1st-year orthopedic fellows (N = 14) from Mexico City in the 9th month of training participated in the study. The pre- and the post- workshop tests included the same 20 questions that had to be answered by identification or demonstration of relevant anatomical items. The questions, arranged by anatomical regions, were asked in five dynamic stations. Overall, the 31 participants showed an increase of correct answers, from a median of 6 (range 1 to 12) in the pre-workshop test, to a median of 14 (range 7 to 19) in the post-workshop test. In the pre-workshop test, the correct median answers were 7 (range 2 to 12) in the orthopedic fellows and 5 (range 1 to 10) in the rheumatology fellows (p = 0.297). Corresponding scores in the post-workshop were 15 (range 10 to 19) and 12 (range 7 to 18) (p = 0.026) showing a significant difference favoring the orthopedic group. Our clinical anatomy workshop was efficacious, in the short term, as a teaching instrument for 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. The post-workshop scores, although significantly improved in both groups, particularly in the orthopedic fellows, were still suboptimal. Further refinements of our workshop might yield better results.

  8. Proceedings of the 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Edna; Robb, James A.; Stefanoff, Gustavo; Mellado, Robert Hunter; Coppola, Domenico; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Flores, Idhaliz

    2015-01-01

    The 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop took place on August 20th, 2014 in the Auditorium of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan Puerto Rico. The program for this 1-day, live workshop included lectures by three biobanking experts, followed by presentations from existing biobanks in Puerto Rico and audience discussion. The need for increasing biobanking expertise in Puerto Rico stems from the fact that Hispanics in general are underrepresented in the biobanks in existence in the US, which limits the research conducted specifically to understand the molecular differences in cancer cells compared to other better studied populations. In turn, this lack of information impairs the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our population. Dr. James Robb, M.D., F.C.A.P., consulting pathologist to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR), opened the workshop with a discussion on the basic aspects of the science of biobanking (e.g., what is a biobank; its goals and objectives; protocols and procedures) in his talk addressing the importance of banking tissues for advancing biomedical research. Next, Dr. Gustavo Stefanoff, from the Cancer Institutes Network of Latin America (RINC by its name in Spanish), explained the mission, objectives, and structure of the Network of Latin-American and Caribbean Biobanks (REBLAC by its name in Spanish), which despite limited resources and many challenges, currently accrue high quality human tissue specimens and data to support cancer research in the region. Dr. Robert Hunter-Mellado, Professor of Internal Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, followed with an examination of the ethical and regulatory aspects of biobanking tissues for future research, including informed consent of subjects; protection of human subjects rights; and balancing risks and benefit ratios. In the afternoon, the

  9. Psychiatric Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for 1st and 2nd Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell-Swanson, La Vonne; Frankenberger, William; Ley, Katie; Bowman, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the proportion of children in 1st and 2nd grade classes who were currently prescribed medication for psychotropic disorders. The study also examined the attitudes of 1st and 2nd grade teachers toward diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and use of psychiatric medication to treat children. Results of the current study indicate…

  10. Levels of innate immune factors in preterm and term mothers' breast milk during the 1st month postpartum.

    PubMed

    Trend, Stephanie; Strunk, Tobias; Lloyd, Megan L; Kok, Chooi Heen; Metcalfe, Jessica; Geddes, Donna T; Lai, Ching Tat; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A; Simmer, Karen; Currie, Andrew

    2016-04-14

    There is a paucity of data on the effect of preterm birth on the immunological composition of breast milk throughout the different stages of lactation. We aimed to characterise the effects of preterm birth on the levels of immune factors in milk during the 1st month postpartum, to determine whether preterm milk is deficient in antimicrobial factors. Colostrum (days 2-5 postpartum), transitional milk (days 8-12) and mature milk (days 26-30) were collected from mothers of extremely preterm (<28 weeks of gestation, n 15), very preterm (28-<32 weeks of gestation, n 15), moderately preterm (32-<37 weeks of gestation, n 15) and term infants (37-41 weeks of gestation, n 15). Total protein, lactoferrin, secretory IgA, soluble CD14 receptor (sCD14), transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), α defensin 5 (HD5), β defensins 1 (HBD1) and 2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, interferon-γ, TNF-α and lysozyme (LZ) were quantified in milk. We examined the effects of lactation stage, gestational age, volume of milk expressed, mode of delivery, parity and maternal infection on milk immune factor concentrations using repeated-measures regression analysis. The concentrations of all factors except LZ and HD5 decreased over the 1st month postpartum. Extremely preterm mothers had significantly higher concentrations of HBD1 and TGF-β2 in colostrum than term mothers did. After controlling for other variables in regression analyses, preterm birth was associated with higher concentrations of HBD1, LZ and sCD14 in milk samples. In conclusion, preterm breast milk contains significantly higher concentrations of some immune proteins than term breast milk.

  11. The 1st European Summer School on 'proteomic basics'--the students view. 12-18 August, 2007 Kloster Neustift, Brixen/Bressanone, South Tyrol, Italy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Emily S; Little, Samantha J

    2008-01-01

    Fifty postgraduate and postdoctoral delegates from all over Europe attended the week-long '1st European Summer School on Proteomic Basics' in Kloster Neustift in the Italian South Tyrol in August 2007. Invited proteomics experts gave tutorial lectures on Proteomics techniques with an emphasis on sample preparation, protein separation and purification in the first of an annual series of Proteomics Summer Schools funded by the EU and the Volkswagen Stiftung.

  12. The 1st European Summer School on 'proteomic basics'--the students view. 12-18 August, 2007 Kloster Neustift, Brixen/Bressanone, South Tyrol, Italy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Emily S; Little, Samantha J

    2008-01-01

    Fifty postgraduate and postdoctoral delegates from all over Europe attended the week-long '1st European Summer School on Proteomic Basics' in Kloster Neustift in the Italian South Tyrol in August 2007. Invited proteomics experts gave tutorial lectures on Proteomics techniques with an emphasis on sample preparation, protein separation and purification in the first of an annual series of Proteomics Summer Schools funded by the EU and the Volkswagen Stiftung. PMID:18203275

  13. Creating Research-Rich Learning Experiences and Quantitative Skills in a 1st Year Earth Systems Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. L.; Eggins, S.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are creating a 1st year Earth Systems course at the Australian National University that is built around research-rich learning experiences and quantitative skills. The course has top students including ≤20% indigenous/foreign students; nonetheless, students' backgrounds in math and science vary considerably posing challenges for learning. We are addressing this issue and aiming to improve knowledge retention and deep learning by changing our teaching approach. In 2013-2014, we modified the weekly course structure to a 1hr lecture; a 2hr workshop with hands-on activities; a 2hr lab; an assessment piece covering all face-to-face activities; and a 1hr tutorial. Our new approach was aimed at: 1) building student confidence with data analysis and quantitative skills through increasingly difficult tasks in science, math, physics, chemistry, climate science and biology; 2) creating effective learning groups using name tags and a classroom with 8-person tiered tables; 3) requiring students to apply new knowledge to new situations in group activities, two 1-day field trips and assessment items; 4) using pre-lab and pre-workshop exercises to promote prior engagement with key concepts; 5) adding open-ended experiments to foster structured 'scientific play' or enquiry and creativity; and 6) aligning the assessment with the learning outcomes and ensuring that it contains authentic and challenging southern hemisphere problems. Students were asked to design their own ocean current experiment in the lab and we were astounded by their ingenuity: they simulated the ocean currents off Antarctica; varied water density to verify an equation; and examined the effect of wind and seafloor topography on currents. To evaluate changes in student learning, we conducted surveys in 2013 and 2014. In 2014, we found higher levels of student engagement with the course: >~80% attendance rates and >~70% satisfaction (20% neutral). The 2014 cohort felt that they were more competent in writing

  14. One week terbinafine 1% cream (Lamisil) once daily is effective in the treatment of interdigital tinea pedis: a vehicle controlled study. LAS-INT-06 Study Group.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Tietz, H J; Bräutigam, M; Mayser, P; Rapatz, G; Paul, C

    2001-08-01

    Duration of therapy is an important factor determining patients' compliance in dermatomycosis clinical practice. We undertook a prospective, randomised, double-blind, parallel group study to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of once daily treatment with terbinafine 1% cream for 1 week, compared to its vehicle, in adult patients with interdigital tinea pedis. Efficacy was assessed in terms of mycological cure, total clinical signs and symptoms scores, and clinical response, 1 day and 1, 5 and 7 weeks after end of treatment. Terbinafine 1% cream was significantly more effective than its vehicle in achieving and maintaining mycological cure for 7 weeks: 91.4% vs. 37.1%, P < 0.001. Terbinafine was also significantly more effective than its vehicle in reducing total clinical signs and symptoms scores, and in achieving clinical response. We conclude that terbinafine 1% cream, applied once daily for 7 days, is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for interdigital tinea pedis in nonimmunocompromised patients. The short duration of treatment needed to achieve mycological cure has important implications for patient compliance and for control of infection within the community.

  15. Texas Reports 1st U.S. Case of Zika from Travel to Another State

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160450.html Texas Reports 1st U.S. Case of Zika From Travel to Another State Resident had recently ... what appears to be the first case of Zika infection traveling across state lines, Texas health officials ...

  16. 45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Turn span from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  17. 46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Overall view, from S. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  18. BLOEDNER MONUMENT (32ND INDIANA, 1ST GERMAN MONUMENT), SECTION C, FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLOEDNER MONUMENT (32ND INDIANA, 1ST GERMAN MONUMENT), SECTION C, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF GERMAN TEXT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cave Hill National Cemetery, 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  19. U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years

    MedlinePlus

    ... 161792.html U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years March of Dimes' report finds ... United States increased in 2015 for the first time in eight years, and rates are especially high ...

  20. 28. ENGINE CLUSTER OF 1ST STAGE OF A SATURN I ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. ENGINE CLUSTER OF 1ST STAGE OF A SATURN I ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. VIEW SOUTH/SOUTHEAST LOOKING DOWN ON 2ND AQUEDUCT AND 1ST AQUEDUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH/SOUTHEAST LOOKING DOWN ON 2ND AQUEDUCT AND 1ST AQUEDUCT CASCADES TOWARDS FILTRATION PLANT AND LOS ANGELES RESERVOIR - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Cascades Structures, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 4. VIEW WEST, WEST SIDE, SHOWING CHANNELS 1ST AND 2ND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW WEST, WEST SIDE, SHOWING CHANNELS 1ST AND 2ND VERTICAL BRACED DOUBLE ANGLES, DIAGONAL BRACING AND CROSS BRACED RAILING - Thirty-Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning Rabbit River, Hamilton, Allegan County, MI

  3. 14. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, 1st floor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, 1st floor, crib area of building, showing electrical and plumbing cribs, wall and ceiling detail, looking S. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  4. 7. 1ST FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING DINING ROOM FIREPLACE (LEFT); ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 1ST FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH SHOWING DINING ROOM FIREPLACE (LEFT); ENTRY SITTING ROOM FIREPLACE (RIGHT) AND LIVING ROOM (BACKGROUND). - Fort Riley, Building No. 4, 4 Barry Avenue, Riley, Riley County, KS

  5. Florida Reports 1st Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160151.html Florida Reports 1st Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S. 4 cases likely originated from ... apparently experiencing its first local outbreak of the Zika virus, with four human infections reported in South ...

  6. 62. Neg. No. F75A, Jun 18, 1930, INTERIORWAREHOUSE, 1ST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. Neg. No. F-75A, Jun 18, 1930, INTERIOR-WAREHOUSE, 1ST FLOOR, STORAGE OF AUTOMOBILE COMPONENTS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. MAGAZINE E30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE E-30. VIEW FROM BETWEEN 1ST AND 2ND BLAST WALL LOOKING TO THE REAR OF THE MAGAZINE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Tunnel Magazine Type, Waikakalaua & Kipapa Gulches, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 19. Detail of brick courses 116, back side, between 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail of brick courses 1-16, back side, between 1st and 2nd windows from the right - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  9. 20. Detail of brick courses 4675, back side, between 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of brick courses 46-75, back side, between 1st and 2nd windows from the right - Oklahoma State University, Boys Dormitory, Northwest corner of Hester Street & Athletic Avenue, Stillwater, Payne County, OK

  10. If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study Chances just as high for women who go ... it really is a potent factor," said senior study author Laura Jelliffe-Pawlowski. She is associate director ...

  11. Six-week follow-up after HIV-1 exposure: a position statement from the Public Health Agency of Sweden and the Swedish Reference Group for Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Hans; Albert, Jan; Axelsson, Maria; Berglund, Torsten; Gisslén, Magnus; Sönnerborg, Anders; Blaxhult, Anders; Bogdanovic, Gordana; Brytting, Maria; Carlander, Christina; Flamholc, Leo; Follin, Per; Haggar, Axana; Hagstam, Per; Johansson, Marcus; Navér, Lars; Persson Blom, Jenny; Samuelson, Agneta; Ström, Helena; Sundqvist, Martin; Svedhem Johansson, Veronica; Tegmark Wisell, Karin; Tegnell, Anders; Thorstensson, Rigmor

    2016-02-01

    In 2014 the Public Health Agency of Sweden and the Swedish Reference Group for Antiviral Therapy (RAV) conducted a review and analysis of the state of knowledge on the duration of follow-up after exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Up until then a follow-up of 12 weeks after exposure had been recommended, but improved tests and new information on early diagnosis motivated a re-evaluation of the national recommendations by experts representing infectious diseases and microbiology, county medical officers, the RAV, the Public Health Agency, and other national authorities. Based on the current state of knowledge the Public Health Agency of Sweden and the RAV recommend, starting in April 2015, a follow-up period of 6 weeks after possible HIV-1 exposure, if HIV testing is performed using laboratory-based combination tests detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. If point-of-care rapid HIV tests are used, a follow-up period of 8 weeks is recommended, because currently available rapid tests have insufficient sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 antigen. A follow-up period of 12 weeks is recommended after a possible exposure for HIV-2, since presently used assays do not include HIV-2 antigens and only limited information is available on the development of HIV antibodies during early HIV-2 infection. If pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis is administered, the follow-up period is recommended to begin after completion of prophylaxis. Even if infection cannot be reliably excluded before the end of the recommended follow-up period, HIV testing should be performed at first contact for persons who seek such testing.

  12. 1st- and 2nd-order motion and texture resolution in central and peripheral vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1995-01-01

    STIMULI. The 1st-order stimuli are moving sine gratings. The 2nd-order stimuli are fields of static visual texture, whose contrasts are modulated by moving sine gratings. Neither the spatial slant (orientation) nor the direction of motion of these 2nd-order (microbalanced) stimuli can be detected by a Fourier analysis; they are invisible to Reichardt and motion-energy detectors. METHOD. For these dynamic stimuli, when presented both centrally and in an annular window extending from 8 to 10 deg in eccentricity, we measured the highest spatial frequency for which discrimination between +/- 45 deg texture slants and discrimination between opposite directions of motion were each possible. RESULTS. For sufficiently low spatial frequencies, slant and direction can be discriminated in both central and peripheral vision, for both 1st- and for 2nd-order stimuli. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, at both retinal locations, slant discrimination is possible at higher spatial frequencies than direction discrimination. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, motion resolution decreases 2-3 times more rapidly with eccentricity than does texture resolution. CONCLUSIONS. (1) 1st- and 2nd-order motion scale similarly with eccentricity. (2) 1st- and 2nd-order texture scale similarly with eccentricity. (3) The central/peripheral resolution fall-off is 2-3 times greater for motion than for texture.

  13. Changes in precipitation isotope-climate relationships from temporal grouping and aggregation of weekly-resolved USNIP data: impacts on paleoclimate and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, P. D.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial variations in precipitation isotopes have been the focus of much recent research, but relatively less work has explored changes at various temporal scales. This is partly because most spatially-diverse and long-term isotope databases are offered at a monthly resolution, while daily or event-level records are spatially and temporally limited by cost and logistics. A subset of 25 United States Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (USNIP) sites with weekly-resolution in the east-central United States was analyzed for site-specific relationships between δ18O and δD (the local meteoric water line/LMWL), δ18O and surface temperature, and δ18O and precipitation amount. Weekly data were then aggregated into monthly and seasonal data to examine the effect of aggregation on correlation and slope values for each of the relationships. Generally, increasing aggregation improved correlations (>25% for some sites) due to a reduced effect of extreme values, but estimates on regression variable error increased (>100%) because of reduced sample sizes. Aggregation resulted in small, but significant drops (5-25%) in relationship slope values for some sites. Weekly data were also grouped by month and season to explore changes in relationships throughout the year. Significant subannual variability exists in slope values and correlations even for sites with very strong overall correlations. LMWL slopes are highest in winter and lowest in summer, while the δ18O-surface temperature relationship is strongest in spring. Despite these overall trends, a high level of month-to-month and season-to-season variability is the norm for these sites. Researchers blindly applying overall relationships drawn from monthly-resolved databases to paleoclimate or environmental research risk assuming these relationships apply at all temporal resolutions. When possible, researchers should match the temporal resolution used to calculate an isotopic relationship with the temporal resolution of

  14. Effects of a 12-week Rehabilitation Program with Music & Exercise Groups on Range of Motion in Young Children with Severe Burns

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Christine Tuden; Serghiou, Michael; Herndon, David N.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that rehabilitation programs supplemented with a strength and endurance-based exercise program improve lean body mass, pulmonary function, endurance, strength, and functional outcomes in severely burned children over the age of 7-years when compared to standard of care. To date, supplemental exercise programming for severely burned children under the age of 7-years has not yet been explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 12-week rehabilitation program supplemented with music & exercise, was more effective in improving functional outcomes than the standard of care alone. METHODS This is a descriptive study that measured elbow and knee range of motion (ROM) in 24 severely burned children between ages two and six years. Groups were compared for demographics as well as active and passive ROM to bilateral elbows and knees. A total of 15 patients completed the rehabilitation with supplemental music and exercise, and data was compared to 9 patients who received standard of care. RESULTS Patients receiving the 12-week program significantly improved ROM in all joints assessed except for one. Patients receiving standard of care showed a significant improvement in only one of the joints assessed. CONCLUSION Providing a structured supplemental music and exercise program in conjunction with occupational and physical therapy seems to improve both passive and active ROM to a greater extent than the standard of care alone. PMID:18849852

  15. Highly efficient -1st-order reflection in Littrow mounted dielectric double-groove grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kota; Iizuka, Hideo

    2013-06-01

    We show that in a silicon double-groove grating with two different groove widths per period attached on top of a semi-infinite SiO2 substrate, almost 100% reflectivity is achieved for the -1st-order reflection with an incident angle of 60° in the Littrow mounting condition. The modal analysis reveals that modes propagating in the upward and downward directions have nearly the same amplitudes at resonance. They are added constructively for the -1st-order reflection and destructively for the 0th-order reflection and the -1st-order and 0th-order transmission. The asymmetric structure with a dielectric material poses a unique feature as a four port device.

  16. Comparative clinical profile of mirtazapine and duloxetine in practical clinical settings in Japan: a 4-week open-label, parallel-group study of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Kei; Kishi, Taro; Moriwaki, Masatsugu; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanouchi, Yoshio; Funahashi, Toshihiko; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-01-01

    No studies have compared mirtazapine with duloxetine in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Fifty-six patients were nonrandomly assigned to a 4-week treatment with either 15 to 45 mg/day of mirtazapine (n = 22) or 20 to 60 mg/day of duloxetine (n = 34). The primary efficacy measurements were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression 6-point Rating Scale (MADRS) scores. The second efficacy measurements were the response and remission rates of treatment. Tolerability assessments were also performed. Fifty-six patients (43 male; age, 43.6 years) were recruited. There was no significant difference in the discontinuation rate between the mirtazapine and duloxetine treatment groups (P = 0.867). Both mirtazapine and duloxetine significantly improved the HRSD and MADRS scores from baseline (P < 0.0001–0.0004). While mirtazapine was superior to duloxetine in the reduction of HRSD scores (P = 0.0421), there was no significant change in MADRS scores in terms of between-group differences (P = 0.171). While more somnolence was observed with mirtazapine (P = 0.0399), more nausea was associated with duloxetine (P = 0.0089). No serious adverse events were observed for either antidepressant. Mirtazapine and duloxetine were safe and well-tolerated treatments for Japanese patients with MDD. Double-blind controlled studies are needed to further explore the efficacy and safety of mirtazapine and duloxetine in Japanese patients with MDD. PMID:23766648

  17. BMI differences in 1st and 2nd generation immigrants of Asian and European origin to Australia.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Katharina; Hollingsworth, Bruce; Morgan, Lawrie

    2011-01-01

    We estimate assimilation of immigrants' body mass index (BMI) to the host population of Australia over one generation, conducting separate analyses for immigrants from 7 regions of Europe and Asia. We use quantile regressions to allow for differing impact of generational status across 19 quantiles of BMI from under-weight to morbidly obese individuals. We find that 1st generation South European immigrants have higher, and South and East Asian immigrants have lower BMI than Australians, but have assimilated to the BMI of their hosts in the 2nd generation. There are no or only small BMI differences between Australians and 1st and 2nd generation immigrants from East Europe, North-West Europe, Middle East and Pacific regions. We conclude that both upward and downward assimilation in some immigrant groups is most likely caused by factors which can change over one generation (such as acculturation), and not factors which would take longer to change (such as genetics). Our results suggest that public health policies targeting the lifestyles of well educated Asian immigrants may be effective in preventing BMI increase in this subgroup.

  18. Minimally Invasive Arthrodesis of 1st Metatarsophalangeal Joint for Hallux Rigidus.

    PubMed

    Sott, A H

    2016-09-01

    First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis plays a significant role in the management of symptomatic hallux rigidus/osteoarthritis of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. Several open and few percutaneous techniques have been described in the literature. This article describes and discusses a percutaneous technique that has been successfully used to achieve a pain-free stable and functional 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. All aspects of surgical indication and operative technique and details of patient-reported outcomes are presented with a referenced discussion. PMID:27524706

  19. Forgiveness Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Art

    1984-01-01

    Carefully orchestrated public relations and publicity campaign at Free Library of Philadelphia motivated an estimated 35,000 patrons to return almost 160,000 overdues during "no fines" week. Coverage by radio stations, newspapers, and television aided recovery of materials including rare 1910 score of a Rachmaninoff symphony which was 31 years…

  20. 130. Post1911. Photograph labeled, 'SEASON 1913. CAPTAIN, 1st MATE, SUPT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. Post-1911. Photograph labeled, 'SEASON 1913. CAPTAIN, 1st MATE, SUPT AND STOREKEEPER, A.P. ASS'N CANNERY, SHIP STAR OF ALASKA.' View forward from mizzenmast, post side. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, viewed from W. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  2. 42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of postcard ca. 1900. Copy owned and made by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Shows two-span steel truss, built by Phoenix Bridge Co. in 1878. Negative copied by: Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. 48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, view from N. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  4. 49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Top of pier and underside of w end of turn span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. The Student View of 1st Year Laboratory Work in the Biosciences--Score Gamma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Mike; Gibson, Alan; Hughes, Ian; Sayers, Gill; Todd, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Students registered on 1st year bioscience courses in 9 universities were surveyed for their views on the laboratory classes they were taking. Returns were obtained from 695 (70%). Student views were varied, some viewing particular features of laboratory classes as "good" while others viewed the same features as "bad". Students identified as the…

  6. How Many Attempts Until Success in Some Core 1st. Year Disciplines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Graça Leão; Andrade e Silva, João; Lopes, Margarida Chagas

    2012-01-01

    Due to a general development in education brought about by democracy, Portugal has witnessed tremendous development in Higher Education (HE) since the beginning of the 1980s. Nevertheless, the percentage of graduates among the Portuguese population still ranks far below most European countries. This is why academic performance in HE 1st cycle…

  7. First-Generation College Students' 1st-Year College Experiences: Challenges Attending a Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students (FGCS) face challenges when switching from high school to college and during their 1st-year in college. Additionally, FGCS may have difficulty understanding the steps required to prepare for and enroll in postsecondary education. The social capital theory examines support of social, academic, and cultural networks…

  8. 24. OVERALL OF 1st FLOOR OF MILL NO. 1. PALLETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. OVERALL OF 1st FLOOR OF MILL NO. 1. PALLETS HELD CLOTH IN STORAGE IN LATE 20th CENTURY. IRON POSTS IN LEFT DISTANCE FRONTED CLOTH BINS. HISTORIAN LEEANN LANDS IN BACKGROUND WITH LIGHT. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  9. 77 FR 22574 - Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Washington Special Election In the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Washington has...

  10. The Course of Psychological Disorders in the 1st Year After Cancer Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Maria; Henry, Jane L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid anxiety, depressive, and substance use disorders over the first 12-month period following a cancer diagnosis. Individuals recently diagnosed with 1st onset head and neck or lung malignancy were assessed for ASD within…

  11. Perceptual Narrowing of Linguistic Sign Occurs in the 1st Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephanie Baker; Fais, Laurel; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Werker, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    Over their 1st year of life, infants' "universal" perception of the sounds of language narrows to encompass only those contrasts made in their native language (J. F. Werker & R. C. Tees, 1984). This research tested 40 infants in an eyetracking paradigm and showed that this pattern also holds for infants exposed to seen language--American Sign…

  12. Requirement of copper for 1st-log growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Como, S.A.; Valerio, V.; Nickless, S.; Connelly, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Routine evaluation of the role of copper (Cu) in the growth of various mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae disclosed an unexpected effect of Cu on the fermentative first-log growth. The authors subsequent studies are attempting to ascertain the nature and significance of this observation. Cells are grown on glucose in a supplemented minimal media at 29/sup 0/C for 48-72 hrs. using New Brunswick incubator shaking at 200 rpm. Cu concentration was varied by addition of Cu salts or bathocuproine disulfonate (BC), a highly specific Cu chelator. Samples were removed periodically from flasks and dry weights were determined. Growth curve plots of normal yeasts grown in the presence of 1mM to 38mM Cu showed little variation in the expected 1st log; diauxi; 2nd log; stationary phase picture. However, in the presence of BC growth rate in the 1st log was significantly slowed and as expected 2nd log growth was essentially stopped. The low 1st log growth rate could be titrated to normal (+Cu) levels by increments of added Cu but not by added iron. The effect was not seen when Rho-minus strains were used nor when growth was followed under anaerobic conditions. Results to date implicate a mitochondrial protein, oxygen and copper in the 1st log growth of S Cerevisiae. The character of the protein agent and the possible contribution of cytochrome oxidase activity to the lst log growth are being evaluated.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 1st Quarter FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A.

    2015-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (27 from the 1St Qtr FY-15 and 46 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 38 other issue reports (including nine not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions reported during the1st Qtr FY-15) identified at INL during the past 12 months.

  14. Effect of 1st-trimester loss on restoration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Elkas, J C; Cunningham, D S

    1995-01-01

    This randomized prospective study was conducted to determine the length of time required for re-establishment of the reproductive axis following a 1st-trimester spontaneous abortion. The spontaneous gonadotropin secretion was significantly depressed during the first menstrual cycle after pregnancy loss, while the estradiol levels had normalized. Provocative testing revealed blunted gonadotropin release in the first menstrual cycle with return to normal during the first menstrual cycle after a spontaneous abortion. Endometrial biopsy specimens were also abnormal during the first menstrual cycle with normal histological characteristics by the second menstrual cycle. Therefore, restoration of the hypothalamic-pituitary- ovarian axis after a 1st-trimester loss is achieved within two menstrual cycles, as determined by return of normal pituitary function.

  15. 44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Detail from Camille Drie's map: A Bird's Eye View of Columbus, Mississippi ca. 1875-76. Shows M&O RR bridge before the Phoenix Bridge Co. erected iron truss spans in 1878. Credit: Photostat of map in Lowndes Co. Public Library Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  16. 43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of photo 1900. Shows 1878 M&O RR bridge. The steamboat, 'Gopher,' in foreground, was an archeological survey vessel from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Published in Art in Mississippi (1901). Credit: Copied from print in Lowndes Co. Public Library by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  17. 46. NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, 1st FLOOR, BELOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, 1st FLOOR, BELOW PICKER AND CLOTH ROOM AREA. FUNCTION OF THIS SPACE UNKNOWN AT PRESENT. NOTE THAT EYE BEAM REPLACES ORIGINAL WALL OF 1892 PICKER HOUSE. CENTER (OR LEFT) DOOR IS ENTRY TO MILL NO. 2. RIGHT DOOR IS ENTRY TO 1892 NAPPER ROOM. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  18. 7. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, ELECTRICAL 1ST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, ELECTRICAL 1ST AND 2ND FLOOR PLANS, SHEET 10 of 11, DRAWING NO. 35-03-05 SF 5/1677, U.S. Army Engineer District, Detroit, Corps of Engineers, 9 June, 1959, on file Selfridge Base Museum. - Selfridge Field, Building No. 1041, West of E Street, north of D Street, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  19. Ruthenium indenylidene "1(st) generation" olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Cazin, Catherine S J

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords "1(st) generation" cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands.

  20. Ruthenium indenylidene “1st generation” olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite

    PubMed Central

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords “1st generation” cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands. PMID:26425210

  1. Ruthenium indenylidene "1(st) generation" olefin metathesis catalysts containing triisopropyl phosphite.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Stefano; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Cazin, Catherine S J

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of triisopropyl phosphite with phosphine-based indenylidene pre-catalysts affords "1(st) generation" cis-complexes. These have been used in olefin metathesis reactions. The cis-Ru species exhibit noticeable differences with the trans-Ru parent complexes in terms of structure, thermal stability and reactivity. Experimental data underline the importance of synergistic effects between phosphites and L-type ligands. PMID:26425210

  2. The 'Earlybird' gets the breastmilk: findings from an evaluation of combined professional and peer support groups to improve breastfeeding duration in the first eight weeks after birth.

    PubMed

    Kruske, Sue; Schmied, Virginia; Cook, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    Australia has high initiation rates of breastfeeding, but the challenges of establishing and maintaining breastfeeding in the first few months of infant life result in many women changing to artificial formula feeding. This paper reports on the impact of a new strategy to improve breastfeeding duration rates in the first 8 weeks post-partum. The Earlybird Program (EBP) combines the professional expertise of child and family health (C&FH) nurses with the expertise of the participating mothers to support each other in establishing breastfeeding in the first 8 weeks. This retrospective study compared the breastfeeding patterns of first-time mothers who attended the EBP, with the breastfeeding patterns of mothers who accessed individual appointments with the nurses in a 12-month period, and examined the predictors of continued breastfeeding at 8 weeks. The total sample comprised 193 infant records. Women who selected the EBP were more likely to be employed and less likely to be categorized as non-English speaking background. These women also had more visits to the C&FH service. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with breastfeeding cessation at 8 weeks post-natal. After adjusting for variables, only exclusive breastfeeding at first visit and attending the EBP were significant predictors of continuing to breastfeed at 8 weeks. Facilitation skills that recognize the expertise of participating women were considered an important aspect of the programme.

  3. Weekly oral etoposide in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: a phase I multicenter trial of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J; Kahn, J O; Tong, W P; Feldstein, M L; Lin, S; Bennett, J M; Metroka, C E; Ratner, L; Krown, S E

    1995-06-01

    We conducted a Phase I trial to evaluate the safety, maximally tolerated dose (MTD), antitumor activity, and pharmacology of once-weekly oral etoposide in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and AIDS. From September 1990 to October 1991, 27 eligible patients with biopsy-confirmed KS were treated at six etoposide dose levels, ranging from 150 to 400 mg weekly. Patients were treated until their tumor progressed or until unacceptable toxicity developed. On the first day of therapy, etoposide plasma concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The MTD was defined as the etoposide dose that induced reversible grade 3 toxicity in three of six patients during the first 4 weeks. Although dose-limiting toxicity was uncommon during the first 4 weeks of treatment (three of 27 patients), and the MTD was not reached, with longer treatment > 50% of patients developed dose-limiting toxicities, most commonly neutropenia. Responses were observed at all dosage levels (except 350 mg weekly), with partial tumor regression documented in nine (36%) of 25 evaluable patients. There was marked variability in etoposide area under the plasma concentration versus time curve, elimination half-time (t1/2), and urinary excretion. These pharmacokinetic features were not, however, associated with the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms, the severity of side effects, or tumor response. We conclude that weekly oral etoposide can be safely administered to patients with AIDS and KS. The observed antitumor effects over a wide range of doses support further studies with very low and minimally toxic etoposide doses, alone or in combination with other agents.

  4. Protocol: the effect of 12 weeks of Tai Chi practice on anxiety in healthy but stressed people compared to exercise and wait-list comparison groups: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuai; Lal, Sara; Meier, Peter; Sibbritt, David; Zaslawski, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Stress is a major problem in today's fast-paced society and can lead to serious psychosomatic complications. The ancient Chinese mind-body exercise of Tai Chi may provide an alternative and self-sustaining option to pharmaceutical medication for stressed individuals to improve their coping mechanisms. The protocol of this study is designed to evaluate whether Tai Chi practice is equivalent to standard exercise and whether the Tai Chi group is superior to a wait-list control group in improving stress coping levels. This study is a 6-week, three-arm, parallel, randomized, clinical trial designed to evaluate Tai Chi practice against standard exercise and a Tai Chi group against a nonactive control group over a period of 6 weeks with a 6-week follow-up. A total of 72 healthy adult participants (aged 18-60 years) who are either Tai Chi naïve or have not practiced Tai Chi in the past 12 months will be randomized into a Tai Chi group (n = 24), an exercise group (n = 24) or a wait-list group (n = 24). The primary outcome measure will be the State Trait Anxiety Inventory with secondary outcome measures being the Perceived Stress Scale 14, heart rate variability, blood pressure, Short Form 36 and a visual analog scale. The protocol is reported using the appropriate Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) items.

  5. The effect of 1-week feed restriction on performance, digestibility of nutrients and digestive system development in the growing rabbit.

    PubMed

    Tůmová, E; Volek, Z; Chodová, D; Härtlová, H; Makovický, P; Svobodová, J; Ebeid, T A; Uhlířová, L

    2016-01-01

    A 3 to 4 week feed restriction of about 20% to 25% of the free intake is widely applied in rabbit breeding systems to reduce post-weaning digestive disorders. However, a short intensive feed restriction is described in few studies and can be beneficial for growing rabbits due to a longer re-alimentation period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ad libitum (AL) and two restriction levels of feeding (50 and 65 g/rabbit per day) applied for 1 week on performance, gastrointestinal morphology and physiological parameters during the restriction and during the re-alimentation period. Rabbits were divided into three experimental groups: AL rabbits were fed AL, R1 rabbits were restricted from 42 to 49 days of age and received 50 g daily (29% of AL) and R2 rabbits were restricted at the same age and were fed 65 g of feed daily (37% of AL). In the 1(st) week after weaning and in the weeks after restriction, all the groups were fed AL. During the restriction period, daily weight gain (DWG) in R1 significantly dropped to 11% (experiment 1) and 5% (experiment 2) compared with rabbits in the AL group, although they were fed 29% of AL, whereas in the R2 group it decreased to 20% (experiment 1) and 10% (experiment 2). In the week following feed restriction, DWG in the restricted groups increased (P<0.001) to 166% and 148% in R1 and to 128% and 145% in R2. Restricted rabbits in both the experiments reached up to 90% to 93% of the final live weight (70 days) of the AL group. Over the entire experimental period, feed restriction significantly decreased feed intake to 85% to 88% of the AL group; however, the feed conversion ratio was lower (P<0.05) only in experiment 1 (-6% in R1 and -4% in R2). Digestibilities of CP and fat were not significantly higher during the restriction period and during the 1(st) week of re-alimentation compared with the AL group. Significant interactions between feeding regime and age revealed the shortest large intestine in the AL group at

  6. Relief of Night-time Symptoms Associated With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following 4 Weeks of Treatment With Pantoprazole Magnesium: The Mexican Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Orr, William; Vargas-Romero, José Antonio; Remes-Troche, José María; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Mateos-Pérez, Gualberto; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Saez-Ríos, Adolfo; Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Chiu-Ugalde, Jazmin; Tholen, Anne; Horbach, Silke; Lundberg, Lars; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) 40 mg in the relief of esophageal and extra-esophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), particularly night-time symptoms. Methods Patients (aged 18-50 years) with 3-month history of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation plus at least one other symptom in the last week were enrolled in a nationwide, prospective and observational study in Mexico. Patients received pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily during 4 weeks. Symptoms were assessed through a physician-administered structured interview and the patient-completed ReQuest in Practice™ questionnaire. Night-time GERD was defined as arousal from sleep during the night due to GERD-associated symptoms. Results Out of 4,343 patients included at basal visit, 3,665 were considered for the effectiveness per protocol analysis. At baseline, patients had a median of 8 GERD related symptoms. Patients with night-time GERD symptoms (42.7%) were more likely to have extra-esophageal symptoms (P < 0.001) than other GERD patients. Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks improved a broad range of GERD-associated symptoms from baseline (80% reduction on physicians assessments; 68-77% reduction on ReQuest in Practice™ dimensions), including both day- and night-time GERD symptoms; improvements were the greatest for extra-esophageal symptoms in patients with night-time symptoms. Pantoprazole-Mg was well tolerated. Conclusions Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg significantly improved a broad range of esophageal and extra-esophageal GERD related symptoms including sleep disturbances, as well as well-being, in patients with daytime or night-time GERD, making it a good option for patients with GERD, especially when extra-esophageal and night-time symptoms are present. PMID:24466446

  7. Autopsy as a tool for learning gross anatomy during 1st year MBBS

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Parmod Kumar; Gupta, Monika; Kaur, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Embalmed cadavers are the primary tool for teaching anatomy. However, difficulties are encountered due to changed color/texture of organs, hardening of tissues, and smell of formaldehyde. To overcome these difficulties, dissections on a fresh human body were shown to the 1st year MBBS students, and their perception was noted. Materials and Methods: After taking universal precautionary measures, postmortem dissections were shown to students on voluntary donated bodies in the dissection hall, in addition to the traditional teaching on embalmed cadavers. Feedback was taken from students and faculty regarding the utility of these sessions. Results: Better appreciation of texture, orientation, location, and relations of organs in fresh body, integration of teaching, awareness of the process and laws related to body donations were the outcomes of the study. However, the smell and sight of blood was felt to be nauseating by some students, and some students were worried about the spread of infectious diseases. Conclusions: Visualizing single fresh body dissection during 1st year professional MBBS is recommended either on medicolegal autopsy or on voluntarily-donated bodies. PMID:27563594

  8. EDITORIAL: The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jack Jiqui; Fang, Fengzhou

    2009-05-01

    Nanomanufacturing is an emerging technology in the field of synthesis of nanomaterials, manufacture of nanodevices, nanosystems and the relevant characterization technologies, and will greatly impact our society and environment: speeding up scientific discovery, technological development, improving healthcare and living standards and slowing down the exhaustion of energy resources, to name but few. The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) was held on the 13-16 July 2008 in Singapore in conjunction with ThinFilm2008 (The 4th International Conference on Technological Advances of Thin Films & Surface Coatings). Approximately 140 delegates from all over the world have participated in the conference and presented their latest discoveries and technological developments. The main focuses of the conference were modern nanomanufacturing by laser machining, focused ion beam fabrication, nano/micro-molding/imprinting, nanomaterial synthesis and characterization, nanometrology and nano/microsystems fabrication and characterization. There was also great interest in applications of nanomanufacturing technologies in traditional areas such as free form machining, polishing and grinding with nano-scale precision and the smoothness of surfaces of objects, and applications in space exploration, military and medicine. This special issue is devoted to NanoMan2008 with a collection of 9 invited talks presented at the conference, covering all the topics of nanomanufacturing technology and development. These papers have been upgraded by the authors with new results and discoveries since the preparation of the conference manuscripts, hence presenting the latest developments. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all the delegates who attended the conference and made the conference successful, and to the authors who contributed papers to this special issue. Thanks also go to the conference committee for their efforts and devotion to the conference. We

  9. Perceptual narrowing of linguistic sign occurs in the 1st year of life.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephanie Baker; Fais, Laurel; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Werker, Janet F

    2012-01-01

    Over their 1st year of life, infants'"universal" perception of the sounds of language narrows to encompass only those contrasts made in their native language (J. F. Werker & R. C. Tees, 1984). This research tested 40 infants in an eyetracking paradigm and showed that this pattern also holds for infants exposed to seen language-American Sign Language (ASL). Four-month-old, English-only, hearing infants discriminated an ASL handshape distinction, while 14-month-old hearing infants did not. Fourteen-month-old ASL-learning infants, however, did discriminate the handshape distinction, suggesting that, as in heard language, exposure to seen language is required for maintenance of visual language discrimination. Perceptual narrowing appears to be a ubiquitous learning mechanism that contributes to language acquisition. PMID:22277043

  10. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M; Le Péchoux, C; Postmus, P E; Sorensen, J B; Felip, E

    2011-09-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through discussion at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement in SCLC is reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update.

  11. 4th generation of the 1st level surface detector trigger in the Pierre Auger Observator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.

    The proposal of a new 4th generation of the Front-End with the advanced 1st level triggers for the Infill Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory and for the Auger North is described. Newest FPGA chips offer much higher capacity of logic registers and memories, as well as DSP blocks. The calibration channel, previously supported by an external dual-port RAM, has been fully implemented into FPGA chip, through a large internal memory. In turn DSP blocks allowed on implementation of much more sophisticated spectral trigger algorithms. A single chip simplified board design, newer architecture of FPGA reduced resouces utilization and power consumption. Higher sampling in the new Front- End in comparison with previous 40 MHz designs as well as free resources for new detection algotithms can be a good platform for CR radio detection technique at Auger enhancing a duty cycle for the detection of UHECR’s.

  12. [The 1st International Youth Ecologist Forum in China, 2009: a review].

