Science.gov

Sample records for 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups

  1. Binary supramolecular adduct based upon trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylenemercury and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde: Enumerating the strength of perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Steven P.; Krueger, Herman R.; Groeneman, Ryan H.; Reinheimer, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its proximity of Hg(II) atoms, electron-withdrawing properties and inherent accessibility to electrophilic sites on the molecular surface, trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylenemercury, (o-C6F4Hg)3, has demonstrated a capacity to form supramolecular adducts with a variety of neutral and anionic substrates. Often within these complexes the Lewis acid, (o-C6F4Hg)3, interacts with a Lewis base rather than itself in the solid state via various supramolecular interactions. Among these, perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions have been utilized in the construction of various supramolecular materials; however, within these molecular complexes, this category of non-covalent interaction is not often observed. Even though these perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions have been used to produce new materials, their overall strength has not been generally reported in the literature. In this contribution, we highlight not only the synthesis, structural and spectroscopic properties of a novel binary supramolecular adduct between (o-C6F4Hg)3 and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde (4-ClBA) [(o-C6F4Hg)3(4-ClBA)] 1, but also report on the overall strength of the perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interaction energies determined by means of computational chemistry. The carbonyl group of the 4-ClBA substrate was found to interact with all three mercury atoms within (o-C6F4Hg)3 via Hg⋯O contacts. An infrared spectroscopic analysis of 1 demonstrated a lower wavenumber for the carbonyl stretching frequency when compared to that for the free substrate confirming the presence of these Hg⋯O interactions.

  2. Scalable antifouling reverse osmosis membranes utilizing perfluorophenyl azide photochemistry.

    PubMed

    McVerry, Brian T; Wong, Mavis C Y; Marsh, Kristofer L; Temple, James A T; Marambio-Jones, Catalina; Hoek, Eric M V; Kaner, Richard B

    2014-09-01

    We present a method to produce anti-fouling reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that maintains the process and scalability of current RO membrane manufacturing. Utilizing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) photochemistry, commercial reverse osmosis membranes were dipped into an aqueous solution containing PFPA-terminated poly(ethyleneglycol) species and then exposed to ultraviolet light under ambient conditions, a process that can easily be adapted to a roll-to-roll process. Successful covalent modification of commercial reverse osmosis membranes was confirmed with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. By employing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was determined that PFPAs undergo UV-generated nitrene addition and bind to the membrane through an aziridine linkage. After modification with the PFPA-PEG derivatives, the reverse osmosis membranes exhibit high fouling-resistance. PMID:25042670

  3. Synthesis and physico-chemical properties of ionic liquidscontaining tetrakis(perfluorophenyl)borate, tetraphenylborate andtrifluorophenylborate anions.

    SciTech Connect

    Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Salminen, Justin; Yakelis, Neal; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-03-01

    Synthesis and some physico-chemical properties are reported for six new hydrophobic ionic liquids containing tetrakis(perfluorophenyl)borate, tetraphenylborate or trfluorophenylborate anions and imidazolium or pyridinium cations.

  4. No Natives Here: A Focus Group Study of Student Perceptions of Web 2.0 and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhanna, Kenneth J.; Seeholzer, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    This study explores Web 2.0 technologies in an academic library through focus groups with undergraduates at Kent State University. Results reveal that students, despite being heavy users, are less sophisticated and expressive in their use of Web 2.0 than presumed. Students set clear boundaries between educational and social spaces on the Web, and…

  5. FLAMEnGO 2.0: An enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  6. Perfluorophenyl-phenyl interactions in the crystallization and topochemical polymerization of triacetylene monomers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Schweizer, W Bernd; Frauenrath, Holger

    2009-09-14

    A series of symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted octa-2,4,6-triyne-1,8-diol derivatives with benzoyl, 4-dodecyloxybenzoyl, as well as perfluorobenzoyl substituents were prepared and investigated with respect to their crystal structures and topochemical polymerizability. Single-crystal structures for several of these triacetylene monomers have been obtained and proved that the perfluorophenyl-phenyl interactions played a decisive role in the molecular packing. As a consequence of the geometric requirements imposed by the perfluorophenyl-phenyl interactions, packing parameters appropriate for a topochemical triacetylene polymerization in the sense of either a 1,6- or a 1,4-polyaddition along different crystallographic axes were observed in two cases, and UV irradiation led to successful polymerization. Raman as well as solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of the obtained polymers revealed that the polymerization had predominantly proceeded in the form of a 1,4-polyaddition. PMID:19637260

  7. Carbohydrate Conjugation through Microwave-Assisted Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Perfluorophenyl Azides

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R.; Park, Jae Hyeung

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications. PMID:25746392

  8. Effects of Group Reflection Variations in Project-Based Learning Integrated in a Web 2.0 Learning Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Paul; Hong, Ji-Seong; Bonk, Curtis; Lim, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    A Web 2.0 environment that is coupled with emerging multimodal interaction tools can have considerable influence on team learning outcomes. Today, technologies supporting social networking, collective intelligence, emotional interaction, and virtual communication are introducing new forms of collaboration that are profoundly impacting education.…

  9. Utility of a dermatology interest group blog: the impact of medical student interest groups and Web 2.0 tools as educational resources.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Wagner, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    The open access University of Texas Dermatology Interest Group blog was established in 2004 for the purposes of increasing communication and collaboration between medical students and dermatology faculty, residents, and alumni, as well as to promote educational opportunities and the missions for which the interest group was created. This blog is unique because of its longevity and continuous postings directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. A blog user survey was performed to assess viewers' thoughts, purpose of viewing, demographic profile, subscriber status, usage of the blog and other Web 2.0 tools (forums, Facebook, blogs, Twitter, podcasts), and perceived usefulness. Sixty-one anonymous online surveys were completed during a 1-month period. Statistical analyses of the responses demonstrated that the utilization of web-based tools and the blog were valuable resources for students, especially for blog subscribers, those more involved in an interest group, and those reading the blog for a longer period of time. The usefulness and impact of this method of communication and dissemination of information in medical education may encourage other student groups, faculty advisors, and educators to implement similar educational tools at their institutions. PMID:25298742

  10. Perfluorophenyl Azides: New Applications in Surface Functionalization and Nanomaterial Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Hong; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus A major challenge in materials science is the ongoing search for coupling agents that are readily synthesized, capable of versatile chemistry, able to easily functionalize materials and surfaces, and efficient in covalently linking organic and inorganic entities. A decade ago, we began a research program investigating perfluorophenylazides (PFPAs) as the coupling agents in surface functionalization and nanomaterial synthesis. The p-substituted PFPAs are attractive heterobifunctional coupling agents because of their two distinct and synthetically distinguishable reactive centers: (i) the fluorinated phenylazide, which is capable of forming stable covalent adducts, and (ii) the functional group R, which can be tailored through synthesis. Two approaches have been undertaken for material synthesis and surface functionalization. The first method involves synthesizing PFPA bearing the first molecule or material with a functional linker R, and then attaching the resulting PFPA to the second material by activating the azido group. In the second approach, the material surface is first functionalized with PFPA via functional center R, and coupling of the second molecule or material is achieved with the surface azido groups. In this Account, we review the design and protocols of the two approaches, providing examples in which PFPA derivatives were successfully used in material surface functionalization, ligand conjugation, and the synthesis of hybrid nanomaterials. The methods developed have proved to be general and versatile, and they are applicable to a wide range of materials (especially those that lack reactive functional groups or are difficult to derivatize) and to various substrates of polymers, oxides, carbon materials, and metal films. The coupling chemistry can be initiated by light, heat, and electrons. Patterned structures can be generated by selectively activating the areas of interest. Furthermore, the process is easy to perform, and light activation

  11. Supporting Small-Group Learning Using Multiple Web 2.0 Tools: A Case Study in the Higher Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laru, Jari; Naykki, Piia; Jarvela, Sanna

    2012-01-01

    In this single-case study, small groups of learners were supported by use of multiple social software tools and face-to-face activities in the context of higher education. The aim of the study was to explore how designed learning activities contribute to students' learning outcomes by studying probabilistic dependencies between the variables.…

  12. Validation of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella Test for Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Shell Eggs and Poultry-Associated Matrixes.

    PubMed

    Mozola, Mark; Biswas, Preetha; Viator, Ryan; Feldpausch, Emily; Foti, Debra; Li, Lin; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Alles, Susan; Rice, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella lateral flow immunoassay for use in detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in raw shell eggs and poultry-associated matrixes, including chicken carcass rinse and poultry feed. In inclusivity testing, the Reveal 2.0 test detected all 37 strains of SE tested. The test also detected all but one of 18 non-Enteritidis somatic group D1 Salmonella serovars examined. In exclusivity testing, none of 42 strains tested was detected. The exclusivity panel included Salmonella strains of somatic groups other than D1, as well as strains of other genera of Gram-negative bacteria. In matrix testing, performance of the Reveal 2.0 test was compared to that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for chicken carcass rinse and to that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual for raw shell eggs and poultry feed. For all matrixes evaluated, there were no significant differences in the ability to detect SE when comparing the Reveal 2.0 method and the appropriate reference culture procedure as determined by probability of detection statistical analysis. The ability of the Reveal 2.0 test to withstand modest perturbations to normal operating parameters was examined in robustness experiments. Results showed that the test can withstand deviations in up to three operating parameters simultaneously without significantly affecting performance. Real-time stability testing of multiple lots of Reveal 2.0 devices established the shelf life of the test device at 16 months postmanufacture. PMID:27214854

  13. Evaluation of the electronic properties of perfluorophenyl functionalized quinolines and their hybrids with carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sygellou, Lambrini; Kakogianni, Sofia; Andreopoulou, Aikaterini K; Theodosiou, Krystallia; Leftheriotis, George; Kallitsis, Joannis K; Siokou, Angeliki

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid materials based on perfluorophenyl functionalized quinolines directly attached onto the sp(2) hybridized surface of carbon nanostructures have been prepared and studied herein along with their precursor semiconducting small molecules. Tails of different polarities have been used so that the molecules would present improved solubility and controllable affinity for the selected substrates. These materials were evaluated for their electronic and electrochemical properties for potential application in organic photovoltaic solar cells (OPVs), using UPS, XPS and CV measurements after deposition onto oxygen plasma cleaned Si wafers or solvent treated ITO coated glass. A weak interaction between the fluorine atoms and both the Si and the ITO substrates was observed by XPS. The extent of this interfacial interaction was found to be related to the orientation of the quinoline moieties on the organic layer. Moreover, the combination of XPS and UPS analyses showed that the absolute energy value of the HOMO level increased as the amount of surface fluorine atoms increased. CV measurements revealed that hybridisation of the small molecules with carbon nanostructures decreases the materials' energy gap and increases the absolute energy value of the LUMO level. These features prove the efficiency of the proposed method to produce materials with controlled energy levels for solar cell devices. PMID:26781962

  14. The Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) v2.0 Dataset: 35 year Quasi-Global Precipitation Estimates for Drought Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, P.; Funk, C. C.; Landsfeld, M. F.; Pedreros, D. H.; Shukla, S.; Husak, G. J.; Harrison, L.; Verdin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A high quality, long-term, high-resolution precipitation dataset is a key requirement for supporting drought monitoring and long term trend analysis. In this presentation we introduce a new dataset: the Climate Hazards group InfraRed Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) v2.0, developed by scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center. This new quasi-global precipitation product is available at daily to seasonal time scales, with a spatial resolution of 0.05°, and a 1981 to near real-time period of record. The three main types of information used in the CHIRPS are: (1) global 0.05° precipitation climatologies, (2) gridded precipitation estimates derived from time-varying cold cloud duration, and (3) in situ precipitation observations. The Climate Hazards Group (CHG) has developed an extensive database of in situ daily, pentadal, and monthly precipitation totals with over a billion daily observations worldwide. A screening procedure was developed to flag and remove potential false zeros from the daily GTS and GSOD data. These potentially spurious data can artificially suppress CHIRPS rainfall totals. Using GPCC v7 as the best-available standard, we compare CHIRPS with ARC2, CFS-Reanalysis, CHIRP, CMORPH, CPC-Unified, ECMWF, PERSIANNE, RFE2, TAMSAT, TRMM-RT7, and TRMM-V7. The CHIRPS is shown to have higher correlation, and lower systematic errors (bias) and mean absolute errors with GPCC v7 than the other datasets. Comparison with independent validation data suggests that the CHIRPS performance is similar to research quality products like the GPCC and GPCP, but with higher resolution and lower latency. We conclude by looking at the change in availability of station data within a monitoring time frame, contrasting countries with and without near real time data.

  15. Marketing 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that today's student is much more savvy with using computers than the students of years gone by. This tech generation eagerly embraces the Internet, online searching, and the newer Web 2.0 technologies. This latter platform provides users with the ability to interact in a large virtual world, share/take (upload/download)…

  16. Albany 2.0

    2012-10-29

    New to version 2.0 of Albany is the development of equations sets for specific application areas. These are independent research and development efforts that have chosen to use Albany as their software deployment vehicle. Because of synergies between the projects, they remain in the same code repository and are all releasing together as the Albany software.

  17. How effective and acceptable is Web 2.0 Balint group participation for general practitioners and general practitioner registrars in regional Australia? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Koppe, Hilton; Ahern, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective General practitioners (GPs) and general practice registrars report work‐related stress. Balint groups may improve coping mechanisms. However, attendance at a face‐to‐face Balint group is difficult for rural doctors due to distance constraints. The study aim was to evaluate online Balint groups for rural doctors and determine effect size for a full‐scale trial. Design A mixed‐methods approach, including a pre–post controlled trial and thematic analysis of qualitative data. Setting Rural primary care. Participants Thirteen GPs and 8 general practice registrars completed the study. Interventions Balint groups were delivered over 8–9 fortnightly online sessions. GPs and GP registrars participated in separate groups. Data were collected on work‐related affect, psychological medicine skills and professional isolation using the Warr's Work‐Related Affect Scale, the Psychological Medicine Inventory, and a professional isolation scale. Main outcome measures Change scores on Warr's Work‐Related Affect Scale, the Psychological Medicine Inventory, and a professional isolation scale. Results Balint participants' scores were significantly higher post‐intervention on the Psychological Medicine Inventory (mean 6.49 (±0.20) versus 5.43 (±0.26); P < 0.01) and Warr's Work‐Related Affect (mean 4.09 (±0.09) versus 3.60 (±0.12); P < 0.01) scales than control group scores. Effect size on these scales ranged from 0.46 to 0.50. The greatest challenge was technical problems related to insufficient broadband speed. Conclusions Online Balint groups appear to improve rural doctors' psychological medicine skills and work‐related affect. New data on effect size will inform a full‐scale trial. Improved national broadband infrastructure may enhance online support opportunities for rural doctors. PMID:26114400

  18. PARTNERWORKSV2.0

    2000-04-12

    PartnerWorks Ver. 2.0 uses MAPI and OLE to tightly integrate the information system into the user's desktop. The applications are mail and fax enabled, and data can be linked or exported to and from all popular desktop applications at the push of a button. PartnerWorks converts financial data from Project Year to Fiscal Year. PartnerWorks also makes use of off-the-shelf software (Microsoft NT) encryption. PartnerWorks Ver, 2.0 automates the management of laboratory agreements with industry.more » PartnerWorks is a three-tier client server system. It uses MS SQL server (480 tables) as the central data repository for agreement information and document objects. The front-end applications consist of various MS Access applications. Data in remote systems is queried live or imported on a fixed schedule depending on the data type and volatility. All data is accessed via ODBC. This multi-front end application, multi-back end data source provides the end user with the illusion that all data exists in his or her custom application. PartnerWorks manages: Managing laboratory-partner agreement life cycle including contract and funding details (16 agreement-specific modules); Pending laboratory partnership agreements; Partner details for existing and potential partners; Potential agreement sources and partnership opportunities; Automating and warehousing the agreement documentation (document warehousing module); Automating standardized email communication for agreements; Enforcing business rules and work flow (action tracking module); Automated reporting including demand print, and schedule delivery (reporting module); Marketing intellectual property and past successes (Web module).« less

  19. PARTNERWORKSV2.0

    SciTech Connect

    George Longmire, SNL 4212; David Skousen, SNL 4212.

    2000-04-12

    PartnerWorks Ver. 2.0 uses MAPI and OLE to tightly integrate the information system into the user's desktop. The applications are mail and fax enabled, and data can be linked or exported to and from all popular desktop applications at the push of a button. PartnerWorks converts financial data from Project Year to Fiscal Year. PartnerWorks also makes use of off-the-shelf software (Microsoft NT) encryption. PartnerWorks Ver, 2.0 automates the management of laboratory agreements with industry. PartnerWorks is a three-tier client server system. It uses MS SQL server (480 tables) as the central data repository for agreement information and document objects. The front-end applications consist of various MS Access applications. Data in remote systems is queried live or imported on a fixed schedule depending on the data type and volatility. All data is accessed via ODBC. This multi-front end application, multi-back end data source provides the end user with the illusion that all data exists in his or her custom application. PartnerWorks manages: Managing laboratory-partner agreement life cycle including contract and funding details (16 agreement-specific modules); Pending laboratory partnership agreements; Partner details for existing and potential partners; Potential agreement sources and partnership opportunities; Automating and warehousing the agreement documentation (document warehousing module); Automating standardized email communication for agreements; Enforcing business rules and work flow (action tracking module); Automated reporting including demand print, and schedule delivery (reporting module); Marketing intellectual property and past successes (Web module).

  20. Moving to Their Own Beat: Exploring How Students Use Web 2.0 Technologies to Support Group Work outside of Class Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman; Nickle, Todd; Silovs, Jim; Zimmer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have consistently reported that, regardless of the subject matter, students working in small groups tend to learn more of what is taught and retain it longer than when the same content is presented in other instructional formats (Beckman, 1990; Chickering & Gamson, 1991). The majority of these research studies have…

  1. Quantitative fluorine NMR to determine carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide-functionalized silica nanoparticles by click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Zhou, Juan; Park, JaeHyeung; Xie, Sheng; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-09-15

    A quantitative fluorine NMR ((19)F qNMR) method was developed to determine the carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials. Mannose (Man)- and galactose (Gal)-conjugated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized SNPs and propargylated Man or Gal by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). After treating PFPA-SNPs or Man-SNPs with hydrofluoric acid followed by lyophilization, the remaining residues were directly subjected to (19)F NMR analysis. The density of PFPA on PFPA-SNP was determined to be 7.7 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) and Man on Man-SNP to be 6.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) giving a yield of ∼83% for the click coupling reaction. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of Man-SNPs with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-concanavalin A (Con A) was determined using a fluorescence competition assay to be 0.289 ± 0.003 μM, which represents more than 3 orders of magnitude affinity increase compared to free Man with Con A. PMID:26280598

  2. Xenopatients 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A; Alarcón, Tomás; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin, Ángel G; Vellon, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    stemness factors following the activation of phenotypic copies of specific cancer diseases might crucially evaluate a “reprogramming cure” for cancer. A new era of xenopatients 2.0 generated via nuclear reprogramming of the epigenetic landscapes of patient-derived cancer genomes might revolutionize the current personalized translational platforms in cancer research. PMID:24406535

  3. Web 2.0, Meet Literacy 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrod, Diane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Literacy 2.0 is defined in terms of Web 2.0 influences. Literacy 2.0 encompasses several major characteristics that distinguish it from traditional literacy practices (Literacy 1.0). For educational technology professionals, Literacy 2.0 skills become a critical means for developing lifelong learning.

  4. Lewis acid-base interactions between platinum(ii) diaryl complexes and bis(perfluorophenyl)zinc: strongly accelerated reductive elimination induced by a Z-type ligand.

    PubMed

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L; Levine, Daniel S; Ziegler, Micah S; Bergman, Robert G; Tilley, T Don

    2016-05-19

    Z-type interactions between bis(perfluorophenyl)zinc and platinum(ii) diaryl complexes supported by 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), and bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe) ligands are reported. In the solid state, the nature of the Pt-Zn interaction depends on the bidentate ligand; the phen-supported complex exhibits an unsupported Pt-Zn bond, while the dmpe derivative features additional bridging aryl interactions. A strongly accelerated rate of reductive elimination is observed for phen- and bpy-supported complexes, while aryl exchange between Pt and Zn is observed for the dmpe complex. PMID:27161155

  5. Library Instruction 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgewater, Rachel; Deitering, Anne-Marie; Munro, Karen

    2009-01-01

    At the 2008 ALA Annual Conference, a wonderful Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) preconference was presented entitled "Library Instruction 2.0: Building Your Online Instruction Toolkit". The presentation was enlightening and provided numerous and valuable recommendations for Web 2.0 sites that can facilitate and enliven library…

  6. Academic Leadership 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Academic Leadership 2.0 means making an administrative partnership with the faculty the cornerstone of an institution's culture. Administrators have to stop thinking of themselves as operating on a different level from the faculty. The fear many administrators have is that if they demonstrate their willingness to advocate for the faculty, the…

  7. Change Management Meets Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Doug

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 is the term used to describe a group of web-based creativity, information-sharing, and collaboration tools including wikis, blogs, social networks, and folksonomies. The common thread in all of these tools is twofold: They enable collaboration and information sharing, and their impact on higher education has been dramatic. A recent study…

  8. Introducing Science 2.0!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunsell, Eric; Horejsi, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The internet of the mid-to-late 1990s was defined by static web pages created by people with specialized technical skills. Today, that barrier has been all but eliminated with the emergence of easy-to-use online tools for creating and sharing content. "Web 2.0," or the read/write web, has dramatically altered the way we communicate and share…

  9. Autogen Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy

    2007-01-01

    Version 2.0 of the autogen software has been released. "Autogen" (automated sequence generation) signifies both a process and software used to implement the process of automated generation of sequences of commands in a standard format for uplink to spacecraft. Autogen requires fewer workers than are needed for older manual sequence-generation processes and reduces sequence-generation times from weeks to minutes.

  10. The (2, 0) superconformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Christopher; Lemos, Madalena; Rastelli, Leonardo; van Rees, Balt C.

    2016-01-01

    We develop the conformal bootstrap program for six-dimensional conformal field theories with (2, 0) supersymmetry, focusing on the universal four-point function of stress tensor multiplets. We review the solution of the superconformal Ward identities and describe the superconformal block decomposition of this correlator. We apply numerical bootstrap techniques to derive bounds on operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients and scaling dimensions from the constraints of crossing symmetry and unitarity. We also derive analytic results for the large spin spectrum using the light cone expansion of the crossing equation. Our principal result is strong evidence that the A1 theory realizes the minimal allowed central charge (c =25 ) for any interacting (2, 0) theory. This implies that the full stress tensor four-point function of the A1 theory is the unique unitary solution to the crossing symmetry equation at c =25 . For this theory, we estimate the scaling dimensions of the lightest unprotected operators appearing in the stress tensor operator product expansion. We also find rigorous upper bounds for dimensions and OPE coefficients for a general interacting (2, 0) theory of central charge c . For large c , our bounds appear to be saturated by the holographic predictions obtained from eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  11. CASPER Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Rabideau, Gregg; Tran, Daniel; Knight, Russell; Chouinard, Caroline; Estlin, Tara; Gaines, Daniel; Clement, Bradley; Barrett, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    CASPER is designed to perform automated planning of interdependent activities within a system subject to requirements, constraints, and limitations on resources. In contradistinction to the traditional concept of batch planning followed by execution, CASPER implements a concept of continuous planning and replanning in response to unanticipated changes (including failures), integrated with execution. Improvements over other, similar software that have been incorporated into CASPER version 2.0 include an enhanced executable interface to facilitate integration with a wide range of execution software systems and supporting software libraries; features to support execution while reasoning about urgency, importance, and impending deadlines; features that enable accommodation to a wide range of computing environments that include various central processing units and random- access-memory capacities; and improved generic time-server and time-control features.

  12. WMS Server 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian; Wood, James F.

    2012-01-01

    This software is a simple, yet flexible server of raster map products, compliant with the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) 1.1.1 protocol. The server is a full implementation of the OGC WMS 1.1.1 as a fastCGI client and using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) for data access. The server can operate in a proxy mode, where all or part of the WMS requests are done on a back server. The server has explicit support for a colocated tiled WMS, including rapid response of black (no-data) requests. It generates JPEG and PNG images, including 16-bit PNG. The GDAL back-end support allows great flexibility on the data access. The server is a port to a Linux/GDAL platform from the original IRIX/IL platform. It is simpler to configure and use, and depending on the storage format used, it has better performance than other available implementations. The WMS server 2.0 is a high-performance WMS implementation due to the fastCGI architecture. The use of GDAL data back end allows for great flexibility. The configuration is relatively simple, based on a single XML file. It provides scaling and cropping, as well as blending of multiple layers based on layer transparency.

  13. Introducing ADS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the ADS Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the ADS is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named ADS 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the ADS platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.

  14. Web 2.0 Applications in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Dongsheng; Liu, Chen

    Since 2005, the term Web 2.0 has gradually become a hot topic on the Internet. Web 2.0 lets users create web contents as distinct from webmasters or web coders. Web 2.0 has come to our work, our life and even has become an indispensable part of our web-life. Its applications have already been widespread in many fields on the Internet. So far, China has about 137 million netizens [1], therefore its Web 2.0 market is so attractive that many sources of venture capital flow into the Chinese Web 2.0 market and there are also a lot of new Web 2.0 companies in China. However, the development of Web 2.0 in China is accompanied by some problems and obstacles. In this paper, we will mainly discuss Web 2.0 applications in China, with their current problems and future development trends.

  15. Using Web 2.0 to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buechler, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 is not only for kids anymore, businesses are using it, too. Businesses are adopting Web 2.0 technology for a variety of purposes. In this article, the author discusses how he incorporates Web 2.0 into his business communications course. He describes a project that has both individual and collaborative elements and requires extensive…

  16. Understanding FCAT 2.0 Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Florida Department of Education (FDOE) is transitioning from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) to the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test® 2.0 (FCAT 2.0) to align with new student academic content standards. This booklet has been prepared to help understand the reports for the FCAT 2.0. It includes explanations of the reports,…

  17. Trust, Voice, and Library 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Candice

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 is a constant and growing theme in the library field. This article describes a social networking site based on a Web 2.0 infused course management system (CMS) developed by Clatsop Community College in Astoria, Oregon.

  18. Student Inquiry and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Pam

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 applications are changing how educators interact both with each other and with their students. Educators can use these new Web tools daily to create, share, socialize, and collaborate with students, colleagues, and newly developed network contacts. School librarians are finding that Web 2.0 tools are bringing them more ways to embrace and…

  19. Young Adult Literature 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools enable today's writers to connect with their audience in unprecedented ways. The advent of social networking and other Web 2.0 tools have changed the rules for how authors and book publishers market and communicate with their audience. Through tools like blogs, Twitter, MySpace, and Facebook, Young Adult (YA) lit authors can choose…

  20. Breathing Fire into Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Justin; Carpenter, David

    2007-01-01

    Today's methods of social networking and the technologies that support them offer powerful examples of how educators can connect to the "real" world of client population. To fully engage with the Web 2.0 world, educators work to include aspects of Web 2.0 into their teaching through the use of wikis, forums, and blogs. Administrators are also…

  1. SFA 2.0- Metabolic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jill; Beller, Harry

    2015-02-17

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientists Jill Banfield and Harry Beller explain the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project's research on metabolic potential—or how metabolic lifestyles of microbial communities modulate in response to as well as influence environmental change.

  2. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  3. Lost in Web 2.0 Cyberspace?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Web 1.0 never left. It's just a term that refers to cyberspace before 2002. People mark the shift from Web 1.0 to 2.0 with the dramatic collapse of Web-based companies whose phenomenal growth was based on the profit potential of a new customer: the Internet user. Generally, Web 1.0 sites have a commercial focus. On the other hand, Web 2.0 reverses…

  4. Combustion and Carbon Cycle 2.0 and Computation in CC 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Cheng, Robert K; Meza, Juan

    2011-06-08

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza provide two presentations in one session at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  5. Web 2.0 and Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Brent I.

    2009-01-01

    New types of social Internet applications (often referred to as Web 2.0) are becoming increasingly popular within higher education environments. Although developed primarily for entertainment and social communication within the general population, applications such as blogs, social video sites, and virtual worlds are being adopted by higher education institutions. These newer applications differ from standard Web sites in that they involve the users in creating and distributing information, hence effectively changing how the Web is used for knowledge generation and dispersion. Although Web 2.0 applications offer exciting new ways to teach, they should not be the core of instructional planning, but rather selected only after learning objectives and instructional strategies have been identified. This paper provides an overview of prominent Web 2.0 applications, explains how they are being used within education environments, and elaborates on some of the potential opportunities and challenges that these applications present. PMID:19960079

  6. Global Impacts (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Gadgil, Ashok [EETD and UC Berkeley

    2011-06-08

    Ashok Gadgil, Faculty Senior Scientist and Acting Director, EETD, also Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  7. Global Impacts (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-02-02

    Ashok Gadgil, Faculty Senior Scientist and Acting Director, EETD, also Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. Looking for Collection 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buczynski, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Libraries are integrating Web 2.0 services into work practices, positioning themselves in online social environments, and deploying enhanced search and discovery tools. Collections conversely are not progressing to the same degree. Like many public services today, library budgets are stained. User-pay options are appearing in library systems,…

  9. Three Challenges of Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Douglas B.

    2009-01-01

    There's no doubt that Web 2.0--the social and technological phenomenon that enables users to generate content, interact, and share information across borders--can be a force for good in the world of education. The author's enthusiasm for collaborative Web-based content is tempered, however, by concern about these three challenges: (1) Partners…

  10. Professional Development and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakes, David

    2007-01-01

    Professional development in most schools has a predictable look and feel: summer workshops, brown-bag luncheon trainings, and the infamous in-service day. These events can be successful, and there is no doubt they have helped numerous educators become better at what they do. Web 2.0, however, opens up a new world of professional learning. This…

  11. Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2015-12-19

    Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division Director Susan Hubbard, the Project Lead for the Sustainable Systems Scientific Focus Area (SFA) 2.0, gives an overview of the project and its mission to develop a predictive understanding of terrestrial environments, from the genome to the watershed scales, to enable a new class of solutions for environmental and energy solutions.

  12. Social Participation in Health 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Bradford W.; Hansen, Derek; Finholt, Thomas; Munson, Sean; Kellogg, Wendy; Thomas, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Computer scientists are working with biomedical researchers, policy specialists, and medical practitioners to usher in a new era in healthcare. A recently convened panel of experts considered various research opportunities for technology-mediated social participation in Health 2.0. PMID:21379365

  13. The PLATO 2.0 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauer, H.; Catala, C.; Aerts, C.; Appourchaux, T.; Benz, W.; Brandeker, A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Deleuil, M.; Gizon, L.; Goupil, M.-J.; Güdel, M.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Mas-Hesse, M.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Pollacco, D.; Santos, Ċ.; Smith, A.; Suárez, J.-C.; Szabó, R.; Udry, S.; Adibekyan, V.; Alibert, Y.; Almenara, J.-M.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Asplund, M.; Antonello, E.; Barnes, S.; Baudin, F.; Belkacem, K.; Bergemann, M.; Bihain, G.; Birch, A. C.; Bonfils, X.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Borsa, F.; Brandão, I. M.; Brocato, E.; Brun, S.; Burleigh, M.; Burston, R.; Cabrera, J.; Cassisi, S.; Chaplin, W.; Charpinet, S.; Chiappini, C.; Church, R. P.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Cunha, M.; Damasso, M.; Davies, M. B.; Deeg, H. J.; Díaz, R. F.; Dreizler, S.; Dreyer, C.; Eggenberger, P.; Ehrenreich, D.; Eigmüller, P.; Erikson, A.; Farmer, R.; Feltzing, S.; de Oliveira Fialho, F.; Figueira, P.; Forveille, T.; Fridlund, M.; García, R. A.; Giommi, P.; Giuffrida, G.; Godolt, M.; Gomes da Silva, J.; Granzer, T.; Grenfell, J. L.; Grotsch-Noels, A.; Günther, E.; Haswell, C. A.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hébrard, G.; Hekker, S.; Helled, R.; Heng, K.; Jenkins, J. M.; Johansen, A.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Kley, W.; Kolb, U.; Krivova, N.; Kupka, F.; Lammer, H.; Lanza, A. F.; Lebreton, Y.; Magrin, D.; Marcos-Arenal, P.; Marrese, P. M.; Marques, J. P.; Martins, J.; Mathis, S.; Mathur, S.; Messina, S.; Miglio, A.; Montalban, J.; Montalto, M.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Moradi, H.; Moravveji, E.; Mordasini, C.; Morel, T.; Mortier, A.; Nascimbeni, V.; Nelson, R. P.; Nielsen, M. B.; Noack, L.; Norton, A. J.; Ofir, A.; Oshagh, M.; Ouazzani, R.-M.; Pápics, P.; Parro, V. C.; Petit, P.; Plez, B.; Poretti, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Raimondo, G.; Rainer, M.; Reese, D. R.; Redmer, R.; Reffert, S.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Salmon, S.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Schou, J.; Schuh, S.; Schunker, H.; Silva-Valio, A.; Silvotti, R.; Skillen, I.; Snellen, I.; Sohl, F.; Sousa, S. G.; Sozzetti, A.; Stello, D.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Švanda, M.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Tkachenko, A.; Valencia, D.; Van Grootel, V.; Vauclair, S. D.; Ventura, P.; Wagner, F. W.; Walton, N. A.; Weingrill, J.; Werner, S. C.; Wheatley, P. J.; Zwintz, K.

    2014-11-01

    PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA's M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, including potentially habitable planets? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes (32 with 25 s readout cadence and 2 with 2.5 s candence) providing a wide field-of-view (2232 deg 2) and a large photometric magnitude range (4-16 mag). It focusses on bright (4-11 mag) stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for these bright stars to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2 %, 4-10 % and 10 % for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The planned baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2-3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars and an additional step-and-stare phase to cover in total about 50 % of the sky. PLATO 2.0 will observe up to 1,000,000 stars and detect and characterize hundreds of small planets, and thousands of planets in the Neptune to gas giant regime out to the HZ. It will therefore provide the first large-scale catalogue of bulk characterized planets with accurate radii, masses, mean densities and ages. This catalogue will include terrestrial planets at intermediate orbital distances, where surface temperatures are moderate. Coverage of this parameter range with statistical numbers of bulk characterized planets is unique to PLATO 2.0. The PLATO 2.0 catalogue allows us to e.g.: - complete our knowledge of planet

  14. Validation Results for LEWICE 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Rutkowski, Adam

    1999-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Lewis to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 2.0 of this code, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases due to its robustness and its ability to reproduce results accurately for different spacing and time step criteria across computing platform. It also differs in the extensive amount of effort undertaken to compare the results in a quantified manner against the database of ice shapes which have been generated in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The results of the shape comparisons are analyzed to determine the range of meteorological conditions under which LEWICE 2.0 is within the experimental repeatability. This comparison shows that the average variation of LEWICE 2.0 from the experimental data is 7.2% while the overall variability of the experimental data is 2.5%.

  15. ECO2N V2.0

    2015-02-01

    ECO2N V2.0 is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.1) that was designed for applications to geologic sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers and enhanced geothermal reservoirs. ECO2N V2.0 is an enhanced version of the previous ECO2N V1.0 module (Pruess, 2005). It expands the temperature range up to about 300oC whereas V1.0 can only be used for temperatures below about 110oC. V2.0 includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamic and thermophysical propertiesmore » of H2O - NaCl - CO2 mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for the temperature, pressure and salinity conditions 10 °C < T < 300 °C, P < 600 bar, and salinity up to halite saturation. This includes density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, as well as partitioning of mass components H2O, NaCl and CO2 among the different phases. In particular, V2.0 accounts for the effects of water on the thermophysical properties of the CO2-rich phase, which was ignored in V1.0, using a model consistent with the solubility models developed by Spycher and Pruess (2005, 2010). In terms of solubility models, V2.0 uses the same model for partitioning of mass components among the different phases (Spycher and Pruess, 2005) as V1.0 for the low temperature range (<99oC) but uses a new model (Spycher and Pruess, 2010) for the high temperature range (>109oC). In the transition range (99-109oC), a smooth interpolation is applied to estimate the partitioning as a function of the temperature. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO2-rich) phase, as well as two-phase (brine-CO2) mixtures. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. Note that the model cannot be applied to subcritical conditions that involves both liquid and gaseous CO2

  16. ECO2N V2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Spycher, Nicolas; Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    ECO2N V2.0 is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.1) that was designed for applications to geologic sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers and enhanced geothermal reservoirs. ECO2N V2.0 is an enhanced version of the previous ECO2N V1.0 module (Pruess, 2005). It expands the temperature range up to about 300oC whereas V1.0 can only be used for temperatures below about 110oC. V2.0 includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of H2O - NaCl - CO2 mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for the temperature, pressure and salinity conditions 10 °C < T < 300 °C, P < 600 bar, and salinity up to halite saturation. This includes density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, as well as partitioning of mass components H2O, NaCl and CO2 among the different phases. In particular, V2.0 accounts for the effects of water on the thermophysical properties of the CO2-rich phase, which was ignored in V1.0, using a model consistent with the solubility models developed by Spycher and Pruess (2005, 2010). In terms of solubility models, V2.0 uses the same model for partitioning of mass components among the different phases (Spycher and Pruess, 2005) as V1.0 for the low temperature range (<99oC) but uses a new model (Spycher and Pruess, 2010) for the high temperature range (>109oC). In the transition range (99-109oC), a smooth interpolation is applied to estimate the partitioning as a function of the temperature. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO2-rich) phase, as well as two-phase (brine-CO2) mixtures. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. Note that the model cannot be applied to subcritical conditions that involves both liquid and gaseous CO2 unless

  17. [Adolescents in Web 2.0: risks and chances ].

