Science.gov

Sample records for 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups

  1. Binary supramolecular adduct based upon trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylenemercury and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde: Enumerating the strength of perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Steven P.; Krueger, Herman R.; Groeneman, Ryan H.; Reinheimer, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its proximity of Hg(II) atoms, electron-withdrawing properties and inherent accessibility to electrophilic sites on the molecular surface, trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylenemercury, (o-C6F4Hg)3, has demonstrated a capacity to form supramolecular adducts with a variety of neutral and anionic substrates. Often within these complexes the Lewis acid, (o-C6F4Hg)3, interacts with a Lewis base rather than itself in the solid state via various supramolecular interactions. Among these, perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions have been utilized in the construction of various supramolecular materials; however, within these molecular complexes, this category of non-covalent interaction is not often observed. Even though these perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions have been used to produce new materials, their overall strength has not been generally reported in the literature. In this contribution, we highlight not only the synthesis, structural and spectroscopic properties of a novel binary supramolecular adduct between (o-C6F4Hg)3 and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde (4-ClBA) [(o-C6F4Hg)3(4-ClBA)] 1, but also report on the overall strength of the perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interaction energies determined by means of computational chemistry. The carbonyl group of the 4-ClBA substrate was found to interact with all three mercury atoms within (o-C6F4Hg)3 via Hg⋯O contacts. An infrared spectroscopic analysis of 1 demonstrated a lower wavenumber for the carbonyl stretching frequency when compared to that for the free substrate confirming the presence of these Hg⋯O interactions.

  2. Scalable antifouling reverse osmosis membranes utilizing perfluorophenyl azide photochemistry.

    PubMed

    McVerry, Brian T; Wong, Mavis C Y; Marsh, Kristofer L; Temple, James A T; Marambio-Jones, Catalina; Hoek, Eric M V; Kaner, Richard B

    2014-09-01

    We present a method to produce anti-fouling reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that maintains the process and scalability of current RO membrane manufacturing. Utilizing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) photochemistry, commercial reverse osmosis membranes were dipped into an aqueous solution containing PFPA-terminated poly(ethyleneglycol) species and then exposed to ultraviolet light under ambient conditions, a process that can easily be adapted to a roll-to-roll process. Successful covalent modification of commercial reverse osmosis membranes was confirmed with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. By employing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was determined that PFPAs undergo UV-generated nitrene addition and bind to the membrane through an aziridine linkage. After modification with the PFPA-PEG derivatives, the reverse osmosis membranes exhibit high fouling-resistance.

  3. Synthesis and physico-chemical properties of ionic liquidscontaining tetrakis(perfluorophenyl)borate, tetraphenylborate andtrifluorophenylborate anions.

    SciTech Connect

    Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Salminen, Justin; Yakelis, Neal; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-03-01

    Synthesis and some physico-chemical properties are reported for six new hydrophobic ionic liquids containing tetrakis(perfluorophenyl)borate, tetraphenylborate or trfluorophenylborate anions and imidazolium or pyridinium cations.

  4. No Natives Here: A Focus Group Study of Student Perceptions of Web 2.0 and the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhanna, Kenneth J.; Seeholzer, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    This study explores Web 2.0 technologies in an academic library through focus groups with undergraduates at Kent State University. Results reveal that students, despite being heavy users, are less sophisticated and expressive in their use of Web 2.0 than presumed. Students set clear boundaries between educational and social spaces on the Web, and…

  5. FLAMEnGO 2.0: an enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  6. FLAMEnGO 2.0: An enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  7. Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications.

  8. Effects of Group Reflection Variations in Project-Based Learning Integrated in a Web 2.0 Learning Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Paul; Hong, Ji-Seong; Bonk, Curtis; Lim, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    A Web 2.0 environment that is coupled with emerging multimodal interaction tools can have considerable influence on team learning outcomes. Today, technologies supporting social networking, collective intelligence, emotional interaction, and virtual communication are introducing new forms of collaboration that are profoundly impacting education.…

  9. Utility of a dermatology interest group blog: the impact of medical student interest groups and Web 2.0 tools as educational resources

    PubMed Central

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Wagner, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    The open access University of Texas Dermatology Interest Group blog was established in 2004 for the purposes of increasing communication and collaboration between medical students and dermatology faculty, residents, and alumni, as well as to promote educational opportunities and the missions for which the interest group was created. This blog is unique because of its longevity and continuous postings directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. A blog user survey was performed to assess viewers’ thoughts, purpose of viewing, demographic profile, subscriber status, usage of the blog and other Web 2.0 tools (forums, Facebook, blogs, Twitter, podcasts), and perceived usefulness. Sixty-one anonymous online surveys were completed during a 1-month period. Statistical analyses of the responses demonstrated that the utilization of web-based tools and the blog were valuable resources for students, especially for blog subscribers, those more involved in an interest group, and those reading the blog for a longer period of time. The usefulness and impact of this method of communication and dissemination of information in medical education may encourage other student groups, faculty advisors, and educators to implement similar educational tools at their institutions. PMID:25298742

  10. Utility of a dermatology interest group blog: the impact of medical student interest groups and Web 2.0 tools as educational resources.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Wagner, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    The open access University of Texas Dermatology Interest Group blog was established in 2004 for the purposes of increasing communication and collaboration between medical students and dermatology faculty, residents, and alumni, as well as to promote educational opportunities and the missions for which the interest group was created. This blog is unique because of its longevity and continuous postings directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. A blog user survey was performed to assess viewers' thoughts, purpose of viewing, demographic profile, subscriber status, usage of the blog and other Web 2.0 tools (forums, Facebook, blogs, Twitter, podcasts), and perceived usefulness. Sixty-one anonymous online surveys were completed during a 1-month period. Statistical analyses of the responses demonstrated that the utilization of web-based tools and the blog were valuable resources for students, especially for blog subscribers, those more involved in an interest group, and those reading the blog for a longer period of time. The usefulness and impact of this method of communication and dissemination of information in medical education may encourage other student groups, faculty advisors, and educators to implement similar educational tools at their institutions.

  11. Utility of a dermatology interest group blog: the impact of medical student interest groups and Web 2.0 tools as educational resources.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Wagner, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    The open access University of Texas Dermatology Interest Group blog was established in 2004 for the purposes of increasing communication and collaboration between medical students and dermatology faculty, residents, and alumni, as well as to promote educational opportunities and the missions for which the interest group was created. This blog is unique because of its longevity and continuous postings directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. A blog user survey was performed to assess viewers' thoughts, purpose of viewing, demographic profile, subscriber status, usage of the blog and other Web 2.0 tools (forums, Facebook, blogs, Twitter, podcasts), and perceived usefulness. Sixty-one anonymous online surveys were completed during a 1-month period. Statistical analyses of the responses demonstrated that the utilization of web-based tools and the blog were valuable resources for students, especially for blog subscribers, those more involved in an interest group, and those reading the blog for a longer period of time. The usefulness and impact of this method of communication and dissemination of information in medical education may encourage other student groups, faculty advisors, and educators to implement similar educational tools at their institutions. PMID:25298742

  12. Supporting Small-Group Learning Using Multiple Web 2.0 Tools: A Case Study in the Higher Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laru, Jari; Naykki, Piia; Jarvela, Sanna

    2012-01-01

    In this single-case study, small groups of learners were supported by use of multiple social software tools and face-to-face activities in the context of higher education. The aim of the study was to explore how designed learning activities contribute to students' learning outcomes by studying probabilistic dependencies between the variables.…

  13. Oxidative addition of halogens to homoleptic perfluoromethyl or perfluorophenyl derivatives of platinum(II): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Menjón, Babil; Martínez-Salvador, Sonia; Gómez-Saso, Miguel A; Forniés, Juan; Falvello, Larry R; Martín, Antonio; Tsipis, Athanassios

    2009-06-22

    Chlorocarbon solvents (solv=CH(2)Cl(2), CHCl(3)) are suggested to play an active role in the oxidative addition of halogens, X(2) (X=Cl, Br, I), to homoleptic d(8) perfluoromethyl and -phenyl platinum(II) species [Pt(R(F))(4)](2-) (R(F)=CF(3), C(6)F(5)). The perfluoromethyl group, CF(3), has been found to be considerably less prone to undergo reductive elimination processes, and is, therefore, more suitable for stabilizing organoplatinum(IV) derivatives (see scheme).The equilibrium geometries of the homoleptic perfluorinated organoplatinate(II) anions [Pt(CF(3))(4)](2-) and [Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)](2-) have been computed at the B3P86/LANL2DZ level of theory. Remarkably good agreement with the experimentally determined structures has been obtained by X-ray diffraction methods. The reactivity of [NBu(4)](2)[Pt(CF(3))(4)] (1) towards halogens (Cl(2), Br(2), and I(2)) has been investigated by using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. The perfluoromethyl derivative 1 has been found to undergo clean oxidative addition of the three halogens under investigation, giving rise to [NBu(4)](2)[trans-Pt(CF(3))(4)X(2)] (X=Cl (7), Br (10), I (13)) in a quantitative and stereoselective way. In the low-temperature reaction of the perfluorophenyl derivative [NBu(4)](2)[Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)] (3) with Cl(2) or Br(2), the corresponding oxidative-addition products [NBu(4)](2)[trans-Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)X(2)] (X=Cl (14), Br (15)) can also be obtained. In the case in which X=Br and working in CHCl(3) at -55 degrees C, it has been possible to detect the formation of an intermediate species to which we assign the formula [trans-Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)Br(ClCHCl(2))](-) (16). The solvento complex 16 is thermally unstable and prone to undergo reductive elimination of C(6)F(5)--C(6)F(5). In the presence of PhCN, complex [NBu(4)][trans-Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)Br(NCPh)] (17) was isolated and structurally characterized. The reaction of 3 with I(2) gave no organoplatinum(IV) compound. Our comparative study reveals that

  14. Performance of the Vitek MS v2.0 System in Distinguishing Streptococcus pneumoniae from Nonpneumococcal Species of the Streptococcus mitis Group

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Rachelle P.; Garner, Cherilyn D.; Rychert, Jenna A.; Ferraro, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    The Vitek MS v2.0 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry system accurately distinguished Streptococcus pneumoniae from nonpneumococcal S. mitis group species. Only 1 of 116 nonpneumococcal isolates (<1%) was misidentified as S. pneumoniae. None of 95 pneumococcal isolates was misidentified. This method provides a rapid, simple means of discriminating among these challenging organisms. PMID:23784130

  15. Validation of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella Test for Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Shell Eggs and Poultry-Associated Matrixes.

    PubMed

    Mozola, Mark; Biswas, Preetha; Viator, Ryan; Feldpausch, Emily; Foti, Debra; Li, Lin; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Alles, Susan; Rice, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella lateral flow immunoassay for use in detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in raw shell eggs and poultry-associated matrixes, including chicken carcass rinse and poultry feed. In inclusivity testing, the Reveal 2.0 test detected all 37 strains of SE tested. The test also detected all but one of 18 non-Enteritidis somatic group D1 Salmonella serovars examined. In exclusivity testing, none of 42 strains tested was detected. The exclusivity panel included Salmonella strains of somatic groups other than D1, as well as strains of other genera of Gram-negative bacteria. In matrix testing, performance of the Reveal 2.0 test was compared to that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for chicken carcass rinse and to that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual for raw shell eggs and poultry feed. For all matrixes evaluated, there were no significant differences in the ability to detect SE when comparing the Reveal 2.0 method and the appropriate reference culture procedure as determined by probability of detection statistical analysis. The ability of the Reveal 2.0 test to withstand modest perturbations to normal operating parameters was examined in robustness experiments. Results showed that the test can withstand deviations in up to three operating parameters simultaneously without significantly affecting performance. Real-time stability testing of multiple lots of Reveal 2.0 devices established the shelf life of the test device at 16 months postmanufacture. PMID:27214854

  16. The Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) v2.0 Dataset: 35 year Quasi-Global Precipitation Estimates for Drought Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, P.; Funk, C. C.; Landsfeld, M. F.; Pedreros, D. H.; Shukla, S.; Husak, G. J.; Harrison, L.; Verdin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A high quality, long-term, high-resolution precipitation dataset is a key requirement for supporting drought monitoring and long term trend analysis. In this presentation we introduce a new dataset: the Climate Hazards group InfraRed Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) v2.0, developed by scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center. This new quasi-global precipitation product is available at daily to seasonal time scales, with a spatial resolution of 0.05°, and a 1981 to near real-time period of record. The three main types of information used in the CHIRPS are: (1) global 0.05° precipitation climatologies, (2) gridded precipitation estimates derived from time-varying cold cloud duration, and (3) in situ precipitation observations. The Climate Hazards Group (CHG) has developed an extensive database of in situ daily, pentadal, and monthly precipitation totals with over a billion daily observations worldwide. A screening procedure was developed to flag and remove potential false zeros from the daily GTS and GSOD data. These potentially spurious data can artificially suppress CHIRPS rainfall totals. Using GPCC v7 as the best-available standard, we compare CHIRPS with ARC2, CFS-Reanalysis, CHIRP, CMORPH, CPC-Unified, ECMWF, PERSIANNE, RFE2, TAMSAT, TRMM-RT7, and TRMM-V7. The CHIRPS is shown to have higher correlation, and lower systematic errors (bias) and mean absolute errors with GPCC v7 than the other datasets. Comparison with independent validation data suggests that the CHIRPS performance is similar to research quality products like the GPCC and GPCP, but with higher resolution and lower latency. We conclude by looking at the change in availability of station data within a monitoring time frame, contrasting countries with and without near real time data.

  17. Web 2.0, Library 2.0, and Librarian 2.0:Preparing for the 2.0 World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, S.

    2007-10-01

    There is a global conversation going on right now about the next generation of the web. It's happening under the name of Web 2.0. It's the McLuhanesque hot web where true human interaction takes precedence over merely `cool' information delivery and e-mail. It's about putting information into the real context of our users' lives, research, work and play. Concurrently, a group of information professionals are having a conversation about the vision for what Library 2.0 will look like in this Web 2.0 ecosystem. Some are even going so far as to talk about Web 3.0! Web 2.0 is coming fast and it's BIG! What are the skills and competencies that Librarian 2.0 will need? Come and hear an overview of Web 2.0 and a draft vision for Library 2.0 and an opinion about what adaptations we'll need to make to thrive in this future scenario. Let's talk about the Librarian 2.0 in our users' future!

  18. Science 2.0.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, M Mitchell

    2008-05-01

    Science 2.0 generally refers to new practices of scientists who post raw experimental results, nascent theories, claims of discovery and draft papers on the Web for others to see and comment on. Proponents say these "open access" practices make scientific progress more collaborative and therefore more productive. Critics say scientists who put preliminary findings online risk having others copy or exploit the work to gain credit or even patents. Despite pros and cons, Science 2.0 sites are beginning to proliferate; one notable example is the OpenWetWare project started by biological engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PMID:18444327

  19. Marketing 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that today's student is much more savvy with using computers than the students of years gone by. This tech generation eagerly embraces the Internet, online searching, and the newer Web 2.0 technologies. This latter platform provides users with the ability to interact in a large virtual world, share/take (upload/download)…

  20. Albany 2.0

    2012-10-29

    New to version 2.0 of Albany is the development of equations sets for specific application areas. These are independent research and development efforts that have chosen to use Albany as their software deployment vehicle. Because of synergies between the projects, they remain in the same code repository and are all releasing together as the Albany software.

  1. Quantitative fluorine NMR to determine carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide-functionalized silica nanoparticles by click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Zhou, Juan; Park, JaeHyeung; Xie, Sheng; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-09-15

    A quantitative fluorine NMR ((19)F qNMR) method was developed to determine the carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials. Mannose (Man)- and galactose (Gal)-conjugated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized SNPs and propargylated Man or Gal by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). After treating PFPA-SNPs or Man-SNPs with hydrofluoric acid followed by lyophilization, the remaining residues were directly subjected to (19)F NMR analysis. The density of PFPA on PFPA-SNP was determined to be 7.7 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) and Man on Man-SNP to be 6.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) giving a yield of ∼83% for the click coupling reaction. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of Man-SNPs with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-concanavalin A (Con A) was determined using a fluorescence competition assay to be 0.289 ± 0.003 μM, which represents more than 3 orders of magnitude affinity increase compared to free Man with Con A.

  2. PARTNERWORKSV2.0

    SciTech Connect

    George Longmire, SNL 4212; David Skousen, SNL 4212.

    2000-04-12

    PartnerWorks Ver. 2.0 uses MAPI and OLE to tightly integrate the information system into the user's desktop. The applications are mail and fax enabled, and data can be linked or exported to and from all popular desktop applications at the push of a button. PartnerWorks converts financial data from Project Year to Fiscal Year. PartnerWorks also makes use of off-the-shelf software (Microsoft NT) encryption. PartnerWorks Ver, 2.0 automates the management of laboratory agreements with industry. PartnerWorks is a three-tier client server system. It uses MS SQL server (480 tables) as the central data repository for agreement information and document objects. The front-end applications consist of various MS Access applications. Data in remote systems is queried live or imported on a fixed schedule depending on the data type and volatility. All data is accessed via ODBC. This multi-front end application, multi-back end data source provides the end user with the illusion that all data exists in his or her custom application. PartnerWorks manages: Managing laboratory-partner agreement life cycle including contract and funding details (16 agreement-specific modules); Pending laboratory partnership agreements; Partner details for existing and potential partners; Potential agreement sources and partnership opportunities; Automating and warehousing the agreement documentation (document warehousing module); Automating standardized email communication for agreements; Enforcing business rules and work flow (action tracking module); Automated reporting including demand print, and schedule delivery (reporting module); Marketing intellectual property and past successes (Web module).

  3. PARTNERWORKSV2.0

    2000-04-12

    PartnerWorks Ver. 2.0 uses MAPI and OLE to tightly integrate the information system into the user's desktop. The applications are mail and fax enabled, and data can be linked or exported to and from all popular desktop applications at the push of a button. PartnerWorks converts financial data from Project Year to Fiscal Year. PartnerWorks also makes use of off-the-shelf software (Microsoft NT) encryption. PartnerWorks Ver, 2.0 automates the management of laboratory agreements with industry.more » PartnerWorks is a three-tier client server system. It uses MS SQL server (480 tables) as the central data repository for agreement information and document objects. The front-end applications consist of various MS Access applications. Data in remote systems is queried live or imported on a fixed schedule depending on the data type and volatility. All data is accessed via ODBC. This multi-front end application, multi-back end data source provides the end user with the illusion that all data exists in his or her custom application. PartnerWorks manages: Managing laboratory-partner agreement life cycle including contract and funding details (16 agreement-specific modules); Pending laboratory partnership agreements; Partner details for existing and potential partners; Potential agreement sources and partnership opportunities; Automating and warehousing the agreement documentation (document warehousing module); Automating standardized email communication for agreements; Enforcing business rules and work flow (action tracking module); Automated reporting including demand print, and schedule delivery (reporting module); Marketing intellectual property and past successes (Web module).« less

  4. How effective and acceptable is Web 2.0 Balint group participation for general practitioners and general practitioner registrars in regional Australia? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Koppe, Hilton; Ahern, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective General practitioners (GPs) and general practice registrars report work‐related stress. Balint groups may improve coping mechanisms. However, attendance at a face‐to‐face Balint group is difficult for rural doctors due to distance constraints. The study aim was to evaluate online Balint groups for rural doctors and determine effect size for a full‐scale trial. Design A mixed‐methods approach, including a pre–post controlled trial and thematic analysis of qualitative data. Setting Rural primary care. Participants Thirteen GPs and 8 general practice registrars completed the study. Interventions Balint groups were delivered over 8–9 fortnightly online sessions. GPs and GP registrars participated in separate groups. Data were collected on work‐related affect, psychological medicine skills and professional isolation using the Warr's Work‐Related Affect Scale, the Psychological Medicine Inventory, and a professional isolation scale. Main outcome measures Change scores on Warr's Work‐Related Affect Scale, the Psychological Medicine Inventory, and a professional isolation scale. Results Balint participants' scores were significantly higher post‐intervention on the Psychological Medicine Inventory (mean 6.49 (±0.20) versus 5.43 (±0.26); P < 0.01) and Warr's Work‐Related Affect (mean 4.09 (±0.09) versus 3.60 (±0.12); P < 0.01) scales than control group scores. Effect size on these scales ranged from 0.46 to 0.50. The greatest challenge was technical problems related to insufficient broadband speed. Conclusions Online Balint groups appear to improve rural doctors' psychological medicine skills and work‐related affect. New data on effect size will inform a full‐scale trial. Improved national broadband infrastructure may enhance online support opportunities for rural doctors. PMID:26114400

  5. Moving to Their Own Beat: Exploring How Students Use Web 2.0 Technologies to Support Group Work outside of Class Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman; Nickle, Todd; Silovs, Jim; Zimmer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have consistently reported that, regardless of the subject matter, students working in small groups tend to learn more of what is taught and retain it longer than when the same content is presented in other instructional formats (Beckman, 1990; Chickering & Gamson, 1991). The majority of these research studies have…

  6. Xenopatients 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A; Alarcón, Tomás; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin, Ángel G; Vellon, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    stemness factors following the activation of phenotypic copies of specific cancer diseases might crucially evaluate a “reprogramming cure” for cancer. A new era of xenopatients 2.0 generated via nuclear reprogramming of the epigenetic landscapes of patient-derived cancer genomes might revolutionize the current personalized translational platforms in cancer research. PMID:24406535

  7. Web 2.0, Meet Literacy 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrod, Diane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Literacy 2.0 is defined in terms of Web 2.0 influences. Literacy 2.0 encompasses several major characteristics that distinguish it from traditional literacy practices (Literacy 1.0). For educational technology professionals, Literacy 2.0 skills become a critical means for developing lifelong learning.

  8. Autogen Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy

    2007-01-01

    Version 2.0 of the autogen software has been released. "Autogen" (automated sequence generation) signifies both a process and software used to implement the process of automated generation of sequences of commands in a standard format for uplink to spacecraft. Autogen requires fewer workers than are needed for older manual sequence-generation processes and reduces sequence-generation times from weeks to minutes.

  9. Introducing Science 2.0!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunsell, Eric; Horejsi, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The internet of the mid-to-late 1990s was defined by static web pages created by people with specialized technical skills. Today, that barrier has been all but eliminated with the emergence of easy-to-use online tools for creating and sharing content. "Web 2.0," or the read/write web, has dramatically altered the way we communicate and share…

  10. The (2, 0) superconformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Christopher; Lemos, Madalena; Rastelli, Leonardo; van Rees, Balt C.

    2016-01-01

    We develop the conformal bootstrap program for six-dimensional conformal field theories with (2, 0) supersymmetry, focusing on the universal four-point function of stress tensor multiplets. We review the solution of the superconformal Ward identities and describe the superconformal block decomposition of this correlator. We apply numerical bootstrap techniques to derive bounds on operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients and scaling dimensions from the constraints of crossing symmetry and unitarity. We also derive analytic results for the large spin spectrum using the light cone expansion of the crossing equation. Our principal result is strong evidence that the A1 theory realizes the minimal allowed central charge (c =25 ) for any interacting (2, 0) theory. This implies that the full stress tensor four-point function of the A1 theory is the unique unitary solution to the crossing symmetry equation at c =25 . For this theory, we estimate the scaling dimensions of the lightest unprotected operators appearing in the stress tensor operator product expansion. We also find rigorous upper bounds for dimensions and OPE coefficients for a general interacting (2, 0) theory of central charge c . For large c , our bounds appear to be saturated by the holographic predictions obtained from eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  11. Change Management Meets Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Doug

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 is the term used to describe a group of web-based creativity, information-sharing, and collaboration tools including wikis, blogs, social networks, and folksonomies. The common thread in all of these tools is twofold: They enable collaboration and information sharing, and their impact on higher education has been dramatic. A recent study…

  12. Biocellion Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Seunghwa Kang, PNNL

    2015-01-09

    This work extends Biocellion 1.0 to solve advection-reaction-diffusion and incompressible Navier-Stokes partial differential equations to model water/blood flow. Biocellion is a software framework to simulate a large number of cells using high-performance parallel computers. The version 1.0 allows software users to describe biological system behaviors as a set of rules describing how individual cells behave and how cells locally interact with neighboring cells or the surrounding micro-environment. However, the version 1.0 does not support users to incorporate water/blood flow into the model, which is important to properly capture long distance communications between distant cells. This extension (version 2.0) integrates two partial differential equation solvers to the Biocellion framework to solve this limitation. Navier-Stokes equation solvers (for incompressible flow) are added to compute flow rate, and advection-reaction-diffusion equation solvers are added to update molecular concentrations considering both advection (due to flow) and local diffusion.

  13. Biocellion Version 2.0

    2015-01-09

    This work extends Biocellion 1.0 to solve advection-reaction-diffusion and incompressible Navier-Stokes partial differential equations to model water/blood flow. Biocellion is a software framework to simulate a large number of cells using high-performance parallel computers. The version 1.0 allows software users to describe biological system behaviors as a set of rules describing how individual cells behave and how cells locally interact with neighboring cells or the surrounding micro-environment. However, the version 1.0 does not support usersmore » to incorporate water/blood flow into the model, which is important to properly capture long distance communications between distant cells. This extension (version 2.0) integrates two partial differential equation solvers to the Biocellion framework to solve this limitation. Navier-Stokes equation solvers (for incompressible flow) are added to compute flow rate, and advection-reaction-diffusion equation solvers are added to update molecular concentrations considering both advection (due to flow) and local diffusion.« less

  14. Introducing ADS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the ADS Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the ADS is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named ADS 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the ADS platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.

  15. WMS Server 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian; Wood, James F.

    2012-01-01

    This software is a simple, yet flexible server of raster map products, compliant with the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) 1.1.1 protocol. The server is a full implementation of the OGC WMS 1.1.1 as a fastCGI client and using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) for data access. The server can operate in a proxy mode, where all or part of the WMS requests are done on a back server. The server has explicit support for a colocated tiled WMS, including rapid response of black (no-data) requests. It generates JPEG and PNG images, including 16-bit PNG. The GDAL back-end support allows great flexibility on the data access. The server is a port to a Linux/GDAL platform from the original IRIX/IL platform. It is simpler to configure and use, and depending on the storage format used, it has better performance than other available implementations. The WMS server 2.0 is a high-performance WMS implementation due to the fastCGI architecture. The use of GDAL data back end allows for great flexibility. The configuration is relatively simple, based on a single XML file. It provides scaling and cropping, as well as blending of multiple layers based on layer transparency.

  16. IMPACTS-BRC 2. 0

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, B.L. )

    1990-04-01

    IMPACTS-BRC2 was designed for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to classify specific waste streams as below regulatory concern (BRC). The code provides a capability for calculating radiation dose to a maximal individual, critical group, and the general population as a result of transportation, treatment, disposal, and post disposal activities involving low-level radioactive waste. Impacts are calculated for multiple waste streams, nuclides, and pathways depending on user-specified treatment, disposal options. Treatment and disposal options include on-site incineration, off-site incineration at municipal and hazardous waste facilities, and off-site disposal at municipal (sanitary) and hazardous waste landfills. Included within the disposal options is the ability to calculate impacts from the sorting and/or recycling of metal containers and metal and glass materials. Nuclide-specific accounting is provided to facilitate the identification of critical nuclides and pathways that contribute significantly to the radiological impacts.

  17. Web 2.0 Applications in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Dongsheng; Liu, Chen

    Since 2005, the term Web 2.0 has gradually become a hot topic on the Internet. Web 2.0 lets users create web contents as distinct from webmasters or web coders. Web 2.0 has come to our work, our life and even has become an indispensable part of our web-life. Its applications have already been widespread in many fields on the Internet. So far, China has about 137 million netizens [1], therefore its Web 2.0 market is so attractive that many sources of venture capital flow into the Chinese Web 2.0 market and there are also a lot of new Web 2.0 companies in China. However, the development of Web 2.0 in China is accompanied by some problems and obstacles. In this paper, we will mainly discuss Web 2.0 applications in China, with their current problems and future development trends.

  18. Using Web 2.0 to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buechler, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 is not only for kids anymore, businesses are using it, too. Businesses are adopting Web 2.0 technology for a variety of purposes. In this article, the author discusses how he incorporates Web 2.0 into his business communications course. He describes a project that has both individual and collaborative elements and requires extensive…

  19. IMPACTS-BRC, Version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, B.L. ); Lee, C.E. )

    1990-04-01

    This manual describes the procedures for implementing IMPACT-BRC Version 2.0. IMPACTS-BRC is a generic, radiological assessment code intended to be used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate petitions to classify specific waste streams as below regulatory concern (BRC). The code is designed to demonstrate compliance to BRC standards by modeling and calculating annual radiological impacts to the maximal individual, critical groups, and the general population as the result of transportation treatment, disposal, and post-disposal activities involving low-level radioactive waste. Impacts are calculated for multiple nuclides and pathways depending on data input and treatment and disposal options specified by the code user. The treatment and disposal options include onsite incineration, offsite incineration at municipal and hazardous waste landfills. Included within the disposal options is the ability to calculate impacts from the sorting and/or recycling of metal containers and metal and glass materials. Nuclide-specific accounting is provided to facilitate identification of the critical nuclides and pathways contributing to the impacts. Default environmental and facility parameters are developed from reference treatment/disposal sites. The user has the option to replace default parameters with site-specific parameters to provide more realistic estimation of impacts. 8 refs., 10 figs., 44 tabs.