    PubMed

    Xiong, You-cai; Xiong, Jun-lan; Li, Pu-fang; Li, Zhi-hua; Kong, Hai-yan; Wang, Shao-ming

    2011-04-01

    To promote the communication and cooperation between Chinese and overseas youth ecologists, a conference entitled "The 1st International Young Ecologist Forum" was held at Lanzhou University in June 29-30, 2009. This conference was organized by outstanding overseas ecologists and hosted by Lanzhou University. The presentations covered broad areas of ecology, including plant-soil interactions, structure and function of regional ecosystems, ecological security and ecological planning, global change ecology, and environmental sustainability, demonstrating that the development of China ecology is gradually from traditional basic research transforming into applied research. The presentations also reflected in some extent the development characteristics, evolution direction, and distribution pattern of China ecological research. China ecological research has gradually formed four centers, the Northeast, North, Northwest, and Southeast China, and each of them has its definite regional characteristics. Some suggestions about the organization form and future planning of the forum were put forward.

  13. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test.

    PubMed

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 -9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 -15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 -8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.

  14. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test.

    PubMed

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 -9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 -15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 -8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults. PMID:27243035

  15. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test

    PubMed Central

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults. PMID:27243035

  16. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  17. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  18. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gömze, László A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of materials and their rheological behaviors during their manufacturing processes and in their applications in many cases can help to increase the efficiency and competitiveness not only of the finished goods and products but the organizations and societies also. The more scientific supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive products with better thermal, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive knowledge, materials, equipment and technology processes. The idea to organize in Hungary the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials we have received from prospective scientists, physicists, chemists, mathematicians and engineers from Asia, Europe, North and South America including India, Korea, Russia, Turkey, Estonia, France, Italy, United Kingdom, Chile, Mexico and USA. The goals of ic-rmm1 the 1st International Conference on Rheology and Modeling of Materials are the following: • Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of modeling and measurements of rheological properties and behavior of materials under processing and applications. • Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. • Promote the communication between the scientists of different disciplines, nations, countries and continents. The international conference ic-rmm1 provides a platform among the leading international scientists, researchers, PhD students and engineers for discussing recent achievements in measurement, modeling and application of rheology in materials technology and materials science of liquids, melts, solids, crystals and amorphous structures. Among the major fields of interest are the influences of material structures, mechanical stresses temperature and deformation speeds on rheological and physical properties, phase transformation of

  19. Effect of milk feed source, frequency of feeding and age at turnout on calf performance, live-weight at mating and 1st lactation milk production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Female calves (n = 108) were assigned to 6 cold milk feeding treatments in two experiments for a 70-day period. Live-weight (LW) was measured weekly, with an additional LW taken at day 410 and post-calving for animals in experiment 1. In Experiment 1, the effect of feeding frequency and age of turnout to pasture on calf performance and 1st lactation milk yields were evaluated. The whole milk (WM) feeding treatments applied were (i) once daily feeding (OD), (ii) twice daily feeding (TD), (iii) OD feeding, outdoors at 38 days (ODO). In Experiment 2, the effects of feeding milk replacer (MR) as opposed to WM and age of turnout to pasture on calf performance were evaluated. The treatments applied were (i) OD feeding with WM (OD), (ii) OD feeding with milk replacer (MR) (ODMR), (iii) OD feeding with MR, outdoors at 38 days (ODMRO). Experiment 1: There were no differences (P > 0.05) in LW or average daily gain between TD and OD calves at day 80 or 410. ODO calves had lower LW at day 80 as compared to OD or TD (P < 0.001). Calf LW at day 80 was 86, 89 and 85 kg and at day 410 was 304, 309 and 316 kg for OD, TD and ODO, respectively. Milk feeding frequency or time of calf turnout had no effect on LW post calving, milk composition or 1st lactation milk yields. Experiment 2: Total LW at day 80 was higher (P < 0.05) for ODMR compared to OD or ODMRO calves. Calf LW was 87, 95, and 88 kg for OD, ODMR and ODMRO, respectively. However, LW at day 410 did not differ between treatments. This study showed that while some differences were observed in calf LW at day 80, these differences had no effect on LW at day 410 or 1st lactation milk yield. It can be concluded that calves can be successfully reared when fed OD with WM or MR, indoors and when turned out to pasture at 38 days of age. PMID:23078871

  20. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization international standards for human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and type 18 DNA.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dianna E; Baylis, Sally A; Padley, David; Heath, Alan B; Ferguson, Morag; Pagliusi, Sonia R; Quint, Wim G; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-06-15

    A World Health Organization collaborative study was conducted to evaluate candidate international standards for human papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16 DNA (NIBSC code 06/202) and HPV Type 18 DNA (NIBSC code 06/206) for use in the amplification and detection steps of nucleic acid-based assays. The freeze-dried candidate international standards were prepared from bulk preparations of cloned plasmid containing full-length HPV-16 or HPV-18 genomic DNA. Nineteen laboratories from 13 countries participated in the study using a variety of commercial and in-house quantitative and qualitative assays. The data presented here indicate that, upon freeze-drying, there is no significant loss in potency for the candidate HPV-18 DNA and a slight loss in potency for the candidate HPV-16 DNA; although this is likely not scientifically relevant when assay precision is considered. In general, the individual laboratory mean estimates for each study sample were grouped +/- approximately 2 log(10) around the theoretical HPV DNA concentration of the reconstituted ampoule (1 x 10(7) HPV genome equivalents/mL). The agreement between laboratories is improved when potencies are made relative to the candidate international standards, demonstrating their utility in harmonizing amplification and detection steps of HPV-16 and -18 DNA assays. Degradation studies indicate that the candidate international standards are extremely stable and suitable for long-term use. Based on these findings, the candidate standards were established as the 1st WHO international standards for HPV-16 DNA and HPV-18 DNA, each with a potency of 5 x 10(6) international units (IU) per ampoule or 1 x 10(7) IU mL(-1) when reconstituted as directed.

  1. Identifying 1st instar larvae for three forensically important blowfly species using "fingerprint" cuticular hydrocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hannah E; Adam, Craig D; Drijfhout, Falko P

    2014-07-01

    Calliphoridae are known to be the most forensically important insects when it comes to establishing the minimum post mortem interval (PMImin) in criminal investigations. The first step in calculating the PMImin is to identify the larvae present to species level. Accurate identification which is conventionally carried out by morphological analysis is crucial because different insects have different life stage timings. Rapid identification in the immature larvae stages would drastically cut time in criminal investigations as it would eliminate the need to rear larvae to adult flies to determine the species. Cuticular hydrocarbon analysis on 1st instar larvae has been applied to three forensically important blowflies; Lucilia sericata, Calliphora vicina and Calliphora vomitoria, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). The results show that each species holds a distinct "fingerprint" hydrocarbon profile, allowing for accurate identification to be established in 1-day old larvae, when it can be challenging to apply morphological criteria. Consequently, this GC-MS based technique could accelerate and strengthen the identification process, not only for forensically important species, but also for other entomological samples which are hard to identify using morphological features.

  2. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence. PMID:26334946

  3. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence.

  4. The U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope 1st Catalog (URAT1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Finch, Charlie T.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; DiVittorio, Mike; Harris, Hugh C.; Rafferty, Ted; Wieder, Gary; Eric Ferguson, Chris Kilian, Albert Rhodes, Mike Schultheis

    2015-01-01

    The 1st USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog (URAT1) is about tobe released. It contains accurate positions (typically 10 to 30 mas std.error) of 220 million stars, mainly on the northern hemisphere. Propermotions were obtained for 85% of these stars utilizing the 2MASS as 1stepoch. URAT1 is supplemented by 2MASS and APASS photometry. The URAT1catalog was derived from 2 years of operations (April 2012 to April 2014)of the USNO "redlens" astrograph with its 474 Mpx 4-shooter camera at theNaval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) in a joint effort betweenUSNO's Astrometry Department and NOFS. Due to a combination of longexposures and short exposures with objective grating, URAT1 observationscover the large 3 to 18.5 magnitude range in a single 680-750 nm bandpass.The catalog properties are presented together with a brief summary ofobservations and reductions methods. URAT1 has on average about 4-timesthe number of stars per square degree and is 4-times more accurate thanUCAC4. URAT1 will serve as the currently most accurate astrometric anddeep photometric optical reference star catalog until the delivery ofthe Gaia catalog.

  5. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  6. 1st paleomagnetic investigation of Nubia Sandstone at Kalabsha, south Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, R.; Khashaba, A.; El-Hemaly, I. A.; Takla, E. M.; Abdel Aal, E.; Odah, H.

    2016-06-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: the 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 °N, 32.75 °E). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with α95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 82.8 °N and Long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with α95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 78.3 °N and Long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at Lat. = 80.5 °N and Long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind magnetic components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  7. Wind-US Results for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis; Dippold, Vance, III; Georgiadis, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    This presentation contains Wind-US results presented at the 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The The workshop was organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Air Breathing Propulsion Propulsion Systems Integration Technical Committee with the purpose of assessing the accuracy of computational computational fluid dynamics for air breathing propulsion applications. Attendees included representatives from representatives from government, industry, academia, and commercial software companies. Participants were were encouraged to explore and discuss all aspects of the simulation process including the effects of mesh type and mesh type and refinement, solver numerical schemes, and turbulence modeling. The first set of challenge cases involved computing the thrust and discharge coefficients for a series of convergent convergent nozzles for a range of nozzle pressure ratios between 1.4 and 7.0. These configurations included a included a reference axisymmetric nozzle as well as 15deg , 25deg , and 40deg conical nozzles. Participants were also asked also asked to examine the plume shock structure for two cases where the 25deg conical nozzle was bifurcated by a bifurcated by a solid plate. The final test case was a serpentine inlet diffuser with an outlet to inlet area ratio of 1.52 ratio of 1.52 and an offset of 1.34 times the inlet diameter. Boundary layer profiles, wall static pressure, and total and total pressure at downstream rake locations were examined.

  8. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  9. Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer in flexible flatfoot deformity improves talo-1st metatarsal-Index, clinical outcome and pedographic parameter.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus (LO) and flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) transfer to the navicular is one option for the treatment of flexible flatfoot deformity (FD). The aim of the study was to analyse the amount of correction and clinical outcome including pedographic assessment. In a prospective consecutive non-controlled clinical followup study, all patients with FD that were treated with LO and FDL from September 1st 2006 to August 31st, 2009 were included. Assessment was performed before surgery and at 2-year-followup including clinical examination (with staging of posterior tibialis insufficiency) weight bearing radiographs (Talo-1st metatarsal angles (TMT)), pedography (increased midfoot contact area and force) and Visual Analogue Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS FA). 112 feet in 102 patients were analysed (age, 57.6 (13-82), 42% male). In 12 feet (9%) wound healing delay without further surgical measures was registered. All patients achieved full weight bearing during the 7th postoperative week. Until followup, revision surgery was done in 3 patients (fusion calcaneocuboid joint (n=2), correction triple arthrodesis (n=1)). 101 feet (90%) completed 2-year-followup. TMT dorsoplantar/lateral/Index and VAS FA scores were increased, and posterior tibialis insufficiency stage, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage were decreased (each p<.05). All relevant parameters (stage of posterior tibialis insufficiency, TMT angles and Index, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage, VAS FA) were improved 2 years after LO and FDL transfer to the navicular in FD. The complication rate was low. This method allows safe and predictable correction.

  10. 78 FR 47698 - Notice to all Interested Parties of the Termination of the Receivership of 10183, 1st American...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION Notice to all Interested Parties of the Termination of the Receivership of 10183, 1st American State Bank of Minnesota Hancock, MN Notice is hereby given that the Federal Deposit...

  11. Laying a Foundation for Lifelong Learning: Case Studies of E-Assessment in Large 1st-Year Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about noncompletion and the quality of the 1st-year student experience have been linked to recent changes in higher education such as modularisation, increased class sizes, greater diversity in the student intake and reduced resources. Improving formative assessment and feedback processes is seen as one way of addressing academic failure,…

  12. 78 FR 7781 - Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the South Carolina Special Elections in the 1st Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special elections. SUMMARY: South Carolina...

  13. Bills to Increase Employment Opportunities through the Youth Conservation Corps and Other Means, 95th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This packet contains nine Senate bills and eight House bills from the 95th Congress, 1st session, all dealing with various means of increasing employment opportunities. Most of the bills deal with the creation of new jobs or with programs for job training, counseling, or placement. Seven of the bills constitute amendments to the Youth Conservation…

  14. Jordanian Kindergarten and 1st-Grade Teachers' Beliefs about Child-Based Dimensions of School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Oliemat, Enass

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs of Jordanian kindergarten and 1st-grade teachers regarding six child-based dimensions of school readiness: academic knowledge, basic thinking skills, socioemotional maturity, physical well-being and motor development, self-discipline, and communication skills. Questionnaires were used to collect…

  15. Maternal Sleep-Related Cognitions and Infant Sleep: A Longitudinal Study from Pregnancy through the 1st Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikotzky, Liat; Sadeh, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Infant sleep is a major source of concern for many parents. The aims of this longitudinal study were to assess: (a) the development of sleep patterns among infants, (b) the development of maternal cognitions regarding infant sleep, and (c) the relations between these domains during the 1st year of life. Eighty-five mothers were recruited during…

  16. Addressing the Effects of Reciprocal Teaching on the Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary of 1st-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Eliana; Osana, Helena P.; Venkatesh, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Adapted Reciprocal Teaching (ART) on the receptive and expressive flight-word vocabulary of 1st-grade students. During ART, classroom interactions produced narrative contexts within which students assumed responsibility for applying new flight words in personally meaningful ways. Students in the control group…

  17. PREFACE: 1st Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science 2013 (LPBMS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi

    2014-04-01

    From 29-31 August 2013, the 1st International Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science, LPBMS 2013, took place in the Tsukuba International Congress Center in the city of Tsukuba, Japan. The conference was a continuation of the international series Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS), which started in 1994. The last one, SRMS-7, was held in Oxford UK 11-14 July 2010, where the International Advisory Committee (IAC) recommended the conference be enlarged to incorporate Materials Research from Neutron, Muon, and Slow Positron Sources, as well as the science emerging from Synchrotron Light Sources. The conference brought together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experience from the physics, chemistry and engineering communities. The topics covered in the LPBMS2013 include strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism and magnetic materials, soft matter, interface and surface defects, catalysts, biomaterials, and ceramics. In the 3-day scientific program, the conference consisted of 9 plenary talks, 33 invited talks, 20 oral presentations, and 126 poster presentations. We are pleased to publish the proceedings of the LPBMS2013 in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. This volume contains 58 papers representing the work that was presented and discussed at the conference. We hope that this volume will promote further development of this interdisciplinary materials research emerging from synchrotron light, neutron, muon, and slow positron sciences. Finally, we would like to thank the International Advisory Committee (Chair: Professor G N Greaves), sponsors, all the participants and contributors for making possible this international meeting of researchers. Reiji Kumai & Youichi Murakami Conference photograph Details of the program and organizing committees are available in the pdf

  18. Foreword to Selected presentations from the 1st European Hip Sport Meeting.

    PubMed

    Dallari, Dante; Ribas, Manuel

    2016-05-14

    Recent years have witnessed a growing number of people practising sports both at professional and amateur level. This trend led to a progressive rise in the incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic hip damage. The treatment of hip disease in subjects practising sports is a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon. The evaluation of patients, in particular those of young age with high functional demands, is inevitably complex and should be performed with a multidisciplinary approach; from a surgical point of view, it is essential to carefully assess whether the indication is towards conservative surgery or hip replacement surgery. The advent of arthroscopic surgery in recent years has allowed us to improve our knowledge of hip joint diseases, such as femoroacetabular impingement that is typical of sports and overuse activity. A correct and early diagnosis of the disease can direct the patient promptly to a conservative surgical treatment that could reduce the progression of degenerative pathology. However, when the joint is permanently damaged, the only reliable solution remains prosthetic surgery, leading to a series of issues that the orthopaedic surgeon should be able to master, leading to a thoughtful decision on, for example, which implant to use, which biomaterials, which surgical approach or which sport to practise after surgery. This supplement contains selected contributions stemming from the work performed by internationally recognised experts in the field and presented during the 1st European Hip Sport Meeting held in Bologna on May 19th, 20th, 2016 that we had the honour to co-chair. We hope that these contributions will help the orthopaedic surgeon, the sports physician and physiotherapist in their day-to-day practice, and will help in fulfilling our ultimate aim to improve the knowledge of the hip pathology related to sports and overuse activities. PMID:27174057

  19. Patterns of Irregular Burials in Western Europe (1st-5th Century A.D.)

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marco; Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Knüsel, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Irregular burials (IB—burials showing features that contrast with the majority of others in their geographic and chronological context) have been the focus of archaeological study because of their relative rarity and enigmatic appearance. Interpretations of IB often refer to supposed fear of the dead or to social processes taking place in time-specific contexts. However, a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of IB for various geographical contexts is still lacking, a fact that hampers any discussion of these burials on a larger scale. Methods Here, we collected a bibliographic dataset of 375 IB from both Britain and Continental Europe, altogether spanning a time period from the 1st to the 5th century AD. Each burial has been coded according to ten dichotomous variables, further analyzed by means of chi-squared tests on absolute frequencies, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Results Even acknowledging the limits of this study, and in particular the bias represented by the available literature, our results point to interesting patterns. Geographically, IB show a contrast between Britain and Continental Europe, possibly related to historical processes specific to these regions. Different types of IB (especially prone depositions and depositions with the cephalic extremity displaced) present a series of characteristics and associations between features that permit a more detailed conceptualization of these occurrences from a socio-cultural perspective that aids to elucidate their funerary meaning. Conclusions and Significance Altogether, the present work stresses the variability of IB, and the need to contextualize them in a proper archaeological and historical context. It contributes to the discussion of IB by providing a specific geographic and chronological frame of reference that supports a series of hypotheses about the cultural processes possibly underlying their occurrence. PMID:26115408

  20. Computational Simulations of Convergent Nozzles for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were completed for a series of convergent nozzles in participation of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The simulations were performed using the Wind-US flow solver. Discharge and thrust coefficients were computed for four axisymmetric nozzles with nozzle pressure ratios (NPR) ranging from 1.4 to 7.0. The computed discharge coefficients showed excellent agreement with available experimental data; the computed thrust coefficients captured trends observed in the experimental data, but over-predicted the thrust coefficient by 0.25 to 1.0 percent. Sonic lines were computed for cases with NPR >= 2.0 and agreed well with experimental data for NPR >= 2.5. Simulations were also performed for a 25 deg. conic nozzle bifurcated by a flat plate at NPR = 4.0. The jet plume shock structure was compared with and without the splitter plate to the experimental data. The Wind-US simulations predicted the shock structure well, though lack of grid resolution in the plume reduced the sharpness of the shock waves. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and Detached Eddy Simulations (DES) were performed at NPR = 1.6 for the 25 deg conic nozzle with splitter plate. The simulations predicted vortex shedding from the trailing edge of the splitter plate. However, the vortices of URANS and DES solutions appeared to dissipate earlier than observed experimentally. It is believed that a lack of grid resolution in the region of the vortex shedding may have caused the vortices to break down too soon

  1. Mathematics at matriculation level as an indicator of success or failure in the 1st year of the Veterinary Nursing Diploma at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria.

    PubMed

    Botha, A E; McCrindle, C M E; Owen, J H

    2003-12-01

    Mathematics at matriculation level (Grade 12) is one of the subjects required for admission to the Veterinary Nursing Diploma in the Faculty at Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria. The present study shows that there is no statistically significant relationship between the grade of mathematics at matriculation level and the success or failure in the 1st year of study. There is, however, a statistical difference in the adjusted mark obtained for mathematics at matriculation level between the groups that passed and failed the 1st year of the veterinary nursing course. The results of this research are not consistent with other research which showed that secondary school mathematics results are not a significant factor in tertiary education. It is recommended that selection criteria for veterinary nurses should in future still include mathematics, but that cognisance should be taken of the mark obtained and students with higher marks (above 57%) given preference.

  2. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research 2011 (ICMER2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Rosli

    2012-09-01

    The year 2010 represented a significant milestone in the history of the Mechanical Engineering community with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (National Conference in Mechanical Engineering for Research, 1st and 2nd NCMER) at Universiti Malaysia Pahang on 26-27 May and 3-4 December 2010. The conferences attracted a large number of delegates from different premier academic and research institutions in the country to participate and share their research experiences at the conference. The International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2011) followed on from the first and second conferences due to good support from researchers. The ICMER 2011 is a good platform for researchers and postgraduate students to present their latest finding in research. The conference covers a wide range of topics including the internal combustion engine, machining processes, heat and mass transfer, fuel, biomechanical analysis, aerodynamic analysis, thermal comfort, computational techniques, design and simulation, automotive transmission, optimization techniques, hybrid electric vehicles, engine vibration, heat exchangers, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, green energy, vehicle dynamics renewable energy, combustion, design, product development, advanced experimentation techniques, to name but a few. The international conference has helped to bridge the gap between researchers working at different institutions and in different countries to share their knowledge and has helped to motivate young scientists with their research. This has also given some clear direction for further research from the deliberations of the conference. Several people have contributed in different ways to the success of the conference. We thank the keynote speakers and all authors of the contributed papers, for the cooperation rendered to us in the publication of the CD conference proceedings. In particular, we would like to place on record our

  3. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja Syed, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    The 1st International Conference on Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies (ICSICCST-2013), took place in Karachi, Pakistan, from 24-26 June 2013. It was organized by Indus University, Karachi, in collaboration with HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi. More than 80 abstracts were submitted to the conference and were double blind-reviewed by an international scientific committee. The topics of the Conference were: Video, Image & Voice Sensing Sensing for Industry, Environment, and Health Automation and Controls Laser Sensors and Systems Displays for Innovative Applications Emerging Technologies Unmanned, Robotic, and Layered Systems Sensing for Defense, Homeland Security, and Law Enforcement The title of the conference, 'Sensing for Industry, Control, Communication & Security Technologies' is very apt in capturing the main issues facing the industry of Pakistan and the world. We believe the sensing industry, particularly in Pakistan, is currently at a critical juncture of its development. The future of the industry will depend on how the industry players choose to respond to the challenge of global competition and opportunities arising from strong growth in the Asian region for which we are pleased to note that the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues with an international perspective. This will certainly assist industry players to make informed decisions in shaping the future of the industry. The conference gathered qualified researchers from developed countries like USA, UK, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, China, South Korea and Malaysia etc whose expertise resulting from the research can be drawn upon to build an exploitable area of new technology that has potential Defense, Homeland Security, and Military applicability. More than 250 researchers/students attended the event and made the event great success as the turnout was 100%. An exceptional line-up of speakers spoke at the occasion. We want

  4. Effects of the April 1st, 2014 GLONASS Outage on GNSS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Romero, I.; D'Anastasio, E.

    2014-12-01

    The use of multi-constellation GNSS receivers has been assumed as a way to increase system integrity both by increased coverage during normal operations and failover redundancy in the event of a constellation failure. At approximately 21:00 UTC on April 1st the entire GLONASS constellation was disrupted as illegal ephemeris uploaded to each satellite took effect simultaneously. The outage continued for more than 10 hours. While ephemeris were incorrect, pseudoranges were correctly broadcast on both L1 and L2 and carrier phases were not affected; in the best case, GNSS receivers could be expected to continue to track all signals including GLONASS and at the worst to continue to track GPS and other constellations. It became clear to operators of the GeoNet network in New Zealand that the majority of their 79 GLONASS-enabled receivers experienced total tracking failures. Further detailed analysis of data from these and 315 additional GLONASS-enabled stations worldwide showed that receiver tracking behavior was affected for most receiver brands and models, both for GLONASS and GPS. Findings regarding the impacts of the GLONASS outage on receiver behavior will be highlighted. We use data recorded by GLONASS enabled global sites for the days during, preceding and following the outage to evaluate the impact of the outage on tracking and positioning performance. We observe that for some receiver types the onboard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) failed to ignore the incorrect messages, resulting in degraded GLONASS and GPS tracking and in some cases complete tracking failures and significant data loss. In addition, many of the receivers with clock steering enabled showed outliers in their receiver clock bias estimates that also coincided with the outage. Our results show in detail how different brands, configurations, and distributions of receivers were affected to varying extents, but no common factors are apparent. This event shows that many manufacturers

  5. Effects of Patterning Instruction on the Academic Achievement of 1st-Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Julie K.; Carlson, Abby G.; Gadzichowski, K. Marinka; Boyer, Caroline E.; Gallington, Debbie A.; Pasnak, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A test of the effectiveness of patterning instruction was conducted with 140 first-graders. First, 383 first-graders from 20 classes were screened on a patterning test. The eight in each class who scored worst were given individual 15-minute lessons on patterning or reading or mathematics or social studies three times weekly for a period of 6 1/2…

  6. Teachers' Spatial Anxiety Relates to 1st-and 2nd-Graders' Spatial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Elizabeth A.; Ramirez, Gerardo; Beilock, Sian L.; Levine, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers' anxiety about an academic domain, such as math, can impact students' learning in that domain. We asked whether this relation held in the domain of spatial skill, given the importance of spatial skill for success in math and science and its malleability at a young age. We measured 1st-and 2nd-grade teachers' spatial anxiety…

  7. Gene-Environment Interaction Effects on the Development of Immune Responses in the 1st Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoffjan, Sabine; Nicolae, Dan; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Roberg, Kathy; Evans, Michael; Mirel, Daniel B.; Steiner, Lori; Walker, Karen; Shult, Peter; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Gern, James E.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Ober, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that results from both genetic and environmental risk factors. Children attending day care in the 1st year of life have lower risks for developing asthma, although the mechanism for this “day care” effect is largely unknown. We investigated the interactions between day care exposure in the 1st 6 mo of life and genotypes for 72 polymorphisms at 45 candidate loci and their effects on cytokine response profiles and on the development of atopic phenotypes in the 1st year of life in the Childhood Onset of Asthma (COAST) cohort of children. Six interactions (at four polymorphisms in three loci) with “day care” that had an effect on early-life immune phenotypes were significant at P<.001. The estimated false-discovery rate was 33%, indicating that an estimated four P values correspond to true associations. Moreover, the “day care” effect at some loci was accounted for by the increased number of viral infections among COAST children attending day care, whereas interactions at other loci were independent of the number of viral infections, indicating the presence of additional risk factors associated with day care environment. This study identified significant gene-environment interactions influencing the early patterning of the immune system and the subsequent development of asthma and highlights the importance of considering environmental risk factors in genetic analyses. PMID:15726497

  8. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    more recent pollution. The concept and format of the 1st PAGES YSM worked very well, and

  9. PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2010-03-01

    more recent pollution. The concept and format of the 1st PAGES YSM worked very well, and created a high degree of enthusiasm and stimulation among the participants (as is demonstrated by this special issue). The 2nd YSM is therefore firmly planned to take place in 2013, back-to-back with the 4th PAGES OSM. Crucial and gratefully acknowledged contributions to the success of the YSM were made by the numerous co-sponsors (see logos below), who provided the financial basis for the YSM and supported the attendance of many early-career researchers from various parts of the world. Furthermore, we cordially thank all reviewers for shaping this proceeding issue with their insightful and helpful reviews. Conference photograph

  10. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  11. The effect of intermittent use of occlusal splint devices on sleep bruxism: a 4-week observation with a portable electromyographic recording device.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, H; Tsukiyama, Y; Kuwatsuru, R; Koyano, K

    2015-04-01

    This randomised controlled study investigated the effect of intermittent use of occlusal splints on sleep bruxism compared with that of continuous use by measuring masseter muscle electromyographic activity using a portable electromyographic recording system. Twenty bruxers were randomly allocated to the continuous group and intermittent group. Subjects in the continuous group wore stabilisation splints during sleep for 29 nights continuously, whereas those in the intermittent group wore splints during sleep every other week, that is they used splints on the 1st-7th, 15th-21st and 29th nights. Electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during sleep was recorded for the following six time points: before (baseline), immediately after, and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after the insertion of a stabilisation splint. The number of nocturnal masseter electromyographic events, duration and the total activity of sleep bruxism were analysed. In the continuous group, nocturnal masseter electromyographic events were significantly reduced immediately and 1 week after the insertion of the stabilisation splint, and duration was reduced immediately after the insertion (P < 0·05, Dunnett's test), but no reduction was observed at 2, 3 and 4 weeks after insertion. In the intermittent group, nocturnal masseter electromyographic events and duration were significantly reduced immediately after and also 4 weeks after insertion of the stabilisation splint (P < 0·05, Dunnett's test). The obtained results of the present exploratory trial indicate that the intermittent use of stabilisation splints may reduce sleep bruxism activity for a longer period compared with that of continuous use.

  12. Attitudes towards General Practice: a comparative cross-sectional survey of 1st and 5th year medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kruschinski, Carsten; Wiese, Birgitt; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Positive attitudes towards General Practice can be understood as a prerequisite for becoming a General Practitioner (GP) and for collaboration with GPs later on. This study aimed to assess attitudes of medical students at the beginning and the end of medical school. Methods: A total of 160 1st year students at Hannover Medical School were surveyed. Their attitudes were compared to those of 287 5th year students. Descriptive, bi- and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate influences of year of study and gender. Results: Year of study and gender both were associated with the attitudes towards General Practice. The interest in General Practice and patient-orientation (communication, care of older patients with chronic diseases) was higher in 1st year students compared to more advanced students. Female students valued such requirements more than male students, the differences in attitudes between the years of study being more pronounced in male students. Conclusion: Despite some limitations caused by the cross-sectional design, the attitudes towards General Practice competencies changed to their disadvantage during medical school. This suggests a formative influence of the strategies used in medical education. Educational strategies, however, could be used to bring about a change of attitudes in the other direction. PMID:23255966

  13. MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  14. MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  15. Molecular cloning, functional characterization and expression of potato (Solanum tuberosum) 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 1 (StDXS1) in response to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Maria Antonia; Soliman, Atta; Li, Genyi; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Ayele, Belay T; Daayf, Fouad

    2016-02-01

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the initial step of the plastidial 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (DOXP-MEP) pathway involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. In this study, we cloned the complete cDNA of potato DXS gene that was designated StDXS1. StDXS1 cDNA encodes for 719 amino acid residues, with MW of 77.8 kDa, and is present in one copy in the potato genome. Phylogenetic analysis and protein sequence alignments assigned StDXS1 to a group with DXS homologues from closely related species and exhibited homodomain identity with known DXS proteins from other plant species. Late blight symptoms occurred in parallel with a reduction in StDXS1 transcript levels, which may be associated with the levels of isoprenoids that contribute to plant protection against pathogens. Subcellular localization indicated that StDXS1 targets the chloroplasts where isoprenoids are synthesized. Arabidopsis expressing StDXS1 showed a higher accumulation of carotenoids and chlorophyll as compared to wild type controls. Lower levels of ABA and GA were detected in the transgenic DXS lines as compared to control plants, which reflected on higher germination rates of the transgenic DXS lines. No changes were detected in JA or SA contents. Selected downstream genes in the DOXP-MEP pathway, especially GGPPS genes, were up-regulated in the transgenic lines.

  16. Report on: "The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in ASEAN Countries, April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand".

    PubMed

    Hattasingh, Weerawan; Pengsaa, Krisana; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2016-03-01

    The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Countries Group (WNIPVC-ASEAN) held a meeting on April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand under the auspices of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the World Health Organization (WHO). Reports on the current status and initiatives of the national immunization program (NIP) in each ASEAN countries that attended were presented. These reports along with survey data collected from ministries of health in ASEAN countries NIPs demonstrate that good progress has been made toward the goal of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). However, some ASEAN countries have fragile health care systems that still have insufficient vaccine coverage of some basic EPI antigens. Most ASEAN countries still do not have national coverage of some new and underused vaccines, and raising funds for the expansion of NIPs is challenging. Also, there is insufficient research into disease burden of vaccine preventable diseases and surveillance. Health care workers must advocate NIPs to government policy makers and other stakeholders as well as improve research and surveillance to achieve the goals of the GVAP.

  17. The Perceptions of Professionalism by 1st and 5th Grade Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Vrecko, Helena

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Professionalism is essential for the development of mature physicians but not much education is devoted to that theme. Aim: We aimed to determine the views of undergraduate medical students on medical professionalism. Methods: This was a qualitative study, based on focus groups of the first and fifth-year undergraduate medical students. Transcripts of the focus groups were independently evaluated by two researches. Segments of transcripts, identified as important, were marked as verbatims. A grounded theory method with open coding was applied. A list of codes was developed and reviewed by both researchers until the consensus was reached. Then, the codes were reviewed and put into the categories and dimensions. Results: Students recognized 10 main medical professionalism dimensions (empathy, respect, responsibility, autonomy, trust, communication, difference between professional and private life, team work, partnership) and two dimensions associated with it (physician's characteristics, external factors). Slight change of the attitudes towards a more self-centred future physicians’ figure was observed in the fifth-year medical students. Conclusion: The students have an appropriate picture of the physicians’ figure even at the beginning of their medical studies but still needs an education in professionalism. It seems that the fifth-year students perceive physicians as more self-centred when compared to their first-year colleagues. PMID:25568575

  18. [Quality guidelines for presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy therapy: 1st revised version].

    PubMed

    Rosenow, F; Bast, T; Czech, T; Hans, V; Helmstaedter, C; Huppertz, H-J; Seeck, M; Trinka, E; Wagner, K

    2014-06-01

    In patients with pharmacorefractory epilepsy, preoperative epilepsy evaluation and subsequent epilepsy surgery lead to a significant improvement of seizure control, proportion of seizure-free patients, quality of life and social participation. The aims of preoperative epilepsy evaluation are to define the chance of complete seizure freedom and the likelihood of inducing new neurological deficits in a given patient. As epilepsy surgery is an elective procedure quality standards are particularly high. As detailed in the first edition of these practice guidelines, quality control relates to seven different domains: (1) establishing centres with a sufficient number of sufficiently and specifically trained personnel, (2) minimum technical standards and equipment, (3) continuing medical education of employees, (4) surveillance by trained personnel during the video electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEM), (5) systematic acquisition of clinical and outcome data, (6) the minimum number of preoperative evaluations and epilepsy surgery procedures and (7) cooperation of epilepsy centres. In the first edition of these practice guidelines published in 2000 it was defined which standards were desirable and that their implementation should be aimed for. These standards related especially to the certification required for different groups of medical doctors involved and to the minimum numbers of procedures required. In the subsequent decade quite a number of colleagues have been certified by the trinational Working Group (Arbeitsgemeinschaft, AG) for Presurgical Epilepsy Diagnosis and Operative Epilepsy Treatment (http://www.ag-epilepsiechirurgie.de) and therefore, on 8 May 2013 the executive board of the AG decided to now make these standards obligatory. PMID:24861193

  19. Impact of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the 1st millennium AD in a comprehensive climate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastian; Zorita, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The climate of the 1st millennium AD shows some remarkable differences compared to the last millennium concerning variation in external forcings. Together with an orbitally induced increased solar insolation during the northern hemisphere summer season and a general lack of strong solar minima, the frequency and intensity of large tropical and extratropical eruptions is decreased. Here we present results of a new climate simulation carried out with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM-P forced with variations in orbital, solar, volcanic and greenhouse gas variations and land use changes for the last 2,100 years. The atmospheric model has a horizontal resolution of T63 (approx. 125x125 km) and therefore also allows investigations of regional-to-continental scale climatic phenomena. The volcanic forcing was reconstructed based on a publication by Sigl et al. (2013) using the sulfate records of the NEEM and WAIS ice cores. To obtain information on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) these sulfate records were scaled to an established reconstruction from Crowley and Unterman (2010), which is also a standard forcing in the framework of CMIP5/PMIP3. A comparison between the newly created data set with the Crowley and Unterman dataset reveals that the new reconstruction shows in general weaker intensities, especially of the large tropical outbreaks and fewer northern hemispheric small-to-medium scale eruptions. However, the general pattern in the overlapping period is similar. A hypothesis that can be tested with the simulation is whether the reduced volcanic intensity of the 1st millennium AD contributed to the elevated temperature levels over Europe, evident within a new proxy-based reconstruction. On the other hand, the few but large volcanic eruptions, e.g. the 528 AD event, also induced negative decadal-scale temperature anomalies. Another interesting result of the simulation relates to the 79 AD eruption of the Vesuvius, which caused the collapse of the city of

  20. Improving conversion yield of fermentable sugars into fuel ethanol in 1st generation yeast-based production processes.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2015-06-01

    Current fuel ethanol production using yeasts and starch or sucrose-based feedstocks is referred to as 1st generation (1G) ethanol production. These processes are characterized by the high contribution of sugar prices to the final production costs, by high production volumes, and by low profit margins. In this context, small improvements in the ethanol yield on sugars have a large impact on process economy. Three types of strategies used to achieve this goal are discussed: engineering free-energy conservation, engineering redox-metabolism, and decreasing sugar losses in the process. Whereas the two former strategies lead to decreased biomass and/or glycerol formation, the latter requires increased process and/or yeast robustness.

  1. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event

    PubMed Central

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R⊙. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona. PMID:25685432

  2. Report of the 1st meeting of the "Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISAER)".

    PubMed

    Druml, Christiane; Singer, Ernst A; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The European Directive 2001/20/EC ("Clinical Trials Directive") was aimed at simplifying and harmonising European clinical research. The directive's attempt represents an important step because many European Member States lack national laws that specifically address details of research, but the goal has been only partly achieved. For academic investigators doing national or multi-national research the new European law and the requirements following its implementation are likely to have the opposite effect. Some areas seem to be of particular concern: trial sponsorship, the ethical review process, the participation of patients who are temporarily not able to consent in clinical trials, in particular the informed consent process, an accepted European registry for all clinical trials, insurance and pharmacovigilance. Furthermore there are fundamental problems of the conduct of clinical trials that could have been foreseen at the time of implementation of the new law, which are impeding academic basic clinical research. The bureaucratic burden for academic investigators has tremendously increased without representing any contribution to patients' safety or to the scientific value of research. Furthermore some large European academic trials cannot be conducted anymore due to the new regulations. This result in a reduction in the number of trials and additionally in a reduction in the number of patients enrolled in a study. European research and thus European patients will suffer from the loss of potential benefits of research. The Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISEAR) brings together leading stakeholders from academic research groups and interested parties from industry, international organisations and regulatory authorities to focus on the issues of concern regarding the organisational and funding of academic clinical research in order to improve the development and use of medicines in Europe. The first step of the initiative was a meeting held

  3. Quantitative Proteomic (iTRAQ) Analysis of 1st Trimester Maternal Plasma Samples in Pregnancies at Risk for Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kolla, Varaprasad; Jenö, Paul; Moes, Suzette; Lapaire, Olav; Hoesli, Irene; Hahn, Sinuhe

    2012-01-01

    A current major obstacle is that no reliable screening markers exist to detect pregnancies at risk for preeclampsia. Quantitative proteomic analysis employing isobaric labelling (iTRAQ) has been suggested to be suitable for the detection of potential plasma biomarkers, a feature we recently verified in analysis of pregnancies with Down syndrome foetuses. We have now examined whether this approach could yield biomarkers to screen pregnancies at risk for preeclampsia. In our study, we used maternal plasma samples obtained at 12 weeks of gestation, six from women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and six with uncomplicated deliveries. In our analysis, we observed elevations in 10 proteins out of 64 proteins in the preeclampsia study group when compared to the healthy control group. These proteins included clusterin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, and angiotensinogen, increased levels of which are known to be associated with preeclampsia. An elevation in the immune-modulatory molecule, galectin 3 binding protein, was also noted. Our pilot study, therefore, indicates that quantitative proteomic iTRAQ analysis could be a useful tool for the detection of new preeclampsia screening markers. PMID:22570525

  4. Social and moral norm differences among Portuguese 1st and 6th year medical students towards their intention to comply with hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Magda S; Mearns, Kathryn; Silva, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines social and moral norms towards the intention to comply with hand hygiene among Portuguese medical students from 1st and 6th years (N = 175; 121 from the 1st year, 54 from the 6th year). The study extended the theory of planned behaviour theoretical principles and hypothesised that both subjective and moral norms will be the best predictors of 1st and 6th year medical students' intention to comply with hand hygiene; however, these predictors ability to explain intention variance will change according to medical students' school year. Results indicated that the subjective norm, whose referent focuses on professors, is a relevant predictor of 1st year medical students' intention, while the subjective norm that emphasises the relevance of colleagues predicts the intentions of medical students from the 6th year. In terms of the moral norm, 6th year students' intention is better predicted by a norm that interferes with compliance; whereas intentions from 1st year students are better predicted by a norm that favours compliance. Implications of the findings highlight the importance of role models and mentors as key factors in teaching hand hygiene in medical undergraduate curricula. PMID:22111788

  5. Assessment of the orbits from the 1st IGS reprocessing campaign (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Gendt, G.; Nischan, T.; Ray, J.