    PubMed

    Salisch, Maria von

    2014-01-01

    That almost all adolescents possess an individual access to the internet and that they use it every day, lays the foundation for the improved means of self presentation and participation that are known by the notion of Web 2.0. Social networks and other interactive internet formats give rise to new risks like cyber mobbing which is the topic of three contributions. At the same time, Web 2.0 offers chances in the form of online counseling and online therapy that cater to the preferences of media-friendly target group of adolescents. PMID:24877775

  18. UQTk version 2.0 user manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Debusschere, Bert J.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Safta, Cosmin

    2013-10-01

    The UQ Toolkit (UQTk) is a collection of libraries and tools for the quanti cation of uncer- tainty in numerical model predictions. Version 2.0 o ers intrusive and non-intrusive methods for propagating input uncertainties through computational models, tools for sensitivity anal- ysis, methods for sparse surrogate construction, and Bayesian inference tools for inferring parameters from experimental data. This manual discusses the download and installation process for UQTk, provides pointers to the UQ methods used in the toolkit, and describes some of the examples provided with the toolkit.

  19. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Frames 2.0 Pest Integration (F2PEST)

    SciTech Connect

    Castleton, Karl J.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2009-06-17

    The implementation of the FRAMES 2.0 F2PEST module is described, including requirements, design, and specifications of the software. This module integrates the PEST parameter estimation software within the FRAMES 2.0 environmental modeling framework. A test case is presented.

  20. NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model. 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model-Version 2.0 (MET-V 2.0) and contains an explanation on the use of the computer program along with an example of the MET-V 2.0 model products. The MET-V 2.0 provides an update to the 1988 version of the model. It provides information on the total mass density, temperature, and individual species number densities for any altitude between 90 and 2,500 km as a function of latitude, longitude, time, and solar and geomagnetic activity. A description is given for use of estimated future 13-mo smoothed solar flux and geomagnetic index values as input to the model. Address technical questions on the MET-V 2.0 and associated computer program to Jerry K. Owens, Spaceflight Experiments Group, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (256-961-7576; e-mail Jerry.Owens@msfc.nasa.gov).

  1. Teaching Web 2.0 technologies using Web 2.0 technologies

    PubMed Central

    Piorun, Mary; Prince, J. Dale

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The research evaluated participant satisfaction with the content and format of the “Web 2.0 101: Introduction to Second Generation Web Tools” course and measured the impact of the course on participants' self-evaluated knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. Methods: The “Web 2.0 101” online course was based loosely on the Learning 2.0 model. Content was provided through a course blog and covered a wide range of Web 2.0 tools. All Medical Library Association members were invited to participate. Participants were asked to complete a post-course survey. Respondents who completed the entire course or who completed part of the course self-evaluated their knowledge of nine social software tools and concepts prior to and after the course using a Likert scale. Additional qualitative information about course strengths and weaknesses was also gathered. Results: Respondents' self-ratings showed a significant change in perceived knowledge for each tool, using a matched pair Wilcoxon signed rank analysis (P<0.0001 for each tool/concept). Overall satisfaction with the course appeared high. Hands-on exercises were the most frequently identified strength of the course; the length and time-consuming nature of the course were considered weaknesses by some. Conclusion: Learning 2.0-style courses, though demanding time and self-motivation from participants, can increase knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. PMID:19851488

  2. FLEXAN (version 2.0) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1989-01-01

    The FLEXAN (Flexible Animation) computer program, Version 2.0 is described. FLEXAN animates 3-D wireframe structural dynamics on the Evans and Sutherland PS300 graphics workstation with a VAX/VMS host computer. Animation options include: unconstrained vibrational modes, mode time histories (multiple modes), delta time histories (modal and/or nonmodal deformations), color time histories (elements of the structure change colors through time), and rotational time histories (parts of the structure rotate through time). Concurrent color, mode, delta, and rotation, time history animations are supported. FLEXAN does not model structures or calculate the dynamics of structures; it only animates data from other computer programs. FLEXAN was developed to aid in the study of the structural dynamics of spacecraft.

  3. DISFRAC Version 2.0 Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Kristine B; Erickson, Marjorie A; Williams, Paul T; Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2013-01-01

    DISFRAC is the implementation of a theoretical, multi-scale model for the prediction of fracture toughness in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) region of ferritic steels. Empirically-derived models of the DBTT region cannot legitimately be extrapolated beyond the range of existing fracture toughness data. DISFRAC requires only tensile properties and microstructural information as input, and thus allows for a wider range of application than empirical, toughness data dependent models. DISFRAC is also a framework for investigating the roles of various microstructural and macroscopic effects on fracture behavior, including carbide particle sizes, grain sizes, strain rates, and material condition. DISFRAC s novel approach is to assess the interaction effects of macroscopic conditions (geometry, loading conditions) with variable microstructural features on cleavage crack initiation and propagation. The model addresses all stages of the fracture process, from microcrack initiation within a carbide particle, to propagation of that crack through grains and across grain boundaries, finally to catastrophic failure of the material. The DISFRAC procedure repeatedly performs a deterministic analysis of microcrack initiation and propagation within a macroscopic crack plastic zone to calculate a critical fracture toughness value for each microstructural geometry set. The current version of DISFRAC, version 2.0, is a research code for developing and testing models related to cleavage fracture and transition toughness. The various models and computations have evolved significantly over the course of development and are expected to continue to evolve as testing and data collection continue. This document serves as a guide to the usage and theoretical foundations of DISFRAC v2.0. Feedback is welcomed and encouraged.

  4. [Gastroenterology 2.0: useful resources for the gastroenterologist available on the Web 2.0].

    PubMed

    Curioso, Walter H; Proaño, Alvaro; Ruiz, Eloy F

    2011-01-01

    The term Web 2.0 refers to the use of Internet applications which enable the users to share, participate and collaborate together on information. The objective of this study is to check different applications that use Web 2.0, which could help the gastroenterologist in his daily practice. The applications that will be checked include: blogs, microblogging, RSS, podcasts, wikis and social networks. "Gastroenterology 2.0" represents the applications, services, and tools based on Web 2.0, which are of easy use and easily accessible - to consumers, patients, gastroenterologists and other health professionals, as well as researchers. Although several studies have shown the benefits these technologies have on the medical practice, it is necessary to conduct further studies to demonstrate the use of these applications on improving health. PMID:22086320

  5. Solar Fuels and Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Alivisatos, Paul

    2011-06-03

    Paul Alivisatos, LBNL Director speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 4, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  6. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Bill Collins: A future without CC2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Collins

    2010-02-09

    Bill Collins speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  7. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Bill Collins: A future without CC2.0

    ScienceCinema

    Bill Collins

    2010-09-01

    Bill Collins speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. The SISAL 2. 0 reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, A.P.W.; Oldehoeft, R.R. . Dept. of Computer Science); Cann, D.C.; Feo, J.T. )

    1991-12-10

    In this report we describe the SISAL 2.0 programming language. The project began in 1982 as a cooperative venture by Digital Equipment Corporation, the University of Manchester (England), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Colorado State University. The project's goals evolved to become: Define a general-purpose functional language that can run efficiently on conventional and novel parallel architectures; Define a dataflow graph intermediate form independent of language and target architecture; Develop optimization techniques for high-performance applicative computing; Develop a thread management environment to support dataflow-style parallel computing on conventional shared-memory multiprocessors; Achieve sequential and parallel execution performance competitive with program written in conventional languages; and Validate the functional style of programming for large-scale scientific applications. The last three goals set SISAL apart from other efforts. We have shown that the dataflow approach can profitably be applied outside the classic dataflow world, without the use of specialized hardware. SISAL runs on uniprocessors, shared-memory multiprocessors, the Cray-X/MP, the Warp systolic processor as well as Manchester's dataflow machine. Development continues for the Connection Machine and some experimental systems.

  9. The SISAL 2.0 reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, A.P.W.; Oldehoeft, R.R.; Cann, D.C.; Feo, J.T.

    1991-12-10

    In this report we describe the SISAL 2.0 programming language. The project began in 1982 as a cooperative venture by Digital Equipment Corporation, the University of Manchester (England), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Colorado State University. The project`s goals evolved to become: Define a general-purpose functional language that can run efficiently on conventional and novel parallel architectures; Define a dataflow graph intermediate form independent of language and target architecture; Develop optimization techniques for high-performance applicative computing; Develop a thread management environment to support dataflow-style parallel computing on conventional shared-memory multiprocessors; Achieve sequential and parallel execution performance competitive with program written in conventional languages; and Validate the functional style of programming for large-scale scientific applications. The last three goals set SISAL apart from other efforts. We have shown that the dataflow approach can profitably be applied outside the classic dataflow world, without the use of specialized hardware. SISAL runs on uniprocessors, shared-memory multiprocessors, the Cray-X/MP, the Warp systolic processor as well as Manchester`s dataflow machine. Development continues for the Connection Machine and some experimental systems.

  10. BSD Portals for LINUX 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNab, A. David; woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Portals, an experimental feature of 4.4BSD, extend the file system name space by exporting certain open () requests to a user-space daemon. A portal daemon is mounted into the file name space as if it were a standard file system. When the kernel resolves a pathname and encounters a portal mount point, the remainder of the path is passed to the portal daemon. Depending on the portal "pathname" and the daemon's configuration, some type of open (2) is performed. The resulting file descriptor is passed back to the kernel which eventually returns it to the user, to whom it appears that a "normal" open has occurred. A proxy portalfs file system is responsible for kernel interaction with the daemon. The overall effect is that the portal daemon performs an open (2) on behalf of the kernel, possibly hiding substantial complexity from the calling process. One particularly useful application is implementing a connection service that allows simple scripts to open network sockets. This paper describes the implementation of portals for LINUX 2.0.

  11. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Randi; Zarebski, Laura; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Emami, Hussein; Hoof, Ilka; Salimi, Nima; Damle, Rohini; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course of 4 years, the data from 180 978 experiments were curated manually from the literature, which covers ∼99% of all publicly available information on peptide epitopes mapped in infectious agents (excluding HIV) and 93% of those mapped in allergens. In addition, data that would otherwise be unavailable to the public from 129 186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009. PMID:19906713

  12. A Call to Action: Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Alivisatos, Paul

    2011-06-08

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  13. A Call to Action: Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  14. A Future with (out) Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Collins, Bill

    2011-06-08

    Bill Collins, Head of LBNL's Climate Sciences Department, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  15. Prevention 2.0: targeting cyberbullying @ school.

    PubMed

    Wölfer, Ralf; Schultze-Krumbholz, Anja; Zagorscak, Pavle; Jäkel, Anne; Göbel, Kristin; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Although cyberbullying is characterized by worrying prevalence rates and associated with a broad range of detrimental consequences, there is a lack of scientifically based and evaluated preventive strategies. Therefore, the present study introduces a theory-based cyberbullying prevention program (Media Heroes; German original: Medienhelden) and evaluates its effectiveness. In a pretest-posttest design (9-month interval), schools were asked to randomly assign their participating classes to either control or intervention group. Longitudinal data were available from 593 middle school students (M Age = 13.3 years, 53 % girls) out of 35 classes, who provided information on cyberbullying behavior as well as socio-demographic and psychosocial variables. While the present results revealed worrying prevalence rates of cyberbullying in middle school, multilevel analyses clearly demonstrate the program's effectiveness in reducing cyberbullying behavior within intervention classes in contrast to classes of the control group. Hence, this study presents a promising program which evidentially prevents cyberbullying in schools. PMID:24122481

  16. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence)

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-01-01

    In the past several years, the science of health care improvement has advanced considerably. In this article, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26497490

  17. QuakeSim 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Granat, Robert A.; Norton, Charles D.; Rundle, John B.; Pierce, Marlon E.; Fox, Geoffrey C.; McLeod, Dennis; Ludwig, Lisa Grant

    2012-01-01

    QuakeSim 2.0 improves understanding of earthquake processes by providing modeling tools and integrating model applications and various heterogeneous data sources within a Web services environment. QuakeSim is a multisource, synergistic, data-intensive environment for modeling the behavior of earthquake faults individually, and as part of complex interacting systems. Remotely sensed geodetic data products may be explored, compared with faults and landscape features, mined by pattern analysis applications, and integrated with models and pattern analysis applications in a rich Web-based and visualization environment. Integration of heterogeneous data products with pattern informatics tools enables efficient development of models. Federated database components and visualization tools allow rapid exploration of large datasets, while pattern informatics enables identification of subtle, but important, features in large data sets. QuakeSim is valuable for earthquake investigations and modeling in its current state, and also serves as a prototype and nucleus for broader systems under development. The framework provides access to physics-based simulation tools that model the earthquake cycle and related crustal deformation. Spaceborne GPS and Inter ferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) data provide information on near-term crustal deformation, while paleoseismic geologic data provide longerterm information on earthquake fault processes. These data sources are integrated into QuakeSim's QuakeTables database system, and are accessible by users or various model applications. UAVSAR repeat pass interferometry data products are added to the QuakeTables database, and are available through a browseable map interface or Representational State Transfer (REST) interfaces. Model applications can retrieve data from Quake Tables, or from third-party GPS velocity data services; alternatively, users can manually input parameters into the models. Pattern analysis of GPS and seismicity data

  18. Preimplantation genetic screening 2.0: the theory.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, Joep; Sermon, Karen

    2016-08-01

    During the last few years a new generation of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been introduced. In this paper, an overview of the different aspects of this so-called PGS 2.0 with respect to the why (what are the indications), the when (which developmental stage, i.e. which material should be studied) and the how (which molecular technique should be used) is given. With respect to the aims it is clear that PGS 2.0 can be used for a variety of indications. However, the beneficial effect of PGS 2.0 has not been proved yet in RCTs. It is clear that cleavage stage is not the optimal stage for biopsy. Almost all advocates of PGS 2.0 prefer trophectoderm biopsy. There are many new methods that allow the study of complete aneuploidy with respect to one or more of the 24 chromosomes. Because of the improved vitrification methods, selection of fresh embryos for transfer is more and more often replaced by frozen embryo transfer. The main goal of PGS has always been the improvement of IVF success. However, success is defined by different authors in many different ways. This makes it very difficult to compare the outcomes of different studies. In conclusion, the introduction of PGS 2.0 will depend on the success of the new biopsy strategies in combination with the analysis of all 24 chromosomes. It remains to be seen which approach will be the most successful and for which specific groups of patients. PMID:27256482

  19. Network Queuing System, Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Howard; Bridges, Mike; Carver, Terrie; Kingsbury, Brent

    1993-01-01

    Network Queuing System (NQS) computer program is versatile batch- and device-queuing facility for single UNIX computer or group of computers in network. User invokes NQS collection of user-space programs to move batch and device jobs freely among different computers in network. Provides facilities for remote queuing, request routing, remote status, queue-status controls, batch-request resource quota limits, and remote output return. Revision of NQS provides for creation, deletion, addition, and setting of complexes aiding in limiting number of requests handled at one time. Also has improved device-oriented queues along with some revision of displays. Written in C language.

  20. NATIONAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ASSESSMENT MODEL, VERSION 2.0 (NWPCAM 2.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    NWPCAM 2.0 is a national-level water quality modeling system that can be used to simulate the water quality changes and economic benefits that result from various pollution control policies. It builds and significantly improves on an earlier model the Clean Water Act Effects Mode...

  1. Enabling Problem Based Learning through Web 2.0 Technologies: PBL 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos; Ryberg, Thomas; Buus, Lillian; Peristeras, Vassilios; Lee, Deirdre; Porwol, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT), particularly the so-called Web 2.0, are affecting all aspects of our life: How we communicate, how we shop, how we socialise, how we learn. Facilitating learning through the use of ICT, also known as eLearning, is a vital part of modern educational systems. Established pedagogical…

  2. Oh! Web 2.0, Virtual Reference Service 2.0, Tools & Techniques (II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arya, Harsh Bardhan; Mishra, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the theory and definition of the practice of librarianship, specifically addressing how Web 2.0 technologies (tools) such as synchronous messaging, collaborative reference service and streaming media, blogs, wikis, social networks, social bookmarking tools, tagging, RSS feeds, and mashups might intimate changes and how…

  3. SOAP 2.0: Spot Oscillation And Planet 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2015-04-01

    SOAP (Spot Oscillation And Planet) 2.0 simulates the effects of dark spots and bright plages on the surface of a rotating star, computing their expected radial velocity and photometric signatures. It includes the convective blueshift and its inhibition in active regions.

  4. Web 2.0 and health 2.0: are you in?

    PubMed

    Felkey, Bill G

    2008-01-01

    With over 6 billion web pages, over $100 billion in online sales every year in the U.S. alone and the average growth rate of online purchasing exceeding 26% over the last 5 years, the Internet is a powerful business tool. Today's shopper sees your actual pharmacy location and your Internet presence as one and the same. One study showed that 82% of the consumers surveyed who had a single frustrating experience online with a retailer would not return to the site for future dealings. A bad experience online made 28% of those surveyed unlikely to return to the retail location of the business, and over 55% said a bad online experience would have a negative impact on their overall opinion of the retailer. Web 2.0 refers to the social networking applications of the internet, Health 2.0 to its special health applications. Taking your Internet presence to the 2.0 level must be balanced with all of the other demands you are facing-but be aware that it's happening all around you. PMID:23969714

  5. Study of medicine 2.0 due to Web 2.0?! - Risks and opportunities for the curriculum in Leipzig

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Gunther; Neef, Martin; Rotzoll, Daisy; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 is changing the study of medicine by opening up totally new ways of learning and teaching in an ongoing process. Global social networking services like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google Drive and Xing already play an important part in communication both among students and between students and teaching staff. Moreover, local portals (such as the platform [http://www.leipzig-medizin.de] established in 2003) have also caught on and in some cases eclipsed the use of the well-known location-independent social media. The many possibilities and rapid changes brought about by social networks need to be publicized within medical faculties. Therefore, an E-learning and New Media Working Group was set up at the Faculty of Medicine of Universität Leipzig in order to harness the opportunities of Web 2.0, analyse the resulting processes of change in the study of medicine, and curb the risks of the Internet. With Web 2.0 and the social web already influencing the study of medicine, the opportunities of the Internet now need to be utilized to improve the teaching of medicine. PMID:23467440

  6. Users guide for ENVSTD program Version 2. 0 and LTGSTD program Version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Crawley, D.B.; Riesen, P.K.; Briggs, R.S.

    1989-02-01

    On January 30, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR Part 435, Subpart A, an Interim Rule entitled ''Energy Conservation Voluntary Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings; Mandatory for New Federal Buildings.'' As a consequence, federal agencies must design all future federal commercial and multifamily high rise residential buildings in accordance with the Standards, or show that their current standards already meet or exceed the energy-efficiency requirements of the Standards. Although these newly enacted Standards do not regulate the design of nonfederal buildings, DOE recommends that all design professionals use the Standards as guidelines for designing energy-conserving buildings. To encourage private sector use, the Standards were presented in the January 30, 1989, Federal Register in the format typical of commercial standards rather than a federal regulation. As a further help, DOE supported the development of various microcomputer programs to ease the use of the Standards. Two of these programs/emdash/ENVSTD (Version 2.0) and LTGSTD (Version 2.0)/emdash/are detailed in this users guide and provided on the accompanying diskette. This package, developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is intended to facilitate the designer's use of the Standards dealing specifically with a building's envelope and lighting system designs. Using these programs will greatly simplify the designer's task of performing the sometimes complex calculations needed to determine a design's compliance with the Standards. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Web 2.0 and Critical Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunaway, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The impact of Web 2.0 upon culture, education, and knowledge is obfuscated by the pervasiveness of Web 2.0 applications and technologies. Web 2.0 is commonly conceptualized in terms of the tools that it makes possible, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Wikipedia. In the context of information literacy instruction, Web 2.0 is frequently conceptualized…

  8. PETSc 2.0 Users Manual: Revision 2.0.16

    SciTech Connect

    Balay, S.; Gropp, W.; McInnes, L.C.; Smith, B.

    1997-02-01

    This manual describes the use of PETSc 2.0 for the numerical solution of partial differential equations and related problems on high-performance computers. The Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is a suite of data structures and routines that provide the building blocks for the implementation of large-scale application codes on parallel (and serial) computers. PETSc 2.0 uses the MPI standard for all message-passing communication. PETSc includes an expanding suite of parallel linear and nonlinear equation solvers that may be used in application codes written in Fortran, C, and C++. PETSc provides many of the mechanisms needed thin parallel application codes, such as simple parallel matrix and vector assembly routines that allow the overlap of communication and computation. In addition, PETSc includes growing support for distributed arrays. The library is organized hierarchically, enabling users to employ the level of abstraction that is most appropriate for a particular problem. By using techniques of object-oriented programming, PETSc provides enormous flexibility for users. PETSc is a sophisticated set of software tools; as such, for some users it initially has a much steeper learning curve than a simple subroutine library. In particular, for individuals without some computer science background or experience programming in C, Pascal, or C++, it may require a large amount of time to take full advantage of the features that enable efficient software use. However, the power of the PETSc design and the algorithms it incorporates make the efficient implementation of many application codes much simpler than rolling them yourself. For many simple tasks a package such as Matlab is often the best tool; PETSc is not intended for the classes of problems for which effective Matlab code can be written. Since PETSc is still under development, small changes in usage and calling sequences of PETSc routines will continue to occur.

  9. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  10. Deriving a Typology of Web 2.0 Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the methods and outcomes of a typological analysis of Web 2.0 technologies. A comprehensive review incorporating over 2000 links led to identification of over 200 Web 2.0 technologies that were suitable for learning and teaching purposes. The typological analysis involved development of relevant Web 2.0 dimensions, grouping…

  11. Exploring Library 2.0 on the Social Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Library 2.0 literature has described many of the possibilities Web 2.0 technologies offer to libraries. Case studies have assessed local use, but no studies have measured the Library 2.0 phenomenon by searching public social networking sites. This study used library-specific terms to search public social networking sites, blog search engines, and…

  12. Microsoft or Google Web 2.0 Tools for Course Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienzo, Thomas; Han, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    While Web 2.0 has no universal definition, it always refers to online interactions in which user groups both provide and receive content with the aim of collective intelligence. Since 2005, online software has provided Web 2.0 collaboration technologies, for little or no charge, that were formerly available only to wealthy organizations. Academic…

  13. Collaborating across Time Zones: How 2.0 Technology Can Bring Your Global Team Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The Web 2.0 tools and services that are making socializing, networking, and communicating in general so easy are also making group projects seriously simple. With the judicious use of a few of the popular tools that use Web 2.0 technologies and philosophies, one can collaboratively create documents, spreadsheets, presentations, websites, project…

  14. MyPyramid Equivalents Database, 2.0 for USDA Survey Foods, 2003-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MyPyramid Equivalents Database, 2.0 for USDA Survey Foods, 2003-2004 (MPED 2.0) translates the amounts of foods reported as eaten in the What We Eat in America (WWEIA), the dietary intake (survey) component of the NHANES 2003-2004, into the number of equivalents of the 32 MyPyramid food groups...

  15. AFCI-2.0 Neutron Cross Section Covariance Library

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.; Herman, M; Oblozinsky, P.; Mattoon, C.M.; Pigni, M.; Hoblit, S.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.; Talou, P.; Chadwick, M.B.; Hale, G.M.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Little, R.C.; Yount, P.G.

    2011-03-01

    materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Covariances are given in 33-energy groups, from 10?5 eV to 19.6 MeV, obtained by processing with LANL processing code NJOY using 1/E flux. In addition to these 110 files, the library contains 20 files with nu-bar covariances, 3 files with covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (238,239,240-Pu), and 2 files with mu-bar covariances (23-Na, 56-Fe). Over the period of three years several working versions of the library have been released and tested by ANL and INL reactor analysts. Useful feedback has been collected allowing gradual improvements of the library. In addition, QA system was developed to check basic properties and features of the whole library, allowing visual inspection of uncertainty and correlations plots, inspection of uncertainties of integral quantities with independent databases, and dispersion of cross sections between major evaluated libraries. The COMMARA-2.0 beta version of the library was released to ANL and INL reactor analysts in October 2010. The final version, described in the present report, was released in March 2011.

  16. Using Web 2.0 for health promotion and social marketing efforts: lessons learned from Web 2.0 experts.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Jennifer Allyson; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 experts working in social marketing participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. The research aimed to document the current state of Web 2.0 practice. Perceived strengths (such as the viral nature of Web 2.0) and weaknesses (such as the time consuming effort it took to learn new Web 2.0 platforms) existed when using Web 2.0 platforms for campaigns. Lessons learned were identified--namely, suggestions for engaging in specific types of content creation strategies (such as plain language and transparent communication practices). Findings present originality and value to practitioners working in social marketing who want to effectively use Web 2.0. PMID:24878406

  17. The Next Wave Now: Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Lane B.

    2007-01-01

    While many people are just getting comfortable with the Internet and e-mail, Web 2.0 technologies are already changing the playing field for education. Though definitions of Web 2.0 vary, the one constant is that Internet users are now content providers rather than content receivers. The top-down approach of the Web has been replaced with users…

  18. Web 2.0 Strategy in Libraries and Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 challenges libraries to change from their predominantly centralised service models with integrated library management systems at the hub. Implementation of Web 2.0 technologies and the accompanying attitudinal shifts will demand reconceptualisation of the nature of library and information service around a dynamic, ever changing, networked,…

  19. Ubiquitous Complete in a Web 2.0 World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Ferster, Bill

    2006-01-01

    In the third wave of computing, people will interact with multiple computers in multiple ways in every setting. The value of ubiquitous computing is enhanced and reinforced by another trend: the transition to a Web 2.0 world. In a Web 2.0 world, applications and data reside on the Web itself. Schools are not yet approaching a ratio of one…

  20. Information Literacy Instruction in the Web 2.0 Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humrickhouse, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how library educators can implement Web 2.0 tools in their Information Literacy programs to better prepare students for the rigors of academic research. Additionally, this paper looks at transliteracy and constructivism as the most useful teaching methods in a Web 2.0 classroom and attempts to pinpoint specific educational…

  1. Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide 2.0" continues Project WET's dedication to 21st-century, cutting-edge water education. Now in full color, Guide 2.0 offers new activities on topics such as National Parks and storm water, fully revised and updated activities from the original Guide and the very best activities gathered from all of…

  2. Scenarios and Strategies for Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Graeme; Reddington, Martin; Kneafsey, Mary Beth; Sloman, Martyn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to bring together ideas from the authors' review of the Web 2.0 literature, the data and their insights from this and other technology-related projects to produce a framework for strategies on Web 2.0 focusing on the implications for human resource professionals. Design/methodology/approach: The authors discuss…

  3. Unleashing the Power of Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2008-01-01

    As Web 2.0 technologies impact the evolution of online learning, they are certain to blur the definitional lines between electronic portfolios and personal learning environments (PLEs). According to Gary Brown, director of Washington State University's Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology, the Web 2.0 technologies that are emerging…

  4. Students as Digital Citizens on Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebel, Michelle; Jamison, Barbara; Bennett, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Internet tools associated with Web 2.0 such as wikis, blogs, and video podcasts are increasingly available in elementary classrooms. ("Web 2.0" is a vaguely defined, folk-tech term that means, roughly, the Internet and all software and devices, constantly improving, that strive to exploit it in creative and useful ways.) Today, elementary students…

  5. A Framework for Web 2.0 Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt; Hedberg, John G.; Kuswara, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to conceptualising and performing Web 2.0-enabled learning design. Based on the Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge model of educational practice, the approach conceptualises Web 2.0 learning design by relating Anderson and Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Learning, Teaching and Assessing, and different types…

  6. What You Need to Know about Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imperatore, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Also known as the read/write or participatory Web, Web 2.0 includes such tools as blogs, podcasts, forums, wikis and social networks. It gives users the ability to take in information and create, organize and connect with others interested in the same topics. Web 2.0 is revolutionizing education because students and educators can easily and…

  7. Changing Paradigms Managed Learning Environments and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Emory M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how emerging technologies and Web 2.0 services are transforming the structure of the web and their potential impact on managed learning environments (MLS) and learning content management systems (LCMS). Design/methodology/approach: Innovative Web 2.0 applications are reviewed in the paper to…

  8. Leadership 2.0: Social Media in Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Lisa; Vodicka, Devin; White, John

    2011-01-01

    Technology is always changing, always improving, and always pushing the envelope for how one works in education. In this increasingly connected age, people have seen rapid growth in social network tools such as Twitter and Facebook. These sites are representative of Web 2.0 resources where users contribute content. Other examples of Web 2.0 sites…

  9. Web 2.0 in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of successful mathematics teachers is that they are able to provide varied activities that promote student learning and assessment. Web 2.0 applications can provide an assortment of tools to help produce creative activities. A Web 2.0 tool enables the student to enter data and create multimedia products using text, graphics,…

  10. Web 2.0: Creating a Classroom without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This article is about my year-long journey implementing Web 2.0 tools into my teaching practice. The goal throughout my journey has always been to increase my students' intrinsic motivation to learn about science. The Web 2.0 tools I used along my journey were weblogs (blogs) and podcasts. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. On Recommending Web 2.0 Tools to Personalise Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juškeviciene, Anita; Kurilovas, Eugenijus

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to present research results on using Web 2.0 tools for learning personalisation. In the work, personalised Web 2.0 tools selection method is presented. This method takes into account student's learning preferences for content and communication modes tailored to the learning activities with a view to help the learner to quickly and…

  12. Raptor: An Enterprise Knowledge Discovery Engine Version 2.0

    2011-08-31

    The Raptor Version 2.0 computer code uses a set of documents as seed documents to recommend documents of interest from a large, target set of documents. The computer code provides results that show the recommended documents with the highest similarity to the seed documents. Version 2.0 was specifically developed to work with SharePoint 2007 and MS SQL server.

  13. Culture, Learning Styles, and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaniran, Bolanle A.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores Web 2.0 in interactive learning environments. Specifically, the article examines Web 2.0 as an interactive learning platform that holds potential, but is also limited by learning styles and cultural value preferences. The article explores the issue of control from both teacher and learner perspectives, and in particular the…

  14. Untangling Web 2.0's Influences on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magolda, Peter M.; Platt, Glenn J.

    2009-01-01

    The recent creation of Web 2.0 applications dramatically alters the ways in which universities recruit and educate students. Technology insiders usually attribute the phrase "Web 2.0" to Tim O'Reilly, author and publisher of the ubiquitous O'Reilly series of technology books (http://oreilly.com). Although there is no shortage of definitions of Web…

  15. New and Innovative Library Services: Moving with Web 2.0 / Library 2.0 Technology, a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, H. K.; Pathak, S. K.; Singh, S. N.

    2010-10-01

    We give an overview and definition of Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 technology, especially addressing how it changes access to collections for users. We also describe its unlimited possibilities. The various components of Library 2.0 viz blogs, wikis, RSS, instant messaging, social networking, podcasting, and tagging are briefly summarized. Initiatives at three special information centers and libraries (IUCAA — Astronomy and Astrophysics; IIT — Science and Technology; and NIV — Viral Diseases) are described. We conclude with a futuristic view of Library 2.0.

  16. Sky Event Reporting Metadata Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Rob; Williams, Roy; Allan, Alasdair; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloom, Joshua; Brewer, John; Denny, Robert; Fitzpatrick, Mike; Graham, Matthew; Gray, Norman; Hessman, Frederic; Marka, Szabolcs; Rots, Arnold; Vestrand, Tom; Wozniak, Przemyslaw; Seaman, Rob; Williams, Roy

    2011-07-01

    document. IVOA's role in making the Recommendation is to draw attention to the specification and to promote its widespread deployment. This enhances the functionality and interoperability inside the Astronomical Community.URL: http://www.ivoa.net/Documents/REC/VOE/REC-VOEvent-2.0-20110719.*Filename: 1097___REC-VOEvent-2.0.pdfAvailable formats:PDF,DOCmaintained by ::ivoa document coordinator::

  17. Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation, and Openness

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In a very significant development for eHealth, a broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally Controlled Health Records such as Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and Dossia. “Medicine 2.0” applications, services, and tools are defined as Web-based services for health care consumers, caregivers, patients, health professionals, and biomedical researchers, that use Web 2.0 technologies and/or semantic web and virtual reality approaches to enable and facilitate specifically 1) social networking, 2) participation, 3) apomediation, 4) openness, and 5) collaboration, within and between these user groups. The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) publishes a Medicine 2.0 theme issue and sponsors a conference on “How Social Networking and Web 2.0 changes Health, Health Care, Medicine, and Biomedical Research”, to stimulate and encourage research in these five areas. PMID:18725354

  18. Medicine 2.0: social networking, collaboration, participation, apomediation, and openness.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2008-01-01

    In a very significant development for eHealth, broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally Controlled Health Records such as Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and Dossia. "Medicine 2.0" applications, services and tools are defined as Web-based services for health care consumers, caregivers, patients, health professionals, and biomedical researchers, that use Web 2.0 technologies and/or semantic web and virtual reality approaches to enable and facilitate specifically 1) social networking, 2) participation, 3) apomediation, 4) openness and 5) collaboration, within and between these user groups. The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) publishes a Medicine 2.0 theme issue and sponsors a conference on "How Social Networking and Web 2.0 changes Health, Health Care, Medicine and Biomedical Research", to stimulate and encourage research in these five areas. PMID:18725354

  19. Oh! Web 2.0, Virtual Reference Service 2.0, Tools and Techniques (I): A Basic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arya, Harsh Bardhan; Mishra, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This study targets librarians and information professionals who use Web 2.0 tools and applications with a view to providing snapshots on how Web 2.0 technologies are used. It also aims to identify values and impact that such tools have exerted on libraries and their services, as well as to detect various issues associated with the implementation…

  20. NQS - NETWORK QUEUING SYSTEM, VERSION 2.0 (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, H.

    1994-01-01

    ; device queues hold and prioritize device requests; pipe queues transport both batch and device requests to other batch, device, or pipe queues at local or remote machines. Unique to batch queues are resource quota limits that restrict the amounts of different resources that a batch request can consume during execution. Unique to each device queue is a set of one or more devices, such as a line printer, to which requests can be sent for execution. Pipe queues have associated destinations to which they route and deliver requests. If the proper destination machine is down or unreachable, pipe queues are able to requeue the request and deliver it later when the destination is available. All NQS network conversations are performed using the Berkeley socket mechanism as ported into the respective vendor kernels. NQS is written in C language. The generic UNIX version (ARC-13179) has been successfully implemented on a variety of UNIX platforms, including Sun3 and Sun4 series computers, SGI IRIS computers running IRIX 3.3, DEC computers running ULTRIX 4.1, AMDAHL computers running UTS 1.3 and 2.1, platforms running BSD 4.3 UNIX. The IBM RS/6000 AIX version (COS-10042) is a vendor port. NQS 2.0 will also communicate with the Cray Research, Inc. and Convex, Inc. versions of NQS. The standard distribution medium for either machine version of NQS 2.0 is a 60Mb, QIC-24, .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. Upon request the generic UNIX version (ARC-13179) can be provided in UNIX tar format on alternate media. Please contact COSMIC to discuss the availability and cost of media to meet your specific needs. An electronic copy of the NQS 2.0 documentation is included on the program media. NQS 2.0 was released in 1991. The IBM RS/6000 port of NQS was developed in 1992. IRIX is a trademark of Silicon Graphics Inc. IRIS is a registered trademark of Silicon Graphics Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories Inc. Sun3 and Sun4 are trademarks of

  1. Online Reputation Systems in Web 2.0 Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weijun; Jin, Leigh

    Web 2.0 has transformed how reputation systems are designed and used by the Web. Based on a thorough review of the existing online reputation systems and their challenges in use, this paper studied a case of Amazon’s reputation system for the impacts of Web 2.0. Through our case study, several distinguished features of new generation reputation systems are noted including multimedia feedbacks, reviewer centered, folksonomy, community contribution, comprehensive reputation, dynamic and interactive system etc. These new developments move towards a relatively trustworthy and reliable online reputation system in the Web 2.0 era.