  20. Young Adult Literature 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools enable today's writers to connect with their audience in unprecedented ways. The advent of social networking and other Web 2.0 tools have changed the rules for how authors and book publishers market and communicate with their audience. Through tools like blogs, Twitter, MySpace, and Facebook, Young Adult (YA) lit authors can choose…

  1. Student Inquiry and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Pam

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 applications are changing how educators interact both with each other and with their students. Educators can use these new Web tools daily to create, share, socialize, and collaborate with students, colleagues, and newly developed network contacts. School librarians are finding that Web 2.0 tools are bringing them more ways to embrace and…

  2. Trust, Voice, and Library 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Candice

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 is a constant and growing theme in the library field. This article describes a social networking site based on a Web 2.0 infused course management system (CMS) developed by Clatsop Community College in Astoria, Oregon.

  3. Breathing Fire into Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Justin; Carpenter, David

    2007-01-01

    Today's methods of social networking and the technologies that support them offer powerful examples of how educators can connect to the "real" world of client population. To fully engage with the Web 2.0 world, educators work to include aspects of Web 2.0 into their teaching through the use of wikis, forums, and blogs. Administrators are also…

  4. Public health and Web 2.0.

    PubMed

    Hardey, Michael

    2008-07-01

    This article examines the nature and role of Web 2.0 resources and their impact on health information made available though the Internet. The transition of the Web from version one to Web 2.0 is described and the main features of the new Web examined. Two characteristic Web 2.0 resources are explored and the implications for the public and practitioners examined. First, what are known as 'user reviews' or 'user testimonials', which allow people to comment on the health services delivered to them, are described. Second, new mapping applications that take advantage of the interactive potential of Web 2.0 and provide tools to visualize complex data are examined. Following a discussion of the potential of Web 2.0, it is concluded that it offers considerable opportunities for disseminating health information and creating new sources of data, as well as generating new questions and dilemmas.

  5. SFA 2.0- Metabolic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jill; Beller, Harry

    2015-02-17

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientists Jill Banfield and Harry Beller explain the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project's research on metabolic potential—or how metabolic lifestyles of microbial communities modulate in response to as well as influence environmental change.

  6. Lost in Web 2.0 Cyberspace?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Web 1.0 never left. It's just a term that refers to cyberspace before 2002. People mark the shift from Web 1.0 to 2.0 with the dramatic collapse of Web-based companies whose phenomenal growth was based on the profit potential of a new customer: the Internet user. Generally, Web 1.0 sites have a commercial focus. On the other hand, Web 2.0 reverses…

  7. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Smit, Berend

    2016-07-12

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. Combustion and Carbon Cycle 2.0 and Computation in CC 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Cheng, Robert K; Meza, Juan

    2016-07-12

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza provide two presentations in one session at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  9. Combustion and Carbon Cycle 2.0 and Computation in CC 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Robert K; Meza, Juan

    2010-02-03

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza provide two presentations in one session at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  10. Different Spaces: Staff Development for Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samarawickrema, Gayani; Benson, Robyn; Brack, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative staff development activity run across two Australian universities, for academic staff integrating Web 2.0 technologies into their teaching. It describes a three-week long virtual workshop on teaching with wikis, where participants in two groups developed a group project as students and then assessed the work…

  11. Web 2.0 and pharmacy education.

    PubMed

    Cain, Jeff; Fox, Brent I

    2009-11-12

    New types of social Internet applications (often referred to as Web 2.0) are becoming increasingly popular within higher education environments. Although developed primarily for entertainment and social communication within the general population, applications such as blogs, social video sites, and virtual worlds are being adopted by higher education institutions. These newer applications differ from standard Web sites in that they involve the users in creating and distributing information, hence effectively changing how the Web is used for knowledge generation and dispersion. Although Web 2.0 applications offer exciting new ways to teach, they should not be the core of instructional planning, but rather selected only after learning objectives and instructional strategies have been identified. This paper provides an overview of prominent Web 2.0 applications, explains how they are being used within education environments, and elaborates on some of the potential opportunities and challenges that these applications present.

  12. Web 2.0 and Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Brent I.

    2009-01-01

    New types of social Internet applications (often referred to as Web 2.0) are becoming increasingly popular within higher education environments. Although developed primarily for entertainment and social communication within the general population, applications such as blogs, social video sites, and virtual worlds are being adopted by higher education institutions. These newer applications differ from standard Web sites in that they involve the users in creating and distributing information, hence effectively changing how the Web is used for knowledge generation and dispersion. Although Web 2.0 applications offer exciting new ways to teach, they should not be the core of instructional planning, but rather selected only after learning objectives and instructional strategies have been identified. This paper provides an overview of prominent Web 2.0 applications, explains how they are being used within education environments, and elaborates on some of the potential opportunities and challenges that these applications present. PMID:19960079

  13. Global Impacts (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Gadgil, Ashok [EETD and UC Berkeley

    2016-07-12

    Ashok Gadgil, Faculty Senior Scientist and Acting Director, EETD, also Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  14. World Wide Web Astronomy 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppelman, M.; Gay, P. L.

    2008-11-01

    The Internet has changed astronomy. It's changed research, outreach and education and it's changed how people consume astronomy as enthusiasts. People have new ways to talk to each other and new ways to participate. Coined ``Web 2.0,'' technologies such as blogs, social networks, wikis, photo and video sharing sites, podcasts and micro-blogging have been adopted by the astronomy community and exciting things are happening as a result. The International Year of Astronomy's New Media Task Force has been working to harness the excitement of ``Web 2.0'' to make the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) highly visible on the Internet around the world.

  15. Professional Development and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakes, David

    2007-01-01

    Professional development in most schools has a predictable look and feel: summer workshops, brown-bag luncheon trainings, and the infamous in-service day. These events can be successful, and there is no doubt they have helped numerous educators become better at what they do. Web 2.0, however, opens up a new world of professional learning. This…

  16. Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2015-12-19

    Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division Director Susan Hubbard, the Project Lead for the Sustainable Systems Scientific Focus Area (SFA) 2.0, gives an overview of the project and its mission to develop a predictive understanding of terrestrial environments, from the genome to the watershed scales, to enable a new class of solutions for environmental and energy solutions.

  17. Do Web 2.0 Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The author and his colleague, Deborah Polin, traveled around the United States to get a first-hand look at how teachers are developing successful Web 2.0 activities for their classrooms. With funding from Intel, they interviewed 39 educators in 22 schools throughout the country about how they employed these tools in their classrooms in innovative…

  18. Social Participation in Health 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Bradford W.; Hansen, Derek; Finholt, Thomas; Munson, Sean; Kellogg, Wendy; Thomas, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Computer scientists are working with biomedical researchers, policy specialists, and medical practitioners to usher in a new era in healthcare. A recently convened panel of experts considered various research opportunities for technology-mediated social participation in Health 2.0. PMID:21379365

  19. Looking for Collection 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buczynski, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Libraries are integrating Web 2.0 services into work practices, positioning themselves in online social environments, and deploying enhanced search and discovery tools. Collections conversely are not progressing to the same degree. Like many public services today, library budgets are stained. User-pay options are appearing in library systems,…

  20. The PLATO 2.0 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauer, H.; Catala, C.; Aerts, C.; Appourchaux, T.; Benz, W.; Brandeker, A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Deleuil, M.; Gizon, L.; Goupil, M.-J.; Güdel, M.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Mas-Hesse, M.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Pollacco, D.; Santos, Ċ.; Smith, A.; Suárez, J.-C.; Szabó, R.; Udry, S.; Adibekyan, V.; Alibert, Y.; Almenara, J.-M.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Asplund, M.; Antonello, E.; Barnes, S.; Baudin, F.; Belkacem, K.; Bergemann, M.; Bihain, G.; Birch, A. C.; Bonfils, X.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Borsa, F.; Brandão, I. M.; Brocato, E.; Brun, S.; Burleigh, M.; Burston, R.; Cabrera, J.; Cassisi, S.; Chaplin, W.; Charpinet, S.; Chiappini, C.; Church, R. P.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Cunha, M.; Damasso, M.; Davies, M. B.; Deeg, H. J.; Díaz, R. F.; Dreizler, S.; Dreyer, C.; Eggenberger, P.; Ehrenreich, D.; Eigmüller, P.; Erikson, A.; Farmer, R.; Feltzing, S.; de Oliveira Fialho, F.; Figueira, P.; Forveille, T.; Fridlund, M.; García, R. A.; Giommi, P.; Giuffrida, G.; Godolt, M.; Gomes da Silva, J.; Granzer, T.; Grenfell, J. L.; Grotsch-Noels, A.; Günther, E.; Haswell, C. A.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hébrard, G.; Hekker, S.; Helled, R.; Heng, K.; Jenkins, J. M.; Johansen, A.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Kley, W.; Kolb, U.; Krivova, N.; Kupka, F.; Lammer, H.; Lanza, A. F.; Lebreton, Y.; Magrin, D.; Marcos-Arenal, P.; Marrese, P. M.; Marques, J. P.; Martins, J.; Mathis, S.; Mathur, S.; Messina, S.; Miglio, A.; Montalban, J.; Montalto, M.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Moradi, H.; Moravveji, E.; Mordasini, C.; Morel, T.; Mortier, A.; Nascimbeni, V.; Nelson, R. P.; Nielsen, M. B.; Noack, L.; Norton, A. J.; Ofir, A.; Oshagh, M.; Ouazzani, R.-M.; Pápics, P.; Parro, V. C.; Petit, P.; Plez, B.; Poretti, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Raimondo, G.; Rainer, M.; Reese, D. R.; Redmer, R.; Reffert, S.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Salmon, S.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Schou, J.; Schuh, S.; Schunker, H.; Silva-Valio, A.; Silvotti, R.; Skillen, I.; Snellen, I.; Sohl, F.; Sousa, S. G.; Sozzetti, A.; Stello, D.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Švanda, M.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Tkachenko, A.; Valencia, D.; Van Grootel, V.; Vauclair, S. D.; Ventura, P.; Wagner, F. W.; Walton, N. A.; Weingrill, J.; Werner, S. C.; Wheatley, P. J.; Zwintz, K.

    2014-11-01

    PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA's M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, including potentially habitable planets? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes (32 with 25 s readout cadence and 2 with 2.5 s candence) providing a wide field-of-view (2232 deg 2) and a large photometric magnitude range (4-16 mag). It focusses on bright (4-11 mag) stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for these bright stars to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2 %, 4-10 % and 10 % for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The planned baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2-3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars and an additional step-and-stare phase to cover in total about 50 % of the sky. PLATO 2.0 will observe up to 1,000,000 stars and detect and characterize hundreds of small planets, and thousands of planets in the Neptune to gas giant regime out to the HZ. It will therefore provide the first large-scale catalogue of bulk characterized planets with accurate radii, masses, mean densities and ages. This catalogue will include terrestrial planets at intermediate orbital distances, where surface temperatures are moderate. Coverage of this parameter range with statistical numbers of bulk characterized planets is unique to PLATO 2.0. The PLATO 2.0 catalogue allows us to e.g.: - complete our knowledge of planet

  1. STRANAL-PMC Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert; Carney, Kelly S.; Binienda, Wieslaw; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2006-01-01

    Version 2.0 of the Strain Rate Dependent Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites (STRANAL-PMC) software has been released. A prior version was reported in Analyzing Loads and Strains in Polymer- Matrix Composites (LEW-17227), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 36. To recapitulate: Modified versions of constitutive equations of viscoplasticity of metals are used to represent deformation of a polymeric matrix. The equations are applied in a micromechanical approach, proceeding upward from slices of unit cells, through the ply level, to the laminate level. The constitutive equations are integrated in time by a Runge- Kutta technique. To predict the ultimate strength of each composite ply, failure criteria are implemented within the micromechanics. The inputs to STRANAL-PMC are the laminate geometry, properties of the fiber and matrix materials, and applied stress or strain versus time. The outputs are time-dependent stresses and strains at the slice, ply, and laminate levels. The improvements in version 2.0 include more rigorous representation of hydrostatic- stress effects in the matrix, refinement and extension of ply failure models, and capabilities to analyze transverse shear stresses. Version 2.0 can be implemented as a material-model code within transient dynamic finite-element codes.

  2. Validation Results for LEWICE 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Rutkowski, Adam

    1999-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Lewis to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 2.0 of this code, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases due to its robustness and its ability to reproduce results accurately for different spacing and time step criteria across computing platform. It also differs in the extensive amount of effort undertaken to compare the results in a quantified manner against the database of ice shapes which have been generated in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The results of the shape comparisons are analyzed to determine the range of meteorological conditions under which LEWICE 2.0 is within the experimental repeatability. This comparison shows that the average variation of LEWICE 2.0 from the experimental data is 7.2% while the overall variability of the experimental data is 2.5%.

  3. ECO2N V2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Spycher, Nicolas; Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    ECO2N V2.0 is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.1) that was designed for applications to geologic sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers and enhanced geothermal reservoirs. ECO2N V2.0 is an enhanced version of the previous ECO2N V1.0 module (Pruess, 2005). It expands the temperature range up to about 300oC whereas V1.0 can only be used for temperatures below about 110oC. V2.0 includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of H2O - NaCl - CO2 mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for the temperature, pressure and salinity conditions 10 °C < T < 300 °C, P < 600 bar, and salinity up to halite saturation. This includes density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, as well as partitioning of mass components H2O, NaCl and CO2 among the different phases. In particular, V2.0 accounts for the effects of water on the thermophysical properties of the CO2-rich phase, which was ignored in V1.0, using a model consistent with the solubility models developed by Spycher and Pruess (2005, 2010). In terms of solubility models, V2.0 uses the same model for partitioning of mass components among the different phases (Spycher and Pruess, 2005) as V1.0 for the low temperature range (<99oC) but uses a new model (Spycher and Pruess, 2010) for the high temperature range (>109oC). In the transition range (99-109oC), a smooth interpolation is applied to estimate the partitioning as a function of the temperature. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO2-rich) phase, as well as two-phase (brine-CO2) mixtures. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. Note that the model cannot be applied to subcritical conditions that involves both liquid and gaseous CO2 unless

  4. ECO2N V2.0

    2015-02-01

    ECO2N V2.0 is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.1) that was designed for applications to geologic sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers and enhanced geothermal reservoirs. ECO2N V2.0 is an enhanced version of the previous ECO2N V1.0 module (Pruess, 2005). It expands the temperature range up to about 300oC whereas V1.0 can only be used for temperatures below about 110oC. V2.0 includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamic and thermophysical propertiesmore » of H2O - NaCl - CO2 mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for the temperature, pressure and salinity conditions 10 °C < T < 300 °C, P < 600 bar, and salinity up to halite saturation. This includes density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition, as well as partitioning of mass components H2O, NaCl and CO2 among the different phases. In particular, V2.0 accounts for the effects of water on the thermophysical properties of the CO2-rich phase, which was ignored in V1.0, using a model consistent with the solubility models developed by Spycher and Pruess (2005, 2010). In terms of solubility models, V2.0 uses the same model for partitioning of mass components among the different phases (Spycher and Pruess, 2005) as V1.0 for the low temperature range (<99oC) but uses a new model (Spycher and Pruess, 2010) for the high temperature range (>109oC). In the transition range (99-109oC), a smooth interpolation is applied to estimate the partitioning as a function of the temperature. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO2-rich) phase, as well as two-phase (brine-CO2) mixtures. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. Note that the model cannot be applied to subcritical conditions that involves both liquid and gaseous CO2

  5. UQTk version 2.0 user manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Debusschere, Bert J.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Safta, Cosmin

    2013-10-01

    The UQ Toolkit (UQTk) is a collection of libraries and tools for the quanti cation of uncer- tainty in numerical model predictions. Version 2.0 o ers intrusive and non-intrusive methods for propagating input uncertainties through computational models, tools for sensitivity anal- ysis, methods for sparse surrogate construction, and Bayesian inference tools for inferring parameters from experimental data. This manual discusses the download and installation process for UQTk, provides pointers to the UQ methods used in the toolkit, and describes some of the examples provided with the toolkit.

  6. [Adolescents in Web 2.0: risks and chances ].

    PubMed

    Salisch, Maria von

    2014-01-01

    That almost all adolescents possess an individual access to the internet and that they use it every day, lays the foundation for the improved means of self presentation and participation that are known by the notion of Web 2.0. Social networks and other interactive internet formats give rise to new risks like cyber mobbing which is the topic of three contributions. At the same time, Web 2.0 offers chances in the form of online counseling and online therapy that cater to the preferences of media-friendly target group of adolescents. PMID:24877775

  7. [Adolescents in Web 2.0: risks and chances ].

    PubMed

    Salisch, Maria von

    2014-01-01

    That almost all adolescents possess an individual access to the internet and that they use it every day, lays the foundation for the improved means of self presentation and participation that are known by the notion of Web 2.0. Social networks and other interactive internet formats give rise to new risks like cyber mobbing which is the topic of three contributions. At the same time, Web 2.0 offers chances in the form of online counseling and online therapy that cater to the preferences of media-friendly target group of adolescents.

  8. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Frames 2.0 Pest Integration (F2PEST)

    SciTech Connect

    Castleton, Karl J.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2009-06-17

    The implementation of the FRAMES 2.0 F2PEST module is described, including requirements, design, and specifications of the software. This module integrates the PEST parameter estimation software within the FRAMES 2.0 environmental modeling framework. A test case is presented.

  9. Bringing Web 2.0 to bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Enabling deft data integration from numerous, voluminous and heterogeneous data sources is a major bioinformatic challenge. Several approaches have been proposed to address this challenge, including data warehousing and federated databasing. Yet despite the rise of these approaches, integration of data from multiple sources remains problematic and toilsome. These two approaches follow a user-to-computer communication model for data exchange, and do not facilitate a broader concept of data sharing or collaboration among users. In this report, we discuss the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to transcend this model and enhance bioinformatics research. We propose a Web 2.0-based Scientific Social Community (SSC) model for the implementation of these technologies. By establishing a social, collective and collaborative platform for data creation, sharing and integration, we promote a web services-based pipeline featuring web services for computer-to-computer data exchange as users add value. This pipeline aims to simplify data integration and creation, to realize automatic analysis, and to facilitate reuse and sharing of data. SSC can foster collaboration and harness collective intelligence to create and discover new knowledge. In addition to its research potential, we also describe its potential role as an e-learning platform in education. We discuss lessons from information technology, predict the next generation of Web (Web 3.0), and describe its potential impact on the future of bioinformatics studies.

  10. FLEXAN (version 2.0) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1989-01-01

    The FLEXAN (Flexible Animation) computer program, Version 2.0 is described. FLEXAN animates 3-D wireframe structural dynamics on the Evans and Sutherland PS300 graphics workstation with a VAX/VMS host computer. Animation options include: unconstrained vibrational modes, mode time histories (multiple modes), delta time histories (modal and/or nonmodal deformations), color time histories (elements of the structure change colors through time), and rotational time histories (parts of the structure rotate through time). Concurrent color, mode, delta, and rotation, time history animations are supported. FLEXAN does not model structures or calculate the dynamics of structures; it only animates data from other computer programs. FLEXAN was developed to aid in the study of the structural dynamics of spacecraft.

  11. Mass spectrometry and Web 2.0.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K

    2007-10-01

    The term Web 2.0 is a convenient shorthand for a new era in the Internet in which users themselves are both generating and modifying existing web content. Several types of tools can be used. With social bookmarking, users assign a keyword to a web resource and the collection of the keyword 'tags' from multiple users form the classification of these resources. Blogs are a form of diary or news report published on the web in reverse chronological order and are a popular form of information sharing. A wiki is a website that can be edited using a web browser and can be used for collaborative creation of information on the site. This article is a tutorial that describes how these new ways of creating, modifying, and sharing information on the Web are being used for on-line mass spectrometry resources.

  12. Teaching Web 2.0 technologies using Web 2.0 technologies

    PubMed Central

    Piorun, Mary; Prince, J. Dale

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The research evaluated participant satisfaction with the content and format of the “Web 2.0 101: Introduction to Second Generation Web Tools” course and measured the impact of the course on participants' self-evaluated knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. Methods: The “Web 2.0 101” online course was based loosely on the Learning 2.0 model. Content was provided through a course blog and covered a wide range of Web 2.0 tools. All Medical Library Association members were invited to participate. Participants were asked to complete a post-course survey. Respondents who completed the entire course or who completed part of the course self-evaluated their knowledge of nine social software tools and concepts prior to and after the course using a Likert scale. Additional qualitative information about course strengths and weaknesses was also gathered. Results: Respondents' self-ratings showed a significant change in perceived knowledge for each tool, using a matched pair Wilcoxon signed rank analysis (P<0.0001 for each tool/concept). Overall satisfaction with the course appeared high. Hands-on exercises were the most frequently identified strength of the course; the length and time-consuming nature of the course were considered weaknesses by some. Conclusion: Learning 2.0-style courses, though demanding time and self-motivation from participants, can increase knowledge of Web 2.0 tools. PMID:19851488

  13. NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model. 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model-Version 2.0 (MET-V 2.0) and contains an explanation on the use of the computer program along with an example of the MET-V 2.0 model products. The MET-V 2.0 provides an update to the 1988 version of the model. It provides information on the total mass density, temperature, and individual species number densities for any altitude between 90 and 2,500 km as a function of latitude, longitude, time, and solar and geomagnetic activity. A description is given for use of estimated future 13-mo smoothed solar flux and geomagnetic index values as input to the model. Address technical questions on the MET-V 2.0 and associated computer program to Jerry K. Owens, Spaceflight Experiments Group, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (256-961-7576; e-mail Jerry.Owens@msfc.nasa.gov).

  14. DISFRAC Version 2.0 Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Kristine B; Erickson, Marjorie A; Williams, Paul T; Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2013-01-01

    DISFRAC is the implementation of a theoretical, multi-scale model for the prediction of fracture toughness in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) region of ferritic steels. Empirically-derived models of the DBTT region cannot legitimately be extrapolated beyond the range of existing fracture toughness data. DISFRAC requires only tensile properties and microstructural information as input, and thus allows for a wider range of application than empirical, toughness data dependent models. DISFRAC is also a framework for investigating the roles of various microstructural and macroscopic effects on fracture behavior, including carbide particle sizes, grain sizes, strain rates, and material condition. DISFRAC s novel approach is to assess the interaction effects of macroscopic conditions (geometry, loading conditions) with variable microstructural features on cleavage crack initiation and propagation. The model addresses all stages of the fracture process, from microcrack initiation within a carbide particle, to propagation of that crack through grains and across grain boundaries, finally to catastrophic failure of the material. The DISFRAC procedure repeatedly performs a deterministic analysis of microcrack initiation and propagation within a macroscopic crack plastic zone to calculate a critical fracture toughness value for each microstructural geometry set. The current version of DISFRAC, version 2.0, is a research code for developing and testing models related to cleavage fracture and transition toughness. The various models and computations have evolved significantly over the course of development and are expected to continue to evolve as testing and data collection continue. This document serves as a guide to the usage and theoretical foundations of DISFRAC v2.0. Feedback is welcomed and encouraged.

  15. [Gastroenterology 2.0: useful resources for the gastroenterologist available on the Web 2.0].

    PubMed

    Curioso, Walter H; Proaño, Alvaro; Ruiz, Eloy F

    2011-01-01

    The term Web 2.0 refers to the use of Internet applications which enable the users to share, participate and collaborate together on information. The objective of this study is to check different applications that use Web 2.0, which could help the gastroenterologist in his daily practice. The applications that will be checked include: blogs, microblogging, RSS, podcasts, wikis and social networks. "Gastroenterology 2.0" represents the applications, services, and tools based on Web 2.0, which are of easy use and easily accessible - to consumers, patients, gastroenterologists and other health professionals, as well as researchers. Although several studies have shown the benefits these technologies have on the medical practice, it is necessary to conduct further studies to demonstrate the use of these applications on improving health.

  16. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Bill Collins: A future without CC2.0

    ScienceCinema

    Bill Collins

    2016-07-12

    Bill Collins speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  17. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Bill Collins: A future without CC2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Collins

    2010-02-09

    Bill Collins speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  18. Solar Fuels and Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-02-04

    Paul Alivisatos, LBNL Director speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 4, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  19. Solar Fuels and Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Alivisatos, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Paul Alivisatos, LBNL Director speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 4, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  20. BSD Portals for LINUX 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNab, A. David; woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Portals, an experimental feature of 4.4BSD, extend the file system name space by exporting certain open () requests to a user-space daemon. A portal daemon is mounted into the file name space as if it were a standard file system. When the kernel resolves a pathname and encounters a portal mount point, the remainder of the path is passed to the portal daemon. Depending on the portal "pathname" and the daemon's configuration, some type of open (2) is performed. The resulting file descriptor is passed back to the kernel which eventually returns it to the user, to whom it appears that a "normal" open has occurred. A proxy portalfs file system is responsible for kernel interaction with the daemon. The overall effect is that the portal daemon performs an open (2) on behalf of the kernel, possibly hiding substantial complexity from the calling process. One particularly useful application is implementing a connection service that allows simple scripts to open network sockets. This paper describes the implementation of portals for LINUX 2.0.

  1. New features in OSIRIS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Abreu, P.; Martins, J.; Fiúza, F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.; Decyk, V.; Tsung, F.; Tonge, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-11-01

    OSIRIS 2.0 [1] is a state of the art, fully relativistic massively parallel particle in cell code, that is widely used in kinetic plasma modeling for many astrophysical and laboratory scenarios. We report on the new developments done in the code, focusing on the new high performance vector SIMD code (Altivec/SSE3) for single precision calculations, detailing performance and floating point efficiency, and also parallel I/O for diagnostics, allowing for higher performance and scalability on HPC systems. We will also describe the new numerical precision features in the code, and we will also present the new algorithms incorporated into the code, in terms of field solver (4^th order Yee solver, etc.), new filtering techniques, perfectly matched layers (PML) boundary conditions, and boosted frame simulations. Finally, we also report on a new diagnostic tool to calculate the radiation produced with wavelengths below the simulation grid resolution. [4pt] [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342, (2002)

  2. ViennaRNA Package 2.0

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Secondary structure forms an important intermediate level of description of nucleic acids that encapsulates the dominating part of the folding energy, is often well conserved in evolution, and is routinely used as a basis to explain experimental findings. Based on carefully measured thermodynamic parameters, exact dynamic programming algorithms can be used to compute ground states, base pairing probabilities, as well as thermodynamic properties. Results The ViennaRNA Package has been a widely used compilation of RNA secondary structure related computer programs for nearly two decades. Major changes in the structure of the standard energy model, the Turner 2004 parameters, the pervasive use of multi-core CPUs, and an increasing number of algorithmic variants prompted a major technical overhaul of both the underlying RNAlib and the interactive user programs. New features include an expanded repertoire of tools to assess RNA-RNA interactions and restricted ensembles of structures, additional output information such as centroid structures and maximum expected accuracy structures derived from base pairing probabilities, or z-scores for locally stable secondary structures, and support for input in fasta format. Updates were implemented without compromising the computational efficiency of the core algorithms and ensuring compatibility with earlier versions. Conclusions The ViennaRNA Package 2.0, supporting concurrent computations via OpenMP, can be downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/RNA. PMID:22115189

  3. The Warburg effect version 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Joven, Jorge; Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Alarcón, Tomás; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    When fighting cancer, knowledge on metabolism has always been important. Today, it matters more than ever. The restricted cataloging of cancer genomes is quite unlikely to achieve the task of curing cancer, unless it is integrated into metabolic networks that respond to and influence the constantly evolving cancer stem cell (CSC) cellular states. Once the genomic era of carcinogenesis had pushed the 1920s Otto Warburg’s metabolic cancer hypothesis into obscurity for decades, the most recent studies begin to support a new developing paradigm, in which the molecular logic behind the conversion of non-CSCs into CSCs can be better understood in terms of the “metabolic facilitators” and “metabolic impediments” that operate as proximate openings and roadblocks, respectively, for the transcriptional events and signal transduction programs that ultimately orchestrate the intrinsic and/or microenvironmental paths to CSC cellular states. Here we propose that a profound understanding of how human carcinomas install a proper “Warburg effect version 2.0” allowing them to “run” the CSCs’ “software” programs should guide a new era of metabolo-genomic-personalized cancer medicine. By viewing metabolic reprogramming of CSCs as an essential characteristic that allows dynamic, multidimensional and evolving cancer populations to compete successfully for their expansion on the organism, we now argue that CSCs bioenergetics might be another cancer hallmark. A definitive understanding of metabolic reprogramming in CSCs may complement or to some extent replace, the 30-y-old paradigm of targeting oncogenes to treat human carcinomas, because it can be possible to metabolically create non-permissive or “hostile” metabotypes to prevent the occurrence of CSC cellular states with tumor- and metastasis-initiating capacity. PMID:23549172

  4. QuakeSim 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Granat, Robert A.; Norton, Charles D.; Rundle, John B.; Pierce, Marlon E.; Fox, Geoffrey C.; McLeod, Dennis; Ludwig, Lisa Grant

    2012-01-01

    QuakeSim 2.0 improves understanding of earthquake processes by providing modeling tools and integrating model applications and various heterogeneous data sources within a Web services environment. QuakeSim is a multisource, synergistic, data-intensive environment for modeling the behavior of earthquake faults individually, and as part of complex interacting systems. Remotely sensed geodetic data products may be explored, compared with faults and landscape features, mined by pattern analysis applications, and integrated with models and pattern analysis applications in a rich Web-based and visualization environment. Integration of heterogeneous data products with pattern informatics tools enables efficient development of models. Federated database components and visualization tools allow rapid exploration of large datasets, while pattern informatics enables identification of subtle, but important, features in large data sets. QuakeSim is valuable for earthquake investigations and modeling in its current state, and also serves as a prototype and nucleus for broader systems under development. The framework provides access to physics-based simulation tools that model the earthquake cycle and related crustal deformation. Spaceborne GPS and Inter ferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) data provide information on near-term crustal deformation, while paleoseismic geologic data provide longerterm information on earthquake fault processes. These data sources are integrated into QuakeSim's QuakeTables database system, and are accessible by users or various model applications. UAVSAR repeat pass interferometry data products are added to the QuakeTables database, and are available through a browseable map interface or Representational State Transfer (REST) interfaces. Model applications can retrieve data from Quake Tables, or from third-party GPS velocity data services; alternatively, users can manually input parameters into the models. Pattern analysis of GPS and seismicity data

  5. Prevention 2.0: targeting cyberbullying @ school.

    PubMed

    Wölfer, Ralf; Schultze-Krumbholz, Anja; Zagorscak, Pavle; Jäkel, Anne; Göbel, Kristin; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Although cyberbullying is characterized by worrying prevalence rates and associated with a broad range of detrimental consequences, there is a lack of scientifically based and evaluated preventive strategies. Therefore, the present study introduces a theory-based cyberbullying prevention program (Media Heroes; German original: Medienhelden) and evaluates its effectiveness. In a pretest-posttest design (9-month interval), schools were asked to randomly assign their participating classes to either control or intervention group. Longitudinal data were available from 593 middle school students (M Age = 13.3 years, 53 % girls) out of 35 classes, who provided information on cyberbullying behavior as well as socio-demographic and psychosocial variables. While the present results revealed worrying prevalence rates of cyberbullying in middle school, multilevel analyses clearly demonstrate the program's effectiveness in reducing cyberbullying behavior within intervention classes in contrast to classes of the control group. Hence, this study presents a promising program which evidentially prevents cyberbullying in schools.