    2009-12-01

    All eight Finals Analysis Centers (ACs) of the International GNSS Service (IGS), plus three allied groups, for a total of eleven contributing ACs, are using the latest models and methodology to reanalyze the history of Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected since 1994 by a global network of tracking stations. The solutions from the contributing ACs will be used to form a fully consistent, long-term set of official IGS products, specifically Earth orientation parameters, clocks, orbits and station coordinates. This is the first such reprocessing campaign by the IGS, which is expected to be complete by mid-November, 2009. A second reprocessing campaign will follow as further updates and improvements are made to the models and methodology. This paper, then, focuses on assessing the reliability and quality of the combined orbits from this first campaign, and making recommendations to be considered in preparation for the second campaign. In our preliminary assessment of the reliability of the combined orbits, we have examined the reprocessed AC orbit estimates from the 1025 days of results until the end of 2007. Each daily AC satellite ephemeris for each pair of consecutive days has been fitted to the extended CODE orbit model, extrapolated to the mid-point epoch between the days, and the geocentric satellite position differences computed to give time series of orbit repeatabilities. Occasional data gaps have been filled by linear interpolation, FFT power spectra computed, and the spectra stacked over the full GPS constellation and lightly smoothed. This preliminary analysis of the midnight discontinuities reveals considerable diversity among AC orbits. Several show broad semi-annual and fortnightly spectral peaks, as well as even harmonics of the GPS draconitic year (1.040 cpy) with varying amplitudes. High-frequency white noise floors can be detected in most AC orbit spectra, with an average sigma of 14 mm and larger. The statistics from preliminary orbit

  6. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  7. A Week of Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colasacco, Jenne

    2011-01-01

    Even the most effective teachers have room to grow, but it's not always easy for principals to give adequate guidance through short observations. High school principal Jenne Colasacco decided to bring more depth to her observations by observing each of her teachers during one class for an entire week. The new observation structure, which included…

  8. Swahili 12 Weeks Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-weeks course in basic Swahili comprises 55 lesson units in five volumes. The general course format consists of (1) perception drills for comprehension, oral production, and association using "situational picture" illustrations; (2) dialogs in English and Swahili, with cartoon guides; (3) sequenced pattern and recombination drills, and (4)…

  9. World breastfeeding week.

    PubMed

    Coleridge, Hannah-Lee

    2003-08-01

    'Breastfeeding in a globalised world for peace and justice' is the theme of this year's World Breastfeeding Week, which is to be held at the beginning of August. This article explores the aims of the campaign, the obstacles and benefits of globalisation and the activities that are being held around the world.

  10. Frontline nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: results from the European ENEST1st study

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, A; Rosti, G; Cross, N C P; Steegmann, J L; le Coutre, P; Ossenkoppele, G; Petrov, L; Masszi, T; Hellmann, A; Griskevicius, L; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Rea, D; Coriu, D; Brümmendorf, T H; Porkka, K; Saglio, G; Gastl, G; Müller, M C; Schuld, P; Di Matteo, P; Pellegrino, A; Dezzani, L; Mahon, F-X; Baccarani, M; Giles, F J

    2016-01-01

    The Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials as First-Line Treatment (ENEST1st) study included 1089 patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. The rate of deep molecular response (MR4 (BCR-ABL1⩽0.01% on the International Scale or undetectable BCR-ABL1 with ⩾10 000 ABL1 transcripts)) at 18 months was evaluated as the primary end point, with molecular responses monitored by the European Treatment and Outcome Study network of standardized laboratories. This analysis was conducted after all patients had completed 24 months of study treatment (80.9% of patients) or discontinued early. In patients with typical BCR-ABL1 transcripts and ⩽3 months of prior imatinib therapy, 38.4% (404/1052) achieved MR4 at 18 months. Six patients (0.6%) developed accelerated or blastic phase, and 13 (1.2%) died. The safety profile of nilotinib was consistent with that of previous studies, although the frequencies of some nilotinib-associated adverse events were lower (for example, rash, 21.4%). Ischemic cardiovascular events occurred in 6.0% of patients. Routine monitoring of lipid and glucose levels was not mandated in the protocol. These results support the use of frontline nilotinib, particularly when achievement of a deep molecular response (a prerequisite for attempting treatment-free remission in clinical trials) is a treatment goal. PMID:26437782

  11. Embryonic development of chicken (Gallus Gallus Domesticus) from 1st to 19th day-ectodermal structures.

    PubMed

    Toledo Fonseca, Erika; De Oliveira Silva, Fernanda Menezes; Alcântara, Dayane; Carvalho Cardoso, Rafael; Luís Franciolli, André; Sarmento, Carlos Alberto Palmeira; Fratini, Paula; José Piantino Ferreira, Antônio; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-12-01

    Birds occupy a prominent place in the Brazilian economy not only in the poultry industry but also as an animal model in many areas of scientific research. Thus the aim of this study was to provide a description of macro and microscopic aspects of the ectoderm-derived structures in chicken embryos / fetuses poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) from 1st to 19th day of incubation. 40 fertilized eggs, from a strain of domestic chickens, with an incubation period of 2-19 days were subjected to macroscopic description, biometrics, light, and scanning microscopy. All changes observed during the development were described. The nervous system, skin and appendages and organs related to vision and hearing began to be identified, both macro and microscopically, from the second day of incubation. The vesicles from the primitive central nervous system-forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain-were identified on the third day of incubation. On the sixth day of incubation, there was a clear vascularization of the skin. The optic vesicle was first observed fourth day of development and on the fifth day there was the beginning of the lens formation. Although embryonic development is influenced by animal line as well as external factors such as incubation temperature, this paper provides a chronological description for chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) during its embryonic development. PMID:24019213

  12. 1st Quarter Transportation Report FY 2015: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Louis

    2015-02-20

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 1st quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report include minor volumes of non-radioactive classified waste/material that were approved for disposal (non-radioactive classified or nonradioactive classified hazardous). Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to rounding conventions for volumetric conversions from cubic meters to cubic feet.

  13. A collaborative study to establish the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus for nucleic acid amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jacqueline F; Heath, Alan B; Minor, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the performance of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays presents a significant problem in the diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Here we describe a collaborative study to evaluate the suitability of candidate reference materials to harmonize HCMV viral load measurements in a wide range of NAT assays. Candidate materials comprised lyophilized Merlin virus, liquid Merlin virus, liquid AD169 virus, and purified HCMV Merlin DNA cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. Variability in the laboratory mean HCMV concentrations determined for virus samples across the different assays was 2 log10. Variability for the purified DNA sample was higher (>3 log10). The agreement between laboratories was markedly improved when the potencies of the liquid virus samples were expressed relative to the lyophilized virus candidate. In contrast, the agreement between laboratories for the purified DNA sample was not improved. Results indicated the suitability of the lyophilized Merlin virus preparation as the 1st WHO International Standard for HCMV for NAT. It was established in October 2010, with an assigned potency of 5 × 10(6) International Units (IU) (NIBSC code 09/162). It is intended to be used to calibrate secondary references, used in HCMV NAT assays, in IU. PMID:27179913

  14. Embryonic development of chicken (Gallus Gallus Domesticus) from 1st to 19th day-ectodermal structures.

    PubMed

    Toledo Fonseca, Erika; De Oliveira Silva, Fernanda Menezes; Alcântara, Dayane; Carvalho Cardoso, Rafael; Luís Franciolli, André; Sarmento, Carlos Alberto Palmeira; Fratini, Paula; José Piantino Ferreira, Antônio; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-12-01

    Birds occupy a prominent place in the Brazilian economy not only in the poultry industry but also as an animal model in many areas of scientific research. Thus the aim of this study was to provide a description of macro and microscopic aspects of the ectoderm-derived structures in chicken embryos / fetuses poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) from 1st to 19th day of incubation. 40 fertilized eggs, from a strain of domestic chickens, with an incubation period of 2-19 days were subjected to macroscopic description, biometrics, light, and scanning microscopy. All changes observed during the development were described. The nervous system, skin and appendages and organs related to vision and hearing began to be identified, both macro and microscopically, from the second day of incubation. The vesicles from the primitive central nervous system-forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain-were identified on the third day of incubation. On the sixth day of incubation, there was a clear vascularization of the skin. The optic vesicle was first observed fourth day of development and on the fifth day there was the beginning of the lens formation. Although embryonic development is influenced by animal line as well as external factors such as incubation temperature, this paper provides a chronological description for chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) during its embryonic development.

  15. Child gender and weight status moderate the relation of maternal feeding practices to body esteem in 1st grade children.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Lenka H; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Harrist, Amanda W; Topham, Glade; Page, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of body dissatisfaction development is critical for minimizing adverse effects of poor body esteem on eating behaviors, self-esteem, and overall health. Research has examined body esteem and its correlates largely in pre-adolescents and adolescents; however, important questions remain about factors influencing body esteem of younger children. The main purpose of this study was to test moderation by children's gender and weight status of the relation of maternal controlling feeding practices to 1st graders' body esteem. The Body Esteem Scale (BES) and anthropometric measurements were completed during one-on-one child interviews at school. Mothers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (restriction, monitoring, concern, self-assessed maternal weight). A total of 410 mother/child dyads (202 girls) participated. Percent of children classified as overweight (BMI-for-age ≥85th) was: girls - 29%; boys - 27%. Gender moderated the relation between restriction and body esteem (β = -.140, p = .05), with maternal restriction predicting body esteem in girls but not boys. The hypothesized three-way interaction among gender, child weight status, and monitoring was confirmed. Monitoring was significantly inversely related to body esteem only for overweight/obese girls (b = -1.630). The moderating influence of gender or gender and weight status on the link between maternal feeding practices and body esteem suggests the importance of body esteem interventions for girls as early as first grade. PMID:25624022

  16. Dynamics of the 1st order phase transition between the nuclear ordered phases of solid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takayoshi; Ito, Hideaki; Sasaki, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takao

    2005-08-01

    Dynamics of the 1st order phase transition between the U2D2 and the high field phases (HFP) was studied by field-cycling method between these phases by using ultra low temperature magnetic resonance imaging (ULT-MRI). Single Crystal of U2D2 3He was produced at the bottom of compressional cell in superfluid 3He-B at about 0.5 mK. Domain distribution in the U2D2 crystal was examined by ULT-MRI. We have measured the NMR signal intensity to extract the time-evolution of the HFP, after the static magnetic field was swept quickly through the critical field BC1 and was stayed at B=BC1+ΔB. The volume concentration of the U2D2 decreased exponentially in time during the early stage of the phase transition. The rate constant depended positively on ΔB. After the phase transition to the HFP was completed, the static field decreased through BC1 and was fixed at B=BC1-ΔB. The observed rate constant was similar to the value in the opposite direction with identical ΔB. This exponential evolution and ΔB dependence of its rate suggest that the early stage of the phase transition is controlled by the nucleation process.

  17. Synthesis of nanomagnetic fluids and their UV spectrophotometric response with aliphatic organic acids and 1st tier dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Shivani R.; Singh, Man

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of Magnetic nanoparticles were made using coprecipitation method on mixing Fe+3 and Fe+2 in 2:1 ratio with aqueous 8M NaOH which on heating at 90°C for 2 h has yielded 85% magnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs), characterized by XRD, VSM, SEM, and HR-TEM. The formic acid (FA), oxalic acid (OA) and citric acid (CA), the series of aliphatic organic acids along with Trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridimethyl malonate (TTDMM), trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridiethyl malonate (TTDEM), trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridipropyl malonate (TTDPM), trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridibutyl malonate (TTDBM) and trimesoyl 1, 3, 5 tridihexyl malonate (TTDHM) 1st tier dendrimers were used separately for preparing nanomagnetic fluid. From 25 to 150 µM MNPs at an interval of 25 µM were dispersed in 150 µM of acids and dendrimers separately with DMSO. UV-VIS spectrophotometry showed a maximum MNPs dispersion with TTDMM against others and found to be most stable nanomagnetic fluid on account of capping type mechanism of acids.

  18. Child gender and weight status moderate the relation of maternal feeding practices to body esteem in 1st grade children.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Lenka H; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Harrist, Amanda W; Topham, Glade; Page, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of body dissatisfaction development is critical for minimizing adverse effects of poor body esteem on eating behaviors, self-esteem, and overall health. Research has examined body esteem and its correlates largely in pre-adolescents and adolescents; however, important questions remain about factors influencing body esteem of younger children. The main purpose of this study was to test moderation by children's gender and weight status of the relation of maternal controlling feeding practices to 1st graders' body esteem. The Body Esteem Scale (BES) and anthropometric measurements were completed during one-on-one child interviews at school. Mothers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (restriction, monitoring, concern, self-assessed maternal weight). A total of 410 mother/child dyads (202 girls) participated. Percent of children classified as overweight (BMI-for-age ≥85th) was: girls - 29%; boys - 27%. Gender moderated the relation between restriction and body esteem (β = -.140, p = .05), with maternal restriction predicting body esteem in girls but not boys. The hypothesized three-way interaction among gender, child weight status, and monitoring was confirmed. Monitoring was significantly inversely related to body esteem only for overweight/obese girls (b = -1.630). The moderating influence of gender or gender and weight status on the link between maternal feeding practices and body esteem suggests the importance of body esteem interventions for girls as early as first grade.

  19. Case Study of Severe Lightning Activity Prior to and During the Outbreak of the June 1st Greenbelt Tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, B. H.; Badesha, S.; Shishineh, A.; Adams, N. H.

    2012-12-01

    Surges in lightning activity have been known to be associated with the outbreak of tornado activity. We present a case study of a tornado that touched down near Greenbelt Maryland during the evening of June 1st 2012. Preceding the tornado touchdown, two single point lightning detection systems, a Boltek LD-250 and Vaisala SA20, recorded very high lightning activity rates. An electric field mill (EFM) was also making measurements and recorded large, rapid amplitude oscillations in the vertical electric fields. These electric field oscillations quickly subsided after the initial tornado touchdown. The lightning activity also generated significant RF interference in the S-band dish antenna operated at the Applied Physics Laboratory. It was somewhat surprising that the lightning activity produced enough radiation at these frequencies to cause measured levels of interference which could potentially impair satellite communications. Our interpretation of the EFM data is that intensive vertical forcing and rotation in the thunderstorm during the tornado formation caused the observed rapid electric field oscillations. At the same time, the vertical mixing in the storm caused a surge in lightning activity rates recorded by the Boltek and Vaisala sensors. Following the tornado touchdown, there was a rapid decrease in the lightning rates from the sensors. The EFM oscillations also abruptly ceased and went to a more normal slow-varying pattern typically observed during other thunderstorms without associated tornado activity. It is suggested that a network of field mills could provide realtime warning of imminent tornado activity.

  20. a week in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    collette, christian

    2016-04-01

    COLLETTE Christian Institut Saint Laurent Liège Belgium. I am a science teacher at a technical high school. Generally, my students don't come from a privileged social background and are not particularly motivated for studies. For 10 years, I organize, for one of my sections, a spatial (and special) school year that ends in a spatial week. Throughout this year, with the help of my colleagues, I will introduce into all themes a lot of concepts relating to space. French, history, geography, English, mathematics, technical courses, sciences, and even gymnastics will be training actors in space culture. In spring, I will accompany my class in the Euro Space Center (Redu- Belgium) where we will live one week 24 hours on "like astronauts" One third of the time is dedicated to astronaut training (moonwalk, remote manipulator system, mission simulation, weightless wall, building rockets, satellites, etc.), One third to more intellectual activities on space (lectures, research, discovery of the outside run) the last one third of time in outside visits (museums, site of ESA-Redu) or in movies about space (October sky, Apollo 13, etc.) During this year, the profits, so educational as human, are considerable!

  1. The Impact of Gender-Fair versus Gender-Stereotyped Basal Readers on 1st-Grade Children's Gender Stereotypes: A Natural Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karniol, Rachel; Gal-Disegni, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Israeli 1st-grade children in two different schools in the same neighborhood who were using either a gender-stereotyped or a gender-fair basal reader were asked to judge for a series of female-stereotyped, male-stereotyped, and gender-neutral activities whether they were characteristic of females, of males, or of both. Children using the…

  2. Moving beyond the Lone Scientist: Helping 1st-Grade Students Appreciate the Social Context of Scientific Work Using Stories about Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkawy, Azza

    2009-01-01

    While several studies have documented young children's (K-2) stereotypic views of scientists and scientific work, few have examined students' views of the social nature of scientific work and the strategies effective in broadening these views. The purpose of this study is to examine how stories about scientists influence 1st-grade students' views…

  3. Diagnostic Online Assessment of Basic IT Skills in 1st-Year Undergraduates in the Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieber, Vivien

    2009-01-01

    Attitude, experience and competence (broadly covered by the European Computer Driving Licence syllabus) in information technology (IT) were assessed in 846 1st-year Medical Sciences Division undergraduates (2003-06) at the start of their first term. Online assessments delivered during induction workshops were presented as an opportunity for…

  4. Hybrid distributed Raman amplification combining random fiber laser based 2nd-order and low-noise LD based 1st-order pumping.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Yuan, Cheng-Xu; Li, Jin; Yan, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Wei-Li; Wu, Han; Zhu, Ye-Yu; Peng, Fei

    2013-10-21

    A configuration of hybrid distributed Raman amplification (H-DRA), that is formed by incorporating a random fiber laser (RFL) based 2nd-order pump and a low-noise laser-diode (LD) based 1st-order pump, is proposed in this paper. In comparison to conventional bi-directional 1st-order DRA, the effective noise figure (ENF) is found to be lower by amount of 0 to 4 dB due to the RFL-based 2nd-order pump, depending on the on-off gain, while the low-noise 1st-order Raman pump is used for compensating the worsened signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the vicinity towards the far end of the fiber and avoiding the potential nonlinear impact induced by excess injection of pump power and suppressing the pump-signal relative intensity noise (RIN) transfer. As a result, the gain distribution can be optimized along ultra-long fiber link, due to combination of the 2nd-order RFL and low-noise 1st-order pumping, making the transmission distance be extended significantly. We utilized such a configuration to achieve ultra-long-distance distributed sensing based on Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA). A repeater-less sensing distance record of up to 154.4 km with 5 m spatial resolution and ~ ± 1.4 °C temperature uncertainty is successfully demonstrated.

  5. New approaches for improving the production of the 1st and 2nd generation ethanol by yeast.

    PubMed

    Kurylenko, Olena; Semkiv, Marta; Ruchala, Justyna; Hryniv, Orest; Kshanovska, Barbara; Abbas, Charles; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn; Sibirny, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Increase in the production of 1st generation ethanol from glucose is possible by the reduction in the production of ethanol co-products, especially biomass. We have developed a method to reduce biomass accumulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the manipulation of the intracellular ATP level due to overexpression of genes of alkaline phosphatase, apyrase or enzymes involved in futile cycles. The strains constructed accumulated up to 10% more ethanol on a cornmeal hydrolysate medium. Similar increase in ethanol accumulation was observed in the mutants resistant to the toxic inhibitors of glycolysis like 3-bromopyruvate and others. Substantial increase in fuel ethanol production will be obtained by the development of new strains of yeasts that ferment sugars of the abundant lignocellulosic feedstocks, especially xylose, a pentose sugar. We have found that xylose can be fermented under elevated temperatures by the thermotolerant yeast, Hansenula polymorpha. We combined protein engineering of the gene coding for xylose reductase (XYL1) along with overexpression of the other two genes responsible for xylose metabolism in yeast (XYL2, XYL3) and the deletion of the global transcriptional activator CAT8, with the selection of mutants defective in utilizing ethanol as a carbon source using the anticancer drug, 3-bromopyruvate. Resulted strains accumulated 20-25 times more ethanol from xylose at the elevated temperature of 45°C with up to 12.5 g L(-1) produced. Increase in ethanol yield and productivity from xylose was also achieved by overexpression of genes coding for the peroxisomal enzymes: transketolase (DAS1) and transaldolase (TAL2), and deletion of the ATG13 gene. PMID:26619255

  6. Cognitive-based approach in teaching 1st year Physics for Life Sciences, including Atmospheric Physics and Climate Change components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelina, S. V.

    2009-12-01

    Most 1st year students who take the service course in Physics - Physics for Life Sciences - in Australia encounter numerous problems caused by such factors as no previous experience with this subject; general perception that Physics is hard and only very gifted people are able to understand it; lack of knowledge of elementary mathematics; difficulties encountered by lecturers in teaching university level Physics to a class of nearly 200 students with no prior experience, diverse and sometime disadvantageous backgrounds, different majoring areas, and different learning abilities. As a result, many students either drop, or fail the subject. In addition, many of those who pass develop a huge dislike towards Physics, consider the whole experience as time wasted, and spread this opinion among their peers and friends. The above issues were addressed by introducing numerous changes to the curriculum and modifying strategies and approaches in teaching Physics for Life Sciences. Instead of a conventional approach - teaching Physics from simple to complicated, topic after topic, the students were placed in the world of Physics in the same way as a newborn child is introduced to this world - everything is seen all the time and everywhere. That created a unique environment where a bigger picture and all details were always present and interrelated. Numerous concepts of classical and modern physics were discussed, compared, and interconnected all the time with “Light” being a key component. Our primary field of research is Atmospheric Physics, in particular studying the atmospheric composition and structure using various satellite and ground-based data. With this expertise and also inspired by an increasing importance of training a scientifically educated generation who understands the challenges of the modern society and responsibilities that come with wealth, a new section on environmental physics has been developed. It included atmospheric processes and the greenhouse

  7. PREFACE: 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    Dear Colleagues, 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on March 25 - 27, 2014 at St. Petersburg Academic University - Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim to introduce young scientists with actual problems and major advances in physics and technology. The keynote speakers were: Mikhail Glazov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Vladimir Dubrovskii (Saint Petersburg Academic University RAS, Russia) Alexey Kavokin (University of Southampton, United Kingdom and St. Petersburg State University, Russia) Vladimir Korenev (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Sergey Kukushkin (Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering RAS, Russia) Nikita Pikhtin (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia and "Elfolum" Ltd., Russia) Dmitry Firsov (Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Russia) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. Sufficiently large number of participants with more than 160 student attendees from all over the world allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for the fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers basing on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year's School and Conference is supported by SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics), OSA (The Optical Society), St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University and by Skolkovo Foundation. It is a continuation of the annual schools and

  8. Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks • What is a “medically indicated” delivery? • What is ... the baby grow and develop during the last weeks of pregnancy? • What are the risks for babies ...

  9. Daily practice management of myelodysplastic syndromes in France: data from 907 patients in a one-week cross-sectional study by the Groupe Francophone des Myélodysplasies

    PubMed Central

    Kelaidi, Charikleia; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Quesnel, Bruno; Guerci, Agnes; Dreyfus, François; Brechignac, Sabine; Berthou, Christian; Prebet, Thomas; Hicheri, Yosr; Hacini, Maya; Delaunay, Jacques; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Camo, Jean-Marie; Zerazhi, Hacene; Taksin, Anne-Laure; Legros, Laurence; Choufi, Bachra; Fenaux, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Background There is little published information on the everyday clinical management of myelodysplastic syndromes in real world practice. Design and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of all patients with myelodysplastic syndromes attending 74 French centers in a 1-week period for inpatient admission, day-hospital care or outpatient visits. Results Nine hundred and seven patients were included; 67.3% had lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (International Prognostic Scoring System: low or intermediate-1). Karyotype had been analyzed in 82.5% of the cases and was more often of intermediate or poor risk in patients under 65 years old compared with those who were older. Red blood cell transfusions accounted for as many as 31.4% of the admissions. Endogenous erythropoietin level was less than 500 IU/L in 88% of the patients tested. Erythroid stimulating agents had been or were being used in 36.8% of the lower risk patients, iron chelation in 31% of lower risk patients requiring red blood cell transfusions and lenalidomide in 41% of lower risk patients with del 5q. High-dose chemotherapy, hypomethylating agents, low dose cytarabine and allogeneic stem cell transplantation had been or were being used in 14.8%, 31.1%, 8.8% and 5.1%, respectively, of higher-risk patients. Conclusions Karyotype is now assessed in most patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and patients under 65 years old may have more aggressive disease. Apart from erythroid-stimulating agents and, in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, hypomethylating agents, specific treatments are used in a minority of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and red blood cell transfusions still represent the major reason for hospital admission. PMID:20015890

  10. A Randomized Phase III Trial of IV Carboplatin and Paclitaxel x 3 Courses Followed by Observation Versus Weekly Maintenance Low Dose Paclitaxel in Patients with Early Stage Ovarian Carcinoma: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Mannel, Robert S; Brady, Mark F; Kohn, Elise C.; Hanjani, Parviz; Hiura, Masamichi; Lee, Roger; DeGeest, Koen; Cohn, David E; Monk, Bradley J.; Michael, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the recurrence-free interval (RFI), and safety profile in patients with completely resected high-risk early-stage ovarian cancer patients treated with intravenous (IV) carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without maintenance low-dose paclitaxel for 24 weeks. Methods Eligibility was limited to patients with Stage I-A/B (Grade 3 or clear cell), all I-C or II epithelial ovarian cancer. All patients were to receive carboplatin AUC 6 and paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 q 3 wks × 3 courses with random assignment to either observation or maintenance paclitaxel 40 mg/m2/wk × 24 wks. Recurrence required clinical or radiological evidence of new tumor. Results There were 571 patients enrolled onto this study, of whom 29 were deemed ineligible due to inappropriate stage or pathology, leaving 542 patients. At least 3 cycles of treatment were administered to 524/542 (97%) of patients, and among those assigned to maintenance paclitaxel, 80% completed the regimen. The incidence of grade 2 or worse peripheral neuropathy (15.5% vs 6%), infection/fever (19.9% vs 8.7%), and dermatologic events (70.8% vs 52.1%) were higher on the maintenance regimen (p<0.001). The cumulative probability of recurring within 5 years for the maintenance paclitaxel regimen is 20% vs. 23% for surveillance (hazard ratio 0.807; 95% CI: 0.565–1.15). The probability of surviving 5 years was 85.4% and 86.2%, respectively. Conclusion Maintenance paclitaxel at 40 mg/m2/wk × 24 wks added to standard dose AUC6 and paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 × 3 doses provides no significant increase in RFI. PMID:21529904

  11. 1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on processes and skills for education in cardiology in Brazil--executive summary.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcos Roberto de; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Köhler, Ilmar; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Schneider, Jamil Cherem; Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ferreira, João Fernando Monteiro; Morais, Nelson Siqueira de

    2012-02-01

    This article summarizes the "1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on Processes and Skills for Education in Cardiology in Brazil," which can be found in full at: . The guideline establishes the education time required in Internal Medicine and Cardiology with Specialization through theoretical and practical training. These requirements must be available at the center forming Specialists in Cardiology and the Cardiology contents.

  12. All-optical 1st- and 2nd-order differential equation solvers with large tuning ranges using Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaisheng; Hou, Jie; Huang, Zhuyang; Cao, Tong; Zhang, Jihua; Yu, Yuan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-optical temporal computation scheme for solving 1st- and 2nd-order linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with tunable constant coefficients by using Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifiers (FP-SOAs). By changing the injection currents of FP-SOAs, the constant coefficients of the differential equations are practically tuned. A quite large constant coefficient tunable range from 0.0026/ps to 0.085/ps is achieved for the 1st-order differential equation. Moreover, the constant coefficient p of the 2nd-order ODE solver can be continuously tuned from 0.0216/ps to 0.158/ps, correspondingly with the constant coefficient q varying from 0.0000494/ps(2) to 0.006205/ps(2). Additionally, a theoretical model that combining the carrier density rate equation of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with the transfer function of the Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity is exploited to analyze the solving processes. For both 1st- and 2nd-order solvers, excellent agreements between the numerical simulations and the experimental results are obtained. The FP-SOAs based all-optical differential-equation solvers can be easily integrated with other optical components based on InP/InGaAsP materials, such as laser, modulator, photodetector and waveguide, which can motivate the realization of the complicated optical computing on a single integrated chip.

  13. Couples groups for parents of preschoolers: ten-year outcomes of a randomized trial*

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Carolyn Pape; Cowan, Philip A.; Barry, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a 10-year follow-up of two variations of a couples group preventive intervention offered to couples in the year before their oldest child made the transition to kindergarten. 100 couples were randomly assigned to (1) a low-dose control condition, (2) a couples group meeting for 16 weeks that focused more on couple relationship issues among other family topics, or (3) a couples group meeting for 16 weeks that focused more on parenting issues among other family issues, with an identical curriculum to condition (2). Earlier papers reported that both variations of the intervention produced positive results on parent-child relationships and on the children’s adaptation to kindergarten and 1st grade, and that the groups emphasizing couple relationships also had additional positive effects on couple interaction quality. The present paper uses growth curve analyses to examine intervention effects extending from the children’s transition to kindergarten to the transition to high school – ten years after the couples groups ended. There were 6-year positive effects of the pre-kindergarten interventions on observed couple interaction and 10-year positive effects on both parents’ marital satisfaction and the children’s adaptation (hyperactivity and aggression). Discussion includes a focus on the implications of these results for family policy, clinical practice, and the need to include a couples focus in preventive interventions to strengthen family relationships and enhance children’s adaptation to school. PMID:21480703

  14. Psychological adjustment among African American breast cancer patients: one-year follow-up results of a randomized psychoeducational group intervention.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn L; Lamdan, Ruth M; Siegel, Jamie E; Shelby, Rebecca; Moran-Klimi, Karen; Hrywna, Mary

    2003-05-01

    The effectiveness of support group interventions for cancer patients has been established among White patients but has been virtually unstudied among minority patients. The current study represents the 1st randomized support group intervention targeted to African American women with breast cancer. Participants (N = 73) with nonmetastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned to an 8-week group intervention or an assessment-only control condition At 12 months, the intervention resulted in improved mood as well as improved general and cancer-specific psychological functioning among women with greater baseline distress or lower income. Subsequent research is needed to address effective methods of enrolling and following women with fewer psychosocial and financial resources, as they were the most likely to benefit from this particular intervention.

  15. Ovarian Features after 2 Weeks, 3 Weeks and 4 Weeks Transdermal Testosterone Gel Treatment and Their Associated Effect on IVF Outcomes in Poor Responders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Ahn, Jun-Woo; Moon, Jei-Won; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of of transdermal testosterone gel (TTG) on controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and IVF outcomes and ovarian morphology according to pretreatment duration in poor responders. A total of 120 women were recruited for this pilot study. They were randomized into control, 2 weeks, 3 weeks or 4 weeks TTG treatment groups. For three TTG treatment groups, 12.5 mg TTG was applied daily for 2 weeks, 3 weeks or 4 weeks in preceding period of study stimulation cycle. After 3 weeks of TTG pretreatment, significant increase of antral follicle count (AFC) and significant decreases of mean follicular diameter (MFD) and resistance index (RI) value of ovarian stromal artery were observed (p=0.026, p<0.001, p<0.01, respectively). The total dose of rhFSH administered for COS significantly decreased after 3 and 4 weeks TTG treatment both compared with control group (p<0.001, p<0.001). The numbers of oocytes retrieved and mature oocytes were significanty higher in 3 and 4 weeks TTG treatment groups than control group (p<0.001, p<0.001 in the number of oocytes retrieved; p<0.001, p<0.001 in the number of mature oocytes). The clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate were increased only in 4 weeks TTG treatment group compared with control group (p=0.030 and p=0.042, respectively). These data demonstrated that TTG pretreatment for 3 to 4 weeks increases AFC and ovarian stromal blood flow, thereby potentially improving the ovarian response to COS and IVF outcome in poor responders undergoing IVF/ICSI. PMID:25949183

  16. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  17. Monitoring 6 weeks of progressive endurance training with plasma glutamine.

    PubMed

    Kargotich, S; Keast, D; Goodman, C; Bhagat, C I; Joske, D J L; Dawson, B; Morton, A R

    2007-03-01

    The distinction between positive and negative training adaptation is an important prerequisite in the identification of any marker for monitoring training in athletes. To investigate the glutamine responses to progressive endurance training, twenty healthy males were randomly assigned to a training group or a non-exercising control group. The training group performed a progressive (3 to 6 x 90 minute sessions per week at 70 % V.O (2max)) six-week endurance training programme on a cycle ergometer, while the control group did not participate in any exercise during this period. Performance assessments (V.O (2max) and time to exhaustion) and resting blood samples (for haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, cortisol, ferritin, creatine kinase, glutamine, uric acid and urea analysis) were obtained prior to the commencement of training (Pre) and at the end of week 2, week 4 and week 6. The training group showed significant improvements in time to exhaustion (p < 0.01), and V.O (2max) (p < 0.05) at all time points (except week 2 for V.O (2max)), while the control group performance measures did not change. In the training group, haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit were significantly lower (p < 0.01) than pretraining values at week 2 and 4, as percentage changes in plasma volume indicated a significant (p < 0.01) haemodilution (+ 6 - 9 %) was present at week 2, 4 and 6. No changes were seen in the control group. In the training group, plasma glutamine (week 2, 4 and 6), creatine kinase (week 2 and 4), uric acid (week 2 and 4) and urea (week 2 and 4) all increased significantly from pretraining levels. No changes in cortisol or ferritin were found in the training group and no changes in any blood variables were present in the control group. Plasma glutamine was the only blood variable to remain significantly above pretraining (966 +/- 32 micromol . 1 (-1)) levels at week 6 (1176 +/- 24 micromol . 1 (-1); p < 0.05) The elevation seen here in glutamine levels, after 6

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of the distal movement of maxillary 1st molars in patients fitted with mini-implant-aided trans-palatal arches

    PubMed Central

    Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Sajedi, Ahmad; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate three-dimensional molar displacement after distalization via miniscrews and a horizontal modification of the trans-palatal-arch (TPA). Methods The subjects in this clinical trial were 26 Class II patients. After the preparation of a complete set of diagnostic records, miniscrews were inserted between the maxillary 2nd premolar and 1st molar on the palatal side. Elastic modules connected to the TPA exerting an average force of 150-200 g/side parallel to the occlusal plane were applied. Cone-beam computed tomography was utilized to evaluate the position of the miniscrews relative to the adjacent teeth and maxillary sinus, and the direction of force relative to molar furcation. The distances from the central point of the incisive papilla to the mesiopalatal cusps of the 1st maxillary molars and the distances between the mesiopalatal cusps of the left and right molars were measured to evaluate displacement of the maxillary molars on the horizontal plane. Interocclusal space was used to evaluate vertical changes. Results Mean maxillary 1st molar distalization was 2.3 ± 1.1 mm, at a rate of 0.4 ± 0.2 mm/month, and rotation was not significant. Intermolar width increased by 2.9 ± 1.8 mm. Molars were intruded relative to the neighboring teeth, from 0.1 to 0.8 mm. Conclusions Distalization of molars was possible without extrusion, using the appliance investigated. The intrusive component of force reduced the rate of distal movement. PMID:26445718

  19. ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution and their implication for feto-maternal incompatibility among the Palestinian population.

    PubMed

    Dudin, A A; Rambaud-Cousson, A; Badawi, S; Da'na, N A; Thalji, A; Hannoun, A

    1993-01-01

    ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution was evaluated among Palestinian women in the southern area of the West Bank and east Jerusalem. Eleven per cent of women were Rh(D) negative. The review of the last 12,169 deliveries at Makassed Hospital showed that 4.8% of Rh(D)-negative mothers gave birth to Rh(D)-positive infants with haemolytic disease of the newborn. Thirty per cent of A or B infants born to O Rh(D)-positive mothers had a positive direct antiglobulin test with the presence of allo-immune A or B antibody in infant serum. ABO incompatibility was a major reason for phototherapy during the 1st week of life. Results and possibilities for prevention are discussed.

  20. VARIATION OCCURRING IN GROUP A STREPTOCOCCI DURING HUMAN INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Rothbard, Sidney; Watson, Robert F.

    1948-01-01

    A study was made of the variation occurring in group A streptococci during the natural course of infection in man. From 54 patients with 56 different group A streptococcal infections of the upper respiratory tract, 251 strains of streptococci, isolated at weekly intervals following infection, were tested for their capacity to resist the bacteriostatic action of normal human blood. In 52 of the infections the streptococci were of recognized serological types and were also tested for variation in their ability to produce the type-specific M protein antigen. Strains isolated in the 1st week of infection were uniformly highly resistant to bacteriostasis and elaborated large amounts of M substance. In 42 per cent of the 52 infections, strains isolated in the convalescent and carrier stages showed an increasing susceptibility to bacteriostasis correlated with a progressive loss of M substance; whereas in the remaining 58 per cent resistance to bacteriostasis and the capacity to produce M protein were maintained throughout the observation period. In 3 different infections, the streptococci became so degraded that no M protein could be demonstrated in acid extracts of these variants. Concomitantly these strains became highly susceptible to bacteriostasis. Spontaneous reversion did not occur, but serial mouse passage reestablished these functions. These degraded variants had the same T antigen as their respective original strains. No evidence was obtained that variation of group A streptococci in resistance to bacteriostasis or in the ability to produce the type-specific M antigen was associated (a) with the appearance of type-specific bacteriostatic antibodies; (b) with any particular serological type of streptococcus; (c) with the production of streptococcal proteinase which digests the M protein; (d) with the therapeutic administration of sulfadiazine; or (e) with the development of complications. The possible relationship of these observations to the problem of the

  1. Adult Learners' Week in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, John

    2002-01-01

    Promotional materials and activities for Australia's Adult Learners Week, which are shaped by a variety of stakeholders , include media strategies and a website. Activities are evaluated using a market research company and website and telephone hotline statistics. (SK)

  2. Understanding abnormal potential behaviors at the 1st charge in Li2S cathode material for rechargeable Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yongjo; Kang, Byoungwoo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, electrochemical behaviors of Li2S such as a large potential barrier at the beginning of the 1st charging process and a continuous increase in potential to ∼4 V during the rest of this process were understood through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and electrochemical evaluations for a full utilization of Li2S. The large potential barrier to the 1st charge in Li2S can be caused by the presence of insulating oxidized products (Li2SO3 or Li2SO4-like structures) on the surface; simple surface etching can remove them and thereby reduce the potential barrier. Even though the potential barrier was substantially reduced, the electrochemical activity of Li2S might not be improved due to the continuous increase in potential. This increase in potential was related to the polarization caused by the Li2S-conversion reaction; the polarization can affect the utilization of Li2S in subsequent cycles. We speculate that the increase in potential is related to the decomposition of oxidized products such as Li2CO3-like or Li2O-like structures on the surface of the Li2S particles. These findings indicate that the full utilization of Li2S can be achieved by controlling their surface characteristics, especially the surface oxidation products. PMID:27426215

  3. [Risk of death 4 years after a 1st cerebral infarction: prospective study in Barquisimeto, Estado Lara, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Poni, E; Granero, R; Escobar, B

    1995-12-01

    Stroke, the 5th. cause of death in Venezuela, has been associated to cerebral infarction. However, there is little information concerning lethality factors. 33 atherothrombotic subtype stroke patients, 31 (96%) Latino and 2(4%) white, were admitted into a prospective study to analyze the role of 11 mortality risk factors for those patients. A mortality relative risk (RR) > 1.5 or < 1 (protective) was considered clinically important if 1 was excluded from the 95% confidence interval (95%CI). The Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square procedure was use to test statistical significance (p < 0.05). Mortality RR for patients age 65 and over (RR = 2.95) and 4 year mortality RR for male patients (RR = 2.04) were clinically and statistically significant. History of high blood pressure was protective (RR = 0.62) probably due to good medical control. Cumulative mortality was higher than that of comparable studies, even from the first week of follow-up, reaching 67% at the 4th year.

  4. ONE WEEK VERSUS FOUR WEEK HEPARIN PROPHYLAXIS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR COLORECTAL CANCER.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-28

    The Primary Study Objective is to Assess the Efficacy and; Safety of Extended 4-week Heparin Prophylaxis Compared to; Prophylaxis Given for 8±2 Days After Planned Laparoscopic; Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.; The Clinical Benefit Will be Evaluated as the Difference in; the Incidence of VTE or VTE-related Death Occurring Within 30 Days; From Surgery in the Two Study Groups.