  2. Social Interaction within a Web 2.0 Learning Environment: The Impact on Learner Social Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinman, Debbie Cinque

    2010-01-01

    In this case study, the researcher observed the social interactions within a Web 2.0 learning environment to examine the nature of the learner social presence. Social presence is essential to facilitate group cooperation and plays a central role in establishing learners' sense of belonging and social cohesion to the group. Social presence is…

  3. SFA 2.0- Watershed Structure and Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ken

    2015-01-23

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientist Ken Williams explains the watershed research within the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project—including identification and monitoring of primary factors that control watershed biogeochemical functioning.

  4. Guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major: Version 2.0.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The APA Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major: Version 2.0 (henceforth Guidelines 2.0; APA, 2013) represents a national effort to describe and develop high-quality undergraduate programs in psychology. The task force charged with the revision of the original guidelines for the undergraduate major examined the success of the document's implementation and made changes to reflect emerging best practices and to integrate psychology's work with benchmarking scholarship in higher education. Guidelines 2.0 abandoned the original distinction drawn between psychology-focused skills and psychology skills that enhance liberal arts development. Instead, Guidelines 2.0 describes five inclusive goals for the undergraduate psychology major and two developmental levels of student learning outcomes. Suggestions for assessment planning are provided for each of the five learning goals. PMID:26866986

  5. RadCat 2.0 User Guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.; O'Donnell, Brandon, M.; Orcutt, David J.; Heames, Terence J.; Hinojosa, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a detailed discussion and a guide for the use of the RadCat 2.0 Graphical User Interface input file generator for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The differences between RadCat 2.0 and RadCat 1.0 can be attributed to the differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 as well as clarification for some of the input parameters. 3

  6. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ashok Gadgil: global impact

    ScienceCinema

    Ashok Gadgi

    2010-09-01

    Ashok Gadgil speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  7. Biofuels Science and Facilities (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay D

    2011-06-03

    Jay D. Keasling speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ashok Gadgil: global impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ashok Gadgi

    2010-02-09

    Ashok Gadgil speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  9. What Web 2.0 Means to Facilities Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Scott

    2008-01-01

    It's official--the Web is now social. Actually, it has always been social to a degree, but now it's "mostly" social. A lot of terms have been coined or adopted to describe various aspects of this phenomenon--social media, social networking, consumer-generated media (CGM) and Web 2.0. While it is hard to define "exactly" what Web 2.0 is, or when…

  10. Energy Demand in China (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Price, Lynn

    2011-06-08

    Lynn Price, LBNL scientist, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  11. Happiness and the Family 2.0 Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocan, Rodica; Racorean, Stefana

    Does new media technology have the potential to make us happier? This paper explores the influence of new information communication technologies on family life satisfaction while analyzing some of the factors that determine changes in the way we live our lives in the information age. Family 2.0 is the new paradigm of family life and the emergence of Web 2.0 type of applications is at the very core of its existence.

  12. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  13. UCbase 2.0: ultraconserved sequences database (2014 update)

    PubMed Central

    Lomonaco, Vincenzo; Martoglia, Riccardo; Mandreoli, Federica; Anderlucci, Laura; Emmett, Warren; Bicciato, Silvio; Taccioli, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    UCbase 2.0 (http://ucbase.unimore.it) is an update, extension and evolution of UCbase, a Web tool dedicated to the analysis of ultraconserved sequences (UCRs). UCRs are 481 sequences >200 bases sharing 100% identity among human, mouse and rat genomes. They are frequently located in genomic regions known to be involved in cancer or differentially expressed in human leukemias and carcinomas. UCbase 2.0 is a platform-independent Web resource that includes the updated version of the human genome annotation (hg19), information linking disorders to chromosomal coordinates based on the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine classification, a query tool to search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and a new text box to directly interrogate the database using a MySQL interface. To facilitate the interactive visual interpretation of UCR chromosomal positioning, UCbase 2.0 now includes a graph visualization interface directly linked to UCSC genome browser. Database URL: http://ucbase.unimore.it PMID:24951797

  14. Exploring technology impacts of Healthcare 2.0 initiatives.

    PubMed

    Randeree, Ebrahim

    2009-04-01

    As Internet access proliferates and technology becomes more accessible, the number of people online has been increasing. Web 2.0 and the social computing phenomena (such as Facebook, Friendster, Flickr, YouTube, Blogger, and MySpace) are creating a new reality on the Web: Users are changing from consumers of Web-available information and resources to generators of information and content. Moving beyond telehealth and Web sites, the push toward Personal Health Records has emerged as a new option for patients to take control of their medical data and to become active participants in the push toward widespread digitized healthcare. There is minimal research on the impact of Web 2.0 in healthcare. This paper reviews the changing patient-physician relationship in the Healthcare 2.0 environment, explores the technological challenges, and highlights areas for research. PMID:19382863

  15. Development and application of GASP 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrory, W. D.; Huebner, L. D.; Slack, D. C.; Walters, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    GASP 2.0 represents a major new release of the computational fluid dynamics code in wide use by the aerospace community. The authors have spent the last two years analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of the previous version of the finite-rate chemistry, Navier Stokes solution algorithm. What has resulted is a completely redesigned computer code that offers two to four times the performance of previous versions while requiring as little as one quarter of the memory requirements. In addition to the improvements in efficiency over the original code, Version 2.0 contains many new features. A brief discussion of the improvements made to GASP, and an application using GASP 2.0 which demonstrates some of the new features are presented.

  16. UCbase 2.0: ultraconserved sequences database (2014 update).

    PubMed

    Lomonaco, Vincenzo; Martoglia, Riccardo; Mandreoli, Federica; Anderlucci, Laura; Emmett, Warren; Bicciato, Silvio; Taccioli, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    UCbase 2.0 (http://ucbase.unimore.it) is an update, extension and evolution of UCbase, a Web tool dedicated to the analysis of ultraconserved sequences (UCRs). UCRs are 481 sequences >200 bases sharing 100% identity among human, mouse and rat genomes. They are frequently located in genomic regions known to be involved in cancer or differentially expressed in human leukemias and carcinomas. UCbase 2.0 is a platform-independent Web resource that includes the updated version of the human genome annotation (hg19), information linking disorders to chromosomal coordinates based on the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine classification, a query tool to search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and a new text box to directly interrogate the database using a MySQL interface. To facilitate the interactive visual interpretation of UCR chromosomal positioning, UCbase 2.0 now includes a graph visualization interface directly linked to UCSC genome browser. Database URL: http://ucbase.unimore.it. PMID:24951797

  17. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2011-06-08

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  18. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Paul Alivisatos: Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Alivisatos

    2010-02-09

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  19. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Paul Alivisatos: Introduction

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Alivisatos

    2010-09-01

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  20. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Don

    2010-02-03

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  1. Verification and validation of DEPOSITION 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Eadie, W.J.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to verify and validate the usage of the computer program, DEPOSITION 2.0 for use in assessing line loss in CAM and fixed head lines throughout certain Hanford Site facilities. The scope of use is limited to this function. DEPOSITION 2.0 is the second version of this code to be used on the Hanford Site, the program now incorporates additional user-friendly features beyond those which were available in an earlier version, DEPOSITION 1.03.

  2. Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2010-02-04

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  3. Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2011-06-08

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  4. HCLS 2.0/3.0: Health Care and Life Sciences Data Mashup Using Web 2.0/3.0

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Yip, Kevin Y.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Scotch, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We describe the potential of current Web 2.0 technologies to achieve data mashup in the health care and life sciences (HCLS) domains, and compare that potential to the nascent trend of performing semantic mashup. After providing an overview of Web 2.0, we demonstrate two scenarios of data mashup, facilitated by the following Web 2.0 tools and sites: Yahoo! Pipes, Dapper, Google Maps and GeoCommons. In the first scenario, we exploited Dapper and Yahoo! Pipes to implement a challenging data integration task in the context of DNA microarray research. In the second scenario, we exploited Yahoo! Pipes, Google Maps, and GeoCommons to create a geographic information system (GIS) interface that allows visualization and integration of diverse categories of public health data, including cancer incidence and pollution prevalence data. Based on these two scenarios, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these Web 2.0 mashup technologies. We then describe Semantic Web, the mainstream Web 3.0 technology that enables more powerful data integration over the Web. We discuss the areas of intersection of Web 2.0 and Semantic Web, and describe the potential benefits that can be brought to HCLS research by combining these two sets of technologies. PMID:18487092

  5. Web 2.0 Tools for Supporting Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantinidis, Angelos; Theodostadou, Dimitra; Pappos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools provide enormous opportunities for teaching and learning, yet their application in education is still underdeveloped. What is more, it is no longer possible for teachers to ignore such a technological advance, while they are expected to provide students with opportunities to take control of their learning. However, teachers are still…

  6. Changing Academic Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Barbara; Byles, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Academic teaching can change with the use of Web 2.0 technologies, such as blogs and wikis, as these enable a different pedagogical approach through collaborative learning and the social construction of knowledge. Student expectations of their university learning experience have changed as they expect e-learning to be part of the learning…

  7. Teaching Talented Writers with Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olthouse, Jill M.; Miller, Myriah Tasker

    2012-01-01

    This article is a review of 12 online writing resources and contains suggestions about how such resources might be used in a differentiated classroom with talented writers. Youth with writing talent are defined by distinguishing characteristics and the authors discuss how those characteristics can be supported and enhanced using Web 2.0 tools.…

  8. Emergent Learning and Learning Ecologies in Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Roy; Karousou, Regina; Mackness, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes emergent learning and situates it within learning networks and systems and the broader learning ecology of Web 2.0. It describes the nature of emergence and emergent learning and the conditions that enable emergent, self-organised learning to occur and to flourish. Specifically, it explores whether emergent learning can be…

  9. Experience of Integrating Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkova, Katerina; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Putnik, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Web users in the 21st century are no longer only passive consumers. On a contrary, they are active contributors willing to obtain, share and evolve information. In this paper we report our experience regarding the implementation of Web 2.0 concept in several Computer Ethics related courses jointly conducted at two Universities. These courses have…

  10. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels

    ScienceCinema

    Jay Keasling

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  11. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Nitash Balsara: Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Nitash Balsara

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  12. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Keasling

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  13. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  14. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    ScienceCinema

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  15. Data-Based Decision Making 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The phrase "data-based decision making" has been used so often in discussions about school improvement efforts that it has become almost a mantra. However, it's "how" data is used that really provides the critical link between practice and school improvement. "Data-Based Decision Making 2.0" is designed to help principals take on the role of…

  16. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Nitash Balsara: Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Nitash Balsara

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  17. Using Web 2.0 for Learning in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Robin; Rennie, Frank

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a range of Web 2.0 technologies to support the development of community for a newly formed Land Trust on the Isle of Lewis, in NW Scotland. The application of social networking tools in text, audio and video has several purposes: informal learning about the area to increase tourism, community interaction,…

  18. Conceptualising Teachers' Professional Learning with Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burden, Kevin John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to identify and develop an exploratory framework for conceptualising how teachers might use the affordances of Web 2.0 technologies to support their own professional learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on a large corpus of literature and recent research evidence to identify the principal elements and…

  19. What, How and Why Web 2.0?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanewald, Ria; White, Pennie

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on introducing Web 2.0 technologies and possible uses for student and teacher learning and collaboration. Many of these tools are already used in social and business contexts. These new and emerging applications are also gaining popularity in classrooms across all education levels. Various applications are introduced to raise…

  20. 2.0 at AASL 2009 National Conference in Charlotte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Joyce Kasman

    2009-01-01

    School library media specialists are information and communication specialists who lead and model these roles in schools and at their major professional events making use of the relevant new Web 2.0 tools available to them to network, collaborate, and share. Using these tools effectively helps them become leaders in their buildings and districts.…

  1. Towards adaptation in e-learning 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Alexandra I.; Ghali, Fawaz

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents several essential steps from an overall study on shaping new ways of learning and teaching, by using the synergetic merger of three different fields: Web 2.0, e-learning and adaptation (in particular, personalisation to the learner). These novel teaching and learning ways-the latter focus of this paper-are reflected in and finally adding to various versions of the My Online Teacher 2.0 adaptive system. In particular, this paper focuses on a study of how to more effectively use and combine the recommendation of peers and content adaptation to enhance the learning outcome in e-learning systems based on Web 2.0. In order to better isolate and examine the effects of peer recommendation and adaptive content presentation, we designed experiments inspecting collaboration between individuals based on recommendation of peers who have greater knowledge, and compare this to adaptive content recommendation, as well as to "simple" learning in a system with a minimum of Web 2.0 support. Overall, the results of adding peer recommendation and adaptive content presentation were encouraging, and are further discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  3. Journalism Students, Web 2.0 and the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Mary Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if students were utilizing Web 2.0 applications. Since the applications in question are often employed by the media industry, the study aspired to find out if students majoring in mass communication and journalism utilized the applications more often than other students. The "digital divide" is a term used…

  4. Social Dimension of Web 2.0 in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Andreas; Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary engineers need to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for engineering and technology services. Social dimension of Web 2.0 which penetrates our society more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services has the potential to contribute decisively to the sustainable development of…

  5. Tweeting and Blogging: Moving towards Education 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tian; Franklin, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study that employed Twitter and blogs as instructional Web 2.0 tools to support student learning in an undergraduate-level class. Case study methodology entailing a usage survey, an exit survey, and 12 in-depth semi-structured interviews was sought to examine patterns and characteristics of students' usage of…

  6. What Web 2.0 Means for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Chad

    2008-01-01

    The term "Web 2.0"--a buzzword for a technological evolution that's been taking place online for some time--has many different definitions. In general, it refers to Web sites that go beyond simply presenting words and images, often allowing users to share information and collaborate in new ways. Content on the Web used to be largely static. One…

  7. Assessing E-Learning 2.0 System Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hei Chia; Chiu, Yi Fang

    2011-01-01

    Traditional e-learning systems support "one-way" communication. Teachers provide knowledge for learners, but they are unable to use a student's learning experiences to benefit the class as a whole. To address these problems, this study explores e-learning success factors via the design and evaluation of an e-learning 2.0 system. This study…

  8. Implications of Implementing Web 2.0 on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerio, Gabriel; Valenzuela, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge Society has altered the way humanity works, learns and amuses itself; from here the rise of the so called e-learning, an educational modality whose "innovation" has been questioned because of the tendency to simulate traditional ways to educate. This paper explores the concept of e-learning 2.0, the implications of…

  9. Web 2.0 for R&R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2009-01-01

    Are colleges and universities doing enough to take advantage of Web 2.0 and social networking tools in their recruitment and retention efforts? "Not even close," says Sam Richard, a 23-year-old junior in the College of Public Programs at Arizona State University in Phoenix. Richard is one of six students in ASU's Student Ambassadors for…

  10. Web 2.0 Technologies: Applications for Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajt, Susanne K.

    2011-01-01

    The current generation of new students, referred to as the Millennial Generation, brings a new set of challenges to the community college. The influx of these technologically sophisticated students, who interact through the social phenomenon of Web 2.0 technology, bring expectations that may reshape institutions of higher learning. This chapter…

  11. Learner Digital Stories in a Web 2.0 Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alameen, Ghinwa,

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a 4-week class project in which students created Web 2.0 digital stories and shared and discussed them with their peers using VoiceThread, a digital media online tool. Participants were English language learners in an academic writing class at a major research university in the United States. Digital stories provided an…

  12. USERS MANUAL: LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL - VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's guide for a computer model, Version 2.0 of the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM), for estimating air pollution emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The model can be used to estimate emission rates for methane, carbon dioxide, nonmet...

  13. Mobile Web 2.0, Microlearning, Intertwingularity, and Mobile Widgets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaokar, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    Four facets of the unfolding mobile open ecology in which OER will move are described. Web 2.0 is a platform harnessing collective intelligence where participation and pushing content are stimulated. Microlearning is different from e-learning, which replicated the classroom online; microlearning deals with relatively small learning units and…

  14. ECONOMIC GROWTH ANALYSIS SYSTEM: USER'S GUIDE VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report describes the development of and provides information needed to operate, the Economic Growth Analysis System (E-GAS) Version 2.0 model. The model will be used to project emissions inventories of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a...

  15. ECONOMIC GROWTH ANALYSIS SYSTEM: REFERENCE MANUAL VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report describes the development of and provides information needed to operate, the Economic Growth Analysis System (E-GAS) Version 2.0 model. The model will be used to project emissions inventories of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a...

  16. Photography Education in a Web 2.0 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Erik

    2009-01-01

    As a novice teacher, the author was confident in his ability to teach digital photography but didn't initially realize the extent to which blogs, wikis, and social networks could reshape and enhance how students learn, and how, by incorporating these tools into his curriculum, he would ultimately find ways to use Web 2.0 tools to truly engage and…

  17. MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS SYSTEM (MPS): USER'S MANUAL VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's manual for Multiple Projections System (MPS) Version 2.0, based on the 3% reasonable further progress (RFP) tracking system that was developed in FY92/FY93. The 3% RFP tracking system is a Windows application, and enhancements to convert the 3% RFP track...

  18. Web 2.0 and Emerging Technologies in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    As online learning continues to grow, so do the free or nearly free Web 2.0 and emerging online learning technologies available to faculty and students. This chapter explores the implementation process and corresponding considerations of adapting such tools for teaching and learning. Issues addressed include copyright, intellectual property,…

  19. Pedagogical Lessons from Students' Participation in Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dang, Tan Tin; Robertson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Responses of Vietnamese undergraduate students majoring in English to the integration of a Moodle site during an upper intermediate macro-skill course highlight differences in learner autonomy and expectations. Students' general attitudes towards and participation in this online Web 2.0 environment provide the basis for the research reported in…

  20. Webquest 2.0: An Instructional Model for Digital Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Diana F. Abernathy

    2012-01-01

    Teaching and learning tools such as Moodle and Web 2.0 tools are appearing in K-12 classrooms; however, there is a lack of scholarly research to guide the implementation of these tools. The WebQuest model, a widely adopted inquiry-based model for online instruction, has instructional inadequacies and does not make the most of emerging…

  1. Student Engagement and Web 2.0: What's the Connection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, rising tuition costs and concerns about student success and retention rates have led to an increased focus on levels of student engagement in higher education. The current interest in student engagement may be helping to revive the traditional view of education as a community of learners. The growing use of Web 2.0

  2. Librarians 2.0: Sowing Padi in (the) SEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an exploratory survey as part of a presentation for the Bridging Worlds 2008 conference. It seeks to understand how library institutions in the South East Asia (SEA) region have implemented Web 2.0 technologies--blogs, RSS feeds, wikis, or the use of services like Flickr, YouTube, de.lici.ous.…

  3. The r-Java 2.0 code: nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, M.; Koning, N.; Shand, Z.; Ouyed, R.; Jaikumar, P.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We present r-Java 2.0, a nucleosynthesis code for open use that performs r-process calculations, along with a suite of other analysis tools. Methods: Equipped with a straightforward graphical user interface, r-Java 2.0 is capable of simulating nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE), calculating r-process abundances for a wide range of input parameters and astrophysical environments, computing the mass fragmentation from neutron-induced fission and studying individual nucleosynthesis processes. Results: In this paper we discuss enhancements to this version of r-Java, especially the ability to solve the full reaction network. The sophisticated fission methodology incorporated in r-Java 2.0 that includes three fission channels (beta-delayed, neutron-induced, and spontaneous fission), along with computation of the mass fragmentation, is compared to the upper limit on mass fission approximation. The effects of including beta-delayed neutron emission on r-process yield is studied. The role of Coulomb interactions in NSE abundances is shown to be significant, supporting previous findings. A comparative analysis was undertaken during the development of r-Java 2.0 whereby we reproduced the results found in the literature from three other r-process codes. This code is capable of simulating the physical environment of the high-entropy wind around a proto-neutron star, the ejecta from a neutron star merger, or the relativistic ejecta from a quark nova. Likewise the users of r-Java 2.0 are given the freedom to define a custom environment. This software provides a platform for comparing proposed r-process sites.

  4. Has Web 2.0 Revitalized Informal Learning? The Relationship between Web 2.0 and Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, D.; Lee, J.

    2014-01-01

    Learning is becoming increasingly self-directed and often occurs away from schools and other formal educational settings. The development of a myriad of new technologies for learning has enabled people to learn anywhere and anytime. Web 2.0 technology allows researchers to shed a new light on the importance and prevalence of informal learning.…

  5. Preparing Teachers to Integrate Web 2.0 in School Practice: Toward a Framework for Pedagogy 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Tsiotakis, Panagiotis; Roussinos, Dimitrios; Siorenta, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 has captured the interest and the imagination of both educators and researchers while it is expected to exert a significant impact on instruction and learning, in the context of the 21st century education. Hailed as an open collaborative learning space, many questions remain unanswered regarding the appropriate teacher preparation and the…

  6. Learning about Learning 2.0: Evaluating the "New South Wales Public Library Learning 2.0" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Ellen; Joseph, Mylee; Perry, Leanne

    2009-01-01

    The "New South Wales Learning 2.0" training program is being made available to the entire NSW public library work force of over 2300 people in 2008-2009. This paper is a snapshot of the impact of the course as at September 2008, five months after it was launched. It explores how the training impacted on the staff skill levels, knowledge, and…

  7. National High School Center Early Warning System Tool v2.0: Technical Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National High School Center, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Early Warning System (EWS) Tool v2.0 is a Microsoft Excel-based tool developed by the National High School Center at the American Institutes for Research in collaboration with Matrix Knowledge Group. The tool enables schools, districts, and states to identify students who may be at risk of dropping out of high school and to monitor these…

  8. Views and Dreams: A Delphi Investigation into Library 2.0 Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Jenny; Aharony, Noa

    2009-01-01

    The study's purpose was to investigate the views and opinions of librarians about the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies into library operations and services. The Delphi technique was chosen as the method of inquiry in this study, in which a group of panelists graded the desirability and probability of a list of statements. Thirty-nine…

  9. Usage, Barriers, and Training of Web 2.0 Technology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Christopher G.; Pritchett, Christal C.; Wohleb, Elisha C.

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to determine the degree of use of Web 2.0 technology applications by certified education professionals and examine differences among various groups as well as reasons for these differences. A quantitative survey instrument was developed to gather demographic information and data. Participants reported they would be…

  10. Tool interoperability in SSE OI 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, C. L.; Shotton, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the concept and implementation of tool interoperability in the Space Station Software Support Environment (SSE) OI 2.0. By first providing a description of SSE, the paper describes the problem at hand, that is; the nature of the SSE that gives rise to the requirement for interoperability--between SSE workstations and hence, between the tools which reside on the workstations. Specifically, word processor and graphic tool interoperability are discussed. The concept for interoperability that is implemented in OI 2.0 is described, as is an overview of the implementation strategy. Some of the significant challenges that the development team had to overcome to bring about interoperability are described, perhaps as a checklist, or warning, to others who would bring about tool interoperability. Lastly, plans to extend tool interoperability to a third class of tools in OI 3.0 are described.

  11. Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS), revision 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, W. L.; Hattan, C. P.; Hitney, H. V.; Paulus, R. A.; Barrios, A. E.; Lindem, G. E.; Anderson, K. D.

    1990-02-01

    The Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS) is a system of individual stand-alone IBM/PC-compatible programs that have been designed to assist an engineer in properly assessing electromagnetic propagation effects of the lower atmosphere on proposed radar, electronic warfare, or communication systems. The EREPS models account for effects from optical interference, diffraction, tropospheric scatter, refraction, evaporation and surface-based ducting, and water-vapor absorption under horizontally homogeneous atmospheric conditions. EREPS revision 2.0 is an upgrade to revision 1.0 released in July 1988 (Hitney, 1988). There are two completely new programs in revision 2.0, COVER and PROPH, and a user-callable propagation-factor source code subroutine that may be helpful to anyone who wants to integrate the EREPS propagation model into their own applications program.

  12. AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.; Pigni,M.; Hoblit,S.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Sonzogni,A.; Talou,P.; Chadwick,M.B.; Hale.G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G.

    2011-06-26

    Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular new LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.

  13. HEP Outreach, Inreach, and Web 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Steven

    2011-12-01

    I report on current usage of multimedia and social networking "Web 2.0" tools for Education and Outreach in high-energy physics, and discuss their potential for internal communication within large worldwide collaborations, such as those of the LHC. Following a brief description of the history of Web 2.0 development, I present a survey of the most popular sites and describe their usage in HEP to disseminate information to students and the general public. I then discuss the potential of certain specific tools, such as document and multimedia sharing sites, for boosting the speed and effectiveness of information exchange within the collaborations. I conclude with a brief discussion of the successes and failures of these tools, and make suggestions for improved usage in the future.

  14. Measurement Invariance of the WHODAS 2.0 in a Population-Based Sample of Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kimber, Melissa; Rehm, Jürgen; Ferro, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) is a brief measure of global disability originally developed for adults, which has since been implemented among samples of children and youth. However, evidence of its validity for use among youth, particularly measurement invariance, is lacking. Investigations of measurement invariance assess the extent to which the psychometric properties of observed items in a measure are generalizable across samples. Satisfying the assumption of measurement invariance is critical for any inferences about between-group differences. The objective of this paper was to empirically assess the measurement invariance of the 12-item interview version of the WHODAS 2.0 measure in an epidemiological sample of youth (15 to 17 years) and adults (≥ 18 years) in Canada. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis using a categorical variable framework allowed for the sequential testing of increasingly restrictive models to evaluate measurement invariance of the WHODAS 2.0 between adults and youth. Findings provided evidence for full measurement invariance of the WHODAS 2.0 in youth aged 15 to 17 years. The final model fit the data well: χ2(159) = 769.04, p < .001; CFI = 0.950, TLI = 0.958, RMSEA (90% CI) = 0.055 [0.051, 0.059]. Results from this study build on previous work supporting the validity of the WHODAS 2.0. Findings indicate that the WHODAS 2.0 is valid for making substantive comparisons of disability among youth as young as 15 years of age. PMID:26565410

  15. Web 2.0 technologies for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education: an online survey

    PubMed Central

    Sandars, J; Schroter, S

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To identify the current familiarity and use of Web 2.0 technologies by medical students and qualified medical practitioners, and to identify the barriers to its use for medical education. Methods A semi‐structured online questionnaire survey of 3000 medical students and 3000 qualified medical practitioners (consultants, general practitioners and doctors in training) on the British Medical Association's membership database. Results All groups had high familiarity, but low use, of podcasts. Ownership of digital media players was higher among medical students. There was high familiarity, but low use, of other Web 2.0 technologies except for high use of instant messaging and social networking by medical students. All groups stated that they were interested in using Web 2.0 technologies for education but there was lack of knowledge and skills in how to use these new technologies. Conclusions There is an overall high awareness of a range of new Web 2.0 technologies by both medical students and qualified medical practitioners and high interest in its use for medical education. However, the potential of Web 2.0 technologies for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education will only be achieved if there is increased training in how to use this new approach. PMID:18057175

  16. The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Michael T; Hunter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 is a modular framework that describes how semantic annotations should be made about mathematical models encoded in the CellML (www.cellml.org) format, and their elements. In addition to the Core specification, there are several satellite specifications, each designed to cater for model annotation in a different context. Basic Model Information, Citation, License and Biological Annotation specifications are presented. PMID:26528558

  17. Some User's Insights Into ADIFOR 2.0D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giesy, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Some insights are given which were gained by one user through experience with the use of the ADIFOR 2.0D software for automatic differentiation of Fortran code. These insights are generally in the area of the user interface with the generated derivative code - particularly the actual form of the interface and the use of derivative objects, including "seed" matrices. Some remarks are given as to how to iterate application of ADIFOR in order to generate second derivative code.

  18. Recent plant studies using Victoria 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    BIXLER,NATHAN E.; GASSER,RONALD D.

    2000-03-08

    VICTORIA 2.0 is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within the reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe nuclear reactor accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS and secondary circuits. These predictions account for the chemical and aerosol processes that affect radionuclide behavior. VICTORIA 2.0 was released in early 1999; a new version VICTORIA 2.1, is now under development. The largest improvements in VICTORIA 2.1 are connected with the thermochemical database, which is being revised and expanded following the recommendations of a peer review. Three risk-significant severe accident sequences have recently been investigated using the VICTORIA 2.0 code. The focus here is on how various chemistry options affect the predictions. Additionally, the VICTORIA predictions are compared with ones made using the MELCOR code. The three sequences are a station blackout in a GE BWR and steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) and pump-seal LOCA sequences in a 3-loop Westinghouse PWR. These sequences cover a range of system pressures, from fully depressurized to full system pressure. The chief results of this study are the fission product fractions that are retained in the core, RCS, secondary, and containment and the fractions that are released into the environment.

  19. The PLATO 2.0 mission. Spanish contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Urqui O'Callaghan, R.; Suárez J. C.; Deeg, H.; Balado, A.

    2015-05-01

    The PLATO 2.0 space mission (PLAnetary Transits and Oscillation of stars) was selected by the ESA Science Programme in February 2014, as the M3 mission to be launched in 2024. PLATO 2.0 will detect terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone of bright solar-type stars and characterise their bulk properties. The exoplanets will be detected by the weak eclipses they produce when transiting in front of their parent star, while the long uninterrupted observations will allow also to analyze the oscillations of these stars, yielding their internal structure and evolutionary state. The stellar sample targeted by PLATO is bright enough (V<11.5) to be able to confirm the planets candidates using radial velocity spectroscopy from ground, providing so a complete characterization of the exoplanetary systems. Spain will contribute to the PLATO 2.0 instrument by providing the Focal Plane Assemblies of its 34 telescopes, as well as the Main Electronics Units which will perform onboard and in real time the photometric extraction of the stellar lightcurves.

  20. Students' Everyday Use of Web 2.0 Collaboration Tools and Use within Moodle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmane-Ozolina, Lasma; Kulmane, Vineta; Kazakevica, Marina

    Moodle is the one of most popular learning management systems. Situation in Liepaja University shows that Moodle is used mainly for content delivery. To activate student learning in Moodle and enhance Moodle usage, collaboration supported tools will be present for academic staff. Research is made to choose the most popular tools from the student point of view to enhance their learning. Focus group interviews is conducted to find out what web 2.0 collaboration tools students are using in their everyday life and what tools using in Moodle. The idea is to transmit the students' everyday life skills with Web 2.0 in the learning activities.

  1. Using Web 2.0 Applications as Supporting Tools for Personal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompen, Ricardo Torres; Edirisingha, Palitha; Monguet, Josep M.

    This paper shows the results of a pilot study based on a proposed framework for building Personal Learning Environments using Web 2.0 tools. A group of 33 students from a Business Administration program were introduced to Web 2.0 tools in the context of an Information Systems class, during the academic year 2008-2009, and reflected about this experience through essays and interviews. The responses show evidence of learning and acquiring skills, strengthening social interactions and improvement in the organization and management of content and learning resources.

  2. GPS 2.0, a Tool to Predict Kinase-specific Phosphorylation Sites in Hierarchy *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yu; Ren, Jian; Gao, Xinjiao; Jin, Changjiang; Wen, Longping; Yao, Xuebiao

    2008-01-01

    Identification of protein phosphorylation sites with their cognate protein kinases (PKs) is a key step to delineate molecular dynamics and plasticity underlying a variety of cellular processes. Although nearly 10 kinase-specific prediction programs have been developed, numerous PKs have been casually classified into subgroups without a standard rule. For large scale predictions, the false positive rate has also never been addressed. In this work, we adopted a well established rule to classify PKs into a hierarchical structure with four levels, including group, family, subfamily, and single PK. In addition, we developed a simple approach to estimate the theoretically maximal false positive rates. The on-line service and local packages of the GPS (Group-based Prediction System) 2.0 were implemented in Java with the modified version of the Group-based Phosphorylation Scoring algorithm. As the first stand alone software for predicting phosphorylation, GPS 2.0 can predict kinase-specific phosphorylation sites for 408 human PKs in hierarchy. A large scale prediction of more than 13,000 mammalian phosphorylation sites by GPS 2.0 was exhibited with great performance and remarkable accuracy. Using Aurora-B as an example, we also conducted a proteome-wide search and provided systematic prediction of Aurora-B-specific substrates including protein-protein interaction information. Thus, the GPS 2.0 is a useful tool for predicting protein phosphorylation sites and their cognate kinases and is freely available on line. PMID:18463090

  3. The NERC Vocabulary Server: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbetter, A. M.; Lowry, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    Version 2 of the NVS (NVS2.0) underpins the semantic layer for the Open Service Network for Marine Environmental Data (NETMAR) project, funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme. Within NETMAR, NVS2.0 has been used for: - semantic validation of inputs to chained OGC Web Processing Services - smart discovery of data and services - integration of data from distributed nodes of the International Coastal Atlas Network Since its deployment, NVS2.0 has been adopted within the European SeaDataNet community's software products which has significantly increased the usage of the NVS2.0 Application Programming Interace (API), as illustrated in Table 1. Here we present the results of upgrading the NVS to version 2 and show applications which have been built on top of the NVS2.0 API, including a SPARQL endpoint and a hierarchical catalogue of oceanographic hardware.Table 1. NVS2.0 API usage by month from 467 unique IP addressest;

  4. WALK 2.0 - Using Web 2.0 applications to promote health-related physical activity: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is one of the leading modifiable causes of death and disease in Australia. National surveys indicate less than half of the Australian adult population are sufficiently active to obtain health benefits. The Internet is a potentially important medium for successfully communicating health messages to the general population and enabling individual behaviour change. Internet-based interventions have proven efficacy; however, intervention studies describing website usage objectively have reported a strong decline in usage, and high attrition rate, over the course of the interventions. Web 2.0 applications give users control over web content generated and present innovative possibilities to improve user engagement. There is, however, a need to assess the effectiveness of these applications in the general population. The Walk 2.0 project is a 3-arm randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of “next generation” web-based applications on engagement, retention, and subsequent physical activity behaviour change. Methods/design 504 individuals will be recruited from two sites in Australia, randomly allocated to one of two web-based interventions (Web 1.0 or Web 2.0) or a control group, and provided with a pedometer to monitor physical activity. The Web 1.0 intervention will provide participants with access to an existing physical activity website with limited interactivity. The Web 2.0 intervention will provide access to a website featuring Web 2.0 content, including social networking, blogs, and virtual walking groups. Control participants will receive a logbook to record their steps. All groups will receive similar educational material on setting goals and increasing physical activity. The primary outcomes are objectively measured physical activity and website engagement and retention. Other outcomes measured include quality of life, psychosocial correlates, and anthropometric measurements. Outcomes will be measured at baseline

  5. NASA Meteoroid Engineering Model Release 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, A. V.; Koehler, H. M.; Cooke, W. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Meteoroid Engineering Model release 2.0 (MEMR2) software is NASA's most current and accurate model of the meteoroid environment. It enables the user to generate a trajectory-specific meteoroid environment for spacecraft traveling within the inner solar system. In addition to the total meteoroid flux, MEMR2 provides the user with meteoroid directionality and velocity information. Users have the ability to make a number of analysis and output choices that tailor the resulting environment to their needs. This Technical Memorandum outlines the history of MEMR2, the meteoroid environment it describes, and makes recommendations for the correct use of the software and interpretation of its results.

  6. ADIFOR 2.0 user`s guide (Revision B)

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Khademi, P.; Mauer, A.; Hovland, P.; Carle, A.

    1995-04-01

    Automatic differentiation is a technique for computing the derivatives of functions described by computer programs. ADIFOR implements automatic differentiation by transforming a collection of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that compute a function {line_integral} into new FORTRAN 77 suborutines that compute the derivaties of the outputs of {line_integral} with respect to a specified set of inputs of {line_integral}. This guide describes step by step how to use version 2.0 of ADIFOR to generate derivative code. Familiarity with UNIX and FORTRAN 77 is assumed.