  6. Prevention 2.0: targeting cyberbullying @ school.

    PubMed

    Wölfer, Ralf; Schultze-Krumbholz, Anja; Zagorscak, Pavle; Jäkel, Anne; Göbel, Kristin; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Although cyberbullying is characterized by worrying prevalence rates and associated with a broad range of detrimental consequences, there is a lack of scientifically based and evaluated preventive strategies. Therefore, the present study introduces a theory-based cyberbullying prevention program (Media Heroes; German original: Medienhelden) and evaluates its effectiveness. In a pretest-posttest design (9-month interval), schools were asked to randomly assign their participating classes to either control or intervention group. Longitudinal data were available from 593 middle school students (M Age = 13.3 years, 53 % girls) out of 35 classes, who provided information on cyberbullying behavior as well as socio-demographic and psychosocial variables. While the present results revealed worrying prevalence rates of cyberbullying in middle school, multilevel analyses clearly demonstrate the program's effectiveness in reducing cyberbullying behavior within intervention classes in contrast to classes of the control group. Hence, this study presents a promising program which evidentially prevents cyberbullying in schools. PMID:24122481

  7. A Future with (out) Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Collins, Bill

    2016-07-12

    Bill Collins, Head of LBNL's Climate Sciences Department, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. A Call to Action: Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Alivisatos, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  9. A Future with (out) Carbon Cycle 2.0 (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Bill

    2010-02-01

    Bill Collins, Head of LBNL's Climate Sciences Department, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  10. GEM Building Taxonomy (Version 2.0)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brzev, S.; Scawthorn, C.; Charleson, A.W.; Allen, L.; Greene, M.; Jaiswal, Kishor; Silva, V.

    2013-01-01

    team validated that the GEM Building Taxonomy is highly functional, robust and able to describe different buildings around the world. The GEM Building Taxonomy is accompanied by supplementary resources. All terms have been explained in a companion online Glossary, which provides both text and graphic descriptions. The Taxonomy is accompanied by TaxT, a computer application that enables a user record information about a building or a building typology using the attributes of the GEM Building Taxonomy v2.0. TaxT can generate a taxonomy string and enable a user to generate a report in PDF format which summarizes the attribute values (s)he has chosen as representative of the building typology under consideration. The report concludes with recommendations for future development of the GEM Building Taxonomy. Appendices provide the detailed GEM Building Taxonomy tables and additional resource, as well as mappings to other taxonomies.

  11. Oh! Web 2.0, Virtual Reference Service 2.0, Tools & Techniques (II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arya, Harsh Bardhan; Mishra, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the theory and definition of the practice of librarianship, specifically addressing how Web 2.0 technologies (tools) such as synchronous messaging, collaborative reference service and streaming media, blogs, wikis, social networks, social bookmarking tools, tagging, RSS feeds, and mashups might intimate changes and how…

  12. SOAP 2.0: Spot Oscillation And Planet 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2015-04-01

    SOAP (Spot Oscillation And Planet) 2.0 simulates the effects of dark spots and bright plages on the surface of a rotating star, computing their expected radial velocity and photometric signatures. It includes the convective blueshift and its inhibition in active regions.

  13. Enabling Problem Based Learning through Web 2.0 Technologies: PBL 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos; Ryberg, Thomas; Buus, Lillian; Peristeras, Vassilios; Lee, Deirdre; Porwol, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT), particularly the so-called Web 2.0, are affecting all aspects of our life: How we communicate, how we shop, how we socialise, how we learn. Facilitating learning through the use of ICT, also known as eLearning, is a vital part of modern educational systems. Established pedagogical…

  14. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence)

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-01-01

    In the past several years, the science of health care improvement has advanced considerably. In this article, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26497490

  15. Preimplantation genetic screening 2.0: the theory.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, Joep; Sermon, Karen

    2016-08-01

    During the last few years a new generation of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been introduced. In this paper, an overview of the different aspects of this so-called PGS 2.0 with respect to the why (what are the indications), the when (which developmental stage, i.e. which material should be studied) and the how (which molecular technique should be used) is given. With respect to the aims it is clear that PGS 2.0 can be used for a variety of indications. However, the beneficial effect of PGS 2.0 has not been proved yet in RCTs. It is clear that cleavage stage is not the optimal stage for biopsy. Almost all advocates of PGS 2.0 prefer trophectoderm biopsy. There are many new methods that allow the study of complete aneuploidy with respect to one or more of the 24 chromosomes. Because of the improved vitrification methods, selection of fresh embryos for transfer is more and more often replaced by frozen embryo transfer. The main goal of PGS has always been the improvement of IVF success. However, success is defined by different authors in many different ways. This makes it very difficult to compare the outcomes of different studies. In conclusion, the introduction of PGS 2.0 will depend on the success of the new biopsy strategies in combination with the analysis of all 24 chromosomes. It remains to be seen which approach will be the most successful and for which specific groups of patients. PMID:27256482

  16. Spectral flow as a map between N = (2 , 0)-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A. E.; Gepner, D.

    2014-07-01

    The space of (2 , 0) models is of particular interest among all heterotic-string models because it includes the models with the minimal SO (10) unification structure, which is well motivated by the Standard Model of particle physics data. The fermionic Z2 ×Z2 heterotic-string models revealed the existence of a new symmetry in the space of string configurations under the exchange of spinors and vectors of the SO (10) GUT group, dubbed spinor-vector duality. In this paper we generalize this idea to arbitrary internal rational conformal field theories (RCFTs). We explain how the spectral flow operator normally acting within a general (2 , 2) theory can be used as a map between (2 , 0) models. We describe the details, give an example and propose more simple currents that can be used in a similar way.

  17. Study of medicine 2.0 due to Web 2.0?! - Risks and opportunities for the curriculum in Leipzig

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Gunther; Neef, Martin; Rotzoll, Daisy; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 is changing the study of medicine by opening up totally new ways of learning and teaching in an ongoing process. Global social networking services like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google Drive and Xing already play an important part in communication both among students and between students and teaching staff. Moreover, local portals (such as the platform [http://www.leipzig-medizin.de] established in 2003) have also caught on and in some cases eclipsed the use of the well-known location-independent social media. The many possibilities and rapid changes brought about by social networks need to be publicized within medical faculties. Therefore, an E-learning and New Media Working Group was set up at the Faculty of Medicine of Universität Leipzig in order to harness the opportunities of Web 2.0, analyse the resulting processes of change in the study of medicine, and curb the risks of the Internet. With Web 2.0 and the social web already influencing the study of medicine, the opportunities of the Internet now need to be utilized to improve the teaching of medicine. PMID:23467440

  18. Study of medicine 2.0 due to Web 2.0?! -- risks and opportunities for the curriculum in Leipzig.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Gunther; Neef, Martin; Rotzoll, Daisy; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 is changing the study of medicine by opening up totally new ways of learning and teaching in an ongoing process. Global social networking services like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google Drive and Xing already play an important part in communication both among students and between students and teaching staff. Moreover, local portals (such as the platform [http://www.leipzig-medizin.de] established in 2003) have also caught on and in some cases eclipsed the use of the well-known location-independent social media. The many possibilities and rapid changes brought about by social networks need to be publicized within medical faculties. Therefore, an E-learning and New Media Working Group was set up at the Faculty of Medicine of Universität Leipzig in order to harness the opportunities of Web 2.0, analyse the resulting processes of change in the study of medicine, and curb the risks of the Internet. With Web 2.0 and the social web already influencing the study of medicine, the opportunities of the Internet now need to be utilized to improve the teaching of medicine.

  19. Users guide for ENVSTD program Version 2. 0 and LTGSTD program Version 2. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Crawley, D.B.; Riesen, P.K.; Briggs, R.S.

    1989-02-01

    On January 30, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR Part 435, Subpart A, an Interim Rule entitled ''Energy Conservation Voluntary Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings; Mandatory for New Federal Buildings.'' As a consequence, federal agencies must design all future federal commercial and multifamily high rise residential buildings in accordance with the Standards, or show that their current standards already meet or exceed the energy-efficiency requirements of the Standards. Although these newly enacted Standards do not regulate the design of nonfederal buildings, DOE recommends that all design professionals use the Standards as guidelines for designing energy-conserving buildings. To encourage private sector use, the Standards were presented in the January 30, 1989, Federal Register in the format typical of commercial standards rather than a federal regulation. As a further help, DOE supported the development of various microcomputer programs to ease the use of the Standards. Two of these programs/emdash/ENVSTD (Version 2.0) and LTGSTD (Version 2.0)/emdash/are detailed in this users guide and provided on the accompanying diskette. This package, developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is intended to facilitate the designer's use of the Standards dealing specifically with a building's envelope and lighting system designs. Using these programs will greatly simplify the designer's task of performing the sometimes complex calculations needed to determine a design's compliance with the Standards. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Web 2.0 and Critical Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunaway, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The impact of Web 2.0 upon culture, education, and knowledge is obfuscated by the pervasiveness of Web 2.0 applications and technologies. Web 2.0 is commonly conceptualized in terms of the tools that it makes possible, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Wikipedia. In the context of information literacy instruction, Web 2.0 is frequently conceptualized…

  1. PETSc 2.0 Users Manual: Revision 2.0.16

    SciTech Connect

    Balay, S.; Gropp, W.; McInnes, L.C.; Smith, B.

    1997-02-01

    This manual describes the use of PETSc 2.0 for the numerical solution of partial differential equations and related problems on high-performance computers. The Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is a suite of data structures and routines that provide the building blocks for the implementation of large-scale application codes on parallel (and serial) computers. PETSc 2.0 uses the MPI standard for all message-passing communication. PETSc includes an expanding suite of parallel linear and nonlinear equation solvers that may be used in application codes written in Fortran, C, and C++. PETSc provides many of the mechanisms needed thin parallel application codes, such as simple parallel matrix and vector assembly routines that allow the overlap of communication and computation. In addition, PETSc includes growing support for distributed arrays. The library is organized hierarchically, enabling users to employ the level of abstraction that is most appropriate for a particular problem. By using techniques of object-oriented programming, PETSc provides enormous flexibility for users. PETSc is a sophisticated set of software tools; as such, for some users it initially has a much steeper learning curve than a simple subroutine library. In particular, for individuals without some computer science background or experience programming in C, Pascal, or C++, it may require a large amount of time to take full advantage of the features that enable efficient software use. However, the power of the PETSc design and the algorithms it incorporates make the efficient implementation of many application codes much simpler than rolling them yourself. For many simple tasks a package such as Matlab is often the best tool; PETSc is not intended for the classes of problems for which effective Matlab code can be written. Since PETSc is still under development, small changes in usage and calling sequences of PETSc routines will continue to occur.

  2. Deriving a Typology of Web 2.0 Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the methods and outcomes of a typological analysis of Web 2.0 technologies. A comprehensive review incorporating over 2000 links led to identification of over 200 Web 2.0 technologies that were suitable for learning and teaching purposes. The typological analysis involved development of relevant Web 2.0 dimensions, grouping…

  3. Exploring Library 2.0 on the Social Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Library 2.0 literature has described many of the possibilities Web 2.0 technologies offer to libraries. Case studies have assessed local use, but no studies have measured the Library 2.0 phenomenon by searching public social networking sites. This study used library-specific terms to search public social networking sites, blog search engines, and…

  4. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  5. Collaborating across Time Zones: How 2.0 Technology Can Bring Your Global Team Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The Web 2.0 tools and services that are making socializing, networking, and communicating in general so easy are also making group projects seriously simple. With the judicious use of a few of the popular tools that use Web 2.0 technologies and philosophies, one can collaboratively create documents, spreadsheets, presentations, websites, project…

  6. Microsoft or Google Web 2.0 Tools for Course Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienzo, Thomas; Han, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    While Web 2.0 has no universal definition, it always refers to online interactions in which user groups both provide and receive content with the aim of collective intelligence. Since 2005, online software has provided Web 2.0 collaboration technologies, for little or no charge, that were formerly available only to wealthy organizations. Academic…

  7. Creating and Consuming Web 2.0 in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, Melanie L.

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 has the potential to dramatically affect educational practices in a variety of ways. Within the field of art education, students and teachers can utilize Web 2.0 to further student understanding and art-making. The potential for students to create the Web is an aspect of Web 2.0 that is particularly well suited for an art classroom.…

  8. Pathology in the era of Web 2.0.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, William E; Giustini, Dean M

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, the term Web 2.0 has become a descriptor for the increased functionality of Web sites, including those with medical content. Most physicians do not know what Web 2.0 means or how it can impact their work lives. This review provides some background on the evolution of Web 2.0 and describes how its features are being incorporated into medical Web sites. Some potential applications of Web 2.0 in pathology and laboratory medicine are discussed, as are the issues that must be considered when adopting this new technology.

  9. Using Web 2.0 for health promotion and social marketing efforts: lessons learned from Web 2.0 experts.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Jennifer Allyson; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 experts working in social marketing participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. The research aimed to document the current state of Web 2.0 practice. Perceived strengths (such as the viral nature of Web 2.0) and weaknesses (such as the time consuming effort it took to learn new Web 2.0 platforms) existed when using Web 2.0 platforms for campaigns. Lessons learned were identified--namely, suggestions for engaging in specific types of content creation strategies (such as plain language and transparent communication practices). Findings present originality and value to practitioners working in social marketing who want to effectively use Web 2.0. PMID:24878406

  10. Using Web 2.0 for health promotion and social marketing efforts: lessons learned from Web 2.0 experts.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Jennifer Allyson; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 experts working in social marketing participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. The research aimed to document the current state of Web 2.0 practice. Perceived strengths (such as the viral nature of Web 2.0) and weaknesses (such as the time consuming effort it took to learn new Web 2.0 platforms) existed when using Web 2.0 platforms for campaigns. Lessons learned were identified--namely, suggestions for engaging in specific types of content creation strategies (such as plain language and transparent communication practices). Findings present originality and value to practitioners working in social marketing who want to effectively use Web 2.0.

  11. Web 2.0: Creating a Classroom without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This article is about my year-long journey implementing Web 2.0 tools into my teaching practice. The goal throughout my journey has always been to increase my students' intrinsic motivation to learn about science. The Web 2.0 tools I used along my journey were weblogs (blogs) and podcasts. (Contains 1 figure.)

  12. What You Need to Know about Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imperatore, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Also known as the read/write or participatory Web, Web 2.0 includes such tools as blogs, podcasts, forums, wikis and social networks. It gives users the ability to take in information and create, organize and connect with others interested in the same topics. Web 2.0 is revolutionizing education because students and educators can easily and…

  13. Unleashing the Power of Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2008-01-01

    As Web 2.0 technologies impact the evolution of online learning, they are certain to blur the definitional lines between electronic portfolios and personal learning environments (PLEs). According to Gary Brown, director of Washington State University's Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology, the Web 2.0 technologies that are emerging…

  14. Changing Paradigms Managed Learning Environments and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Emory M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how emerging technologies and Web 2.0 services are transforming the structure of the web and their potential impact on managed learning environments (MLS) and learning content management systems (LCMS). Design/methodology/approach: Innovative Web 2.0 applications are reviewed in the paper to…

  15. Students as Digital Citizens on Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebel, Michelle; Jamison, Barbara; Bennett, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Internet tools associated with Web 2.0 such as wikis, blogs, and video podcasts are increasingly available in elementary classrooms. ("Web 2.0" is a vaguely defined, folk-tech term that means, roughly, the Internet and all software and devices, constantly improving, that strive to exploit it in creative and useful ways.) Today, elementary students…

  16. Untangling Web 2.0's Influences on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magolda, Peter M.; Platt, Glenn J.

    2009-01-01

    The recent creation of Web 2.0 applications dramatically alters the ways in which universities recruit and educate students. Technology insiders usually attribute the phrase "Web 2.0" to Tim O'Reilly, author and publisher of the ubiquitous O'Reilly series of technology books (http://oreilly.com). Although there is no shortage of definitions of Web…

  17. The Next Wave Now: Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Lane B.

    2007-01-01

    While many people are just getting comfortable with the Internet and e-mail, Web 2.0 technologies are already changing the playing field for education. Though definitions of Web 2.0 vary, the one constant is that Internet users are now content providers rather than content receivers. The top-down approach of the Web has been replaced with users…

  18. Leadership 2.0: Social Media in Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Lisa; Vodicka, Devin; White, John

    2011-01-01

    Technology is always changing, always improving, and always pushing the envelope for how one works in education. In this increasingly connected age, people have seen rapid growth in social network tools such as Twitter and Facebook. These sites are representative of Web 2.0 resources where users contribute content. Other examples of Web 2.0 sites…

  19. On Recommending Web 2.0 Tools to Personalise Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juškeviciene, Anita; Kurilovas, Eugenijus

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to present research results on using Web 2.0 tools for learning personalisation. In the work, personalised Web 2.0 tools selection method is presented. This method takes into account student's learning preferences for content and communication modes tailored to the learning activities with a view to help the learner to quickly and…

  20. Information Literacy Instruction in the Web 2.0 Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humrickhouse, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how library educators can implement Web 2.0 tools in their Information Literacy programs to better prepare students for the rigors of academic research. Additionally, this paper looks at transliteracy and constructivism as the most useful teaching methods in a Web 2.0 classroom and attempts to pinpoint specific educational…

  1. The use of Web 2.0 technologies.

    PubMed

    Kohtz, Cindy; Gowda, Connie; Stockert, Patricia; White, Jane; Kennel, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Although many publications laud the potential benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies in nursing education, little has been published on the extent of their use. This descriptive study examined the personal and academic use of Web 2.0 technologies among nursing students enrolled in 3 different baccalaureate programs.

  2. Culture, Learning Styles, and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaniran, Bolanle A.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores Web 2.0 in interactive learning environments. Specifically, the article examines Web 2.0 as an interactive learning platform that holds potential, but is also limited by learning styles and cultural value preferences. The article explores the issue of control from both teacher and learner perspectives, and in particular the…

  3. A Framework for Web 2.0 Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt; Hedberg, John G.; Kuswara, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to conceptualising and performing Web 2.0-enabled learning design. Based on the Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge model of educational practice, the approach conceptualises Web 2.0 learning design by relating Anderson and Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Learning, Teaching and Assessing, and different types…

  4. Web 2.0 in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P.

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of successful mathematics teachers is that they are able to provide varied activities that promote student learning and assessment. Web 2.0 applications can provide an assortment of tools to help produce creative activities. A Web 2.0 tool enables the student to enter data and create multimedia products using text, graphics,…

  5. Web 2.0 Strategy in Libraries and Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 challenges libraries to change from their predominantly centralised service models with integrated library management systems at the hub. Implementation of Web 2.0 technologies and the accompanying attitudinal shifts will demand reconceptualisation of the nature of library and information service around a dynamic, ever changing, networked,…

  6. Raptor: An Enterprise Knowledge Discovery Engine Version 2.0

    2011-08-31

    The Raptor Version 2.0 computer code uses a set of documents as seed documents to recommend documents of interest from a large, target set of documents. The computer code provides results that show the recommended documents with the highest similarity to the seed documents. Version 2.0 was specifically developed to work with SharePoint 2007 and MS SQL server.

  7. Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide 2.0" continues Project WET's dedication to 21st-century, cutting-edge water education. Now in full color, Guide 2.0 offers new activities on topics such as National Parks and storm water, fully revised and updated activities from the original Guide and the very best activities gathered from all of…

  8. Scenarios and Strategies for Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Graeme; Reddington, Martin; Kneafsey, Mary Beth; Sloman, Martyn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to bring together ideas from the authors' review of the Web 2.0 literature, the data and their insights from this and other technology-related projects to produce a framework for strategies on Web 2.0 focusing on the implications for human resource professionals. Design/methodology/approach: The authors discuss…

  9. New and Innovative Library Services: Moving with Web 2.0 / Library 2.0 Technology, a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, H. K.; Pathak, S. K.; Singh, S. N.

    2010-10-01

    We give an overview and definition of Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 technology, especially addressing how it changes access to collections for users. We also describe its unlimited possibilities. The various components of Library 2.0 viz blogs, wikis, RSS, instant messaging, social networking, podcasting, and tagging are briefly summarized. Initiatives at three special information centers and libraries (IUCAA — Astronomy and Astrophysics; IIT — Science and Technology; and NIV — Viral Diseases) are described. We conclude with a futuristic view of Library 2.0.

  10. Health 2.0 and implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ramona

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 20 years the evolution of web browsers providing easy access to the Internet has initiated a revolution in access to healthcare related information for both healthcare providers and patients. This access has changed both the process used to deliver education and the content of the nursing education curriculum worldwide. Our amazing ability to access information around the world is referred as to Web 1.0. Web 2.0 moves beyond access to a world where users are interactively creating information. With the advent of Health 2.0 we are confronting a second revolution that is challenging all aspects of healthcare including all aspects of nursing. This paper explores the concept of Health 2.0, discusses a conceptual framework approach for integrating Health 2.0 content into the nursing curriculum, outlines examples of key concepts required in today's nursing curriculum and identifies selected issues arising from the impact of Health 2.0.

  11. Usage Analysis of Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 Tools by Librarians in Kwara State Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Adeyinka; Soluoku, Taofeeqat

    2016-01-01

    This study analysed the usage of Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 tools by librarians in Kwara State academic libraries. A sample of 40 librarians was surveyed through total enumeration sampling technique from four different tertiary education institutions libraries in Kwara State, Nigeria. Questionnaire was used for the collection of data. The collected…

  12. Oh! Web 2.0, Virtual Reference Service 2.0, Tools and Techniques (I): A Basic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arya, Harsh Bardhan; Mishra, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This study targets librarians and information professionals who use Web 2.0 tools and applications with a view to providing snapshots on how Web 2.0 technologies are used. It also aims to identify values and impact that such tools have exerted on libraries and their services, as well as to detect various issues associated with the implementation…

  13. NQS - NETWORK QUEUING SYSTEM, VERSION 2.0 (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, H.

    1994-01-01

    ; device queues hold and prioritize device requests; pipe queues transport both batch and device requests to other batch, device, or pipe queues at local or remote machines. Unique to batch queues are resource quota limits that restrict the amounts of different resources that a batch request can consume during execution. Unique to each device queue is a set of one or more devices, such as a line printer, to which requests can be sent for execution. Pipe queues have associated destinations to which they route and deliver requests. If the proper destination machine is down or unreachable, pipe queues are able to requeue the request and deliver it later when the destination is available. All NQS network conversations are performed using the Berkeley socket mechanism as ported into the respective vendor kernels. NQS is written in C language. The generic UNIX version (ARC-13179) has been successfully implemented on a variety of UNIX platforms, including Sun3 and Sun4 series computers, SGI IRIS computers running IRIX 3.3, DEC computers running ULTRIX 4.1, AMDAHL computers running UTS 1.3 and 2.1, platforms running BSD 4.3 UNIX. The IBM RS/6000 AIX version (COS-10042) is a vendor port. NQS 2.0 will also communicate with the Cray Research, Inc. and Convex, Inc. versions of NQS. The standard distribution medium for either machine version of NQS 2.0 is a 60Mb, QIC-24, .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. Upon request the generic UNIX version (ARC-13179) can be provided in UNIX tar format on alternate media. Please contact COSMIC to discuss the availability and cost of media to meet your specific needs. An electronic copy of the NQS 2.0 documentation is included on the program media. NQS 2.0 was released in 1991. The IBM RS/6000 port of NQS was developed in 1992. IRIX is a trademark of Silicon Graphics Inc. IRIS is a registered trademark of Silicon Graphics Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories Inc. Sun3 and Sun4 are trademarks of

  14. Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation, and Openness

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In a very significant development for eHealth, a broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally Controlled Health Records such as Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and Dossia. “Medicine 2.0” applications, services, and tools are defined as Web-based services for health care consumers, caregivers, patients, health professionals, and biomedical researchers, that use Web 2.0 technologies and/or semantic web and virtual reality approaches to enable and facilitate specifically 1) social networking, 2) participation, 3) apomediation, 4) openness, and 5) collaboration, within and between these user groups. The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) publishes a Medicine 2.0 theme issue and sponsors a conference on “How Social Networking and Web 2.0 changes Health, Health Care, Medicine, and Biomedical Research”, to stimulate and encourage research in these five areas. PMID:18725354

  15. Medicine 2.0: social networking, collaboration, participation, apomediation, and openness.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2008-08-25

    In a very significant development for eHealth, broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally Controlled Health Records such as Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and Dossia. "Medicine 2.0" applications, services and tools are defined as Web-based services for health care consumers, caregivers, patients, health professionals, and biomedical researchers, that use Web 2.0 technologies and/or semantic web and virtual reality approaches to enable and facilitate specifically 1) social networking, 2) participation, 3) apomediation, 4) openness and 5) collaboration, within and between these user groups. The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) publishes a Medicine 2.0 theme issue and sponsors a conference on "How Social Networking and Web 2.0 changes Health, Health Care, Medicine and Biomedical Research", to stimulate and encourage research in these five areas.

  16. Guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major: Version 2.0.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The APA Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major: Version 2.0 (henceforth Guidelines 2.0; APA, 2013) represents a national effort to describe and develop high-quality undergraduate programs in psychology. The task force charged with the revision of the original guidelines for the undergraduate major examined the success of the document's implementation and made changes to reflect emerging best practices and to integrate psychology's work with benchmarking scholarship in higher education. Guidelines 2.0 abandoned the original distinction drawn between psychology-focused skills and psychology skills that enhance liberal arts development. Instead, Guidelines 2.0 describes five inclusive goals for the undergraduate psychology major and two developmental levels of student learning outcomes. Suggestions for assessment planning are provided for each of the five learning goals. PMID:26866986

  17. SFA 2.0- Watershed Structure and Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ken

    2015-01-23

    Berkeley Lab Earth Scientist Ken Williams explains the watershed research within the Sustainable Systems SFA 2.0 project—including identification and monitoring of primary factors that control watershed biogeochemical functioning.