  5. Bridging the gap in 1st year dental material curriculum: A 3 year randomized cross over trial

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Sivaranjani; Shetty, Vibha; Murthy, N. S.; Marimuthu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Case-oriented small group discussions (COSGDs) can help students to correlate and integrate the basic science of dental materials into clinical application. We used COSGDs along with didactic lectures in dental material curriculum and hypothesized that case-oriented group discussions would be more effective than traditional lecture alone in terms of performance of students, student perception on the above two teaching methodologies and the feasibility in classes of 2010, 2011 and 2012. Methods: A total of 170 students were taught using both COSGD and didactic lecture in a randomized controlled crossover trial design. Their performance was assessed through multiple-choice questions (MCQs) as part of the formative assessment, and their perception was assessed through Likert scale questionnaire. Results: The mean difference in the scores between case-oriented group discussions with lecture and didactic lecture showed significant difference only in few topics. Around 94–96% of students perceived COSGD with didactic lecture help them understand theory better; 76–92% of students feel more comfortable asking questions in a group discussion; 89–98% of students feel such discussions motivate them and 91–100% of students agree that discussions make the subject interesting in the respective years of 2010, 2011 and 2012. Conclusion: Effectiveness of COSGD in terms of scores through MCQs is comparable to traditional lecture. However, most of the students perceive COSGD help them understand the theory better; co-relate clinically; more motivating and interesting than a traditional lecture. Feasibility in institution needs more time and resources to conduct COSGD within the dental material curriculum. PMID:26929520

  6. ODYSSEY MONO: effect of alirocumab 75 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks as monotherapy versus ezetimibe over 24 weeks.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eli M; McKenney, James M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Alirocumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody to PCSK9. The ODYSSEY MONO study was the first alirocumab Phase III study to test a previously unused dose of 75 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks in a population on no lipid-lowering therapy. A total of 103 patients were randomly assigned to alirocumab starting at 75 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks or ezetimibe 10 mg per os every day with alirocumab dose uptitration at 12 weeks based on achieved LDL-cholesterol level at week 8 and followed to week 24. At the week-24 primary end point, the alirocumab intent-to-treat group showed a 47.2% (least square [LS] mean) reduction in LDL-cholesterol compared with a 15.6% (LS mean) reduction with ezetimibe (LS mean difference of 31.6%; p < 0.0001). Safety parameters and adverse events were similar between the two groups. PMID:25606700

  7. Results of Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty Using 36 mm Femoral Heads on 1st Generation Highly Cross Linked Polyethylene in Patients 50 Years and Less with Minimum Five Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Kee; Kim, Hee-soo; Nam, Jun-Ho; Chae, Seung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the clinical and radiographic midterm results of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a 36 mm diameter femoral head on 1st generation highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) in patients 50 years and less with minimum five year follow-up. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 31 patients (41 hips) aged 50 years and less underwent primary THA with a 36 mm diameter femoral head on HXLPE between 2004 and 2010. Clinical follow-ups included specific measurements like modified Harris hip scores (HHS) and Merle d'Aubigne and Postel score. For radiologic evaluations, together with position of acetabular cup at six weeks later of postoperation, we separately calculated the penentrations of femoral head into polyethylene liners during postoperation and one year later check-ups, and during one year later check-ups and final check-ups. Results There were no major complications except for one case of dislocation. Average modified HHS at final follow-up was 88 (81-98), and Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scores were more than 15. Mean acetabular cup inclination and anteversion were 45.81°(36.33°-54.91°) and 13.26°(6.72°-27.71°), respectively. Average femoral head penetration of steady-state wear rate determined using radiographs taken at one-year postoperatively and at latest follow-up was 0.042±0.001 mm/year. Conclusion Based on minimum 5 years clinical results, we think 36 mm metal head coupling with HXLPE as the good alternate articulation surface when planning THA for patients aged 50 years and less. PMID:27536648

  8. Dad’s Last Week

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    I had intended to spend our spring break week in Montana with my kids and my dad, going to parks and museums together. Instead, I spent the week in the hospital, helping my dad make end-of-life choices and learning more about the importance of communication in health care settings and the preciousness of close relationships in life. I am a better person and a better physician because my dad trusted me to be there while he was dying. During his last week, I was grateful to have spent years studying medicine and years getting to know my dad. This combination of professional and personal knowledge enabled me to help him choose his own end-of-life path. As someone who does not like hospitals, I have always wondered why I became a doctor; now I know. PMID:27185000

  9. Specialty preferences of 1st year medical students in a Saudi Medical School – Factors affecting these choices and the influence of gender

    PubMed Central

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Qureshi, Habib; Al Wadani, Fahad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: In recent years there has been a growing appreciation of the issues of career preference in medicine as it affects student learning and academic performance. Various factors influence the specialty choices of medical students. Some specialties tend to attract students more than others. One possible consequence of this would be a mismatch between health needs and specialist numbers in the region. This study investigated the career preferences of 1st year medical students in a Saudi medical school and to assess factors affecting these choices. Materials and Methods: The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out on the 1st year undergraduate students in the college of medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A total of 109 students (57 female and 52 males) responded to the questionnaire which was initially administered to all the students of the 1st year – A total of 120 students (response rate was 90.8%). A mixed method approach was used and qualitative data from open-ended questions were analyzed based on thematic analysis. Results: The top choices were general surgery, internal medicine, and pediatrics. Among female students; the top specialty choices were: General surgery (23%), pediatrics (18%), and dermatology (15%). Among the male students; the top choices were: General surgery (54%) and internal medicine (23%). Of the total, 57% of the students agreed or strongly agreed that primary aptitude was the main factor affecting the choice. Only 31% felt that there was a significant influence of role model, 48% felt that the advice of others – peers and family, would be a factor influencing their choices, and 53% agreed that specialty choice would influence their future learning patterns. Males were more likely to choose a specialty based on actual aptitude for the specialty, financial rewards, and scope for research; and this gender difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Surgery was the top-choice in both genders

  10. Seasonal variation in nutrient uptake in a 1st-order tributary of Lake Superior and implications for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, A. A.; Marcarelli, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In-stream biogeochemical cycling can control the timing and form of nutrients exported from watersheds to downstream ecosystems, and seasonal changes in light availability, discharge, temperature, or nutrient inputs may affect nutrient transformation and retention. Without an understanding of how in-stream biogeochemical cycling varies seasonally in snow-dominated regions it is uncertain how climate change will affect nutrient export to downstream ecosystems. Further compounding this uncertainty, few studies have examined in-stream nutrient processing during winter. Long-term monitoring (30 years) of climate and snowpack at Calumet watershed, a first order tributary of Lake Superior, has documented trends of increasing winter temperatures and greater snowmelt contributions to early season runoff. Identifying environmental variables that drive nutrient uptake is important because these observed trends may shift the timing of nutrient pulses relative to water temperatures and light availability. We hypothesized that ammonium (NH4) uptake velocity, a measure of nutrient uptake efficiency, would be greater in spring and fall due to increased light availability and nutrient pulses contributed by snowmelt in spring and leaf litter in fall. To test this hypothesis, we measured nutrient uptake velocity of ammonium (NH4) at 2-4 week intervals for one year in Calumet watershed by releasing inorganic nutrients (NH4Cl, KH2PO4) and a conservative tracer (rhodamine WT) into the stream and quantifying changes in nutrient and tracer concentrations along the stream reach. Canopy cover, ambient NH4 concentrations, stream water temperature, periphyton biomass, and discharge were also measured to identify which environmental covariates affected NH4 uptake velocities. The lowest NH4 uptake velocities were observed in winter (2.33 mm min-1) and summer months (2.03-2.08 mm min-1). Spring NH4 uptake velocities were variable: the greatest uptake velocities were observed following snowmelt

  11. Spatial epidemiology in zoonotic parasitic diseases: insights gained at the 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health in Lijiang, China, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Lv, Shan; Yang, Guo-Jing; Kristensen, Thomas K; Bergquist, N Robert; Utzinger, Jürg; Malone, John B

    2009-01-01

    The 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health was convened in Lijiang, Yunnan province, People's Republic of China from 8 to 9 September, 2007. The objective was to review progress made with the application of spatial techniques on zoonotic parasitic diseases, particularly in Southeast Asia. The symposium featured 71 presentations covering soil-transmitted and water-borne helminth infections, as well as arthropod-borne diseases such as leishmaniasis, malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The work made public at this occasion is briefly summarized here to highlight the advances made and to put forth research priorities in this area. Approaches such as geographical information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing (RS), including spatial statistics, web-based GIS and map visualization of field investigations, figured prominently in the presentation. PMID:19193214

  12. JANNAF 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S.; Becker, Dorothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Volume I, the first of three volumes, is a compilation of 24 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee, 37th Combustion Subcommittee and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meeting held jointly with the 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered include: a Keynote Address on Future Combat Systems, a review of the new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on Hyper-X propulsion development and verification; GTX airbreathing launch vehicles; Hypersonic technology development, including program overviews, fuels for advanced propulsion, ramjet and scramjet research, hypersonic test medium effects; and RBCC engine design and performance, and PDE and UCAV advanced and combined cycle engine technologies.

  13. [State of the reproductive systemin in male rats of 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and exposed to electromagnetic radiation (897 MHz) during embryogenesis and postnatal development].

    PubMed

    Vereshchako, G G; Chueshova, N V; Gorokh, G A; Naumov, A D

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation from cellular phone (897 MHz, daily 8 h/day) in male rats of the 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and subjected to prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation of the range of mobile communications during ontogeny and postnatal development were studied. It has been found that irradiation causes a decrease in the number of births of animals, changing the sex ratio towards the increase in the number of males. It had a significant impact on the reproductive system of males, accelerating their sexual development, revealed at the age of two months. Radiation from cell phones led to significant disproportions in the cell number at different stages of spermatogenesis. It increased the number of mature spermatozoa which decreased viability.

  14. [State of the reproductive systemin in male rats of 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and exposed to electromagnetic radiation (897 MHz) during embryogenesis and postnatal development].

    PubMed

    Vereshchako, G G; Chueshova, N V; Gorokh, G A; Naumov, A D

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation from cellular phone (897 MHz, daily 8 h/day) in male rats of the 1st generation obtained from irradiated parents and subjected to prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation of the range of mobile communications during ontogeny and postnatal development were studied. It has been found that irradiation causes a decrease in the number of births of animals, changing the sex ratio towards the increase in the number of males. It had a significant impact on the reproductive system of males, accelerating their sexual development, revealed at the age of two months. Radiation from cell phones led to significant disproportions in the cell number at different stages of spermatogenesis. It increased the number of mature spermatozoa which decreased viability. PMID:25764821

  15. Understanding Stress-Related Behavioral Phenotypes: Report from the 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International “Stress and Behavior” Conference

    PubMed Central

    LaPorte, J. L.; Klimenko, V. M.; Kalueff, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    The 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International Multidisciplinary Neuroscience and Biopsychiatry Conference on Stress and Behavior were held in St. Petersburg, Russia, during May 9–20, 2008. The summer school gathered 30 talented young scientists from 15 countries worldwide, and was dedicated to different topics of behavioral neuroscience. Many interactive courses were provided on neuropharmacology, animal phenotyping, and biopsychology. The conference's excellent scientific and social program attracted almost 500 delegates from 40 countries from many areas of stress research. The eclectic interaction between medical doctors, basic scientists, psychologists, and students made for a productive and collaborative environment, which contributed greatly to the success of the school and conference.

  16. Portuguese Special Course: 12 Weeks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-week course in beginning Portuguese comprises four volumes of student text (Lessons 1-55) and a fifth volume of Portuguese-English/English-Portuguese vocabulary. Lesson materials consist of basic dialogs with English translation, recombination dialogs, readings and comprehension questions, oral exercises, and in later units, additional…

  17. Impact of the training on the compliance and persistence of weekly bisphosphonate treatment in postmenopausal osteoporosis: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Şansın; Akyüz, Gülseren; Eskiyurt, Nurten; Memiş, Asuman; Kuran, Banu; İçağasıoğlu, Afitap; Sarpel, Tunay; Özdemir, Ferda; Özgirgin, Neşe; Günaydın, Rezzan; Cakçı, Aytül; Yurtkuran, Merih

    2013-01-01

    25.4 vs. 34.0±14.6, p<0.001); however, the difference was not significant between AT and PT groups both in visit 1 and visit 5. In conclusion, in addition to active training, passive training provided at the 1(st) visit did not improve the persistence and compliance of the patients for bisphosphonate treatment.

  18. Weekly Paclitaxel in the Adjuvant Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Molin; Martino, Silvana; Jones, Vicky; Perez, Edith A.; Saphner, Tom; Wolff, Antonio C.; Sledge, George W.; Wood, William C.; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND We compared the efficacy of two different taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, given either weekly or every 3 weeks, in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. METHODS We enrolled 4950 women with axillary lymph node–positive or high-risk, lymph node–negative breast cancer. After randomization, all patients first received 4 cycles of intravenous doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide at 3-week intervals and were then assigned to intravenous paclitaxel or docetaxel given at 3-week intervals for 4 cycles or at 1-week intervals for 12 cycles. The primary end point was disease-free survival. RESULTS As compared with patients receiving standard therapy (paclitaxel every 3 weeks), the hazard ratio for disease-free survival was 1.27 among those receiving weekly paclitaxel (P = 0.006), 1.23 among those receiving docetaxel every 3 weeks (P = 0.02), and 1.09 among those receiving weekly docetaxel (P = 0.29) (with a hazard ratio >1 favoring the groups receiving experimental therapy). As compared with standard therapy, weekly paclitaxel was also associated with improved survival (hazard ratio, 1.32; P = 0.01). An exploratory analysis of a subgroup of patients whose tumors expressed no human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 protein found similar improvements in disease-free and overall survival with weekly paclitaxel treatment, regardless of hormone-receptor expression. Grade 2, 3, or 4 neuropathy was more frequent with weekly paclitaxel than with paclitaxel every 3 weeks (27% vs. 20%). CONCLUSIONS Weekly paclitaxel after standard adjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide improves disease-free and overall survival in women with breast cancer. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00004125.) PMID:18420499

  19. Astronomy Week in Madeira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.; Sobrinho, J. L.

    2012-05-01

    The outreach programme Semanas da Astronomia (Astronomy Weeks) is held in late spring or summer on the island of Madeira, Portugal. This programme has been attracting enough interest to be mentioned in the regional press/TV/radio every year and is now, without doubt, the astronomical highlight of the year on Madeira. We believe that this programme is a good case study for showing how to attract the general public to astronomy in a small (population 250 000, area 900 km2) and fairly isolated place such as Madeira. Our Astronomy Weeks have been different each year and have so far included exhibitions, courses, talks, a forum, documentaries, observing sessions (some with blackouts), music and an astro party. These efforts may contribute towards putting Madeira on the map with respect to observational astronomy, and have also contributed to the planned installation of two observatories in the island.

  20. Six Week Slavery Novel Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Darolyn Lyn

    Developed in conjunction with a graduate course and used in classrooms with all types of learners, this paper presents a 6-week unit of study on slavery based on two adolescent novels--"NIGHTJOHN" by Gary Paulson and "My Name Is not Angelica" by Scott O'Dell. After a brief introduction to the unit, the paper presents the 14 activities of the unit:…

  1. Family planning week in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Antarsh, L

    1997-01-01

    More than 600 events, including disco dances, seminars, and training courses for health professionals, took place during National Family Planning Week, held throughout Ukraine this year from May 26 to June 1. The events were announced on the radio, television, and in newspapers in every region of the country. The following are among the events which took place during the week: physicians gave presents and contraceptives to mothers of newborn infants in maternity hospitals in Dnipropetrovsk; loudspeakers blared messages about family planning in the most crowded streets of Sevastopol, Crimea; family planning rooms and centers opened in 8 districts of Rivninska; and every region of the country held an official opening ceremony. Many of the events had a special focus upon youth, with more than 200 events for adolescents. For more than 6 months, a special multi-ministry coordinating committee worked closely with AVSC to make this first-time event a reality. Public awareness of family planning increased as a result of the Week. Ukraine's Ministry of Health is looking forward to holding the event again next year with or without the support of outside agencies. PMID:12349011

  2. PREFACE: 1st METECH workshop - From deep-sea to coastal zones: Methods and Techniques for studying Palaeoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga-Pires, C.; St-Onge, G.

    2008-10-01

    review of the actual knowledge of living phytoplankton dynamics and the processes, or environmental conditions, which could contribute to the production of fossilized biogenic remains. In the next paper, de Vernal presents a review, based on several case studies, on how palynological fossils observed in sediments are used in tracing biogenic fluxes, characterizing sedimentary environments, or even reconstructing hydrographical conditions and productivity. The two other papers presented in the micropaleontological proxy section are case studies on the use of dinoflagellates (Rochon) and calcareous plankton remains (Guerreiro et al), respectively, to better understand their local or regional environmental living characteristics ant therefore their specific interpretation for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction at a regional scale. Isotopic proxies can be used either as provenance tracers or as chronometers of different processes. Once again, each study can provide a very specific framework of the proxies' use and it is very important to know and evaluate the limits of these tools in each environment and/or type of analyzed material. Accordingly, the two first articles deal with the study of organic carbon either by carbon and oxygen stable isotopes (Hélie) or by radiocarbon (Mollhenhauer and Rethemeyer) analysis. The two other articles in this section deal with the use of radioisotopes. Ghaleb reviews the methods for measuring short-lived radiosisotopes in sediments, giving examples of their use for estimating recent sedimentary accumulation rates; whereas Hillaire-Marcel reviews the potential use of U-series isotopes as radiochronometers in biogenic carbonates. Geochemistry groups more than one field of expertise. However, in the present section, inorganic geochemistry is not treated and both articles present work on a very specific, and at the same time very complex, compound of the organic matter realm: black carbon. As such, Veilleux et al present a density

  3. Comparison of Clinical Outcome Between Twice-Weekly and Thrice-Weekly Hemodialysis in Patients With Residual Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Hong, Yoo Ah; Yoon, Hye Eun; Chang, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Suk Young; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Residual kidney function (RKF) contributes to improved survival in hemodialysis (HD) patients. However, it is not clear whether RKF allows a comparable survival rate in patients undergoing twice-weekly HD compared with thrice-weekly HD. We enrolled 685 patients from a prospective multicenter observational cohort. RKF and HD adequacy was monitored regularly over 3-year follow-up. Patients with RKF were divided into groups undergoing twice-weekly HD (n = 113) or thrice-weekly HD (n = 137). Patients without RKF undergoing thrice-weekly HD (n = 435) were included as controls. Fluid balance and dialysis-associated characteristics were followed and clinical outcomes evaluated using all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events (CVE). In patients with RKF, baseline and follow-up RKF were significantly higher in patients undergoing twice-weekly HD than in those undergoing thrice-weekly HD. Total Kt/V urea (dialysis plus residual renal) in patients with RKF undergoing twice-weekly HD was greater than or equal to those in patients with or without RKF undergoing thrice-weekly HD. Compared with patients with RKF undergoing thrice-weekly HD, patients with RKF undergoing twice-weekly HD had no fluid excess, but their normalized protein catabolic rate became lower since 24-month follow up. In multivariable analyses, patients with RKF undergoing twice-weekly HD had a noninferior risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.83; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.34–2.01, P = 0.68) and of CVE (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.28–1.29, P = 0.19) compared with patients without RKF undergoing thrice-weekly HD. However, this group showed an independent association with a greater risk of mortality compared with patients with RKF undergoing thrice-weekly HD (HR, 4.20; 95% CI, 1.02–17.32, P = 0.04). In conclusion, patients with RKF undergoing twice-weekly HD had an increased risk of mortality compared with those undergoing thrice-weekly HD. Decisions about twice-weekly

  4. A Comparison of Student Outcomes and Overall Retention between a 10-Week Accelerated and a 15-Week Traditional Curriculum in a Postsecondary Apprenticeship Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gilbert L.

    2013-01-01

    This ex post facto comparison study of a postsecondary apprenticeship program at a naval ship construction company examined 8 years of academic performance and program completion data for two curricular formats: a 15-week traditional group (1,259 apprentices) and a 10-week accelerated group (736 apprentices). The two groups were investigated to…

  5. [Skin manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in patients at the 1st Dermato-venereologic Clinic of Comenius University Medical School in Bratislava 1996-1998].

    PubMed

    Svecová, D; Buchvald, J; Oprsalová, K; Dolezalová, A

    2000-08-01

    60-70% of Lyme borreliosis is formed by early manifestations, in particular erythema migrans (EM). All vegetative forms of the tick Ixodes ricinus (e.g. full grown tick, nymphae and larvae) transmit the causal organism, the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. garinii, B. afzelii). The objective of the work was to evaluate clinical and epidemiological parameters and to contribute by testing and investigating in greater detail criteria to the early and exact diagnosis of the disease. In a group of 50 patients the time of development of EM was evaluated, the mode of transmission, the incubation period, localization, symptoms of dissemination of B. burgdorferi, the period of treatment and the antibiotic used. The dynamics of the antibody titre against B. burgdorferi (IFA test) were assessed in 21 patients with EM for a period of 1 to 22 months and in 5 patients with acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans (ACA) for 3 to 55 months. In 50% EM developed during the summer months. 66% reported as the vector a tick, 14% insects and 20% did not know. An incubation of 1 and 2 weeks was reported in 34%, the lower extremities were affected in 52%. Manifestations of dissemination were found in 6 patients, in 2 patients EM relapsed. Antibodies (Ab) against B. burgdorferi were present in 38 patients. In 21 patients the dynamics of the antibody titre were followed up for 1 to 22 months and no substantial changes were found. Serum positivity in patients with ACA persisted without change of the titre for several years. In the treatment of EM most frequently doxycycline was administered for two weeks. EM as the early stage of LB is a seasonal disease with a natural focus. If treatment is started in the early stage of infection, antibodies against B. burgdorferi need not develop. There is no correlation between clinical complaints and serological results and the type of treatment. The prognosis of the disease is favourable in the majority of

  6. Prospective randomized clinical trial: single and weekly viscosupplementation

    PubMed Central

    Zóboli, Alejandro Agustin Carri; de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Pasqualin, Thiago; Frucchi, Renato; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two different dosages of an intermediate molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (HA) (Osteonil®-TRB Pharma) assessing whether a single 6 ml application of this HA has the same effectiveness as the classical three-weekly 2 ml dose. METHODS: 108 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomized into two groups of 54 patients each. The groups were designated "single" (S) and "weekly" (W). Patients in group S underwent a viscosupplementation procedure by application of only 6 ml of sodium hyaluronate and 1 ml triamcinolone hexacetonide. Patients in group W underwent the procedure of viscosupplementation through three applications with 2 ml sodium hyaluronate with a week interval between them, and the first application was also performed with the infiltration of 1 ml (20 mg) of Triamcinolone Hexacetonide. Both groups were assessed before, at one month and three months after application, by responding to the WOMAC, Lequesne, IKDC and VAS questionnaires. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the single application of 6 ml of sodium hyaluronate and classic application with three weekly injections. However, only the classical regime showed statistically significant improvement in baseline pain (WOMAC pain and VAS). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that both application schemes improve application function, but the three-weekly regimen of 2 ml was more effective in reducing pain. Level of Evidence I, Prospective Randomized, Clinical Trial. PMID:24453681

  7. The Four Day School Week. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Can four-day school weeks help districts save money? How do districts overcome the barriers of moving to a four-day week? What is the effect of a four-day week on students, staff and the community? This paper enumerates the benefits for students and teachers of four-day school weeks. Recommendations for implementation of a four-day week are also…

  8. Source Process of the Solomon Islands Earthquake of April 1st, 2007 (Mw8.1) Based on SAR Data and its Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, M.; Kato, T.; Furuya, M.; Ochi, T.; Miyazaki, S.; Aoki, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data to derive the crustal deformation due to the Solomon Islands earthquake (Mw8.1) that occurred on April 1st, 2007. Three tracks that cover the source areas were used and the image data taken before and after the earthquake were processed to make interferograms. Then, we examined the obtained interferograms if the previous two source models that were obtained by seismic wave form inversion analyses could reproduce them. However, none of the models were able to reproduce the crustal deformations derived from the SAR data analysis. Then, we tried to construct a source model that explains the observed crustal deformations well. We considered some geophysical data to constrain the source geometry; the multichannel reflection data and observed vertical deformations using coral reef survey. Considering these lines of evidence, we introduced two possible source geometries; one is single-segment model that assumes only shallow-dipping (10 deg.) main thrust ruptured, and the other is two-segment model that assumes both a high angle spray fault of 30 degree dip and the main thrust fault slipped. The comparison of models based on inversion analyses suggested that the two-segment model would be preferable. This result suggests that the Solomon Islands earthquake would be the first observed earthquake on a steeply dipping splay fault that ruptured off the main converging plate boundary. If this is the case, this earthquake might provide us with an important clue for understanding the mechanisms of land formation such as landward titling of the coastal terraces.

  9. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  10. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics & 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38) and the 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics (IWTCP-1). Both the conference and the workshop were held from 29 July to 1 August 2013 in Pullman hotel, Da Nang, Vietnam. The IWTCP-1 was a new activity of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society (VTPS) organized in association with the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38), the most well-known annual scientific forum dedicated to the dissemination of the latest development in the field of theoretical physics within the country. The IWTCP-1 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). The overriding goal of the IWTCP is to provide an international forum for scientists and engineers from academia to share ideas, problems and solution relating to the recent advances in theoretical physics as well as in computational physics. The main IWTCP motivation is to foster scientific exchanges between the Vietnamese theoretical and computational physics community and world-wide scientists as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. About 110 participants coming from 10 countries participated in the conference and the workshop. 4 invited talks, 18 oral contributions and 46 posters were presented at the conference. In the workshop we had one keynote lecture and 9 invited talks presented by international experts in the fields of theoretical and computational physics, together with 14 oral and 33 poster contributions. The proceedings were edited by Nguyen Tri Lan, Trinh Xuan Hoang, and Nguyen Ai Viet. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the conference and the workshop successful. Nguyen Ai Viet Chair of NCTP-38 and IWTCP-1

  11. Educators' Guide to Ally Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2010

    2010-01-01

    An ally is an individual who speaks out and stands up for a person or group that is targeted and/or discriminated against. An ally works to end oppression by supporting and advocating for people who are stigmatized, or treated unfairly because of who they are. In this context, Allies are referred to as people who do not identify as LGBT (lesbian,…

  12. 'Heat Dome' Not Budging Until Week's End

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160083.html 'Heat Dome' Not Budging Until Week's End Eastern part of country still in its ... not be budging before the end of the week, weather forecasters said Tuesday. "With no strong pushes ...

  13. Conservative management of preterm premature rupture of membranes beyond 32 weeks' gestation: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Tsafrir, Z; Margolis, G; Cohen, Y; Cohen, A; Laskov, I; Levin, I; Mandel, D; Many, A

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether conservative management of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) at 32-34 weeks' gestation improves outcome. In this retrospective analysis of singleton pregnancies, the study group included patients with PPROM at 28-34 weeks' gestation and the control group included patients presented with spontaneous preterm delivery at 28-34 weeks' gestation. Both groups were subdivided according to gestational age - early (28-31 weeks' gestation) versus late (32-34 weeks' gestation). Adverse neonatal outcome included neonatal death, intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3/4, respiratory distress syndrome, periventricular leucomalacia and neonatal sepsis. The study and control groups included 94 and 86 women, respectively. The study group had a lower incidence of adverse neonatal outcome at the earlier weeks (28-31), compared with the control group at the same gestational age. In contrast, at 32-34 weeks' gestation no difference in the risk for adverse neonatal outcome was noticed. Additionally, within the study group, chorioamnionitis rate was significantly higher among those who delivered at 32-34 weeks' gestation (p < 0.01). No advantage for conservative management of PPROM was demonstrated beyond 31 weeks' gestation. Moreover, conservative management of PPROM at 32-34 weeks' gestation may expose both mother and neonate to infectious morbidity.

  14. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  15. Four-Day Week Schedule. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    What does research say about the four-day week as an alternative school schedule? More than 100 districts in at least 12 states currently use a four-day week alternative schedule. Most are located in rural areas, serve less than 1000 students, and made the move to a shorter school week with longer instructional days for financial reasons. Although…

  16. 2-weekly docetaxel: issues for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Massari, F; Maines, F; Bria, E; Galligioni, E; Caffo, O; Tortora, G

    2015-01-01

    In the phase III trial comparing 2 docetaxel schedules (3-weekly versus 2-weekly) as first-line chemotherapy for CRPC, recently published in The Lancet Oncology, fewer serious adverse events, particularly hematologic toxicities, and longer times on treatment, in favor of the 2-weekly regimen are reported.1,2,3 PMID:25456569

  17. 1st principle simulations of ions in water solutions: Bond structure and chemistry in the hydration shells of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weare, John

    2012-02-01

    Methods of direct simulation (Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics) have provided new insights into the structure and dynamics of electrolyte solutions. However, these methods are limited by the difficulty of developing reliable ion-solvent and solvent-solvent potential interactions in the highly perturbed hydration region. To model the interactions in this region methods of simulation that are based on the direct on the fly solution to the electronic Schr"odinger equation (ab-initio molecular dynamics, AIMD) are being developed. However, 1st principle methods have their own problems because the solution to the electronic structure problem is intractable unless rather uncontrolled approximations are made (e.g. density functional theory, DFT) and there is high computational cost to the solution to the Schr"odinger equation. To test the accuracy of AIMD methods we have directly simulated the XAFS spectra for a series of transition metal ions Ca^2+, Cr^3+, Mn^2+, Fe^3+, Co^2+, Ni^2+, Cu^2+, and Zn^2+. Despite DFT's well know deficiencies, the agreement between the calculated XAFS spectra and the data is almost quantitative for these test ions. This agreement supports the extension of the interpretation well beyond that of the usual XAFS analysis to include higher-order multiple scattering signals in the XAFS spectra, which provide a rigorous probe of the first shell distances and disorders. Less well resolved features of the spectra can still be analyzed and are related to 2nd shell structure. The combination of XAFS measurements and the parameter free AIMD method leads to new insights into the hydration structure of these ions. While strictly local DFT +gga provides excellent agreement with data, the addition of exact exchange seems to provide slightly better structural agreement. The computational complexity of these calculations requires the development of simulation tools that scale to high processor number on massively parallel supercomputers. Our present algorithm

  18. The effects of 8-week balance training or weight training

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sukwon; Lockhart, Thurmon; Roberto, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of participating in an 8-week physical training (ie: balance or weight training) on psychosocial outcomes for independently living healthy older adults. Eighteen older adults (65 years old or older) voluntarily participated for this study. Participants were randomly and evenly distributed in 3 different groups such as balance, weight, or control group; 6 participants each. Fear of falling and social activity levels were statistically tested by evaluating questionnaires validated in previous studies. Psychological factors improved in all groups after 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Social interaction level did not improve in any of the three groups, although all participants exhibited improvements in being physically independent (P < 0.05). Results suggested that being physically active as well as being socially active could result in being less fearful of falls, more confident of leaving residency, being more independent, and being more active. PMID:21394234

  19. Poster Presentations: Turning a Lab of the Week into a Culminating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Quin~ones, Rosalynn; Sunderland, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    An assignment incorporating posters into a second-year analytical chemistry lab is described. Students work in groups and are assigned one of the application-themed weekly laboratories as a topic. Course data acquired for these weekly laboratories are compiled into spreadsheets that the poster group then analyzes to present in an on-campus poster…

  20. The truncated Newton using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state method: a new approach for traveltime tomography without rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.

    2013-12-01

    named as the truncated Newton (TCN) (Métivier et al. 2012) with a more accurate estimation of the impact of the Hessian. We propose an efficient implementation for first-arrival traveltime tomography. In TCN, the model update Δm is obtained through the iterative resolution of the Newton linear system H Δm = - g. Based on a matrix-free conjugate gradient resolution, the iterative solver requires only the computation of the gradient and of Hessian-vector products. We propose a generalization of the computation of the gradient using the adjoint-state method that allows to consider receivers located anywhere. Then the Hessian-vector products are computed using an original formulation based on a 2nd-order adjoint-state method, at the cost of an additional forward modeling. The TCN algorithm is composed of two nested loops: an internal loop to compute Δm, and an external loop where a line search is performed to update the subsurface parameters. TCN thus considers locally the inversion of the traveltime data using an estimation of the full Hessian (both 1st and 2nd order terms) at an acceptable cost. Tomography with TCN is an improvement over the simple gradient-based adjoint-state tomography due to its good convergence property, to the better consideration of illumination, and is a promising tool for multi-parameter inversion as rescaling is given by the Hessian.

  1. Variation occurring in group A streptococci during human infection; progressive loss of M substance correlated with increasing susceptibility to bacteriostasis.

    PubMed

    ROTHBARD, S; WATSON, R F

    1948-06-01

    A study was made of the variation occurring in group A streptococci during the natural course of infection in man. From 54 patients with 56 different group A streptococcal infections of the upper respiratory tract, 251 strains of streptococci, isolated at weekly intervals following infection, were tested for their capacity to resist the bacteriostatic action of normal human blood. In 52 of the infections the streptococci were of recognized serological types and were also tested for variation in their ability to produce the type-specific M protein antigen. Strains isolated in the 1st week of infection were uniformly highly resistant to bacteriostasis and elaborated large amounts of M substance. In 42 per cent of the 52 infections, strains isolated in the convalescent and carrier stages showed an increasing susceptibility to bacteriostasis correlated with a progressive loss of M substance; whereas in the remaining 58 per cent resistance to bacteriostasis and the capacity to produce M protein were maintained throughout the observation period. In 3 different infections, the streptococci became so degraded that no M protein could be demonstrated in acid extracts of these variants. Concomitantly these strains became highly susceptible to bacteriostasis. Spontaneous reversion did not occur, but serial mouse passage reestablished these functions. These degraded variants had the same T antigen as their respective original strains. No evidence was obtained that variation of group A streptococci in resistance to bacteriostasis or in the ability to produce the type-specific M antigen was associated (a) with the appearance of type-specific bacteriostatic antibodies; (b) with any particular serological type of streptococcus; (c) with the production of streptococcal proteinase which digests the M protein; (d) with the therapeutic administration of sulfadiazine; or (e) with the development of complications. The possible relationship of these observations to the problem of the

  2. Four weeks of mobility after 8 weeks of immobility fails to restore normal motion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Guy; Zhou, Jian; Uhthoff, Hans K; Laneuville, Odette

    2008-05-01

    Prolonged immobilization reduces passive range of motion of joints creating joint contractures. Whether and to what extent these iatrogenic contractures can be reduced is unknown. We raised three questions using an animal model: What degree of contracture remains at the end of a defined remobilization period? Do contractures in sham-operated and immobilized joints differ? What is the contribution of the posterior knee capsule in limiting knee extension? We immobilized one knee of 11 adult male rats in flexion to induce a joint contracture; 10 control animals underwent a sham operation. After 8 weeks, the internal fixation device was removed, and the animals were allowed to resume unrestricted activity for 4 weeks at the end of which the knee range of motion was measured with standardized torques. The mean flexion contracture was higher in the immobilized group (51.9 degrees +/- 2.8 degrees ) than in the sham-operated group (18.9 degrees +/- 2.1 degrees ). Eighty-eight percent of the contractures remained in the immobilized group after dividing skin and muscle, suggesting an important contribution of the posterior knee capsule in limiting knee mobility. Based on our preliminary study the range of motion of rat knees immobilized for 8 weeks remained substantially reduced after a 4-week period of unassisted remobilization.

  3. 75 FR 62307 - Fire Prevention Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8577 of October 1, 2010 Fire Prevention Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During Fire Prevention Week, we reaffirm the importance of...

  4. 76 FR 63801 - Fire Prevention Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-26720... October 13, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8732--Fire Prevention Week, 2011 Proclamation 8733...; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8732 of October 7, 2011 Fire Prevention Week, 2011...

  5. Using the Weekly Newspaper in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Sharon; Kendall, Stuart

    Intended for teachers in all subject areas at the elementary and secondary school levels, this booklet contains a variety of activities involving the use of the weekly newspaper as a teaching aid. Following a list of features of a weekly newspaper that make it suitable for classroom instruction, the activities are presented for elementary and…

  6. 77 FR 42941 - Captive Nations Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-17948 Filed 7-19... July 20, 2012 Part VI The President Proclamation 8841--Captive Nations Week, 2012 Memorandum of July 11... President ] Proclamation 8841 of July 16, 2012 Captive Nations Week, 2012 By the President of the...

  7. 75 FR 28183 - World Trade Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8521 of May 12, 2010 World Trade Week, 2010 By the President of the United.... World Trade Week is an opportunity for us to reaffirm the importance of trade to our Nation's...

  8. 75 FR 29393 - Small Business Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-12755 Filed 5-25-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8525 of May 20, 2010 Small Business Week, 2010 By the President of the United... new private sector jobs. During Small Business Week, we reaffirm our support for America's...

  9. 75 FR 71005 - American Education Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-29516 Filed 11-19-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Education Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Education is essential to our success as both a people and a Nation. During American Education Week, we rededicate...

  10. 75 FR 71519 - National Family Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-29729 Filed 11-23-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Like generations before them... Family Week, we celebrate the resilient spirit of America's families and their role in building...

  11. 78 FR 30729 - World Trade Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8983 of May 17, 2013 World Trade Week, 2013 By the President of the United... Week, we recognize workers, growers, and entrepreneurs nationwide who share that ambition, and...

  12. 77 FR 22177 - National Volunteer Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-9017 Filed 4-11-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... April 12, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8797--National Volunteer Week, 2012 Proclamation 8798--Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2012 Proclamation 8799--National Former Prisoner of...

  13. 78 FR 69749 - American Education Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-28018 Filed 11-19-13; 11:15 am... November 20, 2013 Part II The President Proclamation 9058--American Education Week, 2013 #0; #0; #0... American Education Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Education...

  14. 76 FR 29139 - World Trade Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8677 of May 13, 2011 World Trade Week, 2011 By the President of the United... interdependent. World Trade Week is a time to highlight the vital connection between the global economy and...

  15. 77 FR 69733 - National Family Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-28457 Filed 11-20... Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The bonds that tie us to our... strength of character in their children. This week, we celebrate the unity and compassion that keep...

  16. 78 FR 24321 - National Volunteer Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-09867 Filed 4-23-13... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8960 of April 19, 2013 National Volunteer Week, 2013 By the President of the... accept certain obligations to one another. National Volunteer Week is a time to renew that...

  17. 76 FR 71445 - American Education Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-29938 Filed... November 17, 2011 Part II The President Proclamation 8753--American Education Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... American Education Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ensuring...

  18. 75 FR 42279 - Captive Nations Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-17984 Filed 7-20-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8541 of July 16, 2010 Captive Nations Week... and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the third week of July of each year...

  19. 78 FR 24323 - National Park Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8961 of April 19, 2013 National Park Week, 2013 By the President of the... be passed on. During National Park Week, we celebrate the wonders entrusted to us by our...

  20. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-9415 Filed... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8500 of April 16, 2010 National Volunteer Week, 2010 By the President of the... country. This week, we recognize their enduring contributions and encourage more Americans, especially...

  1. 76 FR 28623 - Small Business Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-12307 Filed... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8673 of May 12, 2011 Small Business Week... to work hard enough, you can succeed in our country. This week, we honor and celebrate...

  2. 77 FR 68045 - American Education Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-27922 Filed 11-14-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8904 of November 9, 2012 American Education Week, 2012 By the President of... Nation's economic prosperity and civic life. This week, we reaffirm our national mission of educating...

  3. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-8837 Filed 4-11-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195... Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation America's story has been... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers...

  4. 77 FR 31151 - World Trade Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-12880 Filed 5-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8827 of May 21, 2012 World Trade Week, 2012 By the President of the United... demand for goods and services designed and produced by Americans. During World Trade Week, we...

  5. National Poison Prevention Week Promotional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poison Prevention Week Council, Washington, DC.

    This collection of materials for parents, early childhood workers, the elderly, and anyone in situations requiring safeguards against poisoning, spans the years 1993 and 1994 and is intended to promote National Poison Prevention Week. The materials included are: (1) the 31-page, illustrated report on National Poison Prevention Week for 1993,…

  6. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  7. Determining what caused the error in the prediction of the December 1st, 2013 snow storm using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Nikunjkumar; Trout, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The severity of snow events in the northeast United States depends on the position of the pressure systems and the fronts. Although numerical models have improved greatly as computer power has increased, occasionally the forecasts of the pressure systems and fronts can have large margins of error. For example, the snow storm which passed over the north east coast on the week of December 1, 2013, which proved to be much more severe than predicted. In this research, The Weather Research and Forecasting Model(WRF-Model) is used to model the December 1, 2013 storm. Multiple simulations using nested, high resolution grids are compared. Research in computational atmospheric physics.

  8. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  9. Small group discussion: Students perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. Aims: The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Subjects and Methods: Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1st year medical students of 2014–2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Results: Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. Conclusions: The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods. PMID:26380202

  10. Self-Reported Recovery from 2-Week 12-Hour Shift Work Schedules: A 14-Day Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Merkus, Suzanne L.; Holte, Kari Anne; Huysmans, Maaike A.; van de Ven, Peter M.; van Mechelen, Willem; van der Beek, Allard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery from fatigue is important in maintaining night workers' health. This study compared the course of self-reported recovery after 2-week 12-hour schedules consisting of either night shifts or swing shifts (i.e., 7 night shifts followed by 7 day shifts) to such schedules consisting of only day work. Methods Sixty-one male offshore employees—20 night workers, 16 swing shift workers, and 25 day workers—rated six questions on fatigue (sleep quality, feeling rested, physical and mental fatigue, and energy levels; scale 1–11) for 14 days after an offshore tour. After the two night-work schedules, differences on the 1st day (main effects) and differences during the follow-up (interaction effects) were compared to day work with generalized estimating equations analysis. Results After adjustment for confounders, significant main effects were found for sleep quality for night workers (1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.05–1.89) and swing shift workers (1.42, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.94) when compared to day workers; their interaction terms were not statistically significant. For the remaining fatigue outcomes, no statistically significant main or interaction effects were found. Conclusion After 2-week 12-hour night and swing shifts, only the course for sleep quality differed from that of day work. Sleep quality was poorer for night and swing shift workers on the 1st day off and remained poorer for the 14-day follow-up. This showed that while working at night had no effect on feeling rested, tiredness, and energy levels, it had a relatively long-lasting effect on sleep quality. PMID:26929834

  11. Effect of 12 weeks of wrist and forearm training on high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; Szymanski, Jessica M; Molloy, Joseph M; Pascoe, David D

    2004-08-01

    This study examined the effect of 12 weeks of wrist and forearm training on male high school baseball players (mean age = 15.3 +/- 1.1 years). Participants (N = 43) were tested for 10 repetition maximum (RM) wrist barbell flexion, wrist barbell extension, dominant (D) and nondominant (ND) hand-forearm supination, D and ND forearm pronation, D and ND wrist radial deviation, D and ND wrist ulnar deviation, D and ND grip strength, and a 3RM parallel squat (PS) and bench press (BP). Group 1 (n = 23) and group 2 (n = 20), randomly assigned by a stratified sampling technique, performed the same resistance exercises while training 3 days a week for 12 weeks according to a stepwise periodized model. Group 2 also performed wrist and forearm exercises 3 days a week for 12 weeks to determine if additional wrist and forearm training provided further wrist and forearm strength improvements. All wrist and forearm strength variables were measured before and after 12 weeks of training. The 3RM PS and BP were measured at 0 and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training. Both groups significantly increased wrist and forearm strength (kg +/- SD) except 10RM D and ND forearm supination for group 1 (p < 0.05). Group 2 showed statistically greater improvements (p < 0.05) in all wrist and forearm strength variables than did group 1 except for D and ND grip strength. Predicted 1RM (kg +/- SD) PS and BP increased significantly (p < 0.05) after weeks 4, 8, and 12 for both groups. These data indicate that a 12-week stepwise periodized training program can significantly increase wrist, forearm, PS, and BP strength for both groups. Additionally, group 2 had further wrist and forearm strength gains.