  7. Solar Advisor Model User Guide for Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Janzou, S.; Cameron, C.

    2008-08-01

    The Solar Advisor Model (SAM) provides a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, from photovoltaic systems for residential and commercial markets to concentrating solar power and large photovoltaic systems for utility markets. This manual describes Version 2.0 of the software, which can model photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies for electric applications for several markets. The current version of the Solar Advisor Model does not model solar heating and lighting technologies.

  8. IPG Job Manager v2.0 Design Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Chaumin

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a high-level design of the IPG Job Manager, and satisfies its Master Requirement Specification v2.0 Revision 1.0, 01/29/2003. The presentation includes a Software Architecture/Functional Overview with the following: Job Model; Job Manager Client/Server Architecture; Job Manager Client (Job Manager Client Class Diagram and Job Manager Client Activity Diagram); Job Manager Server (Job Manager Client Class Diagram and Job Manager Client Activity Diagram); Development Environment; Project Plan; Requirement Traceability.

  9. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so. PMID:24390896

  10. Performance of the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-In; Long, Jeffrey D; Mills, James A; Downing, Nancy; Williams, Janet K; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-11-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), recommends the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) 2.0 for routine clinical use. We tested the utility of the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease. Using data from 726 participants and 630 companions over a 3-year follow-up, linear mixed models were fitted to test (1) baseline and longitudinal differences by progression group; (2) participant and companion differences within each group; and (3) sensitivity of the 12-item WHODAS in comparison to the 36-item WHODAS and the Total Functional Capacity (TFC) score from the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale. Participants showed baseline group differences whereas companions showed baseline and longitudinal group differences. Companions reported worse functional decline over time than participants as the disease progresses. The 12-item WHODAS detected longitudinal change better than the 36-item WHODAS and the TFC in the medium progression group. Results suggest the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 can detect baseline and longitudinal differences in prodromal HD and may be useful in HD clinical trials. PMID:25735480

  11. Opportunities and challenges of Web 2.0 for vaccination decisions.

    PubMed

    Betsch, Cornelia; Brewer, Noel T; Brocard, Pauline; Davies, Patrick; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Haase, Niels; Leask, Julie; Renkewitz, Frank; Renner, Britta; Reyna, Valerie F; Rossmann, Constanze; Sachse, Katharina; Schachinger, Alexander; Siegrist, Michael; Stryk, Marybelle

    2012-05-28

    A growing number of people use the Internet to obtain health information, including information about vaccines. Websites that allow and promote interaction among users are an increasingly popular source of health information. Users of such so-called Web 2.0 applications (e.g. social media), while still in the minority, represent a growing proportion of online communicators, including vocal and active anti-vaccination groups as well as public health communicators. In this paper, the authors: define Web 2.0 and examine how it may influence vaccination decisions; discuss how anti-vaccination movements use Web 2.0 as well as the challenges Web 2.0 holds for public health communicators; describe the types of information used in these different settings; introduce the theoretical background that can be used to design effective vaccination communication in a Web 2.0 environment; make recommendations for practice and pose open questions for future research. The authors conclude that, as a result of the Internet and Web 2.0, private and public concerns surrounding vaccinations have the potential to virally spread across the globe in a quick, efficient and vivid manner. Web 2.0 may influence vaccination decisions by delivering information that alters the perceived personal risk of vaccine-preventable diseases or vaccination side-effects. It appears useful for public health officials to put effort into increasing the effectiveness of existing communication by implementing interactive, customized communication. A key step to providing successful public health communication is to identify those who are particularly vulnerable to finding and using unreliable and misleading information. Thus, it appears worthwhile that public health websites strive to be easy to find, easy to use, attractive in its presentation and readily provide the information, support and advice that the searcher is looking for. This holds especially when less knowledgeable individuals are in need of reliable

  12. Fuel Cycle Services Needs Estimator v.2.0

    2008-03-18

    The "Fuel Cycle Services Needs Estimator", Version 2.0 allows users to estimate the amount of uranium enrichment services needed and amount of spent nuclear fuel produced by a given fleet of nuclear power reactors through 2050 based on user-determined information about the size of a reactor fleet and average characteristics of reactors in that fleet. The program helps users evaluate the current and future supply of nuclear fuel cycle services. The program also allows usersmore » to compare the enrichment needs and spent fuel production of more up to seven defined nuclear power reactor fleets and to aggregate estimated needs. Version 2.0 of the program has an additions of new graphs to show results of calculations (calculation capabilities and other graphing tools included in version 1.o), maps showing flows of material based on calculation results, and additional calculation capabilities that allow the user to compare supply to demand (demand calculations included in version 1.0). Default values for seven selected nuclear energy programs in East Asia are included for reference and comparison. The program was designed using the dynamic simulation software, Powersim.« less

  13. SCOR: Structural classification of RNA, Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K.; Klosterman, Peter

    2003-10-03

    SCOR (http://scor.lbl.gov), the Structural Classification of RNA, is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions, and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a wholly new classification system. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence, and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5,880 secondary structural elements are classified; 2,104 hairpin loops and 3,776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as ''Kinkturn'' and ''GNRA loops,'' are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  14. A Summary of Validation Results for LEWICE 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.

    1998-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Lewis to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 2.0 of this code, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases due to its robustness and its ability to reproduce results accurately for different point spacing, and time step criteria across general computing platforms. It also differs in the extensive amount of effort undertaken to compare the results in a quantifiable manner against the database of ice shapes which have been generated in the NASA Lewis Icing, Research Tunnel (IRT), The complete set of data used for this comparison is available in a recent contractor report . The result of this comparison shows that the difference between the predicted ice shape from LEWICE 2.0 and the average of the experimental data is 7.2% while the variability of the experimental data is 2.5%.

  15. QuakeML 2.0: Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euchner, Fabian; Kästli, Philipp; Heiniger, Lukas; Saul, Joachim; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Clinton, John

    2016-04-01

    QuakeML is a community-backed data model for seismic event parameter description. Its current version 1.2, released in 2013, has become the gold standard for parametric data dissemination at seismological data centers, and has been adopted as an FDSN standard. It is supported by several popular software products and data services, such as FDSN event web services, QuakePy, and SeisComP3. Work on the successor version 2.0 is under way since 2015. The scope of QuakeML has been expanded beyond event parameter description. Thanks to a modular architecture, many thematic packages have been added, which cover peak ground motion, site and station characterization, hydraulic parameters of borehole injection processes, and macroseismics. The first three packages can be considered near final and implementations of program codes and SQL databases are in productive use at various institutions. A public community review process has been initiated in order to turn them into community-approved standards. The most recent addition is a package for single station quake location, which allows a detailed probabilistic description of event parameters recorded at a single station. This package adds some information elements such as angle of incidence, frequency-dependent phase picks, and dispersion relations. The package containing common data types has been extended with a generic type for probability density functions. While on Earth, single station methods are niche applications, they are of prominent interest in planetary seismology, e.g., the NASA InSight mission to Mars. So far, QuakeML is lacking a description of seismic instrumentation (inventory). There are two existing standards of younger age (FDSN StationXML and SeisComP3 Inventory XML). We discuss their respective strengths, differences, and how they could be combined into an inventory package for QuakeML, thus allowing full interoperability with other QuakeML data types. QuakeML is accompanied by QuakePy, a Python package

  16. Visual Sample Plan Version 2.0 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hassig, Nancy L.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Carlson, Deborah K.; O'Brien, Robert F.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Bates, Derrick J.

    2002-09-23

    This user's guide describes Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Version 2.0 and provides instructions for using the software. VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to environmental decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 1.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (95, 98, Millenium Edition, 2000, and Windows NT). Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to any two-dimensional geographical population to be sampled (e.g., surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, building surfaces, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality.

  17. Coastal Online Analysis and Synthesis Tool 2.0 (COAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Nguyen, Beth T.

    2009-01-01

    The Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST) 3D geobrowser has been developed to integrate disparate coastal datasets from NASA and other sources into a desktop tool that provides new data visualization and analysis capabilities for coastal researchers, managers, and residents. It is built upon the widely used NASA-developed open source World Wind geobrowser from NASA Ames (Patrick Hogan et al.) .Net and C# version is used for development. It is leveraged off of World Wind community shared code samples and COAST 2.0 enhancement direction is based on Coastal science community feedback and needs assessment (GOMA). The main objective is to empower the user to bring more user-meaningful data into multi-layered, multi-temporal spatial context.

  18. CBP TOOLBOX VERSION 2.0: CODE INTEGRATION ENHANCEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Flach, G.; BROWN, K.

    2013-06-01

    This report describes enhancements made to code integration aspects of the Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) Toolbox as a result of development work performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in collaboration with Vanderbilt University (VU) in the first half of fiscal year 2013. Code integration refers to the interfacing to standalone CBP partner codes, used to analyze the performance of cementitious materials, with the CBP Software Toolbox. The most significant enhancements are: 1) Improved graphical display of model results. 2) Improved error analysis and reporting. 3) Increase in the default maximum model mesh size from 301 to 501 nodes. 4) The ability to set the LeachXS/Orchestra simulation times through the GoldSim interface. These code interface enhancements have been included in a new release (Version 2.0) of the CBP Toolbox.

  19. SISAL reference manual. Language version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Oldehoeft, R.R.; Boehm, A.P.W.; Grit, D.H.; Cann, D.C.; Feo, J.T.

    1990-05-01

    In this report we describe the SISAL 2.0 programming language. The project began in 1982 as a cooperative venture by Digital Equipment Corporation, the University of Manchester (England), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Colorado State University. The project`s goals evolved to become: Define a general-purpose functional language that can run efficiently on conventional and novel parallel architectures; define a dataflow graph intermediate form independent of language and target architecture; develop optimization techniques for high-performance applicative computing;develop a thread management environment to support dataflow-style parallel computing on conventional shared-memory multiprocessors; achieve sequential and parallel execution performance competitive with programs written in conventional languages; and validate the functional style of programming for large-scale scientific applications.

  20. Atlas Basemaps in Web 2.0 Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaniuk, V.; Dyshlyk, O.

    2016-06-01

    The authors have analyzed their experience of the production of various Electronic Atlases (EA) and Atlas Information Systems (AtIS) of so-called "classical type". These EA/AtIS have been implemented in the past decade in the Web 1.0 architecture (e.g., National Atlas of Ukraine, Atlas of radioactive contamination of Ukraine, and others). One of the main distinguishing features of these atlases was their static nature - the end user could not change the content of EA/AtIS. Base maps are very important element of any EA/AtIS. In classical type EA/AtIS they were static datasets, which consisted of two parts: the topographic data of a fixed scale and data of the administrative-territorial division of Ukraine. It is important to note that the technique of topographic data production was based on the use of direct channels of topographic entity observation (such as aerial photography) for the selected scale. Changes in the information technology of the past half-decade are characterized by the advent of the "Web 2.0 epoch". Due to this, in cartography appeared such phenomena as, for example, "neo-cartography" and various mapping platforms like OpenStreetMap. These changes have forced developers of EA/AtIS to use new atlas basemaps. Our approach is described in the article. The phenomenon of neo-cartography and/or Web 2.0 cartography are analysed by authors using previously developed Conceptual framework of EA/AtIS. This framework logically explains the cartographic phenomena relations of three formations: Web 1.0, Web 1.0x1.0 and Web 2.0. Atlas basemaps of the Web 2.0 epoch are integrated information systems. We use several ways to integrate separate atlas basemaps into the information system - by building: weak integrated information system, structured system and meta-system. This integrated information system consists of several basemaps and falls under the definition of "big data". In real projects it is already used the basemaps of three strata: Conceptual

  1. The Earth Satellite Program (ESP), version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callwood, R.; Gaffney, L. M.

    1994-02-01

    The Earth Satellite Program (ESP) version 2.0 is a user-friendly, highly graphical, Macintosh-based program that was developed for the Air Force Milstar program to support satellite constellation and ground site terminal design studies. The computer program generates satellite ground tracks; computes elevation angles, ranges, and range rates; determines outage zones for a constellation of satellites; and generates spot beam projections. Any elliptical Earth-orbit may be accommodated. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator is used to propagate satellite orbits. Perturbations due to the Earth's oblateness (J2 effects), atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure are included. This paper contains a user's guide to the program, presents the underlying mathematical models, and includes several sample outputs and the software on diskette.

  2. Very Large Array observations of Uranus at 2. 0 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, G.L.; Muhleman, D.O.; Linfield, R.P.

    1988-07-01

    Radio observations of Uranus obtained at 2.0 cm with the B configuration of the VLA during April 1985 are reported. The calibration and data-reduction procedures are described in detail, and the results are presented in tables, maps, and graphs and compared with IRIS 44-micron observations (Hanel et al., 1986). Features discussed include highest brightness centered on the pole rather than on the subearth point, a decrease in brightness temperature (by up to 9 K) at latitudes between -20 and -50 deg (well correlated with the IRIS data), and disk-center position (corrected for the observed radio asymmetry) in good agreement with that found on the basis of the outer contours of the image. 15 references.

  3. Labs21 environmental performance criteria Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2002-10-01

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. The Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC) is a rating system for use by laboratory building project stakeholders to assess the environmental performance of laboratory facilities. Currently, the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED{trademark} Rating System is the primary tool used. However, LEED{trademark} was designed for U.S. commercial office buildings and as such, lacks some attributes essential to the sustainable design of this unique and complex building type. To facilitate widespread use and to avoid ''re-inventing the wheel'' this effort builds on the existing LEED{trademark} Rating System 2.0.

  4. Security Requirements for Social Networks in Web 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Eduardo B.; Marin, Carolina; Petrie, Maria M. Larrondo

    A social network is a structure of individuals or organizations, which are connected by one or more types of interdependency, such as friendship, affinity, common interests or knowledge. Social networks use now web 2.0 technology and the users may need to follow a series of restrictions or conditions to join or add contents. We look here at their context and threats, in order to ascertain their needs for security. We propose the use of patterns to specify these requirements in a precise way and we present two specific patterns. A pattern is an encapsulated solution to a software problem in a given context. We present here the Participation-Collaboration Pattern, which describes the functionality of the collaboration between users in applications and the Collaborative Tagging Pattern, which is useful to share content using keywords to tag bookmarks, photographs and other contents. We also discuss possible improvements to the current situation.

  5. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA 2.0) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; O'Coin, James; Wichowski, Robert; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system is a low-power assembly capable of simultaneously removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. Two solid amine sorbent beds are alternated between an uptake mode and a regeneration mode. During the uptake mode, the sorbent is exposed to an air steam (ventilation loop) to adsorb CO2 and water (H2O) vapor, whereas during the regeneration mode, the sorbent rejects the adsorbed CO2 and H2O vapor to a vacuum source. The two beds operate such that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. A novel valve assembly provides a simple means of diverting the process air flow through the uptake bed while simultaneously directing the vacuum source to the regeneration bed. Additionally, the valve assembly is designed to allow for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The process can be controlled by a compact, low-power controller design with several modes of operation available to the user. Together with NASA Johnson Space Center, Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. has been developing RCA 2.0 based on performance and design feedback on several sorbent bed test articles and valve design concepts. A final design of RCA 2.0 was selected in November 2011 and fabricated and assembled between March and August 2012, with delivery to NASA Johnson Space Center in September 2012. This paper provides an overview of the RCA system design and results of pre-delivery testing.

  6. Enabling the transition towards Earth Observation Science 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Desnos, Yves-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Science 2.0 refers to the rapid and systematic changes in doing Research and organising Science driven by the rapid advances in ICT and digital technologies combined with a growing demand to do Science for Society (actionable research) and in Society (co-design of knowledge). Nowadays, teams of researchers around the world can easily access a wide range of open data across disciplines and remotely process them on the Cloud, combining them with their own data to generate knowledge, develop information products for societal applications, and tackle complex integrative complex problems that could not be addressed a few years ago. Such rapid exchange of digital data is fostering a new world of data-intensive research, characterized by openness, transparency, and scrutiny and traceability of results, access to large volume of complex data, availability of community open tools, unprecedented level of computing power, and new collaboration among researchers and new actors such as citizen scientists. The EO scientific community is now facing the challenge of responding to this new paradigm in science 2.0 in order to make the most of the large volume of complex and diverse data delivered by the new generation of EO missions, and in particular the Sentinels. In this context, ESA - in particular within the framework of the Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) element - is supporting a variety of activities in partnership with research communities to ease the transition and make the most of the data. These include the generation of new open tools and exploitation platforms, exploring new ways to exploit data on cloud-based platforms, dissiminate data, building new partnership with citizen scientists, and training the new generation of data scientists. The paper will give a brief overview of some of ESA activities aiming to facilitate the exploitation of large amount of data from EO missions in a collaborative, cross-disciplinary, and open way, from science to

  7. Evaluating HDR photos using Web 2.0 technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Mei, Yujie; Duan, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) photography is an emerging technology that has the potential to dramatically enhance the visual quality and realism of digital photos. One of the key technical challenges of HDR photography is displaying HDR photos on conventional devices through tone mapping or dynamic range compression. Although many different tone mapping techniques have been developed in recent years, evaluating tone mapping operators prove to be extremely difficult. Web2.0, social media and crowd-sourcing are emerging Internet technologies which can be harnessed to harvest the brain power of the mass to solve difficult problems in science, engineering and businesses. Paired comparison is used in the scientific study of preferences and attitudes and has been shown to be capable of obtaining an interval-scale ordering of items along a psychometric dimension such as preference or importance. In this paper, we exploit these technologies for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. We have developed a Web2.0 style system that enables Internet users from anywhere to evaluate tone mapped HDR photos at any time. We adopt a simple paired comparison protocol, Internet users are presented a pair of tone mapped images and are simply asked to select the one that they think is better or click a "no difference" button. These user inputs are collected in the web server and analyzed by a rank aggregation algorithm which ranks the tone mapped photos according to the votes they received. We present experimental results which demonstrate that the emerging Internet technologies can be exploited as a new paradigm for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. The advantages of this approach include the potential of collecting large user inputs under a variety of viewing environments rather than limited user participation under controlled laboratory environments thus enabling more robust and reliable quality assessment. We also present data analysis to correlate user generated qualitative

  8. A Short (Personal) Future History of Revolution 2.0.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Barbara A

    2015-11-01

    Crisis of replicability is one term that psychological scientists use for the current introspective phase we are in-I argue instead that we are going through a revolution analogous to a political revolution. Revolution 2.0 is an uprising focused on how we should be doing science now (i.e., in a 2.0 world). The precipitating events of the revolution have already been well-documented: failures to replicate, questionable research practices, fraud, etc. And the fact that none of these events is new to our field has also been well-documented. I suggest four interconnected reasons as to why this time is different: changing technology, changing demographics of researchers, limited resources, and misaligned incentives. I then describe two reasons why the revolution is more likely to catch on this time: technology (as part of the solution) and the fact that these concerns cut across social and life sciences-that is, we are not alone. Neither side in the revolution has behaved well, and each has characterized the other in extreme terms (although, of course, each has had a few extreme actors). Some suggested reforms are already taking hold (e.g., journals asking for more transparency in methods and analysis decisions; journals publishing replications) but the feared tyrannical requirements have, of course, not taken root (e.g., few journals require open data; there is no ban on exploratory analyses). Still, we have not yet made needed advances in the ways in which we accumulate, connect, and extract conclusions from our aggregated research. However, we are now ready to move forward by adopting incremental changes and by acknowledging the multiplicity of goals within psychological science. PMID:26581743

  9. Educators' Perceived Importance of Web 2.0 Technology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Christal C.; Wohleb, Elisha C.; Pritchett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to examine the degree of perceived importance of interactive technology applications among various groups of certified educators; the degree to which education professionals utilized interactive online technology applications and to determine if there was a significant difference between the different groups based…

  10. Multicenter evaluation of the updated and extended API (RAPID) Coryne database 2.0.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; Renaud, F N; Freney, J; Riegel, P

    1997-01-01

    In a multicenter study, 407 strains of coryneform bacteria were tested with the updated and extended API (RAPID) Coryne system with database 2.0 (bioMérieux, La-Balme-les-Grottes, France) in order to evaluate the system's capability of identifying these bacteria. The design of the system was exactly the same as for the previous API (RAPID) Coryne strip with database 1.0, i.e., the 20 biochemical reactions covered were identical, but database 2.0 included both more taxa and additional differential tests. Three hundred ninety strains tested belonged to the 49 taxa covered by database 2.0, and 17 strains belonged to taxa not covered. Overall, the system correctly identified 90.5% of the strains belonging to taxa included, with additional tests needed for correct identification for 55.1% of all strains tested. Only 5.6% of all strains were not identified, and 3.8% were misidentified. Identification problems were observed in particular for Corynebacterium coyleae, Propionibacterium acnes, and Aureobacterium spp. The numerical profiles and corresponding identification results for the taxa not covered by the new database 2.0 were also given. In comparison to the results from published previous evaluations of the API (RAPID) Coryne database 1.0, more additional tests had to be performed with version 2.0 in order to completely identify the strains. This was the result of current changes in taxonomy and to provide for organisms described since the appearance of version 1.0. We conclude that the new API (RAPID) Coryne system 2.0 is a useful tool for identifying the diverse group of coryneform bacteria encountered in the routine clinical laboratory. PMID:9399506

  11. Case-Based Reasoning to Help Educators Design with Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Verily; Kou, Xiaojing

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes the use of case-based reasoning to help educators design with Web 2.0. Principles for designing a web-enhanced case-based activity (CBA) were used to design an online professional development course for a group of 16 in-service educators. The Learning in Context model was used as a scaffold to help participants in their design…

  12. GDF v2.0, an enhanced version of GDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Gavrilis, Dimitris; Dermatas, Evangelos

    2007-12-01

    An improved version of the function estimation program GDF is presented. The main enhancements of the new version include: multi-output function estimation, capability of defining custom functions in the grammar and selection of the error function. The new version has been evaluated on a series of classification and regression datasets, that are widely used for the evaluation of such methods. It is compared to two known neural networks and outperforms them in 5 (out of 10) datasets. Program summaryTitle of program: GDF v2.0 Catalogue identifier: ADXC_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXC_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 98 147 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 040 684 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: GNU C++ Computer: The program is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Operating system: Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD RAM: 200000 bytes Classification: 4.9 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The technique of function estimation tries to discover from a series of input data a functional form that best describes them. This can be performed with the use of parametric models, whose parameters can adapt according to the input data. Solution method: Functional forms are being created by genetic programming which are approximations for the symbolic regression problem. Reasons for new version: The GDF package was extended in order to be more flexible and user customizable than the old package. The user can extend the package by defining his own error functions and he can extend the grammar of the package by adding new functions to the function repertoire. Also, the new version can perform function estimation of multi

  13. Incorporating Web 2.0 Technologies from an Organizational Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) provides support for the organization, facilitation, and dissemination of online educational and scientific materials and information to a wide range of stakeholders. ARCUS is currently weaving the fabric of Web 2.0 technologies—web development featuring interactive information sharing and user-centered design—into its structure, both as a tool for information management and for educational outreach. The importance of planning, developing, and maintaining a cohesive online platform in order to integrate data storage and dissemination will be discussed in this presentation, as well as some specific open source technologies and tools currently available, including: ○ Content Management: Any system set up to manage the content of web sites and services. Drupal is a content management system, built in a modular fashion allowing for a powerful set of features including, but not limited to weblogs, forums, event calendars, polling, and more. ○ Faceted Search: Combined with full text indexing, faceted searching allows site visitors to locate information quickly and then provides a set of 'filters' with which to narrow the search results. Apache Solr is a search server with a web-services like API (Application programming interface) that has built in support for faceted searching. ○ Semantic Web: The semantic web refers to the ongoing evolution of the World Wide Web as it begins to incorporate semantic components, which aid in processing requests. OpenCalais is a web service that uses natural language processing, along with other methods, in order to extract meaningful 'tags' from your content. This metadata can then be used to connect people, places, and things throughout your website, enriching the surfing experience for the end user. ○ Web Widgets: A web widget is a portable 'piece of code' that can be embedded easily into web pages by an end user. Timeline is a widget developed as part of the

  14. Reference guide to WPP version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-01-22

    WPP is a computer program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel machines. WPP solves the governing equations in second order formulation using a node-based finite difference approach. The basic numerical method is described in [9]. WPP implements substantial capabilities for 3-D seismic modeling, with a free surface condition on the top boundary, non-reflecting far-field boundary conditions on the other boundaries, point force and point moment tensor source terms with many predefined time dependencies, fully 3-D heterogeneous material model specification, output of synthetic seismograms in the SAC [4] format, output of GMT [11] scripts for laying out simulation information on a map, and output of 2-D slices of (derived quantites of) the solution field as well as the material model. Version 2.0 of WPP allows the free surface boundary condition to be imposed on a curved topography. For this purpose a curvilinear mesh is used near the free surface, extending into the computational domain down to a user specified level. The elastic wave equations and the free surface boundary conditions are discretized on the curvilinear mesh using the energy conserving technique described in [2]. A curvilinear mesh generator is built into WPP and the curvilinear mesh is automatically generated from the topography. Below the curvilinear grid, the elastic wave equation is discretized on Cartesian meshes, which leads to a more computationally efficient algorithm. In version 2.0 of WPP, Cartesian local mesh refinement can be used to make the computational mesh finer near the free surface, where more resolution often is needed to resolve short wave lenghts in the solution, for example in sedimentary basins. The mesh refinement is performed in the vertical direction and each Cartesian grid is constructed from user specified refinement levels. In this approach, the grid size in all three spatial directions is doubled across each mesh refinement interface, leading to substantial

  15. Activity Catalog Tool (ACT) user manual, version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.; Andre, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    This report comprises the user manual for version 2.0 of the Activity Catalog Tool (ACT) software program, developed by Leon D. Segal and Anthony D. Andre in cooperation with NASA Ames Aerospace Human Factors Research Division, FLR branch. ACT is a software tool for recording and analyzing sequences of activity over time that runs on the Macintosh platform. It was designed as an aid for professionals who are interested in observing and understanding human behavior in field settings, or from video or audio recordings of the same. Specifically, the program is aimed at two primary areas of interest: human-machine interactions and interactions between humans. The program provides a means by which an observer can record an observed sequence of events, logging such parameters as frequency and duration of particular events. The program goes further by providing the user with a quantified description of the observed sequence, through application of a basic set of statistical routines, and enables merging and appending of several files and more extensive analysis of the resultant data.

  16. AdjudiPro{reg_sign} 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.; Connolly, J.; Simons, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    AdjudiPro, version 2.0, is the latest incarnation of United HealthCare`s patented physician claims adjudication expert system (US patent No. 5,359,509). Its core is an embedded expert system that contains the logic for processing 55% of all physician claim situations reviewed on United HealthCare`s managed care system. Certain physician services are reviewed as part of the claims adjudication process to ensure that submitted charges meet contractual, and other guidelines. In 1995, nearly $20 million in gross savings was realized through use of this system. Since its initial deployment in 1991-1992, there has been a steep increase in AdjudiPro`s processing volume. This increased demand created a number of issues that had to be addressed to ensure AdjudiPro`s continued viability and growth. As a result, much of the past three years was spent rearchitecting AdjudiPro to meet the increasing load placed on it, while achieving acceptable throughput. AdjudiPro is now an essentially real-time application, processing claims twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. This paper describes the current AdjudiPro application, and the key issues faced during the past three years.

  17. Teachers Professional Development through Web 2.0 Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Cristina

    Teacher professional development is no longer synonymous with acquiring new teaching techniques, it is rather about starting new processes as to engage with new forms of learning, reflected in the practice of teaching. With easy access to the panoply of online communications tools, new opportunities for further development have been enabled. Learning within a wider community has not only become a possibility, but rather a reality accessible to a larger number of individuals interested in pursuing their learning path both in a personalised and networked way. The web provides the space for learning, but the learning environment is decidedly dependent on the interrelationships that are established amongst individuals. The effectiveness of the web is reflected in the unconventional opportunities it offers for people to emerge as knowledge producers rather than information collectors. Hence, it is not the tools that most matter to develop a learning environment where more personalized learning opportunities and collective intelligence prospers as the result of personal and collaborative effort. Although web tools provide the space for interaction, it is the enhancement of a meaningful learning atmosphere, resulting in a joint enterprise to learn and excel in their practice, which will transform a space for learning into an effective, interactive learning environment. The paper will examine learning and training experiences in informal web environments as the basis for an open discussion about professional development in web 2.0 environments.

  18. Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) Version 2.0.0.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Bryan; Beal, Jacob; Clancy, Kevin; Misirli, Goksel; Roehner, Nicholas; Oberortner, Ernst; Pocock, Matthew; Bissell, Michael; Madsen, Curtis; Nguyen, Tramy; Zhang, Zhen; Gennari, John H; Myers, Chris; Wipat, Anil; Sauro, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology builds upon the techniques and successes of genetics, molecular biology, and metabolic engineering by applying engineering principles to the design of biological systems. The field still faces substantial challenges, including long development times, high rates of failure, and poor reproducibility. One method to ameliorate these problems would be to improve the exchange of information about designed systems between laboratories. The Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) has been developed as a standard to support the specification and exchange of biological design information in synthetic biology, filling a need not satisfied by other pre-existing standards. This document details version 2.0 of SBOL, introducing a standardized format for the electronic exchange of information on the structural and functional aspects of biological designs. The standard has been designed to support the explicit and unambiguous description of biological designs by means of a well defined data model. The standard also includes rules and best practices on how to use this data model and populate it with relevant design details. The publication of this specification is intended to make these capabilities more widely accessible to potential developers and users in the synthetic biology community and beyond. PMID:26528570

  19. SPHY v2.0: Spatial Processes in HYdrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terink, W.; Lutz, A. F.; Simons, G. W. H.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Droogers, P.

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces and presents the Spatial Processes in HYdrology (SPHY) model (v2.0), its development background, its underlying concepts, and some example applications. SPHY has been developed with the explicit aim of simulating terrestrial hydrology on flexible scales, under various physiographical and hydroclimatic conditions, by integrating key components from existing and well-tested models. SPHY is a spatially distributed leaky bucket type of model, and is applied on a cell-by-cell basis. The model is written in the Python programming language using the PCRaster dynamic modeling framework. SPHY (i) integrates most hydrologic processes, (ii) has the flexibility to be applied in a wide range of hydrologic applications, and (iii) on various scales, and (iv) can easily be implemented. The most relevant hydrological processes that are integrated into the SPHY model are rainfall-runoff processes, cryosphere processes, evapotranspiration processes, the dynamic evolution of vegetation cover, lake/reservoir outflow, and the simulation of root-zone moisture contents. Studies in which the SPHY model was successfully applied and tested are described in this paper, including (i) real-time soil moisture predictions to support irrigation management in lowland areas, (ii) climate change impact studies in snow- and glacier-fed river basins, and (iii) operational flow forecasting in mountainous catchments.

  20. SPHY v2.0: Spatial Processes in HYdrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terink, W.; Lutz, A. F.; Simons, G. W. H.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Droogers, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces and presents the Spatial Processes in HYdrology (SPHY) model (v2.0), its development background, its underlying concepts, and some typical applications. The SPHY model is developed using the best components of existing and well-tested simulation models, and is developed with the explicit aim to simulate terrestrial hydrology at flexible scales, under various land use and climate conditions. SPHY is a spatially distributed leaky bucket type of model, and is applied on a cell-by-cell basis. The model is written in the Python programming language using the PCRaster dynamic modelling framework. Compared to other hydrological models, that typically focus on the simulation of streamflow only, the SPHY model has several advantages: it (i) integrates most relevant hydrological processes, (ii) is setup modular, (iii) is easy adjustable and applicable, (iii) can easily be linked to remote sensing data, and (iv) can be applied for operational as well as strategic decision support. The most relevant hydrological processes that are integrated in the SPHY model are rainfall-runoff processes, cryosphere processes, evapotranspiration processes, the simulation of dynamic vegetational cover, lake/reservoir outflow, and the simulation of rootzone moisture contents. Studies in which the SPHY model was successfully applied and tested are described in this paper, and range from (i) real-time soil moisture predictions to support irrigation management in lowland areas, to (ii) detailed climate change impact studies in snow and glacier-fed river basins, to (iii) operational flow forecasting in mountainous catchments.

  1. TADPLOT program, version 2.0: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dana P.

    1991-01-01

    The TADPLOT Program, Version 2.0 is described. The TADPLOT program is a software package coordinated by a single, easy-to-use interface, enabling the researcher to access several standard file formats, selectively collect specific subsets of data, and create full-featured publication and viewgraph quality plots. The user-interface was designed to be independent from any file format, yet provide capabilities to accommodate highly specialized data queries. Integrated with an applications software network, data can be assessed, collected, and viewed quickly and easily. Since the commands are data independent, subsequent modifications to the file format will be transparent, while additional file formats can be integrated with minimal impact on the user-interface. The graphical capabilities are independent of the method of data collection; thus, the data specification and subsequent plotting can be modified and upgraded as separate functional components. The graphics kernel selected adheres to the full functional specifications of the CORE standard. Both interface and postprocessing capabilities are fully integrated into TADPLOT.

  2. [Questionnaire for the mobbing risk: CDL2.0].

    PubMed

    Gilioli, R; Cassitto, M G; Campanini, P; Punzi, S; Consonni, D; Rengo, C; Fattorini, E; Foá, V

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop and validate a questionnaire able to evaluate the risk of mobbing at the workplace. A multiple-choice questionnaire has been developed which contains, among the different items, only one revealing a mobbing situation. The questionnaire has been administered to two groups (group A--243 subjects in a mobbing situation and group B--63 subjects without exposure to mobbing) and the differences in the scores obtained have been analysed. The questionnaire has proved to be valid and reliable. The results show that the presence of five mobbing actions is sufficient to define the workplace situation as potentially at risk for mobbing. The study reveals some limits in the selection of the two samples thus needing some adjustment. However, the questionnaire, also in the present form, can be considered a tool able to detect the mobbing situations. PMID:16240603

  3. mHealth 2.0: Experiences, Possibilities, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Schumacher, Nikolaus; Krocza, Johann; Diamantidis, Clarissa; Albrecht, Urs-Vito

    2014-01-01

    With more than 1 billion users having access to mobile broadband Internet and a rapidly growing mobile app market, all stakeholders involved have high hopes that this technology may improve health care. Expectations range from overcoming structural barriers to access in low-income countries to more effective, interactive treatment of chronic conditions. Before medical health practice supported by mobile devices ("mHealth") can scale up, a number of challenges need to be adequately addressed. From a psychological perspective, high attrition rates, digital divide of society, and intellectual capabilities of the users are key issues when implementing such technologies. Furthermore, apps addressing behavior change often lack a comprehensive concept, which is essential for an ongoing impact. From a clinical point of view, there is insufficient evidence to allow scaling up of mHealth interventions. In addition, new concepts are required to assess the efficacy and efficiency of interventions. Regarding technology interoperability, open standards and low-energy wireless protocols appear to be vital for successful implementation. There is an ongoing discussion in how far health care-related apps require a conformity assessment and how to best communicate quality standards to consumers. "Apps Peer-Review" and standard reporting via an "App synopsis" appear to be promising approaches to increase transparency for end users. With respect to development, more emphasis must be placed on context analysis to identify what generic functions of mobile information technology best meet the needs of stakeholders involved. Hence, interdisciplinary alliances and collaborative strategies are vital to achieve sustainable growth for "mHealth 2.0," the next generation mobile technology to support patient care. PMID:25099752

  4. mHealth 2.0: Experiences, Possibilities, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Diamantidis, Clarissa

    2014-01-01

    With more than 1 billion users having access to mobile broadband Internet and a rapidly growing mobile app market, all stakeholders involved have high hopes that this technology may improve health care. Expectations range from overcoming structural barriers to access in low-income countries to more effective, interactive treatment of chronic conditions. Before medical health practice supported by mobile devices ("mHealth") can scale up, a number of challenges need to be adequately addressed. From a psychological perspective, high attrition rates, digital divide of society, and intellectual capabilities of the users are key issues when implementing such technologies. Furthermore, apps addressing behavior change often lack a comprehensive concept, which is essential for an ongoing impact. From a clinical point of view, there is insufficient evidence to allow scaling up of mHealth interventions. In addition, new concepts are required to assess the efficacy and efficiency of interventions. Regarding technology interoperability, open standards and low-energy wireless protocols appear to be vital for successful implementation. There is an ongoing discussion in how far health care-related apps require a conformity assessment and how to best communicate quality standards to consumers. "Apps Peer-Review" and standard reporting via an "App synopsis" appear to be promising approaches to increase transparency for end users. With respect to development, more emphasis must be placed on context analysis to identify what generic functions of mobile information technology best meet the needs of stakeholders involved. Hence, interdisciplinary alliances and collaborative strategies are vital to achieve sustainable growth for "mHealth 2.0," the next generation mobile technology to support patient care. PMID:25099752

  5. BPM2.0. Fossil-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    BOILER PERFORMANCE MODEL (BPM2.0) is a set of programs for predicting the heat transfer performance of fossil-fired utility boilers. The programs can model a wide variety of boiler designs, provide boiler performance estimates for coal, oil or gaseous fuels, determine the influence of slagging and fouling characteristics on boiler performance, and calculate performance factors for tradeoff analyses comparing boilers and fuels. Given a set of target operating conditions, the programs can estimate control settings, gas and steam operating profiles through the boiler, overall boiler efficiency, and fuel consumption. The programs are broken into three categories: data, calculation, and reports with a central processor program acting as the link allowing the user to access any of the data or calculation programs and easily move between programs. The calculations are divided among the following five programs: heat duty calculation, combustion calculation, furnace performance calculation, convection pass performance calculation, and air heater performance calculation. The programs can model subcritical or supercritical boilers, most configurations of convective passes including boilers that achieve final reheat steam temperature control by split back pass, boilers with as many as two reheat circuits and/or multiple attemperator stations in series, and boilers with or without economizers and/or air heaters. Either regenerative or tubular air heaters are supported. For wall-fired or tangentially-fired furnaces, the furnace performance program predicts the temperature of the flue gases leaving the furnace. It accounts for variations in excess air, gas recirculation, burner tilt, wall temperature, and wall cleanliness. For boilers having radiant panels or platens above the furnace, the convective pass program uses the results of the combustion chamber calculation to estimate the gas temperature entering the convective pass.