  18. Happiness and the Family 2.0 Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocan, Rodica; Racorean, Stefana

    Does new media technology have the potential to make us happier? This paper explores the influence of new information communication technologies on family life satisfaction while analyzing some of the factors that determine changes in the way we live our lives in the information age. Family 2.0 is the new paradigm of family life and the emergence of Web 2.0 type of applications is at the very core of its existence.

  19. Energy Demand in China (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Price, Lynn

    2016-07-12

    Lynn Price, LBNL scientist, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  20. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ashok Gadgil: global impact

    ScienceCinema

    Ashok Gadgi

    2016-07-12

    Ashok Gadgil speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  1. RadCat 2.0 User Guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.; O'Donnell, Brandon, M.; Orcutt, David J.; Heames, Terence J.; Hinojosa, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a detailed discussion and a guide for the use of the RadCat 2.0 Graphical User Interface input file generator for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The differences between RadCat 2.0 and RadCat 1.0 can be attributed to the differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 as well as clarification for some of the input parameters. 3

  2. What Web 2.0 Means to Facilities Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Scott

    2008-01-01

    It's official--the Web is now social. Actually, it has always been social to a degree, but now it's "mostly" social. A lot of terms have been coined or adopted to describe various aspects of this phenomenon--social media, social networking, consumer-generated media (CGM) and Web 2.0. While it is hard to define "exactly" what Web 2.0 is, or when…

  3. Biofuels Science and Facilities (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Jay D. Keasling speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  4. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ashok Gadgil: global impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ashok Gadgi

    2010-02-09

    Ashok Gadgil speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  5. (2, 0)-SUPER-YANG-MILLS Coupled to Nonlinear σ-MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góes-Negrão, M. S.; Negrão, M. R.; Penna-Firme, A. B.

    Considering a class of (2, 0)-super-Yang-Mills multiplets that accommodate a pair of independent gauge potentials in connection with a single symmetry group, we present here their coupling to ordinary matter and to nonlinear σ-models in (2, 0)-superspace. The dynamics and the couplings of the gauge potentials are discussed and the interesting feature that comes out is a sort of "chirality" for one of the gauge potentials once light-cone coordinates are chosen.

  6. Social Interaction within a Web 2.0 Learning Environment: The Impact on Learner Social Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinman, Debbie Cinque

    2010-01-01

    In this case study, the researcher observed the social interactions within a Web 2.0 learning environment to examine the nature of the learner social presence. Social presence is essential to facilitate group cooperation and plays a central role in establishing learners' sense of belonging and social cohesion to the group. Social presence is…

  7. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  8. UCbase 2.0: ultraconserved sequences database (2014 update).

    PubMed

    Lomonaco, Vincenzo; Martoglia, Riccardo; Mandreoli, Federica; Anderlucci, Laura; Emmett, Warren; Bicciato, Silvio; Taccioli, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    UCbase 2.0 (http://ucbase.unimore.it) is an update, extension and evolution of UCbase, a Web tool dedicated to the analysis of ultraconserved sequences (UCRs). UCRs are 481 sequences >200 bases sharing 100% identity among human, mouse and rat genomes. They are frequently located in genomic regions known to be involved in cancer or differentially expressed in human leukemias and carcinomas. UCbase 2.0 is a platform-independent Web resource that includes the updated version of the human genome annotation (hg19), information linking disorders to chromosomal coordinates based on the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine classification, a query tool to search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and a new text box to directly interrogate the database using a MySQL interface. To facilitate the interactive visual interpretation of UCR chromosomal positioning, UCbase 2.0 now includes a graph visualization interface directly linked to UCSC genome browser. Database URL: http://ucbase.unimore.it.

  9. Development and application of GASP 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrory, W. D.; Huebner, L. D.; Slack, D. C.; Walters, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    GASP 2.0 represents a major new release of the computational fluid dynamics code in wide use by the aerospace community. The authors have spent the last two years analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of the previous version of the finite-rate chemistry, Navier Stokes solution algorithm. What has resulted is a completely redesigned computer code that offers two to four times the performance of previous versions while requiring as little as one quarter of the memory requirements. In addition to the improvements in efficiency over the original code, Version 2.0 contains many new features. A brief discussion of the improvements made to GASP, and an application using GASP 2.0 which demonstrates some of the new features are presented.

  10. [Surgeon 2.0: the challenge is on the Web].

    PubMed

    Belda Lozano, Ricardo; Ferrer Márquez, Manuel; García Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Alvarez García, Antonio; Reina Duarte, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Numerous articles and opinions have been published in the last few years on how the Internet is changing clinical practice. In this article we focus on describing 2 aspects that we believe are fundamental in the web 2.0 and Medicine-Surgery inter-relationship: a) web 2.0 conceptualisation and its differences with other pre-existing tools, and b) a description of some of the tools that from a medical-surgical view could be of major interest to the professionals, the patients, and interaction between both. The time has arrived to board train 2.0, where the channels of communication between the professionals, and between them and the patients, are improving disease situations daily, to improve learning through contact with other physicians and surgeons, at the same time providing an excellent resource for maintaining health and to know the disease and its treatment.

  11. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Paul Alivisatos: Introduction

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Alivisatos

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  12. User's Manual Frac-Explore 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.A.; Guo, Genliang

    1999-03-09

    FRAC-EXPLORE 2.0, a new computer software package for oil and gas exploration using surface lineament and fracture analysis. FRAC-EXPLORE 2.0 provides a suite of tools for analyzing the characteristics and patterns of surface lineaments and fractures, as well as other surface geological features. These tools help identify priority areas of potential subsurface oil and gas traps. The package can be used in a frontier basin to initially screen the priority locations for further seismic and/or geochemical surveys. It can also be used in a mature basin to help delineate additional oil and gas reservoirs.

  13. M2-branes and the (2, 0) superalgebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, N.; Sacco, D.

    2016-09-01

    We present a generalization of the six-dimensional (2, 0) system of arXiv:1007.2982 to include a constant abelian 3-form. For vanishing 3-form this system is known to provide a variety descriptions of parallel M5-branes. For a particular choice of 3-form the system is shown to reduce to that of two M2-branes. Thus this generalised (2, 0) system provides a unified description of two parallel M2-branes or M5-branes.

  14. Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2016-07-12

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  15. Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2010-02-04

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  16. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Paul Alivisatos: Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Alivisatos

    2010-02-09

    Berkeley Lab Director Paul Alivisatos speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 1, 2010. Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences.Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  17. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2016-07-12

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  18. Supersymmetric solutions of N = (2, 0) topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik Deger, Nihat; Moutsopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    We first make a Killing spinor analysis for a general three-dimensional off-shell N=(2,0) supergravity and find conditions for a bosonic background to preserve at least one real supercharge. We then consider a particular model, namely N=(2,0) topologically massive supergravity and impose its field equations. By making a suitable ansatz on metric functions we find a large class of solutions that include spacelike, timelike and null warped AdS 3 among others. Isometric quotients of spacelike and timelike squashed AdS 3 solutions yield extremal black holes without closed causal curves.

  19. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Don

    2010-02-03

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  20. GoldenBraid 2.0: a comprehensive DNA assembly framework for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an evergrowing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects. PMID:23669743

  1. GoldenBraid 2.0: a comprehensive DNA assembly framework for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an evergrowing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects.

  2. HCLS 2.0/3.0: Health Care and Life Sciences Data Mashup Using Web 2.0/3.0

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Yip, Kevin Y.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Scotch, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We describe the potential of current Web 2.0 technologies to achieve data mashup in the health care and life sciences (HCLS) domains, and compare that potential to the nascent trend of performing semantic mashup. After providing an overview of Web 2.0, we demonstrate two scenarios of data mashup, facilitated by the following Web 2.0 tools and sites: Yahoo! Pipes, Dapper, Google Maps and GeoCommons. In the first scenario, we exploited Dapper and Yahoo! Pipes to implement a challenging data integration task in the context of DNA microarray research. In the second scenario, we exploited Yahoo! Pipes, Google Maps, and GeoCommons to create a geographic information system (GIS) interface that allows visualization and integration of diverse categories of public health data, including cancer incidence and pollution prevalence data. Based on these two scenarios, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these Web 2.0 mashup technologies. We then describe Semantic Web, the mainstream Web 3.0 technology that enables more powerful data integration over the Web. We discuss the areas of intersection of Web 2.0 and Semantic Web, and describe the potential benefits that can be brought to HCLS research by combining these two sets of technologies. PMID:18487092

  3. HCLS 2.0/3.0: health care and life sciences data mashup using Web 2.0/3.0.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Yip, Kevin Y; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Scotch, Matthew

    2008-10-01

    We describe the potential of current Web 2.0 technologies to achieve data mashup in the health care and life sciences (HCLS) domains, and compare that potential to the nascent trend of performing semantic mashup. After providing an overview of Web 2.0, we demonstrate two scenarios of data mashup, facilitated by the following Web 2.0 tools and sites: Yahoo! Pipes, Dapper, Google Maps and GeoCommons. In the first scenario, we exploited Dapper and Yahoo! Pipes to implement a challenging data integration task in the context of DNA microarray research. In the second scenario, we exploited Yahoo! Pipes, Google Maps, and GeoCommons to create a geographic information system (GIS) interface that allows visualization and integration of diverse categories of public health data, including cancer incidence and pollution prevalence data. Based on these two scenarios, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these Web 2.0 mashup technologies. We then describe Semantic Web, the mainstream Web 3.0 technology that enables more powerful data integration over the Web. We discuss the areas of intersection of Web 2.0 and Semantic Web, and describe the potential benefits that can be brought to HCLS research by combining these two sets of technologies.

  4. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Nitash Balsara: Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Nitash Balsara

    2016-07-12

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  5. Outcome-Driven Experiential Learning with Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, C. Derrick; Behara, Ravi S.

    2007-01-01

    Experiential learning, an effective pedagogical method in MIS and other business courses, has been limited by instructional formats and teaching resources. But with the advent of Web 2.0 and its rich set of social networking and mass authoring tools, a shift in learning structure in content, process, and outcome is emerging. In this paper, we…

  6. iPath2.0: interactive pathway explorer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takuji; Letunic, Ivica; Okuda, Shujiro; Kanehisa, Minoru; Bork, Peer

    2011-07-01

    iPath2.0 is a web-based tool (http://pathways.embl.de) for the visualization and analysis of cellular pathways. Its primary map summarizes the metabolism in biological systems as annotated to date. Nodes in the map correspond to various chemical compounds and edges represent series of enzymatic reactions. In two other maps, iPath2.0 provides an overview of secondary metabolite biosynthesis and a hand-picked selection of important regulatory pathways and other functional modules, allowing a more general overview of protein functions in a genome or metagenome. iPath2.0's main interface is an interactive Flash-based viewer, which allows users to easily navigate and explore the complex pathway maps. In addition to the default pre-computed overview maps, iPath offers several data mapping tools. Users can upload various types of data and completely customize all nodes and edges of iPath2.0's maps. These customized maps give users an intuitive overview of their own data, guiding the analysis of various genomics and metagenomics projects.

  7. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels

    ScienceCinema

    Jay Keasling

    2016-07-12

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  8. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    ScienceCinema

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    2016-07-12

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  9. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  10. Using Web 2.0 for Learning in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Robin; Rennie, Frank

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a range of Web 2.0 technologies to support the development of community for a newly formed Land Trust on the Isle of Lewis, in NW Scotland. The application of social networking tools in text, audio and video has several purposes: informal learning about the area to increase tourism, community interaction,…

  11. ECONOMIC GROWTH ANALYSIS SYSTEM: REFERENCE MANUAL VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report describes the development of and provides information needed to operate, the Economic Growth Analysis System (E-GAS) Version 2.0 model. The model will be used to project emissions inventories of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a...

  12. ECONOMIC GROWTH ANALYSIS SYSTEM: USER'S GUIDE VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report describes the development of and provides information needed to operate, the Economic Growth Analysis System (E-GAS) Version 2.0 model. The model will be used to project emissions inventories of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a...

  13. Tweeting and Blogging: Moving towards Education 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tian; Franklin, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study that employed Twitter and blogs as instructional Web 2.0 tools to support student learning in an undergraduate-level class. Case study methodology entailing a usage survey, an exit survey, and 12 in-depth semi-structured interviews was sought to examine patterns and characteristics of students' usage of…

  14. What Web 2.0 Means for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Chad

    2008-01-01

    The term "Web 2.0"--a buzzword for a technological evolution that's been taking place online for some time--has many different definitions. In general, it refers to Web sites that go beyond simply presenting words and images, often allowing users to share information and collaborate in new ways. Content on the Web used to be largely static. One…

  15. Mobile Web 2.0, Microlearning, Intertwingularity, and Mobile Widgets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaokar, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    Four facets of the unfolding mobile open ecology in which OER will move are described. Web 2.0 is a platform harnessing collective intelligence where participation and pushing content are stimulated. Microlearning is different from e-learning, which replicated the classroom online; microlearning deals with relatively small learning units and…

  16. Learner Digital Stories in a Web 2.0 Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alameen, Ghinwa,

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a 4-week class project in which students created Web 2.0 digital stories and shared and discussed them with their peers using VoiceThread, a digital media online tool. Participants were English language learners in an academic writing class at a major research university in the United States. Digital stories provided an…

  17. Teaching Talented Writers with Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olthouse, Jill M.; Miller, Myriah Tasker

    2012-01-01

    This article is a review of 12 online writing resources and contains suggestions about how such resources might be used in a differentiated classroom with talented writers. Youth with writing talent are defined by distinguishing characteristics and the authors discuss how those characteristics can be supported and enhanced using Web 2.0 tools.…

  18. Web 2.0 for R&R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2009-01-01

    Are colleges and universities doing enough to take advantage of Web 2.0 and social networking tools in their recruitment and retention efforts? "Not even close," says Sam Richard, a 23-year-old junior in the College of Public Programs at Arizona State University in Phoenix. Richard is one of six students in ASU's Student Ambassadors for…

  19. Librarians 2.0: Sowing Padi in (the) SEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an exploratory survey as part of a presentation for the Bridging Worlds 2008 conference. It seeks to understand how library institutions in the South East Asia (SEA) region have implemented Web 2.0 technologies--blogs, RSS feeds, wikis, or the use of services like Flickr, YouTube, de.lici.ous.…

  20. Web 2.0 and Emerging Technologies in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    As online learning continues to grow, so do the free or nearly free Web 2.0 and emerging online learning technologies available to faculty and students. This chapter explores the implementation process and corresponding considerations of adapting such tools for teaching and learning. Issues addressed include copyright, intellectual property,…

  1. Journalism Students, Web 2.0 and the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Mary Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if students were utilizing Web 2.0 applications. Since the applications in question are often employed by the media industry, the study aspired to find out if students majoring in mass communication and journalism utilized the applications more often than other students. The "digital divide" is a term used…

  2. Data-Based Decision Making 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The phrase "data-based decision making" has been used so often in discussions about school improvement efforts that it has become almost a mantra. However, it's "how" data is used that really provides the critical link between practice and school improvement. "Data-Based Decision Making 2.0" is designed to help principals take on the role of…

  3. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Jay Keasling: Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Keasling

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  4. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Nitash Balsara: Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Nitash Balsara

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  5. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Cheng and Juan Meza

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  6. Ethnography 2.0: Writing with Digital Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates how digital video technology can be used in ethnographic research and considers the implications of digital production, presentation and dissemination of ethnographic educational research knowledge. In this article, I introduce the term Ethnography 2.0 and address some of the issues that emerged from my decision to use…

  7. Photography Education in a Web 2.0 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Erik

    2009-01-01

    As a novice teacher, the author was confident in his ability to teach digital photography but didn't initially realize the extent to which blogs, wikis, and social networks could reshape and enhance how students learn, and how, by incorporating these tools into his curriculum, he would ultimately find ways to use Web 2.0 tools to truly engage and…

  8. MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS SYSTEM (MPS): USER'S MANUAL VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's manual for Multiple Projections System (MPS) Version 2.0, based on the 3% reasonable further progress (RFP) tracking system that was developed in FY92/FY93. The 3% RFP tracking system is a Windows application, and enhancements to convert the 3% RFP track...

  9. Integrating Web 2.0 across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    For many years, educators have touted the benefits of learning with educational tools such as spreadsheets and databases that allow students to actively process and manipulate information (Jonassen, 1995). Hundreds if not thousands of Web 2.0 tools have been created in the last few years, taking the "technology as tool" metaphor to a new level. In…

  10. Web 2.0 Technologies: Applications for Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajt, Susanne K.

    2011-01-01

    The current generation of new students, referred to as the Millennial Generation, brings a new set of challenges to the community college. The influx of these technologically sophisticated students, who interact through the social phenomenon of Web 2.0 technology, bring expectations that may reshape institutions of higher learning. This chapter…

  11. Changing Academic Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Barbara; Byles, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Academic teaching can change with the use of Web 2.0 technologies, such as blogs and wikis, as these enable a different pedagogical approach through collaborative learning and the social construction of knowledge. Student expectations of their university learning experience have changed as they expect e-learning to be part of the learning…

  12. Student Engagement and Web 2.0: What's the Connection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, rising tuition costs and concerns about student success and retention rates have led to an increased focus on levels of student engagement in higher education. The current interest in student engagement may be helping to revive the traditional view of education as a community of learners. The growing use of Web 2.0

  13. Experience of Integrating Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkova, Katerina; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Putnik, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Web users in the 21st century are no longer only passive consumers. On a contrary, they are active contributors willing to obtain, share and evolve information. In this paper we report our experience regarding the implementation of Web 2.0 concept in several Computer Ethics related courses jointly conducted at two Universities. These courses have…

  14. Implications of Implementing Web 2.0 on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerio, Gabriel; Valenzuela, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge Society has altered the way humanity works, learns and amuses itself; from here the rise of the so called e-learning, an educational modality whose "innovation" has been questioned because of the tendency to simulate traditional ways to educate. This paper explores the concept of e-learning 2.0, the implications of…

  15. Social Dimension of Web 2.0 in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Andreas; Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary engineers need to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for engineering and technology services. Social dimension of Web 2.0 which penetrates our society more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services has the potential to contribute decisively to the sustainable development of…

  16. USERS MANUAL: LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL - VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's guide for a computer model, Version 2.0 of the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM), for estimating air pollution emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The model can be used to estimate emission rates for methane, carbon dioxide, nonmet...

  17. 2.0 at AASL 2009 National Conference in Charlotte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Joyce Kasman

    2009-01-01

    School library media specialists are information and communication specialists who lead and model these roles in schools and at their major professional events making use of the relevant new Web 2.0 tools available to them to network, collaborate, and share. Using these tools effectively helps them become leaders in their buildings and districts.…

  18. Web 2.0 Tools for Supporting Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantinidis, Angelos; Theodostadou, Dimitra; Pappos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools provide enormous opportunities for teaching and learning, yet their application in education is still underdeveloped. What is more, it is no longer possible for teachers to ignore such a technological advance, while they are expected to provide students with opportunities to take control of their learning. However, teachers are still…

  19. Assessing E-Learning 2.0 System Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hei Chia; Chiu, Yi Fang

    2011-01-01

    Traditional e-learning systems support "one-way" communication. Teachers provide knowledge for learners, but they are unable to use a student's learning experiences to benefit the class as a whole. To address these problems, this study explores e-learning success factors via the design and evaluation of an e-learning 2.0 system. This study…

  20. Webquest 2.0: An Instructional Model for Digital Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Diana F. Abernathy

    2012-01-01

    Teaching and learning tools such as Moodle and Web 2.0 tools are appearing in K-12 classrooms; however, there is a lack of scholarly research to guide the implementation of these tools. The WebQuest model, a widely adopted inquiry-based model for online instruction, has instructional inadequacies and does not make the most of emerging…

  1. The r-Java 2.0 code: nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, M.; Koning, N.; Shand, Z.; Ouyed, R.; Jaikumar, P.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We present r-Java 2.0, a nucleosynthesis code for open use that performs r-process calculations, along with a suite of other analysis tools. Methods: Equipped with a straightforward graphical user interface, r-Java 2.0 is capable of simulating nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE), calculating r-process abundances for a wide range of input parameters and astrophysical environments, computing the mass fragmentation from neutron-induced fission and studying individual nucleosynthesis processes. Results: In this paper we discuss enhancements to this version of r-Java, especially the ability to solve the full reaction network. The sophisticated fission methodology incorporated in r-Java 2.0 that includes three fission channels (beta-delayed, neutron-induced, and spontaneous fission), along with computation of the mass fragmentation, is compared to the upper limit on mass fission approximation. The effects of including beta-delayed neutron emission on r-process yield is studied. The role of Coulomb interactions in NSE abundances is shown to be significant, supporting previous findings. A comparative analysis was undertaken during the development of r-Java 2.0 whereby we reproduced the results found in the literature from three other r-process codes. This code is capable of simulating the physical environment of the high-entropy wind around a proto-neutron star, the ejecta from a neutron star merger, or the relativistic ejecta from a quark nova. Likewise the users of r-Java 2.0 are given the freedom to define a custom environment. This software provides a platform for comparing proposed r-process sites.

  2. Web 2.0 in the Classroom? Dilemmas and Opportunities Inherent in Adolescent Web 2.0 Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuck, Sandy; Aubusson, Peter; Kearney, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the implications of the current phenomenon of adolescent engagement in digital spaces. Young people are increasingly active Web 2.0 users, and their interactions through these technologies are altering their social identities, styles of learning, and exchanges with others around the world. The paper argues for more research to…

  3. Has Web 2.0 Revitalized Informal Learning? The Relationship between Web 2.0 and Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, D.; Lee, J.

    2014-01-01

    Learning is becoming increasingly self-directed and often occurs away from schools and other formal educational settings. The development of a myriad of new technologies for learning has enabled people to learn anywhere and anytime. Web 2.0 technology allows researchers to shed a new light on the importance and prevalence of informal learning.…

  4. Preparing Teachers to Integrate Web 2.0 in School Practice: Toward a Framework for Pedagogy 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Tsiotakis, Panagiotis; Roussinos, Dimitrios; Siorenta, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 has captured the interest and the imagination of both educators and researchers while it is expected to exert a significant impact on instruction and learning, in the context of the 21st century education. Hailed as an open collaborative learning space, many questions remain unanswered regarding the appropriate teacher preparation and the…

  5. Learning about Learning 2.0: Evaluating the "New South Wales Public Library Learning 2.0" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Ellen; Joseph, Mylee; Perry, Leanne

    2009-01-01

    The "New South Wales Learning 2.0" training program is being made available to the entire NSW public library work force of over 2300 people in 2008-2009. This paper is a snapshot of the impact of the course as at September 2008, five months after it was launched. It explores how the training impacted on the staff skill levels, knowledge, and…

  6. Knowledge Management System Based on Web 2.0 Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Guillermo; Barradas, Carlos

    Most of the research work on knowledge management systems has been addressed to knowledge representation, storage, and retrieval. However, user interaction has suffered from the same limitations faced by most current Web-based systems. Web 2.0 technologies bring completely new elements that make possible designing user interfaces similar to those that could be built in windowing environments of current desktop platforms. These technologies open new possibilities to enhance user experience when working with Web-based applications. This chapter shows how Web 2.0 technologies could be used to design user interaction in a knowledge management system. Details presented could be useful to improve online interaction with Web-based support systems (WSS) in other application domains.

  7. HEP Outreach, Inreach, and Web 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Steven

    2011-12-01

    I report on current usage of multimedia and social networking "Web 2.0" tools for Education and Outreach in high-energy physics, and discuss their potential for internal communication within large worldwide collaborations, such as those of the LHC. Following a brief description of the history of Web 2.0 development, I present a survey of the most popular sites and describe their usage in HEP to disseminate information to students and the general public. I then discuss the potential of certain specific tools, such as document and multimedia sharing sites, for boosting the speed and effectiveness of information exchange within the collaborations. I conclude with a brief discussion of the successes and failures of these tools, and make suggestions for improved usage in the future.

  8. Some User's Insights Into ADIFOR 2.0D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giesy, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Some insights are given which were gained by one user through experience with the use of the ADIFOR 2.0D software for automatic differentiation of Fortran code. These insights are generally in the area of the user interface with the generated derivative code - particularly the actual form of the interface and the use of derivative objects, including "seed" matrices. Some remarks are given as to how to iterate application of ADIFOR in order to generate second derivative code.

  9. The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Michael T; Hunter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 is a modular framework that describes how semantic annotations should be made about mathematical models encoded in the CellML (www.cellml.org) format, and their elements. In addition to the Core specification, there are several satellite specifications, each designed to cater for model annotation in a different context. Basic Model Information, Citation, License and Biological Annotation specifications are presented. PMID:26528558

  10. Recent plant studies using Victoria 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    BIXLER,NATHAN E.; GASSER,RONALD D.

    2000-03-08

    VICTORIA 2.0 is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within the reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe nuclear reactor accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS and secondary circuits. These predictions account for the chemical and aerosol processes that affect radionuclide behavior. VICTORIA 2.0 was released in early 1999; a new version VICTORIA 2.1, is now under development. The largest improvements in VICTORIA 2.1 are connected with the thermochemical database, which is being revised and expanded following the recommendations of a peer review. Three risk-significant severe accident sequences have recently been investigated using the VICTORIA 2.0 code. The focus here is on how various chemistry options affect the predictions. Additionally, the VICTORIA predictions are compared with ones made using the MELCOR code. The three sequences are a station blackout in a GE BWR and steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) and pump-seal LOCA sequences in a 3-loop Westinghouse PWR. These sequences cover a range of system pressures, from fully depressurized to full system pressure. The chief results of this study are the fission product fractions that are retained in the core, RCS, secondary, and containment and the fractions that are released into the environment.

  11. The PLATO 2.0 mission. Spanish contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Urqui O'Callaghan, R.; Suárez J. C.; Deeg, H.; Balado, A.

    2015-05-01

    The PLATO 2.0 space mission (PLAnetary Transits and Oscillation of stars) was selected by the ESA Science Programme in February 2014, as the M3 mission to be launched in 2024. PLATO 2.0 will detect terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone of bright solar-type stars and characterise their bulk properties. The exoplanets will be detected by the weak eclipses they produce when transiting in front of their parent star, while the long uninterrupted observations will allow also to analyze the oscillations of these stars, yielding their internal structure and evolutionary state. The stellar sample targeted by PLATO is bright enough (V<11.5) to be able to confirm the planets candidates using radial velocity spectroscopy from ground, providing so a complete characterization of the exoplanetary systems. Spain will contribute to the PLATO 2.0 instrument by providing the Focal Plane Assemblies of its 34 telescopes, as well as the Main Electronics Units which will perform onboard and in real time the photometric extraction of the stellar lightcurves.

  12. Use of Web 2.0 tools by hospital pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Bonaga Serrano, B; Aldaz Francés, R; Garrigues Sebastiá, M R; Hernández San Salvador, M

    2014-04-01

    Objetivo: Las herramientas de la Web 2.0 están transformando los canales que los profesionales sanitarios emplean para comunicarse entre sí y con los pacientes por lo que esta situación obliga a un cambio de mentalidad para implementarlas. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el grado de conocimiento y aplicación de las principales herramientas Web 2.0 por parte de farmacéuticos hospitalarios. Método: El estudio se llevó a cabo mediante una encuesta anómina dirigida a todos los miembros de la Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (SEFH) a través de la aplicación Google Drive®. Después de completarse los 3 meses del período de estudio, los datos recogidos se analizaron usando SPPS v15.0. Resultados: La tasa de respuesta fue del 7,3%, siendo el 70,5% mujeres y el 76,3 % especialistas. La mayoría de los que respondieron (54,2%) estaban en el rango de edad de 20 a 35 años. Pubmed fue el medio principal de acceder a los artículos publicados. El 65,2% de los farmacéuticos conocía el término “Web 2.0”. El 45,3% eran usuarios de Twitter, de los cuales un 58,9% principalmente para uso profesional. La mayoría creía que Twitter era una buena herramienta para interactuar entre los profesionales y los pacientes. El 78,7% no usaba un agregador, pero cuando lo hacían, Google Reader era el más habitual. Conclusión: Aunque las aplicaciones de la Web 2.0 están ganando popularidad, algunos profesionales sanitarios se resisten a utilizarlas. De hecho, más de la mitad de los farmacéuticos entrevistados manifestaba un nulo conocimiento de las herramientas de la Web 2.0. Sería positivo que los farmacéuticos las usasen adecuadamente durante su práctica profesional para sacarles el máximo partido.