  12. The Hospital Microbiome Project: Meeting Report for the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project Workshop on sampling design and building science measurements, Chicago, USA, June 7th-8th 2012

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Alverdy, John; An, Gary; Coleman, Maureen; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Green, Jessica; Keegan, Kevin; Kelley, Scott T.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Kociolek, Larry; Levin, Hal; Landon, Emily; Olsiewski, Paula; Knight, Rob; Siegel, Jeffrey; Weber, Stephen; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Hospital Microbiome Project workshop held on June 7th-8th, 2012 at the University of Chicago, USA. The workshop was arranged to determine the most appropriate sampling strategy and approach to building science measurement to characterize the development of a microbial community within a new hospital pavilion being built at the University of Chicago Medical Center. The workshop made several recommendations and led to the development of a full proposal to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as well as to the creation of the Hospital Microbiome Consortium. PMID:23961316

  13. Elementary Physical Education Weekly Lesson Plan. Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchorage Borough School District, AK.

    This curriculum guide is for the teaching of physical education to kindergarten students. Teaching procedures, warm-up activities, safety procedures, modifications, and athletic equipment needed are described for each of the specific activities in the weekly lesson plans. (CJ)

  14. This Week @ NASA - 11/5/10

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Postponement of Mission STS-133 tops the billboard on This Week @ NASA. Also, EPOXI meets a Comet, NASA and LEGO build a future together, Administrator Bolden heralds ten years of ISS, KSC Twee...

  15. A 4-week Repeated dose Oral Toxicity Study of Mecasin in Sprague-Dawley Rats to Determine the Appropriate Doses for a 13-week, Repeated Toxicity Test

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eunhye; Lee, Jongchul; Lee, Seongjin; Park, Manyong; Song, Inja; Son, Ilhong; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Dongwoung; Lee, Jongdeok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we investigated the 4-week repeated-dose oral toxicity of gami-jakyak gamcho buja decoction (Mecasin) to develop safe treatments. Methods: In order to investigate the 4-week oral toxicity of Mecasin, we administered Mecasin orally to rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups of five male and five female animals per group: group 1 being the control group and groups 2, 3, and 4 being the experimental groups. Doses of Mecasin of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution of 10 mL/kg was administered to the control group. We examined the survival rate, weight, clinical signs, and gross findings for four weeks. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weights or food consumption between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Serum biochemistry revealed that some groups showed significant decrease in inorganic phosphorus (IP) (P < 0.05). During necropsy on the rats, one abnormal macroscopic feature, a slight loss of fur, was observed in the mid dosage (1,000 mg/ kg) male group. No abnormalities were observed in any other rats. In histopathological findings, the tubular basophilia and cast of the kidney and extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen were found. However, those changes were minimal and had occurred naturally or sporadically. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, oral toxicity test of Mecasin in SD rats, no toxicity changes due to Mecasin were observed in any of the male or the female rats in the high dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg respectively. PMID:26998389

  16. Physical and psychological benefits of once-a-week Pilates exercises in young sedentary women: A 10-week longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Tolnai, Nóra; Szabó, Zsófia; Köteles, Ferenc; Szabo, Attila

    2016-09-01

    Pilates exercises have several demonstrated physical and psychological benefits. To date, most research in this context was conducted with symptomatic or elderly people with few dependent measures. The current study examined the chronic or longitudinal effects of very low frequency, once a week, Pilates training on several physical and psychological measures, over a 10-week intervention, in young, healthy, and sedentary women. Further, the study gauged the acute effects of Pilates exercises on positive- and negative affect in 10 exercise sessions. Compared to a control group, the Pilates group exhibited significant improvements in skeletal muscle mass, flexibility, balance, core- and abdominal muscle strength, body awareness, and negative affect. This group also showed favorable changes in positive (22.5% increase) and negative affect (12.2% decrease) in nine out of ten exercise sessions. This work clearly demonstrates the acute and chronic benefits of Pilates training on both physical and psychological measures. It also reveals that even only once a week Pilates training is enough to trigger detectable benefits in young sedentary women. While this frequency is below the required levels of exercise for health, it may overcome the 'lack of time' excuse for not exercising and subsequently its tangible benefits may positively influence one's engagement in more physical activity. PMID:27195456

  17. Welfare of entire male pigs is improved by socialising piglets and keeping intact groups until slaughter.

    PubMed

    Rydhmer, L; Hansson, M; Lundström, K; Brunius, C; Andersson, K

    2013-09-01

    In today's production systems, pigs raised for slaughter are mixed many times, resulting in stress and fighting. The negative consequences of mixing are probably more severe with entire males than with castrates, as they fight more. In this project, we studied a system without castration where entire male pigs met unfamiliar pigs only once. Piglets from two litters were allowed to visit each other from circa 2 weeks of age through an opening between the farrowing pens. Entire males from these litters were kept in intact groups from weaning and onwards, and they were slaughtered pen-wise in intact groups. Control pigs were raised and weaned in their litters and mixed with unknown pigs when moved to the growing-finishing unit. They were slaughtered by split marketing based on individual weight. In total, 96 entire males from 24 litters were studied. Activity and social interactions of pigs were studied by direct observations on three observation occasions per pen for pigs kept in intact groups and four occasions for control pigs. All pigs were inspected for skin lesions during raising and at slaughter. Results showed that fewer pigs in intact groups were resting (17.1% v. 28.5%; P = 0.044) and they showed less aggressive behaviour (16.1 v. 27.7 number of interactions per hour; P = 0.001) than control pigs when moved to the growing-finishing unit. They also got fewer skin lesions compared with control pigs (15 v. 35; P < 0.001). Consequently, control pigs tended to grow slower during the 1st week after mixing; however, growth rate during the whole growing-finishing phase did not differ between treatments (P = 0.205). Control pigs directed more aggressive behaviour towards non-litter mates than towards litter mates during the whole growing-finishing phase, whereas pigs from the other treatment made no difference between litter mates and other familiar pigs. At 67 kg, there was more sexual behaviour (mounting) among control pigs (7.6 v. 3.4; P = 0.033), but after

  18. Twelve- and 52-week safety of albuterol multidose dry powder inhaler in patients with persistent asthma

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Gordon; Taveras, Herminia; Iverson, Harald; O’Brien, Christopher; Miller, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Evaluate the safety of albuterol multidose dry powder inhaler (MDPI), a novel, inhalation-driven device that does not require coordination of actuation with inhalation, in patients with persistent asthma. Methods: We report pooled safety data from two 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, repeat-dose, parallel-group studies and the 12-week double-blind phase of a 52-week multicenter safety study as well as safety data from the 40-week open-label phase of the 52-week safety study. In each study, eligible patients aged ≥12 years with persistent asthma received placebo MDPI or albuterol MDPI 180 µg (2 inhalations × 90 µg/inhalation) 4 times/day for 12 weeks. In the 40-week open-label phase of the 52-week safety study, patients received albuterol MDPI 180 μg (2 inhalations × 90 μg/inhalation) as needed (PRN). Results: During both 12-week studies and the 12-week double-blind phase of the 52-week study, adverse events were more common with placebo MDPI (50%; n = 333) than albuterol MDPI (40%; n = 321); most frequent were upper respiratory tract infection (placebo MDPI 11%, albuterol MDPI 10%), nasopharyngitis (6%, 5%), and headache (6%, 4%). Incidences of β2-agonist-related events (excluding headache) during the pooled 12-week dosing periods were low (≤1%) in both groups. The safety profile with albuterol MDPI PRN during the 40-week open-label phase [most frequent adverse events: nasopharyngitis (12%), sinusitis (11%), upper respiratory tract infection (9%)] was similar to that observed during the 12-week pooled analysis. Conclusions: The safety profile of albuterol MDPI 180 μg in these studies was comparable with placebo MDPI and consistent with the well-characterized profile of albuterol in patients with asthma. PMID:26369589

  19. Advancing the Agenda of Inclusive Education. Proceedings of the CASWE Summer Institute (1st, St. Catherines, Ontario, Canada, June 7-9, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Carol E., Ed.; Depledge, Norma E., Ed.

    The first Canadian Association for the Study of Women and Education (CASWE) Summer Institute convened to address issues resulting from exclusionary practices in education. The forum provided a venue for individuals and groups involved in a wide range of educational endeavors to share perspectives of inclusive education. Those facing exclusion in…

  20. Female sexual dysfunction: A comparative study in drug naive 1st episode of depression in a general hospital of South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Payel; Manohar, Shivananda; Raman, Rajesh; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women's sexual dysfunction is found to be highly prevalent in western and Indian literature. Limited studies are available on drug naive depression in western literature and in Indian population. Aim: To determine the prevalence rate and symptom profile of female sexual dysfunctions in patients with untreated depression. Design: A cross-sectional study in the psychiatry out-patient department of general hospital in South India. Materials and Methods: Following written informed consent female sexual functioning index (FSFI) and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) – female version and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD - 17 item) on 30 cases and 30 controls was administered. Sociodemographic data, pattern and type of sexual dysfunctions were enquired. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, contingency co-efficient analysis and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The mean score of HAMD 17 item in study group was 19.13. The study showed that female sexual dysfunction was 70.3% in study group compared to 43.3% in control FSFI scores above 16 in HAMD had dysfunction of 76% with FSFI in study group. With ASEX-F sexual dysfunction was 73.3% in study compared to 20% in control. Scores above 16 in HAMD had 80% of sexual dysfunction with ASEX-F in study group. Conclusion: The study found that ASEX-F co-related better with HAMD 17 item. Following the onset of depression, the incidence of sexual dysfunction started at an early age in women. PMID:26600576

  1. Qualification Challenges in the Partner Countries and Member States. Proceedings of the Workshop on Curriculum Innovation (1st, Turin, Italy, September 26-27, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    These proceedings present 10 presentations and 3 working group reports from a workshop on the challenges of the new learning culture and their consequences for the partner countries of the European Union (EU). "Introduction and Summary of the Workshop" (Bernhard Buck) begins with a brief overview of distinctions between the vocational education…

  2. The effect of Tembusu virus infection in different week-old Cherry Valley breeding ducks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjian; Dou, Yanguo; Ti, Jinfeng; Wang, Aihua; Cheng, Binghua; Zhang, Xin; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-08-30

    To study the effect of Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection on Cherry Valley Breeding ducks of different ages, 350 five-week-old ducks were divided into 14 groups. Ducks in seven experimental group were respectively infected with 1.265×10(5) mean embryo lethal dose (ELD50) of TMUV-AHQY strain (in 4.2mL) by intravenous route. Ducks in control groups were inoculated with Phosphate-buffered Saline (PBS) in the same way. Clinical symptoms, gross and microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum antibodies were detected and recorded for 20days after infection. Some ducks infected at 7 and 21 week s of age showed severe clinical symptoms including depression and inappetence, and no obvious clinical symptoms were seen in other week-old infected ducks. Severe gross lesions including hepatomegaly, meningeal congestion, myocardial hemorrhage, intestinal, myocardial and pulmonary edema were observed in ducks infected at 7, 18 and 21 weeks of age. No or mild gross lesions were observed in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. The main microscopic lesions including hyperaemia, degeneration and necrosis of different cells and inflammatory cellular infiltration mainly consisting of mononuclear cells or lymphocytes were observed in ducks infected at 7 and 21 week of age. But relatively intact structures and rare lymphocytic infiltration were presented in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. Viral antigen was more frequently observed in organ slices collected from 7 week-old infected ducks and few positive staining was found in 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Less viral loads in different tissues and swabs were detected by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The level of viral loads in the tissues of ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age was very lower than that of ducks infected at 7 and 21 weeks of age. Meanwhile, less viral copy numbers were detected in swab samples collected from 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Ducks infected at 14-week-old developed significantly

  3. The effect of Tembusu virus infection in different week-old Cherry Valley breeding ducks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjian; Dou, Yanguo; Ti, Jinfeng; Wang, Aihua; Cheng, Binghua; Zhang, Xin; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-08-30

    To study the effect of Tembusu virus (TMUV) infection on Cherry Valley Breeding ducks of different ages, 350 five-week-old ducks were divided into 14 groups. Ducks in seven experimental group were respectively infected with 1.265×10(5) mean embryo lethal dose (ELD50) of TMUV-AHQY strain (in 4.2mL) by intravenous route. Ducks in control groups were inoculated with Phosphate-buffered Saline (PBS) in the same way. Clinical symptoms, gross and microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum antibodies were detected and recorded for 20days after infection. Some ducks infected at 7 and 21 week s of age showed severe clinical symptoms including depression and inappetence, and no obvious clinical symptoms were seen in other week-old infected ducks. Severe gross lesions including hepatomegaly, meningeal congestion, myocardial hemorrhage, intestinal, myocardial and pulmonary edema were observed in ducks infected at 7, 18 and 21 weeks of age. No or mild gross lesions were observed in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. The main microscopic lesions including hyperaemia, degeneration and necrosis of different cells and inflammatory cellular infiltration mainly consisting of mononuclear cells or lymphocytes were observed in ducks infected at 7 and 21 week of age. But relatively intact structures and rare lymphocytic infiltration were presented in ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age. Viral antigen was more frequently observed in organ slices collected from 7 week-old infected ducks and few positive staining was found in 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Less viral loads in different tissues and swabs were detected by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The level of viral loads in the tissues of ducks infected at 14 and 16 weeks of age was very lower than that of ducks infected at 7 and 21 weeks of age. Meanwhile, less viral copy numbers were detected in swab samples collected from 14 and 16 week-old infected ducks. Ducks infected at 14-week-old developed significantly

  4. Eight-Week Traditional Mat Pilates Training-Program Effects on Adult Fitness Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kate; Gibson, Ann L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated responses of adult, novice practitioners (n = 9) to an 8-week traditional mat Pilates program (P) that met 1 hr/day three times/week. Classes consisted primarily of beginner and intermediate level exercises. Compared to an active control group (C; n = 13) that showed no improvements, those in P significantly (p less than 0.05)…

  5. Treatment of Adolescent Panic Disorder: A Nonrandomized Comparison of Intensive versus Weekly CBT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rhea M.; Whitton, Sarah W.; Pincus, Donna B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the relative efficacy of intensive versus weekly panic control treatment (PCT) for adolescent panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). Twenty-six adolescents participated in weekly sessions and 25 received intensive treatment involving daily sessions. Both groups demonstrated significant and comparable reductions in panic…

  6. Effects of 8-Week Training on Aerobic Capacity and Swimming Performance of Boys Aged 12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarzeczny, Ryszard; Kuberski, Mariusz; Deska, Agnieszka; Zarzeczna, Dorota; Rydz, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Anna; Balchanowski, Tomasz; Bosiacki, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the effects of 8-week endurance training in swimming on work capacity of boys aged 12 years. Material and methods: The following groups of schoolboys aged 12 years were studied: untrained control (UC; n = 14) and those training swimming for two years. The latter ones were subjected to 8-week training in classical style (CS; n…

  7. 3 CFR 8718 - Proclamation 8718 of September 21, 2011. National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011 8718 Proclamation 8718 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8718 of September 21, 2011 Proc. 8718 National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011By the... opportunity to realize their full potential. As our Nation’s largest minority group, Hispanics represent...

  8. Vehicle Technologies' Fact of the Week 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Moore, Sheila A; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2013-02-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2012. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Fact of the Week 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Williams, Susan E; Moore, Sheila A; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2014-03-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2013. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  10. Effect of twelve weeks of medicine ball training on high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; Szymanski, Jessica M; Bradford, T Jason; Schade, Ryan L; Pascoe, David D

    2007-08-01

    This study examined the effect of 12 weeks of medicine ball training on high school baseball players. Forty-nine baseball players (age 15.4 +/- 1.2 years) were randomly assigned using a stratified sampling technique to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 24) and group 2 (n = 25) performed the same full-body resistance exercises according to a stepwise periodized model and took 100 bat swings a day, 3 days per week, with their normal game bat for 12 weeks. Group 2 performed additional rotational and full-body medicine ball exercises 3 days per week for 12 weeks. Pre- and post-testing consisted of a 3 repetition maximum (RM) dominant and nondominant torso rotational strength and sequential hip-torso-arm rotational strength (medicine ball hitter's throw). A 3RM parallel squat and bench press were measured at 0 and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training. Although both groups made statistically significant increases (p < or = 0.05) in dominant (10.5 vs. 17.1%) and nondominant (10.2 vs. 18.3%) torso rotational strength and the medicine ball hitter's throw (3.0 vs. 10.6%), group 2 showed significantly greater increases in all 3 variables than group 1. Furthermore, both groups made significant increases in predicted 1RM parallel squat and bench press after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training; however, there were no differences between groups. These data indicate that performing a 12-week medicine ball training program in addition to a stepwise periodized resistance training program with bat swings provided greater sport-specific training improvements in torso rotational and sequential hip-torso-arm rotational strength for high school baseball players.

  11. Training Groups, Encounter Groups, Sensitivity Groups and Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Louis A.; Pattison, E. Mansell; Schafer, Donald W.

    1971-01-01

    Descriptions and comparison of group therapies and the new group procedures (training groups and sensitivity groups—an outgrowth of the so-called Laboratory Movement methods of the mid-1930's) have been provided for the better understanding of non-psychiatric physicians. A group leader must have proper training and must help his group in its search for its avowed goals, whether he is a group therapist, a sensitivity trainer, or anyone else interested in utilizing group processes. Those goals are either the therapeutic benefit of the individual, as defined in group psychotherapy, or a better understanding of how one functions in groups, as in T-groups or the other group processes in the area of sensitive living. All group situations contain powerful tools which must be handled with proper respect. When so handled by experienced leaders, the individuals involved can achieve their goals in these group experiences. PMID:18730582

  12. Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Clarence A.

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the major concerns of group counseling and differentiates among group guidance, group counseling, and group therapy. It also evaluates the research status of group counseling and presents implications for the future of this approach. Comment by Carl E. Thoresen follows. (Author)

  13. Effects of a 4-week youth baseball conditioning program on throwing velocity.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; Yamashiro, Kyle; Mikla, Tony; Dunning, Russell; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2010-12-01

    Effects of a 4-week youth baseball conditioning program on throwing velocity. This study examined the effects of a 4-week youth baseball conditioning program on maximum throwing velocity. Thirty-four youth baseball players (11-15 years of age) were randomly and equally divided into control and training groups. The training group performed 3 sessions (each 75 minutes) weekly for 4 weeks, which comprised a sport specific warm-up, resistance training with elastic tubing, a throwing program, and stretching. Throwing velocity was assessed initially and at the end of the 4-week conditioning program for both control and training groups. The level of significance used was p < 0.05. After the 4-week conditioning program, throwing velocity increased significantly (from 25.1 ± 2.8 to 26.1 ± 2.8 m·s) in the training group but did not significantly increase in the control group (from 24.2 ± 3.6 to 24.0 ± 3.9 m·s). These results demonstrate that the short-term 4-week baseball conditioning program was effective in increasing throwing velocity in youth baseball players. Increased throwing velocity may be helpful for pitchers (less time for hitters to swing) and position players (decreased time for a runner to advance to the next base). PMID:21068687

  14. Effects of a 4-week youth baseball conditioning program on throwing velocity.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; Yamashiro, Kyle; Mikla, Tony; Dunning, Russell; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2010-12-01

    Effects of a 4-week youth baseball conditioning program on throwing velocity. This study examined the effects of a 4-week youth baseball conditioning program on maximum throwing velocity. Thirty-four youth baseball players (11-15 years of age) were randomly and equally divided into control and training groups. The training group performed 3 sessions (each 75 minutes) weekly for 4 weeks, which comprised a sport specific warm-up, resistance training with elastic tubing, a throwing program, and stretching. Throwing velocity was assessed initially and at the end of the 4-week conditioning program for both control and training groups. The level of significance used was p < 0.05. After the 4-week conditioning program, throwing velocity increased significantly (from 25.1 ± 2.8 to 26.1 ± 2.8 m·s) in the training group but did not significantly increase in the control group (from 24.2 ± 3.6 to 24.0 ± 3.9 m·s). These results demonstrate that the short-term 4-week baseball conditioning program was effective in increasing throwing velocity in youth baseball players. Increased throwing velocity may be helpful for pitchers (less time for hitters to swing) and position players (decreased time for a runner to advance to the next base).

  15. Weekly administration of rapamycin improves survival and biomarkers in obese male mice on high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Leontieva, Olga V; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine M; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2014-08-01

    Recent discoveries have revealed the key role of mTOR (target of rapamycin) in aging. Furthermore, rapamycin extends lifespan in mice, especially in female mice. Here, we treated obese male mice on high-fat diet with rapamycin given intermittently: either weekly (once a week) or alternating bi-weekly (three injections every other week). While only marginally reducing obesity, intermittent administration of rapamycin significantly extended lifespan. Significance was achieved for weekly treated group and for the three rapamycin-received groups combined. In weekly treatment group, 100% mice were alive by the age of 2 years, whereas 60% of mice died in untreated group by this age. The effect of weekly treatment on survival was highly significant and cannot be fully explained by partial reduction in obesity. Alternating bi-weekly treatments seem to be less effective than weekly treatment, although effects of additional factors (see ) may not be excluded. After one year of treatment, all survived mice were sacrificed 8 days after the last administration of rapamycin to avoid its direct interference with parameters examined. Fasting levels of cardiac and hepatic p-S6, a marker of mTORC1 activity, were lower in weekly treatment group compared with control mice. In contrast, levels of p-Akt (S473), glucose, triglycerides and insulin were unchanged, whereas leptin and IGF-1 tended to be lower. Thus, weekly treatment with rapamycin may slow down aging in obese male mice on high-fat diet. PMID:24655348

  16. Serum AMH concentration as a marker evaluating gonadal function in boys operated on for unilateral cryptorchidism between 1st and 4th year of life.

    PubMed

    Matuszczak, Ewa; Hermanowicz, Adam; Debek, Wojciech; Oksiuta, Marzanna; Dzienis-Koronkiewicz, Ewa; Zelazowska-Rutkowska, Beata

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the serum AMH (anti-Mullerian hormone) concentrations in a group of boys with or without cryptorchidism, evaluation of karyotypes, testicular position, morphology, and major length of the undescended testes. Fifty boys who were 1-4 years old (median = 2.4 years) with unilateral cryptorchidism were evaluated. All of them underwent orchidopexy in 2010. Prior to the procedure, all of the subjects had undergone karyotyping to exclude chromosomal abnormalities. Fifty healthy boys within the same age range (median = 2.1 years) admitted for planned inguinal hernia repair in 2010, served as controls. Blood samples were collected, while obtaining blood for standard laboratory tests routinely performed before the surgeries. Medians of AMH in boys with cryptorchidism were lower than in boys with inguinal hernia and differed significantly between two groups. Undescended testes were generally found in superficial inguinal pouch (n = 46), in two cases were noted to be in the external ring of the inguinal canal, and in another two instances, in the abdominal cavity. The major lengths of the undescended testes were smaller in comparison to the testes positioned normally (mean of 1 cm vs. a mean of 1.5 cm, respectively). In nine of the cases, the testes had turgor deficit, a drop shape, with epididymides that were small, dysplastic, and separated from the testis. The authors found that AMH was lower in boys with unilateral cryptorchidism (also found to have smaller testis) when compared with the control group.

  17. Activities across Nation Mark National Chemistry Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Ernest, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes national and local activities done during National Chemistry Week including chemistry demonstrations, shopping center exhibits, contests, and museum exhibits. Discusses the supplementary material about chemistry in selected editions of 16 newspapers, "Solution for the Future." Presents many pictures showing those activities. (YP)

  18. 76 FR 43107 - Captive Nations Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... everywhere. Such brave actions led to the birth of our Nation, the fall of the Soviet Union, and countless other achievements that have shaped our world. During Captive Nations Week, we remember the men and women throughout the world still suffering under oppressive regimes, and we underscore our commitment...

  19. 78 FR 62305 - Fire Prevention Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-16

    ...- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-24498 Filed 10-15-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F4 ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 9034 of October 4, 2013 Fire Prevention Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Fires take more...

  20. 77 FR 62133 - Fire Prevention Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-25228 Filed 10-11-12; 8:45... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8881 of October 5, 2012 Fire Prevention Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every year, fires in...

  1. What to Do in Week One?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormeli, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Although teachers can build positive relationships with students throughout the school year, the first weeks are crucial, writes Wormeli. They set the tone and conditions for the year ahead, creating a more effective teaching and learning enterprise for everyone. Wormeli tells how, as a middle school teacher, he set a goal of learning the names of…

  2. [Seventh National Population Week in Rwanda, 1993].

    PubMed

    Munyanziza, B

    1993-08-01

    The 1993 National Population Week opened in the commune of Rutare on August 2 and ended in Gikongoro in the commune of Rwamiko on August 6. Its goal was to sensitize all levels of the population to Rwanda's demographic problems through an IEC (information, education, communication) program while respecting the individual liberty, and the moral and religious beliefs of couples. On the first day of the population education campaign, the mayors of each commune along with its elite presided over a meeting to discuss implementation of the campaign, the sociodemographic situation at the commune level (especially at the household level), and the importance of family planning in family health. During August 2-5 at the commune level, the communal elite and the abakangurambagas presided over sensitization meetings, conference-debates, educational discussions, home visits, theatrical sessions, songs and dances, orientation to health centers, and recruitment of family planning acceptors. On the last day, development technicians working in the commune, teachers, students, religious leaders, abakangurambagas, political party leaders, and mass media journalists, all of whom took part in the week's activities, met at the communal office to evaluate the week's activities and to amass resolutions and recommendations. The mayor closed the 1993 edition of the National Population Week after the evaluation.

  3. A 4-Day Work Week That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kenneth; Timmerman, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Describes Navarro College's (Corsicana, TX) program to reduce kilowatt hour consumption through alternative energy sources and energy costs through transition to a four-day/40-hour work week. Presents results of studies of employee performance levels, community response, and the cost effectiveness of the program. Lists benefits for the student,…

  4. First Few Weeks on Campus. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Every fall, college and university campuses and communities brace for the onslaught of new and returning students. For first-year students, anecdotal evidence suggests that the first six weeks of enrollment are critical to success. Because many students initiate heavy drinking during these early days of college, the potential exists for excessive…

  5. Science week: May 11”17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    National Science Week, an event launched last year by the National Science Foundation (NSF), will be observed thi s year from May 11 to May 17, 1986. In support of this effort, NSF is urging individuals or organizations to sponsor science and math competitions or fairs, arrange "open house" events at research facilities, organize educational programs and scientific demonstrations, and arrange or participate in other activities. National Science Week is intended to increase public awareness and understanding of science and technology and to encourage young people in the United States to become more involved with and consider careers in science and mathematics. Educational packets will be made available to schools, public libraries, and science museums. The corporate sponsors of National Science Week are the Amoco Foundation, the Atlantic Richfield Foundation, the Dow Chemical Company Foundation, the DuPont Company, the Eastman Kodak Company, the General Electric Foundation, and IBM. For more information, write to National Science Week '86, c/o National Science Foundation, 1800 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20550 (telephone: 1-800-227-SEEK).

  6. Telling the Public--It's Science Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an opportunity to engage the public in demonstrating and explaining some aspects of science. About 10 years ago, the author met Peter Evennett in the ASE Conference exhibition. Peter was a member of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society and currently its president. As a contribution to "Science Week" (which dates back…

  7. The Four-Day School Week. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This paper provides an overview of the 4-day school week being utilized by 36 school districts in Colorado. These districts, which tend to be rural and sparsely populated, schedule 7.5 hours per day for 144 days of school instead of the normal 6 hours for 180 days. Colorado law requires school districts to schedule 1,080 hours per year of…

  8. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components (PFMC-13) jointly organized with the 1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science (FEMaS-1) was held in Rosenheim (Germany) on 9-13 May 2011. PFMC-13 is a successor of the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003 ten 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. Then it was time for a change and redefinition of the scope of the symposium to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution in the field. Under the new name (PFMC-11), the workshop was first organized in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany and PFMC-12 took place in Jülich in 2009. Initially starting in 1985 with about 40 participants as a 1.5 day workshop, the event has continuously grown to about 220 participants at PFMC-12. Due to the joint organization with FEMaS-1, PFMC-13 set a new record with more than 280 participants. The European project Fusion Energy Materials Science, FEMaS, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), organizes and stimulates cooperative research activities which involve large-scale research facilities as well as other top-level materials characterization laboratories. Five different fields are addressed: benchmarking experiments for radiation damage modelling, the application of micro-mechanical characterization methods, synchrotron and neutron radiation-based techniques and advanced nanoscopic analysis based on transmission electron microscopy. All these fields need to be exploited further by the fusion materials community for timely materials solutions for a DEMO reactor. In order to integrate these materials research fields, FEMaS acted as a co-organizer for the 2011 workshop and successfully introduced a number of participants from research labs and universities into the PFMC community. Plasma-facing materials experience particularly hostile conditions as they are

  9. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG)) and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI)).

    PubMed

    Reinhart, K; Brunkhorst, F M; Bone, H-G; Bardutzky, J; Dempfle, C-E; Forst, H; Gastmeier, P; Gerlach, H; Gründling, M; John, S; Kern, W; Kreymann, G; Krüger, W; Kujath, P; Marggraf, G; Martin, J; Mayer, K; Meier-Hellmann, A; Oppert, M; Putensen, C; Quintel, M; Ragaller, M; Rossaint, R; Seifert, H; Spies, C; Stüber, F; Weiler, N; Weimann, A; Werdan, K; Welte, T

    2010-06-28

    Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1(st) revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge) on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care) of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the "German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal" of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF). In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources.

  10. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG)) and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI))

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, K.; Brunkhorst, F. M.; Bone, H.-G.; Bardutzky, J.; Dempfle, C.-E.; Forst, H.; Gastmeier, P.; Gerlach, H.; Gründling, M.; John, S.; Kern, W.; Kreymann, G.; Krüger, W.; Kujath, P.; Marggraf, G.; Martin, J.; Mayer, K.; Meier-Hellmann, A.; Oppert, M.; Putensen, C.; Quintel, M.; Ragaller, M.; Rossaint, R.; Seifert, H.; Spies, C.; Stüber, F.; Weiler, N.; Weimann, A.; Werdan, K.; Welte, T.

    2010-01-01

    Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge) on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care) of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF). In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources. PMID:20628653

  11. PERSISTENT EFFECTS OF REPEATED INHALATION OF TOLUENE: 4 WEEKS VS. 13 WEEKS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding and predicting the extent of neurotoxic damage from repeated exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a problem for many EPA programs. Eighty adult, male Long-Evans rats inhaled toluene (0, 10, 100, or 1000 ppm) 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks in a systema...

  12. Does Shortening the School Week Impact Student Performance? Evidence from the Four-Day School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, D. Mark; Walker, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    School districts use a variety of policies to close budget gaps and stave off teacher layoffs and furloughs. More schools are implementing four-day school weeks to reduce overhead and transportation costs. The four-day week requires substantial schedule changes as schools must increase the length of their school day to meet minimum instructional…

  13. An exploratory cluster randomised trial of a university halls of residence based social norms marketing campaign to reduce alcohol consumption among 1st year students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims This exploratory trial examines the feasibility of implementing a social norms marketing campaign to reduce student drinking in universities in Wales, and evaluating it using cluster randomised trial methodology. Methods Fifty residence halls in 4 universities in Wales were randomly assigned to intervention or control arms. Web and paper surveys were distributed to students within these halls (n = 3800), assessing exposure/contamination, recall of and evaluative responses to intervention messages, perceived drinking norms and personal drinking behaviour. Measures included the Drinking Norms Rating Form, the Daily Drinking Questionnaire and AUDIT-C. Results A response rate of 15% (n = 554) was achieved, varying substantially between sites. Intervention posters were seen by 80% and 43% of students in intervention and control halls respectively, with most remaining materials seen by a minority in both groups. Intervention messages were rated as credible and relevant by little more than half of students, though fewer felt they would influence their behaviour, with lighter drinkers more likely to perceive messages as credible. No differences in perceived norms were observed between intervention and control groups. Students reporting having seen intervention materials reported lower descriptive and injunctive norms than those who did not. Conclusions Attention is needed to enhancing exposure, credibility and perceived relevance of intervention messages, particularly among heavier drinkers, before definitive evaluation can be recommended. A definitive evaluation would need to consider how it would achieve sufficient response rates, whilst hall-level cluster randomisation appears subject to a significant degree of contamination. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN48556384 PMID:23594918

  14. Weekly petroleum status report. Data for week ended, October 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) provides timely information on the petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information, selected prices, and forecasts. The WPSR is intended to provide up-to-date information to the industry, the press, planners, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments. It is published each Thursday by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and excerpts of the data are available electronically after 9:00 a.m. Wednesday. The data contained in this report are based on company submissions for the week ending 7:00 a.m. the preceding Friday. For some weeks which include holidays, publication of the WPSR is delayed by 1 day. The WPSR is not published during 1 of the last 2 weeks of the year depending upon which day of the week Christmas occurs.

  15. Weekly headache periodicity and the effect of weather changes on headache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, P. O.; Lövstrand, K. G.; Lundberg, P. O.; Lundquist, S.; Muhr, C.

    1981-03-01

    A weekly periodicity in the occurrence of headache was found in 53 patients with migraine and in 20 with tension headache during an observation period of four weeks. In the migraine group the frequency was highest on Thursday and on Saturday and lowest on Sunday Monday, and in patients with tension headache it was lowest on Sunday Tuesday and highest on Friday. During the observation period several climatic factors were recorded. After correction for the weekly periodicity a highly significant correlation was found in the migraine group between headache frequency, on the one hand, and atmospheric pressure and outdoor temperature recorded 1 3 days later, on the other.

  16. Access to transport for women with hypovolemic shock differs according to weeks of pregnancy☆

    PubMed Central

    Butrick, Elizabeth; Penn, Amy; Itakura, Kaoru; Mkumba, Gricelia; Winter, Kelly; Amafumba, Rhoda; Miller, Suellen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage are transported to referral hospitals differently depending on weeks of pregnancy in Zambia. Methods In a retrospective study, transport type, wait time, and transit time were assessed for women with obstetric hemorrhage and hypovolemic shock transported from 26 primary health centers to three referral hospitals during 2007–2011. A mean arterial pressure of less than 60 mm Hg was used to indicate severe shock. Women were split into two categories on the basis of the number of weeks of pregnancy (<24 weeks vs ≥24 weeks). Results Overall, 616 women were included. Mode of transport differed significantly by group (P<0.001). 414 (93.0%) of 445 women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were transported by ambulance versus 114 (66.7%) of 171 women at less than 24 weeks. Among those in severe shock, 106 (93.0%) of 114 women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were transported in ambulances versus 26 (52.0%) of 50 women at less than 24 weeks (P<0.001). Conclusion Women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were given preference for ambulance transport even when signs of shock were equivalent. Policy-makers aiming to lower maternal mortality need to address transport issues regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage or week of pregnancy. PMID:25022343

  17. 13-week oral toxicity study of vinyl laurate in rats.

    PubMed

    Lina, Ben A R; Messinger, Horst; Bär, Albert

    2015-02-01

    Vinyl laurate (VL) is used as a monomer in the production of polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer, a component of chewing gum base. The safety of VL was examined in a 13-week oral toxicity study in Wistar rats. VL was administered in corn coil by daily gavage (5 ml/kg bw/d) to four main groups (10 rats/sex) at doses of 0 (vehicle only), 50, 250 and 1000 mg/kg bw/d, respectively. The control and high-dose group comprised an additional 5 rats/sex which were kept untreated for a further 4 weeks until sacrifice (recovery groups). In addition to standard parameters, male and female fertility parameters were determined as well. There were no mortalities and treatment-related clinical signs. Neurobehavioral observations and motor activity assessment, ophthalmoscopic examinations, body weights, feed and water intakes, blood cell counts, coagulation time, standard clinical chemical parameters and urinalyses, absolute and relative organ weights at the end of the treatment as well as macroscopic examination at necropsy and microscopic examination of standard organs and tissues did not show any treatment-related changes. Female and male fertility parameters (estrus cyclicity, testicular and epididymal sperm counts, sperm motility and morphology) were not affected by the treatment. Accordingly, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for VL was determined to be 1000 mg/kg bw/d, i.e. the highest dose level tested. PMID:25445296

  18. Vehicle Technologies' Fact of the Week 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2012-04-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Program (VTP) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/. These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current Fact is available Monday through Friday on the VTP homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2011. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  19. Vehicle Technologies’ Fact of the Week 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W.; Moore, Sheila A.; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2014-04-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week’s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2013. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  20. A novel Van91 I polymorphism in the 1st intron of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor gene and its effect on the urinary cAMP response to PTH.

    PubMed

    Heishi, M; Tazawa, H; Matsuo, T; Saruta, T; Hanaoka, M; Tsukamoto, Y

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to identify a parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor gene polymorphism in a healthy Japanese population. All known 13 introns of this gene were amplified by PCR, except the 1st intron, which was amplified by the long-PCR method. No restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were detected by BsmI or XbaI in any of these introns. Twenty-one other restriction enzymes (Hind III, Bgl II, Sty I, Pvu II, Eco81 I, Van91 I, BstX I, Sse8387 I, EcoR I, BamH I, Mbo II, Tth111 I, PshA I, Eam1105 I, Not I, Srf I, Bgl I, Fok I, Sfi I, Apa I, Taq I) were tested on the 1st intron. Furthermore, digestion by Van911 (CCANNNNNTGG) identified a single, two-allele polymorphism with a fragment of approximately 3.5 kb (V allele) or a fragment of 3.1 and 0.4 kb (v allele). The frequency of the Van91 I polymorphism in 106 healthy Japanese volunteers was 77.4% for type vv, 19.8% for type Vv and 2.8% for type VV. In addition, the urinary cAMP response to exogenous [1-34]PTH was studied in 17 healthy volunteers and found to be significantly greater in persons with type Vv than type vv (p<0.05). In conclusion, the Van91 I polymorphism of the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene can be used to study the role of polymorphism in various disorders involving PTH or PTHrP. PMID:10784412

  1. Promoting independence in adolescent paraplegics: a 2-week "camping" experience.

    PubMed

    Bodzioch, J; Roach, J W; Schkade, J

    1986-01-01

    In the summer of 1982, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital (Dallas, TX, U.S.A.) sponsored a camp for paraplegic adolescents. Six patients, three boys and three girls 14-17 years of age, participated in a 2-week program that was designed to improve their self-esteem, independence, and eventual employability. In their pre- and postcamp psychological evaluations, the campers demonstrated improvement in social skills and self-concept testing as compared with the scores of a matched control group, although this improvement did not reach statistical significance. We believe the camp was immensely successful, an opinion that was shared by both the campers and their parents.

  2. Energy week `96 - PETRO-SAFE

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Proceedings of the Petro-Safe Energy Week Conference and Exhibition held January 29-February 2, 1996 in Houston, Texas are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for 53 papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database. The papers covered such topics as environmental issues in the petroleum industry, process safety management, waste and remediation issues, safety issues, and health, safety, and environemental training issues.

  3. Psychosocial predictors of attitudes toward physician empathy in clinical encounters among 4732 1st year medical students: A report from the CHANGES study☆

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Hardeman, Rachel R.; Phelan, Sean M.; Burke, Sara E.; Przedworski, Julia; Allen, Michele L.; Burgess, Diana J.; Ridgeway, Jennifer; White, Richard O.; Dovidio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Medical school curricula intended to promote empathy varies widely. Even the most effective curricula leave a significant group of students untouched. Pre-existing student factors influence their response to learning experiences. We examined the individual predictors of first semester medical students’ attitudes toward the value of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Methods First year students (n = 4732) attending a stratified random sample of 49 US medical schools completed an online questionnaire that included measures of dispositional characteristics, attitudes and beliefs, self-concept and well-being. Results Discomfort with uncertainty, close-mindedness, dispositional empathy, elitism, medical authoritarianism, egalitarianism, self-concept and well-being all independently predicted first year medical students’ attitudes toward the benefit of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Conclusion Students vary on their attitude toward the value of physician empathy when they start medical school. The individual factors that predict their attitudes toward empathy may also influence their response to curricula promoting empathic care. Practice implications Curricula in medical school promoting empathic care may be more universally effective if students’ preexisting attitudes are taken into account. Messages about the importance of physician empathy may need to be framed in ways that are consistent with the beliefs and prior world-views of medical students. PMID:25065328

  4. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27-28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient's quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined. PMID:27610198

  5. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27–28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R.; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient’s quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined.

  6. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27-28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient's quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined.