  6. Indico — the Road to 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, P.; Avilés, A.; Dafflon, J.; Mönnich, A.; Trichopoulos, I.

    2015-12-01

    Indico has come a long way since it was first used to organize CHEP 2004. More than ten years of development have brought new features and projects, widening the application's feature set and enabling event organizers to work even more efficiently. While that has boosted the tool's usage and facilitated its adoption by a remarkable 300,000 events (at CERN only), it has also generated a whole new range of challenges, which have been the target of the team's attention for the last 2 years. One of them was that of scalability and the maintainability of the current database solution (ZODB). After careful consideration, the decision was taken to move away from ZODB to PostgreSQL, a relational and widely-adopted solution that will permit the development of a more ambitious feature set as well as improved performance and scalability. A change of this type is by no means trivial in nature and requires the refactoring of most backend code as well as the full rewrite of significant portions of it. We are taking this opportunity to modernize Indico, by employing standard web modules, technologies and concepts that not only make development and maintenance easier but also constitute an upgrade to Indico's stack. The first results are already visible since August 2014, with the full migration of the Room Booking module to the new paradigm. In this paper we explain what has been done so far in the context of this ambitious migration, what have been the main findings and challenges, as well as the main technologies and concepts that will constitute the foundation of the resultant Indico 2.0.

  7. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA 2.0) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; O'Coin, James; Wichowski, Robert; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system is a low power assembly capable of simultaneously removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. Two solid amine sorbent beds are alternated between an uptake mode and a regeneration mode. During the uptake mode, the sorbent is exposed to an air steam (ventilation loop) to adsorb CO2 and water vapor, while during the regeneration mode, the sorbent rejects the adsorbed CO2 and water vapor to a vacuum source. The two beds operate such that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. A novel valve assembly provides a simple means of diverting the process air flow through the uptake bed while simultaneously directing the vacuum source to the regeneration bed. Additionally, the valve assembly is designed to allow for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The process can be controlled by a compact, low power controller design with several modes of operation available to the user. Together with NASA, United Technologies Corporation Aerospace Systems has been developing RCA 2.0 based on performance and design feedback on several sorbent bed test articles and valve design concepts. A final design was selected in November 2011 and fabricated and assembled between March and August 2012, with delivery to NASA-JSC in September 2012. This paper will provide an overview on the RCA system design and results of pre-delivery testing.

  8. Quantum mechanical reality according to Copenhagen 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Allan M.

    2016-05-01

    sufficiently incremental so as to be appropriately characterized as Copenhagen 2.0.

  9. SeCom - Serious Community 2.0 prevent flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komma, Juergen; Breuer, Roman; Sewilam, Hani; Concia, Francesca; Aliprandi, Bruno; Siegmund, Sabine; Goossens, Jannis

    2013-04-01

    There is a significant need for raising the awareness and building the capacity of water professionals in different water sectors cross Europe. There is also a need for qualified graduates to implement the EU Flood Risk Directive (FRD). The main aim of this work is to prepare and build the capacity of both groups in flood risk management through identifying synergies, sharing knowledge, and strengthen partnerships between universities and different stakeholders(mainly water professionals). The specific objectives are to develop; a) Development of a dynamic and active tool that allows all target-groups/users to assess their knowledge about flood risk management. b) Development of an innovative, active and problem-based learning methodology for flood risk education and training. c)Development of flood related Vocational Education & Training (VET) modules for water professionals (involving the students to gain practical experience). This will include some modules for undergraduate students on flood risk management and protection.

  10. TERS v2.0: An improved version of TERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present a new version of the semimicroscopic Monte Carlo code "TERS". The procedure for calculating multiple small angle Coulomb scattering of the residues in the target has been modified. Target-backing and residue charge-reset foils, which are often used in heavy ion-induced complete fusion reactions, are included in the code. New version program summaryProgram title: TERS v2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEBD_v2_0 Program summary URL:2_0.html" xlink:type="simple">http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBD_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7309 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 219 555 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: The code has been developed and tested on a PC with Intel Pentium IV processor. Operating system: Linux RAM: About 8 Mbytes Classification: 17.7 External routines: pgplot graphics subroutine library [1] should be installed in the system for generating residue trajectory plots. (The library is included in the CPC distribution file.) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEBD_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 179 (2008) 492 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Recoil separators are employed to select and identify nuclei of interest, produced in a nuclear reaction, rejecting unreacted beam and other undesired reaction products. It is important to know what fraction of the selected nuclei, leaving the target, reach the detection

  11. A computerized approach to cognitive behavioural assessment: an introduction to CBA-2.0 primary scales.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, G; Zotti, A M; Michielin, P; Vidotto, G; Sanavio, E

    1990-03-01

    The Cognitive Behavioural Assessment-2.0 (CBA-2.0) Primary Scales is an automated assessment package investigating the cognitive-verbal response system. It consists of: (1) self-reports and questionnaires aimed at identifying and specifying patients' problems; (2) a group of programs and logical rules, implemented on personal computers, providing an editor with items, questionnaire scoring and an analysis of responses; (3) an intelligent program which analyzes the responses emerging from the questionnaires and forms hypotheses for the selection of Secondary Scales and for further assessment. The package is part of a research project aimed at reducing part of the decision-making process to an operational language and simulating behavioral therapists decisions in cases of clinical assessment. PMID:2197296

  12. Deal making 2.0: a guide to complex negotiations.

    PubMed

    Lax, David A; Sebenius, James K

    2012-11-01

    Most big deals--megamergers, major sales, infrastructure projects--are built on a series of smaller ones. Each component deal presents a tactical challenge, but sequencing the parts in a way that achieves the target outcome is a strategic challenge that can unfold over months or years. This process, which the authors call a negotiation campaign, must generally be conducted on several fronts, each involving multiple parties. A multifront campaign can be much more effective than direct negotiation. After failed talks between Longshoremen and the Pacific Maritime Association--a group of shippers and port operators--the PMA's president turned away from the bargaining table and embarked on a campaign to align member-firms, the business community, the U.S. government, and the public around his target outcome: the deployment of new information technologies to help unclog busy ports. The result was an agreement that was ultimately mutually beneficial. Designing and executing a negotiation campaign involves identifying the relevant parties, grouping them into fronts according to shared interests, determining whether to combine fronts (if, for instance, doing so would unite your allies), and deciding which fronts to approach early on and which to engage only after you've made progress elsewhere. The deal between the PMA and the Longshoremen involved high stakes, but many small-scale deals--such as gaining approval for a new product--also play out on multiple fronts. Going straight to a key decision maker often makes sense, but in many cases a multifront campaign is the only way. PMID:23156000

  13. Toward major evolutionary transitions theory 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    The impressive body of work on the major evolutionary transitions in the last 20 y calls for a reconstruction of the theory although a 2D account (evolution of informational systems and transitions in individuality) remains. Significant advances include the concept of fraternal and egalitarian transitions (lower-level units like and unlike, respectively). Multilevel selection, first without, then with, the collectives in focus is an important explanatory mechanism. Transitions are decomposed into phases of origin, maintenance, and transformation (i.e., further evolution) of the higher level units, which helps reduce the number of transitions in the revised list by two so that it is less top-heavy. After the transition, units show strong cooperation and very limited realized conflict. The origins of cells, the emergence of the genetic code and translation, the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, multicellularity, and the origin of human groups with language are reconsidered in some detail in the light of new data and considerations. Arguments are given why sex is not in the revised list as a separate transition. Some of the transitions can be recursive (e.g., plastids, multicellularity) or limited (transitions that share the usual features of major transitions without a massive phylogenetic impact, such as the micro- and macronuclei in ciliates). During transitions, new units of reproduction emerge, and establishment of such units requires high fidelity of reproduction (as opposed to mere replication). PMID:25838283

  14. Toward major evolutionary transitions theory 2.0.

    PubMed

    Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-08-18

    The impressive body of work on the major evolutionary transitions in the last 20 y calls for a reconstruction of the theory although a 2D account (evolution of informational systems and transitions in individuality) remains. Significant advances include the concept of fraternal and egalitarian transitions (lower-level units like and unlike, respectively). Multilevel selection, first without, then with, the collectives in focus is an important explanatory mechanism. Transitions are decomposed into phases of origin, maintenance, and transformation (i.e., further evolution) of the higher level units, which helps reduce the number of transitions in the revised list by two so that it is less top-heavy. After the transition, units show strong cooperation and very limited realized conflict. The origins of cells, the emergence of the genetic code and translation, the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, multicellularity, and the origin of human groups with language are reconsidered in some detail in the light of new data and considerations. Arguments are given why sex is not in the revised list as a separate transition. Some of the transitions can be recursive (e.g., plastids, multicellularity) or limited (transitions that share the usual features of major transitions without a massive phylogenetic impact, such as the micro- and macronuclei in ciliates). During transitions, new units of reproduction emerge, and establishment of such units requires high fidelity of reproduction (as opposed to mere replication). PMID:25838283

  15. Writing Web 2.0 applications for science archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roby, William

    2010-07-01

    Writing these sorts of science archive web applications is now possible because of some significant breakthroughs in web technology over the last four years. The Web browser is no longer a glorified batch processing terminal, but an interactive environment that allows the user to have a similar experience as one might expect with an installed desktop application. Taking advantage of this technology requires a significant amount of UI design and advanced interactions with the web server. There are new levels of sophistication required to effectively develop this sort of web application. The IRSA group (NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive) is developing web-based software that equally takes advantage of modern technology and is designed to be reused easily. This way we can add new missions and data sets without a large programming effort while keeping the advanced interface. We can now provide true web-based FITS viewing, data overlays, and interaction without any plugins. Our tabular display allows us to filter, sort, and interact with large amounts data in ways that take advantage of the browser's power. This talk will show how we can us AJAX technology, the Google Web Toolkit (GWT), and Java to develop a data archive that is both well designed and creates a truly interactive experience.

  16. Social values for ecosystem services (SolVES): Documentation and user manual, version 2.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrouse, Benson C.; Semmens, Darius J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the need for incorporating quantified and spatially explicit measures of social values into ecosystem services assessments, the Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC), in collaboration with Colorado State University, developed a geographic information system (GIS) application, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES). With version 2.0 (SolVES 2.0), RMGSC has improved and extended the functionality of SolVES, which was designed to assess, map, and quantify the perceived social values of ecosystem services. Social values such as aesthetics, biodiversity, and recreation can be evaluated for various stakeholder groups as distinguished by their attitudes and preferences regarding public uses, such as motorized recreation and logging. As with the previous version, SolVES 2.0 derives a quantitative, 10-point, social-values metric, the Value Index, from a combination of spatial and nonspatial responses to public attitude and preference surveys and calculates metrics characterizing the underlying environment, such as average distance to water and dominant landcover. Additionally, SolVES 2.0 integrates Maxent maximum entropy modeling software to generate more complete social value maps and to produce robust statistical models describing the relationship between the social values maps and explanatory environmental variables. The performance of these models can be evaluated for a primary study area, as well as for similar areas where primary survey data are not available but where social value mapping could potentially be completed using value-transfer methodology. SolVES 2.0 also introduces the flexibility for users to define their own social values and public uses, model any number and type of environmental variable, and modify the spatial resolution of analysis. With these enhancements, SolVES 2.0 provides an improved public domain tool for decisionmakers and researchers to evaluate the social values of ecosystem services and to facilitate

  17. Digital Display Integration Project Project Online 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J. N.

    1999-11-01

    transfer; and optimizing techniques to reduce communications bandwidth. Additional topics that will be addressed include: obtaining greater color control; minimization of seam widths in tiled displays; and the human factors that impact the efficient use of high resolution displays. The scope of the project will include both direct-view displays, for use by individuals and small groups, and projection systems for conference rooms and auditoriums.

  18. GoldenBraid 2.0: A Comprehensive DNA Assembly Framework for Plant Synthetic Biology1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an ever-growing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects. PMID:23669743

  19. Reptilian Transcriptomes v2.0: An Extensive Resource for Sauropsida Genomics and Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tzika, Athanasia C.; Ullate-Agote, Asier; Grbic, Djordje; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of deep-sequencing techniques, genomic and transcriptomic data remain unevenly distributed across phylogenetic groups. For example, reptiles are poorly represented in sequence databases, hindering functional evolutionary and developmental studies in these lineages substantially more diverse than mammals. In addition, different studies use different assembly and annotation protocols, inhibiting meaningful comparisons. Here, we present the “Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0,” which provides extensive annotation of transcriptomes and genomes from species covering the major reptilian lineages. To this end, we sequenced normalized complementary DNA libraries of multiple adult tissues and various embryonic stages of the leopard gecko and the corn snake and gathered published reptilian sequence data sets from representatives of the four extant orders of reptiles: Squamata (snakes and lizards), the tuatara, crocodiles, and turtles. The LANE runner 2.0 software was implemented to annotate all assemblies within a single integrated pipeline. We show that this approach increases the annotation completeness of the assembled transcriptomes/genomes. We then built large concatenated protein alignments of single-copy genes and inferred phylogenetic trees that support the positions of turtles and the tuatara as sister groups of Archosauria and Squamata, respectively. The Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0 resource will be updated to include selected new data sets as they become available, thus making it a reference for differential expression studies, comparative genomics and transcriptomics, linkage mapping, molecular ecology, and phylogenomic analyses involving reptiles. The database is available at www.reptilian-transcriptomes.org and can be enquired using a wwwblast server installed at the University of Geneva. PMID:26133641

  20. Reptilian Transcriptomes v2.0: An Extensive Resource for Sauropsida Genomics and Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Athanasia C; Ullate-Agote, Asier; Grbic, Djordje; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-06-01

    Despite the availability of deep-sequencing techniques, genomic and transcriptomic data remain unevenly distributed across phylogenetic groups. For example, reptiles are poorly represented in sequence databases, hindering functional evolutionary and developmental studies in these lineages substantially more diverse than mammals. In addition, different studies use different assembly and annotation protocols, inhibiting meaningful comparisons. Here, we present the "Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0," which provides extensive annotation of transcriptomes and genomes from species covering the major reptilian lineages. To this end, we sequenced normalized complementary DNA libraries of multiple adult tissues and various embryonic stages of the leopard gecko and the corn snake and gathered published reptilian sequence data sets from representatives of the four extant orders of reptiles: Squamata (snakes and lizards), the tuatara, crocodiles, and turtles. The LANE runner 2.0 software was implemented to annotate all assemblies within a single integrated pipeline. We show that this approach increases the annotation completeness of the assembled transcriptomes/genomes. We then built large concatenated protein alignments of single-copy genes and inferred phylogenetic trees that support the positions of turtles and the tuatara as sister groups of Archosauria and Squamata, respectively. The Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0 resource will be updated to include selected new data sets as they become available, thus making it a reference for differential expression studies, comparative genomics and transcriptomics, linkage mapping, molecular ecology, and phylogenomic analyses involving reptiles. The database is available at www.reptilian-transcriptomes.org and can be enquired using a wwwblast server installed at the University of Geneva. PMID:26133641

  1. Web 2.0 collaboration tools to support student research in hydrology - an opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Gersonius, B.; Radhakrishnan, M.

    2012-02-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that it is unwise to make the a-priori assumption that university students are ready and eager to embrace modern online technologies employed to enhance the educational experience. We present an opinion on employing Wiki, a popular Web 2.0 technology, in small student groups, based on a case-study of using it customized as a personal learning environment (PLE) for supporting thesis research in hydrology. Since inception in 2006 the system presented has proven to facilitate knowledge construction and peer-communication within and across groups of students of different academic years and to stimulate learning. Being an open ended and egalitarian system, it was a minimal burden to maintain, as all students became content authors and shared responsibility. A number of unintended uses of the system were also observed, like using it as a backup medium and mobile storage. We attribute the success and sustainability of the proposed web 2.0-based approach to the fact that the efforts were not limited to the application of the technology, but comprised the creation of a supporting environment with educational activities organized around it. We propose that Wiki-based PLEs are much more suitable than traditional learning management systems for supporting non-classroom education activities like thesis research in hydrology.

  2. Web 2.0 and Marketing Education: Explanations and Experiential Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granitz, Neil; Koernig, Stephen K.

    2011-01-01

    Although both experiential learning and Web 2.0 tools focus on creativity, sharing, and collaboration, sparse research has been published integrating a Web 2.0 paradigm with experiential learning in marketing. In this article, Web 2.0 concepts are explained. Web 2.0 is then positioned as a philosophy that can advance experiential learning through…

  3. Using Web 2.0 to Teach Web 2.0: A Case Study in Aligning Teaching, Learning and Assessment with Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, John; Richardson, Joan; Hamilton, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies have transformed the way people in information industries engage with their clients, collaborate on projects, promote their services and gather community knowledge. In this paper, we describe the impact of industry adoption of Web 2.0 technologies on an information management course. The students in this course are either…

  4. Untangling Web 2.0: Charting Web 2.0 Tools, the NCSS Guidelines for Effective Use of Technology, and Bloom's Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diacopoulos, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for social studies to embrace instructional technology and Web 2.0 applications has become a growing trend in recent social studies research. As part of an ongoing process of collaborative enquiry between an instructional specialist and social studies teachers in a Professional Learning Community, a table of Web 2.0 applications was…

  5. The "Digital Native" in Context: Tensions Associated with Importing Web 2.0 Practices into the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This report draws on 53 focus group interviews conducted with students aged 13 and 15 in both representative and innovating UK secondary schools. The schedule for these discussions covered a wide range of issues relating to the use of Web 2.0 services both in and out of school. These young people were often deeply engaged with this technology and…

  6. Do Web 2.0 Tools Really Open the Door to Learning? Practices, Perceptions and Profiles of 11-16-Year-Old Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckin, Rosemary; Clark, Wilma; Graber, Rebecca; Logan, Kit; Mee, Adrian; Oliver, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report on survey and focus group data relating to the activities and perceptions of learning with Web 2.0 technologies of students aged between 11 and 16 years in 27 UK secondary schools. The study confirms that these learners had high levels of access to Web 2.0 technologies and that Web 2.0 activities were prolific. However,…

  7. Using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) for Predicting Institutionalization of Patients With Dementia in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Escorpizo, Reuben; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chi, Wen-Chou; Yen, Chia-Feng; Liao, Hua-Fang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2015-11-01

    World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) is an assessment tool and it has been applied for disability status assessment of Taiwanese dementia patients since July 2012. The aim of this study was to investigate the predicting accuracy of WHODAS 2.0 for institutionalization of dementia patients.Of these patients, 13,774 resided in a community and 4406 in a long-term care facility. Demographic data and WHODAS 2.0 standardized scores were analyzed using the Chi-square test and independent t test to compare patients with dementia in an institution with those in a community. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was applied to investigate accuracy in predicting institutionalization, and the optimal cutoff point was determined using the Youden index. Binary logistic regression was used to analyze variables to determine risk factors for the institutionalization of patients with dementia.WHODAS 2.0 scores in all domains were higher in patients with dementia in a long-term care facility than in those in a community (P < 0.01). The ROC curve showed moderate accuracy for all domains of WHODAS 2.0 (area under curve 0.6~0.8). Binary logistic regression revealed that the male gender, severity of disease, and standardized WHODAS 2.0 scores surpassing the cutoff values were risk factors for the institutionalization of patients with dementia.Although the accuracy of WHODAS 2.0 in predicting institutionalization is not considerably high for patients with dementia, our study found that the WHODAS 2.0 scores, the male gender, education status, urbanization level, and severity of disease were risk factors for institutionalization in long-term care facilities. PMID:26632747

  8. Web 2.0 collaboration tool to support student research in hydrology - an opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Gersonius, B.; Radhakrishnan, M.

    2012-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that it is unwise to make the a-priori assumption that university students are ready and eager to embrace modern online technologies employed to enhance the educational experience. We present our opinion on employing Wiki, a popular Web 2.0 technology, in small student groups, based on a case-study of using it customized to work as a personal learning environment (PLE1) (Fiedler and Väljataga, 2011) for supporting thesis research in hydrology. Since inception in 2006, the system presented has proven to facilitate knowledge construction and peer-communication within and across groups of students of different academic years and to stimulate learning. Being an open ended and egalitarian system, it was a minimal burden to maintain, as all students became content authors and shared responsibility. A number of unintended uses of the system were also observed, like using it as a backup medium and mobile storage. We attribute the success and sustainability of the proposed Web 2.0-based approach to the fact that the efforts were not limited to the application of the technology, but comprised the creation of a supporting environment with educational activities organized around it. We propose that Wiki-based PLEs are much more suitable than traditional learning management systems for supporting non-classroom education activities like thesis research in hydrology. 1Here we use the term PLE to refer to the conceptual framework to make the process of knowledge construction a personalized experience - rather than to refer to the technology (in this case Wiki) used to attempt implementing such a system.

  9. Preservice Teachers' Critical Thinking Dispositions and Web 2.0 Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendag, Serkan; Erol, Osman; Sezgin, Sezan; Dulkadir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between preservice teachers' Web 2.0 competencies and their critical thinking disposition (CTD). The study employed an associational research design using California Critical Thinking Disposition-Inventory (CCTD-I) and a Web 2.0 competency questionnaire including items related to Web 2.0

  10. Collaborative Middle School Geometry through Blogs and Other Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Mokter; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of blogs, a simple application of Web 2.0 technologies, in middle school geometry instruction. Specifically, it provides an overview of the interactive features of Web 2.0 technologies and the feasibility of using Web 2.0 technologies in geometry teaching and learning, as well as a proposed model for creating a…

  11. The Implementation of Web 2.0 Technology for Information Literacy Instruction in Thai University Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawetrattanasatian, Oranuch

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology has drawn much attention recently as a fascinating tool for Information Literacy Instruction (ILI), especially in academic libraries. This research was aimed to investigate the implementation of Web 2.0 technology for ILI in Thai university libraries, in terms of information literacy skills being taught, types of Web 2.0

  12. A User-Centric Adaptive Learning System for E-Learning 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shiu-Li; Shiu, Jung-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The success of Web 2.0 inspires e-learning to evolve into e-learning 2.0, which exploits collective intelligence to achieve user-centric learning. However, searching for suitable learning paths and content for achieving a learning goal is time consuming and troublesome on e-learning 2.0 platforms. Therefore, introducing formal learning in these…

  13. Developing Web 2.0 Tools for Support of Historical Inquiry in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Hammond, Thomas; Ferster, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools offer new possibilities for teaching and learning. PrimaryAccess is a Web 2.0 tool designed for K-12 history education. PrimaryAccess shares many of the characteristics of other Web 2.0 applications, but its educational focus makes it different from generic Web applications. Our work developing and researching PrimaryAccess has…

  14. 30 CFR 57.22239 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22239 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  15. Information Literacy and Web 2.0: Is It Just Hype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that Web 2.0 provides an exciting set of tools for librarians to help their students become more information-literate. Design/methodology/approach: Recently, information overload and Web 2.0 have led librarians to adopt practices labelled as Library 2.0. Information literacy can be the key to…

  16. Teaching MBA Students the Use of Web 2.0: The Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Meira; Hadar, Irit

    2010-01-01

    The new concepts and technologies of Web 2.0 attract researches in a variety of fields including education, business and knowledge management. However, while the Web 2.0 potential in the education discipline has been widely studied, in the management discipline the Web 2.0 business value has not been fully acknowledged. This research suggests an…

  17. Moessbauer studies in Zn(2+)0.3 Mn(2+)0.7 Mn(3+) (2-y) Fe(3+) (2-y) O4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. G.; Mendiratta, R. G.; Escue, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The Mossbauer effect has proven to be effective in the study of nuclear hyperfine interactions. Ferrite systems having the formula (Zn(2+)0.3)(Mn(2+)0.7)(Mn(3+)y)(Fe(3+)2-y)(O4) were prepared and studied. These systems can be interpreted as mangacese-doped zinc and a part of iron ions. A systematic study of these systems is presented to promote an understanding of their microstructure for which various theories were proposed.

  18. The emergence and potential impact of medicine 2.0 in the healthcare industry.

    PubMed

    Stump, Terra; Zilch, Sarah; Coustasse, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Medicine 2.0 has emerged within healthcare information technology to enable more defined relationships among providers and patients. Physicians, hospitals, and patients are using Medicine 2.0 through social networking to maintain their foothold in the evolution of medical technologies. The authors' purpose was to determine potential improvements that Medicine 2.0 has on communication and collaboration of healthcare information. Research has shown that Medicine 2.0 has integrated into the healthcare industry and is enabling an increase in communication in healthcare matters. The provider-patient relationship is improving through the use of Medicine 2.0 and has positively impacted society so far. PMID:22671433

  19. IBAMar 2.0: 36 years sampling on the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; López-Jurado, J. L.; Balbín, R.; Jansá, J.; Amengual, B.

    2012-04-01

    IBAMar 2.0 is a new database created from the oceanographic data obtained during the development of different oceanographic projects by the Balearic Center of Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) and conducted from 1974 and ongoing in the Western Mediterranean basin (Balearic Sea and Algerian Basin). This database collects data from 27 research projects with 134 oceanographic surveys and 6463 sampling stations. IBAMar 2.0 database covers 36 year sampling and approximately 210,846 km2 in the Western Mediterranean Sea (WM). The effort applied for obtaining this data was growing from less than 100 station/year to more than 700 in the year 2009. IBAMar 2.0 database includes main hydrographic parameters such as pressure, temperature, salinity and others as dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll-a and nutrients (nitrates, nitrites, phosphates and silicates). Most of the data from 1990 until now were obtained with multiparametric CTDs, although earlier data corresponding to cast sampling with Niskin bottles were incorporated too. The main goal of this database is to establish a climatology for the most significant variables to study the existence of decadal cycles or long-term trends, trying to better understand the behaviour of the hydrographic conditions of the Spanish Mediterranean coast, at both seasonal and interannual time scale and long term. From these studies is possible to provide answers on topical issues as the thermohaline anomaly of the deep waters of WM, the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen minimum, or the effects of the Climate Change on the hydrodynamics characteristics of the study area [1]. Future work includes data quality control based on standard protocols like [2] and publishing IBAMar 2.0 (including next surveys) on the website of the Mediterranean Group on Climate Change of IEO (http://www.ma.ieo.es/gcc/). There, the data could be obtained summarized as seasonal climatology. These will include horizontal sections at standard depths

  20. eHealth Literacy and Web 2.0 Health Information Seeking Behaviors Among Baby Boomers and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Bethany; Dodd, Virginia; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Paige, Samantha; Alber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    information (OR 2.63, Wald= 8.09, df=1, P=.004). Finally, more education predicted greater use of Web 2.0 for health information, with college graduates (OR 2.57, Wald= 3.86, df =1, P=.049) and post graduates (OR 7.105, Wald= 4.278, df=1, P=.04) nearly 2 to 7 times more likely than non-high school graduates to use Web 2.0 for health information. Conclusions Being younger and possessing more education was associated with greater eHealth literacy among baby boomers and older adults. Females and those highly educated, particularly at the post graduate level, reported greater use of Web 2.0 for health information. More in-depth surveys and interviews among more diverse groups of baby boomers and older adult populations will likely yield a better understanding regarding how current Web-based health information seeking and sharing behaviors influence health-related decision making. PMID:25783036

  1. Implementing an International Consultation on Earth System Research Priorities Using Web 2.0 Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, L.; Yang, A.

    2009-12-01

    Leah Goldfarb, Paul Cutler, Andrew Yang*, Mustapha Mokrane, Jacinta Legg and Deliang Chen The scientific community has been engaged in developing an international strategy on Earth system research. The initial consultation in this “visioning” process focused on gathering suggestions for Earth system research priorities that are interdisciplinary and address the most pressing societal issues. It was implemented this through a website that utilized Web 2.0 capabilities. The website (http://www.icsu-visioning.org/) collected input from 15 July to 1 September 2009. This consultation was the first in which the international scientific community was asked to help shape the future of a research theme. The site attracted over 7000 visitors from 133 countries, more than 1000 of whom registered and took advantage of the site’s functionality to contribute research questions (~300 questions), comment on posts, and/or vote on questions. To facilitate analysis of results, the site captured a small set of voluntary information about each contributor and their contribution. A group of ~50 international experts were invited to analyze the inputs at a “Visioning Earth System Research” meeting held in September 2009. The outcome of this meeting—a prioritized list of research questions to be investigated over the next decade—was then posted on the visioning website for additional comment from the community through an online survey tool. In general, many lessons were learned in the development and implementation of this website, both in terms of the opportunities offered by Web 2.0 capabilities and the application of these capabilities. It is hoped that this process may serve as a model for other scientific communities. The International Council for Science (ICSU) in cooperation with the International Social Science Council (ISSC) is responsible for organizing this Earth system visioning process.

  2. Organ dose and risk assessment in paediatric radiography using the PCXMC 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladia, A.; Messaris, G.; Delis, H.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Abdominal and chest radiographs are the most common examinations in paediatric radiology. X-ray examination of children attracts particular interest, mainly due to the increased risk for the expression of delayed radiogenic cancers as they have many years of expected life remaining. This study aims to calculate the organ dose and estimate the radiation Risk of Exposure Induced cancer Death (REID) to paediatric patients, using the PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code.Patient data and exposure parameters were recorded during examinations of 240 patients, separated in four age groups undergoing chest or abdomen examinations.The organs received the highest dose in all patient groups were liver, lungs, stomach, thyroid, pancreas, breast, spleen in chest radiographs and liver, lungs, colon, stomach and ovaries, uterus (for girls) and prostate (for boys) in abdomen radiographs. The effective dosefor the chest was 0.49×10-2- 1.07×10-2 mSv, while for the abdomen 1.85×10-2- 3.02×10-2 mSv. The mean REID value was 1.254×10-5 for the abdomen and 0.645×10-5 for the chest.

  3. Exploring Home and School Involvement of Young Children with Web 2.0 and Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on young children's use of Web 2.0 and social media. A background is provided about the use of Web 2.0 and social media among young children. Strengths and concerns are discussed as well as home and school use of Web 2.0 and social media. Exemplary websites are shared. The article concludes with potential changes in the…

  4. From I-Search to iSearch 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvey, Tara L.; Phillips, Nathan C.; Bigelow, Emily C.; Smith, Blaine E.; Pfaff, Erin; Colt, Walt; Leander, Kevin M.; Dalton, Bridget; Ma, Jasmine Y.

    2011-01-01

    This classroom narrative proposes a process for reinventing academic research and writing in secondary schools for the 21st Century. We build on Macrorie's (1988) I-Search paper, drawing on affordances of Web 2.0 technologies and culture, to initiate the iSearch 2.0 process. iSearch 2.0 consists of four phases: 1) messing about and trying on…

  5. 30 CFR 57.22240 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22240 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  6. Comparison of Three Quality of Life Instruments in Lymphatic Filariasis: DLQI, WHODAS 2.0, and LFSQQ

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cristina; Narahari, Saravu R.; Bose, Kuthaje S.; Vivekananda, Kuthaje; Nwe, Steven; West, Dennis P.; Kwasny, Mary; Kundu, Roopal V.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis aims to interrupt transmission of lymphatic filariasis and manage morbidity in people currently living with the disease. A component of morbidity management is improving health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients. Measurement of HRQoL in current management programs is varied because of the lack of a standard HRQoL tool for use in the lymphatic filariasis population. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the psychometric properties of three health status measures were compared when used in a group of lymphatic filariasis patients and healthy controls. The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and the Lymphatic Filariasis Quality of Life Questionnaire (LFSQQ) were administered to 36 stage II and stage III lymphatic filariasis subjects and 36 age and sex matched controls in Kerala, India. All three tools yielded missing value rates lower than 10%, suggesting high feasibility. Highest internal consistency was seen in the LFSQQ (α = 0.97). Discriminant validity analysis demonstrated that HRQoL was significantly lower in the LF group than in controls for the WHODAS 2.0, DLQI, and LFSQQ, but total HRQoL scores did not differ between stage II and stage III lymphedema subjects. The LFSQQ total score correlated most strongly with the WHODAS 2.0 (r = 0.91, p<0.001) and DLQI (r = 0.81, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The WHODAS 2.0, DLQI, and LFSQQ demonstrate acceptable feasibility, internal consistency, discriminate validity, and construct validity. Based on our psychometric analyses, the LFSQQ performs the best and is recommended for use in the lymphatic filariasis population. PMID:24587467

  7. The Building of Digital Archives Personalized Service Website based on Web 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziyu, Cheng; Haining, An

    Web2.0 technology has been applied in the digital archive personalized service website. Although there are few users and they lack of understanding currently, the author believe that web2.0 relying on many advantages of fast, convenient, and the zero cost, will be approved by more and more users in the future. With the continuous perfection and popularity of web2.0, the personalized service of digital archives will display a new vitality. In the paper, author proposes the application approaches of web2.0 in the system.

  8. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model. Version 2.0; User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a guide for using the model in analysis. Those interested in making enhancements or modification to the model should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Technical Description.

  9. SilkDB v2.0: a platform for silkworm (Bombyx mori ) genome biology.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jun; Li, Ruiqiang; Cheng, Daojun; Fan, Wei; Zha, Xingfu; Cheng, Tingcai; Wu, Yuqian; Wang, Jun; Mita, Kazuei; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2010-01-01

    The SilkDB is an open-access database for genome biology of the silkworm (Bombyx mori). Since the draft sequence was completed and the SilkDB was first released 5 years ago, we have collaborated with other groups to make much remarkable progress on silkworm genome research, such as the completion of a new high-quality assembly of the silkworm genome sequence as well as the construction of a genome-wide microarray to survey gene expression profiles. To accommodate these new genomic data and house more comprehensive genomic information, we have reconstructed SilkDB database with new web interfaces. In the new version (v2.0) of SilkDB, we updated the genomic data, including genome assembly, gene annotation, chromosomal mapping, orthologous relationship and experiment data, such as microarray expression data, Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and corresponding references. Several new tools, including SilkMap, Silkworm Chromosome Browser (SCB) and BmArray, are developed to access silkworm genomic data conveniently. SilkDB is publicly available at the new URL of http://www.silkdb.org. PMID:19793867

  10. Fostering Collaborative Learning with Mobile Web 2.0 in Semi-Formal Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Web 2.0 technologies such as: mobile apps, social networking sites and video sharing sites have become essential drivers for shaping daily activities and meeting learning needs in various settings. However, very few studies link mobile Web 2.0 to supporting collaborative learning in real-life problem solving activities in semi-formal…

  11. Library 2.0: Balancing the Risks and Benefits to Maximise the Dividends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Brian; Bevan, Paul; Akerman, Richard; Alcock, Jo; Fraser, Josie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a number of examples of how Web 2.0 technologies and approaches (Library 2.0) are being used within the library sector. The paper acknowledges that there are a variety of risks associated with such approaches. The paper describes the different types of risks and outlines a risk assessment and risk…

  12. The Academic Library Meets Web 2.0: Applications and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Chen; Ouyang, Fenfei; Chu, Heting

    2009-01-01

    Visits to 81 academic library websites in the New York State reveal that 42% of them adopted one or more Web 2.0 tools such as blogs while implementation of those tools in individual libraries varies greatly. We also propose a conceptual model of Academic Library 2.0 in this report. (Contains 4 tables and 6 figures.)