  13. Opportunities and challenges of Web 2.0 within the health care systems: an empirical exploration.

    PubMed

    Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Mayer, Miquel Angel; Torrent, Joan

    2009-09-01

    The Internet has become one of the main drivers of e-health. Whilst its impact and potential is being analysed, the Web 2.0 phenomenon has reached the health field and has emerged as a buzzword that people use to describe a wide range of online activities and applications. The aims of this article are: to explore the opportunities and challenges of the Web 2.0 within the health care system and to identify the gap between the potential of these online activities and applications and the empirical data. The analysis is based on: online surveys to physicians, nurses, pharmacist and patient support groups; static web shot analysis of 1240 web pages and exploration of the most popular Web 2.0 initiatives. The empirical results contrast with the Web 2.0 trends identified. Whereas the main characteristic of the Web 2.0 is the opportunity for social interaction, the health care system at large could currently be characterised by: a lack of interactive communication technologies available on the Internet; a lack of professional production of health care information on the Internet, and a lack of interaction between these professionals and patients on the Internet. These results reveal a scenario away from 2.0 trends.

  14. Usage, Barriers, and Training of Web 2.0 Technology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Christopher G.; Pritchett, Christal C.; Wohleb, Elisha C.

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to determine the degree of use of Web 2.0 technology applications by certified education professionals and examine differences among various groups as well as reasons for these differences. A quantitative survey instrument was developed to gather demographic information and data. Participants reported they would be…

  15. National High School Center Early Warning System Tool v2.0: Technical Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National High School Center, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Early Warning System (EWS) Tool v2.0 is a Microsoft Excel-based tool developed by the National High School Center at the American Institutes for Research in collaboration with Matrix Knowledge Group. The tool enables schools, districts, and states to identify students who may be at risk of dropping out of high school and to monitor these…

  16. Web 2.0 technologies for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education: an online survey

    PubMed Central

    Sandars, J; Schroter, S

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To identify the current familiarity and use of Web 2.0 technologies by medical students and qualified medical practitioners, and to identify the barriers to its use for medical education. Methods A semi‐structured online questionnaire survey of 3000 medical students and 3000 qualified medical practitioners (consultants, general practitioners and doctors in training) on the British Medical Association's membership database. Results All groups had high familiarity, but low use, of podcasts. Ownership of digital media players was higher among medical students. There was high familiarity, but low use, of other Web 2.0 technologies except for high use of instant messaging and social networking by medical students. All groups stated that they were interested in using Web 2.0 technologies for education but there was lack of knowledge and skills in how to use these new technologies. Conclusions There is an overall high awareness of a range of new Web 2.0 technologies by both medical students and qualified medical practitioners and high interest in its use for medical education. However, the potential of Web 2.0 technologies for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education will only be achieved if there is increased training in how to use this new approach. PMID:18057175

  17. The NERC Vocabulary Server: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbetter, A. M.; Lowry, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    Version 2 of the NVS (NVS2.0) underpins the semantic layer for the Open Service Network for Marine Environmental Data (NETMAR) project, funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme. Within NETMAR, NVS2.0 has been used for: - semantic validation of inputs to chained OGC Web Processing Services - smart discovery of data and services - integration of data from distributed nodes of the International Coastal Atlas Network Since its deployment, NVS2.0 has been adopted within the European SeaDataNet community's software products which has significantly increased the usage of the NVS2.0 Application Programming Interace (API), as illustrated in Table 1. Here we present the results of upgrading the NVS to version 2 and show applications which have been built on top of the NVS2.0 API, including a SPARQL endpoint and a hierarchical catalogue of oceanographic hardware.Table 1. NVS2.0 API usage by month from 467 unique IP addressest;

  18. Solar Advisor Model User Guide for Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Janzou, S.; Cameron, C.

    2008-08-01

    The Solar Advisor Model (SAM) provides a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, from photovoltaic systems for residential and commercial markets to concentrating solar power and large photovoltaic systems for utility markets. This manual describes Version 2.0 of the software, which can model photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies for electric applications for several markets. The current version of the Solar Advisor Model does not model solar heating and lighting technologies.

  19. IPG Job Manager v2.0 Design Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Chaumin

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a high-level design of the IPG Job Manager, and satisfies its Master Requirement Specification v2.0 Revision 1.0, 01/29/2003. The presentation includes a Software Architecture/Functional Overview with the following: Job Model; Job Manager Client/Server Architecture; Job Manager Client (Job Manager Client Class Diagram and Job Manager Client Activity Diagram); Job Manager Server (Job Manager Client Class Diagram and Job Manager Client Activity Diagram); Development Environment; Project Plan; Requirement Traceability.

  20. NASA Meteoroid Engineering Model Release 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, A. V.; Koehler, H. M.; Cooke, W. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Meteoroid Engineering Model release 2.0 (MEMR2) software is NASA's most current and accurate model of the meteoroid environment. It enables the user to generate a trajectory-specific meteoroid environment for spacecraft traveling within the inner solar system. In addition to the total meteoroid flux, MEMR2 provides the user with meteoroid directionality and velocity information. Users have the ability to make a number of analysis and output choices that tailor the resulting environment to their needs. This Technical Memorandum outlines the history of MEMR2, the meteoroid environment it describes, and makes recommendations for the correct use of the software and interpretation of its results.

  1. Students' Everyday Use of Web 2.0 Collaboration Tools and Use within Moodle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmane-Ozolina, Lasma; Kulmane, Vineta; Kazakevica, Marina

    Moodle is the one of most popular learning management systems. Situation in Liepaja University shows that Moodle is used mainly for content delivery. To activate student learning in Moodle and enhance Moodle usage, collaboration supported tools will be present for academic staff. Research is made to choose the most popular tools from the student point of view to enhance their learning. Focus group interviews is conducted to find out what web 2.0 collaboration tools students are using in their everyday life and what tools using in Moodle. The idea is to transmit the students' everyday life skills with Web 2.0 in the learning activities.

  2. Using Web 2.0 Applications as Supporting Tools for Personal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompen, Ricardo Torres; Edirisingha, Palitha; Monguet, Josep M.

    This paper shows the results of a pilot study based on a proposed framework for building Personal Learning Environments using Web 2.0 tools. A group of 33 students from a Business Administration program were introduced to Web 2.0 tools in the context of an Information Systems class, during the academic year 2008-2009, and reflected about this experience through essays and interviews. The responses show evidence of learning and acquiring skills, strengthening social interactions and improvement in the organization and management of content and learning resources.

  3. SCOR: Structural Classification of RNA, version 2.0.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K; Klosterman, Peter S; Schimmelman, Nancy R B; Brenner, Steven E; Holbrook, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    SCOR, the Structural Classification of RNA (http://scor.lbl.gov), is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a new classification organization. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511 RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5880 secondary structural elements are classified: 2104 hairpin loops and 3776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as 'Kink turn' and 'GNRA loops', are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  4. SCOR: Structural classification of RNA, Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K.; Klosterman, Peter

    2003-10-03

    SCOR (http://scor.lbl.gov), the Structural Classification of RNA, is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions, and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a wholly new classification system. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence, and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5,880 secondary structural elements are classified; 2,104 hairpin loops and 3,776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as ''Kinkturn'' and ''GNRA loops,'' are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  5. Research, collaboration, and open science using web 2.0.

    PubMed

    Shee, Kevin; Strong, Michael; Guido, Nicholas J; Lue, Robert A; Church, George M; Viel, Alain

    2010-01-01

    There is little doubt that the Internet has transformed the world in which we live. Information that was once archived in bricks and mortar libraries is now only a click away, and people across the globe have become connected in a manner inconceivable only 20 years ago. Although many scientists and educators have embraced the Internet as an invaluable tool for research, education and data sharing, some have been somewhat slower to take full advantage of emerging Web 2.0 technologies. Here we discuss the benefits and challenges of integrating Web 2.0 applications into undergraduate research and education programs, based on our experience utilizing these technologies in a summer undergraduate research program in synthetic biology at Harvard University. We discuss the use of applications including wiki-based documentation, digital brainstorming, and open data sharing via the Web, to facilitate the educational aspects and collaborative progress of undergraduate research projects. We hope to inspire others to integrate these technologies into their own coursework or research projects.

  6. Fuel Cycle Services Needs Estimator v.2.0

    2008-03-18

    The "Fuel Cycle Services Needs Estimator", Version 2.0 allows users to estimate the amount of uranium enrichment services needed and amount of spent nuclear fuel produced by a given fleet of nuclear power reactors through 2050 based on user-determined information about the size of a reactor fleet and average characteristics of reactors in that fleet. The program helps users evaluate the current and future supply of nuclear fuel cycle services. The program also allows usersmore » to compare the enrichment needs and spent fuel production of more up to seven defined nuclear power reactor fleets and to aggregate estimated needs. Version 2.0 of the program has an additions of new graphs to show results of calculations (calculation capabilities and other graphing tools included in version 1.o), maps showing flows of material based on calculation results, and additional calculation capabilities that allow the user to compare supply to demand (demand calculations included in version 1.0). Default values for seven selected nuclear energy programs in East Asia are included for reference and comparison. The program was designed using the dynamic simulation software, Powersim.« less

  7. PlantTFDB 2.0: update and improvement of the comprehensive plant transcription factor database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, He; Jin, Jinpu; Tang, Liang; Zhao, Yi; Gu, Xiaocheng; Gao, Ge; Luo, Jingchu

    2011-01-01

    We updated the plant transcription factor (TF) database to version 2.0 (PlantTFDB 2.0, http://planttfdb.cbi.pku.edu.cn) which contains 53,319 putative TFs predicted from 49 species. We made detailed annotation including general information, domain feature, gene ontology, expression pattern and ortholog groups, as well as cross references to various databases and literature citations for these TFs classified into 58 newly defined families with computational approach and manual inspection. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees for each family can be shown as Weblogo pictures or downloaded as text files. We have redesigned the user interface in the new version. Users can search TFs with much more flexibility through the improved advanced search page, and the search results can be exported into various formats for further analysis. In addition, we now provide web service for advanced users to access PlantTFDB 2.0 more efficiently.

  8. Opportunities and challenges of Web 2.0 for vaccination decisions.

    PubMed

    Betsch, Cornelia; Brewer, Noel T; Brocard, Pauline; Davies, Patrick; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Haase, Niels; Leask, Julie; Renkewitz, Frank; Renner, Britta; Reyna, Valerie F; Rossmann, Constanze; Sachse, Katharina; Schachinger, Alexander; Siegrist, Michael; Stryk, Marybelle

    2012-05-28

    A growing number of people use the Internet to obtain health information, including information about vaccines. Websites that allow and promote interaction among users are an increasingly popular source of health information. Users of such so-called Web 2.0 applications (e.g. social media), while still in the minority, represent a growing proportion of online communicators, including vocal and active anti-vaccination groups as well as public health communicators. In this paper, the authors: define Web 2.0 and examine how it may influence vaccination decisions; discuss how anti-vaccination movements use Web 2.0 as well as the challenges Web 2.0 holds for public health communicators; describe the types of information used in these different settings; introduce the theoretical background that can be used to design effective vaccination communication in a Web 2.0 environment; make recommendations for practice and pose open questions for future research. The authors conclude that, as a result of the Internet and Web 2.0, private and public concerns surrounding vaccinations have the potential to virally spread across the globe in a quick, efficient and vivid manner. Web 2.0 may influence vaccination decisions by delivering information that alters the perceived personal risk of vaccine-preventable diseases or vaccination side-effects. It appears useful for public health officials to put effort into increasing the effectiveness of existing communication by implementing interactive, customized communication. A key step to providing successful public health communication is to identify those who are particularly vulnerable to finding and using unreliable and misleading information. Thus, it appears worthwhile that public health websites strive to be easy to find, easy to use, attractive in its presentation and readily provide the information, support and advice that the searcher is looking for. This holds especially when less knowledgeable individuals are in need of reliable

  9. QuakeML 2.0: Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euchner, Fabian; Kästli, Philipp; Heiniger, Lukas; Saul, Joachim; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Clinton, John

    2016-04-01

    QuakeML is a community-backed data model for seismic event parameter description. Its current version 1.2, released in 2013, has become the gold standard for parametric data dissemination at seismological data centers, and has been adopted as an FDSN standard. It is supported by several popular software products and data services, such as FDSN event web services, QuakePy, and SeisComP3. Work on the successor version 2.0 is under way since 2015. The scope of QuakeML has been expanded beyond event parameter description. Thanks to a modular architecture, many thematic packages have been added, which cover peak ground motion, site and station characterization, hydraulic parameters of borehole injection processes, and macroseismics. The first three packages can be considered near final and implementations of program codes and SQL databases are in productive use at various institutions. A public community review process has been initiated in order to turn them into community-approved standards. The most recent addition is a package for single station quake location, which allows a detailed probabilistic description of event parameters recorded at a single station. This package adds some information elements such as angle of incidence, frequency-dependent phase picks, and dispersion relations. The package containing common data types has been extended with a generic type for probability density functions. While on Earth, single station methods are niche applications, they are of prominent interest in planetary seismology, e.g., the NASA InSight mission to Mars. So far, QuakeML is lacking a description of seismic instrumentation (inventory). There are two existing standards of younger age (FDSN StationXML and SeisComP3 Inventory XML). We discuss their respective strengths, differences, and how they could be combined into an inventory package for QuakeML, thus allowing full interoperability with other QuakeML data types. QuakeML is accompanied by QuakePy, a Python package

  10. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so. PMID:24390896

  11. Performance of the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-In; Long, Jeffrey D; Mills, James A; Downing, Nancy; Williams, Janet K; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-11-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), recommends the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) 2.0 for routine clinical use. We tested the utility of the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease. Using data from 726 participants and 630 companions over a 3-year follow-up, linear mixed models were fitted to test (1) baseline and longitudinal differences by progression group; (2) participant and companion differences within each group; and (3) sensitivity of the 12-item WHODAS in comparison to the 36-item WHODAS and the Total Functional Capacity (TFC) score from the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale. Participants showed baseline group differences whereas companions showed baseline and longitudinal group differences. Companions reported worse functional decline over time than participants as the disease progresses. The 12-item WHODAS detected longitudinal change better than the 36-item WHODAS and the TFC in the medium progression group. Results suggest the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 can detect baseline and longitudinal differences in prodromal HD and may be useful in HD clinical trials.

  12. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so.

  13. [« Biology/medicine 2.0 »: an overview].

    PubMed

    Boudry, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the applications known as "web 2.0" (Facebook, Youtube, Twitter…) have changed our daily life and gradually influence the field of research. This article aims at proposing a critical overview of these new services, and emphasizes the changes induced for researchers (practice of scientific publication, sharing and mutualization of research data and discussion between researchers…) especially in the field of biology/medicine. A focus is done on the limitations that prevent most of scientists from using these services in their common practice (lack of knowledge about these tools, time-consuming, fear of sharing data and ideas). Despite these restrictions, some mutations affecting researcher's information uses are unavoidable, and these new tools may rapidly contribute to scientific advances.

  14. Atlas Basemaps in Web 2.0 Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaniuk, V.; Dyshlyk, O.

    2016-06-01

    The authors have analyzed their experience of the production of various Electronic Atlases (EA) and Atlas Information Systems (AtIS) of so-called "classical type". These EA/AtIS have been implemented in the past decade in the Web 1.0 architecture (e.g., National Atlas of Ukraine, Atlas of radioactive contamination of Ukraine, and others). One of the main distinguishing features of these atlases was their static nature - the end user could not change the content of EA/AtIS. Base maps are very important element of any EA/AtIS. In classical type EA/AtIS they were static datasets, which consisted of two parts: the topographic data of a fixed scale and data of the administrative-territorial division of Ukraine. It is important to note that the technique of topographic data production was based on the use of direct channels of topographic entity observation (such as aerial photography) for the selected scale. Changes in the information technology of the past half-decade are characterized by the advent of the "Web 2.0 epoch". Due to this, in cartography appeared such phenomena as, for example, "neo-cartography" and various mapping platforms like OpenStreetMap. These changes have forced developers of EA/AtIS to use new atlas basemaps. Our approach is described in the article. The phenomenon of neo-cartography and/or Web 2.0 cartography are analysed by authors using previously developed Conceptual framework of EA/AtIS. This framework logically explains the cartographic phenomena relations of three formations: Web 1.0, Web 1.0x1.0 and Web 2.0. Atlas basemaps of the Web 2.0 epoch are integrated information systems. We use several ways to integrate separate atlas basemaps into the information system - by building: weak integrated information system, structured system and meta-system. This integrated information system consists of several basemaps and falls under the definition of "big data". In real projects it is already used the basemaps of three strata: Conceptual

  15. CBP TOOLBOX VERSION 2.0: CODE INTEGRATION ENHANCEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Flach, G.; BROWN, K.

    2013-06-01

    This report describes enhancements made to code integration aspects of the Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) Toolbox as a result of development work performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in collaboration with Vanderbilt University (VU) in the first half of fiscal year 2013. Code integration refers to the interfacing to standalone CBP partner codes, used to analyze the performance of cementitious materials, with the CBP Software Toolbox. The most significant enhancements are: 1) Improved graphical display of model results. 2) Improved error analysis and reporting. 3) Increase in the default maximum model mesh size from 301 to 501 nodes. 4) The ability to set the LeachXS/Orchestra simulation times through the GoldSim interface. These code interface enhancements have been included in a new release (Version 2.0) of the CBP Toolbox.

  16. APACIC++ 2.0. A PArton Cascade In C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, F.; Schälicke, A.; Soff, G.

    2006-06-01

    The new version of the parton shower module APACIC++ for the SHERPA event generator framework is presented. It incorporates some features, that are specific for the consistent merging with multi-particle matrix elements at tree-level. This publication also includes some example results and a short description of the upgraded class structure of APACIC++, version 2.0. Program summaryTitle of program:APACIC++, version 2.0 Catalogue identifier:ADNE_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADNE_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADNE Authors of previous version: R. Kuhn, F. Krauss, B. Iványi, G. Soff Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 134 (2001) 223 Licensing provisions: none Operating system under which the program has been tested: Linux, Unix, Darwin Programming language: C++ No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 352 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 561 276 External routines/libraries used: The makeinstall requires the autotools package Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of the physical problem: Modern collider-based experiments in particle physics are characterized by increasing energies that are released and, thus, by a growing number of particles that are produced. The large numbers of involved particles renders it impossible to derive fully analytical predictions for a detailed description of the final state. In addition, the transformation of the partons of perturbative quantum field theory into the experimentally observable hadrons is until now not understood on a quantitative level. These obstacles prevent a direct comparison of analytical predictions with experimental data, and simulation tools need to be employed to bridge this gap. Method of solution: The event generator SHERPA with a new version of the parton shower module APACIC++ is able to

  17. NAC 2.0 — Unifying Network Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Stephen

    As information technology becomes more strategic and essential, access to networks and applications must be pervasive yet secure and controlled. The purpose of Network Access Control (NAC) has evolved beyond simply managing network access and ensuring endpoint policy compliance. NAC systems today must integrate with other network security components and increase their built-in capabilities to include support for intrusion detection, role-based application access control, network and application visibility and monitoring, leakage detection, VPNs, and other network security technologies. In fact, we need a new unified vision and understanding of network security: one that involves multiple network security functions working together dynamically using open standards. This vision of unified network security has been called “NAC 2.0.”

  18. FADO 2.0: A high level tagging language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C. M. L.; Pimenta, M.; Varela, J.; Souza, J.

    1989-12-01

    FADO 2.0 is a high language, developed in the context of the 4th level trigger of the DELPHI data acquisition project at CERN, that provides a simple and consice way to define physics criteria for event tagging. Its syntax is based on mathematical logic and set theory, as it was found the most appropriate framework to describe the properties of single HEP events. The language is one of the components of the FADO tagging system. The system also implements implicity a mechanism to selectively reconstruct the event data that are needed to fulfil the physics criteria, following the speed requirements of the online data-acquisition system. A complete programming environment is now under development, which will include a syntax directed editor, and incremental compiler, a debugger and a configurer. This last tool can be used to transport the system into the context of other HEP applications, namely offline event selection and filtering.

  19. Very Large Array observations of Uranus at 2. 0 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, G.L.; Muhleman, D.O.; Linfield, R.P.

    1988-07-01

    Radio observations of Uranus obtained at 2.0 cm with the B configuration of the VLA during April 1985 are reported. The calibration and data-reduction procedures are described in detail, and the results are presented in tables, maps, and graphs and compared with IRIS 44-micron observations (Hanel et al., 1986). Features discussed include highest brightness centered on the pole rather than on the subearth point, a decrease in brightness temperature (by up to 9 K) at latitudes between -20 and -50 deg (well correlated with the IRIS data), and disk-center position (corrected for the observed radio asymmetry) in good agreement with that found on the basis of the outer contours of the image. 15 references.

  20. Coastal Online Analysis and Synthesis Tool 2.0 (COAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Nguyen, Beth T.

    2009-01-01

    The Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST) 3D geobrowser has been developed to integrate disparate coastal datasets from NASA and other sources into a desktop tool that provides new data visualization and analysis capabilities for coastal researchers, managers, and residents. It is built upon the widely used NASA-developed open source World Wind geobrowser from NASA Ames (Patrick Hogan et al.) .Net and C# version is used for development. It is leveraged off of World Wind community shared code samples and COAST 2.0 enhancement direction is based on Coastal science community feedback and needs assessment (GOMA). The main objective is to empower the user to bring more user-meaningful data into multi-layered, multi-temporal spatial context.

  1. Labs21 environmental performance criteria Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2002-10-01

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. The Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC) is a rating system for use by laboratory building project stakeholders to assess the environmental performance of laboratory facilities. Currently, the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED{trademark} Rating System is the primary tool used. However, LEED{trademark} was designed for U.S. commercial office buildings and as such, lacks some attributes essential to the sustainable design of this unique and complex building type. To facilitate widespread use and to avoid ''re-inventing the wheel'' this effort builds on the existing LEED{trademark} Rating System 2.0.

  2. An Innovative Approach for Promoting Information Exchanges and Sharing in a Web 2.0-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2009-01-01

    Although Web 2.0 technologies have been recognized as effective means of conducting group learning activities, a critical and challenging issue of Web 2.0-based learning is the lack of mechanisms for promoting information exchanges and sharing among participating students. To cope with this problem, an intelligent blog system is proposed in this…

  3. Evaluating HDR photos using Web 2.0 technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Mei, Yujie; Duan, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) photography is an emerging technology that has the potential to dramatically enhance the visual quality and realism of digital photos. One of the key technical challenges of HDR photography is displaying HDR photos on conventional devices through tone mapping or dynamic range compression. Although many different tone mapping techniques have been developed in recent years, evaluating tone mapping operators prove to be extremely difficult. Web2.0, social media and crowd-sourcing are emerging Internet technologies which can be harnessed to harvest the brain power of the mass to solve difficult problems in science, engineering and businesses. Paired comparison is used in the scientific study of preferences and attitudes and has been shown to be capable of obtaining an interval-scale ordering of items along a psychometric dimension such as preference or importance. In this paper, we exploit these technologies for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. We have developed a Web2.0 style system that enables Internet users from anywhere to evaluate tone mapped HDR photos at any time. We adopt a simple paired comparison protocol, Internet users are presented a pair of tone mapped images and are simply asked to select the one that they think is better or click a "no difference" button. These user inputs are collected in the web server and analyzed by a rank aggregation algorithm which ranks the tone mapped photos according to the votes they received. We present experimental results which demonstrate that the emerging Internet technologies can be exploited as a new paradigm for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. The advantages of this approach include the potential of collecting large user inputs under a variety of viewing environments rather than limited user participation under controlled laboratory environments thus enabling more robust and reliable quality assessment. We also present data analysis to correlate user generated qualitative

  4. Enabling the transition towards Earth Observation Science 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Desnos, Yves-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Science 2.0 refers to the rapid and systematic changes in doing Research and organising Science driven by the rapid advances in ICT and digital technologies combined with a growing demand to do Science for Society (actionable research) and in Society (co-design of knowledge). Nowadays, teams of researchers around the world can easily access a wide range of open data across disciplines and remotely process them on the Cloud, combining them with their own data to generate knowledge, develop information products for societal applications, and tackle complex integrative complex problems that could not be addressed a few years ago. Such rapid exchange of digital data is fostering a new world of data-intensive research, characterized by openness, transparency, and scrutiny and traceability of results, access to large volume of complex data, availability of community open tools, unprecedented level of computing power, and new collaboration among researchers and new actors such as citizen scientists. The EO scientific community is now facing the challenge of responding to this new paradigm in science 2.0 in order to make the most of the large volume of complex and diverse data delivered by the new generation of EO missions, and in particular the Sentinels. In this context, ESA - in particular within the framework of the Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) element - is supporting a variety of activities in partnership with research communities to ease the transition and make the most of the data. These include the generation of new open tools and exploitation platforms, exploring new ways to exploit data on cloud-based platforms, dissiminate data, building new partnership with citizen scientists, and training the new generation of data scientists. The paper will give a brief overview of some of ESA activities aiming to facilitate the exploitation of large amount of data from EO missions in a collaborative, cross-disciplinary, and open way, from science to

  5. A Short (Personal) Future History of Revolution 2.0.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Barbara A

    2015-11-01

    Crisis of replicability is one term that psychological scientists use for the current introspective phase we are in-I argue instead that we are going through a revolution analogous to a political revolution. Revolution 2.0 is an uprising focused on how we should be doing science now (i.e., in a 2.0 world). The precipitating events of the revolution have already been well-documented: failures to replicate, questionable research practices, fraud, etc. And the fact that none of these events is new to our field has also been well-documented. I suggest four interconnected reasons as to why this time is different: changing technology, changing demographics of researchers, limited resources, and misaligned incentives. I then describe two reasons why the revolution is more likely to catch on this time: technology (as part of the solution) and the fact that these concerns cut across social and life sciences-that is, we are not alone. Neither side in the revolution has behaved well, and each has characterized the other in extreme terms (although, of course, each has had a few extreme actors). Some suggested reforms are already taking hold (e.g., journals asking for more transparency in methods and analysis decisions; journals publishing replications) but the feared tyrannical requirements have, of course, not taken root (e.g., few journals require open data; there is no ban on exploratory analyses). Still, we have not yet made needed advances in the ways in which we accumulate, connect, and extract conclusions from our aggregated research. However, we are now ready to move forward by adopting incremental changes and by acknowledging the multiplicity of goals within psychological science.

  6. A Short (Personal) Future History of Revolution 2.0.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Barbara A

    2015-11-01

    Crisis of replicability is one term that psychological scientists use for the current introspective phase we are in-I argue instead that we are going through a revolution analogous to a political revolution. Revolution 2.0 is an uprising focused on how we should be doing science now (i.e., in a 2.0 world). The precipitating events of the revolution have already been well-documented: failures to replicate, questionable research practices, fraud, etc. And the fact that none of these events is new to our field has also been well-documented. I suggest four interconnected reasons as to why this time is different: changing technology, changing demographics of researchers, limited resources, and misaligned incentives. I then describe two reasons why the revolution is more likely to catch on this time: technology (as part of the solution) and the fact that these concerns cut across social and life sciences-that is, we are not alone. Neither side in the revolution has behaved well, and each has characterized the other in extreme terms (although, of course, each has had a few extreme actors). Some suggested reforms are already taking hold (e.g., journals asking for more transparency in methods and analysis decisions; journals publishing replications) but the feared tyrannical requirements have, of course, not taken root (e.g., few journals require open data; there is no ban on exploratory analyses). Still, we have not yet made needed advances in the ways in which we accumulate, connect, and extract conclusions from our aggregated research. However, we are now ready to move forward by adopting incremental changes and by acknowledging the multiplicity of goals within psychological science. PMID:26581743

  7. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA 2.0) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; O'Coin, James; Wichowski, Robert; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system is a low-power assembly capable of simultaneously removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. Two solid amine sorbent beds are alternated between an uptake mode and a regeneration mode. During the uptake mode, the sorbent is exposed to an air steam (ventilation loop) to adsorb CO2 and water (H2O) vapor, whereas during the regeneration mode, the sorbent rejects the adsorbed CO2 and H2O vapor to a vacuum source. The two beds operate such that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. A novel valve assembly provides a simple means of diverting the process air flow through the uptake bed while simultaneously directing the vacuum source to the regeneration bed. Additionally, the valve assembly is designed to allow for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The process can be controlled by a compact, low-power controller design with several modes of operation available to the user. Together with NASA Johnson Space Center, Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. has been developing RCA 2.0 based on performance and design feedback on several sorbent bed test articles and valve design concepts. A final design of RCA 2.0 was selected in November 2011 and fabricated and assembled between March and August 2012, with delivery to NASA Johnson Space Center in September 2012. This paper provides an overview of the RCA system design and results of pre-delivery testing.