  7. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27–28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R.; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient’s quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined. PMID:27610198

  8. Gastrointestinal tolerability with ibandronate after previous weekly bisphosphonate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Derman, Richard; Kohles, Joseph D; Babbitt, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Data from two open-label trials (PRIOR and CURRENT) of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis or osteopenia were evaluated to assess whether monthly oral and quarterly intravenous (IV) ibandronate dosing improved self-reported gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability for patients who had previously experienced GI irritation with bisphosphonate (BP) use. In PRIOR, women who had discontinued daily or weekly BP treatment due to GI intolerance received monthly oral or quarterly IV ibandronate for 12 months. The CURRENT subanalysis included women receiving weekly BP treatment who switched to monthly oral ibandronate for six months. GI symptom severity and frequency were assessed using the Osteoporosis Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire™. In PRIOR, mean GI tolerability scores increased significantly at month 1 from screening for both treatment groups (oral: 79.3 versus 54.1; IV: 84.4 versus 51.0; p < 0.001 for both). Most patients reported improvement in GI symptom severity and frequency from baseline at all post-screening assessments (>90% at Month 10). In the CURRENT subanalysis >60% of patients reported improvements in heartburn or acid reflux and >70% indicated improvement in other stomach upset at month 6. Postmenopausal women with GI irritability with daily or weekly BPs experienced improvement in symptoms with extended dosing monthly or quarterly ibandronate compared with baseline. PMID:19851511

  9. Intervention effects on kindergarten and 1st grade teachers’ classroom food practices and food-related beliefs in American Indian reservation schools

    PubMed Central

    Arcan, Chrisa; Hannan, Peter J.; Himes, John H.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Rock, Bonnie Holy; Smyth, Mary; Story, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of obesity among American Indian (AI) children is higher than the general US population. The school environment and teachers play important roles in helping students develop healthy eating habits. The aim of this prospective study was to examine teachers’ classroom and school food practices and beliefs and the effect of teacher training on these practices and beliefs. Data were used from the Bright Start study, a group-randomized, school-based trial on the Pine Ridge AI reservation (Fall 2005 to Spring 2008). Kindergarten and first grade teachers (n=75) from 14 schools completed a survey at the beginning and end of the school year. Thirty-seven survey items were evaluated using mixed-model analysis of variance to examine the intervention effect for each teacher-practice and belief item (adjusting for teacher type and school as random effect). At baseline, some teachers reported classroom and school food practices and beliefs that supported health and some that did not. The intervention was significantly associated with lower classroom use of candy as a treat (p=0.0005) and fast food rewards (p=0.008); more intervention teachers disagreed that fast food should be offered as school lunch alternatives (p=0.019), that it would be acceptable to sell unhealthy foods as part of school fund-raising (p=0.006), and that it would not make sense to limit students’ food choices in school (p=0.035). School-based interventions involving teacher training can result in positive changes in teachers’ classroom food practices and beliefs about the influence of the school food environment in schools serving AI children on reservations. PMID:23885704

  10. Treatment with α-Lipoic Acid over 16 Weeks in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Symptomatic Polyneuropathy Who Responded to Initial 4-Week High-Dose Loading

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alcala, Hector; Santos Vichido, Celia Isabel; Islas Macedo, Silverio; Genestier-Tamborero, Christelle Nathalie; Minutti-Palacios, Marissa; Hirales Tamez, Omara; García, Carlos; Ziegler, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy remains a challenge. To assess the efficacy and safety of α-lipoic acid (ALA) over 20 weeks, we conducted a multicenter randomized withdrawal open-label study, in which 45 patients with type 2 diabetes and symptomatic polyneuropathy were initially treated with ALA (600 mg tid) for 4 weeks (phase 1). Subsequently, responders were randomized to receive ALA (600 mg qd; n = 16) or to ALA withdrawal (n = 17) for 16 weeks (phase 2). During phase 1, the Total Symptom Score (TSS) decreased from 8.9 ± 1.8 points to 3.46 ± 2.0 points. During phase 2, TSS improved from 3.7 ± 1.9 points to 2.5 ± 2.5 points in the ALA treated group (p < 0.05) and remained unchanged in the ALA withdrawal group. The use of analgesic rescue medication was higher in the ALA withdrawal group than ALA treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in type 2 diabetic patients with symptomatic polyneuropathy who responded to initial 4-week high-dose (600 mg tid) administration of ALA, subsequent treatment with ALA (600 mg qd) over 16 weeks improved neuropathic symptoms, whereas ALA withdrawal was associated with a higher use of rescue analgesic drugs. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02439879. PMID:26345602

  11. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  12. Weekly vs. Every-3-Week Paclitaxel and Carboplatin for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, J.K.; Brady, M.F.; Penson, R.T.; Huang, H.; Birrer, M.J.; Walker, J.L.; DiSilvestro, P.A.; Rubin, S.C.; Martin, L.P.; Davidson, S.A.; Huh, W.K.; O’Malley, D.M.; Boente, M.P.; Michael, H.; Monk, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A dose-dense weekly schedule of paclitaxel (resulting in a greater frequency of drug delivery) plus carboplatin every 3 weeks or the addition of bevacizumab to paclitaxel and carboplatin administered every 3 weeks has shown efficacy in ovarian cancer. We proposed to determine whether dose-dense weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin would prolong progression-free survival as compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin administered every 3 weeks among patients receiving and those not receiving bevacizumab. METHODS We prospectively stratified patients according to whether they elected to receive bevacizumab and then randomly assigned them to receive either paclitaxel, administered intravenously at a dose of 175 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks, plus carboplatin (dose equivalent to an area under the curve [AUC] of 6) for six cycles or paclitaxel, administered weekly at a dose of 80 mg per square meter, plus carboplatin (AUC, 6) for six cycles. The primary end point was progression-free survival. RESULTS A total of 692 patients were enrolled, 84% of whom opted to receive bevacizumab. In the intention-to-treat analysis, weekly paclitaxel was not associated with longer progression-free survival than paclitaxel administered every 3 weeks (14.7 months and 14.0 months, respectively; hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74 to 1.06; P = 0.18). Among patients who did not receive bevacizumab, weekly paclitaxel was associated with progression-free survival that was 3.9 months longer than that observed with paclitaxel administered every 3 weeks (14.2 vs. 10.3 months; hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). However, among patients who received bevacizumab, weekly paclitaxel did not significantly prolong progression-free survival, as compared with paclitaxel administered every 3 weeks (14.9 months and 14.7 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.20; P = 0.60). A test for

  13. [Clinical-pharmacological aspects to accelerate the development process from the preclinical to the clinical phase/1st communication: The contribution of clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    of clinical trial patients to select patient groups which are likely to respond to treatment (pharmacogenomics), modelling and simulation of preclinical and clinical trials, integration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles into drug development, assessment of the interaction potential (CYP-450, trasporter proteins and others), increasing use of biomarker/surrogate marker for rapid clinical feedback, involvement of the target population as soon as possible, applying statistical data analysis techniques for proving effectiveness, co-operation with high quality centers. To reach this goal clinical pharmacology must be fully integrated in the whole process from the candidate selection to its positioning within the market.

  14. [Clinical-pharmacological aspects to accelerate the development process from the preclinical to the clinical phase/1st communication: The contribution of clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    of clinical trial patients to select patient groups which are likely to respond to treatment (pharmacogenomics), modelling and simulation of preclinical and clinical trials, integration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles into drug development, assessment of the interaction potential (CYP-450, trasporter proteins and others), increasing use of biomarker/surrogate marker for rapid clinical feedback, involvement of the target population as soon as possible, applying statistical data analysis techniques for proving effectiveness, co-operation with high quality centers. To reach this goal clinical pharmacology must be fully integrated in the whole process from the candidate selection to its positioning within the market. PMID:15212186

  15. Cooperative Group Trials in the Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wade, James Lloyd; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 40 years the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has created a vibrant public-private partnership for the implementation of NCI sponsored cooperative group (Network) clinical trials throughout the United States and Canada. Over these four decades, the cancer clinical trials process has become more complex more precise and more resource intensive. During this same time period, financial resources to support the NCI community research initiative have become more constrained. The newest manifestation of NCI sponsored community based cancer clinical trial research, known as the National Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) began initial operation August 1st, 2014. This paper describes several key strategies that community sites may use to not only be successful, but to thrive in this new financially austere research environment. PMID:26433550

  16. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability. PMID:26504270

  17. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability.

  18. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  19. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived, and goal…

  20. Earth Science Week is coming soon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti M.

    2012-10-01

    AGU along with other societies, federal agencies, and organizations is participating in Earth Science Week (ESW), being held 14-20 October 2012 (http://www.earthsciweek.org/index.html). This year's theme, "Discovering careers in the Earth sciences," encourages young people everywhere to explore the natural world and learn about the geosciences. To find out more about how you can participate in ESW by planning an event, go to http://www.earthsciweek.org/forplanners/index.html. To learn about ESW events taking place in your area, visit http://www.earthsciweek.org/eventsnearyou/index.html.

  1. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  2. Clinical pharmacology study of cariprazine (MP-214) in patients with schizophrenia (12-week treatment)

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Kubota, Tomoko; Iwakaji, Atsushi; Imada, Masayoshi; Kapás, Margit; Morio, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cariprazine is a potent dopamine D3-preferring D3/D2 receptor partial agonist in development for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and depression. Pharmacokinetics of cariprazine and the two clinically relevant metabolites (desmethyl- and didesmethyl-cariprazine) was evaluated in a clinical pharmacology study. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, fixed-dose (3, 6, or 9 mg/day) study of 28-week duration (≤4-week observation, 12-week open-label treatment, and 12-week follow-up). Once-daily cariprazine was administered to 38 adult patients with schizophrenia. The pharmacokinetics of cariprazine, metabolites, and total active moieties (sum of cariprazine and two metabolites) was evaluated; efficacy and safety were also assessed. Results Steady state was reached within 1–2 weeks for cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine, 4 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine, and 3 weeks for total active moieties. Cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine levels decreased >90% within 1 week after the last dose, didesmethyl-cariprazine decreased ~50% at 1 week, and total active moieties decreased ~90% within 4 weeks. Terminal half-lives of cariprazine, desmethyl-cariprazine, and didesmethyl-cariprazine ranged from 31.6 to 68.4, 29.7 to 37.5, and 314 to 446 hours, respectively. Effective half-life (calculated from time to steady state) of total active moieties was ~1 week. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was 97.4%; 15.8% of patients discontinued due to adverse events. No abnormal laboratory values or major differences from baseline in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed. Conclusion Cariprazine and its active metabolites reached steady state within 4 weeks, and exposure was dose proportional over the range of 3–9 mg/day. Once-daily cariprazine was generally well tolerated in adult patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26834462

  3. Joint Eglin Acoustic Week III Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Conner, David A.; Smith, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    A series of three flight tests have been conducted at an Eglin Air Force Base remote test range located in the Florida panhandle. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustic Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. The most recent was the Eglin Acoustic Week III test conducted in August-September 2007. This series of tests acquired acoustic data for a number of rotary and fixed wing aircraft and are used to generate noise semi-spheres used in predicting the acoustic footprint for prescribed flight operations. This extensive database can be used to determine the impact of flight operations on communities around a terminal area as well as for prediction code validations. Another valuable use of the semi-spheres is determining the long-range propagation of noise for civilian and military purposes. This paper describes the third test in this series. Data described in this report were acquired during testing of the MD-902 and Mi-8M aircraft. In addition, data acquired during a set of atmospheric propagation tests is also described.

  4. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  5. Comparing between results and complications of doing voiding cystourethrogram in the first week following urinary tract infection and in 2-6 weeks after urinary tract infection in children referring to a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Shahsavari, Someyeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection is the most common genitourinary disease in children so about 40% of the children with urinary tract infection suffering from reflux that caused some consequences such as pyelonephritis and kidney parenchymal injury. Objectives: This research was conducted to compare the timing of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) in children with urinary tract infection in first week and after the first week of urinary tract infection. Patients and Methods: This research is a case-control study that both case and control groups include 208 children from 1 month to 12 years old with the complain of urinary tract infection. In case group, the VCUG was performed at the first week of infection and in control group, the VCUG was performed after the first week of infection. Results: complication such as dysuria was observed in two-thirds of children who VCUG was performed during first week after urinary tract infection. Parents stress in case group was more than the other (P=0.015). For overall, the incidence of reflux in case and control groups was 49.5% and 50%, respectively. The mean of reflux grading in right kidney in case group was lower than control group resulting in significant differences between two groups. Conclusion: According to higher grade of stress in parents and complications due to VCUG at the first week of urinary tract infection, it is suggested that VCUG be conducted on selective patients in the hospital at the first week of urinary tract infection and during hospitalization. PMID:27689111

  6. Effects of 24 weeks of Tai Chi Exercise on Postural Control among Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihe; Chang, Shuwan; Cong, Yan; Qin, Meiqin; Sun, Wei; Lian, Jianhua; Yao, Jian; Li, Weiping; Hong, Youlian

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 24 weeks of Tai Chi Quan on the postural control of elderly women. A total of 43 women aged 55-68 years participated in the study. A Tai Chi group (n = 22) underwent an organized Tai Chi exercise, whereas the control group (n = 21) maintained a habitual, no-regular-exercise lifestyle. A Good Balance tester (Metitur, Finland) was used to measure the time, paths and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) of subjects during stance while shifting COP to targeted positions shown on a monitor. After 24 weeks, the Tai Chi group showed significantly shorter total (18.6%, p = 0.005), mediolateral (21.9%, p = 0.002) and anteroposterior (18.3%, p = 0.002) COP sway paths than the control group. The results indicate that 24 weeks of the Tai Chi exercise improved the efficiency of postural control for elderly women. PMID:26223978

  7. Effects of 24 weeks of Tai Chi Exercise on Postural Control among Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihe; Chang, Shuwan; Cong, Yan; Qin, Meiqin; Sun, Wei; Lian, Jianhua; Yao, Jian; Li, Weiping; Hong, Youlian

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 24 weeks of Tai Chi Quan on the postural control of elderly women. A total of 43 women aged 55-68 years participated in the study. A Tai Chi group (n = 22) underwent an organized Tai Chi exercise, whereas the control group (n = 21) maintained a habitual, no-regular-exercise lifestyle. A Good Balance tester (Metitur, Finland) was used to measure the time, paths and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) of subjects during stance while shifting COP to targeted positions shown on a monitor. After 24 weeks, the Tai Chi group showed significantly shorter total (18.6%, p = 0.005), mediolateral (21.9%, p = 0.002) and anteroposterior (18.3%, p = 0.002) COP sway paths than the control group. The results indicate that 24 weeks of the Tai Chi exercise improved the efficiency of postural control for elderly women.

  8. Effects of 24-week Tai Chi exercise on the knee and ankle proprioception of older women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuwan; Zhou, Jihe; Hong, Youlian; Sun, Wei; Cong, Yan; Qin, Meiqin; Lian, Jianhua; Yao, Jian; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of regular Tai Chi (TC) exercise on the kinaesthesia of the knee and ankle joints of older women. A total of 43 women aged 55-68 years participated in this study. In a 24-week study period, the TC group (n = 22) underwent an organized TC exercise, whereas the control group (n = 21) maintained a sedentary lifestyle. Customized instruments were used to measure the threshold for the detection of the passive motion of the knee and ankle joints. After 24 weeks, the TC group showed a significantly smaller threshold for the detection of passive motion of knee extension (31.4%, p = 0.009), knee flexion (27.0%, p = 0.044), and ankle dorsal flexion (28.9%, p = 0.014) than the control group. Other comparisons showed no significant differences. The 24-week TC exercise benefited the lower-limb kinaesthesia of the knee joint flexion and extension and ankle dorsal flexion.

  9. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components (PFMC-13) jointly organized with the 1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science (FEMaS-1) was held in Rosenheim (Germany) on 9-13 May 2011. PFMC-13 is a successor of the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003 ten 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. Then it was time for a change and redefinition of the scope of the symposium to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution in the field. Under the new name (PFMC-11), the workshop was first organized in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany and PFMC-12 took place in Jülich in 2009. Initially starting in 1985 with about 40 participants as a 1.5 day workshop, the event has continuously grown to about 220 participants at PFMC-12. Due to the joint organization with FEMaS-1, PFMC-13 set a new record with more than 280 participants. The European project Fusion Energy Materials Science, FEMaS, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), organizes and stimulates cooperative research activities which involve large-scale research facilities as well as other top-level materials characterization laboratories. Five different fields are addressed: benchmarking experiments for radiation damage modelling, the application of micro-mechanical characterization methods, synchrotron and neutron radiation-based techniques and advanced nanoscopic analysis based on transmission electron microscopy. All these fields need to be exploited further by the fusion materials community for timely materials solutions for a DEMO reactor. In order to integrate these materials research fields, FEMaS acted as a co-organizer for the 2011 workshop and successfully introduced a number of participants from research labs and universities into the PFMC community. Plasma-facing materials experience particularly hostile conditions as they are

  10. Arts Week: A Canadian School Celebrates the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charlene A.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the program called "Arts Week" that demonstrates the importance of the arts in the lives of students at West Point Gray Academy in Vancouver (British Columbia). Describes Arts Week and discusses the process of creating Arts Week. States that Art Week was a success. (CMK)

  11. 20 CFR 625.6 - Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.6 Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions. (a) In all States... worker or unemployed self-employed individual for a week of total unemployment shall be the weekly amount... provisions of the applicable State law for a week of total unemployment. In no event shall such amount be...

  12. 20 CFR 625.6 - Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.6 Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions. (a) In all States... worker or unemployed self-employed individual for a week of total unemployment shall be the weekly amount... provisions of the applicable State law for a week of total unemployment. In no event shall such amount be...

  13. 20 CFR 625.6 - Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.6 Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions. (a) In all States... worker or unemployed self-employed individual for a week of total unemployment shall be the weekly amount... provisions of the applicable State law for a week of total unemployment. In no event shall such amount be...

  14. 20 CFR 625.6 - Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.6 Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions. (a) In all States... worker or unemployed self-employed individual for a week of total unemployment shall be the weekly amount... provisions of the applicable State law for a week of total unemployment. In no event shall such amount be...

  15. 20 CFR 625.6 - Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.6 Weekly amount; jurisdictions; reductions. (a) In all States... worker or unemployed self-employed individual for a week of total unemployment shall be the weekly amount... provisions of the applicable State law for a week of total unemployment. In no event shall such amount be...

  16. Subsidence at the Weeks Island SPR Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    The elevation change data measured at the Weeks Island SPR site over the last 16+ years has been studied and analyzed. The subsidence rate is not constant with time and while the subsidence rate may have increased slightly during the past several years, recently the rate has increased more dramatically. The most recent increase comes at a time when the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage mine had been emptied of oil and was in the process of being refilled with brine. Damage to surface structures that has been observed during the past 12-18 months is attributed to the continued subsidence and dtierential subsidence across structures. The recent greater subsidence rates were unanticipated according to analysis results and will be used to aid further subsidence model development.

  17. Reflections on a Week in Oxford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Tara

    2012-04-01

    When Bob asked me a couple of days ago to give this talk, he said it should be ``pithy and wise.'' When I spoke to Aris the next day he said it should be ``informal and funny.'' Then Elizabeth spoke to me and said it would be great if it was ``controversial and challenging.'' I mentioned to Aris just before dinner that I had put a talk together, and he said ``Oh, you've written a talk-I thought it would be something more spontaneous!'' Faced with an obviously impossible spec, I did what any reasonable programmer would do and rewrote the spec myself. So what I'm going to talk about this evening is a reflection on my week in Oxford.

  18. After Opportunity's First Drive in Six Weeks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its front hazard-identification camera to obtain this image at the end of a drive on the rover's 1,271st sol, or Martian day (Aug. 21, 2007).

    Due to sun-obscuring dust storms limiting the rover's supply of solar energy, Opportunity had not driven since sol 1,232 (July 12, 2007). On sol 1,271, after the sky above Opportunity had been gradually clearing for more than two weeks, the rover rolled 13.38 meters (44 feet). Wheel tracks are visible in front of the rover because the drive ended with a short test of driving backwards.

    Opportunity's turret of four tools at the end of the robotic arm fills the center of the image. Victoria Crater, site of the rover's next science targets, lies ahead.

  19. Twice weekly prophylactic therapy in haemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Aronstam, A; Kirk, P J; McHardy, J; Culver-James, J W; McLellan, D S; Turk, P; Rainsford, S G; Slattery, M

    1977-01-01

    Factor VIII-containing materials were administered to four severely affected haemophiliacs twice weekly in doses calculated to raise the factor VIII level to either 15% or 30% of average normal. The pooled results from those patients with statistically similar baseline bleeding frequencies showed a significant reduction in bleeding frequency on both doses in the first 48 hours. The 30% dose produced a more significant reduction than the 15% dose in the first 24 hours, but there was no significant difference between the two doses in the second 24 hours. It appears that to reduce the bleeding frequency of severely affected haemophiliacs by 60% would require a two-and-a-half-fold increase in therapeutic materials. A 90% reduction would need nine times the amount of material currently in use. PMID:320230

  20. Abrupt discontinuation compared with a 1-week taper regimen in depressed outpatients treated for 24 weeks with desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif; Musgnung, Jeff; Ramey, Tanya; Messig, Michael; Buckley, Gina; Ninan, Philip T

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the occurrence of discontinuation symptoms was equivalent for abrupt discontinuation versus 1-week taper to desvenlafaxine 25 mg/d after a 24-week treatment with desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate) for major depressive disorder. Adult outpatients with major depressive disorder who completed the 24 weeks of open-label treatment with desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d were randomly assigned to no discontinuation (desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d), taper (desvenlafaxine 25 mg/d), or abrupt discontinuation (placebo) groups for the double-blind (DB) taper phase. The primary end point was Discontinuation-Emergent Signs and Symptoms (DESS) scale total score during the first 2 weeks of the DB phase. The null hypothesis that the absolute difference of greater than 2.5 in DESS scores between taper and abrupt discontinuation groups was tested by calculating the 95% 2-sided confidence interval on the mean difference between the 2 groups. Of the 480 patients enrolled in the open-label phase, 357 (≥1 postrandomization DESS record) were included in the primary analysis. Adjusted mean ± SE DESS scores were 4.1 ± 0.72 for no discontinuation (n = 72), 4.8 ± 0.54 for taper (n = 139), and 5.3 ± 0.52 for abrupt discontinuation (n = 146) groups. The difference in adjusted mean DESS total scores between the abrupt discontinuation and taper groups was 0.50 (95% confidence interval, -0.88 to 1.89) within the prespecified margin (±2.5) for equivalence. The number of patients who discontinued because of adverse events or discontinuation symptoms during the DB period was similar between the taper (2.8%) and abrupt discontinuation (2.1%) groups. These findings indicate that an abrupt discontinuation of desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d produces statistically equivalent DESS scores compared with the 1-week taper using 25 mg/d.

  1. Effect of low-power helium-neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Anayatallah; Hekmat, Hossien

    2004-09-01

    Influence of low-power (632.8 nm, Helium-Neon, 13 J/cm2, three times a week) laser on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage was examined with rabbits knee model. Number of chondrocytes and depth of articular cartilage of experimental group were significantly higher than those of sham irradiated group. Surface morphology of sham-irradiated group had rough prominences, fibrillation and lacunae but surface morphology of experimental group had more similarities to control group than to sham irradiated group. There were marked differences between ultrastructure features of control group and experimental group in comparison with sham irradiated group. Low-power Helium-Neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized knee joints of rabbits neutrilized adverse effects of immobilization on articular cartilage.

  2. Dewarless Logging Tool - 1st Generation

    SciTech Connect

    HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

    2000-08-01

    This report focuses on Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications without the need for heat shielding. One of the mechanisms for failure in conventional downhole tools is temperature. They can only survive a limited number of hours in high temperature environments. For the first time since the evolution of integrated circuits, components are now commercially available that are qualified to 225 C with many continuing to work up to 300 C. These components are primarily based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology. Sandia has developed and tested a simple data logger based on this technology that operates up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to only 250 C without thermal protection. An actual well log to 240 C without shielding is discussed. The first prototype high-temperature tool measures pressure and temperature using a wire-line for power and communication. The tool is based around the HT83C51 microcontroller. A brief discussion of the background and status of the High Temperature Instrumentation program at Sandia, objectives, data logger development, and future project plans are given.

  3. Elementary Science Guide -- 1st Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieland, Anne; And Others

    Presented is a resource book to be used with instructional kits for elementary school science students, grade 1. The individual units at this grade level are based on curriculum which has been developed by the National Science Foundation in the 1960s and revised to meet student and teacher identified needs in Anchorage, Alaska. Four units are…

  4. MERIS 1st Year: early calibration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwart, Steven; Bourg, Ludovic; Huot, Jean-Paul

    2004-02-01

    Envisat is ESA's environmental research satellite launched on 1 March 2002. It carries a suit of sensors offering opportunities for a broad range of scientific research and applications. The calibration results from the first year of operation of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) will be presented, including in-flight verification and radiometric, spectral and geometric characterization of the instrument. Radiometric calibration using the on-board diffuser will be discussed and comparison with vicarious calibration results over desert sites or well-characterized marine sites will be presented. The image quality will be assessed, and improvements resulting from the in-flight characterization will be presented.

  5. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken on May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered during the missions 'first light' milestone, and shows celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The objects shown represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period. The radial streaks at the edge of the image are due to stars reflecting from the near ultraviolet detector window.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  6. GALEX 1st Light Near Ultraviolet -50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the two channels of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 50 celestial objects in the constellation Hercules. The reddish objects represent those detected by the camera's near ultraviolet channel over a 5-minute period, while bluish objects were detected over a 3-minute period by the camera's far ultraviolet channel. Deeper imaging may confirm the apparent existence in this field of galaxy pairs and triplets or individual star formation regions in single galaxies.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  7. GALEX 1st Light Far Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image was taken May 21 and 22 by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image was made from data gathered by the far ultraviolet channel of the spacecraft camera during the mission's 'first light' milestone. It shows about 400 celestial objects, appearing in blue, detected over a 3-minute, 20-second period in the constellation Hercules.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's first light images are dedicated to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hercules region was directly above Columbia when it made its last contact with NASA Mission Control on February 1, over the skies of Texas.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer launched on April 28 on a mission to map the celestial sky in the ultraviolet and determine the history of star formation in the universe over the last 10 billion years.

  8. Major outcomes of patients with tuberculous meningitis on directly observed thrice a week regime

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Thomas; Pillai, Ayyappan Kunjukrishna; Cherian, Ajith; Nujum, Zinia T.; Pushpa, Chithra; Dae, Dalus; Krishnapillai, Vijayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) of Government of India provides intermittent thrice-a-week directly observed treatment short course (RNTCP regimen). Objective: Assessments of all-cause mortality and nine-month morbidity outcomes of patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) on RNTCP regimen. Materials and Methods: We prospectively followed up patients registered with RNTCP center, with a diagnosis of TBM from January 1st, 2010 to December 31st, 2011. Morbidity was assessed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Results: We had 43 patients with median duration for follow-up of 396 days and that of survivors of 425 days. Two patients defaulted. Fourteen patients (32.5%) had mRS score of 4 to 6 and 29 had mRS of 0 to 3 after 9-month treatment. Severe disability was not related to any factor on logistic regression. Severe disability was seen in one patient (6.66%) among the 15 patients with stage 1, nine (37.5%) out of 24 patients with stage 2 and three (75%) out of 4 patients with stage 3 disease. Eight patients died (18.6%) of whom 4 died during the intensive phase and 4 during the continuation phase of RNTCP regimen. Mortality was independently related to treatment failure with adjusted Hazard ratio of 8.29 (CI: 1.38-49.78) (P = 0.02). One patient (6.66%) died out of the 15 patients with stage 1 disease, 5 (20.8%) out of 24 patients with stage 2 disease and 2 (50%) out of the 4 with stage 3 disease. Discussion and Conclusion: RNTCP regimen was associated with good compliance, comparable mortality and morbidity. PMID:25221396

  9. Small Worlds Week: Raising Curiosity and Contributing to STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.; Mayo, L.; Stephenson, B. E.; Keck, A.; Cline, T. D.; Lewis, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Dwarf planets, comets, asteroids, and icy moons took center stage in the years 2014-2015 as multiple spacecraft (New Horizons, Dawn, Rosetta, Cassini) and ground-based observing campaigns observed these small and yet amazing celestial bodies. Just prior to the historic New Horizons encounter with the Pluto system, NASA celebrated Small Worlds Week (July 6-10) as a fully online program to highlight small worlds mission discoveries. Small Worlds Week leveraged the infrastructure of Sun-Earth Days that included a robust web design, exemplary education materials, hands-on fun activities, multimedia resources, science and career highlights, and a culminating event. Each day from July 6-9, a new class of solar system small worlds was featured on the website: Monday-comets, Tuesday-asteroids, Wednesday-icy moons, and Thursday-dwarf planets. Then on Friday, July 10, nine scientists from Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, and Lunar and Planetary Institute gathered online for four hours to answer questions from the public via Facebook and Twitter. Throughout the afternoon the scientists worked closely with a social media expert and several summer interns to reply to inquirers and to archive their chats. By all accounts, Small Worlds Week was a huge success. The group plans to improve and replicate the program during the school year with a more classroom focus, and then to build and extend the program to be held every year. For more information, visit http:// sunearthday.nasa.gov or catch us on Twitter, #nasasww.

  10. Adjunctive Aripiprazole Treatment for Risperidone-Induced Hyperprolactinemia: An 8-Week Randomized, Open-Label, Comparative Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingyuan; Song, Xueqin; Ai, Xiaoqing; Gu, Xiaojing; Huang, Guangbiao; Li, Xue; Pang, Lijuan; Ding, Minli; Ding, Shuang; Lv, Luxian

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole treatment in schizophrenia patients with risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia. Methods One hundred and thirteen patients who were receiving a stable dose of risperidone were randomly assigned to either adjunctive aripiprazole treatment (10 mg/day) (aripiprazole group) or no additional treatment (control group) at a 1:1 ratio for 8 weeks. Schizophrenia symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Rating scales and safety assessments (RSESE, BARS, UKU) were performed at baseline and at weeks 4 and 8. Serum levels of prolactin were determined at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8. Metabolic parameters were determined at baseline and again at weeks 4 and 8. Results One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled in this study, and 107 patients completed the study (54 in the aripiprazole group, and 53 in the control group). PANSS-total scores in the aripiprazole group decreased significantly at week 4 (P = 0.003) and week 8 (P = 0.007) compared with the control group. PANSS-negative scores in the aripiprazole group also decreased significantly at week 4 (P = 0.005) and week 8 (P< 0.001) compared with the control group. Serum levels of prolactin in the aripiprazole group decreased significantly at week 2 (P< 0.001), week 4 (P< 0.001), week 6 (P< 0.001) and week 8 (P< 0.001) compared with the control group. There were no significant differences in changes of Fasting Plasma Glucose, Total cholesterol, Triglycerides and High Density Lipoprotein within each group at week 4 and 8 execpt low density lipoproteins. There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse reactions between the two groups. Conclusions Adjunctive aripiprazole treatment may be beneficial in reducing serum levels of prolactin and improving negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients with risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia. Trial Registration chictr.org Chi

  11. [A 13-week toxicity study of simultaneous administration of cochineal and aluminum potassium sulfate in rats].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Umemura, T; Sai, K; Hasegawa, R; Momma, J; Saitoh, M; Matsushima, Y; Nakaji, Y; Tsuda, M; Kurokawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    Cochineal (C), a scarlet material extracted from the powdered pregnant insect, Dactylopius Coceus Costa, is used as a color food additive in the form of aluminum lakes. A 13 week subchronic toxicity study was conducted to investigate the effects of simultaneous administration of C and aluminum potassium sulfate (A). Male and female Wistar rats (5-weeks-old, 15 rats/group) were given diets containing 0.75%A and 0.75%C (1.5%AC), 1.5%A and 1.5%C (3%AC), 3%C alone or 3%A alone. The following results were obtained. 1) No toxic symptoms or death occurred in any treated group. Body weight gain in male rats of the 3%A group decreased significantly. 2) Serum levels of phospholipids, triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol in male rats and TG in female rats fed 3%C, 3%A or 3%AC were significantly decreased at the 13th week. The serum level of glutamate dehydrogenase (GIDH) in male rats treated with 1.5% or 3%AC was increased at the 4th week but no difference from control was observed at the 13th week. 3) No histopathological changes attributable to A and/or C administration were observed. In this 13-week oral toxicity study, no dose-dependent synergistic effects of simultaneous administration of C and A were found except for an increase in serum GIDH.

  12. [A 13-week toxicity study of simultaneous administration of cochineal and aluminum potassium sulfate in rats].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Umemura, T; Sai, K; Hasegawa, R; Momma, J; Saitoh, M; Matsushima, Y; Nakaji, Y; Tsuda, M; Kurokawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    Cochineal (C), a scarlet material extracted from the powdered pregnant insect, Dactylopius Coceus Costa, is used as a color food additive in the form of aluminum lakes. A 13 week subchronic toxicity study was conducted to investigate the effects of simultaneous administration of C and aluminum potassium sulfate (A). Male and female Wistar rats (5-weeks-old, 15 rats/group) were given diets containing 0.75%A and 0.75%C (1.5%AC), 1.5%A and 1.5%C (3%AC), 3%C alone or 3%A alone. The following results were obtained. 1) No toxic symptoms or death occurred in any treated group. Body weight gain in male rats of the 3%A group decreased significantly. 2) Serum levels of phospholipids, triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol in male rats and TG in female rats fed 3%C, 3%A or 3%AC were significantly decreased at the 13th week. The serum level of glutamate dehydrogenase (GIDH) in male rats treated with 1.5% or 3%AC was increased at the 4th week but no difference from control was observed at the 13th week. 3) No histopathological changes attributable to A and/or C administration were observed. In this 13-week oral toxicity study, no dose-dependent synergistic effects of simultaneous administration of C and A were found except for an increase in serum GIDH. PMID:8854902

  13. Current practice of epidemiology in Africa: highlights of the 3rd conference of the African epidemiological association and 1st conference of the Cameroon society of epidemiology, Yaoundé, Cameroon, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Nkwescheu, Armand Seraphin; Fokam, Joseph; Tchendjou, Patrice; Nji, Akindeh; Ngouakam, Hermann; Andre, Bita Fouda; Joelle, Sobngwi; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Akinroye, Kingsley; Mbacham, Wilfred; Colizzi, Vittorio; Leke, Rose; Victora, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    As the study of disease occurrence and health indicators in human populations, Epidemiology is a dynamic field that evolves with time and geographical context. In order to update African health workers on current epidemiological practices and to draw awareness of early career epidemiologists on concepts and opportunities in the field, the 3rd African Epidemiology Association and the 1st Cameroon Society of Epidemiology Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice of Epidemiology in Africa: Stakes, Challenges and Perspectives», the conference attracted close to five hundred guest and participants from all continents. The two main programs were the pre-conference course for capacity building of African Early Career epidemiologists, and the conference itself, providing a forum for scientific exchanges on recent epidemiological concepts, encouraging the use of epidemiological methods in studying large disease burden and neglected tropical diseases; and highlighting existing opportunities. PMID:26523191

  14. 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad: 1st International Conference held in San Francisco, California, May 2012 and 2nd International Conference held in Indianapolis, Indiana, May 2013.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Mary Jane; Nattiv, Aurelia; Joy, Elizabeth; Misra, Madhusmita; Williams, Nancy I; Mallinson, Rebecca J; Gibbs, Jenna C; Olmsted, Marion; Goolsby, Marci; Matheson, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: (1) low energy availability with or without disordered eating, (2) menstrual dysfunction and (3) low bone mineral density. Female athletes often present with one or more of the three Triad components, and an early intervention is essential to prevent its progression to serious endpoints that include clinical eating disorders, amenorrhoea and osteoporosis. This consensus statement represents a set of recommendations developed following the 1st (San Francisco, California, USA) and 2nd (Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) International Symposia on the Female Athlete Triad. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for physicians, athletic trainers and other healthcare providers for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of the Female Athlete Triad and to provide clear recommendations for return to play. The 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad expert panel has proposed a risk stratification point system that takes into account magnitude of risk to assist the physician in decision-making regarding sport participation, clearance and return to play. Guidelines are offered for clearance categories, management by a multidisciplinary team and implementation of treatment contracts. This consensus paper has been endorsed by the Female Athlete Triad Coalition, an International Consortium of leading Triad researchers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine. PMID:24463911

  15. A 4-week toxicity study of methionine in male rats.

    PubMed

    Chin, Keigi; Toue, Sakino; Kawamata, Yasuko; Watanabe, Akiko; Miwa, Tadashi; Smriga, Miro; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-01-01

    To examine 4-week toxicity of l-methionine (methionine), 5-week-old Fisher strain male rats were fed on diets containing 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 2.7 (w/w) of added methionine. Although no deaths were recorded, the highest dose of methionine (2.7% [w/w] of diet) reduced food intake and significantly suppressed growth rate. Growth suppression was characterized by an increase in hemolysis, splenic, and hepatic accumulation of hemosiderin, hemolytic anemia, and promotion of hematopoiesis. Other changes observed in the highest methionine intake group were a decrease in white blood cell count, thymus atrophy, and histological abnormalities in the adrenal gland and testis. Small, but significant, growth suppression, accompanied by some minor changes in plasma biochemical parameters, was also seen in rats fed on a test diet containing 0.9% (w/w) of additional methionine. Thus, no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of diet-added methionine were determined at 0.3% and 0.9% (w/w), corresponding to 236 and 705 mg/kg/d body weight, respectively. Since the basal diet contained protein-bound methionine at 0.5% (w/w), NOAEL and LOAEL of total dietary methionine were estimated at 0.8% and 1.4% (w/w) of diet.

  16. Performance enhancement among adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate baseball weights.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Wen; Liu, Ya-Chen; Lu, Lee-Chang; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi; Liu, Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Compared with regulation-weight baseballs, lightweight baseballs generate lower torque on the shoulder and elbow joints without altering the pitching movement and timing. This study investigates the throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and maximum shoulder external rotation (MSER) of adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate lightweight baseballs. We assigned 24 adolescent players to a lightweight baseball group (group L) and a regulation-weight baseball group (group R) based on their pretraining throwing velocity. Both groups received pitching training 3 times per week for 10 weeks with 4.4- and 5-oz baseballs. The players' throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and MSER were measured from 10 maximum efforts throws using a regulation-weight baseball before and after undergoing the pitching training. The results showed that the players in group L significantly increased their throwing velocity and arm swing velocity (p < 0.05) after 10 weeks of pitching training with the 4.4-oz baseball, whereas group R did not (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the percentage change in the throwing velocity and arm swing velocity of group L was significantly superior to that of group R (p < 0.05). Thus, we concluded that the 10 weeks of pitching training with an appropriate lightweight baseball substantially enhanced the arm swing velocity and throwing velocity of the adolescent baseball players. These findings suggest that using a lightweight baseball, which can reduce the risk of injury without altering pitching patterns, has positive training effects on players in the rapid physical growth and technique development stage.

  17. Performance enhancement among adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate baseball weights.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Wen; Liu, Ya-Chen; Lu, Lee-Chang; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi; Liu, Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Compared with regulation-weight baseballs, lightweight baseballs generate lower torque on the shoulder and elbow joints without altering the pitching movement and timing. This study investigates the throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and maximum shoulder external rotation (MSER) of adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate lightweight baseballs. We assigned 24 adolescent players to a lightweight baseball group (group L) and a regulation-weight baseball group (group R) based on their pretraining throwing velocity. Both groups received pitching training 3 times per week for 10 weeks with 4.4- and 5-oz baseballs. The players' throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and MSER were measured from 10 maximum efforts throws using a regulation-weight baseball before and after undergoing the pitching training. The results showed that the players in group L significantly increased their throwing velocity and arm swing velocity (p < 0.05) after 10 weeks of pitching training with the 4.4-oz baseball, whereas group R did not (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the percentage change in the throwing velocity and arm swing velocity of group L was significantly superior to that of group R (p < 0.05). Thus, we concluded that the 10 weeks of pitching training with an appropriate lightweight baseball substantially enhanced the arm swing velocity and throwing velocity of the adolescent baseball players. These findings suggest that using a lightweight baseball, which can reduce the risk of injury without altering pitching patterns, has positive training effects on players in the rapid physical growth and technique development stage. PMID:23603999

  18. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  19. Inter fractional dose variation during intensity-modulated radiation therapy for cervical cancer assessed by weekly CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Youngyih; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Huh, Seung Jae . E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr; Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Won

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the inter fractional dose variation of a small-bowel displacement system (SBDS)-assisted intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: Four computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out in 10 patients who received radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. The initial CT was taken by use of the SBDS, before the beginning of radiotherapy, and 3 additional CT scans with the SBDS were done in subsequent weeks. IMRT was planned by use of the initial CT, and the subsequent images were fused with the initial CT set. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) changes of the targets (planning target volume [PTV] = clinical target volume [CTV] + 1.5 cm) and of the critical organs were evaluated after obtaining the volumes of each organ on 4 CT sets. Results: No significant differences were found in PTV volumes. Changes on the DVH of the CTVs were not significant, whereas DVH changes of the PTVs at 40% to 100% of the prescription dose level were significant (V{sub 90%}; 2nd week: p = 0.0091, 3rd week: p = 0.0029, 4th week: p = 0.0050). The changes in the small-bowel volume included in the treatment field were significant. These were 119.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 26.9-251.0 cm{sup 3}), 126 cm{sup 3} (range, 38.3-336 cm{sup 3}), 161.9 cm{sup 3} (range, 37.7-294.6 cm{sup 3}), and 149.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 38.6-277.8 cm{sup 3}) at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks, respectively, and were significantly correlated with the DVH change in the small bowel, which were significant at the 3rd (V{sub 80%}; p = 0.0230) and 4th (V{sub 80%}; p = 0.0263) weeks. The bladder-volume change correlated to the large volume change (>20%) of the small-bowel volume. Conclusions: Significant DVH differences for the small bowel can result because of interfractional position variations, whereas the DVH differences of the CTV were not significant. Strict bladder-filling control and an accurate margin for the PTV, as well as image-guided position verification

  20. Cortical Reorganisation during a 30-Week Tinnitus Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Catherine M; Ibrahim, Ronny K; Mathur, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is characterised by the conscious perception of a phantom sound. Previous studies have shown that individuals with chronic tinnitus have disrupted sound-evoked cortical tonotopic maps, time-shifted evoked auditory responses, and altered oscillatory cortical activity. The main objectives of this study were to: (i) compare sound-evoked brain responses and cortical tonotopic maps in individuals with bilateral tinnitus and those without tinnitus; and (ii) investigate whether changes in these sound-evoked responses occur with amelioration of the tinnitus percept during a 30-week tinnitus treatment program. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of 12 bilateral tinnitus participants and 10 control normal-hearing subjects reporting no tinnitus were recorded at baseline, using 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz tones presented monaurally at 70 dBSPL through insert tube phones. For the tinnitus participants, MEG recordings were obtained at 5-, 10-, 20- and 30- week time points during tinnitus treatment. Results for the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz sources (where hearing thresholds were within normal limits for all participants) showed that the tinnitus participants had a significantly larger and more anteriorly located source strengths when compared to the non-tinnitus participants. During the 30-week tinnitus treatment, the participants' 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strengths remained higher than the non-tinnitus participants; however, the source locations shifted towards the direction recorded from the non-tinnitus control group. Further, in the left hemisphere, there was a time-shifted association between the trajectory of change of the individual's objective (source strength and anterior-posterior source location) and subjective measures (using tinnitus reaction questionnaire, TRQ). The differences in source strength between the two groups suggest that individuals with tinnitus have enhanced central gain which is not significantly influenced by the tinnitus

  1. Cortical Reorganisation during a 30-Week Tinnitus Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Ibrahim, Ronny K.; Mathur, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is characterised by the conscious perception of a phantom sound. Previous studies have shown that individuals with chronic tinnitus have disrupted sound-evoked cortical tonotopic maps, time-shifted evoked auditory responses, and altered oscillatory cortical activity. The main objectives of this study were to: (i) compare sound-evoked brain responses and cortical tonotopic maps in individuals with bilateral tinnitus and those without tinnitus; and (ii) investigate whether changes in these sound-evoked responses occur with amelioration of the tinnitus percept during a 30-week tinnitus treatment program. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of 12 bilateral tinnitus participants and 10 control normal-hearing subjects reporting no tinnitus were recorded at baseline, using 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz tones presented monaurally at 70 dBSPL through insert tube phones. For the tinnitus participants, MEG recordings were obtained at 5-, 10-, 20- and 30- week time points during tinnitus treatment. Results for the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz sources (where hearing thresholds were within normal limits for all participants) showed that the tinnitus participants had a significantly larger and more anteriorly located source strengths when compared to the non-tinnitus participants. During the 30-week tinnitus treatment, the participants’ 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strengths remained higher than the non-tinnitus participants; however, the source locations shifted towards the direction recorded from the non-tinnitus control group. Further, in the left hemisphere, there was a time-shifted association between the trajectory of change of the individual’s objective (source strength and anterior-posterior source location) and subjective measures (using tinnitus reaction questionnaire, TRQ). The differences in source strength between the two groups suggest that individuals with tinnitus have enhanced central gain which is not significantly influenced by the

  2. Impact of twice weekly versus daily iron supplementation during pregnancy on maternal and fetal haematological indices: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Goshtasebi, A; Alizadeh, M

    2012-06-01

    A randomized clinical trial examined the efficiency and tolerability of twice weekly versus daily iron supplementation during pregnancy. A total of 370 pregnant women were randomly assigned to receive either daily or twice weekly iron supplementation during pregnancy. There were no significant differences in initial and delivery haemoglobin and haematocrit levels between the 2 groups. Ferritin concentrations were significantly lower in the twice weekly group at delivery, but hypoferritinaemia (ferritin < 15 microg/L) was not observed in either group. The frequency of nausea, vomiting and constipation were significantly lower in the twice weekly group. Birth weight and length were significantly higher in the daily supplemented group. In non-anaemic mothers, a smaller dose of iron may be sufficient and also might prevent the complications of iron excess.