  13. Literacies in a Participatory, Multimodal World: The Arts and Aesthetics of Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasudevan, Lalitha

    2010-01-01

    Communicative and expressive modalities, such as smart phones and video cameras, have become increasingly multifunctional and reflect an evolving digital landscape often referred to as Web 2.0. The "ethos" and "technical" affordances of Web 2.0 have the potential to catalyze the aesthetic creativity of youth. Following a discussion of aesthetics…

  14. Evaluating Web 2.0 Technologies in Higher Education Using Students' Perceptions and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karvounidis, T.; Chimos, K.; Bersimis, S.; Douligeris, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Web 2.0 technologies in higher education are evaluated using students' perceptions, satisfaction, performance and behaviour. The study evaluates the Web 2.0 tools as stand-alone entities as well in terms of their cross-operability and integration (confluence) to synergistic contributions towards the enhancement of student…

  15. Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes toward the Implementation of Web 2.0 Tools in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadri, Lekan Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have concluded that Web 2.0 technologies offered many educational benefits. However, many secondary teachers in a large northwestern school district were not using Web 2.0 tools in spite of its possibilities for teaching and learning. The purpose of this quantitative correlational research was to explore the relationships between the…

  16. Capitalizing on Web 2.0 in the Social Studies Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Lori B.; Beal, Candy M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses primarily on the integration of Web 2.0 technologies into social studies education. It documents how various Web 2.0 tools can be utilized in the social studies context to support and enhance teaching and learning. For the purposes of focusing on one specific topic, global connections at the middle school level will be the…

  17. Integration of Web 2.0 Tools in Learning a Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majid, Nazatul Aini Abd

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools are expected to assist students to acquire knowledge effectively in their university environment. However, the lack of effort from lecturers in planning the learning process can make it difficult for the students to optimize their learning experiences. The aim of this paper is to integrate Web 2.0 tools with learning strategy in…

  18. Integrating Web 2.0 in Health Education Preparation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Carl; Thackeray, Rosemary; Barnes, Michael; Neiger, Brad; McIntyre, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Competency in 21st-century health communication involves an understanding that the internet landscape has evolved from static webpages to applications that engage users. This evolution to "Web 2.0" includes such applications as blogs, wikis, social-networking sites, and podcasts. This review presents trends in Web 2.0 internet usage, summarizes…

  19. Investigating the Use of Web 2.0 Technology by Malaysian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaria, Mohd Hafiz; Watson, Jason; Edwards, Sylvia L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Many research have uncovered the use of Web 2.0 technology by students from various countries. Yet, limited studies have been done from the context of developing country such as Malaysia. This paper aims to highlight the development of a survey instrument that captured the use of Web 2.0 applications by Malaysian students for learning.…

  20. Coming from outside the Academy. Values and 2.0 Culture in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrat, Nuria; Rubio, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on how some values, interests, and particularities of 2.0 culture enter on higher and postgraduate education institutions. Through the identification of the features of 2.0, this document visualizes some of the resistances, obstacles, possibilities, and opportunities detected in these institutions, many of them focusing on…

  1. Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Adler, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    The building blocks provided by the Open Educational Resources movement, along with e-Science and e-Humanities and the resources of the Web 2.0, are creating the conditions for the emergence of new kinds of open participatory learning ecosystems that will support active, passion-based learning: Learning 2.0. This new form of learning begins with…

  2. Designing "Geometry 2.0" Learning Environments: A Preliminary Study with Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Nuria Joglar; Sordo Juanena, José María; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    The information and communication technologies of Web 2.0 are arriving in our schools, allowing the design and implementation of new learning environments with great educational potential. This article proposes a pedagogical model based on a new geometry technology-integrated learning environment, called "Geometry 2.0," which was tested…

  3. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  4. Journal Writing with Web 2.0 Tools: A Vision for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Aagard, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how Web 2.0 technologies may facilitate journaling and related inquiry methods among older adults. Benefits and limitations of journaling are summarized as well as computer skills of older adults. We then describe how Web 2.0 technologies can enhance journaling among older adults by diminishing feelings of isolation,…

  5. The Knowledge of Web 2.0 by Library and Information Science Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Daihani, Sultan

    2009-01-01

    This research paper reports the results of a Web-based survey designed to explore the attitude of Library and Information Science (LIS) academics to Web 2.0. It investigates their familiarity with Web 2.0 concepts, tools and services and applications as these relate to LIS education, and the barriers to their use. A Web-based questionnaire was…

  6. From Fatigue to Anxiety? Implications for Educational Design in a Web 2.0 World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to recognise that as educators moving into, or already in, a Web 2.0 world, we are likely to experience anxiety, and to explore the implications for educational design in a Web 2.0 world. Design/methodology/approach: The objectives are achieved as the result of recent successes with the commissioners for two…

  7. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies in LIS Education: Experiences at Tallinn University, Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virkus, Sirje

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiences of the Institute of Information Studies of Tallinn University in introducing ICT, including Web 2.0 technologies, in library and information science education, and to explore the role that these can play in new models of learning and teaching. Design/methodology/approach: Web 2.0

  8. Web 2.0 Integration in Information Literacy Instruction: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Lili

    2010-01-01

    Survey and semi-structured interviews were conducted in this study to examine the adoption of the Web 2.0 technology in information literacy instruction. Findings suggest that librarians use Web 2.0 tools in three different levels, and overall it has a positive impact on teaching and learning. (Contains 2 tables.)

  9. Language Learning: The Merge of Teletandem and Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu-Ellis, Carla; Ellis, Jason Brent; Carle, Abbie; Blevens, Jared; Decker, Aline; Carvalho, Leticia; Macedo, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The following action research provides an overview of student's perceptions of the incorporation of Web 2.0 technologies into in-tandem language learning activities. American and Brazilian college students were partnered in order to work in-tandem through pre-determined language activities using Web 2.0 technologies to learn a second…

  10. E-Learning 3.0 = E-Learning 2.0 + Web 3.0?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Fehmida

    2012-01-01

    Web 3.0, termed as the semantic web or the web of data is the transformed version of Web 2.0 with technologies and functionalities such as intelligent collaborative filtering, cloud computing, big data, linked data, openness, interoperability and smart mobility. If Web 2.0 is about social networking and mass collaboration between the creator and…

  11. Motivating Pre-Service Teachers in Technology Integration of Web 2.0 for Teaching Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Jang, Hwan Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of pre-service teachers' use of Web 2.0 tools during a teaching internship, after a course that emphasized the use of the tools for instructional activities. Results revealed that integrating Web 2.0 tools during their teaching internship was strongly predicted by participants' perceived…

  12. Gender Divide and Acceptance of Collaborative Web 2.0 Applications for Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Wen-Hao David; Hood, Denice Ward; Yoo, Sun Joo

    2013-01-01

    Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' "Web 2.0 for learning" perception ratings collected by relevant categories of "Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use…

  13. The Influences of Social Collaboration on Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turky, Mohamed Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The present study tries to research the relationship between Social Collaboration Activity and Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education student. It additionally looks to decide how Social Collaboration adds to the forecast of their sense Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy. The study reported in this paper was led to inspect the relationship Social…

  14. Acceptable Use Policies in a Web 2.0 & Mobile Era: A Guide for School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for School Networking (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 applications and mobile Internet devices have added new issues to the safety/access situation for schools. The purpose of this guide is to assist school districts in developing, rethinking, or revising Internet policies as a consequence of the emergence of Web 2.0, and the growing pervasiveness of smart phone use. The Consortium for School…

  15. 75 FR 22577 - Proposed Notice and Comment Policy Version 2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Notice and Comment Policy Version 2.0 AGENCY: U.S. Election Assistance Commission. ACTION: Notice and request for public comment on Proposed Notice and Comment Policy 2.0. SUMMARY: The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) seeks public comment on the Proposed Notice and Comment Policy...

  16. Web 2.0-Mediated Competence--Implicit Educational Demands on Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohn, Nina Bonderup

    2009-01-01

    The employment of Web 2.0 within higher educational settings has become increasingly popular. Reasons for doing so include student motivation, didactic considerations of facilitating individual and collaborative knowledge construction, and the support Web 2.0 gives the learner in transgressing and resituating content and practices between the…

  17. Closing the Communication Gap: "Web 2.0 Tools for Enhanced Planning and Collaboration"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kelly J.; Dickens, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Web 2.0 is expanding the way general and special educators collaborate, especially in co-teaching situations. This article draws attention to several free web-based tools and a co-teaching lesson plan supplement that can be used to incorporate Web 2.0 technologies during the co-planning, co-teaching and shared reflection processes between the…

  18. Integrating Web 2.0-Based Informal Learning with Workplace Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Fang; Kemp, Linzi J.

    2012-01-01

    Informal learning takes place in the workplace through connection and collaboration mediated by Web 2.0 applications. However, little research has yet been published that explores informal learning and how to integrate it with workplace training. We aim to address this research gap by developing a conceptual Web 2.0-based workplace learning and…

  19. Web 2.0 Technologies for Effective Knowledge Management in Organizations: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Anupam Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of Internet-based collaborative tools, commonly known as Web 2.0, has increased in popularity, availability, and power in the last few years (Kane and Fichman, 2009). Web 2.0 is a set of Internet-based applications that harness network effects by facilitating collaborative and participative computing (O'Reilly, 2006).…

  20. Build, Buy, Open Source, or Web 2.0?: Making an Informed Decision for Your Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit; Keach, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    When improving a web presence, today's libraries have a choice: using a free Web 2.0 application, opting for open source, buying a product, or building a web application. This article discusses how to make an informed decision for one's library. The authors stress that deciding whether to use a free Web 2.0 application, to choose open source, to…

  1. Web 2.0 and Higher Education: Its Educational Use in the University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campion, Raul Santiago; Nalda, Fermin Navaridas; Rivilla, Antonio Medina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is for the teachers in higher education to provide relative information about the use of the web 2.0 resources within its context and within the framework of the university staff training program. In this context, we have developed a tool in order to study 400 teachers attitude, use and perceived usefulness of web 2.0

  2. Web 2.0 and Second Language Learning: What Does the Research Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shenggao; Vasquez, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews current research on the use of Web 2.0 technologies in second language (L2) learning. Its purpose is to investigate the theoretical perspectives framing it, to identify some of the benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies in L2 learning, and to discuss some of the limitations. The review reveals that blogs and wikis have been…

  3. Web 2.0 as a Non-Foundational Network-Centric Learning Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eijkman, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to initiate a timely discussion about the epistemological advantages of Web 2.0 as a non-foundational network-centric learning space in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: A philosophical analysis of the underpinning design principles of Web 2.0 social media and of conventional "foundational" and emergent…

  4. Alignment 2.0: Strategic Use of New Internet Technologies in Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, Albert; Thaens, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    This paper challenges the view that strategies for using Web 2.0 should primarily be based upon technological characteristics. The value of the organizational strategic alignment approach for developing specific operational Web 2.0 strategies for government organizations is explored both theoretically and empirically. On the basis of a review of…

  5. Web 2.0 Technologies and Applications in the Best Practice Networks and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagiene, Valentina; Kurilovas, Eugenijus

    2010-01-01

    The paper is aimed to analyse the external expert evaluation results of eContent"plus" programme's iCOPER (Interoperable Content for Performance in a Competency-driven Society) project's deliverables, especially quality control and Web 2.0 technologies report. It is a suitability report for better practice concerning the use of Web 2.0

  6. Comparison of Web 2.0 Technology Acceptance Level Based on Cultural Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Sun Joo; Huang, Wen-hao David

    2011-01-01

    In order to inform educators in higher education on the integration of Web 2.0 applications for engaging and effective learning experiences, this survey study compared the use and acceptance of Web 2.0 applications between American and Korean college students through the lens of cultural differences. Undergraduate students were recruited to…

  7. BMDS 2.0 BETA WITH NEW QUANTAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT EXTERNAL REVIEW REPORTS AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the availability of BMDS 2.0 on the BMDS web site, EPA is providing (a) results of the external review (charge to reviewers and reviewer comments), (b) EPA responses to the review comments, and (c) a report describing development and testing of the models in BMDS 2.0 with ne...

  8. Multiliteracies and Active Learning in CLIL--The Development of Learn Web2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marenzi, I.; Zerr, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of LearnWeb2.0, a search and collaboration environment for supporting searching, organizing, and sharing distributed resources, and our pedagogical setup based on the multiliteracies approach. In LearnWeb2.0, collaborative and active learning is supported through project-focused search and aggregation, with…

  9. Aqua-Aura QuickDAM (QDAM) 2.0 Ops Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nidhiry, John

    2015-01-01

    The presentation describes the Quick Debris Avoidance Maneuver (QDAM) 2.0 process used the Aqua and Aura flight teams to (a) reduce the work load and dependency on staff and systems; (b) reduce turn-around time and provide emergency last minute capabilities; and (c) increase burn parameter flexibility. The presentation also compares the QDAM 2.0 process to previous approaches.

  10. The Enterprise 2.0 Concept: Challenges on Data and Information Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana; Moreira, Fernando; Varajão, João

    The Web 2.0 wave has "hit" businesses all over the world, with companies taking advantage of the 2.0 concept and new applications stimulating collaboration between employees, and also with external partners (suppliers, contractors, universities, R&D organizations and others). However, the use of Web 2.0 applications inside organizations has created additional security challenges, especially regarding data and information security. Companies need to be aware of these risks when deploying the 2.0 concept and take a proactive approach on security. In this paper are identified and discussed some of the challenges and risks of the use of Web 2.0 tools, namely when it comes to securing companies' intellectual property.

  11. An Exploratory Discuss of New Ways for Competitive Intelligence on WEB2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhonghua; Luo, Ling

    Competitive Intelligence (CI) plays an increasingly important role in the strategic management and decision-making of enterprises. Adequate and timely information is the necessity of CI which makes the gathering information very import activities in CI. Web2.0 introduced many new types of applications for users to express their thoughts easily and quickly. In the view of CI, Web2.0 paved new ways and channels for gathering information. This article surveys the applications of Web2.0 relative to CI, and explores approaches of gathering information for CI through Web2.0. Four of applications of Web2.0 (Blog, Wiki, SNS, and RSS ) are discussed for CI use in detail.

  12. Enhancing promotional strategies within social marketing programs: use of Web 2.0 social media.

    PubMed

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Hanson, Carl L; McKenzie, James F

    2008-10-01

    The second generation of Internet-based applications (i.e., Web 2.0), in which users control communication, holds promise to significantly enhance promotional efforts within social marketing campaigns. Web 2.0 applications can directly engage consumers in the creative process by both producing and distributing information through collaborative writing, content sharing, social networking, social bookmarking, and syndication. Web 2.0 can also enhance the power of viral marketing by increasing the speed at which consumers share experiences and opinions with progressively larger audiences. Because of the novelty and potential effectiveness of Web 2.0, social marketers may be enticed to prematurely incorporate related applications into promotional plans. However, as strategic issues such as priority audience preferences, selection of appropriate applications, tracking and evaluation, and related costs are carefully considered, Web 2.0 will expand to allow health promotion practitioners more direct access to consumers with less dependency on traditional communication channels. PMID:18936268

  13. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model: Technical Description. 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a technical description of FAM 2.0 and its computer files to enable the modeler and programmer to make enhancements or modifications to the model. Those interested in a guide for using the model in analysis should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Users Manual.

  14. Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence 2.0: revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2016-02-01

    Since the publication of Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this article, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26515734

  15. Squire 2.0 (Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence): revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26523003

  16. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): Revised Publication Guidelines from a Detailed Consensus Process

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015, using 1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group; 2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts; and 3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26517437

  17. Comparative simulations of a two-layer landfill barrier using the HELP Version 2. 0 and UNSAT-H Version 2. 0 computer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents the results of a simulation of the performance of a two-layer infiltration barrier for a nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (NRDWL) at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in semi-arid southeast Washington State. The performance of the barrier was simulated for a period of 10 years using the UNSAT-H version 2.0 groundwater flow computer code. Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed this simulation to compare results using UNSAT-H 2.0 with those of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) version 2.0 code. A conceptualization of the actual landfill barrier design was modeled using both codes. This model was simulated using 10 years of daily meteorological data collected at the Hanford Meteorological Station from 1979 through 1988. The intent of the comparison was to demonstrate that HELP conservatively predicts deep percolation of meteoric water at the Hanford Site. This demonstration required that the two codes be used to simulate the same conceptual model using identical, or at least essentially equivalent, input data. Comparing the results of the 10-year simulations showed that for the meteorological data and soil properties modeled the HELP 2.0 code was more conservative than the UNSAT-H code. HELP predicted a net drainage or deep percolation of 0.3592 cm (0.1556 in.) from the barrier for the 10-year period simulated. None to the UNSAT-H simulations predicted any deep percolation. HELP also predicted a greater proportion of precipitation returned to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration than did the UNSAT-H simulations in spite of the larger precipitation values being provided to HELP through an apparent data entry error. 14 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. SME 2.0: Roadmap towards Web 2.0-Based Open Innovation in SME-Networks - A Case Study Based Research Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindermann, Nadine; Valcárcel, Sylvia; Schaarschmidt, Mario; von Kortzfleisch, Harald

    Small- and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are of high social and economic importance since they represent 99% of European enterprises. With regard to their restricted resources, SMEs are facing a limited capacity for innovation to compete with new challenges in a complex and dynamic competitive environment. Given this context, SMEs need to increasingly cooperate to generate innovations on an extended resource base. Our research project focuses on the aspect of open innovation in SME-networks enabled by Web 2.0 applications and referring to innovative solutions of non-competitive daily life problems. Examples are industrial safety, work-life balance issues or pollution control. The project raises the question whether the use of Web 2.0 applications can foster the exchange of creativity and innovative ideas within a network of SMEs and hence catalyze new forms of innovation processes among its participants. Using Web 2.0 applications within SMEs implies consequently breaking down innovation processes to employees’ level and thus systematically opening up a heterogeneous and broader knowledge base to idea generation. In this paper we address first steps on a roadmap towards Web 2.0-based open innovation processes within SME-networks. It presents a general framework for interaction activities leading to open innovation and recommends a regional marketplace as a viable, trust-building driver for further collaborative activities. These findings are based on field research within a specific SME-network in Rhineland-Palatinate Germany, the “WirtschaftsForum Neuwied e.V.”, which consists of roughly 100 heterogeneous SMEs employing about 8,000 workers.

  19. WaterML2.0: Harmonising standards for water observations data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter; Walker, Gavin; Valentine, David; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    particular domain such as hydrology, but rather the abstract components that are needed when making observations: features, observed properties of features, observation procedures and results. By making use of the O&M standard and specialising it with harmonised definitions of water observation concepts, it is proposed that a domain-level standard, WaterML2.0, be developed. It would be capable of precisely describing the relevant aspects of hydrological observations. Re-using existing standards suites, such as OGC, allows the development to focus on capturing domain specific concepts without redefining common types such as spatial types, standard data structures and so on. The development will be done by involving key stakeholders who have developed existing standards and understand hydrological observational practices. Through the Hydrology Domain Working Group within OGC, jointly chaired by the OGC and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), WaterML2.0 will be developed as an OGC standard. It may then be leveraged by existing web services, such as the OGC's Sensor Observation Service (SOS), to query and extract water information across the Internet using common tools. This will allow water information to be shared - and most importantly understood - by a much wider audience.

  20. A comparable study of clinical and optical outcomes after 1.8, 2.0 mm microcoaxial and 3.0 mm coaxial cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-Bo; Zhu, Ya-Nan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yi-Dong; Yu, Yin-Hui; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical and optical outcomes after clear corneal incision cataract surgery (CICS) with three different incision sizes (1.8, 2.0 and 3.0 mm). METHODS Eyes of 150 patients with age-related cataract scheduled for coaxial cataract surgery were randomized to three groups: 1.8, 2.0, or 3.0 mm CICS. Intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes including surgically induced astigmatism (SIA), the corneal incision thickness, wavefront aberrations and modulation transfer function (MTF) of cornea were obtained. RESULTS There were no significant differences among the three groups in demographic characteristics and intraoperative outcome. The 1.8 and 2.0 mm microincisions showed more satisfactory clinical outcomes than the 3.0 mm incision. The 1.8 mm incision showed significantly less SIA than the 2.0 mm incision until postoperative 1mo (P<0.05), but the difference was only 0.14-0.18 D. Combined with less increased incision thickness only at postoperative 1d (P=0.013), the 1.8 mm incision presented better uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCDVA) than the 2.0 mm incision only at 1d postoperatively (P=0.008). For higher-order aberrations and other Zernike coefficients, there were no significant differences between the 1.8 mm group and 2.0 mm group (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Converting from 3.0 mm CICS to 1.8 or 2.0 mm CICS result in better clinical and optical outcomes. However, when incision is 1.8 mm, the benefits from further reduction in size compared with 2.0 mm are limited. The necessity to reduce the incision size is to be deliberated. PMID:27158610

  1. Web-based Training in German University Eye Hospitals – Education 2.0?

    PubMed Central

    Handzel, Daniel M.; Hesse, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyse web-based training in ophthalmology offered by German university eye hospitals. Methods: In January 2010 the websites of all 36 German university hospitals were searched for information provided for visitors, students and doctors alike. We evaluated the offer in terms of quantity and quality. Results: All websites could be accessed at the time of the study. 28 pages provided information for students and doctors, one page only for students, three exclusively for doctors. Four pages didn’t offer any information for these target groups. The websites offered information on events like congresses or students curricular education, there were also material for download for these events or for other purposes. We found complex e-learning-platforms on 9 pages. These dealt with special ophthalmological topics in a didactic arrangement. In spite of the extensive possibilities offered by the technology of Web 2.0, many conceivable tools were only rarely made available. It was not always possible to determine if the information provided was up-to-date, very often the last actualization of the content was long ago. On one page the date for the last change was stated as 2004. Conclusion: Currently there are 9 functional e-learning-applications offered by German university eye hospitals. Two additional hospitals present links to a project of the German Ophthalmological Society. There was a considerable variation in quantity and quality. No website made use of crediting successful studying, e.g. with CME-points or OSCE-credits. All German university eye hospitals present themselves in the World Wide Web. However, the lack of modern, technical as well as didactical state-of-the-art learning applications is alarming as it leaves an essential medium of today’s communication unused. PMID:21866245

  2. Adsorption and decomposition of H 2S on UO 2(0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qifei; Yakshinskiy, Boris V.; Madey, Theodore E.

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption and decomposition of H 2S on UO 2(0 0 1) are studied using ultrahigh vacuum methods, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (LEIS), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), over the temperature range 100-800 K. Our work is motivated by the large stockpiles of depleted uranium in the US, and the interest in possible uses of UO 2 in catalytic applications, e.g., hydrodesulfurization processes to remove impurity sulfur from petroleum. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) is adsorbed molecularly at 100 K on the surface, and a desorption peak for molecular H 2S is observed at ˜130 K in TPD, corresponding to a binding energy of ˜0.3 eV. Adsorption properties as a function of H 2S exposure are measured at different temperatures using XPS; the S2p intensity and lineshapes demonstrate that the saturation coverage of S-containing species is ˜1 monolayer (ML) at 100 K, and decreases with increasing temperature to ˜0.2 ML of dissociation fragments at 300 K. Moreover, LEIS and XPS show that a small amount of S remains chemically bonded to the UO 2 surface after TPD measurements. We use complementary ESD techniques to measure the adsorption rates of H 2S at different coverages and temperatures, for comparison with the XPS data. We suggest that oxygen vacancies are of importance in the adsorption of S-containing molecules, as proposed recently by several groups for the S/TiO 2 system.

  3. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies for Public Outreach on a Simulated Mars Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiro, B.; Palaia, J.; Ferrone, K.

    2009-12-01

    Recent advances in social media and internet communications have revolutionized the ways people interact and disseminate information. Astronauts are already starting to take advantage of these tools by blogging and tweeting from space, and almost all NASA missions now have presences on the major social networking sites. One priority for future human explorers on Mars will be communicating their experiences to the people back on Earth. During July 2009, a six-member crew of volunteers carried out a simulated Mars mission at the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) on Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic. Living in a habitat, conducting EVAs wearing spacesuits, and observing communication delays with “Earth,” the crew endured restrictions similar to those that will be faced by future human Mars explorers. Throughout the expedition, crewmembers posted regular blog entries, reports, photos, videos, and updates to their website and social media outlets Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Picasa Web Albums. During the sixteen EVAs of their field science research campaign, FMARS crewmembers collected GPS track information and took geotagged photos using GPS-enabled cameras. They combined their traverse GPS tracks with photo location information into KML/KMZ files that website visitors can view in Google Maps or Google Earth. Although the crew observed a strict 20-minute communication delay with “Earth” to simulate a real Mars mission, they broke this rule to conduct four very successful live webcasts with student groups using Skype since education and public outreach were important objectives of the endeavor. This presentation will highlight the use of Web 2.0 technologies for public outreach during the simulated Mars expedition and the implications for other remote scientific journeys. The author embarks on a "rover" to carry out an EVA near the FMARS Habitat. The satellite dish to the right of the structure was used for all communications with the remote

  4. The Interplay of Web 2.0 and Collaboration Support Systems: Leveraging Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilla, Michael; Ritterskamp, Carsten

    In recent years, we have experienced the rise of so-called Web 2.0 applications, in which a large number of users voluntarily engage in collaborative work. The characteristics of Web 2.0 can be best described as an "architecture of participation" (O'Reilly 2005), which includes simplicity of usage, immediate feedback on UI and structural level, and valuing each user's contributions (Grudin 2006; Kittur et al. 2007). Web 2.0 orchestrates available technology in a way that encourages users to participate actively as its architecture of participation helps to balance effort and benefit even in work-related settings. The success of these applications - e.g., Wikis, Word Processors on the Web, or Social Tagging systems - supports this point of view. This immediately leads to the question whether Web 2.0 applications are the new generation of collaboration support systems.

  5. Advanced Hybrid On-Board Science Data Processor - SpaceCube 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatley, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Topics include an overview of On-board science data processing, software upset mitigation, on-board data reduction, on-board products, HyspIRI demonstration testbed, SpaceCube 2.0 block diagram, and processor comparison.

  6. Designing Geometry 2.0 learning environments: a preliminary study with primary school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglar Prieto, Nuria; María Sordo Juanena, José; Star, Jon R.

    2014-04-01

    The information and communication technologies of Web 2.0 are arriving in our schools, allowing the design and implementation of new learning environments with great educational potential. This article proposes a pedagogical model based on a new geometry technology-integrated learning environment, called Geometry 2.0, which was tested with 39 sixth grade students from a public school in Madrid (Spain). The main goals of the study presented here were to describe an optimal role for the mathematics teacher within Geometry 2.0, and to analyse how dynamic mathematics and communication might affect young students' learning of basic figural concepts in a real setting. The analyses offered in this article illustrate how our Geometry 2.0 model facilitates deeply mathematical tasks which encourage students' exploration, cooperation and communication, improving their learning while fostering geometrical meanings.

  7. Energy Storage: Breakthrough in Battery Technologies (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Balsara, Nitash

    2011-06-03

    Nitash Balsara speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Mary Ann Piette: Impact of efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Ann Piette

    2010-02-09

    Mary Ann Piette speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  9. Building a Library Web Site on the Pillars of Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a project they undertook to reshape the libraries' Web services of the University of Houston site. The site had been in a state of flux and it needed a new structure for both managing and organizing it. She realized the staff was looking for a Web site that was more "Web 2.0" in nature. Web 2.0 is often…

  10. ClinicalKey 2.0: Upgrades in a Point-of-Care Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Huslig, Mary Ann; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalKey 2.0, launched September 23, 2014, offers a mobile-friendly design with a search history feature for targeting point-of-care resources for health care professionals. Browsing is improved with searchable, filterable listings of sources highlighting new resources. ClinicalKey 2.0 improvements include more than 1,400 new Topic Pages for quick access to point-of-care content. A sample search details some of the upgrades and content options. PMID:26211794

  11. Making Web 2.0 Work--From "Librarian Habilis" to "Librarian Sapiens"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvetkovic, Milica

    2009-01-01

    When people look back at the World Wide Web of 1996, there can be no doubt that today's web is better and more useful. Hyperlinking webpages and bookmarking were two of the most important aspects of the Web 1.0 world. Soon, though, usability and sharing became very high priorities, and Web 2.0 evolved. Information published in the Web 2.0 world…

  12. Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS) user's manual, revision PC-2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, W. L.

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this manual is to introduce the contents and operation of the integrated refractive effects prediction system, personal computer version 2.0 (IREPS PC-2.0). IREPS is a system designed to assess the electromagnetic propagation effects of the lower atmosphere on radar, electronic warfare, communication, and weapon guidance systems. The IREPS models account for effects from optical interference, diffraction, tropospheric scatter, refraction, and evaporation and surface-based ducting under horizontally homogeneous atmospheric conditions.

  13. HPIDB 2.0: a curated database for host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Mais G.; Gresham, Cathy R.; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Identification and analysis of host–pathogen interactions (HPI) is essential to study infectious diseases. However, HPI data are sparse in existing molecular interaction databases, especially for agricultural host–pathogen systems. Therefore, resources that annotate, predict and display the HPI that underpin infectious diseases are critical for developing novel intervention strategies. HPIDB 2.0 (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/hpi/main.html) is a resource for HPI data, and contains 45, 238 manually curated entries in the current release. Since the first description of the database in 2010, multiple enhancements to HPIDB data and interface services were made that are described here. Notably, HPIDB 2.0 now provides targeted biocuration of molecular interaction data. As a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium, annotations provided by HPIDB 2.0 curators meet community standards to provide detailed contextual experimental information and facilitate data sharing. Moreover, HPIDB 2.0 provides access to rapidly available community annotations that capture minimum molecular interaction information to address immediate researcher needs for HPI network analysis. In addition to curation, HPIDB 2.0 integrates HPI from existing external sources and contains tools to infer additional HPI where annotated data are scarce. Compared to other interaction databases, our data collection approach ensures HPIDB 2.0 users access the most comprehensive HPI data from a wide range of pathogens and their hosts (594 pathogen and 70 host species, as of February 2016). Improvements also include enhanced search capacity, addition of Gene Ontology functional information, and implementation of network visualization. The changes made to HPIDB 2.0 content and interface ensure that users, especially agricultural researchers, are able to easily access and analyse high quality, comprehensive HPI data. All HPIDB 2.0 data are updated regularly, are publically available for direct

  14. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Mary Ann Piette: Impact of efficient buildings

    ScienceCinema

    Mary Ann Piette

    2010-09-01

    Mary Ann Piette speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  15. Rényi entropy of a free (2, 0) tensor multiplet and its supersymmetric counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nian, Jun; Zhou, Yang

    2016-06-01

    We compute the Rényi entropy and the supersymmetric Rényi entropy for the six-dimensional free (2, 0) tensor multiplet. We make various checks on our results, and they are consistent with the previous results about the (2, 0) tensor multiplet. As a by-product, we have established a canonical way to compute the Rényi entropy for p -form fields in d -dimensions.

  16. HPIDB 2.0: a curated database for host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Ammari, Mais G; Gresham, Cathy R; McCarthy, Fiona M; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Identification and analysis of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) is essential to study infectious diseases. However, HPI data are sparse in existing molecular interaction databases, especially for agricultural host-pathogen systems. Therefore, resources that annotate, predict and display the HPI that underpin infectious diseases are critical for developing novel intervention strategies. HPIDB 2.0 (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/hpi/main.html) is a resource for HPI data, and contains 45, 238 manually curated entries in the current release. Since the first description of the database in 2010, multiple enhancements to HPIDB data and interface services were made that are described here. Notably, HPIDB 2.0 now provides targeted biocuration of molecular interaction data. As a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium, annotations provided by HPIDB 2.0 curators meet community standards to provide detailed contextual experimental information and facilitate data sharing. Moreover, HPIDB 2.0 provides access to rapidly available community annotations that capture minimum molecular interaction information to address immediate researcher needs for HPI network analysis. In addition to curation, HPIDB 2.0 integrates HPI from existing external sources and contains tools to infer additional HPI where annotated data are scarce. Compared to other interaction databases, our data collection approach ensures HPIDB 2.0 users access the most comprehensive HPI data from a wide range of pathogens and their hosts (594 pathogen and 70 host species, as of February 2016). Improvements also include enhanced search capacity, addition of Gene Ontology functional information, and implementation of network visualization. The changes made to HPIDB 2.0 content and interface ensure that users, especially agricultural researchers, are able to easily access and analyse high quality, comprehensive HPI data. All HPIDB 2.0 data are updated regularly, are publically available for direct

  17. The Logic of Wikis: The Possibilities of the Web 2.0 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Michael; Kang, Min Ju

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of Web 2.0 and some of its ascendant tools such as blogs and wikis have the potential to dramatically change education, both in how we conceptualize and operationalize processes and strategies. We argue in this paper that it is a change that has been over a century in coming. The promise of the Web 2.0 is similar to ideas proposed by…

  18. WALK 2.0: Examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a ‘real world’ setting: an ecological trial

    PubMed Central

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Savage, Trevor N; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Maeder, Anthony J; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Van Itallie, Anetta; Tague, Rhys; Mummery, W Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of health-enhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Web-based interventions are a popular approach for behaviour change given their wide reach and accessibility. However, challenges with participant engagement and retention reduce the long-term maintenance of behaviour change. Web 2.0 features present a new and innovative online environment supporting greater interactivity, with the potential to increase engagement and retention. In order to understand the applicability of these innovative interventions for the broader population, ‘real-world’ interventions implemented under ‘everyday conditions’ are required. The aim of this study is to investigate the difference in physical activity behaviour between individuals using a traditional Web 1.0 website with those using a novel Web 2.0 website. Methods and analysis In this study we will aim to recruit 2894 participants. Participants will be recruited from individuals who register with a pre-existing health promotion website that currently provides Web 1.0 features (http://www.10000steps.org.au). Eligible participants who provide informed consent will be randomly assigned to one of the two trial conditions: the pre-existing 10 000 Steps website (with Web 1.0 features) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (with Web 2.0 features). Primary and secondary outcome measures will be assessed by self-report at baseline, 3 months and 12 months, and include: physical activity behaviour, height and weight, Internet self-efficacy, website usability, website usage and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination This study has received ethics approval from the University of Western Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (Reference Number H8767) and has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (Reference Number 589903). Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, academic

  19. Education 2.0 - How has social media and Web 2.0 been integrated into medical education? A systematical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hollinderbäumer, Anke; Hartz, Tobias; Ückert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Present-day students have grown up with considerable knowledge concerning multi-media. The communication modes they use are faster, more spontaneous, and independent of place and time. These new web-based forms of information and communication are used by students, educators, and patients in various ways. Universities which have already used these tools report many positive effects on the learning behaviour of the students. In a systematic literature review, we summarized the manner in which the integration of Social Media and Web 2.0 into education has taken place. Method: A systematic literature search covering the last 5 years using MeSH terms was carried out via PubMed. Result: Among the 20 chosen publications, there was only one German publication. Most of the publications are from the US and Great Britain. The latest publications report on the concrete usage of the tools in education, including social networking, podcasts, blogs, wikis, YouTube, Twitter and Skype. Conclusion: The integration of Web 2.0 and Social Media is the modern form of self-determined learning. It stimulates reflection and actively integrates the students in the construction of their knowledge. With these new tools, the students acquire skills which they need in both their social and professional lives. PMID:23467509

  20. Toward Global Biobank Integration by Implementation of the Minimum Information About BIobank Data Sharing (MIABIS 2.0 Core).