  8. Educators' Perceived Importance of Web 2.0 Technology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Christal C.; Wohleb, Elisha C.; Pritchett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to examine the degree of perceived importance of interactive technology applications among various groups of certified educators; the degree to which education professionals utilized interactive online technology applications and to determine if there was a significant difference between the different groups based…

  9. Incorporating Web 2.0 Technologies from an Organizational Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) provides support for the organization, facilitation, and dissemination of online educational and scientific materials and information to a wide range of stakeholders. ARCUS is currently weaving the fabric of Web 2.0 technologies—web development featuring interactive information sharing and user-centered design—into its structure, both as a tool for information management and for educational outreach. The importance of planning, developing, and maintaining a cohesive online platform in order to integrate data storage and dissemination will be discussed in this presentation, as well as some specific open source technologies and tools currently available, including: ○ Content Management: Any system set up to manage the content of web sites and services. Drupal is a content management system, built in a modular fashion allowing for a powerful set of features including, but not limited to weblogs, forums, event calendars, polling, and more. ○ Faceted Search: Combined with full text indexing, faceted searching allows site visitors to locate information quickly and then provides a set of 'filters' with which to narrow the search results. Apache Solr is a search server with a web-services like API (Application programming interface) that has built in support for faceted searching. ○ Semantic Web: The semantic web refers to the ongoing evolution of the World Wide Web as it begins to incorporate semantic components, which aid in processing requests. OpenCalais is a web service that uses natural language processing, along with other methods, in order to extract meaningful 'tags' from your content. This metadata can then be used to connect people, places, and things throughout your website, enriching the surfing experience for the end user. ○ Web Widgets: A web widget is a portable 'piece of code' that can be embedded easily into web pages by an end user. Timeline is a widget developed as part of the

  10. GDF v2.0, an enhanced version of GDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Gavrilis, Dimitris; Dermatas, Evangelos

    2007-12-01

    An improved version of the function estimation program GDF is presented. The main enhancements of the new version include: multi-output function estimation, capability of defining custom functions in the grammar and selection of the error function. The new version has been evaluated on a series of classification and regression datasets, that are widely used for the evaluation of such methods. It is compared to two known neural networks and outperforms them in 5 (out of 10) datasets. Program summaryTitle of program: GDF v2.0 Catalogue identifier: ADXC_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXC_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 98 147 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 040 684 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: GNU C++ Computer: The program is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Operating system: Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD RAM: 200000 bytes Classification: 4.9 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The technique of function estimation tries to discover from a series of input data a functional form that best describes them. This can be performed with the use of parametric models, whose parameters can adapt according to the input data. Solution method: Functional forms are being created by genetic programming which are approximations for the symbolic regression problem. Reasons for new version: The GDF package was extended in order to be more flexible and user customizable than the old package. The user can extend the package by defining his own error functions and he can extend the grammar of the package by adding new functions to the function repertoire. Also, the new version can perform function estimation of multi

  11. Reference guide to WPP version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-01-22

    WPP is a computer program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel machines. WPP solves the governing equations in second order formulation using a node-based finite difference approach. The basic numerical method is described in [9]. WPP implements substantial capabilities for 3-D seismic modeling, with a free surface condition on the top boundary, non-reflecting far-field boundary conditions on the other boundaries, point force and point moment tensor source terms with many predefined time dependencies, fully 3-D heterogeneous material model specification, output of synthetic seismograms in the SAC [4] format, output of GMT [11] scripts for laying out simulation information on a map, and output of 2-D slices of (derived quantites of) the solution field as well as the material model. Version 2.0 of WPP allows the free surface boundary condition to be imposed on a curved topography. For this purpose a curvilinear mesh is used near the free surface, extending into the computational domain down to a user specified level. The elastic wave equations and the free surface boundary conditions are discretized on the curvilinear mesh using the energy conserving technique described in [2]. A curvilinear mesh generator is built into WPP and the curvilinear mesh is automatically generated from the topography. Below the curvilinear grid, the elastic wave equation is discretized on Cartesian meshes, which leads to a more computationally efficient algorithm. In version 2.0 of WPP, Cartesian local mesh refinement can be used to make the computational mesh finer near the free surface, where more resolution often is needed to resolve short wave lenghts in the solution, for example in sedimentary basins. The mesh refinement is performed in the vertical direction and each Cartesian grid is constructed from user specified refinement levels. In this approach, the grid size in all three spatial directions is doubled across each mesh refinement interface, leading to substantial

  12. Entwicklungsperspektiven von Social Software und dem Web 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Alexander

    Der Artikel beschäftigt sich zunächst mit dem derzeitigen und zukünftigen Einsatz von Social Software in Unternehmen. Nach dem großen Erfolg von Social Software im Web beginnen viele Unternehmen eigene Social Software-Initiativen zu entwickeln. Der Artikel zeigt die derzeit wahrgenommenen Einsatzmöglichkeiten von Social Software im Unternehmen auf, erörtert Erfolgsfaktoren für die Einführung und präsentiert mögliche Wege für die Zukunft. Nach der Diskussion des Spezialfalles Social Software in Unternehmen werden anschließend die globalen Trends und Zukunftsperspektiven des Web 2.0 in ihren technischen, wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Dimensionen dargestellt. Wie aus den besprochenen Haupttrends hervorgeht, wird die Masse an digital im Web verfügbaren Informationen stetig weiterwachsen. So stellt sich die Frage, wie es in Zukunft möglich sein wird, die Qualität der Informationssuche und der Wissensgenerierung zu verbessern. Mit dem Einsatz von semantischen Technologien im Web wird hier eine revolutionäre Möglichkeit geboten, Informationen zu filtern und intelligente, gewissermaßen verstehende" Anwendungen zu entwerfen. Auf dem Weg zu einem intelligenten Web werden sich das Semantic Web und Social Software annähern: Anwendungen wie Semantic Wikis, Semantic Weblogs, lightweight Semantic Web-Sprachen wie Microformats oder auch kommerzielle Angebote wie Freebase von Metaweb werden die ersten Vorzeichen einer dritten Generation des Webs sein.

  13. SWEET 2.0: Moving Toward Community-Based Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) project has produced an upper-level ontology set for Earth system science. These ontologies have been under development for several years and include concepts of science, data, and services. SWEET includes mappings to other controlled vocabulary lists such as the GCMD science keyword and CF standard names. The initial design (SWEET 1.0) defined about 1700 concepts organized by facet, such as: physical property, small-scale process, large-scale phenomena, living and non-living substance, Earth realm, space, time, units, etc. For Version 2.0, the number of concepts has doubled to 3500 and the facet structure is similar. However, there no longer remains a one-to-one mapping of a facet to an ontology file. The original 12 ontology files have been reorganized into nearly 100 files, organized by subject. This new design is much more scalable, as it is easy for domain specialists to add content for their specialization by adding an additional file. SWEET enables representations of all aspects of the Earth system (from core to heliosphere) and more general aspects of planetary and solar science. It is anticipated that the ESIP Federation Semantic Web Cluster will maintain this ontology set over the long-term.

  14. TADPLOT program, version 2.0: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dana P.

    1991-01-01

    The TADPLOT Program, Version 2.0 is described. The TADPLOT program is a software package coordinated by a single, easy-to-use interface, enabling the researcher to access several standard file formats, selectively collect specific subsets of data, and create full-featured publication and viewgraph quality plots. The user-interface was designed to be independent from any file format, yet provide capabilities to accommodate highly specialized data queries. Integrated with an applications software network, data can be assessed, collected, and viewed quickly and easily. Since the commands are data independent, subsequent modifications to the file format will be transparent, while additional file formats can be integrated with minimal impact on the user-interface. The graphical capabilities are independent of the method of data collection; thus, the data specification and subsequent plotting can be modified and upgraded as separate functional components. The graphics kernel selected adheres to the full functional specifications of the CORE standard. Both interface and postprocessing capabilities are fully integrated into TADPLOT.

  15. Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) Version 2.0.0.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Bryan; Beal, Jacob; Clancy, Kevin; Misirli, Goksel; Roehner, Nicholas; Oberortner, Ernst; Pocock, Matthew; Bissell, Michael; Madsen, Curtis; Nguyen, Tramy; Zhang, Zhen; Gennari, John H; Myers, Chris; Wipat, Anil; Sauro, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology builds upon the techniques and successes of genetics, molecular biology, and metabolic engineering by applying engineering principles to the design of biological systems. The field still faces substantial challenges, including long development times, high rates of failure, and poor reproducibility. One method to ameliorate these problems would be to improve the exchange of information about designed systems between laboratories. The Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) has been developed as a standard to support the specification and exchange of biological design information in synthetic biology, filling a need not satisfied by other pre-existing standards. This document details version 2.0 of SBOL, introducing a standardized format for the electronic exchange of information on the structural and functional aspects of biological designs. The standard has been designed to support the explicit and unambiguous description of biological designs by means of a well defined data model. The standard also includes rules and best practices on how to use this data model and populate it with relevant design details. The publication of this specification is intended to make these capabilities more widely accessible to potential developers and users in the synthetic biology community and beyond. PMID:26528570

  16. Activity Catalog Tool (ACT) user manual, version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.; Andre, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    This report comprises the user manual for version 2.0 of the Activity Catalog Tool (ACT) software program, developed by Leon D. Segal and Anthony D. Andre in cooperation with NASA Ames Aerospace Human Factors Research Division, FLR branch. ACT is a software tool for recording and analyzing sequences of activity over time that runs on the Macintosh platform. It was designed as an aid for professionals who are interested in observing and understanding human behavior in field settings, or from video or audio recordings of the same. Specifically, the program is aimed at two primary areas of interest: human-machine interactions and interactions between humans. The program provides a means by which an observer can record an observed sequence of events, logging such parameters as frequency and duration of particular events. The program goes further by providing the user with a quantified description of the observed sequence, through application of a basic set of statistical routines, and enables merging and appending of several files and more extensive analysis of the resultant data.

  17. SPHY v2.0: Spatial Processes in HYdrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terink, W.; Lutz, A. F.; Simons, G. W. H.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Droogers, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces and presents the Spatial Processes in HYdrology (SPHY) model (v2.0), its development background, its underlying concepts, and some typical applications. The SPHY model is developed using the best components of existing and well-tested simulation models, and is developed with the explicit aim to simulate terrestrial hydrology at flexible scales, under various land use and climate conditions. SPHY is a spatially distributed leaky bucket type of model, and is applied on a cell-by-cell basis. The model is written in the Python programming language using the PCRaster dynamic modelling framework. Compared to other hydrological models, that typically focus on the simulation of streamflow only, the SPHY model has several advantages: it (i) integrates most relevant hydrological processes, (ii) is setup modular, (iii) is easy adjustable and applicable, (iii) can easily be linked to remote sensing data, and (iv) can be applied for operational as well as strategic decision support. The most relevant hydrological processes that are integrated in the SPHY model are rainfall-runoff processes, cryosphere processes, evapotranspiration processes, the simulation of dynamic vegetational cover, lake/reservoir outflow, and the simulation of rootzone moisture contents. Studies in which the SPHY model was successfully applied and tested are described in this paper, and range from (i) real-time soil moisture predictions to support irrigation management in lowland areas, to (ii) detailed climate change impact studies in snow and glacier-fed river basins, to (iii) operational flow forecasting in mountainous catchments.

  18. Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) Version 2.0.0.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Bryan; Beal, Jacob; Clancy, Kevin; Misirli, Goksel; Roehner, Nicholas; Oberortner, Ernst; Pocock, Matthew; Bissell, Michael; Madsen, Curtis; Nguyen, Tramy; Zhang, Zhen; Gennari, John H; Myers, Chris; Wipat, Anil; Sauro, Herbert

    2015-09-04

    Synthetic biology builds upon the techniques and successes of genetics, molecular biology, and metabolic engineering by applying engineering principles to the design of biological systems. The field still faces substantial challenges, including long development times, high rates of failure, and poor reproducibility. One method to ameliorate these problems would be to improve the exchange of information about designed systems between laboratories. The Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) has been developed as a standard to support the specification and exchange of biological design information in synthetic biology, filling a need not satisfied by other pre-existing standards. This document details version 2.0 of SBOL, introducing a standardized format for the electronic exchange of information on the structural and functional aspects of biological designs. The standard has been designed to support the explicit and unambiguous description of biological designs by means of a well defined data model. The standard also includes rules and best practices on how to use this data model and populate it with relevant design details. The publication of this specification is intended to make these capabilities more widely accessible to potential developers and users in the synthetic biology community and beyond.

  19. SPHY v2.0: Spatial Processes in HYdrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terink, W.; Lutz, A. F.; Simons, G. W. H.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Droogers, P.

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces and presents the Spatial Processes in HYdrology (SPHY) model (v2.0), its development background, its underlying concepts, and some example applications. SPHY has been developed with the explicit aim of simulating terrestrial hydrology on flexible scales, under various physiographical and hydroclimatic conditions, by integrating key components from existing and well-tested models. SPHY is a spatially distributed leaky bucket type of model, and is applied on a cell-by-cell basis. The model is written in the Python programming language using the PCRaster dynamic modeling framework. SPHY (i) integrates most hydrologic processes, (ii) has the flexibility to be applied in a wide range of hydrologic applications, and (iii) on various scales, and (iv) can easily be implemented. The most relevant hydrological processes that are integrated into the SPHY model are rainfall-runoff processes, cryosphere processes, evapotranspiration processes, the dynamic evolution of vegetation cover, lake/reservoir outflow, and the simulation of root-zone moisture contents. Studies in which the SPHY model was successfully applied and tested are described in this paper, including (i) real-time soil moisture predictions to support irrigation management in lowland areas, (ii) climate change impact studies in snow- and glacier-fed river basins, and (iii) operational flow forecasting in mountainous catchments.

  20. Multicenter evaluation of the updated and extended API (RAPID) Coryne database 2.0.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; Renaud, F N; Freney, J; Riegel, P

    1997-01-01

    In a multicenter study, 407 strains of coryneform bacteria were tested with the updated and extended API (RAPID) Coryne system with database 2.0 (bioMérieux, La-Balme-les-Grottes, France) in order to evaluate the system's capability of identifying these bacteria. The design of the system was exactly the same as for the previous API (RAPID) Coryne strip with database 1.0, i.e., the 20 biochemical reactions covered were identical, but database 2.0 included both more taxa and additional differential tests. Three hundred ninety strains tested belonged to the 49 taxa covered by database 2.0, and 17 strains belonged to taxa not covered. Overall, the system correctly identified 90.5% of the strains belonging to taxa included, with additional tests needed for correct identification for 55.1% of all strains tested. Only 5.6% of all strains were not identified, and 3.8% were misidentified. Identification problems were observed in particular for Corynebacterium coyleae, Propionibacterium acnes, and Aureobacterium spp. The numerical profiles and corresponding identification results for the taxa not covered by the new database 2.0 were also given. In comparison to the results from published previous evaluations of the API (RAPID) Coryne database 1.0, more additional tests had to be performed with version 2.0 in order to completely identify the strains. This was the result of current changes in taxonomy and to provide for organisms described since the appearance of version 1.0. We conclude that the new API (RAPID) Coryne system 2.0 is a useful tool for identifying the diverse group of coryneform bacteria encountered in the routine clinical laboratory. PMID:9399506

  1. Case-Based Reasoning to Help Educators Design with Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Verily; Kou, Xiaojing

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes the use of case-based reasoning to help educators design with Web 2.0. Principles for designing a web-enhanced case-based activity (CBA) were used to design an online professional development course for a group of 16 in-service educators. The Learning in Context model was used as a scaffold to help participants in their design…

  2. Indico — the Road to 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, P.; Avilés, A.; Dafflon, J.; Mönnich, A.; Trichopoulos, I.

    2015-12-01

    Indico has come a long way since it was first used to organize CHEP 2004. More than ten years of development have brought new features and projects, widening the application's feature set and enabling event organizers to work even more efficiently. While that has boosted the tool's usage and facilitated its adoption by a remarkable 300,000 events (at CERN only), it has also generated a whole new range of challenges, which have been the target of the team's attention for the last 2 years. One of them was that of scalability and the maintainability of the current database solution (ZODB). After careful consideration, the decision was taken to move away from ZODB to PostgreSQL, a relational and widely-adopted solution that will permit the development of a more ambitious feature set as well as improved performance and scalability. A change of this type is by no means trivial in nature and requires the refactoring of most backend code as well as the full rewrite of significant portions of it. We are taking this opportunity to modernize Indico, by employing standard web modules, technologies and concepts that not only make development and maintenance easier but also constitute an upgrade to Indico's stack. The first results are already visible since August 2014, with the full migration of the Room Booking module to the new paradigm. In this paper we explain what has been done so far in the context of this ambitious migration, what have been the main findings and challenges, as well as the main technologies and concepts that will constitute the foundation of the resultant Indico 2.0.

  3. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA 2.0) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; O'Coin, James; Wichowski, Robert; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system is a low power assembly capable of simultaneously removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. Two solid amine sorbent beds are alternated between an uptake mode and a regeneration mode. During the uptake mode, the sorbent is exposed to an air steam (ventilation loop) to adsorb CO2 and water vapor, while during the regeneration mode, the sorbent rejects the adsorbed CO2 and water vapor to a vacuum source. The two beds operate such that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. A novel valve assembly provides a simple means of diverting the process air flow through the uptake bed while simultaneously directing the vacuum source to the regeneration bed. Additionally, the valve assembly is designed to allow for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The process can be controlled by a compact, low power controller design with several modes of operation available to the user. Together with NASA, United Technologies Corporation Aerospace Systems has been developing RCA 2.0 based on performance and design feedback on several sorbent bed test articles and valve design concepts. A final design was selected in November 2011 and fabricated and assembled between March and August 2012, with delivery to NASA-JSC in September 2012. This paper will provide an overview on the RCA system design and results of pre-delivery testing.

  4. mHealth 2.0: Experiences, Possibilities, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Diamantidis, Clarissa

    2014-01-01

    With more than 1 billion users having access to mobile broadband Internet and a rapidly growing mobile app market, all stakeholders involved have high hopes that this technology may improve health care. Expectations range from overcoming structural barriers to access in low-income countries to more effective, interactive treatment of chronic conditions. Before medical health practice supported by mobile devices ("mHealth") can scale up, a number of challenges need to be adequately addressed. From a psychological perspective, high attrition rates, digital divide of society, and intellectual capabilities of the users are key issues when implementing such technologies. Furthermore, apps addressing behavior change often lack a comprehensive concept, which is essential for an ongoing impact. From a clinical point of view, there is insufficient evidence to allow scaling up of mHealth interventions. In addition, new concepts are required to assess the efficacy and efficiency of interventions. Regarding technology interoperability, open standards and low-energy wireless protocols appear to be vital for successful implementation. There is an ongoing discussion in how far health care-related apps require a conformity assessment and how to best communicate quality standards to consumers. "Apps Peer-Review" and standard reporting via an "App synopsis" appear to be promising approaches to increase transparency for end users. With respect to development, more emphasis must be placed on context analysis to identify what generic functions of mobile information technology best meet the needs of stakeholders involved. Hence, interdisciplinary alliances and collaborative strategies are vital to achieve sustainable growth for "mHealth 2.0," the next generation mobile technology to support patient care. PMID:25099752

  5. Quantum mechanical reality according to Copenhagen 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Allan M.

    2016-05-01

    sufficiently incremental so as to be appropriately characterized as Copenhagen 2.0.

  6. mHealth 2.0: Experiences, Possibilities, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Schumacher, Nikolaus; Krocza, Johann; Diamantidis, Clarissa; Albrecht, Urs-Vito

    2014-01-01

    With more than 1 billion users having access to mobile broadband Internet and a rapidly growing mobile app market, all stakeholders involved have high hopes that this technology may improve health care. Expectations range from overcoming structural barriers to access in low-income countries to more effective, interactive treatment of chronic conditions. Before medical health practice supported by mobile devices ("mHealth") can scale up, a number of challenges need to be adequately addressed. From a psychological perspective, high attrition rates, digital divide of society, and intellectual capabilities of the users are key issues when implementing such technologies. Furthermore, apps addressing behavior change often lack a comprehensive concept, which is essential for an ongoing impact. From a clinical point of view, there is insufficient evidence to allow scaling up of mHealth interventions. In addition, new concepts are required to assess the efficacy and efficiency of interventions. Regarding technology interoperability, open standards and low-energy wireless protocols appear to be vital for successful implementation. There is an ongoing discussion in how far health care-related apps require a conformity assessment and how to best communicate quality standards to consumers. "Apps Peer-Review" and standard reporting via an "App synopsis" appear to be promising approaches to increase transparency for end users. With respect to development, more emphasis must be placed on context analysis to identify what generic functions of mobile information technology best meet the needs of stakeholders involved. Hence, interdisciplinary alliances and collaborative strategies are vital to achieve sustainable growth for "mHealth 2.0," the next generation mobile technology to support patient care. PMID:25099752

  7. TERS v2.0: An improved version of TERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.

    2009-11-01

    We present a new version of the semimicroscopic Monte Carlo code "TERS". The procedure for calculating multiple small angle Coulomb scattering of the residues in the target has been modified. Target-backing and residue charge-reset foils, which are often used in heavy ion-induced complete fusion reactions, are included in the code. New version program summaryProgram title: TERS v2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEBD_v2_0 Program summary URL:2_0.html" xlink:type="simple">http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBD_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7309 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 219 555 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: The code has been developed and tested on a PC with Intel Pentium IV processor. Operating system: Linux RAM: About 8 Mbytes Classification: 17.7 External routines: pgplot graphics subroutine library [1] should be installed in the system for generating residue trajectory plots. (The library is included in the CPC distribution file.) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEBD_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 179 (2008) 492 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Recoil separators are employed to select and identify nuclei of interest, produced in a nuclear reaction, rejecting unreacted beam and other undesired reaction products. It is important to know what fraction of the selected nuclei, leaving the target, reach the detection

  8. SeCom - Serious Community 2.0 prevent flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komma, Juergen; Breuer, Roman; Sewilam, Hani; Concia, Francesca; Aliprandi, Bruno; Siegmund, Sabine; Goossens, Jannis

    2013-04-01

    There is a significant need for raising the awareness and building the capacity of water professionals in different water sectors cross Europe. There is also a need for qualified graduates to implement the EU Flood Risk Directive (FRD). The main aim of this work is to prepare and build the capacity of both groups in flood risk management through identifying synergies, sharing knowledge, and strengthen partnerships between universities and different stakeholders(mainly water professionals). The specific objectives are to develop; a) Development of a dynamic and active tool that allows all target-groups/users to assess their knowledge about flood risk management. b) Development of an innovative, active and problem-based learning methodology for flood risk education and training. c)Development of flood related Vocational Education & Training (VET) modules for water professionals (involving the students to gain practical experience). This will include some modules for undergraduate students on flood risk management and protection.

  9. Cultural competency 2.0: exploring the concept of "difference" in engagement with the other.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Kumagai, Arno K; Varley, Joseph; Zarconi, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Cultural competency efforts have received much attention in medical education. Most efforts focus on the acquisition of knowledge and skills about various groups based on race and ethnic identity, national origins, religion, and the like. The authors propose an approach, "Cultural Competency 2.0," that does not reject such efforts but, rather, adds a more critical and expanded focus on learners' attitudes and beliefs toward people unlike themselves. Cultural Competency 2.0 includes learners' examination of the social position of most U.S. medical students, Bourdieu's concept of habitus, and the phenomenon of countertransference to come to new critical insights on learners' attitudes, beliefs, and, ultimately, interactions with all patients. Suggestions are offered for how and where Cultural Competency 2.0 can be used in the curriculum through narrative medicine, particularly through the development of reading practices that unmask illusions of "pure" objectivity often assumed in clinical settings, and that make visible how words and images constrain, manipulate, or empower individuals, groups, ideas, or practices.The authors argue that these educational approaches should be sustained throughout the students' clinical experiences, where they encounter patients of many kinds and see clinicians' varied approaches to these patients. Further, these educational approaches should include assisting students in developing strategies to exercise moral courage within the limitations of their hierarchical learning environments, to strengthen their voices, and, when possible, to develop a sense of fearlessness: to always be advocates for their patients and to do what is right, fair, and good in their care.

  10. MBROLE 2.0-functional enrichment of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    López-Ibáñez, Javier; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Mónica

    2016-07-01

    Metabolites Biological Role (MBROLE) is a server that performs functional enrichment analysis of a list of chemical compounds derived from a metabolomics experiment, which allows this list to be interpreted in biological terms. Since its release in 2011, MBROLE has been used by different groups worldwide to analyse metabolomics experiments from a variety of organisms. Here we present the latest version of the system, MBROLE2, accessible at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/mbrole2 MBROLE2 has been supplemented with 10 databases not available in the previous version, which allow analysis over a larger, richer set of vocabularies including metabolite-protein and drug-protein interactions. This new version performs automatic conversion of compound identifiers from different databases, thus simplifying usage. In addition, the user interface has been redesigned to generate an interactive, more intuitive representation of the results.

  11. Deal making 2.0: a guide to complex negotiations.

    PubMed

    Lax, David A; Sebenius, James K

    2012-11-01

    Most big deals--megamergers, major sales, infrastructure projects--are built on a series of smaller ones. Each component deal presents a tactical challenge, but sequencing the parts in a way that achieves the target outcome is a strategic challenge that can unfold over months or years. This process, which the authors call a negotiation campaign, must generally be conducted on several fronts, each involving multiple parties. A multifront campaign can be much more effective than direct negotiation. After failed talks between Longshoremen and the Pacific Maritime Association--a group of shippers and port operators--the PMA's president turned away from the bargaining table and embarked on a campaign to align member-firms, the business community, the U.S. government, and the public around his target outcome: the deployment of new information technologies to help unclog busy ports. The result was an agreement that was ultimately mutually beneficial. Designing and executing a negotiation campaign involves identifying the relevant parties, grouping them into fronts according to shared interests, determining whether to combine fronts (if, for instance, doing so would unite your allies), and deciding which fronts to approach early on and which to engage only after you've made progress elsewhere. The deal between the PMA and the Longshoremen involved high stakes, but many small-scale deals--such as gaining approval for a new product--also play out on multiple fronts. Going straight to a key decision maker often makes sense, but in many cases a multifront campaign is the only way.

  12. Exploring the potential of Web 2.0 to address health disparities.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, M Chris; Fleisher, Linda; Slamon, Rachel E; Bass, Sarah; Kandadai, Venk; Beck, J Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses use of the Internet and Web 2.0 technologies by racial and ethnic minorities and explores the potential opportunities and challenges in leveraging Web 2.0 approaches to impact health disparities. These opportunities and challenges include developing approaches and methods to (a) identify strategies for integrating social media into health promotion interventions focused on major health-related issues that affect members of medically underserved groups; (b) amalgamate techniques to leverage and connect social-media technologies to other evidence-informed online resources; (c) integrate health communication best practices, including addressing health literacy issues; (d) capitalize on social networking to enhance access and communication with health care providers; and (e) advance current efforts and ongoing expansion of research participation by individuals from underserved communities.

  13. Toward major evolutionary transitions theory 2.0.

    PubMed

    Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-08-18

    The impressive body of work on the major evolutionary transitions in the last 20 y calls for a reconstruction of the theory although a 2D account (evolution of informational systems and transitions in individuality) remains. Significant advances include the concept of fraternal and egalitarian transitions (lower-level units like and unlike, respectively). Multilevel selection, first without, then with, the collectives in focus is an important explanatory mechanism. Transitions are decomposed into phases of origin, maintenance, and transformation (i.e., further evolution) of the higher level units, which helps reduce the number of transitions in the revised list by two so that it is less top-heavy. After the transition, units show strong cooperation and very limited realized conflict. The origins of cells, the emergence of the genetic code and translation, the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, multicellularity, and the origin of human groups with language are reconsidered in some detail in the light of new data and considerations. Arguments are given why sex is not in the revised list as a separate transition. Some of the transitions can be recursive (e.g., plastids, multicellularity) or limited (transitions that share the usual features of major transitions without a massive phylogenetic impact, such as the micro- and macronuclei in ciliates). During transitions, new units of reproduction emerge, and establishment of such units requires high fidelity of reproduction (as opposed to mere replication). PMID:25838283

  14. Toward major evolutionary transitions theory 2.0.

    PubMed

    Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-08-18

    The impressive body of work on the major evolutionary transitions in the last 20 y calls for a reconstruction of the theory although a 2D account (evolution of informational systems and transitions in individuality) remains. Significant advances include the concept of fraternal and egalitarian transitions (lower-level units like and unlike, respectively). Multilevel selection, first without, then with, the collectives in focus is an important explanatory mechanism. Transitions are decomposed into phases of origin, maintenance, and transformation (i.e., further evolution) of the higher level units, which helps reduce the number of transitions in the revised list by two so that it is less top-heavy. After the transition, units show strong cooperation and very limited realized conflict. The origins of cells, the emergence of the genetic code and translation, the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, multicellularity, and the origin of human groups with language are reconsidered in some detail in the light of new data and considerations. Arguments are given why sex is not in the revised list as a separate transition. Some of the transitions can be recursive (e.g., plastids, multicellularity) or limited (transitions that share the usual features of major transitions without a massive phylogenetic impact, such as the micro- and macronuclei in ciliates). During transitions, new units of reproduction emerge, and establishment of such units requires high fidelity of reproduction (as opposed to mere replication).