  3. Group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  4. Teaching Group Work on Teletechnet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nina W.

    Many undergraduate courses can be easily modified for televised instruction. However, courses such as group work require weekly writing, have major expectations of practice, and necessitate immediate feedback, and so need considerable revamping for televised instruction. Ways to achieve this modification are covered here. The first consideration…

  5. Chronic flexibility improvement after 12 week of stretching program utilizing the ACSM recommendations: hamstring flexibility.

    PubMed

    Sainz de Baranda, P; Ayala, F

    2010-06-01

    The ACSM flexibility training recommendations emphasize proper stretching of muscles supporting the major joints, but there is a little evidence to support this recommendation in terms of effectiveness, and which stretching parameters (technique and single stretch duration) are more adequate. A randomized controlled clinical trial design was use to investigate whether the ACSM flexibility training recommendation parameters improve hip flexion range of motion. A total of 173 subjects, 122 men (21.3+/-2.5 years; 176.33+/-8.35 cm; 74.42+/-10.80 kg) and 51 women (20.7+/-1.6 years; 163.43+/-6.57 cm; 60.12+/-7.88 kg), classified as recreationally active young adult university students were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 groups: 1 control group (no stretching) or 1 of 6 stretching groups. All stretching groups performed 12 weeks of flexibility training with a consistent stretch daily dose (180 s) and frequency (3 days per week) parameters and different stretch technique (passive or active) and single stretch duration (15, 30, or 45 s). Hip flexion passive range of motion (PROM) was determined through the bilateral straight-leg raise test before, during (at 4 and 8 weeks), and after the program (12 weeks). All stretching groups performed hip flexion PROM after flexibility training. A significant improvement was identified in mean PROM for each stretching group, but no significant differences were found between stretch technique and single stretch duration (p>0.05). The control group's mean PROM decreased (Delta PROM: -0.08 degrees, 95% confidence interval [CI]=-2.3 to 5.3), whereas all stretching groups increased PROM (Delta PROM: 15.14 degrees, 95% CI=10.19 to 23.56) in hip flexion after 12 weeks of stretching (p<0.05). The present study suggests that the current ACSM flexibility training recommendations are effective for improving hip flexion ROM in recreationally active young adults.

  6. Twelve-week exercise training and the quality of life in menopausal women – clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska, Jolanta; Rutkowska, Magdalena; Michalski, Bogdan Adam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The menopause transition is associated with decreased health functioning. About 80-90% of women experience mild to severe physical or physiological menopause-related complaints per year when approaching menopause. Physical activity may reduce some climacteric symptoms and improve the quality of life. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to investigate the influence of a 12-week training programme on the quality of life (QoL) in menopausal-aged women living in a rural area. Material and methods Participants were 80 women aged 40-65 years and divided into two randomly selected groups in training sessions (exercising group, n = 40 and control group, n = 40). SF36 was used to assess the quality of life in both groups before and after 12 weeks. Exercising women participated in training session 3 times a week. Each 60-minute exercise session included warming-up exercises, walking, stretching, strengthening exercises with an elastic band and cooling down exercises. Results A non-significant positive difference in all SF36 domains in the exercising group was observed. The results of the study showed a statistically significant higher QoL in the exercising group compared to the control group after 12-week training in two domains: vitality and mental health. The improvement in the quality of life in the study group was 0.19 points (role limits – physical domain, least change) and 4.96 (vitality domain, most change). Conclusions Controlled and regular exercise for 12 weeks was significantly correlated with a positive change in vitality and mental health. Sedentary women should consider modification of their lifestyle to include physical activity as it leads to improvement of their quality of life. PMID:27095954

  7. Reference limits for biochemical and hematological analytes of dairy cows one week before and one week after parturition

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Rocha, Gerardo F.; LeBlanc, Stephen J.; Duffield, Todd F.; Wood, Darren; Leslie, Ken E.; Jacobs, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Since dairy cows during the transition period have multiple endocrine and metabolic changes, it is necessary to determine the reference limits of laboratory analytes in normal transition cows. Reference limits for the weeks before and after calving were determined in dairy cows. Animals that had adverse clinical outcomes after calving and cows that were culled or had mastitis within the first 7 days after calving were excluded. All biochemical analytes (β-hydroxybutyrate, fatty acids, glucose, cholesterol, urea, calcium, and phosphorus) were statistically different between precalving and postcalving groups. The hematological analytes were not significantly different except for eosinophils. The data from precalving and postcalving cows were significantly different from reference limits in a university-associated laboratory derived from early- and mid-lactation cows. Different reference limits for precalving and postcalving dairy cows should be determined for biochemical analytes to ensure appropriate interpretation of results. PMID:19436445

  8. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  9. Effects of a 10-Week High-Intensity Exercise Intervention on College Staff with Psychological Burnout and Multiple Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyer, Lukas; Dreyer, Sonja; Rankin, Dean

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a 10-week physical exercise program on the health status of college staff. Eighty-one participants were pre-tested on 22 variables including physical fitness, biochemical status, psychological health, and morphological measures. Participants in an experimental group (n = 61) received a 10-week intervention…

  10. Effects of Improvac and Bopriva on the testicular function of boars ten weeks after immunization.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Nicholas; Crouch, Spencer; Pearl, Christopher A

    2013-11-30

    This study investigated the effects of Improvac and Bopriva, two anti-GnRF immunization products, on testicular function in boars. We predicted that both products would diminish testicular function; however, we specifically tested the hypothesis that the duration of efficacy for Bopriva would be longer than that of Improvac. Animals were immunized with either Improvac or Bopriva and then observed ten weeks after the second injection. Serum GnRF antibody titers rose after the second injection and peaked approximately two weeks later. At the same time testosterone concentrations decreased to undetectable levels and remained below assay detection for at least six weeks. At approximately eight weeks, testosterone began to increase in animals treated with Improvac though levels remained decreased in Bopriva treated animals throughout the ten weeks. Daily sperm production at 10 weeks was significantly reduced in both treatment groups; however, the reduction was greater in Bopriva treated boars. Examination of testes of both treatments revealed incomplete spermatogenesis with impaired spermatid production and reduced seminiferous tubule diameter. These findings were universal in Bopriva treated animals, but Improvac treated animals exhibited morphologies intermediate between Bopriva treated animals and control boars. Overall testicular function in Bopriva boars remained suppressed ten weeks post-immunization while Improvac boars appeared to be recovering. PMID:24139761

  11. Delivering Twins At 37 Weeks May Help Prevent Stillbirths

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160834.html Delivering Twins at 37 Weeks May Help Prevent Stillbirths If babies share placenta, delivery should probably occur a week earlier, research suggests To use the sharing features ...

  12. Pregnancy Flu Shot Protects Newborn for 8 Weeks: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Pregnancy Flu Shot Protects Newborn for 8 Weeks: Study Effectiveness drops dramatically after that To use ... protection is likely limited to the first eight weeks of life, said Marta Nunes, of the University ...

  13. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  14. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  15. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 60, Number 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  16. An evidence-based approach to nurses week celebrations.

    PubMed

    Hensinger, Barbara; Parry, Juanita; Calarco, Margaret M; Fuhrmann, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    It is time to examine nurses week investments. With expenses increasingly scrutinized, healthcare leaders require data-driven decisions. Managing by instinct and intuition is both inadequate and reckless. This survey of 727 registered nurses identifies celebratory options for nurses week that nurses find meaningful. Knowing what registered nurses value will guide approaches to an effective nurses week activity planning. PMID:18403990

  17. The 4-Day School Week. The Informed Educator Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donis-Keller, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This "Informed Educator" examines the use of a 4-day school week as a way to reduce expenses while using limited resources most effectively. Discussion focuses on various models of 4-day week schedules, what to do during the fifth day, and how 4-day school weeks affect extracurricular activities. Detailed discussion of financial savings, student…

  18. 78 FR 30723 - National Safe Boating Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-12399 Filed 5-21-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... May 22, 2013 Part IV The President Proclamation 8981--National Safe Boating Week, 2013 Proclamation 8982--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2013 Proclamation 8983--World Trade Week, 2013 Proclamation...

  19. 77 FR 31143 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-12876 Filed 5-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295... May 24, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8824--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2012 Proclamation 8825--National Safe Boating Week, 2012 Proclamation 8826--National Small Business Week,...

  20. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  1. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 60, Number 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  2. 20 CFR 617.13 - Weekly amounts of TRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Weekly amounts of TRA. 617.13 Section 617.13... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.13 Weekly amounts of TRA. (a) Regular allowance. The amount of TRA payable for a week of total unemployment (including...

  3. 20 CFR 617.13 - Weekly amounts of TRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Weekly amounts of TRA. 617.13 Section 617.13... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.13 Weekly amounts of TRA. (a) Regular allowance. The amount of TRA payable for a week of total unemployment (including...

  4. 20 CFR 617.13 - Weekly amounts of TRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Weekly amounts of TRA. 617.13 Section 617.13... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.13 Weekly amounts of TRA. (a) Regular allowance. The amount of TRA payable for a week of total unemployment (including...

  5. 20 CFR 617.13 - Weekly amounts of TRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Weekly amounts of TRA. 617.13 Section 617.13... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.13 Weekly amounts of TRA. (a) Regular allowance. The amount of TRA payable for a week of total unemployment (including...

  6. 20 CFR 617.13 - Weekly amounts of TRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Weekly amounts of TRA. 617.13 Section 617.13... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.13 Weekly amounts of TRA. (a) Regular allowance. The amount of TRA payable for a week of total unemployment (including...

  7. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 61, Number 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Ronald L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" ("MMWR") Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data presented by the Notifiable Disease Data Team and 122 Cities Mortality Data Team in the weekly "MMWR" are provisional, based on weekly reports to CDC by state health departments. This issue of "Morbidity and…

  8. Three-week integrated body weight reduction programme markedly improves performance and work capacity in severely obese patients.

    PubMed

    Sartorio, A; Ottolini, S; Agosti, F; Massarini, M; Lafortuna, C L

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects on performance and work capacity of a short-term (3-week) integrated body weight reduction programme consisting of an energy-restricted diet, nutritional education, psychological counselling and aerobic exercise training at a constant metabolic load (5 days/week) in 71 severely obese patients (18 males and 53 females aged 29.3 +/- 0.8 years, with a mean weight of 113.8 +/- 2.2 kg and a mean BMI of 41.3 +/- 0.5 kg/m(-2)). Body mass and composition, and maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) were determined before and after the programme. The caloric equivalent of work output and a performance index (PI) during 10 min of bicycle ergometer pedalling (50-60 rpm) and 20 min of treadmill walking (incline 0-3%) at a constant metabolic load (50% of individual VO2max during the preliminary conditioning period--1st week--and 60% during the exercise conditioning period--2nd and 3rd week) were evaluated daily throughout the study. After the programme, body mass reduced significantly (-4.5%, p<0.001), the weight loss being sustained entirely by a significant reduction in fat mass (-7.6%, p<0.001) without any significant changes in fat-free mass. Absolute and body mass-related VO2max significantly increased by respectively 14.5% and 20.2% (p<0.001). Both daily work output during constant metabolic load (ANOVA, p<0.05-0.001) and PI (ANOVA, p<0.05-0.001) increased significantly during each week of the programme, leading to a total increase in work output in response to exercise conditioning of 44.6 +/- 5.8 kcal. It is concluded that the changes in exercise capacity induced by the present programme offer significant advantages for obese patients that can be quantified in terms of an improvement in their ability to perform everyday activities, thus contributing towards improving their quality of life.

  9. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  10. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  11. [Rendering anesthesiological and resuscitation care to wounded by a medical reinforcement group in an armed conflict].

    PubMed

    Polushin, Iu S; Gavrilin, S V; Pashchenko, O V; Samandarov, V Kh; Lebedev, V F; Somov, S V

    2001-10-01

    The authors describe the aims and content of anesthesiologic and reanimatologic care of the medical reinforcement group in the medical institution of the 1st echelon of specialized care. Basing on the experience of treatment of 825 casualties with gunshot injuries the rational methods of anesthesia and intensive care are shown including the prolonged controlled ventilation, infusion-transfusion therapy, early enteral nutrition. The main causes of lethal outcomes are analyzed. The conclusion was made that during counter-terrorist operations it is reasonable to include anesthesiologists and reanimatologists into the medical reinforcement group.

  12. Finding self-directed learning readiness and fostering self-directed learning through weekly assessment of self-directed learning topics during undergraduate clinical training in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Soumendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: To know the individual’s current level of readiness and to manage self-directed learning (SDL) not only help learners but also the instructors. The objectives of this study were to find SDL readiness among 4th year medical student and to analyze the effect of weekly assessment of SDL topics. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study to analyze the effect of weekly assessment of SDL topics in fostering SDL. The 51 4th year students during a clinical posting in ophthalmology participated for this study. Each recruited student was tested for SDL readiness through the SDL readiness scale (SDLRS) developed by Lucy Guglielmino (1978), which was validated in our local setting and responses were collected from students on the 1st day of the clinical posting. The students chose SDL topics which were assessed on a weekly basis in the form of scenario-based multiple choice questionnaires. Written feedback was collected from each student regarding such activity during their clinical posting, especially to know the actual utilization of SDL hours provided in teaching schedule, satisfaction on the type of questions and motivation for SDL. Results: The mean SDLRS score in male students were 214.15 ± 19.73 and in female 207.95 ± 17.983, which falls under average score as defined in Guglielmino scale. The majority of study population expressed better utilization of SDL study hours because of weekly assessment than when they had no assessment for SDL. Conclusions: Majority of the study population were found to be ready for SDL. The weekly assessment of SDL topics was found to stimulate proper utilization of SDL slots in teaching schedule thereby fostering SDL habits. PMID:27563580

  13. Physiological alterations consequent to 20-week conditioning programs of bicycling, tennis, and jogging.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, J H; Davis, J A; O'Brien, R S; Vodak, P A; Walder, G R; Amsterdam, E A

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of free-wheel bicycling and tennis as endurance conditioning activities. The subjects were 38 sedentary, middle-aged male volunteers, who were randomly assigned to one of four groups: bicyling (N=9); tennis (N=10); jogging (N=9); and control (N=10). Each subject was tested twice at the beginning and once at the conclusion of the 20-week study. Each training group exercised 3 days/week for 30 min/day, following 15 minutes of formal warm-up. The bicycling, tennis and jogging groups had an average attendance of 3.0, 2.7, and 2.8 days/week, and maintained theri exercise intensity at 83, 65, and 85% of HR max respectively. Using analysis of covariance, only the bicycle and jogging groups significantly increased treadmill Vo2max (14.8 and 13.3% respectively) even though there was a 5.7% improvement for the tennis group. The control group did not change. Vo2max was also assessed on a cycle ergometer for the bicycle and jogging groups, and increased significantly by 17.4 and 14.0% respectively, thus, specificity of the training response was not identified. VEmax increased significantly in the bicycling and jogging groups, while resting blood pressure did not change for any of the four groups. Relative to body composition, only the bicycle group increased lean body weight. The bicycle and jogging groups had substantial decreases in relative and absolute body fat, but these changes were not statistically significant due to changes in the control group. In conclusion, bicycling and jogging appear to provide comparable physiological benefits. Tennis produced only modest increases in endurance capacity but, since the duration of each training session was only 30 to 50% of a typical time period for playing tennis, the results of the present study may, in fact, be underestimating changes in Vo2max due to the interaction of intensity and duration in facilitating change.

  14. 29 CFR 3.4 - Submission of weekly statements and the preservation and inspection of weekly payroll records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inspection of weekly payroll records. 3.4 Section 3.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND... STATES § 3.4 Submission of weekly statements and the preservation and inspection of weekly payroll... subcontractor, within seven days after the regular payment date of the payroll period, to a representative of...

  15. Twenty-eight week toxicity study of perlite powder in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Nagao, S

    1985-05-01

    Groups of 21 male and 21 female mice were given diets containing 20%, 10%, 1% or 0% (control) perlite for 28 weeks. Appearance, behavior, mortality, and food consumption of mice of treated groups were not affected during the experimental period. Males of the 20% and 10% groups did experience slightly reduced growth rate. No significant drug-related changes were found in urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, and organ weight. No differences were found between control and treated groups in autopsy and histopathological findings. Therefore, the maximum no-effect level is considered to be 1% in the diet which developed no toxic changes in any items examined in mice treated orally with perlite for 28 weeks.

  16. Weekly Carboplatin Reduces Toxicity During Synchronous Chemoradiotherapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma of Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Michael Walpole, Euan; Harvey, Jennifer; Dickie, Graeme; O'Brien, Peter; Keller, Jacqui; Tpcony, Lee; Rischin, Danny

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with weekly carboplatin and adjuvant carboplatin and etoposide was prospectively assessed in a group of patients with high-risk Stage I and II Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin. This regimen was compared with the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96:07 study, which used identical eligibility criteria but carboplatin and etoposide every 3 weeks during RT. Patients and Methods: Patients were eligible if they had disease localized to the primary site and lymph nodes, with high-risk features. RT was delivered to the primary site and lymph nodes to a dose of 50 Gy and weekly carboplatin (area under the curve of 2) was given during RT. This was followed by three cycles of carboplatin and etoposide. A total of 18 patients were entered into the study, and their data were compared with the data from 53 patients entered into the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96:07 study. Results: Involved lymph nodes (Stage II) were present in 14 patients (77%). Treatment was completed as planned in 16 patients. The weekly carboplatin dose was delivered in 17 patients, and 15 were able to complete all three cycles of adjuvant carboplatin and etoposide. Grade 3 and 4 neutrophil toxicity occurred in 7 patients, but no cases of febrile neutropenia developed. Compared with the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96:07 protocol (19 of 53 cases of febrile neutropenia), the reduction in the febrile neutropenia rate (p = 0.003) and decrease in Grade 3 skin toxicity (p = 0.006) were highly statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that weekly carboplatin at this dosage is a safe way to deliver synchronous chemotherapy during RT for MCC and results in a marked reduction of febrile neutropenia and Grade 3 skin toxicity compared with the three weekly regimen.

  17. "Real Women" Essay Writing Competition Guide. National Women's History Week, March 3-9, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthsdotter, Mary, Ed.

    Step-by-step guidelines to help educators and community groups implement a National Women's History Week essay contest, in which elementary and secondary students write about women, are provided. Students are encouraged to write about a woman they personally know so that they can conduct an oral history interview. An alternate approach would be to…

  18. Six Weeks in the Eifel: A Case for Culture Learning during Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Cate

    2007-01-01

    Based on findings from a recent study investigating how a group of undergraduate students defined, experienced, and perceived self-identified cultural encounters during a five-week stay in Mayen, Germany, this article suggests that short-term language and culture study abroad programs are fertile venues for exploring culture learning. After…

  19. Discovering China: A Three Week Teaching/Learning Unit for Upper Elementary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Toni Fuss

    The purpose of this three-week teaching unit on China is to promote interest in the People's Republic of China, to investigate China's role in world politics, and to promote cultural awareness. Chinese culture and geography are covered while research skills, group work, and oral presentations are stressed through assignments. The unit contains:…

  20. Eight Weeks of Kettlebell Swing Training Does not Improve Sprint Performance in Recreationally Active Females

    PubMed Central

    HOLMSTRUP, MICHAEL E.; JENSEN, BROCK T.; EVANS, WILLIAM S.; MARSHALL, EMILY C.

    2016-01-01

    The kettlebell swing (KBS), emphasizing cyclical, explosive hip extension in the horizontal plane, aligns with movement- and velocity-specificity of sprinting. The present study examined the effect of an eight-week KBS intervention on sprinting in recreationally-active females, in comparison to an eight-week intervention using the stiff-legged deadlift (SDL). Following a pre-testing session measuring 30 meter sprint and countermovement vertical jump performance, participants were divided evenly by sprint time into KBS (n=8) and SDL (n=10) cohorts. Following familiarization with the exercises, KBS met twice weekly to perform swings using the Tabata interval (20s work, 10s rest, 8 rounds), stressing a rapid, explosive tempo. In contrast, the SDL group performed their Tabata stiff-legged deadlifts at a conventional resistance training tempo (2 seconds concentric, 2 seconds eccentric). Following eight weeks and greater than 95% training adherence, the SDL group only had a slightly greater average training volume (~3%) than KBS. No significant differences in pre-test values, or changes were noted in sprint performance from pre- to post-intervention in either group. An improvement in vertical jump performance was noted across groups. Potential explanations for the lack of sprint improvement compared to previous studies include differences between recreationally-active and athletic females, and low exercise volume (~46% of a comparable study with improvements in vertical jump). Future studies should seek to determine the appropriate volume and intensity for KBS components of sprint programming. PMID:27766131

  1. Escitalopram for treatment of night eating syndrome: a 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Gang, Catherine H; Griffing, George T; Gadde, Kishore M

    2012-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the short-term effects of escitalopram on symptoms of night eating syndrome (NES) in a randomized controlled clinical trial. A total of 40 patients with NES were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with escitalopram 20 mg (n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) for 12 weeks. Escitalopram was started at 10 mg/d with a dosage increase to 20 mg/d after 4 weeks; placebo dosing was identical. The primary end point was a mean change in total score of the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ). At 12 weeks, mean (SE) change in NEQ total score was -13.0 (1.6) and -10.6 (2.2) in the escitalopram and placebo groups, respectively (F(1,37) = 2.5, P = 0.124). There was a marginal interaction effect between response to escitalopram and race (F(1,34) = 4.0, P = 0.052), with a favorable effect for white patients (F(1,20) = 6.0, P = 0.024) but not for black patients (F(1,13) = 0.6, P = 0.453). Seven patients in the escitalopram group, compared with 6 patients in the placebo group, showed a 50% NEQ score reduction (P = 0.736). Sixteen patients in the escitalopram group and 12 patients in the placebo group no longer met NES criteria (P = 0.168). Twelve patients in the escitalopram group were classified as responders according to the Clinical Global Impression Improvement scale compared with 7 patients in the placebo group (P = 0.113). No significant between-group differences were found for weight, mood ratings, or adverse events. We conclude that escitalopram treatment for 12 weeks was not superior to placebo in reducing NES symptoms as measured by the NEQ.

  2. Changes in faecal bacteria and metabolic parameters in foals during the first six weeks of life.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Juliane; Winterhoff, Nora; Wulf, Manuela; Schweigert, Florian J; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Aurich, Jörg E; Kutzer, Peter; Aurich, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Many foals develop diarrhoea within the first two weeks of life which has been suggested to coincide with postpartum oestrus in their dams. To analyse the pathogenesis of this diarrhoea we have determined faecal bacteria in foals and their dams (n=30 each), and serum IGF-1 and γ-globulins for 6 weeks after birth. In addition, effects of β-carotene supplementation to mares (group 1: 1000 mg/day, n=15, group 2: control, n=15) on diarrhoea in foals were studied. Diarrhoea occurred in 92 and 79% of foals in groups 1 and 2, respectively, but was not correlated with oestrus in mares. Beta-carotene supplementation was without effect on foal diarrhoea. In mares, bacterial flora remained stable. The percentage of foals with cultures positive for E. coli was low at birth but increased within one day, the percentage positive for Enterococcus sp. was low for 10 days and for Streptococcus sp. and Staphylococcus sp. was low for 2-4 weeks. By 4 weeks of age, bacterial flora in foals resembled an adult pattern. Concentration of serum IGF-1 was low at birth (group 1: 149 ± 11, group 2: 166 ± 17ng/ml), increased after day 1 (day 7 group 1: 384 ± 30, group 2: 372 ± 36) but at no time differed between groups. Serum γ-globulin concentration in foals was low before colostrum intake and highest on day 1 (p<0.001 over time). In conclusion, neonatal diarrhoea in foals does not coincide with postpartum oestrus in their dams but with changes in intestinal bacteria and is not influenced by β-carotene supplementation given to mares.

  3. Isotretinoin was not associated with depression or anxiety: A twelve-week study

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Bella; Serrano, Ana; Cova, Yves; Baptista, Trino

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequency and severity of depression and/or anxiety in isotretinoin (ITT)-treated subjects and in a non-ITT control group. METHODS: Sixty consecutively-admitted non-psychiatric outpatients with acne were assigned to either ITT at a fixed dose of 30 mg/d (n = 36) or “other treatment” group (OT; n = 24). The Zung depression or anxiety scales (with cut-off points), two locally developed scales for depression (GeDepr) and anxiety (Ansilet) (without cut-off points) and clinical global impression scales of acne severity were administered at baseline and at weeks 6 and 12 of treatment. Data was analyzed with the chi-squared test and covariance analysis. RESULTS: Gender distribution, age, marital status and education level did not differ between both treatment groups. The frequency of depression, as defined by the Zung scale cut-off points was similar in the ITT and in the non-ITT groups: Weeks 6 and 12: 8.3% in both groups, P = 0.9. The frequency of anxiety was similar in the groups as well: Week 6: ITT = 8.3%; OT = 0.0%, P > 0.05; week 12: ITT = 11.1%, OT = 4.2%, P > 0.05. The scores in both scales’ sets did not differ between the treatment groups at any evaluation time point (P > 0.05). Five ITT-treated subjects (13.8%) and two from the OT-treated group (8.3%) developed clinically significant anxiety and/or depression during treatment (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our study confirms the safety of ITT regarding psychological side effects in regular dermatological patients. Susceptible subjects may exist but their identification requires additional strategies. PMID:27014604

  4. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  5. New archaeomagnetic data recovered from the study of celtiberic remains from central Spain (Numantia and Ciadueña, 3rd-1st centuries BC). Implications on the fidelity of the Iberian paleointensity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Catanzariti, G.; Jimeno, A.; Campuzano, S. A.; Benito-Batanero, J. P.; Tabernero-Galán, C.; Roperch, P.

    2016-11-01

    Variations of geomagnetic field in the Iberian Peninsula prior to roman times are poorly constrained. Here we report new archaeomagnetic results from four ceramic collections and two combustion structures recovered in two pre-roman (celtiberic) archaeological sites in central Spain. The studied materials have been dated by archaeological evidences and supported by five radiocarbon dates. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that the characteristic remanent manetization (ChRM) is carried by a low coercivity magnetic phase with Curie temperatures of 530-575 °C, most likely Ti-poor titanomagnetite/titanomaghemite. Archaeointensity determinations were carried out by using the classical Thellier-Thellier protocol including tests and corrections for magnetic anisotropy and cooling rate dependency. Two magnetic behaviours were depicted during the laboratory treatment. Black potsherds and poor heated samples from the kilns, presented two magnetization components, alterations or curved Arai plots and were therefore rejected. In contrast, well heated specimens (red ceramic fragments and well heated samples from the kilns) show one single well defined component of magnetization going through the origin and linear Arai plots providing successful archaeointensity determinations. The effect of anisotropy of the thermoremanent magnetization (ATRM) on paleointensity analysis was systematically investigated obtaining very high ATRM corrections on fine pottery specimens. In some cases, differences between the uncorrected and ATRM corrected paleointensity values reached up to 86 %. The mean intensity values obtained from three selected set of samples were 64.3 ± 5.8 μT; 56.8 ± 3.8 and 56.7 ± 4.6 μT (NUS2, CI2 and CIA, respectively), which contribute to better understand the evolution of the palaeofield intensity in central Iberia during the 3rd-1st centuries BC. The direction of the field at first century BC has also been determined from oriented samples from CIA kilns (D = 357

  6. Weekly Physical Activity Levels of Older Adults Regularly Using a Fitness Facility

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine if weekly physical activity levels were greater in an independent-living older adult population that was regularly participating in structured fitness activities. Also, lifetime exercise history and sex differences were investigated in an effort to understand how they relate to current weekly step activity. Total weekly step counts, measured with a pedometer, were assessed in two older adult groups; the first consisted of members of a local senior center who regularly used the fitness facility (74.5 ± 6.0 yrs; mean ± SD) while the second group consisted of members who did not use the fitness facility (74.8 ± 6.0 yrs). Participants also completed the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (LPAQ). No significant difference was found in the total number of weekly steps between groups (p = 0.88) or sexes (p = 0.27). The LPAQ suggested a significant decline in activity with aging (p = 0.01) but no difference between groups (p = 0.54) or sexes (p = 0.80). A relationship was observed between current step activity and MET expenditure over the past year (p = 0.008, r2 = 0.153) and from ages 35 to 50 years (p = 0.037, r2 = 0.097). The lack of difference in weekly physical activity level between our groups suggests that independent-living older adults will seek out and perform their desired activity, in either a scheduled exercise program or other leisure-time activities. Also, the best predictor of current physical activity level in independent-living older adults was the activity performed over the past year. PMID:27293890

  7. Weekly Physical Activity Levels of Older Adults Regularly Using a Fitness Facility.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael J; Schmitt, Emily E; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine if weekly physical activity levels were greater in an independent-living older adult population that was regularly participating in structured fitness activities. Also, lifetime exercise history and sex differences were investigated in an effort to understand how they relate to current weekly step activity. Total weekly step counts, measured with a pedometer, were assessed in two older adult groups; the first consisted of members of a local senior center who regularly used the fitness facility (74.5 ± 6.0 yrs; mean ± SD) while the second group consisted of members who did not use the fitness facility (74.8 ± 6.0 yrs). Participants also completed the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (LPAQ). No significant difference was found in the total number of weekly steps between groups (p = 0.88) or sexes (p = 0.27). The LPAQ suggested a significant decline in activity with aging (p = 0.01) but no difference between groups (p = 0.54) or sexes (p = 0.80). A relationship was observed between current step activity and MET expenditure over the past year (p = 0.008, r (2) = 0.153) and from ages 35 to 50 years (p = 0.037, r (2) = 0.097). The lack of difference in weekly physical activity level between our groups suggests that independent-living older adults will seek out and perform their desired activity, in either a scheduled exercise program or other leisure-time activities. Also, the best predictor of current physical activity level in independent-living older adults was the activity performed over the past year. PMID:27293890

  8. Improved WOMAC score following 16-week treatment with bromelain for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kasemsuk, Thitima; Saengpetch, Nadhaporn; Sibmooh, Nathawut; Unchern, Supeenun

    2016-10-01

    Treatment with bromelain-containing enzyme preparation for 3-4 weeks is effective for treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we aimed to assess 16-week treatment with bromelain in mild-to-moderate knee OA patients. We performed a randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study. Forty knee OA patients were randomized to receive oral bromelain (500 mg/day) or diclofenac (100 mg/day). Primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Secondary outcome was the short-form 36 (SF-36). Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite were measured as oxidative stress markers. There was no difference in WOMAC and SF-36 scores compared between bromelain and diclofenac groups after 4 weeks. At week 4, the improvement of total WOMAC and pain subscales from baseline was observed in both groups; however, two patients given diclofenac had adverse effects leading to discontinuation of diclofenac. However, observed treatment difference was inconclusive. At week 16 of bromelain treatment, the patients had improved total WOMAC scores (12.2 versus 25.5), pain subscales (2.4 versus 5.6), stiffness subscales (0.8 versus 2.0), and function subscales (9.1 versus 17.9), and physical component of SF-36 (73.3 versus 65.4) as compared with baseline values. OA patients had higher plasma MDA, nitrite, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood but lower plasma α-tocopherol than control subjects. Plasma MDA and LPS-stimulated PGE2 production were decreased at week 16 of bromelain treatment. Bromelain has no difference in reducing symptoms of mild-to-moderate knee OA after 4 weeks when compared with diclofenac.

  9. The effect of 16-week plyometric training on explosive actions in early to mid-puberty elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Söhnlein, Quirin; Müller, Erich; Stöggl, Thomas L

    2014-08-01

    Plyometric training (PT) programs are widely used to improve explosive actions in soccer players of various ages, although there is debate about optimal training duration and time course of improvement. Twenty-two early to mid-puberty elite soccer players were assigned to a control group (CG, n = 10, regular soccer training) or a plyometric training group (PTG, n = 12, regular soccer training substituted with 2 PT sessions each week). Both groups trained for 16 weeks during the in-season period. Control group performed only tests at baseline and after intervention, whereas PTG performed additional tests after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. During each test, subjects' performances in speed (10 and 30 m; 5 and 20 m), agility, shuttle run, multiple 5 bounds (MB5), and standing long jump (LJ) were recorded. The PTG showed improved performance in 20-m sprint time (-3.2%), agility time (-6.1%), MB5 distance (+11.8%), and LJ distance (+7.3%) (all, p ≤ 0.05) after 16 weeks. All these improvements were higher compared with CG (all, p ≤ 0.05). The time course of improvement in the PT group showed that 20-m sprint time improved after 16 weeks (p = 0.012); agility after 4 (p = 0.047) and 8 weeks (p = 0.004) but stopped after 12 weeks (p = 0.007); MB5 after 8 (p = 0.039), 12 (p = 0.028), and 16 weeks (p < 0.001); and LJ improved after 4 (p = 0.045), 12 (p = 0.008), and 16 weeks (p < 0.001). Plyometric training seems to be an appropriate training tool to enhance some but not all explosive actions. The results indicate that the duration of a PT program is highly dependent on what type of explosive actions should be improved, or whether several explosive actions should be improved at the same time.

  10. The effect of 16-week plyometric training on explosive actions in early to mid-puberty elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Söhnlein, Quirin; Müller, Erich; Stöggl, Thomas L

    2014-08-01

    Plyometric training (PT) programs are widely used to improve explosive actions in soccer players of various ages, although there is debate about optimal training duration and time course of improvement. Twenty-two early to mid-puberty elite soccer players were assigned to a control group (CG, n = 10, regular soccer training) or a plyometric training group (PTG, n = 12, regular soccer training substituted with 2 PT sessions each week). Both groups trained for 16 weeks during the in-season period. Control group performed only tests at baseline and after intervention, whereas PTG performed additional tests after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. During each test, subjects' performances in speed (10 and 30 m; 5 and 20 m), agility, shuttle run, multiple 5 bounds (MB5), and standing long jump (LJ) were recorded. The PTG showed improved performance in 20-m sprint time (-3.2%), agility time (-6.1%), MB5 distance (+11.8%), and LJ distance (+7.3%) (all, p ≤ 0.05) after 16 weeks. All these improvements were higher compared with CG (all, p ≤ 0.05). The time course of improvement in the PT group showed that 20-m sprint time improved after 16 weeks (p = 0.012); agility after 4 (p = 0.047) and 8 weeks (p = 0.004) but stopped after 12 weeks (p = 0.007); MB5 after 8 (p = 0.039), 12 (p = 0.028), and 16 weeks (p < 0.001); and LJ improved after 4 (p = 0.045), 12 (p = 0.008), and 16 weeks (p < 0.001). Plyometric training seems to be an appropriate training tool to enhance some but not all explosive actions. The results indicate that the duration of a PT program is highly dependent on what type of explosive actions should be improved, or whether several explosive actions should be improved at the same time. PMID:24476783

  11. Elective Cesarean section at 37 weeks is associated with the higher risk of neonatal complications.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yamanouchi, Sohsaku; Sekiya, Shin-ichiro; Hirabayashi, Masato; Mine, Kenji; Ohashi, Atsushi; Tsuji, Shoji; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Kanzaki, Hideharu; Hirano, Daishi; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    Elective Cesarean section performed before 39 weeks of gestation may be associated with increased risk of neonatal complications. We retrospectively investigated differences in the neonatal complication rate between 684 newborns delivered by elective Cesarean section at 37 weeks of gestation (n = 390) and those delivered by the same procedure at 38 weeks (n = 294) between 2006 and 2012 at our hospital in order to ascertain whether adverse outcomes differ between the groups. Newborns delivered at 37 weeks had a significantly higher incidence of neonatal intensive care unit admission (p = 0.03), adverse respiratory complications (p < 0.01), low birth weight (p < 0.001), and hypoglycemia (p < 0.005) than those delivered at 38 weeks. Compared with normal weight neonates, low birth weight neonates were more likely to have hypoglycemia (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an adverse respiratory outcome was independently associated with gestational age (p < 0.01; odds ratio [OR], 3.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-7.81), while hypoglycemia was independently associated with birth weight (p < 0.01; OR, 16.34; 95% CI, 7.72-34.56). Respiratory disorders were significantly associated with gestational age even in normal birth weight newborns without any other complications such as hyperbirilubinemia, hypoglycemia or bacterial infections. In conclusion, the incidence of neonatal complications was higher in newborns delivered at 37 weeks of gestation than in those delivered at 38 weeks via elective Cesarean section. Thus, the procedure should be scheduled at 38 weeks to improve neonatal outcomes.

  12. Weekly Cycle of Lightning: Evidence of Storm Invigoration by Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2009-01-01

    We have examined summertime 1998 2009 U.S. lightning data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to look for weekly cycles in lightning activity. As was found by Bell et al. (2008) for rain over the southeast U.S., there is a significant weekly cycle in afternoon lightning activity that peaks in the middle of the week there. The weekly cycle appears to be reduced over population centers. Lightning activity peaks on weekends over waters near the SE U.S. The statistical significance of weekly cycles over the western half of the country is generally small. We found no evidence of a weekly cycle of synoptic-scale forcing that might explain these patterns. The lightning behavior is entirely consistent with the explanation suggested by Bell et al. (2008) for the cycles in rainfall and other atmospheric data from the SE U.S., that aerosols can cause storms to intensify in humid, convectively unstable environments.

  13. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  14. Evidence of muscular adaptations within four weeks of barbell training in women.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matt S; Olinghouse, Kendra D; Drusch, Alexander S; Mota, Jacob A; Hernandez, Jennah M; Akalonu, Chibuzo C; Thompson, Brennan J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the time course of neuromuscular and hypertrophic adaptations associated with only four weeks of barbell squat and deadlift training. Forty-seven previously untrained women (mean±SD, age=21±3years) were randomly assigned to low volume training (n=15), moderate volume training (n=16), and control (n=16) groups. The low and moderate volume training groups performed two and four sets, respectively, of five repetitions per exercise, twice a week. Testing was performed weekly, and included dual X-ray absorptiometry and vastus lateralis and rectus femoris B-mode ultrasonography. Bipolar surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris during isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg extensors. Significant increases in lean mass for the combined gynoid and leg regions for the low (+0.68kg) and moderate volume (+0.47kg) groups were demonstrated within three weeks. Small-to-moderate effect sizes were shown for leg lean mass, vastus lateralis thickness and pennation angle, and peak torque, but EMG amplitude was unaffected. These findings demonstrated rapid muscular adaptations in response to only eight sessions of back squat and deadlift training in women despite the absence of changes in agonist-antagonist EMG amplitude. PMID:26583966

  15. [Children's diseases in the columns of "The Weekly Medicine"].