    PubMed

    Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Norlin, Loreana; van Enckevort, David; Anton, Gabriele; Schuffenhauer, Simone; Silander, Kaisa; Mook, Linda; Holub, Petr; Bild, Raffael; Swertz, Morris; Litton, Jan-Eric

    2016-08-01

    Biobanks are the biological back end of data-driven medicine, but lack standards and generic solutions for interoperability and information harmonization. The move toward a global information infrastructure for biobanking demands semantic interoperability through harmonized services and common ontologies. To tackle this issue, the Minimum Information About BIobank data Sharing (MIABIS) was developed in 2012 by the Biobanking and BioMolecular Resources Research Infrastructure of Sweden (BBMRI.se). The wide acceptance of the first version of MIABIS encouraged evolving it to a more structured and descriptive standard. In 2013 a working group was formed under the largest infrastructure for health in Europe, Biobanking and BioMolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI-ERIC), with the remit to continue the development of MIABIS (version 2.0) through a multicountry governance process. MIABIS 2.0 Core has been developed with 22 attributes describing Biobanks, Sample Collections, and Studies according to a modular structure that makes it easier to adhere to and to extend the standard. This integration standard will make a great contribution to the discovery and exploitation of biobank resources and lead to a wider and more efficient use of valuable bioresources, thereby speeding up the research on human diseases. Many within the European Union have accepted MIABIS 2.0 Core as the "de facto" biobank information standard. PMID:26977825

  1. Development of the Yale Food Addiction Scale Version 2.0.

    PubMed

    Gearhardt, Ashley N; Corbin, William R; Brownell, Kelly D

    2016-02-01

    Parallels in biological, psychological, and behavioral systems have led to the hypothesis that an addictive process may contribute to problematic eating. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) was developed to provide a validated measure of addictive-like eating behavior based upon the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence. Recently, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) was released, which included significant changes to the substance-related and addictive disorders (SRAD) section. In the current study, the YFAS 2.0 was developed to maintain consistency with the current diagnostic understanding of addiction and to improve the psychometric properties of the original YFAS. In a sample of 550 participants, 14.6% met criteria for food addiction. The YFAS 2.0 demonstrated good internal consistency, as well as convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity. Elevated scores on the YFAS 2.0 were associated with higher rates of obesity and more severe pathological eating (e.g., binge eating). The YFAS 2.0 also appeared to capture a related, but unique construct relative to traditional eating disorders. In a separate sample of 209 participants, the YFAS and YFAS 2.0 were directly compared. Both versions of the YFAS were similarly associated with elevated body mass index, binge eating, and weight cycling. However, exceeding the food addiction threshold was more strongly associated with obesity for the YFAS 2.0 than the original YFAS. Thus, the YFAS 2.0 appears to by a psychometrically sound measure that reflects the current diagnostic understanding of addiction to further investigate the potential role of an addictive process in problematic eating behavior. PMID:26866783

  2. IntelligentFreight: A Tracking 2.0 Prototype for Global Supply Chain Transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Gorman, Bryan L.

    2009-01-01

    Imagine a world where boxes talk to containers, containers talk to trucks and trucks talk to forklifts that talk to people. Each box would be smart, carrying all the information about its contents, its shipping history, its handling instructions, and where it is supposed to be. This world is within our reach as a result of Web 2.0 innovations on the Internet. While technologies such as RFID, GPS, cellular phones and barcodes have become ever more prevalent in the freight supply chain, there is still an invisible curtain blocking information flow between proprietary and legacy enterprise systems. Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are working with academia, the U.S. Government, and commercial companies to apply Web 2.0 technologies to the challenge of tracking and monitoring hazardous materials and nuclear sources in the international supply chain. Under the rubric of Tracking 2.0, a term for the use of Web 2.0 technologies for tracking applications, ORNL is developing a prototype called IntelligentFreight. IntelligentFreight interfaces sensors, legacy databases, and proprietary commercial tracking systems. The prototype combines Web 2.0 s social networking and tagging concepts with a classical faceted classification (a way of describing the same object in multiple ways) model to track a shipment across incompatible enterprise systems.

  3. Health 2.0-Lessons Learned: Social Networking With Patients for Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suparna; Kilian, Reena; Leung, Fok-Han

    2014-07-01

    The advent of social networking as a major platform for human interaction has introduced a new dimension into the physician-patient relationship, known as Health 2.0. The concept of Health 2.0 is young and evolving; so far, it has meant the use of social media by health professionals and patients to personalize health care and promote health education. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter offer promising platforms for health care providers to engage patients. Despite the vast potential of Health 2.0, usage by health providers remains relatively low. Using a pilot study as an example, this commentary reviews the ways in which physicians can effectively harness the power of social networking to meaningfully engage their patients in primary prevention. PMID:24522931

  4. Integral Data Benchmark of HENDL2.0/MG Compared with Neutronics Shielding Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jieqiong; Xu, Dezheng; Zheng, Shanliang; He, Zhaozhong; Hu, Yanglin; Li, Jingjing; Zou, Jun; Zeng, Qin; Chen, Mingliang; Wang, Minghuang

    2009-10-01

    HENDL2.0, the latest version of the hybrid evaluated nuclear data library, was developed based upon some evaluated data from FENDL2.1 and ENDF/B-VII. To qualify and validate the working library, an integral test for the neutron production data of HENDL2.0 was performed with a series of existing spherical shell benchmark experiments (such as V, Be, Fe, Pb, Cr, Mn, Cu, Al, Si, Co, Zr, Nb, Mo, W and Ti). These experiments were simulated numerically using HENDL2.0/MG and a home-developed code VisualBUS. Calculations were conducted with both FENDL2.1/MG and FENDL2.1/MC, which are based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo Code MCNP/4C. By comparison and analysis of the neutron leakage spectra and the integral test, benchmark results of neutron production data are presented in this paper.

  5. Collaboration through ICT between Healthcare Professionals: The Social Requirements of Health 2.0 Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duysburgh, Pieter; Jacobs, An

    Social requirements are defined as the users' needs related to the use of an application in interaction with others. This paper aims to formulate social requirements of health 2.0 applications for professional healthcare workers. Collaboration is seen as the central characteristic of these applications. To detect the social requirements, we first identified four features that determine how healthcare professionals collaborate: (1) the professional status of healthcare professionals; (2) patient centeredness; (3) ambiguity in medicine and (4) complex organisation of healthcare. Based on these characteristics and findings of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) research in healthcare, we were able to formulate three social requirements for health 2.0 applications: (1) supported autonomy; (2) rationale in context; and (3) fluid collaboration. These requirements will serve as input for health 2.0 scenarios.

  6. Gen 2.0 Mixer/Ejector Nozzle Test at LSAF June 1995 to July 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arney, L. D.; Sandquist, D. L.; Forsyth, D. W.; Lidstone, G. L.; Long-Davis, Mary Jo (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Testing of the HSCT Generation 2.0 nozzle model hardware was conducted at the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, LSAF. Concurrent measurements of noise and thrust were made at critical takeoff design conditions for a variety of mixer/ejector model hardware. Design variables such as suppressor area ratio, mixer area ratio, liner type and thickness, ejector length, lobe penetration, and mixer chute shape were tested. Parallel testing was conducted at G.E.'s Cell 41 acoustic free jet facility to augment the LSAF test. The results from the Gen 2.0 testing are being used to help shape the current nozzle baseline configuration and guide the efforts in the upcoming Generation 2.5 and 3.0 nozzle tests. The Gen 2.0 results have been included in the total airplane system studies conducted at MDC and Boeing to provide updated noise and thrust performance estimates.

  7. SWIFT MODELLER v2.0: a platform-independent GUI for homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Abhinav; Shankaracharya; Vidyarthi, Ambarish S

    2012-07-01

    SWIFT MODELLER v2.0 is a platform-independent Java-based graphical user interface to MODELLER. It provides an interactive homology modeling solution by automating the formatting, scripting, and data extraction processes, meaning that the user only needs to paste in the protein target sequence as input. SWIFT MODELLER v2.0 takes a step-by-step approach where the flow of the software screens depicts steps in the homology modeling protocol. Ramachandran plots and DOPE profile graphs are sketched and displayed for in-depth model analysis, along with an embedded Jmol viewer for 3D visualization of the constructed model. SWIFT MODELLER v2.0 is functional on all Linux-based and Microsoft Windows operating systems for which MODELLER has been developed. The software is available as freeware at http://www.bitmesra.ac.in/swift-modeller/swift.htm . PMID:22160795

  8. Radiology PRICER 2. 0 subroutine installation guide, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kowaleski, R.

    1989-04-01

    Radiology pricing subroutine (PRICER 2.0) is furnished by the Health Care Financing Administration to process the payment of Outpatient Medicare claims with discharges on or after April 1, 1989. Volumes 1 and 2 contain the installation and operation guidelines necessary to install PRICER 2.0 in an IBM 3090 environment. The installation requires that the receiver be familiar with COBOL/VS, OS JCL, and that an interface module has been previously installed. The installation tape contains the program source code and data files necessary to completely install Radiology PRICER 2.0. Volume 2 contains Appendix A through G: Appendix A - RADMAIN (driver) source listing; Appendix B - RADPRICE source listing; Appendix C - listing of the Provider File; Appendix D - listing of the HCPCS Code File; Appendix E - listing of the Prevailing Charge/Fee Schedule File; Appendix F - listing of the bill test file; Appendix G - listing of the expected test results.

  9. Obtaining miRNA-Target Interaction Information from miRWalk2.0.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Alisha; Gretz, Norbert; Dweep, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    miRWalk2.0 (http://zmf.umm.uni-heidelberg.de/mirwalk2) is a freely accessible, regularly updated comprehensive archive supplying the largest available collection of predicted and experimentally verified miRNA-target interactions, with various novel and unique features to assist the scientific community. Approximately 949 million interactions between 11,748 miRNAs, 308,700 genes, and 68,460 lncRNAs are documented in miRWalk2.0 with 5,146,217 different kinds of identifiers to offer a one-stop site to collect an abundance of information. This article describes a schematic workflow on how to obtain miRNA-target interactions from miRWalk2.0. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27603021

  10. CSDMS2.0: Computational Infrastructure for Community Surface Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Hutton, E.; Peckham, S. D.; Overeem, I.; Kettner, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamic Modeling System (CSDMS) is an NSF-supported, international and community-driven program that seeks to transform the science and practice of earth-surface dynamics modeling. CSDMS integrates a diverse community of more than 850 geoscientists representing 360 international institutions (academic, government, industry) from 60 countries and is supported by a CSDMS Interagency Committee (22 Federal agencies), and a CSDMS Industrial Consortia (18 companies). CSDMS presently distributes more 200 Open Source models and modeling tools, access to high performance computing clusters in support of developing and running models, and a suite of products for education and knowledge transfer. CSDMS software architecture employs frameworks and services that convert stand-alone models into flexible "plug-and-play" components to be assembled into larger applications. CSDMS2.0 will support model applications within a web browser, on a wider variety of computational platforms, and on other high performance computing clusters to ensure robustness and sustainability of the framework. Conversion of stand-alone models into "plug-and-play" components will employ automated wrapping tools. Methods for quantifying model uncertainty are being adapted as part of the modeling framework. Benchmarking data is being incorporated into the CSDMS modeling framework to support model inter-comparison. Finally, a robust mechanism for ingesting and utilizing semantic mediation databases is being developed within the Modeling Framework. Six new community initiatives are being pursued: 1) an earth - ecosystem modeling initiative to capture ecosystem dynamics and ensuing interactions with landscapes, 2) a geodynamics initiative to investigate the interplay among climate, geomorphology, and tectonic processes, 3) an Anthropocene modeling initiative, to incorporate mechanistic models of human influences, 4) a coastal vulnerability modeling initiative, with emphasis on deltas and

  11. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  12. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  13. DREM 2.0: Improved reconstruction of dynamic regulatory networks from time-series expression data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modeling dynamic regulatory networks is a major challenge since much of the protein-DNA interaction data available is static. The Dynamic Regulatory Events Miner (DREM) uses a Hidden Markov Model-based approach to integrate this static interaction data with time series gene expression leading to models that can determine when transcription factors (TFs) activate genes and what genes they regulate. DREM has been used successfully in diverse areas of biological research. However, several issues were not addressed by the original version. Results DREM 2.0 is a comprehensive software for reconstructing dynamic regulatory networks that supports interactive graphical or batch mode. With version 2.0 a set of new features that are unique in comparison with other softwares are introduced. First, we provide static interaction data for additional species. Second, DREM 2.0 now accepts continuous binding values and we added a new method to utilize TF expression levels when searching for dynamic models. Third, we added support for discriminative motif discovery, which is particularly powerful for species with limited experimental interaction data. Finally, we improved the visualization to support the new features. Combined, these changes improve the ability of DREM 2.0 to accurately recover dynamic regulatory networks and make it much easier to use it for analyzing such networks in several species with varying degrees of interaction information. Conclusions DREM 2.0 provides a unique framework for constructing and visualizing dynamic regulatory networks. DREM 2.0 can be downloaded from: www.sb.cs.cmu.edu/drem. PMID:22897824

  14. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Unmanned Vacuum Environment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in more than 30 years, an advanced space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design was operated inside a vacuum chamber representative of the flight operating environment. The test article, PLSS 2.0, was the second system-level integrated prototype of the advanced PLSS design, following the PLSS 1.0 Breadboard that was developed and tested throughout 2011. Whereas PLSS 1.0 included five technology development components with the balance the system simulated using commercial-off-the-shelf items, PLSS 2.0 featured first generation or later prototypes for all components less instrumentation, tubing and fittings. Developed throughout 2012, PLSS 2.0 was the first attempt to package the system into a flight-like representative volume. PLSS 2.0 testing included an extensive functional evaluation known as Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) testing, Human-in-the-Loop testing in which the PLSS 2.0 prototype was integrated via umbilicals to a manned prototype space suit for 19 two-hour simulated EVAs, and unmanned vacuum environment testing. Unmanned vacuum environment testing took place from 1/9/15-7/9/15 with PLSS 2.0 located inside a vacuum chamber. Test sequences included performance mapping of several components, carbon dioxide removal evaluations at simulated intravehicular activity (IVA) conditions, a regulator pressure schedule assessment, and culminated with 25 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). During the unmanned vacuum environment test series, PLSS 2.0 accumulated 378 hours of integrated testing including 291 hours of operation in a vacuum environment and 199 hours of simulated EVA time. The PLSS prototype performed nominally throughout the test series, with two notable exceptions including a pump failure and a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) leak, for which post-test failure investigations were performed. In addition to generating an extensive database of PLSS 2.0 performance data, achievements included requirements and

  15. Teaching a Foreign Language to Deaf People via Vodcasting & Web 2.0 Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drigas, Athanasios; Vrettaros, John; Tagoulis, Alexandors; Kouremenos, Dimitris

    This paper presents the design and development of an e-learning course in teaching deaf people in a foreign language, whose first language is the sign language. The course is based in e-material, vodcasting and web 2.0 tools such as social networking and blog The course has been designed especially for deaf people and it is exploring the possibilities that e-learning material vodcasting and web 2.0 tools can offer to enhance the learning process and achieve more effective learning results.

  16. Supersymmetric solutions of N = (2, 0) topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik Deger, Nihat; Moutsopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    We first make a Killing spinor analysis for a general three-dimensional off-shell N=(2,0) supergravity and find conditions for a bosonic background to preserve at least one real supercharge. We then consider a particular model, namely N=(2,0) topologically massive supergravity and impose its field equations. By making a suitable ansatz on metric functions we find a large class of solutions that include spacelike, timelike and null warped AdS 3 among others. Isometric quotients of spacelike and timelike squashed AdS 3 solutions yield extremal black holes without closed causal curves.

  17. TU-C-18C-01: Medical Physics 1.0 to 2.0: Introduction and Panel Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, E; Pfeiffer, D; Frey, G; Krupinski, E; Pizzutiello, R; Carson, P; Mahesh, M; Hangiandreou, N; Jordan, D; Dixon, R

    2014-06-15

    Medical Physics 2.0, a new frontier in clinical imaging physics: Diagnostic imaging has always been a technological highlight of modern medicine. Imaging systems, with their ever-expanding advancement in terms of technology and application, increasingly require skilled expertise to understand the delicacy of their operation, monitor their performance, design their effective use, and ensure their overall quality and safety, scientifically and in quantitative terms. Physicists can play a crucial role in that process. But that role has largely remained a severely untapped resource. Many imaging centers fail to appreciate this potential, with medical physics groups either nonexistent or highly understaffed and their services poorly integrated into the patient care process. As a field, we have yet to define and enact how the clinical physicist can engage as an active, effective, and integral member of the clinical team, and how the services that she/he provides can be financially accounted for. Physicists do and will always contribute to research and development. However, their indispensible contribution to clinical imaging operations is something that has not been adequately established. That, in conjunction with new realities of healthcare practice, indicates a growing need to establish an updated approach to clinical medical imaging physics. This presentation aims to describe a vision as how clinical imaging physics can expand beyond traditional insular models of inspection and acceptance testing, oriented toward compliance, towards team-based models of operational engagement addressing topics such as new non-classical challenges of new technologies, quantitative imaging, and operational optimization. The Medical Physics 2.0 paradigm extends clinical medical physics from isolated characterization of inherent properties of the equipment to effective use of the equipment and to retrospective evaluation of clinical performance. This is an existential transition of the

  18. Video-Based Response & Revision: Dialogic Instruction Using Video and Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heintz, Anne; Borsheim, Carlin; Caughlan, Samantha; Juzwik, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    This article documents the curricular decisions made by a teacher educator research team whose guiding theoretical focus for intern practice is dialogic instruction. Over a 2-year sequence, teaching interns used video and Web 2.0 technologies to respond critically to and revise their teaching practices in collaboration with peers and instructors.…

  19. Using Web2.0 Applications to Close the Digital Divide in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinidad, Sue; Broadley, Tania

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this paper documents the use of Web2.0 applications with six Western Australian schools that are considered to be regional and/or remote. With a population of two million people within an area of 2,525,500 square kilometres Western Australia has a number of towns that are classified as regional and remote. Each of the…

  20. Printing AppleWorks V2.0 Word Processing Files Using the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for printing AppleWorks version 2.0 word processor files using the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading the word processor files, selecting the print option, printing files, and obtaining additional help. For each step, a diagram of the…

  1. Upgrading to Web 2.0: An Experiential Project to Build a Marketing Wiki

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Wikis are one of the newest features of Web 2.0. This article describes the implementation of a project in a marketing course in which students created an interactive textbook using wiki software. Several surprises encountered along the way are described, and the unique problem of grading individual contributions to a wiki is discussed. The author…

  2. Reading Workshop 2.0: Children's Literature in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank; Youngs, Suzette

    2013-01-01

    As readers encounter children's literature in new formats and modes of delivery, the basic processes of reading, sharing, discussing and analyzing texts will change. Because of these changes, new instructional approaches and resources will be required to support the development of young readers in a Reading Workshop 2.0 environment. In a…

  3. Making (and Not Making) Connections with Web 2.0 Technology in the ESL Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamaru, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes her own attempt at incorporating Web 2.0 technology into her teaching: a wiki project that she used in her English as a second language (ESL) composition course. The theme she traces throughout the rest of this essay is the wiki's ability (or inability) to make "connections" of various kinds. Like any text, the…

  4. Using Web 2.0 Technology to Enhance, Scaffold and Assess Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies, such as social networks, wikis, blogs, and virtual worlds provide a platform for collaborative working, facilitating sharing of resources and joint document production. They can act as a stimulus to promote active learning and provide an engaging and interactive environment for students, and as such align with the philosophy…

  5. Web 2.0 and Virtual World Technologies: A Growing Impact on IS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert L.; Rea, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 and virtual world technologies are here to stay. Today, our students come to our classroom with a presence on Facebook, the latest concert as a podcast on their MP3 player, and experience playing games in virtual worlds. In some respects, students are more tech-savvy than their Information Systems professors. Research showing the benefits…

  6. Making Learning and Web 2.0 Technologies Work for Higher Learning Institutions in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the extent to which learning and Web 2.0 technologies are utilised to support learning and teaching in Africa's higher learning institutions, with a specific focus on Tanzania's public universities. Design/methodology/approach: A combination of content analysis and semi-structured interviews was used to collect…

  7. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  8. Beyond the Book: Using Web 2.0 Tools to Develop 21st Century Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judith J.; Dobson, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    New information and communications technologies (ICT) are redefining teacher education. A university faculty member and an instructional technology consultant incorporated information and communications technologies within a graduate university methods course. The following research questions explored student perceptions of using Web 2.0 tools as…

  9. Adoption of Web 2.0 in US Academic Libraries: A Survey of ARL Library Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Khalid; Richardson, John V., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to survey the web sites of the academic libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (USA) regarding the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: The websites of 100 member academic libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (USA) were surveyed. Findings: All libraries were found to be…

  10. Hypertext Theory: Rethinking and Reformulating What We Know, Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Craig; Lang, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    This article traces the influences of hypertext theory throughout the various genres of online publication in technical communication. It begins with a look back at some of the important concepts and theorists writing about hypertext theory from the post-World War II era, to the early years of the World Wide Web 2.0, and the very differing notions…

  11. A Comparison of Web 2.0 Tools in a Doctoral Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2010-01-01

    Adult, professional students in a doctoral-level course used Web 2.0 tools such as wikis, blogs, and online discussions to develop answers to six "Big Questions" related to higher education finance and also produced a research paper that used original data or the research literature to improve understanding of a specific topic. At the close of the…

  12. What Is Librarian 2.0--New Competencies or Interactive Relations? A Library Professional Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Holmberg, Kim; Kronqvist-Berg, Maria; Nivakoski, Outi; Widén, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Library 2.0 is a change in the way libraries interact with their users. Technological developments on the Web have had a major influence on these changes. The change also places new requirements on librarians' competencies and skills. This research investigates how librarians themselves see this change in terms of their work identity and…

  13. Is Education 1.0 Ready for Web 2.0 Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John

    2007-01-01

    According to John Thompson, Web 2.0 is here. Having moved away from its roots in a read-only medium, the Internet is now a place where any and all users can create, upload, and transform information. A crucial consideration for Thompson is how this technological transformation will affect the pedagogical practices of institutions of higher…

  14. Two Heads Are Better than One: Inservice Teachers Engaging in Instructional Design 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonenko, Pavlo D.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated changes in inservice teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge and technology integration self-efficacy as a result of engaging in collaborative instructional design with Web 2.0 tools. We collected survey and interview data in the pre/post format, and teaching portfolios served to triangulate survey and…

  15. Enterprise 2.0 in Engineering and Business Education: Engineering and Business Students' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Andreas; Zascerinska, Jelena; Bassus, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary engineers and entrepreneurs need to become more cognizant and responsive to the emerging needs of the market for engineering, enterprise and technology services. Enterprise 2.0 which penetrates our society more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services has the potential to contribute decisively to the sustainable…

  16. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Don DePaolo: Geo and Bio Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Don DePaolo:

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  17. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ramamoorthy Ramesh: Low-cost Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh:

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  18. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Don DePaolo: Geo and Bio Sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    Don DePaolo:

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  19. Pervasive Knowledge, Social Networks, and Cloud Computing: E-Learning 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anshari, Muhammad; Alas, Yabit; Guan, Lim Sei

    2015-01-01

    Embedding Web 2.0 in learning processes has extended learning from traditional based learning-centred to a collaborative based learning-centred institution that emphasises learning anywhere and anytime. While deploying Semantic Web into e-learning offers a broader spectrum of pervasive knowledge acquisition to enrich users' experience in learning.…

  20. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  1. E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelet, Jean-Eric, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered the traditional approach to education, brick and mortar institutions are no longer the norm due to e-learning technologies. Populations are turning into ubiquitous human beings, and educational practices are reflecting this change. "E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education" compiles the latest…

  2. E-Safety and Web 2.0 for Children Aged 11-16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharples, M.; Graber, R.; Harrison, C.; Logan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a survey and interviews with children aged 11-16 years, teachers and parents on their attitudes to e-safety in relation to social networking and media creation (Web 2.0) and their practices at school and at home. The results showed that 74% of the children surveyed have used social network (SN) sites and that a…

  3. Implementing E-Learning and Web 2.0 Innovation: Didactical Scenarios and Practical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkee, David; Brant, Stephen; Nevin, Pete; Odell, Annette; Williams, Godfried; Melomey, Divina; Roberts, Hedley; Imafidon, Chris; Perryman, Roy; Lopes, Anna

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the practical implications for teachers wishing to incorporate e-learning and Web 2.0 technologies into their pedagogy. The authors concentrate on applied didactical scenarios and the impacts of e-learning innovations. The methods applied stem from grounded theory and action research. An analytical framework was derived by…

  4. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

  5. Implementing Web 2.0 Tools in the Classroom: Four Teachers' Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Cummins, Megan; Dipzinski, Erin; Joseph, Paula; Laskey, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, four teachers shared their experiences using the following free Web 2.0 tools with their students: Jing, Wix, Google Sites, and Blogger. The teachers found that students reacted positively to lessons in which these tools were used, and also noted improvements they could make when using them in the future.

  6. Smartphones Give You Wings: Pedagogical Affordances of Mobile Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Bateman, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Built on the foundation of four years of research and implementation of mobile learning projects (m-learning), this paper provides an overview of the potential of the integration of mobile Web 2.0 tools (based around smartphones) to facilitate social constructivist pedagogies and engage students in tertiary education. Pedagogical affordances of…

  7. MOSAICA: A Web-2.0 Based System for the Preservation and Presentation of Cultural Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Herscoviz, Orit; Kaberman, Zvia; Dori, Yehudit J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of how to present cultural heritage resources in a way that attracts potential users is becoming important in our ever-changing world. This paper describes MOSAICA system--a web 2.0-based toolbox, dedicated for the preservation and presentation of cultural heritage. This paper also describes an evaluation study that examined MOSAICA…

  8. Collaborating and delivering literature search results to clinical teams using web 2.0 tools.

    PubMed

    Damani, Shamsha; Fulton, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    This article describes the experiences of librarians at the Research Medical Library embedded within clinical teams at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and their efforts to enhance communication within their teams using Web 2.0 tools. Pros and cons of EndNote Web, Delicious, Connotea, PBWorks, and SharePoint are discussed. PMID:20677061

  9. Social Dimension of WEB 2.0 in Teacher Education: Focus on Peer-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Ahrens, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The research deals with the analysis of efficiency of teaching techniques with the use of the social dimension of Web 2.0 within the English for Specific Purposes course in pre-school and primary teacher education that would help students to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for educational services and…

  10. Worth It? Findings from a Study of How Academics Assess Students' Web 2.0 Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Waycott, Jenny; Clerehan, Rosemary; Hamilton, Margaret; Richardson, Joan; Sheard, Judithe; Thompson, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Educational commentators have offered many pedagogical rationales for using Web 2.0 to support learning in higher education, and academics are being encouraged to find ways for their students to use social web technologies. Questions arise as to the value of these activities compared to more conventional assignments, and whether implementing such…

  11. EPA REGIONAL OXIDANT MODEL (ROM2.0): EVALUATION ON 1980 NEROS DATA BASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second generation U.S. EPA Regional Oxidant Model (ROM2.0) has been evaluated for the northeastern United States using the 1980 NER0S data bases. The theoretical basis of the model and its structure and organization are described. The data bases available from the summer 1980...

  12. Building Project Management Communities: Exploring the Contribution of Patterns Supported by Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Elizabeth L.; Hatch, Andrew; Ashurst, Colin; Jessop, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an approach whereby patterns are used to describe management issues and solutions to be used during the project management of team-based software development. The work describes how web 2.0 technologies have been employed to support the use and development of such patterns. To evaluate the success of patterns and the…

  13. Integrating web 2.0 in clinical research education in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Amgad, Mohamed; AlFaar, Ahmad Samir

    2014-09-01

    The use of Web 2.0 tools in education and health care has received heavy attention over the past years. Over two consecutive years, Children's Cancer Hospital - Egypt 57357 (CCHE 57357), in collaboration with Egyptian universities, student bodies, and NGOs, conducted a summer course that supports undergraduate medical students to cross the gap between clinical practice and clinical research. This time, there was a greater emphasis on reaching out to the students using social media and other Web 2.0 tools, which were heavily used in the course, including Google Drive, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Mendeley, Google Hangout, Live Streaming, Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), and Dropbox. We wanted to investigate the usefulness of integrating Web 2.0 technologies into formal educational courses and modules. The evaluation survey was filled in by 156 respondents, 134 of whom were course candidates (response rate = 94.4 %) and 22 of whom were course coordinators (response rate = 81.5 %). The course participants came from 14 different universities throughout Egypt. Students' feedback was positive and supported the integration of Web 2.0 tools in academic courses and modules. Google Drive, Facebook, and Dropbox were found to be most useful. PMID:24395632

  14. The Gypsy Database (GyDB) of mobile genetic elements: release 2.0.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Covelli, Laura; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Viu, Jose M; Tamarit, Daniel; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Jose; Vicente-Ripolles, Miguel; Fuster, Gonzalo; Bernet, Guillermo P; Maumus, Florian; Munoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Sempere, Jose M; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andres

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the second release of the Gypsy Database of Mobile Genetic Elements (GyDB 2.0): a research project devoted to the evolutionary dynamics of viruses and transposable elements based on their phylogenetic classification (per lineage and protein domain). The Gypsy Database (GyDB) is a long-term project that is continuously progressing, and that owing to the high molecular diversity of mobile elements requires to be completed in several stages. GyDB 2.0 has been powered with a wiki to allow other researchers participate in the project. The current database stage and scope are long terminal repeats (LTR) retroelements and relatives. GyDB 2.0 is an update based on the analysis of Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia and Bel/Pao LTR retroelements and the Caulimoviridae pararetroviruses of plants. Among other features, in terms of the aforementioned topics, this update adds: (i) a variety of descriptions and reviews distributed in multiple web pages; (ii) protein-based phylogenies, where phylogenetic levels are assigned to distinct classified elements; (iii) a collection of multiple alignments, lineage-specific hidden Markov models and consensus sequences, called GyDB collection; (iv) updated RefSeq databases and BLAST and HMM servers to facilitate sequence characterization of new LTR retroelement and caulimovirus queries; and (v) a bibliographic server. GyDB 2.0 is available at http://gydb.org. PMID:21036865

  15. Flipping the Online Classroom with Web 2.0: The Asynchronous Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Lance

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how Web 2.0 technologies can be used to "flip" the online classroom by creating asynchronous workshops in social environments where immediacy and social presence can be maximized. Using experience teaching several communication and writing classes in Google Apps (Google+, Google Hangouts, Google Drive, etc.), I…

  16. Children and Young People's Views on Web 2.0 Technologies. LGA Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Peter; Walker, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are online tools that allow users to share, collaborate and interact with one another. This small-scale project focused on young people's personal use of social media, and on the potential to use these tools to collect the views of young people and involve them in democracy in communities and local authorities. The main…

  17. 78 FR 29117 - After Final Consideration Pilot Program 2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office After Final Consideration Pilot Program 2.0 AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and... Legal Advisor, Office of Patent Legal Administration, Office of the Deputy Commissioner for...

  18. From VLEs to Learning Webs: The Implications of Web 2.0 for Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects on the current position of virtual learning environments (VLEs) in universities and speculates about likely future directions for e-learning. Using accepted models of technology innovation and looking at current Web trends, it considers the extent to which e-learning is truly embedded in institutions, how Web 2.0 is being used…

  19. Dynamic Space for Rent: Using Commercial Web Hosting to Develop a Web 2.0 Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgins, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The explosion of Web 2.0 into libraries has left many smaller academic libraries (and other libraries with limited computing resources or support) to work in the cloud using free Web applications. The use of commercial Web hosting is an innovative approach to the problem of inadequate local resources. While the idea of insourcing IT will seem…

  20. INTERFEROME v2.0: an updated database of annotated interferon-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Rusinova, Irina; Forster, Sam; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Masse, Marion; Cumming, Helen; Chapman, Ross; Hertzog, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interferome v2.0 (http://interferome.its.monash.edu.au/interferome/) is an update of an earlier version of the Interferome DB published in the 2009 NAR database edition. Vastly improved computational infrastructure now enables more complex and faster queries, and supports more data sets from types I, II and III interferon (IFN)-treated cells, mice or humans. Quantitative, MIAME compliant data are collected, subjected to thorough, standardized, quantitative and statistical analyses and then significant changes in gene expression are uploaded. Comprehensive manual collection of metadata in v2.0 allows flexible, detailed search capacity including the parameters: range of -fold change, IFN type, concentration and time, and cell/tissue type. There is no limit to the number of genes that can be used to search the database in a single query. Secondary analysis such as gene ontology, regulatory factors, chromosomal location or tissue expression plots of IFN-regulated genes (IRGs) can be performed in Interferome v2.0, or data can be downloaded in convenient text formats compatible with common secondary analysis programs. Given the importance of IFN to innate immune responses in infectious, inflammatory diseases and cancer, this upgrade of the Interferome to version 2.0 will facilitate the identification of gene signatures of importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:23203888

  1. Constructs for Web 2.0 Learning Environments: A Theatrical Metaphor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Blocher, Michael; Roberts, Gayle

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies empower learners to create personalized and community-based collaborative environments. Social networking technology affords learners to weave their human networks through active connections to understand what we know and we want to know. Social acts that bring out identities, awareness, relationships, connections, and…

  2. Learning with Web 2.0: Social Technology and Discursive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm; Lowe, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of Internet technologies which facilitate activities that are, above all, social and participatory, allowing children and adults to create and share their own content, and to communicate in a wide range of forums. Correspondingly, there has been great popular and expert interest in the potential of Web 2.0

  3. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ramamoorthy Ramesh: Low-cost Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh:

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  4. Strategy Approach for eLearning 2.0 Deployment in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casquero, Oskar; Portillo, Javier; Ovelar, Ramon; Romo, Jesus; Benito, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The institutionally powered Personal Learning Environment (iPLE) constitutes our vision of how Web 2.0 technologies, people arrangement and data sharing could be applied for delivering open, flexible, distributed and learner-centred learning environments to university members. Based on the iPLE, this paper explores a strategy approach that…

  5. Facilitating Student-Generated Content Using Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunbae

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies have created a trend of user-generated content by supporting media production, collaboration, communication, and dissemination. User-generated content is translated into student-generated content (SGC) in education. SGC engages learners in an authentic project that fosters students' autonomy, creativity, and real-world…

  6. Education Library 2.0: The Establishment of a Dynamic Multi-Site Liaison Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton Ewbank, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of marketing, Web 2.0 tools, videoconferencing, face-to-face instruction and site visits, a library presence including systematic information literacy instruction is embedded into multiple programs at sixteen sites in a growing college of education with nearly 6000 students and over 115 full-time faculty members. As the needs…

  7. Location Matters: Leveraging Knowledge Building with Mobile Devices and Web 2.0 Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Seow, Peter; Looi, Chee Kit

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential of mobile computing and Web 2.0 technology to support knowledge building in formal and informal settings. Desktop-based knowledge building tools have limited affordances of supporting one-to-one access, learning "in situ," and seamless integration in and out of school environments. In this initial study, we…

  8. Web 2.0 in the Professional LIS Literature: An Exploratory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical descriptive analysis and a thorough content analysis of descriptors and journal titles extracted from the Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA) database, focusing on the subject of Web 2.0 and its main applications: blog, wiki, social network and tags.The primary research questions include: whether the…

  9. Printing AppleWorks V2.0 Spreadsheet Files Using the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for printing AppleWorks version 2.0 spreadsheet files using the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading spreadsheet files; selecting the print option; printing entire files; and for printing specific rows, columns, or blocks of the file. For…

  10. Using Web 2.0 for Tracking and Assessing the Impacts of Civic Engagement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    The interactive Internet, or Web 2.0, has created opportunities for civic engagement research and information management. This article presents a case describing one university's experience of such research. This article also provides a literature review on the evaluation of civic engagement and a description of the approach used at Widener…

  11. Assisting Tutors to Utilize Web 2.0 Tools in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perikos, Isidoros; Grivokostopoulou, Foteini; Kovas, Konstantinos; Hatzilygeroudis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, web has changed the way that educational procedures are delivered to students and has brought innovative learning technologies and possibilities that were not available before. The Web has evolved to a worldwide platform for collaboration, sharing and innovation, constituting what is called Web 2.0. Social media are an…

  12. Supporting Self-Regulated Learning in Web 2.0 Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yong-Ming; Huang, Yueh-Min; Wang, Chia-Sui; Liu, Chien-Hung; Sandnes, Frode Eika

    2012-01-01

    Web-based self-learning (WBSL) provides learners with a powerful means of acquiring knowledge. However, WBSL may disorient learners, especially when their skills are inadequate for regulating their learning. In this paper, a Web 2.0 self-regulated learning (Web2SRL) system based on the theory of self-regulated learning is proposed. Learners use…

  13. Promoting Reflective Thinking Skills by Using Web 2.0 Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate are using Web 2.0 applications promoting reflective thinking skills for higher education student in faculty for education. Although the literature reveals that technology integration is a trend in higher education and researchers and educators have increasingly shared their ideas and examples of implementations of Web…

  14. Vocabulary Learning on Learner-Created Content by Using Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The present research examined the use of Web 2.0 tools to improve students' vocabulary knowledge at the School of Foreign Languages, Gaziantep University. Current studies in literature mostly deal with descriptions of students' attitudes towards the reasons for the use of web-based platforms. However, integrating usual classroom environment with…