  15. Toward major evolutionary transitions theory 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    The impressive body of work on the major evolutionary transitions in the last 20 y calls for a reconstruction of the theory although a 2D account (evolution of informational systems and transitions in individuality) remains. Significant advances include the concept of fraternal and egalitarian transitions (lower-level units like and unlike, respectively). Multilevel selection, first without, then with, the collectives in focus is an important explanatory mechanism. Transitions are decomposed into phases of origin, maintenance, and transformation (i.e., further evolution) of the higher level units, which helps reduce the number of transitions in the revised list by two so that it is less top-heavy. After the transition, units show strong cooperation and very limited realized conflict. The origins of cells, the emergence of the genetic code and translation, the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, multicellularity, and the origin of human groups with language are reconsidered in some detail in the light of new data and considerations. Arguments are given why sex is not in the revised list as a separate transition. Some of the transitions can be recursive (e.g., plastids, multicellularity) or limited (transitions that share the usual features of major transitions without a massive phylogenetic impact, such as the micro- and macronuclei in ciliates). During transitions, new units of reproduction emerge, and establishment of such units requires high fidelity of reproduction (as opposed to mere replication). PMID:25838283

  16. Digital Display Integration Project Project Online 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J. N.

    1999-11-01

    transfer; and optimizing techniques to reduce communications bandwidth. Additional topics that will be addressed include: obtaining greater color control; minimization of seam widths in tiled displays; and the human factors that impact the efficient use of high resolution displays. The scope of the project will include both direct-view displays, for use by individuals and small groups, and projection systems for conference rooms and auditoriums.

  17. Social values for ecosystem services (SolVES): Documentation and user manual, version 2.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrouse, Benson C.; Semmens, Darius J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the need for incorporating quantified and spatially explicit measures of social values into ecosystem services assessments, the Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC), in collaboration with Colorado State University, developed a geographic information system (GIS) application, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES). With version 2.0 (SolVES 2.0), RMGSC has improved and extended the functionality of SolVES, which was designed to assess, map, and quantify the perceived social values of ecosystem services. Social values such as aesthetics, biodiversity, and recreation can be evaluated for various stakeholder groups as distinguished by their attitudes and preferences regarding public uses, such as motorized recreation and logging. As with the previous version, SolVES 2.0 derives a quantitative, 10-point, social-values metric, the Value Index, from a combination of spatial and nonspatial responses to public attitude and preference surveys and calculates metrics characterizing the underlying environment, such as average distance to water and dominant landcover. Additionally, SolVES 2.0 integrates Maxent maximum entropy modeling software to generate more complete social value maps and to produce robust statistical models describing the relationship between the social values maps and explanatory environmental variables. The performance of these models can be evaluated for a primary study area, as well as for similar areas where primary survey data are not available but where social value mapping could potentially be completed using value-transfer methodology. SolVES 2.0 also introduces the flexibility for users to define their own social values and public uses, model any number and type of environmental variable, and modify the spatial resolution of analysis. With these enhancements, SolVES 2.0 provides an improved public domain tool for decisionmakers and researchers to evaluate the social values of ecosystem services and to facilitate

  18. Reptilian Transcriptomes v2.0: An Extensive Resource for Sauropsida Genomics and Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Athanasia C; Ullate-Agote, Asier; Grbic, Djordje; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-06-01

    Despite the availability of deep-sequencing techniques, genomic and transcriptomic data remain unevenly distributed across phylogenetic groups. For example, reptiles are poorly represented in sequence databases, hindering functional evolutionary and developmental studies in these lineages substantially more diverse than mammals. In addition, different studies use different assembly and annotation protocols, inhibiting meaningful comparisons. Here, we present the "Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0," which provides extensive annotation of transcriptomes and genomes from species covering the major reptilian lineages. To this end, we sequenced normalized complementary DNA libraries of multiple adult tissues and various embryonic stages of the leopard gecko and the corn snake and gathered published reptilian sequence data sets from representatives of the four extant orders of reptiles: Squamata (snakes and lizards), the tuatara, crocodiles, and turtles. The LANE runner 2.0 software was implemented to annotate all assemblies within a single integrated pipeline. We show that this approach increases the annotation completeness of the assembled transcriptomes/genomes. We then built large concatenated protein alignments of single-copy genes and inferred phylogenetic trees that support the positions of turtles and the tuatara as sister groups of Archosauria and Squamata, respectively. The Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0 resource will be updated to include selected new data sets as they become available, thus making it a reference for differential expression studies, comparative genomics and transcriptomics, linkage mapping, molecular ecology, and phylogenomic analyses involving reptiles. The database is available at www.reptilian-transcriptomes.org and can be enquired using a wwwblast server installed at the University of Geneva. PMID:26133641

  19. Reptilian Transcriptomes v2.0: An Extensive Resource for Sauropsida Genomics and Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tzika, Athanasia C.; Ullate-Agote, Asier; Grbic, Djordje; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of deep-sequencing techniques, genomic and transcriptomic data remain unevenly distributed across phylogenetic groups. For example, reptiles are poorly represented in sequence databases, hindering functional evolutionary and developmental studies in these lineages substantially more diverse than mammals. In addition, different studies use different assembly and annotation protocols, inhibiting meaningful comparisons. Here, we present the “Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0,” which provides extensive annotation of transcriptomes and genomes from species covering the major reptilian lineages. To this end, we sequenced normalized complementary DNA libraries of multiple adult tissues and various embryonic stages of the leopard gecko and the corn snake and gathered published reptilian sequence data sets from representatives of the four extant orders of reptiles: Squamata (snakes and lizards), the tuatara, crocodiles, and turtles. The LANE runner 2.0 software was implemented to annotate all assemblies within a single integrated pipeline. We show that this approach increases the annotation completeness of the assembled transcriptomes/genomes. We then built large concatenated protein alignments of single-copy genes and inferred phylogenetic trees that support the positions of turtles and the tuatara as sister groups of Archosauria and Squamata, respectively. The Reptilian Transcriptomes Database 2.0 resource will be updated to include selected new data sets as they become available, thus making it a reference for differential expression studies, comparative genomics and transcriptomics, linkage mapping, molecular ecology, and phylogenomic analyses involving reptiles. The database is available at www.reptilian-transcriptomes.org and can be enquired using a wwwblast server installed at the University of Geneva. PMID:26133641

  20. Web 2.0 collaboration tools to support student research in hydrology - an opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Gersonius, B.; Radhakrishnan, M.

    2012-02-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that it is unwise to make the a-priori assumption that university students are ready and eager to embrace modern online technologies employed to enhance the educational experience. We present an opinion on employing Wiki, a popular Web 2.0 technology, in small student groups, based on a case-study of using it customized as a personal learning environment (PLE) for supporting thesis research in hydrology. Since inception in 2006 the system presented has proven to facilitate knowledge construction and peer-communication within and across groups of students of different academic years and to stimulate learning. Being an open ended and egalitarian system, it was a minimal burden to maintain, as all students became content authors and shared responsibility. A number of unintended uses of the system were also observed, like using it as a backup medium and mobile storage. We attribute the success and sustainability of the proposed web 2.0-based approach to the fact that the efforts were not limited to the application of the technology, but comprised the creation of a supporting environment with educational activities organized around it. We propose that Wiki-based PLEs are much more suitable than traditional learning management systems for supporting non-classroom education activities like thesis research in hydrology.

  1. Web 2.0 and Marketing Education: Explanations and Experiential Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granitz, Neil; Koernig, Stephen K.

    2011-01-01

    Although both experiential learning and Web 2.0 tools focus on creativity, sharing, and collaboration, sparse research has been published integrating a Web 2.0 paradigm with experiential learning in marketing. In this article, Web 2.0 concepts are explained. Web 2.0 is then positioned as a philosophy that can advance experiential learning through…

  2. 78 FR 29117 - After Final Consideration Pilot Program 2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office After Final Consideration Pilot Program 2.0 AGENCY: United... Trademark Office (USPTO) has modified the After Final Consideration Pilot Program (AFCP) to create the After Final Consideration Pilot Program 2.0 (AFCP 2.0). Applicants who wish to participate in AFCP 2.0...

  3. Thermal [2+2] cycloaddition of allenynes: easy construction of bicyclo[6.2.0]deca-1,8-dienes, bicyclo[5.2.0]nona-1,7-dienes, and bicyclo[4.2.0]octa-1,6-dienes.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Chisato; Hara, Yasuyuki; Miyashita, Yusuke; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2007-06-01

    The simple refluxing of allenynes, having a phenylsulfonyl functionality on the allenyl group, in xylene (or mesitylene) without microwave irradiation resulted in the efficient formation of bicyclo[5.2.0]nona-1,7-dienes and bicyclo[4.2.0]octa-1,6-dienes in high yields. This method was shown to be successfully applicable to the first construction of bicyclo[6.2.0]deca-1,8-dienes. Construction of the corresponding oxa- and azabicyclo[m.2.0] frameworks could also be attained. This thermal ring-closing reaction involves the formal [2+2] cycloaddition in which the distal double bond of an allenyl moiety exclusively served as one of the pi-components regardless of the position of the phenysulfonyl functionality on the allenyl moiety.

  4. WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease: measures of functioning in neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Nancy R; Kim, Ji-In; Williams, Janet K; Long, Jeffrey D; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials to improve day-to-day function in Huntington disease (HD) require accurate outcome measures. The DSM-5 recommends the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) 2.0 for use in neuropsychiatric disorders. The DSM-5 also states proxy measures may be useful when cognitive function may be impaired. We tested WHODAS participant and companion ratings for differences in baseline and longitudinal function in three prodromal HD groups and a control group. Participants with prodromal HD were stratified by disease progression (low, medium, and high disease burden) based on their cytosine–adenine–guanine (CAG)-age product (CAP) score. Participant (N=726) and companion (N=630) WHODAS scores were examined for group differences, and for participant versus companion differences using linear mixed effects regression and Akaike's information criterion to test model fit. We also compared WHODAS with the Total Functional Capacity (TFC) scale. At baseline, functioning on the WHODAS was rated worse by participants in the high group and companions compared with controls. For longitudinal changes, companions reported functional decline over time in the medium and high groups. In simultaneous analysis, participant and companion longitudinal trajectories showed divergence in the high group, suggesting reduced validity of self-report. The WHODAS showed greater longitudinal difference than the TFC in the medium group relative to controls, whereas the TFC showed greater longitudinal difference than WHODAS in the high group. Results suggest the WHODAS can identify baseline and longitudinal differences in prodromal HD and may be useful in HD clinical trials. Companions may provide more accurate data as the disease progresses. PMID:24327189

  5. WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease: measures of functioning in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Downing, Nancy R; Kim, Ji-In; Williams, Janet K; Long, Jeffrey D; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials to improve day-to-day function in Huntington disease (HD) require accurate outcome measures. The DSM-5 recommends the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) 2.0 for use in neuropsychiatric disorders. The DSM-5 also states proxy measures may be useful when cognitive function may be impaired. We tested WHODAS participant and companion ratings for differences in baseline and longitudinal function in three prodromal HD groups and a control group. Participants with prodromal HD were stratified by disease progression (low, medium, and high disease burden) based on their cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG)-age product (CAP) score. Participant (N=726) and companion (N=630) WHODAS scores were examined for group differences, and for participant versus companion differences using linear mixed effects regression and Akaike's information criterion to test model fit. We also compared WHODAS with the Total Functional Capacity (TFC) scale. At baseline, functioning on the WHODAS was rated worse by participants in the high group and companions compared with controls. For longitudinal changes, companions reported functional decline over time in the medium and high groups. In simultaneous analysis, participant and companion longitudinal trajectories showed divergence in the high group, suggesting reduced validity of self-report. The WHODAS showed greater longitudinal difference than the TFC in the medium group relative to controls, whereas the TFC showed greater longitudinal difference than WHODAS in the high group. Results suggest the WHODAS can identify baseline and longitudinal differences in prodromal HD and may be useful in HD clinical trials. Companions may provide more accurate data as the disease progresses.

  6. Using Web 2.0 to Teach Web 2.0: A Case Study in Aligning Teaching, Learning and Assessment with Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, John; Richardson, Joan; Hamilton, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies have transformed the way people in information industries engage with their clients, collaborate on projects, promote their services and gather community knowledge. In this paper, we describe the impact of industry adoption of Web 2.0 technologies on an information management course. The students in this course are either…

  7. Untangling Web 2.0: Charting Web 2.0 Tools, the NCSS Guidelines for Effective Use of Technology, and Bloom's Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diacopoulos, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for social studies to embrace instructional technology and Web 2.0 applications has become a growing trend in recent social studies research. As part of an ongoing process of collaborative enquiry between an instructional specialist and social studies teachers in a Professional Learning Community, a table of Web 2.0 applications was…

  8. Identification of Salmonella enterica species- and subgroup-specific genomic regions using Panseq 2.0.

    PubMed

    Laing, Chad; Villegas, Andre; Taboada, Eduardo N; Kropinski, Andrew; Thomas, James E; Gannon, Victor P J

    2011-12-01

    The pan-genome of a taxonomic group consists of evolutionarily conserved core genes shared by all members and accessory genes that are present only in some members of the group. Group- and subgroup-specific core genes are thought to contribute to shared phenotypes such as virulence and niche specificity. In this study we analyzed 39 Salmonella enterica genomes (16 closed, 23 draft), a species that contains two human-specific serovars that cause typhoid fever, as well as a large number of zoonotic serovars that cause gastroenteritis in humans. Panseq 2.0 was used to define the pan-genome by adjusting the threshold at which group-specific "core" loci are defined. We found the pan-genome to be 9.03 Mbp in size, and that the core genome size decreased, while the number of SNPs/100 bp increased, as the number of strains used to define the core genome increased, suggesting substantial divergence among S. enterica subgroups. Subgroup-specific "core" genes, in contrast, had fewer SNPs/100 bp, likely reflecting their more recent acquisition. Phylogenetic trees were created from the concatenated and aligned pan-genome, the core genome, and multi-locus-sequence typing (MLST) loci. Branch support increased among the trees, and strains of the same serovar grouped closer together as the number of loci used to create the tree increased. Further, high levels of discrimination were achieved even amongst the most closely related strains of S. enterica Typhi, suggesting that the data generated by Panseq may also be of value in short-term epidemiological studies. Panseq provides an easy and fast way of performing pan-genomic analyses, which can include the identification of group-dominant as well as group-specific loci and is available as a web-server and a standalone version at http://lfz.corefacility.ca/panseq/.

  9. Web 2.0 and the veterinary profession: current trends and future implications for lifelong learning.

    PubMed

    Dale, V H M; Kinnison, T; Short, N; May, S A; Baillie, S

    2011-10-29

    The NOVICE project is an EU initiative under the Lifelong Learning Programme, which aims to develop an online, professional network to promote informal, lifelong learning within the veterinary profession, using Web 2.0 tools. To inform the development of the network, a need analysis study was undertaken with relevant stakeholders. Focus group discussions were undertaken with veterinary students and veterinarians and a survey was administered to first-year students and recent graduates. The results indicate that use of computers and the internet is ubiquitous among junior members of the profession and that use of Web 2.0 tools is increasing. Concerns raised in relation to participation in online communities include verifying the quality of information and issues around professionalism. Compared with face-to-face communities, online communities were perceived to offer a number of advantages. These include convenient access to expert advice on an international scale, as well as helping to alleviate certain barriers to participation in formal, continuing education such as time, distance and cost.

  10. The ALPS project release 2.0: open source software for strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, B.; Carr, L. D.; Evertz, H. G.; Feiguin, A.; Freire, J.; Fuchs, S.; Gamper, L.; Gukelberger, J.; Gull, E.; Guertler, S.; Hehn, A.; Igarashi, R.; Isakov, S. V.; Koop, D.; Ma, P. N.; Mates, P.; Matsuo, H.; Parcollet, O.; Pawłowski, G.; Picon, J. D.; Pollet, L.; Santos, E.; Scarola, V. W.; Schollwöck, U.; Silva, C.; Surer, B.; Todo, S.; Trebst, S.; Troyer, M.; Wall, M. L.; Werner, P.; Wessel, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present release 2.0 of the ALPS (Algorithms and Libraries for Physics Simulations) project, an open source software project to develop libraries and application programs for the simulation of strongly correlated quantum lattice models such as quantum magnets, lattice bosons, and strongly correlated fermion systems. The code development is centered on common XML and HDF5 data formats, libraries to simplify and speed up code development, common evaluation and plotting tools, and simulation programs. The programs enable non-experts to start carrying out serial or parallel numerical simulations by providing basic implementations of the important algorithms for quantum lattice models: classical and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) using non-local updates, extended ensemble simulations, exact and full diagonalization (ED), the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) both in a static version and a dynamic time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) code, and quantum Monte Carlo solvers for dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). The ALPS libraries provide a powerful framework for programmers to develop their own applications, which, for instance, greatly simplify the steps of porting a serial code onto a parallel, distributed memory machine. Major changes in release 2.0 include the use of HDF5 for binary data, evaluation tools in Python, support for the Windows operating system, the use of CMake as build system and binary installation packages for Mac OS X and Windows, and integration with the VisTrails workflow provenance tool. The software is available from our web server at http://alps.comp-phys.org/.

  11. The "Digital Native" in Context: Tensions Associated with Importing Web 2.0 Practices into the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This report draws on 53 focus group interviews conducted with students aged 13 and 15 in both representative and innovating UK secondary schools. The schedule for these discussions covered a wide range of issues relating to the use of Web 2.0 services both in and out of school. These young people were often deeply engaged with this technology and…

  12. Using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) for Predicting Institutionalization of Patients With Dementia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Escorpizo, Reuben; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chi, Wen-Chou; Yen, Chia-Feng; Liao, Hua-Fang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) is an assessment tool and it has been applied for disability status assessment of Taiwanese dementia patients since July 2012. The aim of this study was to investigate the predicting accuracy of WHODAS 2.0 for institutionalization of dementia patients. Of these patients, 13,774 resided in a community and 4406 in a long-term care facility. Demographic data and WHODAS 2.0 standardized scores were analyzed using the Chi-square test and independent t test to compare patients with dementia in an institution with those in a community. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was applied to investigate accuracy in predicting institutionalization, and the optimal cutoff point was determined using the Youden index. Binary logistic regression was used to analyze variables to determine risk factors for the institutionalization of patients with dementia. WHODAS 2.0 scores in all domains were higher in patients with dementia in a long-term care facility than in those in a community (P < 0.01). The ROC curve showed moderate accuracy for all domains of WHODAS 2.0 (area under curve 0.6∼0.8). Binary logistic regression revealed that the male gender, severity of disease, and standardized WHODAS 2.0 scores surpassing the cutoff values were risk factors for the institutionalization of patients with dementia. Although the accuracy of WHODAS 2.0 in predicting institutionalization is not considerably high for patients with dementia, our study found that the WHODAS 2.0 scores, the male gender, education status, urbanization level, and severity of disease were risk factors for institutionalization in long-term care facilities. PMID:26632747

  13. Leopold 2.0: Training for a New Kind of Science Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturner, P. H.; Matson, P. A.; Krebs, M.

    2011-12-01

    To meet the environment and resource challenges of the coming decade, a new kind of scientific leadership is needed - one that is defined by the ability to innovate and lead transformational change; create strategic visions and implement them; catalyze and create bridges among multiple audiences and stakeholder groups; and motivate change in patterns of behavior, processes, and key decision systems. The Leopold Leadership Program has, since 1999, been training mid-career academic leaders in both communication skills and other strategies to link and translate their knowledge to decision making. As a result of the program's recent evaluation and planning activities, and drawing on current social science research, the program has identified storytelling, message-building, interviewing, and dialogue as critical science communication skills for the future. This presentation will provide examples of these skills, and illustrate ways in which they are essential to the work of collaboration, innovation, and action at the heart of "scientific leadership 2.0."

  14. Web 2.0 collaboration tool to support student research in hydrology - an opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Gersonius, B.; Radhakrishnan, M.

    2012-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that it is unwise to make the a-priori assumption that university students are ready and eager to embrace modern online technologies employed to enhance the educational experience. We present our opinion on employing Wiki, a popular Web 2.0 technology, in small student groups, based on a case-study of using it customized to work as a personal learning environment (PLE1) (Fiedler and Väljataga, 2011) for supporting thesis research in hydrology. Since inception in 2006, the system presented has proven to facilitate knowledge construction and peer-communication within and across groups of students of different academic years and to stimulate learning. Being an open ended and egalitarian system, it was a minimal burden to maintain, as all students became content authors and shared responsibility. A number of unintended uses of the system were also observed, like using it as a backup medium and mobile storage. We attribute the success and sustainability of the proposed Web 2.0-based approach to the fact that the efforts were not limited to the application of the technology, but comprised the creation of a supporting environment with educational activities organized around it. We propose that Wiki-based PLEs are much more suitable than traditional learning management systems for supporting non-classroom education activities like thesis research in hydrology. 1Here we use the term PLE to refer to the conceptual framework to make the process of knowledge construction a personalized experience - rather than to refer to the technology (in this case Wiki) used to attempt implementing such a system.

  15. Do Web 2.0 Tools Really Open the Door to Learning? Practices, Perceptions and Profiles of 11-16-Year-Old Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckin, Rosemary; Clark, Wilma; Graber, Rebecca; Logan, Kit; Mee, Adrian; Oliver, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report on survey and focus group data relating to the activities and perceptions of learning with Web 2.0 technologies of students aged between 11 and 16 years in 27 UK secondary schools. The study confirms that these learners had high levels of access to Web 2.0 technologies and that Web 2.0 activities were prolific. However,…

  16. Preservice Teachers' Critical Thinking Dispositions and Web 2.0 Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendag, Serkan; Erol, Osman; Sezgin, Sezan; Dulkadir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between preservice teachers' Web 2.0 competencies and their critical thinking disposition (CTD). The study employed an associational research design using California Critical Thinking Disposition-Inventory (CCTD-I) and a Web 2.0 competency questionnaire including items related to Web 2.0

  17. Information Literacy and Web 2.0: Is It Just Hype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that Web 2.0 provides an exciting set of tools for librarians to help their students become more information-literate. Design/methodology/approach: Recently, information overload and Web 2.0 have led librarians to adopt practices labelled as Library 2.0. Information literacy can be the key to…

  18. Developing Web 2.0 Tools for Support of Historical Inquiry in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Hammond, Thomas; Ferster, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools offer new possibilities for teaching and learning. PrimaryAccess is a Web 2.0 tool designed for K-12 history education. PrimaryAccess shares many of the characteristics of other Web 2.0 applications, but its educational focus makes it different from generic Web applications. Our work developing and researching PrimaryAccess has…

  19. A User-Centric Adaptive Learning System for E-Learning 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shiu-Li; Shiu, Jung-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The success of Web 2.0 inspires e-learning to evolve into e-learning 2.0, which exploits collective intelligence to achieve user-centric learning. However, searching for suitable learning paths and content for achieving a learning goal is time consuming and troublesome on e-learning 2.0 platforms. Therefore, introducing formal learning in these…

  20. Don't Be Afraid to Explore Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 is a hot topic. The term "Web 2.0" refers to the next generation of Internet applications that allow the average Internet user to collaborate and share information online. Web 2.0 sites allow anyone to contribute content and to participate with other users in editing and even combining or remixing existing content with other material to…

  1. 30 CFR 57.22239 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22239 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  2. 30 CFR 57.22239 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22239 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22239 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22239 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  4. Teaching MBA Students the Use of Web 2.0: The Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Meira; Hadar, Irit

    2010-01-01

    The new concepts and technologies of Web 2.0 attract researches in a variety of fields including education, business and knowledge management. However, while the Web 2.0 potential in the education discipline has been widely studied, in the management discipline the Web 2.0 business value has not been fully acknowledged. This research suggests an…

  5. Collaborative Middle School Geometry through Blogs and Other Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Mokter; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of blogs, a simple application of Web 2.0 technologies, in middle school geometry instruction. Specifically, it provides an overview of the interactive features of Web 2.0 technologies and the feasibility of using Web 2.0 technologies in geometry teaching and learning, as well as a proposed model for creating a…

  6. The Implementation of Web 2.0 Technology for Information Literacy Instruction in Thai University Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawetrattanasatian, Oranuch

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology has drawn much attention recently as a fascinating tool for Information Literacy Instruction (ILI), especially in academic libraries. This research was aimed to investigate the implementation of Web 2.0 technology for ILI in Thai university libraries, in terms of information literacy skills being taught, types of Web 2.0

  7. Moessbauer studies in Zn(2+)0.3 Mn(2+)0.7 Mn(3+) (2-y) Fe(3+) (2-y) O4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. G.; Mendiratta, R. G.; Escue, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The Mossbauer effect has proven to be effective in the study of nuclear hyperfine interactions. Ferrite systems having the formula (Zn(2+)0.3)(Mn(2+)0.7)(Mn(3+)y)(Fe(3+)2-y)(O4) were prepared and studied. These systems can be interpreted as mangacese-doped zinc and a part of iron ions. A systematic study of these systems is presented to promote an understanding of their microstructure for which various theories were proposed.

  8. IBAMar 2.0: 36 years sampling on the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; López-Jurado, J. L.; Balbín, R.; Jansá, J.; Amengual, B.

    2012-04-01

    IBAMar 2.0 is a new database created from the oceanographic data obtained during the development of different oceanographic projects by the Balearic Center of Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) and conducted from 1974 and ongoing in the Western Mediterranean basin (Balearic Sea and Algerian Basin). This database collects data from 27 research projects with 134 oceanographic surveys and 6463 sampling stations. IBAMar 2.0 database covers 36 year sampling and approximately 210,846 km2 in the Western Mediterranean Sea (WM). The effort applied for obtaining this data was growing from less than 100 station/year to more than 700 in the year 2009. IBAMar 2.0 database includes main hydrographic parameters such as pressure, temperature, salinity and others as dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll-a and nutrients (nitrates, nitrites, phosphates and silicates). Most of the data from 1990 until now were obtained with multiparametric CTDs, although earlier data corresponding to cast sampling with Niskin bottles were incorporated too. The main goal of this database is to establish a climatology for the most significant variables to study the existence of decadal cycles or long-term trends, trying to better understand the behaviour of the hydrographic conditions of the Spanish Mediterranean coast, at both seasonal and interannual time scale and long term. From these studies is possible to provide answers on topical issues as the thermohaline anomaly of the deep waters of WM, the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen minimum, or the effects of the Climate Change on the hydrodynamics characteristics of the study area [1]. Future work includes data quality control based on standard protocols like [2] and publishing IBAMar 2.0 (including next surveys) on the website of the Mediterranean Group on Climate Change of IEO (http://www.ma.ieo.es/gcc/). There, the data could be obtained summarized as seasonal climatology. These will include horizontal sections at standard depths

  9. Organ dose and risk assessment in paediatric radiography using the PCXMC 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladia, A.; Messaris, G.; Delis, H.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Abdominal and chest radiographs are the most common examinations in paediatric radiology. X-ray examination of children attracts particular interest, mainly due to the increased risk for the expression of delayed radiogenic cancers as they have many years of expected life remaining. This study aims to calculate the organ dose and estimate the radiation Risk of Exposure Induced cancer Death (REID) to paediatric patients, using the PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code.Patient data and exposure parameters were recorded during examinations of 240 patients, separated in four age groups undergoing chest or abdomen examinations.The organs received the highest dose in all patient groups were liver, lungs, stomach, thyroid, pancreas, breast, spleen in chest radiographs and liver, lungs, colon, stomach and ovaries, uterus (for girls) and prostate (for boys) in abdomen radiographs. The effective dosefor the chest was 0.49×10-2- 1.07×10-2 mSv, while for the abdomen 1.85×10-2- 3.02×10-2 mSv. The mean REID value was 1.254×10-5 for the abdomen and 0.645×10-5 for the chest.

  10. eHealth Literacy and Web 2.0 Health Information Seeking Behaviors Among Baby Boomers and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Bethany; Dodd, Virginia; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Paige, Samantha; Alber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    information (OR 2.63, Wald= 8.09, df=1, P=.004). Finally, more education predicted greater use of Web 2.0 for health information, with college graduates (OR 2.57, Wald= 3.86, df =1, P=.049) and post graduates (OR 7.105, Wald= 4.278, df=1, P=.04) nearly 2 to 7 times more likely than non-high school graduates to use Web 2.0 for health information. Conclusions Being younger and possessing more education was associated with greater eHealth literacy among baby boomers and older adults. Females and those highly educated, particularly at the post graduate level, reported greater use of Web 2.0 for health information. More in-depth surveys and interviews among more diverse groups of baby boomers and older adult populations will likely yield a better understanding regarding how current Web-based health information seeking and sharing behaviors influence health-related decision making. PMID:25783036

  11. 30 CFR 57.22240 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22240 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22240 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22240 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22240 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22240 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (V-A mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  14. Exploring Home and School Involvement of Young Children with Web 2.0 and Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on young children's use of Web 2.0 and social media. A background is provided about the use of Web 2.0 and social media among young children. Strengths and concerns are discussed as well as home and school use of Web 2.0 and social media. Exemplary websites are shared. The article concludes with potential changes in the…

  15. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model. Version 2.0; User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a guide for using the model in analysis. Those interested in making enhancements or modification to the model should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Technical Description.