    PubMed

    Marek, Anna

    2005-01-01

    "The Weekly Medicine", the first scientific weekly journal, was published in Warsaw in the years 1847-1868. Its editor and publisher was L. Natanson. The weekly comprised original works, translations from foreign periodicals, books reviews, correspondence, biographies and reports from for example the Warsaw Medical Society. A lot of attention devoted to sickness from birth till adult. In "The Weekly Medicine" wrote polish authors and were very articles translations from foreign periodicals. Authors talked about younger children's illnesses: hydrocephalus, conjunctivitis, thrush, diarrhoea, convulsions, pleurisy, liver cancer, syphilis and teething. In articles have been descriptioned sickness and treatmented. Information about children's illnesses creating basis to develop independent pediatrics science.

  16. Effects of a 6-week junior tennis conditioning program on service velocity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Ellenbecker, Todd; Sanz-Rivas, David; Ulbricht, Alexander; Ferrautia, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week strength-training program on serve velocity in youth tennis players. Thirty competitive healthy and nationally ranked male junior tennis players (13 years of age) were randomly and equally divided into control and training groups. The training group performed 3 sessions (60-70 min) weekly for 6 weeks, comprising core strength, elastic resistance and medicine ball exercises. Both groups (control and training) also performed a supervised stretching routine at the end of each training session, during the 6 week intervention. Service velocity, service accuracy and shoulder internal/external rotation were assessed initially and at the end of the 6-week conditioning program for both, control and training groups. There was a significant improvement in the serve velocity for the training group (p = 0. 0001) after the intervention, whereas in the control group there were no differences between pre and post-tests (p = 0.29). Serve accuracy was not affected in the training group (p = 0.10), nor in the control group (p = 0.15). Shoulder internal/external rotation ROM significantly improved in both groups, training (p = 0.001) and control (p = 0.0001). The present results showed that a short- term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance (i.e., serve velocity) and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motion. Key PointsA short-term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motionA combination of core stabilization, elastic resistance exercises, and upper body plyometric exercises (i.e., medicine ball throws), focussing on the primary muscle groups and stabilizers involved in

  17. Effects of A 6-Week Junior Tennis Conditioning Program on Service Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Ellenbecker, Todd; Sanz-Rivas, david; Ulbricht, Alexander; Ferrautia, lexander

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week strength-training program on serve velocity in youth tennis players. Thirty competitive healthy and nationally ranked male junior tennis players (13 years of age) were randomly and equally divided into control and training groups. The training group performed 3 sessions (60-70 min) weekly for 6 weeks, comprising core strength, elastic resistance and medicine ball exercises. Both groups (control and training) also performed a supervised stretching routine at the end of each training session, during the 6 week intervention. Service velocity, service accuracy and shoulder internal/external rotation were assessed initially and at the end of the 6-week conditioning program for both, control and training groups. There was a significant improvement in the serve velocity for the training group (p = 0. 0001) after the intervention, whereas in the control group there were no differences between pre and post-tests (p = 0.29). Serve accuracy was not affected in the training group (p = 0.10), nor in the control group (p = 0.15). Shoulder internal/external rotation ROM significantly improved in both groups, training (p = 0.001) and control (p = 0.0001). The present results showed that a short- term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance (i.e., serve velocity) and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motion. Key Points A short-term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motion A combination of core stabilization, elastic resistance exercises, and upper body plyometric exercises (i.e., medicine ball throws), focussing on the primary muscle groups and stabilizers involved

  18. 17β-Estradiol administration promotes delayed cutaneous wound healing in 40-week ovariectomised female mice.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kanae; Nakajima, Yukari; Urai, Tamae; Komatsu, Emi; Nasruddin; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on wound healing in 40-week ovariectomised female mice. Thirty-six-week-old female mice were divided into three groups: medication with 17β-estradiol after ovariectomy (OVX + 17β-estradiol), ovariectomy (OVX) and sham (SHAM). The mice received two full-thickness wounds, and the OVX + 17β-estradiol group was administered 17β-estradiol at 0·01 g/day until healing. In the OVX + 17β-estradiol group, the ratio of wound area was significantly smaller than those of the OVX and SHAM groups on days 1-3, 5, 6, 8-12 and 9-12, respectively, the numbers of neutrophils and macrophages were significantly smaller than those on days 3 and 7, the ratio of re-epithelialisation was significantly higher than those on days 3 and 11, the ratio of myofibroblasts was significantly higher than those on day 11 and smaller on day 14, and the ratio of collagen fibres was significantly larger than that of the OVX group on days 7-14. We found that 17β-estradiol administration promotes cutaneous wound healing in 40-week female mice by reducing wound area, shortening inflammatory response, and promoting re-epithelialisation, collagen deposition and wound contraction. Our results suggest that cutaneous wound healing that is delayed because of ageing is promoted by exogenous and continuous 17β-estradiol administration.

  19. Marathons versus Spaced Groups: Skin Conductance and the Effects of Time Distribution on Encounter Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly assigned 41 students to 2 twice-weekly groups, which met for 3 hours eight times; 2 marathons, which met continuously for 24 hours; and nontreatment control group. Treatment groups had significant positive changes on 14 of 15 measured personality variables between pre- and post-test, and positive change on all dependent measures between…

  20. Complete Sequence of pEC012, a Multidrug-Resistant IncI1 ST71 Plasmid Carrying bla CTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an Avian Escherichia coli ST117 Strain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu-Shan; Zong, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Li; Du, Xiang-Dang; Huang, Hui; Zhong, Xing-Hao; Hu, Gong-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A 139,622-bp IncI1 ST71 conjugative plasmid pEC012 from an avian Escherichia coli D-ST117 strain was sequenced, which carried five IS26-bracketed resistance modules: IS26-fosA3-orf1-orf2-Δorf3-IS26, IS26-fip-ΔISEcp1-bla CTX-M-65-IS903D-iroN-IS26, IS26-ΔtnpR-bla TEM-1-rmtB-IS26, IS26-oqxAB-IS26, and IS26-floR-aac(3)-IV-IS26. The backbone of pEC012 was similar to that of several other IncI1 ST71 plasmids: pV408, pM105, and pC271, but these plasmids had different arrangements of multidrug resistance region. In addition, the novel ISEc57 element was identified, which is in the IS21 family. The stepwise emergence of multi-resistance regions demonstrated the accumulation of different resistance determinants through homologous recombination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a multidrug-resistant IncI1 ST71 plasmid carrying bla CTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an avian E. coli ST117 strain. PMID:27486449

  1. Complete Sequence of pEC012, a Multidrug-Resistant IncI1 ST71 Plasmid Carrying blaCTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an Avian Escherichia coli ST117 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yu-Shan; Zong, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Li; Du, Xiang-Dang; Huang, Hui; Zhong, Xing-Hao; Hu, Gong-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A 139,622-bp IncI1 ST71 conjugative plasmid pEC012 from an avian Escherichia coli D-ST117 strain was sequenced, which carried five IS26-bracketed resistance modules: IS26-fosA3-orf1-orf2-Δorf3-IS26, IS26-fip-ΔISEcp1-blaCTX-M-65-IS903D-iroN-IS26, IS26-ΔtnpR-blaTEM-1-rmtB-IS26, IS26-oqxAB-IS26, and IS26-floR-aac(3)-IV-IS26. The backbone of pEC012 was similar to that of several other IncI1 ST71 plasmids: pV408, pM105, and pC271, but these plasmids had different arrangements of multidrug resistance region. In addition, the novel ISEc57 element was identified, which is in the IS21 family. The stepwise emergence of multi-resistance regions demonstrated the accumulation of different resistance determinants through homologous recombination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a multidrug-resistant IncI1 ST71 plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-65, rmtB, fosA3, floR, and oqxAB in an avian E. coli ST117 strain. PMID:27486449

  2. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Shiga toxin gene (stx1)-positive Escherichia coli O91:H14 carrying blaCTX-M-15 on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid isolated from a human patient in Germany.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Mardjan; Bettge-Weller, Gudrun; Fruth, Angelika; Uphoff, Helmut; Pfeifer, Yvonne

    2015-05-01

    In 2011, the Shiga toxin- and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 caused a serious outbreak of gastroenteritis in Germany. This strain carried bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid. During screening of individuals at risk for acquisition of the epidemic E. coli O104:H4, we isolated another ESBL-producing and Shiga toxin-positive E. coli belonging to serotype O91:H14 from feces of a human patient. Interestingly, the patient also carried a further ESBL-producing but Shiga toxin-negative E. coli. Both strains harbored bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid, which was indistinguishable regarding size and plasmid restriction pattern from the plasmid of the epidemic E. coli O104:H4 strain. The patient had traveled to India 6 months prior to the isolation of the E. coli strains. This is the first report of an ESBL-producing, Shiga toxin-positive E. coli of serogroup O91. Our data suggest a high propensity of the IncI1-ST31 plasmid to spread in the human and/or animal population.

  3. Group Experience as a Means of Training Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizur, Avner; Neumann, Michael

    1979-01-01

    All medical students at the Shackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv, who participated in a six-week psychiatric clerkship met once a week in "experimental groups." The results indicate the group was the most significant personal and learning experience of the clerkship, improving interpersonal communication, empathy and sensitivity. (Author/MLW)

  4. A 24-Weeks Toxicity Study of Eryngium foetidum Linn. Leaves in Mice.

    PubMed

    Janwitthayanuchit, Kanittha; Kupradinun, Piengchai; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Butryee, Chaniphun

    2016-07-01

    Eryngium foetidum Linn. leaves (EF) are widely used in Thailand and many countries throughout Asia as a culinary seasoning and a traditional medicine. However, adverse effect of high dose consumption in long duration has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate chronic toxicity of EF in mice. Thirty-two ICR male mice were divided into 4 groups of 8 mice each. The mice were fed AIN-76 rodent diet, or AIN-76 rodent diet supplemented with ground freeze-dried EF at 0.8%, 1.6% and 3.2% that is equivalent to approximately 35, 73 and 155 times that of human consumption, respectively, at 97.5 percentile for a period of 24 weeks. At the end of experiment, the mice were euthanized and blood samples were collected for hematological and biochemical evaluations. Necropsy was performed while visceral organs such as lung, liver, kidneys, spleen etc. were collected, weighed and histopathologically examined. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) results of mice in 1.6% and 3.2% EF diet groups were significantly higher than the BUN of control group. No significant difference was noted in other biochemical and hematological properties between the treatment groups and control; all results were within normal range. Histopathology of almost all visceral organs showed no significant changes. However, tubulonephrosis and chronic interstitial nephritis were observed in the groups treated with 1.6% and 3.2% EF diet. Body weight was reduced significantly at week 12 to week 20 when compared to the control group while relative kidney weights were significantly increased. In conclusion, the consumption of EF in diet at high doses illustrated the adverse effect on some biochemical parameters and histopathology in mice. Our findings suggested that EF daily consumption for 24 weeks, at higher doses than the 0.8% EF diet (35 times of human consumption), might cause adverse effect on kidney function in mice. PMID:27437090

  5. A 24-Weeks Toxicity Study of Eryngium foetidum Linn. Leaves in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Janwitthayanuchit, Kanittha; Kupradinun, Piengchai; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Butryee, Chaniphun

    2016-01-01

    Eryngium foetidum Linn. leaves (EF) are widely used in Thailand and many countries throughout Asia as a culinary seasoning and a traditional medicine. However, adverse effect of high dose consumption in long duration has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate chronic toxicity of EF in mice. Thirty-two ICR male mice were divided into 4 groups of 8 mice each. The mice were fed AIN-76 rodent diet, or AIN-76 rodent diet supplemented with ground freeze-dried EF at 0.8%, 1.6% and 3.2% that is equivalent to approximately 35, 73 and 155 times that of human consumption, respectively, at 97.5 percentile for a period of 24 weeks. At the end of experiment, the mice were euthanized and blood samples were collected for hematological and biochemical evaluations. Necropsy was performed while visceral organs such as lung, liver, kidneys, spleen etc. were collected, weighed and histopathologically examined. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) results of mice in 1.6% and 3.2% EF diet groups were significantly higher than the BUN of control group. No significant difference was noted in other biochemical and hematological properties between the treatment groups and control; all results were within normal range. Histopathology of almost all visceral organs showed no significant changes. However, tubulonephrosis and chronic interstitial nephritis were observed in the groups treated with 1.6% and 3.2% EF diet. Body weight was reduced significantly at week 12 to week 20 when compared to the control group while relative kidney weights were significantly increased. In conclusion, the consumption of EF in diet at high doses illustrated the adverse effect on some biochemical parameters and histopathology in mice. Our findings suggested that EF daily consumption for 24 weeks, at higher doses than the 0.8% EF diet (35 times of human consumption), might cause adverse effect on kidney function in mice. PMID:27437090

  6. Permanent stress may be the trigger of an acute myocardial infarction on the first work-day of the week.

    PubMed

    Bodis, Jozsef; Boncz, Imre; Kriszbacher, Ildiko

    2010-10-29

    Numerous studies have reported the weekly variation of an acute myocardial infarction. The Monday peek has been connected with higher rate of physical and mental, work-related stress. We wished to study the weekly variation of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the group of workers and pensioners, and to find out whether National Holidays on the first day of the week could influence the weekly rhythm of an acute myocardial infarction. We carried out the retrospective analysis of patients admitted to Hungarian hospitals with the diagnose of an AMI (n=90,187) between 2002 and 2007. According to the morbidity data of an AMI, the weekly peek was detected on the first work-day of the week, showing a gradually decreasing tendency until the end of the week. Morbidity rates on Mondays being National Holidays were similar to the number of events on Saturdays and Sundays (Z=-24,431; p<0.001). There was a significant difference between the number of events on work-days and weekends (Z=-27,321; p<0.001). No marked difference was found between workers under the age of 65 and pensioners above the age of 65, or between the two sexes. The results of our study reveal that the occurrence of an AMI shows characteristic changes throughout the days of the week, and the first work-days of the week may be related to higher incidence of an acute myocardial infarction. PMID:19345426

  7. "Mid-Week Pictorial": Pioneer American Photojournalism Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Keith

    In 1914 (22 years before the inception of "Life" magazine), the "New York Times" began publishing "Mid-Week Pictorial" to absorb a flood of war pictures pouring in from Europe. Several sociological and technological forces shaped "Mid-Week Pictorial" as a pioneer of American photojournalism magazines, including the development of the halftone…

  8. I.D. Weeks Library: Guide to Library Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. I.D. Weeks Library.

    This document is a guide to library resources in the I. D. Weeks Library at the University of South Dakota, Vermillion. The guide was designed to accompany an academic library instruction course, "Use of Library Resources, A & S 111." The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the facilities of the I. D. Weeks Library; to acquaint…

  9. Foreign Language Week: A Successful Public Relations Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reschke, Claus

    A detailed description is presented of a foreign language (FL) week project that was organized and executed by the Houston Area Teachers of Foreign Languages (HATFL) during the 1979-80 academic year. The document describes the preparation activities of the organizing committee, the pre-foreign language week advertising campaigns, the design of…

  10. 76 FR 49645 - National Health Center Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-20497 Filed 8-9-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... August 10, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8698--National Health Center Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Health Center Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Across...

  11. 75 FR 48853 - National Health Center Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010... Proclamation 8545--National Health Center Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal...;The President ] Proclamation 8545 of August 5, 2010 National Health Center Week, 2010 By the...

  12. 77 FR 58297 - National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-23299 Filed 9-18-12; 11:15 am] Billing code... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8865 of September 14, 2012 National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2012 By the.... During National Farm Safety and Health Week, we celebrate agricultural workers' vital contributions...

  13. 75 FR 58281 - National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ...-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-24096 Filed 9-22-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8565 of September 17, 2010 National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010 By the... around the globe. As we celebrate National Farm Safety and Health Week, we recognize the...

  14. 59 FR- National Gang Violence Prevention Week, 1994

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-09-13

    ... States of America the two hundred and nineteenth. (Presidential Sig.) > [FR Doc. 94-22846 Filed 9-12-94... Proclamation 6717-- National Gang Violence Prevention Week, 1994 Presidential Documents Federal Register Vol..., 1994 National Gang Violence Prevention Week, 1994 By the President of the United States of America...

  15. 46 CFR 122.720 - Weekly maintenance and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Weekly maintenance and inspections. 122.720 Section 122.720 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING... Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment § 122.720 Weekly maintenance...

  16. 76 FR 27597 - National Women's Health Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-11748 Filed 5-10-11... May 11, 2011 Part V The President Proclamation 8670--National Women's Health Week, 2011 Proclamation... ] Proclamation 8670 of May 6, 2011 National Women's Health Week, 2011 By the President of the United States...

  17. 76 FR 25525 - National Charter Schools Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-11067 Filed 5-4-11; 8:45 am] Billing...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8664 of April 29, 2011 National Charter Schools Week, 2011 By the President of... administrators. During National Charter Schools Week, we recognize these institutions of learning and renew...

  18. 76 FR 29131 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-12546 Filed 5-18-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... May 19, 2011 Part V The President Proclamation 8674--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2011 Proclamation 8675--National Defense Transportation Day and National Transportation Week, 2011 Proclamation...

  19. 75 FR 10991 - National Consumer Protection Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-5291 Filed 3-9-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Protection Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every day, American... their financial well-being and our Nation's economic stability. National Consumer Protection Week...

  20. 75 FR 29389 - National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-12753 Filed 5-25-10... Preparedness Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each year during... National Hurricane Preparedness Week, I urge individuals, families, communities, and businesses to...

  1. 77 FR 31147 - National Safe Boating Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-12877 Filed 5-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8825 of May 21, 2012 National Safe Boating Week, 2012 By the President of the.... During National Safe Boating Week, we renew our commitment to safe, responsible practices on our...

  2. 78 FR 35101 - Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-14045 Filed 6-11-13; 8:45 am... Flag Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each June, our Nation... responsibilities we share as citizens. This week, we celebrate that legacy, and we honor the brave men and...

  3. 75 FR 13215 - National Poison Prevention Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-6222 Filed 3-18-10... Prevention Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since 1962, during National Poison Prevention Week we alert American families about the dangers of accidental poisonings...

  4. 78 FR 17069 - National Poison Prevention Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Prevention Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation For more than 50 years, Americans have marked National Poison Prevention Week by highlighting the steps we can take to...

  5. 75 FR 62451 - National Physician Assistants Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-25706 Filed 10-8-10; 8:45 am] Billing code... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8579 of October 6, 2010 National Physician Assistants Week, 2010 By the... shortages. During National Physician Assistants Week, we honor these dedicated medical professionals...

  6. 78 FR 27032 - National Maritime Week Tugboat Races, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... regulation can be found in the April 27, 1996, issue of the Federal Register (61 FR 16710). A regulated area... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 National Maritime Week Tugboat Races, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Local Regulation for the annual National Maritime Week Tugboat Races in Elliott Bay, WA from 12...

  7. 77 FR 16645 - National Poison Prevention Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-6990 Filed 3-20-12; 11:15 am] Billing code... March 21, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8784--National Poison Prevention Week, 2012... Poison Prevention Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A...

  8. 78 FR 72527 - Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013... December 2, 2013 Part VII The President Proclamation 9062--Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2013... President ] Proclamation 9062 of November 26, 2013 Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2013 By...

  9. 75 FR 27917 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-12069 Filed 5-17-10... Proclamation 8519--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010 Executive Order 13542--Providing an Order of... President ] Proclamation 8519 of May 13, 2010 Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010 By the President of...

  10. 76 FR 59499 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty- sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-24888 Filed 9-23... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8718 of September 21, 2011 National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011... National Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) Week, we renew our commitment to strengthening and...

  11. 77 FR 31149 - National Small Business Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-12879 Filed 5-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8826 of May 21, 2012 National Small Business Week, 2012 By the President of... job creation that moves America forward. During National Small Business Week, we celebrate...

  12. 76 FR 65097 - National Forest Products Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-27319 Filed 10-19-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8738 of October 14, 2011 National Forest Products Week, 2011 By the President... important part of our economy. During National Forest Products Week, we celebrate the value of our...

  13. Choose Privacy Week: Educate Your Students (and Yourself) about Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Helen R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of "Choose Privacy Week" is to encourage a national conversation to raise awareness of the growing threats to personal privacy online and in day-to-day life. The 2016 Choose Privacy Week theme is "respecting individuals' privacy," with an emphasis on minors' privacy. A plethora of issues relating to minors' privacy…

  14. 75 FR 29391 - National Safe Boating Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8524 of May 20, 2010 National Safe Boating Week, 2010 By the President of the... spend time on the water, let us recommit during National Safe Boating Week to practicing safe...

  15. 77 FR 27553 - National Charter Schools Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... May 10, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8815--National Charter Schools Week, 2012 #0; #0; #0... Schools Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As a Nation, we share...

  16. 76 FR 57615 - National Health Information Technology Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-23924... September 15, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8711--National Health Information Technology Week... September 12, 2011 National Health Information Technology Week, 2011 By the President of the United...

  17. 78 FR 26995 - National Charter Schools Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013... May 8, 2013 Part IV The President Proclamation 8975--National Charter Schools Week, 2013 Notice of May... Schools Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation America's success...

  18. 78 FR 24319 - National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-09866 Filed 4-23-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8959 of April 19, 2013 National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2013 By the...' Rights Week, we reaffirm our solemn obligation to ensure they get the services they need--from care...

  19. 75 FR 24367 - National Charter Schools Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-10730 Filed 5-4-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8510 of April 29, 2010 National Charter Schools Week, 2010 By the President of... driving reform throughout many school districts. During National Charter Schools Week, we recommit...

  20. 76 FR 60351 - Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty- sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-25197 Filed... September 28, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8721--Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2011... Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our Nation is guided by...

  1. 76 FR 12817 - National Consumer Protection Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-5541 Filed 3-8-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Protection Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each day, families... communities. For more than a decade, National Consumer Protection Week has encouraged Americans to make...

  2. 77 FR 65095 - National Forest Products Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8892 of October 19, 2012 National Forest Products Week, 2012 By the President... environments for us to explore. During National Forest Products Week, we celebrate sustainable uses of...

  3. 78 FR 62957 - National Forest Products Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-24990 Filed 10-22-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F4 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9044 of October 18, 2013 National Forest Products Week, 2013 By the President... recreation for workers and families across our country. During National Forest Products Week, we...

  4. 77 FR 32877 - National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-13515 Filed...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8830 of May 25, 2012 National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2012 By the... Preparedness Week, we rededicate ourselves to preventing loss of life and damage to property by...

  5. 77 FR 65091 - National Character Counts Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-26342 Filed 10-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code... October 24, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8891--National Character Counts Week, 2012 Proclamation 8892--National Forest Products Week, 2012 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0;...

  6. 77 FR 35807 - Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-14743 Filed 6-14-12; 8:45 am...#0;#0; #0; ] Proclamation 8837 of June 11, 2012 Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2012 By the... against itself.'' This week, we mark nearly one century since that historic proclamation, and more...

  7. 76 FR 30495 - National Safe Boating Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-13167 Filed 5-24-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8680 of May 20, 2011 National Safe Boating Week, 2011 By the President of the... Week is an opportunity to highlight the importance of safety precautions and sensible behavior...

  8. 76 FR 30491 - National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-13166 Filed 5-24-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... May 25, 2011 Part III The President Proclamation 8679--National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2011 Proclamation 8680--National Safe Boating Week, 2011 Proclamation 8681--Armed Forces Day, 2011 Proclamation...

  9. 78 FR 62955 - National Character Counts Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-24986 Filed 10-22-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F4 ... Counts Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As Americans, we are..., and that, above all, we are one people. During National Character Counts Week, we reflect on the...

  10. 77 FR 58299 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-23302 Filed 9-18-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8866 of September 14, 2012 National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2012... many Hispanic students and their families, and this week, we celebrate the critical role these...

  11. 77 FR 25345 - National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-10401 Filed 4-26-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... April 27, 2012 Part V The President Proclamation 8804--National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2012 #0; #0... Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation...

  12. 75 FR 64615 - National Character Counts Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-26554 Filed 10-19-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Counts Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation America's strength... National Character Counts Week, we reflect upon the values of equality, fairness, and compassion that...

  13. 76 FR 22033 - National Maritime Week Tugboat Races, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... regulation can be found in the April 27, 1996 issue of the Federal Register (61 FR 16710). A regulated area... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 National Maritime Week Tugboat Races, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Local Regulation for the annual National Maritime Week Tugboat Races in Elliott Bay, WA from 12...

  14. 76 FR 35087 - Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-15046 Filed 6-14-11; 11:15 am] Billing... June 15, 2011 Part II The President Proclamation 8689--Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... and National Flag Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation On...

  15. 78 FR 14625 - National Consumer Protection Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-05394 Filed 3-5-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... March 6, 2013 Part II The President Proclamation 8937--National Consumer Protection Week, 2013... 8937 of March 1, 2013 National Consumer Protection Week, 2013 By the President of the United States...

  16. 75 FR 24400 - National Maritime Week Tugboat Races, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... in the April 17, 1996 issue of the Federal Register (70 FR 23938). A regulated area is established on... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 National Maritime Week Tugboat Races, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Local Regulation for the annual National Maritime Week Tugboat Races in Elliott Bay, WA on May 8,...

  17. 77 FR 72679 - Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-29576 Filed 12-4-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8912 of November 30, 2012 Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2012 By the... Development Week, let us honor the role America's minority-owned businesses play in spurring our...

  18. 75 FR 71523 - National Farm-City Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-29800 Filed 11-23-10... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8605 of November 19, 2010 National Farm-City Week, 2010 By the President of... environmentally sustainable way of life for future generations. During National Farm-City Week, we recognize...

  19. 78 FR 32535 - National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... May 30, 2013 Part II The President Proclamation 8986--National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2013... 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8986 of May 24, 2013 National Hurricane Preparedness Week,...

  20. 76 FR 16521 - National Poison Prevention Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-7057... March 23, 2011 Part III The President Proclamation 8638--National Poison Prevention Week, 2011 #0; #0..., 2011 National Poison Prevention Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America...

  1. 46 CFR 185.720 - Weekly maintenance and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Weekly maintenance and inspections. 185.720 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment § 185.720 Weekly maintenance and inspections. The following tests and inspections must be carried...

  2. Using Week of the Young Child as an Advocacy Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Week of the Young Child 2009, April 19-25, presents a public policy advocacy opportunity for early childhood programs, faculty, and families. This article offers some ways one can use Week of the Young Child (WOYC) events specifically to further advocacy efforts.

  3. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine....

  4. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine....

  5. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine....

  6. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine....

  7. 78 FR 28711 - National Women's Health Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8978 of May 10, 2013 National Women's Health Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since our Nation's founding, women have given their all to..., advances in women's health and well-being have lagged behind. During National Women's Health Week,...

  8. 23 CFR 635.118 - Payroll and weekly statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contract provisions for the project, are to be retained by the STD for the time period pursuant to 49 CFR... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payroll and weekly statements. 635.118 Section 635.118... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.118 Payroll and weekly statements. For all...

  9. The First Weeks of School: Laying a Quality Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Jane; Burrell, Louise

    Based on the view that the first weeks of school lay the foundation for the remainder of the year, this book uses an ethnographic approach to present the story of one teacher and the classroom she constructed during the first weeks of school. The book's introduction explores beliefs about children and teaching and a view of theory and practice…

  10. Clinical and MRI responses to etanercept in early non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis: 48-week results from the EMBARK study

    PubMed Central

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Dougados, Maxime; Sieper, Joachim; Braun, Jürgen; Citera, Gustavo; Van den Bosch, Filip; Logeart, Isabelle; Wajdula, Joseph; Jones, Heather; Marshall, Lisa; Bonin, Randi; Pedersen, Ron; Vlahos, Bonnie; Kotak, Sameer; Bukowski, Jack F

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of etanercept (ETN) after 48 weeks in patients with early active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). Methods Patients meeting Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA, but not modified New York radiographic criteria, received double-blind ETN 50 mg/week or placebo (PBO) for 12 weeks, then open-label ETN (ETN/ETN or PBO/ETN). Clinical, health, productivity, MRI and safety outcomes were assessed and the 48-week data are presented here. Results 208/225 patients (92%) entered the open-label phase at week 12 (ETN, n=102; PBO, n=106). The percentage of patients achieving ASAS40 increased from 33% to 52% between weeks 12 and 48 for ETN/ETN and from 15% to 53% for PBO/ETN (within-group p value <0.001 for both). For ETN/ETN and PBO/ETN, the EuroQol 5 Dimensions utility score improved by 0.14 and 0.08, respectively, between baseline and week 12 and by 0.23 and 0.22 between baseline and week 48. Between weeks 12 and 48, MRI Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada sacroiliac joint (SIJ) scores decreased by −1.1 for ETN/ETN and by −3.0 for PBO/ETN, p<0.001 for both. Decreases in MRI SIJ inflammation and C-reactive protein correlated with several clinical outcomes at weeks 12 and 48. Conclusions Patients with early active nr-axSpA demonstrated improvement from week 12 in clinical, health, productivity and MRI outcomes that was sustained to 48 weeks. Trial registration number NCT01258738. PMID:26269397

  11. The Effect of an 8-Week Tai Chi Exercise Program on Physical Functional Performance in Middle-Aged Women.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Susan; Taylor, E Laurette; Hofford, Craig W; Brittain, Danielle R; Branscum, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an 8-week Tai Chi Chih exercise program on physical functional performance (PFP) among women aged 45 to 65 years. A quasi-experimental design with a nonequivalent comparison group was used. Forty-one healthy inactive women were assigned to either an intervention group (n = 19) or a comparison group (n = 19). A 60-min Tai Chi Chih exercise class was conducted twice a week for 8 weeks. PFP was measured at baseline and postintervention using the Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance-10 (CS-PFP 10). Between-group differences were analyzed using one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). After participating in the 8-week program, intervention group participants showed greater improvement in the CS-PFP measures (p < .05, η(2) > .06). However, the comparison group had little changes. The findings from this study suggest that participation in an 8-week Tai Chi Chih exercise program can improve PFP in healthy, community-dwelling middle-aged women.

  12. The effect of 8-week plyometric training on leg power, jump and sprint performance in female soccer players.

    PubMed

    Ozbar, Nurper; Ates, Seda; Agopyan, Ani

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 8-week plyometric training (PT) on the leg power and jump and sprint performance in female soccer players. Eighteen female soccer players from Women Second League (age = 18.2 ± 2.3 years, height = 161.3 ± 5.4 cm, body mass = 56.6 ± 7.2 kg) were randomly assigned to control (n = 9) and plyometric (n = 9) groups. Both groups continued together with regular technical and tactical soccer training for 4 days a week. Additionally, the plyometric group underwent PT for 8 weeks, 1 day per week, 60-minute session duration. During the 8-week period, the control group was hindered from any additional conditioning training. All players' jumps (triple hop, countermovement jump, and standing broad jump), running speed (20 m), and peak power were evaluated before and after 8 weeks. No significant difference was found between the groups at pretest variables (p > 0.05). Significant improvements were found in the posttest of both the groups (p ≤ 0.05), except for 20-m sprint test in the control group (p > 0.05). Triple hop distance, countermovement jump, standing broad jump, peak power, and 20-m sprint test values were all significantly improved in the plyometric group, compared with the control group (p ≤ 0.05). We concluded that short duration PT is an improved important component of athletic performance in female soccer players. The results indicate that safe, effective, and alternative PT can be useful to strength and conditioning coaches, especially during competition season where less time is available for training.

  13. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, D. E.; Stuart, B. O.; Rothenberg, S. J.; Kershaw, M.; Mann, P. C.; James, J. T.; Lam, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    Dimethylethoxysilane (DMES), a volatile liquid, is used by NASA to waterproof the heat-protective silica tiles and blankets on the Space Shuttle. Acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation exposures to DMES vapor were conducted in male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the acute study, rats were exposed to 4000, 2000, 1000, 500, or 0 (control) ppm DMES for 4 h and observed for 14 days. There were no deaths. Narcosis and ataxia were observed in rats of the two highest concentrations only. These signs disappeared within 1 h following exposure. There were no DMES-related gross or microscopic tissue lesions in rats of all exposure groups. In the 2-wk study, rats were exposed for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 3000, 1000, 300, 100, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, narcosis was observed in rats of the 3000 and 1000 ppm groups. There was a mild decrease in body weight gain in rats of the 3000 ppm group. A decrease in platelet count, an increase in bile acids, and reduced weights of the thymus, testis, and liver were observed in rats of the 3000 ppm group. Microscopically, hypospermatogenesis and spermatid giant cells were observed in the seminiferous tubules of the testes of rats exposed to 3000 ppm DMES. In the 13-wk study, rats were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 2000, 600, 160, 40, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, rats of the 2000 ppm group exhibited mild narcosis and loss of startle reflex. Recovery from these central nervous system signs was rapid. Body weights were mildly decreased for rats of the 2000 ppm group. There were no exposure-related effects in hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Female rats of the 2000 ppm group had delayed estrous cycles (6 days compared to 5 days in control rats). Noteworthy organ weight changes in rats of the 2000 ppm group included decreases in thymus, liver, and testicular weights; however, pathologic lesions were observed in the testes only. Sperm motility, epididymal sperm count, and testicular spermatid count were dramatically reduced

  14. Prognosis for infants born at 23 to 28 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, V Y; Loke, H L; Bajuk, B; Szymonowicz, W; Orgill, A A; Astbury, J

    1986-01-01

    The survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of 356 extremely preterm infants born at 23 to 28 weeks' gestation were reported by week of gestation. Their corrected 1 year survival improved from 7% at 23 weeks to 75% at 28 weeks. The overall incidence of impairment was 19% and of major disability 12%. Boys had a significantly lower normal survival than girls. Multiple births had a significantly lower survival and higher incidence of impairment than singleton births. Predictions of outcome were made before delivery, after resuscitation, and at 1 week to aid the development of guidelines on when perinatal intensive care is justified, whether obstetric intervention for fetal reasons is warranted, and what initial and ongoing prognoses to give to parents. Intensive care for progressively smaller and more immature infants, many of whom were previously considered non-viable, needs to be carefully monitored by every perinatal centre. PMID:2430661

  15. Solar Week: An experiment of the Yohkoh Public Outreach Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D.

    2001-05-01

    Solar Week is a week-long collection of content, games, and activities centered on the latest data from and discoveries about the Sun. Targetted at middle-school girls, the key feature of Solar Week is the "Ask a Scientist" section enabling direct interaction between participating students and volunteer scientists. All of the contributing scientists are women, serving as experts in their field and providing role models to whom the students can relate. Solar Week has completed two sessions, one in October 2000 and one in April 2001, with a total of some 80 edcuators and 8,000+ students in over 25 states. A major success of the Solar Week program has been the ability of the students to learn more about the scientists as people, through online biographies, and to discuss a variety of topics ranging from science, to careers and common hobbies.

  16. Effects of a 7-week outdoor circuit training program on Swiss Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Marie-Claire; Mäder, Urs; Wyss, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement an outdoor circuit training program as an addition to standard training and to examine its effects on physical fitness and injury incidence rate in Swiss Army recruits. An intervention group (standard and additional training, n = 134, 21.0 ± 1.1 years, 74.1 ± 10.0 kg, and 1.78 ± 0.1 m) and a control group (standard training only, n = 125, 20.4 ± 1.2 years, 73.3 ± 9.1 kg, and 1.78 ± 0.1 m) from the same fusilier infantry training school were compared. Physical standard training in the Swiss Army is specified to consist of 2 sessions with a total duration of at least 3 h·wk(-1). Groups of 20-50 recruits undergo these trainings in a gymnasium hall and outdoors. Standard training includes a wide range of exercises and sport activities (strength and aerobic fitness training, team sports, obstacle courses, physical fitness tests, and orienteering). The additional circuit fitness training program implemented in this study was conducted once a week for 60 minutes. It was performed outdoors and consisted of the same exercises every week (warm-up, squats, prone bridge, back and shoulder exercise, stair climbing, side bridge, single leg balance, walking on a balance beam, intermitted running, and active recovery). Volunteers' physical fitness was assessed during the first and last weeks of basic military training (7 weeks) using a standing long jump, seated 2-kg shot put, 1-leg standing test (OLS), trunk muscle strength test (TMS), and progressive endurance run (PER). Injury data were collected in medical records for the 21 weeks of military training school. The intervention group performed 1.0 session of standard training for 70.0 minutes and 1.0 session of additional outdoor circuit training for 50.0 min·wk(-1). The control group performed 1.3 sessions of standard training for a total of 70.7 min·wk(-1). After the 7-week basic military training, the intervention and the control groups showed significant improvements in OLS

  17. Effects of a 7-week outdoor circuit training program on Swiss Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Marie-Claire; Mäder, Urs; Wyss, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement an outdoor circuit training program as an addition to standard training and to examine its effects on physical fitness and injury incidence rate in Swiss Army recruits. An intervention group (standard and additional training, n = 134, 21.0 ± 1.1 years, 74.1 ± 10.0 kg, and 1.78 ± 0.1 m) and a control group (standard training only, n = 125, 20.4 ± 1.2 years, 73.3 ± 9.1 kg, and 1.78 ± 0.1 m) from the same fusilier infantry training school were compared. Physical standard training in the Swiss Army is specified to consist of 2 sessions with a total duration of at least 3 h·wk(-1). Groups of 20-50 recruits undergo these trainings in a gymnasium hall and outdoors. Standard training includes a wide range of exercises and sport activities (strength and aerobic fitness training, team sports, obstacle courses, physical fitness tests, and orienteering). The additional circuit fitness training program implemented in this study was conducted once a week for 60 minutes. It was performed outdoors and consisted of the same exercises every week (warm-up, squats, prone bridge, back and shoulder exercise, stair climbing, side bridge, single leg balance, walking on a balance beam, intermitted running, and active recovery). Volunteers' physical fitness was assessed during the first and last weeks of basic military training (7 weeks) using a standing long jump, seated 2-kg shot put, 1-leg standing test (OLS), trunk muscle strength test (TMS), and progressive endurance run (PER). Injury data were collected in medical records for the 21 weeks of military training school. The intervention group performed 1.0 session of standard training for 70.0 minutes and 1.0 session of additional outdoor circuit training for 50.0 min·wk(-1). The control group performed 1.3 sessions of standard training for a total of 70.7 min·wk(-1). After the 7-week basic military training, the intervention and the control groups showed significant improvements in OLS

  18. Four-week supplementation with a natural dietary compound produces favorable changes in body composition.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, W W; Harris, C; Long, E M; Hopkins, D R

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a natural dietary supplement produced favorable changes in body composition during a 4-week diet- and-exercise program. The active compound contains a patented combination of chromium picolinate, inulin, capsicum, L-phenylalanine, and other lipotropic nutrients. A double-blind, weight-loss intervention design was used. Participants were randomly assigned to either a diet/exercise/supplement group (n = 56) or a diet/exercise/placebo group (n = 67). Caloric intake was reduced to 1500 kcal/d and participants walked for 45 minutes, 5 days a week, to attain between 60% and 80% of predicted maximal heart rate. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed significant differences (P < .05) between groups in percent body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass; no significant differences were found (P > .05) in body weight, body mass index, or energy intake. Independent t tests showed no significant differences (P > .05) in diet composition between groups. Results indicate that the addition of a natural dietary supplement during a 4-week diet-and-exercise weight-loss program accelerates the rate of body fat loss and helps maintain fat-free mass (lean tissue), thereby producing favorable changes in body composition.

  19. [One-week effects of Tamsulosin on benign prostatic hyperplasia assessed with a daily symptom score].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masayuki; Egawa, Shin; Ikemoto, Isao; Nakajo, Hiroshi; Hatano, Takashi; Kira, Shinichiro; Mizuo, Toshihiko; Kagami, Yutaka

    2009-04-01

    The early effects of Tamsulosin within one week of administration on lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were investigated. Patients with newly diagnosed BPH were randomized into a Tamsulosin group and a Eviprostat group. Changes in subjective symptoms daily for 7 days after the start of administration and in the 4th week (8 times in total) were evaluated using seven symptoms in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and the quality of life (QOL) index entered in a self-scoring diary kept by the patients daily. In the Tamsulosin group, the IPSS total score showed significant improvements. Significant improvements were observed in the incomplete emptying and frequency scores from the day after the start of administration, in the intermittence and straining scores from day 2, in the urgency and weak stream scores from day 3 and in the nocturia score from day 5. The QOL index significantly improved on day 7. In comparison with Eviprostat, Tamsulosin showed a stronger improvement tendency in the total IPSS, voiding symptoms score and incomplete emptying score and the difference was significant. The difference between the two groups was especially marked for the intermittence and weak stream scores and Tamsulosin showed significantly better early effects. Tamsulosin also showed significantly better early effects than Eviprostat in the QOL index. In conclusion, it was clear that Tamsulosin caused significant improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH as a whole from a very early stage within one week after administration.

  20. The effects of anxiety and depression on weekly pain in women with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bruce W; Zautra, Alex J

    2008-08-31

    This study examined the effects of anxiety and depression on pain in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n=82) or osteoarthritis (OA; n=88). Anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed at the beginning of the study. Arthritis pain, interpersonal stress, negative affect, and positive affect were assessed weekly for 11 consecutive weeks. Multilevel analyses were conducted to investigate direct, indirect, and interactive effects of anxiety and depression on weekly changes in pain. When entered separately into the prediction equations, anxiety and depression were both related to elevations in current and next week pain, although the effects were nearly twice as large for anxiety. In addition, both anxiety and depression were indirectly related to current pain through negative and positive affect and depression interacted with stress to predict current pain in the RA group. When entered together into the prediction equations, anxiety alone was still related to elevations in current and next week pain. In addition, anxiety alone was indirectly related to current pain through negative affect and depression alone was indirectly related to current pain through positive affect. These results highlight the need for careful study of the differential effects of anxiety and depression and treatments that target their unique mechanisms.