  15. Web 2.0: A New Generation of Learners and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Dina; Nelson, Charles

    2008-01-01

    New social-sharing applications are transforming the Internet from a "read-only" (Web 1.0) environment to a "read-write" ecology that many are calling Web 2.0. These tools (e.g., weblogs and wikis) enable Internet users to publish information online almost as easily as they can read online, and they have tremendous potential for learning. This…

  16. Pre-Teens' Informal Learning with ICT and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Rebecca; Faulkner, Dorothy; Whitelock, Denise; Sheehy, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and Web 2.0 have the potential to impact on learning by supporting inquiry, literacies, collaboration and publication. Restrictions on the use of these tools within schools, primarily due to concerns about discipline and child safety, make it difficult to make full use of this potential in formal…

  17. The Status of Web 2.0 in Iran's LIS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrafzadeh, Maryam; Hazeri, Afsaneh; Alavi, Soheila

    2011-01-01

    The present paper discusses results of a study which aimed to explore the knowledge and use of Web 2.0 technologies by LIS academics in Iran and to explore the challenges they face for using these technologies. The research method was explorative and empirical. Data was collected through a web-based survey questionnaire containing both open and…

  18. Web 2.0? Let's Get to Web 1.0 First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2006-01-01

    It seems that everyone is talking about Web 2.0. This new vision of the Web enables greater interactivity, more user control of information, radical personalization, the development of online communities, and more democratic management of information. Supporting technologies include blogs, wikis, RSS, podcasts, tagging, XML, and Web services.…

  19. Ethics from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0: Standing outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frances Jacobson

    2009-01-01

    In today's schools and library media centers, emotion-laden concerns about new modes of information and communication technology can hijack librarians' attention, even taking center stage. Something about the online revolution and, more recently, the advent of Web 2.0 tools and their ability to create connections among users, as well as between…

  20. Social Dimension of Web 2.0 in Engineering Education: Students' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Bassus, Olaf; Ahrens, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary engineers need to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for engineering and technology services. Social dimension of Web 2.0 which penetrates our society more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services has the potential to contribute decisively to the sustainable development of…

  1. Techno Savvy: A Web 2.0 Curriculum Encouraging Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herro, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results from a case study focused on understanding student practices regarding production-oriented problem-solving with digital media. Thirty-seven students participated in an elective curriculum called, "Techno Savvy," a nine-week course focused on student exploration of global issues, and designed around Web 2.0

  2. Collaborative Writing with Web 2.0 Technologies: Education Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodahl, Cornelia; Hadjerrouit, Said; Hansen, Nils Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are becoming popular in teaching and learning environments. Among them several online collaborative writing tools, like wikis and blogs, have been integrated into educational settings. Research has been carried out on a wide range of subjects related to wikis, while other, comparable tools like Google Docs and EtherPad remain…

  3. Social Dimension of Web 2.0 in Teacher Education: Pedagogical Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Andreas; Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The research deals with the analysis of efficiency of the process of teaching and learning with use of the social dimension of Web 2.0 within the English for Specific Purposes course in pre-school and primary teacher education that would help students to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for educational…

  4. Web 2.0: Challenges and Opportunities for Media Education and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chi-Kim

    2010-01-01

    The nature of knowledge is being redefined by a new media landscape that allows all participants to be media producers and owners. Without a comprehensive strategy to include Web 2.0 tools and social media practices within schools, powerful new skills will be neither harnessed, nor developed. Despite the challenge to the relationship between…

  5. A Web 2.0-Based Collaborative Model for Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Md. Mokter; Aydin, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Web 2.0 is a collaborative web development platform that has had tremendous usage in building effective, interactive, and collaborative virtual societies at home and abroad. Multicultural study is another trend that has tremendous possibilities to help people in the fight against racism and enables them to become active members of a…

  6. A Little Help from My Friends: Classroom 2.0 Educators Share Their Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargardon, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Blogs, wikis, podcasting, social networks... it seems the entire world has gone 2.0 crazy. Among the followers are educators, who, in ever increasing numbers, are integrating these online, interactive tools into their classrooms and even libraries. This article presents profiles of a few of educators who have taken the plunge, launching blogs,…

  7. The Gypsy Database (GyDB) of mobile genetic elements: release 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Covelli, Laura; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Viu, Jose M.; Tamarit, Daniel; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Jose; Vicente-Ripolles, Miguel; Fuster, Gonzalo; Bernet, Guillermo P.; Maumus, Florian; Munoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Sempere, Jose M.; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andres

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the second release of the Gypsy Database of Mobile Genetic Elements (GyDB 2.0): a research project devoted to the evolutionary dynamics of viruses and transposable elements based on their phylogenetic classification (per lineage and protein domain). The Gypsy Database (GyDB) is a long-term project that is continuously progressing, and that owing to the high molecular diversity of mobile elements requires to be completed in several stages. GyDB 2.0 has been powered with a wiki to allow other researchers participate in the project. The current database stage and scope are long terminal repeats (LTR) retroelements and relatives. GyDB 2.0 is an update based on the analysis of Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia and Bel/Pao LTR retroelements and the Caulimoviridae pararetroviruses of plants. Among other features, in terms of the aforementioned topics, this update adds: (i) a variety of descriptions and reviews distributed in multiple web pages; (ii) protein-based phylogenies, where phylogenetic levels are assigned to distinct classified elements; (iii) a collection of multiple alignments, lineage-specific hidden Markov models and consensus sequences, called GyDB collection; (iv) updated RefSeq databases and BLAST and HMM servers to facilitate sequence characterization of new LTR retroelement and caulimovirus queries; and (v) a bibliographic server. GyDB 2.0 is available at http://gydb.org. PMID:21036865

  8. Web 2.0 technology: how is it impacting your employer brand?

    PubMed

    Russell, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 and social media have exploded in the past 12 to 18 months. The downturn in the economy has had a significant bearing on this growth. Health care organizations are beginning to embrace this technology to engage candidates and enhance their brands. More importantly, they are beginning to see the importance of monitoring their brands as well. PMID:19927449

  9. Organizational and Social Factors in the Adoption of Intranet 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bohyun

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the intranet implementation and adoption process of a SharePoint intranet at a small academic library and investigates why the many Web 2.0 tools of the library intranet are currently underused. Staff interviews showed that common goals for an intranet, such as information dissemination, knowledge sharing,…

  10. Brassica database (BRAD) version 2.0: integrating and mining Brassicaceae species genomic resources

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobo; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The Brassica database (BRAD) was built initially to assist users apply Brassica rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic data efficiently to their research. However, many Brassicaceae genomes have been sequenced and released after its construction. These genomes are rich resources for comparative genomics, gene annotation and functional evolutionary studies of Brassica crops. Therefore, we have updated BRAD to version 2.0 (V2.0). In BRAD V2.0, 11 more Brassicaceae genomes have been integrated into the database, namely those of Arabidopsis lyrata, Aethionema arabicum, Brassica oleracea, Brassica napus, Camelina sativa, Capsella rubella, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and three extremophiles Schrenkiella parvula, Thellungiella halophila and Thellungiella salsuginea. BRAD V2.0 provides plots of syntenic genomic fragments between pairs of Brassicaceae species, from the level of chromosomes to genomic blocks. The Generic Synteny Browser (GBrowse_syn), a module of the Genome Browser (GBrowse), is used to show syntenic relationships between multiple genomes. Search functions for retrieving syntenic and non-syntenic orthologs, as well as their annotation and sequences are also provided. Furthermore, genome and annotation information have been imported into GBrowse so that all functional elements can be visualized in one frame. We plan to continually update BRAD by integrating more Brassicaceae genomes into the database. Database URL: http://brassicadb.org/brad/ PMID:26589635

  11. Teacher Quality 2.0: Toward a New Era in Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M., Ed.; McShane, Michael Q., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    In "Teacher Quality 2.0," American Enterprise Institute (AEI) education experts Frederick M. Hess and Michael Q. McShane convene a diverse array of contributors to examine fruitful innovations that promise to improve teacher quality in a more strategic way. Much of the cutting-edge work in teacher quality is happening in nontraditional…

  12. Examining Web 2.0 Tools Usage of Science Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkan Kiyici, Fatime

    2012-01-01

    Using technology in a science teaching is so important. Only the person, who can use these tools in expert level, can use these tools in their teaching activities. In this research it is aimed firstly identifying science teacher candidates web 2.0 tools usage experience level and factors affecting experience level. In this research survey method…

  13. Fostering a Web 2.0 Ethos in a Traditional e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Marie; Noakes, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    As technology continues to flatten the world and as Web 2.0 changes the way knowledge is created and shared, tertiary education institutions are turning increasingly to e-learning to extend access to students globally as well as to improve the quality of their learning experience. Learning Management Systems (LMS) currently dominate the delivery…

  14. Web 2.0 in Teacher Education: Two Imperatives for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albion, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 represents a more participative and potentially paradigm-changing environment for building and sharing knowledge. Some educators have begun to apply these tools in classrooms but, as their use in society expands, there will be expectations for their wider application in schools. Teacher education faces the dual challenges of applying Web…

  15. Brassica database (BRAD) version 2.0: integrating and mining Brassicaceae species genomic resources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobo; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The Brassica database (BRAD) was built initially to assist users apply Brassica rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic data efficiently to their research. However, many Brassicaceae genomes have been sequenced and released after its construction. These genomes are rich resources for comparative genomics, gene annotation and functional evolutionary studies of Brassica crops. Therefore, we have updated BRAD to version 2.0 (V2.0). In BRAD V2.0, 11 more Brassicaceae genomes have been integrated into the database, namely those of Arabidopsis lyrata, Aethionema arabicum, Brassica oleracea, Brassica napus, Camelina sativa, Capsella rubella, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and three extremophiles Schrenkiella parvula, Thellungiella halophila and Thellungiella salsuginea. BRAD V2.0 provides plots of syntenic genomic fragments between pairs of Brassicaceae species, from the level of chromosomes to genomic blocks. The Generic Synteny Browser (GBrowse_syn), a module of the Genome Browser (GBrowse), is used to show syntenic relationships between multiple genomes. Search functions for retrieving syntenic and non-syntenic orthologs, as well as their annotation and sequences are also provided. Furthermore, genome and annotation information have been imported into GBrowse so that all functional elements can be visualized in one frame. We plan to continually update BRAD by integrating more Brassicaceae genomes into the database. Database URL: http://brassicadb.org/brad/. PMID:26589635

  16. The Influence of LIS Students' Personality Characteristics on Their Perceptions towards Web 2.0 Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2009-01-01

    The information world in which library and information science (LIS) students study and are being educated is in a state of constant change. As Web 2.0 is becoming an important and central topic in our information world, the research reported here explores whether LIS students are familiar with technological changes and innovations, and whether…

  17. Where We Are: Disability and Accessibility--Moving beyond Disability 2.0 in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Tara; Dolmage, Jay; Price, Margaret; Lewiecki-Wilson, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The authors' perception, as specialists at the intersection of disability studies and composition studies, is that disability has arrived--in the sense that it is now on most peoples' radar. Most have come to think of it as "Disability 2.0": the state where acceptance of disabled students and teachers as belonging in our…

  18. Angel or Devil: Face-Off of Web 2.0 Technologies for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Eunjyu

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at empowering students with the NCTE's 21st century literacies, this discussion investigated what role Web 2.0 technologies play in first-year college students' writing practices and what challenges students face while using computer technology for writing. Based on input from a national sample of 37 writing teachers, pedagogical…

  19. Journey to Library 2.0: One Library Trains Staff on the Social Tools Users Employ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Robin

    2007-01-01

    In December 2006, the Missouri River Regional Library (MRRL) in Jefferson City, embarked on a journey. They had been watching the Public Library of Charlotte-Mecklenburg County (PLCMC), NC, on its adventure through the wilds of Web 2.0, and they decided to follow the trail it had blazed. What PLCMC had done was pretty revolutionary. The library…

  20. Faculty Instructional Attitudes, Interest, and Intention: Predictors of Web 2.0 Use in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Jana; Karvonen, Meagan

    2011-01-01

    Higher educational institutions face mounting challenges to the way they operate, including a growing population of demographically diverse students who demand flexibility in course delivery, timing, and content. Web 2.0 applications can be important components in implementing the required change. Implementation, however, requires faculty…

  1. Designing a Virtual Olympic Games Framework by Using Simulation in Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilescu, Dorian

    2013-01-01

    Instructional simulation had major difficulties in the past for offering limited possibilities in practice and learning. This article proposes a link between instructional simulation and Web 2.0 technologies. More exactly, I present the design of the Virtual Olympic Games Framework (VOGF), as a significant demonstration of how interactivity in…

  2. Intelligent Libraries and Apomediators: Distinguishing between Library 3.0 and Library 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwanya, Tom; Stilwell, Christine; Underwood, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Using the "point oh" naming system for developments in librarianship is attracting debate about its appropriateness, basis and syntax and the meaning and potential of Library 2.0. Now a new term, Library 3.0, has emerged. Is there is any significant difference between the two models? Using documentary analysis to explore the terms, the…

  3. Self-Arrangement of Fleeting Student Pairs: A Web 2.0 Approach for Peer Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westera, Wim; de Bakker, Gijs; Wagemans, Leo

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a Web 2.0 approach for the arrangement of peer tutoring in online learning. In online learning environments, the learners' expectations of obtaining frequent, one-to-one support from their teachers tend to increase the teachers' workloads to unacceptably high levels. To address this problem of workload a self-organised peer…

  4. TSGene 2.0: an updated literature-based knowledgebase for tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Kim, Pora; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are a major type of gatekeeper genes in the cell growth. A knowledgebase with the systematic collection and curation of TSGs in multiple cancer types is critically important for further studying their biological functions as well as for developing therapeutic strategies. Since its development in 2012, the Tumor Suppressor Gene database (TSGene), has become a popular resource in the cancer research community. Here, we reported the TSGene version 2.0, which has substantial updates of contents (e.g. up-to-date literature and pan-cancer genomic data collection and curation), data types (noncoding RNAs and protein-coding genes) and content accessibility. Specifically, the current TSGene 2.0 contains 1217 human TSGs (1018 protein-coding and 199 non-coding genes) curated from over 9000 articles. Additionally, TSGene 2.0 provides thousands of expression and mutation patterns derived from pan-cancer data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. A new web interface is available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/TSGene/. Systematic analyses of 199 non-coding TSGs provide numerous cancer-specific non-coding mutational events for further screening and clinical use. Intriguingly, we identified 49 protein-coding TSGs that were consistently down-regulated in 11 cancer types. In summary, TSGene 2.0, which is the only available database for TSGs, provides the most updated TSGs and their features in pan-cancer. PMID:26590405

  5. Interferome v2.0: an updated database of annotated interferon-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Rusinova, Irina; Forster, Sam; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Masse, Marion; Cumming, Helen; Chapman, Ross; Hertzog, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Interferome v2.0 (http://interferome.its.monash.edu.au/interferome/) is an update of an earlier version of the Interferome DB published in the 2009 NAR database edition. Vastly improved computational infrastructure now enables more complex and faster queries, and supports more data sets from types I, II and III interferon (IFN)-treated cells, mice or humans. Quantitative, MIAME compliant data are collected, subjected to thorough, standardized, quantitative and statistical analyses and then significant changes in gene expression are uploaded. Comprehensive manual collection of metadata in v2.0 allows flexible, detailed search capacity including the parameters: range of -fold change, IFN type, concentration and time, and cell/tissue type. There is no limit to the number of genes that can be used to search the database in a single query. Secondary analysis such as gene ontology, regulatory factors, chromosomal location or tissue expression plots of IFN-regulated genes (IRGs) can be performed in Interferome v2.0, or data can be downloaded in convenient text formats compatible with common secondary analysis programs. Given the importance of IFN to innate immune responses in infectious, inflammatory diseases and cancer, this upgrade of the Interferome to version 2.0 will facilitate the identification of gene signatures of importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:23203888

  6. Integrating Web 2.0 Tools into the Classroom: Changing the Culture of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Daniel; Polin, Deborah Keisch

    2010-01-01

    This report presents findings from a two-year investigation of the ways in which Web 2.0 tools and social networking technologies are being used to support teaching and learning in classrooms across the United States. With funding from Intel[R], the Education Development Center's Center for Children and Technology (EDC/CCT) interviewed or visited…

  7. Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference-NASARC, Version 2.0: User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Heyward, Ann O.; Ponchak, Denise S.; Spence, Rodney L.; Zuzek, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The information contained in the NASARC (Version 2.0) Technical Manual (NASA TM-100160) and the NASARC (Version 2.0) User's Manual (NASA TM-100161) relates to the state of the Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software development through October 16, 1987. The technical manual describes the NASARC concept and the algorithms which are used to implement it. The User's Manual provides information on computer system considerations, installation instructions, description of input files, and program operation instructions. Significant revisions have been incorporated in the Version 2.0 software over prior versions. These revisions have enhanced the modeling capabilities of the NASARC procedure while greatly reducing the computer run time and memory requirements. Array dimensions within the software have been structured to fit into the currently available 6-megabyte memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) computer facility. A piecewise approach to predetermined arc generation in NASARC (Version 2.0) allows worldwide scenarios to be accommodated within these memory constraints while at the same time reducing computer run time.

  8. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference-NASARC (version 2.0) technical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Heyward, Ann O.; Ponchak, Denise S.; Spence, Rodney L.; Zuzek, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The information contained in the NASARC (Version 2.0) Technical Manual (NASA TM-100160) and NASARC (Version 2.0) User's Manual (NASA TM-100161) relates to the state of NASARC software development through October 16, 1987. The Technical Manual describes the Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) concept and the algorithms used to implement the concept. The User's Manual provides information on computer system considerations, installation instructions, description of input files, and program operating instructions. Significant revisions have been incorporated in the Version 2.0 software. These revisions have enhanced the modeling capabilities of the NASARC procedure while greatly reducing the computer run time and memory requirements. Array dimensions within the software have been structured to fit within the currently available 6-megabyte memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) computer facility. A piecewise approach to predetermined arc generation in NASARC (Version 2.0) allows worldwide scenarios to be accommodated within these memory constraints while at the same time effecting an overall reduction in computer run time.

  9. FAST - A Framework for Agile Software Testing v. 2.0

    2009-03-25

    The FAST software package contains a variety of Python packages for applying and managing software tests. In version 2.0, FAST includes (1) the EXACT package, which supports the definition and execution of computational experiments, (2) the FAST package, which manages the distributed execution of software builds, and (3) general tools related to the PyUnit testing framework.

  10. Games and Web 2.0: A Winning Combination for Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegelman, Marsha; Glass, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Gaming and social networking define the millennial student. This research focuses on an evolving collaboration between 2 faculty members of different disciplines who merged Web 2.0 and game scenarios to infuse research techniques as integral components of math/computer science courses. Blogs and wikis facilitated student-faculty interaction beyond…

  11. Adolescents' Engagement with Web 2.0 and Social Media: Research, Theory, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvermann, Donna E.; Hutchins, Rhett J.; McDevitt, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Young people's interests in 21st century texts and the literacy practices that play out in Web 2.0 spaces have implications for classroom teachers and teacher educators. In the digitally mediated world in which we live, boundaries between formal and informal learning from an earlier time are breaking down, thus making room for new ways of…

  12. 76 FR 19023 - Commercial Driver's License Information System State Procedures Manual, Release 5.2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ..., therefore, incorporated by reference into Sec. 384.231(d) Version 2.0 of the Manual (67 FR 49742, July 31... published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Robert Redmond, Senior... Federal Register (71 FR 25885). The Plan detailed the statutory requirements for modernization, the...

  13. 76 FR 68328 - Commercial Driver's License Information System State Procedures Manual, Release 5.2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... by reference into Sec. 384.231(d) Version 2.0 of the Manual (67 FR 49742, July 31, 2002) and later updated the rule to incorporate the Manual (Version 4.1.0) (73 FR 73096, December 1, 2008). FMCSA believes... document is available from the following: the Federal Register at...

  14. Web 2.0 at a non-traditional charter school A mixed methods study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollis, Jennifer C.

    In a mixed methods design, I sought to explore teacher and administrator views of technology integration and change in schools. Specifically, I examined a small staff's perspectives towards the integration of Web 2.0 tools and mobile devices into student-centered classroom instruction at a small non-traditional charter school in Southern Georgia. Online surveys and face-to-face interviews were conducted to gather data on the educators' value of technology, the role and integration of technology in the classroom, and their current levels of technology usage. The converged mixed methods results illustrate the following: (a) educators are willing to integrate technologies they value; (b) educators are open to incorporating emerging technologies into the classroom with proper support; (c) educators do not instinctively integrate technology in student-centered ways; (d) educators are open to learning about emerging technologies from their students; (e) teachers and administrators are not equally open to integrating Web 2.0 tools and mobile devices into classrooms. I conclude that teachers and administrators need to critically examine how to apply Web 2.0 technologies and mobile devices to enhance learning in order to remain relevant and meet the needs of their students in the twenty-first century. Keywords: Digital Age, mixed methods, mobile devices, student-centered, teacher and administrator beliefs, Web 2.0 integration

  15. The Role of Web 2.0 Technologies in Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitsantas, Anastasia; Dabbagh, Nada

    2011-01-01

    Recent research shows that Web 2.0 technologies are not only shaping how college students connect to the world and each other but also are affecting their learning and performance. Additionally, some research evidence suggests that faculty can use social software tools to facilitate student self-regulated learning processes, such as goal setting,…

  16. Transforming School Communities: Creating Dialogue Using Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soule, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools should be an important part of every district's communication strategy, creating environments for collaboration in ways never possible before. Most of them are free, inexpensive, easy to use, and require little set up. When combined with basic communication principles and careful planning, they can expand a district's reach, increase…

  17. Web-Writing 2.0: Enabling, Documenting, and Assessing Writing Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Trends in the use of the Internet in recent years, collectively coined Web 2.0, have precipitated changes in modes and uses of writing online. Blogs and social networking sites provide new opportunities and incentives for personal writing. This reading-to-write culture requires use and development of language skills. The challenge for language…

  18. Adventures in Web 2.0: Introducing Social Networking into My Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Honor

    2009-01-01

    Five months ago, the author introduced Web 2.0 technology to her students, and already, there is a story to tell. Integrating a social networking site into her teaching has been even more challenging and will prove to be even more beneficial than she could have imagined. By sharing her story, the author hopes that she can provide a road map for…

  19. Online Tutor 2.0: Methodologies and Case Studies for Successful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco José, Ed.; Seoane-Pardo, Antonio Miguel, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    After centuries of rethinking education and learning, the current theory is based on technology's approach to and affect on the planned interaction between knowledge trainers and trainees. "Online Tutor 2.0: Methodologies and Case Studies for Successful Learning" demonstrates, through the exposure of successful cases in online education…

  20. An Initial Approach to the Integration of Web 2.0 Technologies in the Research Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millan, Nandy; Bromage, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper comprises an extended discussion of the possibilities that Web 2.0 applications offer to doctoral researchers, and where such applications fit in the early twenty-first century in the research environment. It explores the main issues associated with their use by doctoral researchers, and how these factors have influenced the…

  1. Students as Web 2.0 Authors: Implications for Assessment Design and Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Thompson, Celia; Sheard, Judithe; Clerehan, Rosemary; Hamilton, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students now have at their disposal a range of Web 2.0 authoring forms such as audio and video podcasting, blogging, social bookmarking, social networking, virtual world activities and wiki writing. Many university educators are interested in enabling students to demonstrate their learning by creating content in these forms. However, the design…

  2. The Open Ed Tech: Never Mind the Edupunks; or, The Great Web 2.0 Swindle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Brian; Groom, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Has the wave of the open web crested? What does "open educational technology" look like, and does it stand for anything? In this article, the authors discuss the rise of open educational technology. The present range of Web 2.0 service providers offers a self-evident strategic technology framework. Without much effort, online teachers and learners…

  3. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test Version 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, B.R.; Gignac, G.; Manocha, R.; Stough, C.

    2005-01-01

    and discussed.There has been some debate recently over the scoring, reliability and factor structure of ability measures of emotional intelligence (EI). This study examined these three psychometric properties with the most recent ability test of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT V2.0; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso,…

  4. Do Students Want Web 2.0? An Investigation into Student Instructional Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Lash Keith

    2012-01-01

    The critical literature abounds with examples of possible educational uses of Web 2.0 technology in which students become active participants in the production of knowledge through blogging, social networking, creation of podcasts, and other forms of constructivist education. At the same time, teachers, whom the data indicate are somewhat…

  5. Web 2.0 and Language Learners' Motivation: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the observation that most of my students use computer-based technology (CBT) in their daily activities, I used computer assisted language learning (CALL) as an intervention in this action research study, carried out at a university in Bangladesh. This CALL curriculum was focused on Web 2.0 and its applications for educational purposes.…

  6. Realizing the Promise of Web 2.0: Engaging Community Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    HESSE, BRADFORD W.; O’CONNELL, MARY; AUGUSTSON, ERIK M.; CHOU, WEN-YING SYLVIA; SHAIKH, ABDUL R.; RUTTEN, LILA J. FINNEY

    2011-01-01

    Discussions of “Health 2.0,” first coined in 2005, were guided by three main tenets: (a) health was to become more participatory, as an evolution in the Web encouraged more direct consumer engagement in their own healthcare; (b) data was to become the new “Intel Inside” for systems supporting the “vital decisions” in health; and (c) a sense of “collective intelligence” from the network would supplement traditional sources of knowledge in health decision-making. Interests in understanding the implications of a new paradigm for patient engagement in health and healthcare were kindled by findings from surveys such as the National Cancer Institute’s Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), showing that patients were quick to look online for information to help them cope with disease. This paper considers how these three facets of Health 2.0–participation, data, and collective intelligence–can be harnessed to improve the health of the nation according to Healthy People 2020 goals. We begin with an examination of evidence from behavioral science to understand how Web 2.0 participative technologies may influence patient processes and outcomes, better or worse, in an era of changing communication technologies. The paper then focuses specifically on the clinical implications of “Health 2.0” and offers recommendations to ensure that changes in the communication environment do not detract from national (e.g., Health People 2020) health goals. Changes in the clinical environment, as catalyzed by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act to take advantage of Health 2.0 principles in evidence-based ways, are also considered. PMID:21843093

  7. Validation of the Greek version of the device subscale of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology 2.0 (QUEST 2.0).

    PubMed

    Koumpouros, Yiannis; Karavasili, Alexandra; Papageorgiou, Effie; Siavelis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the device subscale of the QUEST 2.0 instrument and provide evidence for the validity and reliability of the Greek version. To this end, a cross-cultural adaptation was performed. Field test studies were conducted to validate the appropriateness of the final outcome. Data were drawn from a study of 115 subjects who had been administered the GR-QUEST questionnaire. Ratings related to the different items were statistically analyzed. The exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation conducted revealed a three factors structure of the device subscale in contrast with previous studies. Our "Safe Use" subscale contains the items adjustments, safety and effectiveness of the original instrument, the "Fit to Use" subscale contains the dimensions, weight and ease of use items, and the "Endurance" subscale contains the items durability and comfort of the original questionnaire. Reliability measures (ICC=0.949, Pearson´s correlation=0.903, Cronbach´s α=0.754) yielded high values. Test-retest outcome showed great stability. Based on the results, the GR-QUEST can be considered as a valid and reliable instrument and thus it can be used to measure the satisfaction of patients with assistive devices, while it is applicable to the Greek population. Further assessment of the services subscale is needed. PMID:26854178

  8. Web 2.0 Chronic Disease Self-Management for Older Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Beth; Barry, Adam E; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, P.S; Zagora, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Background Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults. Objective To review the planning, implementation, and overall effectiveness of Web 2.0 self-management interventions for older adults (mean age ≥ 50) with one or more chronic disease(s). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using six popular health science databases. The RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) model was used to organize findings and compute a study quality score (SQS) for 15 reviewed articles. Results Most interventions were adopted for delivery by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and tested among small samples of white females with diabetes. Studies indicated that Web 2.0 participants felt greater self-efficacy for managing their disease(s) and benefitted from communicating with health care providers and/or website moderators to receive feedback and social support. Participants noted asynchronous communication tools (eg, email, discussion boards) and progress tracking features (eg, graphical displays of uploaded personal data) as being particularly useful for self-management support. Despite high attrition being noted as problematic, this review suggests that greater Web 2.0 engagement may be associated with improvements in health behaviors (eg, physical activity) and health status (eg, HRQoL). However, few studies indicated statistically

  9. Designing ePortfolio 2.0: Integrating and Coordinating Web 2.0 Services with ePortfolio Systems for Enhancing Users' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Sonya Xuesong; Olfman, Lorne; Ractham, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An educational ePortfolio usually contains work that a student has collected, reflected, designed, and published to demonstrate personal learning and growth over time. However, previous studies have shown that traditional ePortfolio systems lack flexibility, peer review, and group collaboration. Without these features, ePortfolios do not have the…

  10. Opportunities and Constraints in Disseminating Qualitative Research in Web 2.0 Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Hays, Charles A; Spiers, Judith A; Paterson, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    The Web 2.0 digital environment is revolutionizing how users communicate and relate to each other, and how information is shared, created, and recreated within user communities. The social media technologies in the Web 2.0 digital ecosystem are fundamentally changing the opportunities and dangers in disseminating qualitative health research. The social changes influenced by digital innovations shift dissemination from passive consumption to user-centered, apomediated cooperative approaches, the features of which are underutilized by many qualitative researchers. We identify opportunities new digital media presents for knowledge dissemination activities including access to wider audiences with few gatekeeper constraints, new perspectives, and symbiotic relationships between researchers and users. We also address some of the challenges in embracing these technologies including lack of control, potential for unethical co-optation of work, and cyberbullying. Finally, we offer solutions to enhance research dissemination in sustainable, ethical, and effective strategies. PMID:25870449

  11. BicOverlapper 2.0: visual analysis for gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, Rodrigo; Therón, Roberto; Quintales, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Systems biology demands the use of several point of views to get a more comprehensive understanding of biological problems. This usually leads to take into account different data regarding the problem at hand, but it also has to do with using different perspectives of the same data. This multifaceted aspect of systems biology often requires the use of several tools, and it is often hard to get a seamless integration of all of them, which would help the analyst to have an interactive discourse with the data. Results: Focusing on expression profiling, BicOverlapper 2.0 visualizes the most relevant aspects of the analysis, including expression data, profiling analysis results and functional annotation. It also integrates several state-of-the-art numerical methods, such as differential expression analysis, gene set enrichment or biclustering. Availability and implementation: BicOverlapper 2.0 is available at: http://vis.usal.es/bicoverlapper2 Contact: rodri@usal.es PMID:24590442

  12. Scaling of metabolic rate on body mass in small mammals at 2.0 g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    It is postulated that augmentation of gravitational loading should produce a shift in the classic Kleiber mammalian allometric relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass by an increase in both these parameters. Oxygen consumption rate and body mass measurements of 10 male rabbits 8 months of age were obtained initially for 1.0 g, and then over a 9-week period of chronic centrifugation at 2.0 g. Analysis of covariance showed that the positioning constant at 2.0 g is increased by 17 percent from that at 1.0 g at the P less than 0.001 level, and the exponent is increased by 8 percent at the P = 0.008 level. It is concluded that abatement of gravitational loading in spaceflight will result in a lowering of both allometric parameters.

  13. A Web 2.0 Personal Learning Environment for Classical Chinese Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiwei; Klamma, Ralf; Gao, Yan; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Jarke, Matthias

    Classical Chinese Poetry (CCP) is a valuable but almost locked treasure chest of human wisdom and civilization since 2000 years. With the advent of the Web 2.0 a renaissance of CCP is possible even outside Chinese-speaking communities world-wide. With mobile technologies and educational games we can address new learning communities for CCP and open the chest again. In this paper, we introduce a Web 2.0 personal learning environment for CCP. We have developed a generic and interoperable data model for CCP we utilize not only for mobile learning scenarios but also for educational gaming with different levels of difficulty. Learners are empowered to learn Chinese poetry, language, history, and culture. This research work shows how modern information technologies assist users to diffuse knowledge across the borderlines of communities and societies.

  14. Web 2.0 for Health Promotion: Reviewing the Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Prestin, Abby; Lyons, Claire

    2013-01-01

    As Web 2.0 and social media make the communication landscape increasingly participatory, empirical evidence is needed regarding their impact on and utility for health promotion. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we searched 4 medical and social science databases for literature (2004–present) on the intersection of Web 2.0 and health. A total of 514 unique publications matched our criteria. We classified references as commentaries and reviews (n = 267), descriptive studies (n = 213), and pilot intervention studies (n = 34). The scarcity of empirical evidence points to the need for more interventions with participatory and user-generated features. Innovative study designs and measurement methods are needed to understand the communication landscape and to critically assess intervention effectiveness. To address health disparities, interventions must consider accessibility for vulnerable populations. PMID:23153164

  15. X-ray study of the supernova remnant G337.2-0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Akihiro; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on the Suzaku result of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G337.2-0.7. The X-ray spectrum is well explained by three components in ionizing phase. One is a plasma with a low temperature kT = 0.70_{-0.03}^{+0.02}keV, solar abundances, and an ionization parameter n_et = 5.7^{+0.7}_{-0.4}× 10^{11}s cm-3. The second is a middle-temperature plasma with kT = 1.54^{+0.13}_{-0.02}keV and high metal abundances in a highly ionized state of n_et = 3.6^{+0.2}_{-0.5}× 10^{11}s cm-3, and the third is a high-temperature plasma with kT = 3.1^{+0.2}_{-0.1}keV and high metal abundances in a low-ionized state of n_et=2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.2}× 10^{10}s cm-3. The high metal-abundance plasmas are likely to be of an ejecta origin, while the solar abundance plasma would be of an interstellar-gas origin. The abundance pattern and mass of the ejecta confirm that G337.2-0.7 is a remnant of a Type Ia supernova (SN). The derived Fe mass of ejecta MFe = 0.025-0.039 M⊙ is far smaller than that expected from any Type Ia model, suggesting that most Fe has not yet been heated by the reverse shock. The ejecta has enhanced distribution in the northeastern region compared to the central region, and therefore the SN explosion or SNR evolution would be asymmetric.

  16. Au(I)-catalyzed efficient synthesis of functionalized bicyclo[3.2.0]heptanes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guotao; Huang, Xiaogen; Zhang, Liming

    2008-06-01

    An efficient Au(I)-catalyzed synthesis of highly strained and functionalized bicyclo[3.2.0]heptanes is developed. Subsequent couplings with various nucleophiles offer additional structural features/complexity. These one-pot, three-component reactions are proposed to proceed via a key 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between a Au carbenoid-containing carbonyl ylide and ethyl vinyl ether. PMID:18465856

  17. Bewertung der Informationsqualität im Enterprise 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlheid, Sven; Graefe, Gernot; Krebs, Alexander; Schuster, Dirk

    Die Entwicklungen zum Web 2.0 haben das World Wide Web (WWW) grundlegend verändert. Nachdem die meisten Nutzer im WWW zunächst "nur" nach Informationen suchten stellen Nutzer inzwischen sehr ausgiebig Informationen über sich selbst oder ihnen vertraute Themen in Blogs und Communities bereit. Facebook und Wikipedia sind zwei prominente Webseiten. Ihre Attraktivität entstammt allein den Informationen, welche die Nutzer selber zur Verfügung stellen.

  18. Geochemical Monitoring Considerations for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Amonette, James E.; Johnson, Timothy A.; Spencer, Clayton F.; Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2014-12-31

    Geochemical monitoring is an essential component of a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect possible loss of containment at the FutureGen 2.0 geologic sequestration site near Jacksonville, IL. This presentation gives an overview of the potential geochemical approaches and tracer technologies that were considered, and describes the evaluation process by which the most cost-effective and robust of these were selected for implementation

  19. The New Digital Shoreline: How Web 2.0 and Millennials Are Revolutionizing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHaney, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Two seismic forces beyond our control--the advent of Web 2.0 and the inexorable influx of tech-savvy Millennials on campus--are shaping what Roger McHaney calls "The New Digital Shoreline" of higher education. Failure to chart its contours, and adapt, poses a major threat to higher education as we know it. These forces demand that we as educators…

  20. Biosecurity Risk Assessment Methodology (BioRAM) v. 2.0

    2009-06-08

    Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction Dept (SNL/IBTR) has an ongoing mission to enhance biosecurity assessment methodologies, tools, and guise. These will aid labs seeking to implement biosecurity as advocated in the recently released WHO's Biorisk Management: Lab Biosecurity Guidance. BioRAM 2.0 is the software tool developed initially using the SNL LDRD process and designed to complement the "Laboratory Biosecurity Risk Handbook" written by Ren Salerno and Jennifer Gaudioso defining biosecurity risk assessment methodologies.