  16. MetaRanker 2.0: a web server for prioritization of genetic variation data.

    PubMed

    Pers, Tune H; Dworzyński, Piotr; Thomas, Cecilia Engel; Lage, Kasper; Brunak, Søren

    2013-07-01

    MetaRanker 2.0 is a web server for prioritization of common and rare frequency genetic variation data. Based on heterogeneous data sets including genetic association data, protein-protein interactions, large-scale text-mining data, copy number variation data and gene expression experiments, MetaRanker 2.0 prioritizes the protein-coding part of the human genome to shortlist candidate genes for targeted follow-up studies. MetaRanker 2.0 is made freely available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaRanker-2.0.

  17. The Teach Web 2.0 Consortium: A Tool to Promote Educational Social Networking and Web 2.0 Use among Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drexler, Wendy; Baralt, Anna; Dawson, Kara

    2008-01-01

    Social networking is changing the way children communicate. Most of this communication takes place outside of school, though countless Web 2.0 applications are emerging with educational potential. Students may benefit from exposure to the twenty-first century learning principles obtained through the use of emerging web applications. This article…

  18. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  19. Alignment 2.0: Strategic Use of New Internet Technologies in Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, Albert; Thaens, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    This paper challenges the view that strategies for using Web 2.0 should primarily be based upon technological characteristics. The value of the organizational strategic alignment approach for developing specific operational Web 2.0 strategies for government organizations is explored both theoretically and empirically. On the basis of a review of…

  20. Acceptable Use Policies in a Web 2.0 & Mobile Era: A Guide for School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for School Networking (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 applications and mobile Internet devices have added new issues to the safety/access situation for schools. The purpose of this guide is to assist school districts in developing, rethinking, or revising Internet policies as a consequence of the emergence of Web 2.0, and the growing pervasiveness of smart phone use. The Consortium for School…

  1. Aqua-Aura QuickDAM (QDAM) 2.0 Ops Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nidhiry, John

    2015-01-01

    The presentation describes the Quick Debris Avoidance Maneuver (QDAM) 2.0 process used the Aqua and Aura flight teams to (a) reduce the work load and dependency on staff and systems; (b) reduce turn-around time and provide emergency last minute capabilities; and (c) increase burn parameter flexibility. The presentation also compares the QDAM 2.0 process to previous approaches.

  2. From Fatigue to Anxiety? Implications for Educational Design in a Web 2.0 World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to recognise that as educators moving into, or already in, a Web 2.0 world, we are likely to experience anxiety, and to explore the implications for educational design in a Web 2.0 world. Design/methodology/approach: The objectives are achieved as the result of recent successes with the commissioners for two…

  3. 75 FR 22577 - Proposed Notice and Comment Policy Version 2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Notice and Comment Policy Version 2.0 AGENCY: U.S. Election Assistance Commission. ACTION: Notice and request for public comment on Proposed Notice and Comment Policy 2.0. SUMMARY: The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) seeks public comment on the Proposed Notice and Comment Policy...

  4. The Influences of Social Collaboration on Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turky, Mohamed Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The present study tries to research the relationship between Social Collaboration Activity and Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education student. It additionally looks to decide how Social Collaboration adds to the forecast of their sense Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy. The study reported in this paper was led to inspect the relationship Social…

  5. Gender Divide and Acceptance of Collaborative Web 2.0 Applications for Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Wen-Hao David; Hood, Denice Ward; Yoo, Sun Joo

    2013-01-01

    Situated in the gender digital divide framework, this survey study investigated the role of computer anxiety in influencing female college students' perceptions toward Web 2.0 applications for learning. Based on 432 college students' "Web 2.0 for learning" perception ratings collected by relevant categories of "Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use…

  6. Integrating Web 2.0-Based Informal Learning with Workplace Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Fang; Kemp, Linzi J.

    2012-01-01

    Informal learning takes place in the workplace through connection and collaboration mediated by Web 2.0 applications. However, little research has yet been published that explores informal learning and how to integrate it with workplace training. We aim to address this research gap by developing a conceptual Web 2.0-based workplace learning and…

  7. Integrating Web 2.0 in Health Education Preparation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Carl; Thackeray, Rosemary; Barnes, Michael; Neiger, Brad; McIntyre, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Competency in 21st-century health communication involves an understanding that the internet landscape has evolved from static webpages to applications that engage users. This evolution to "Web 2.0" includes such applications as blogs, wikis, social-networking sites, and podcasts. This review presents trends in Web 2.0 internet usage, summarizes…

  8. eLearning 2.0 and New Literacies: Are Social Practices Lagging behind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Wei-Ying; So, Hyo-Jeong; Tan, Seng-Chee

    2010-01-01

    While the growing prevalence of Web 2.0 in education opens up exciting opportunities for universities to explore expansive, new literacies practices, concomitantly, it presents unique challenges. Many universities are changing from a content delivery paradigm of eLearning 1.0 to a learner-focused paradigm of eLearning 2.0. In this article, we…

  9. Journal Writing with Web 2.0 Tools: A Vision for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Aagard, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how Web 2.0 technologies may facilitate journaling and related inquiry methods among older adults. Benefits and limitations of journaling are summarized as well as computer skills of older adults. We then describe how Web 2.0 technologies can enhance journaling among older adults by diminishing feelings of isolation,…

  10. Build, Buy, Open Source, or Web 2.0?: Making an Informed Decision for Your Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit; Keach, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    When improving a web presence, today's libraries have a choice: using a free Web 2.0 application, opting for open source, buying a product, or building a web application. This article discusses how to make an informed decision for one's library. The authors stress that deciding whether to use a free Web 2.0 application, to choose open source, to…

  11. Web 2.0: What Is It and Is It for Me?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohley, Katharine A.

    2010-01-01

    This article will define Web 2.0 and determine if it is "right" for you. The author has been teaching with technology for over ten years and has identified Web 2.0 categories that are emerging in higher educational institutions. A summary of seven categories of the "Education Winners" as well as a comparison of each of the…

  12. Critical Literacy and Web 2.0: Exercising and Negotiating Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Julie; Vasinda, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe Web 2.0 as tools that have increased the urgency for students' and teachers' critical literacy skills and have also participated in the implementation of critical literacy. The authors define and position both Web 2.0 and critical literacy. Further, students' and teachers' power dynamics within both critical…

  13. Investigating the Use of Web 2.0 Technology by Malaysian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaria, Mohd Hafiz; Watson, Jason; Edwards, Sylvia L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Many research have uncovered the use of Web 2.0 technology by students from various countries. Yet, limited studies have been done from the context of developing country such as Malaysia. This paper aims to highlight the development of a survey instrument that captured the use of Web 2.0 applications by Malaysian students for learning.…

  14. The Academic Library Meets Web 2.0: Applications and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Chen; Ouyang, Fenfei; Chu, Heting

    2009-01-01

    Visits to 81 academic library websites in the New York State reveal that 42% of them adopted one or more Web 2.0 tools such as blogs while implementation of those tools in individual libraries varies greatly. We also propose a conceptual model of Academic Library 2.0 in this report. (Contains 4 tables and 6 figures.)

  15. E-Learning 3.0 = E-Learning 2.0 + Web 3.0?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Fehmida

    2012-01-01

    Web 3.0, termed as the semantic web or the web of data is the transformed version of Web 2.0 with technologies and functionalities such as intelligent collaborative filtering, cloud computing, big data, linked data, openness, interoperability and smart mobility. If Web 2.0 is about social networking and mass collaboration between the creator and…

  16. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies in LIS Education: Experiences at Tallinn University, Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virkus, Sirje

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the experiences of the Institute of Information Studies of Tallinn University in introducing ICT, including Web 2.0 technologies, in library and information science education, and to explore the role that these can play in new models of learning and teaching. Design/methodology/approach: Web 2.0

  17. Closing the Communication Gap: "Web 2.0 Tools for Enhanced Planning and Collaboration"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kelly J.; Dickens, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Web 2.0 is expanding the way general and special educators collaborate, especially in co-teaching situations. This article draws attention to several free web-based tools and a co-teaching lesson plan supplement that can be used to incorporate Web 2.0 technologies during the co-planning, co-teaching and shared reflection processes between the…

  18. Web 2.0 and Second Language Learning: What Does the Research Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shenggao; Vasquez, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews current research on the use of Web 2.0 technologies in second language (L2) learning. Its purpose is to investigate the theoretical perspectives framing it, to identify some of the benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies in L2 learning, and to discuss some of the limitations. The review reveals that blogs and wikis have been…

  19. Language Learning: The Merge of Teletandem and Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu-Ellis, Carla; Ellis, Jason Brent; Carle, Abbie; Blevens, Jared; Decker, Aline; Carvalho, Leticia; Macedo, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The following action research provides an overview of student's perceptions of the incorporation of Web 2.0 technologies into in-tandem language learning activities. American and Brazilian college students were partnered in order to work in-tandem through pre-determined language activities using Web 2.0 technologies to learn a second…

  20. Evaluating Web 2.0 Technologies in Higher Education Using Students' Perceptions and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karvounidis, T.; Chimos, K.; Bersimis, S.; Douligeris, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Web 2.0 technologies in higher education are evaluated using students' perceptions, satisfaction, performance and behaviour. The study evaluates the Web 2.0 tools as stand-alone entities as well in terms of their cross-operability and integration (confluence) to synergistic contributions towards the enhancement of student…

  1. Web 2.0 Technologies for Effective Knowledge Management in Organizations: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Anupam Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of Internet-based collaborative tools, commonly known as Web 2.0, has increased in popularity, availability, and power in the last few years (Kane and Fichman, 2009). Web 2.0 is a set of Internet-based applications that harness network effects by facilitating collaborative and participative computing (O'Reilly, 2006).…

  2. Multiliteracies and Active Learning in CLIL--The Development of Learn Web2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marenzi, I.; Zerr, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of LearnWeb2.0, a search and collaboration environment for supporting searching, organizing, and sharing distributed resources, and our pedagogical setup based on the multiliteracies approach. In LearnWeb2.0, collaborative and active learning is supported through project-focused search and aggregation, with…

  3. Capitalizing on Web 2.0 in the Social Studies Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Lori B.; Beal, Candy M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses primarily on the integration of Web 2.0 technologies into social studies education. It documents how various Web 2.0 tools can be utilized in the social studies context to support and enhance teaching and learning. For the purposes of focusing on one specific topic, global connections at the middle school level will be the…

  4. Web 2.0 Integration in Information Literacy Instruction: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Lili

    2010-01-01

    Survey and semi-structured interviews were conducted in this study to examine the adoption of the Web 2.0 technology in information literacy instruction. Findings suggest that librarians use Web 2.0 tools in three different levels, and overall it has a positive impact on teaching and learning. (Contains 2 tables.)

  5. Facilitating Students' Global Perspectives: Collaborating with International Partners Using Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Newby, Timothy J.; Yu, Ji Hyun; Liu, Wei; Tomory, Annette; Lee, Young Mi; Sendurur, Emine; Sendurur, Polat

    2011-01-01

    This research was designed to explore the impact of a wiki-based international collaboration project on pre-service teachers' 1) cultural competencies, 2) comfort using technology, including Web 2.0 tools, to interact and collaborate with unknown colleagues, and 3) perceptions of ideas for using technology, including Web 2.0 tools, in their future…

  6. Fostering Collaborative Learning with Mobile Web 2.0 in Semi-Formal Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Web 2.0 technologies such as: mobile apps, social networking sites and video sharing sites have become essential drivers for shaping daily activities and meeting learning needs in various settings. However, very few studies link mobile Web 2.0 to supporting collaborative learning in real-life problem solving activities in semi-formal…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes toward the Implementation of Web 2.0 Tools in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadri, Lekan Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have concluded that Web 2.0 technologies offered many educational benefits. However, many secondary teachers in a large northwestern school district were not using Web 2.0 tools in spite of its possibilities for teaching and learning. The purpose of this quantitative correlational research was to explore the relationships between the…

  8. Web 2.0 and Higher Education: Its Educational Use in the University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campion, Raul Santiago; Nalda, Fermin Navaridas; Rivilla, Antonio Medina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is for the teachers in higher education to provide relative information about the use of the web 2.0 resources within its context and within the framework of the university staff training program. In this context, we have developed a tool in order to study 400 teachers attitude, use and perceived usefulness of web 2.0

  9. Integration of Web 2.0 Tools in Learning a Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majid, Nazatul Aini Abd

    2014-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools are expected to assist students to acquire knowledge effectively in their university environment. However, the lack of effort from lecturers in planning the learning process can make it difficult for the students to optimize their learning experiences. The aim of this paper is to integrate Web 2.0 tools with learning strategy in…

  10. Web 2.0-Mediated Competence--Implicit Educational Demands on Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohn, Nina Bonderup

    2009-01-01

    The employment of Web 2.0 within higher educational settings has become increasingly popular. Reasons for doing so include student motivation, didactic considerations of facilitating individual and collaborative knowledge construction, and the support Web 2.0 gives the learner in transgressing and resituating content and practices between the…

  11. The Knowledge of Web 2.0 by Library and Information Science Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Daihani, Sultan

    2009-01-01

    This research paper reports the results of a Web-based survey designed to explore the attitude of Library and Information Science (LIS) academics to Web 2.0. It investigates their familiarity with Web 2.0 concepts, tools and services and applications as these relate to LIS education, and the barriers to their use. A Web-based questionnaire was…

  12. Designing "Geometry 2.0" Learning Environments: A Preliminary Study with Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Nuria Joglar; Sordo Juanena, José María; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    The information and communication technologies of Web 2.0 are arriving in our schools, allowing the design and implementation of new learning environments with great educational potential. This article proposes a pedagogical model based on a new geometry technology-integrated learning environment, called "Geometry 2.0," which was tested…

  13. Web 2.0 as a Non-Foundational Network-Centric Learning Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eijkman, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to initiate a timely discussion about the epistemological advantages of Web 2.0 as a non-foundational network-centric learning space in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: A philosophical analysis of the underpinning design principles of Web 2.0 social media and of conventional "foundational" and emergent…

  14. Motivating Pre-Service Teachers in Technology Integration of Web 2.0 for Teaching Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Jang, Hwan Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of pre-service teachers' use of Web 2.0 tools during a teaching internship, after a course that emphasized the use of the tools for instructional activities. Results revealed that integrating Web 2.0 tools during their teaching internship was strongly predicted by participants' perceived…

  15. Comparison of Web 2.0 Technology Acceptance Level Based on Cultural Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Sun Joo; Huang, Wen-hao David

    2011-01-01

    In order to inform educators in higher education on the integration of Web 2.0 applications for engaging and effective learning experiences, this survey study compared the use and acceptance of Web 2.0 applications between American and Korean college students through the lens of cultural differences. Undergraduate students were recruited to…

  16. Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Adler, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    The building blocks provided by the Open Educational Resources movement, along with e-Science and e-Humanities and the resources of the Web 2.0, are creating the conditions for the emergence of new kinds of open participatory learning ecosystems that will support active, passion-based learning: Learning 2.0. This new form of learning begins with…

  17. Web 2.0 Technologies and Applications in the Best Practice Networks and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagiene, Valentina; Kurilovas, Eugenijus

    2010-01-01

    The paper is aimed to analyse the external expert evaluation results of eContent"plus" programme's iCOPER (Interoperable Content for Performance in a Competency-driven Society) project's deliverables, especially quality control and Web 2.0 technologies report. It is a suitability report for better practice concerning the use of Web 2.0

  18. Examining Student Decisions to Adopt Web 2.0 Technologies: Theory and Empirical Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Richard; Ajjan, Haya

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student awareness of the pedagogical benefits of Web 2.0 to supplement in-class learning and to better understand factors that influence student decisions to adopt these tools, using the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior (DTPB). Findings indicated that while many students feel that some Web 2.0

  19. Investigating Faculty Decisions to Adopt Web 2.0 Technologies: Theory and Empirical Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajjan, Haya; Hartshorne, Richard

    2008-01-01

    While students are increasing their use of emerging technologies such as text messaging, wikis, social networks, and other Web 2.0 applications, this is not the case with many university faculty. The purpose of this study was to assess faculty's awareness of the benefits of Web 2.0 to supplement in-class learning and better understand faculty's…

  20. Enhancing promotional strategies within social marketing programs: use of Web 2.0 social media.

    PubMed

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Hanson, Carl L; McKenzie, James F

    2008-10-01

    The second generation of Internet-based applications (i.e., Web 2.0), in which users control communication, holds promise to significantly enhance promotional efforts within social marketing campaigns. Web 2.0 applications can directly engage consumers in the creative process by both producing and distributing information through collaborative writing, content sharing, social networking, social bookmarking, and syndication. Web 2.0 can also enhance the power of viral marketing by increasing the speed at which consumers share experiences and opinions with progressively larger audiences. Because of the novelty and potential effectiveness of Web 2.0, social marketers may be enticed to prematurely incorporate related applications into promotional plans. However, as strategic issues such as priority audience preferences, selection of appropriate applications, tracking and evaluation, and related costs are carefully considered, Web 2.0 will expand to allow health promotion practitioners more direct access to consumers with less dependency on traditional communication channels. PMID:18936268

  1. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model: Technical Description. 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a technical description of FAM 2.0 and its computer files to enable the modeler and programmer to make enhancements or modifications to the model. Those interested in a guide for using the model in analysis should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Users Manual.

  2. Enhancing promotional strategies within social marketing programs: use of Web 2.0 social media.

    PubMed

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Hanson, Carl L; McKenzie, James F

    2008-10-01

    The second generation of Internet-based applications (i.e., Web 2.0), in which users control communication, holds promise to significantly enhance promotional efforts within social marketing campaigns. Web 2.0 applications can directly engage consumers in the creative process by both producing and distributing information through collaborative writing, content sharing, social networking, social bookmarking, and syndication. Web 2.0 can also enhance the power of viral marketing by increasing the speed at which consumers share experiences and opinions with progressively larger audiences. Because of the novelty and potential effectiveness of Web 2.0, social marketers may be enticed to prematurely incorporate related applications into promotional plans. However, as strategic issues such as priority audience preferences, selection of appropriate applications, tracking and evaluation, and related costs are carefully considered, Web 2.0 will expand to allow health promotion practitioners more direct access to consumers with less dependency on traditional communication channels.

  3. What medical educators need to know about "Web 2.0".

    PubMed

    McGee, James B; Begg, Michael

    2008-01-01

    "Web 2.0" describes a collection of web-based technologies which share a user-focused approach to design and functionality, where users actively participate in content creation and editing through open collaboration between members of communities of practice. The current generation of students in medical school made Web 2.0 websites such as Facebook and MySpace some of the most popular on the Internet. Medical educators and designers of educational software applications can benefit from understanding and applying Web 2.0 concepts to the curriculum and related websites. Health science schools have begun experimenting with wikis, blogs and other Web 2.0 applications and have identified both advantages and potential problems with these relatively open, student-focused communication tools. This paper reviews the unique features of Web 2.0 technologies, addresses questions regarding potential pitfalls and suggests valuable applications in health science education.

  4. What medical educators need to know about "Web 2.0".

    PubMed

    McGee, James B; Begg, Michael

    2008-01-01

    "Web 2.0" describes a collection of web-based technologies which share a user-focused approach to design and functionality, where users actively participate in content creation and editing through open collaboration between members of communities of practice. The current generation of students in medical school made Web 2.0 websites such as Facebook and MySpace some of the most popular on the Internet. Medical educators and designers of educational software applications can benefit from understanding and applying Web 2.0 concepts to the curriculum and related websites. Health science schools have begun experimenting with wikis, blogs and other Web 2.0 applications and have identified both advantages and potential problems with these relatively open, student-focused communication tools. This paper reviews the unique features of Web 2.0 technologies, addresses questions regarding potential pitfalls and suggests valuable applications in health science education. PMID:18464141

  5. SME 2.0: Roadmap towards Web 2.0-Based Open Innovation in SME-Networks - A Case Study Based Research Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindermann, Nadine; Valcárcel, Sylvia; Schaarschmidt, Mario; von Kortzfleisch, Harald

    Small- and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are of high social and economic importance since they represent 99% of European enterprises. With regard to their restricted resources, SMEs are facing a limited capacity for innovation to compete with new challenges in a complex and dynamic competitive environment. Given this context, SMEs need to increasingly cooperate to generate innovations on an extended resource base. Our research project focuses on the aspect of open innovation in SME-networks enabled by Web 2.0 applications and referring to innovative solutions of non-competitive daily life problems. Examples are industrial safety, work-life balance issues or pollution control. The project raises the question whether the use of Web 2.0 applications can foster the exchange of creativity and innovative ideas within a network of SMEs and hence catalyze new forms of innovation processes among its participants. Using Web 2.0 applications within SMEs implies consequently breaking down innovation processes to employees’ level and thus systematically opening up a heterogeneous and broader knowledge base to idea generation. In this paper we address first steps on a roadmap towards Web 2.0-based open innovation processes within SME-networks. It presents a general framework for interaction activities leading to open innovation and recommends a regional marketplace as a viable, trust-building driver for further collaborative activities. These findings are based on field research within a specific SME-network in Rhineland-Palatinate Germany, the “WirtschaftsForum Neuwied e.V.”, which consists of roughly 100 heterogeneous SMEs employing about 8,000 workers.

  6. MFEprimer-2.0: a fast thermodynamics-based program for checking PCR primer specificity.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wubin; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yanchun; Lu, Yiming; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Chenggang

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating the specificity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers is an essential step in PCR primer design. The MFEprimer-2.0 server allows users to check primer specificity against genomic DNA and messenger RNA/complementary DNA sequence databases quickly and easily. MFEprimer-2.0 uses a k-mer index algorithm to accelerate the search process for primer binding sites and uses thermodynamics to evaluate binding stability between each primer and its DNA template. Several important characteristics, such as the sequence, melting temperature and size of each amplicon, either specific or non-specific, are reported on the results page. Based on these characteristics and the user-friendly output, users can readily draw conclusions about the specificity of PCR primers. Analyses for degenerate primers and multiple PCR primers are also supported in MFEprimer-2.0. In addition, the databases supported by MFEprimer-2.0 are comprehensive, and custom databases can also be supported on request. The MFEprimer-2.0 server does not require a login and is freely available at http://biocompute.bmi.ac.cn/CZlab/MFEprimer-2.0. More over, the MFEprimer-2.0 command-line version and local server version are open source and can be downloaded at https://github.com/quwubin/MFEprimer/wiki/Manual/.

  7. Creating and sharing clinical decision support content with Web 2.0: Issues and examples.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Kashyap, Vipul; Thomas, Sean M; Sittig, Dean F

    2009-04-01

    Clinical decision support is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. However, developing a comprehensive package of decision support interventions is costly and difficult. If used well, Web 2.0 methods may make it easier and less costly to develop decision support. Web 2.0 is characterized by online communities, open sharing, interactivity and collaboration. Although most previous attempts at sharing clinical decision support content have worked outside of the Web 2.0 framework, several initiatives are beginning to use Web 2.0 to share and collaborate on decision support content. We present case studies of three efforts: the Clinfowiki, a world-accessible wiki for developing decision support content; Partners Healthcare eRooms, web-based tools for developing decision support within a single organization; and Epic Systems Corporation's Community Library, a repository for sharing decision support content for customers of a single clinical system vendor. We evaluate the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to enable collaborative development and sharing of clinical decision support systems through the lens of three case studies; analyzing technical, legal and organizational issues for developers, consumers and organizers of clinical decision support content in Web 2.0. We believe the case for Web 2.0 as a tool for collaborating on clinical decision support content appears strong, particularly for collaborative content development within an organization.

  8. Squire 2.0 (Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence): revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26523003

  9. [SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): Revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process].

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-11-20

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semi-structured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of healthcare: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve healthcare, recognizing that they can be complex and multi-dimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org).

  10. Squire 2.0 (Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence): revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org).

  11. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-01-01

    In the past several years, the science of health care improvement has advanced considerably. In this article, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org).

  12. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): Revised Publication Guidelines From a Detailed Consensus Process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semi-structured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of healthcare: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve healthcare, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (http://www.squire-statement.org).

  13. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-10-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using 1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group; 2) 2 face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts and 3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value and safety of healthcare: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve healthcare, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org).

  14. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): Revised Publication Guidelines from a Detailed Consensus Process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015, using 1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group; 2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts; and 3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org).

  15. Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence 2.0: revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2016-02-01

    Since the publication of Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this article, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using (1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group, (2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts, and (3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org).

  16. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): revised publication guidelines from a detailed consensus process.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-10-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript, we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015 using 1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group; 2) 2 face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts and 3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of 3 key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value and safety of healthcare: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve healthcare, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26443286

  17. SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence): Revised Publication Guidelines from a Detailed Consensus Process

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Goodman, Daisy; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE 1.0) guidelines in 2008, the science of the field has advanced considerably. In this manuscript we describe the development of SQUIRE 2.0 and its key components. We undertook the revision between 2012 and 2015, using 1) semistructured interviews and focus groups to evaluate SQUIRE 1.0 plus feedback from an international steering group; 2) two face-to-face consensus meetings to develop interim drafts; and 3) pilot testing with authors and a public comment period. SQUIRE 2.0 emphasizes the reporting of three key components of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value, and safety of health care: the use of formal and informal theory in planning, implementing, and evaluating improvement work; the context in which the work is done; and the study of the intervention(s). SQUIRE 2.0 is intended for reporting the range of methods used to improve health care, recognizing that they can be complex and multidimensional. It provides common ground to share these discoveries in the scholarly literature (www.squire-statement.org). PMID:26517437

  18. The Fifth Annual Sc2.0 and Synthetic Genomes Conference: Synthetic Genomes in High Gear.

    PubMed

    Walker, Roy S K; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-09-16

    The Sc2.0 project is perhaps the largest synthetic biology project in the public domain, and ultimately aims to construct a new version of the humble brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each year, the Sc2.0 consortium gather to discuss progress in this ambitious project and highlight new developments at the forefront of synthetic genome engineering. This viewpoint summarizes some of the key moments of the 2016 conference, including updates on the Sc2.0 project itself, mammalian synthetic biology, DNA assembly automation, HGP-Write and a panel discussion on the social and ethical perspectives of synthetic biology. PMID:27633830

  19. WaterML2.0: Harmonising standards for water observations data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter; Walker, Gavin; Valentine, David; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    particular domain such as hydrology, but rather the abstract components that are needed when making observations: features, observed properties of features, observation procedures and results. By making use of the O&M standard and specialising it with harmonised definitions of water observation concepts, it is proposed that a domain-level standard, WaterML2.0, be developed. It would be capable of precisely describing the relevant aspects of hydrological observations. Re-using existing standards suites, such as OGC, allows the development to focus on capturing domain specific concepts without redefining common types such as spatial types, standard data structures and so on. The development will be done by involving key stakeholders who have developed existing standards and understand hydrological observational practices. Through the Hydrology Domain Working Group within OGC, jointly chaired by the OGC and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), WaterML2.0 will be developed as an OGC standard. It may then be leveraged by existing web services, such as the OGC's Sensor Observation Service (SOS), to query and extract water information across the Internet using common tools. This will allow water information to be shared - and most importantly understood - by a much wider audience.

  20. A Base Solution for Exposing IMS Telecommunication Services to Web 2.0 Enabled Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, Florian; Murarasu, Alin; Bachmann, Andreas; Magedanz, Thomas

    The convergence of telecommunication and Web 2.0 services is leading to new opportunities for the telecommunications market. Companies are looking for ways to include their services in Web 2.0 applications. Predictions suggest that future telecommunication networks will be based on the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), an all IP telecommunication core network. This paper describes an approach to combining Web 2.0 enabled applications, namely widgets, with telecommunication features using IMS. Widgets are small applications based on Web technologies that run on the client device. A new abstraction layer with interfaces for the different telecommunication features will be introduced. In addition a widget engine that makes these telecommunication interfaces available to its widgets will be presented. This will allow the rapid development of IMS applications for external developers and the combination of other Web 2.0 services with IMS features.

  1. Prostate cancer guidelines on Web 2.0-based sites: the screening dilemma continues online.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Daniela B; Koskan, Alexis; Rose, India D

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about prostate cancer (PrCA) screening information on participatory, interactive, and consumer-generated websites collectively referred to as Web 2.0. A content analysis was conducted of PrCA resources on four highly trafficked Web 2.0 social bookmarking sites. A total of 127 webpages were analyzed. Most content was from news websites (48.9%) and blogs (37.8%). PrCA screening was mentioned on 95.3% of pages; only 30.7% discussed the prostate-specific antigen test. Less than half (43.8%) mentioned current screening guidelines. PrCA content is inconsistent on Web 2.0 sites. Future research should assess the readability and usability of Web 2.0 cancer resources.

  2. Designing Geometry 2.0 learning environments: a preliminary study with primary school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglar Prieto, Nuria; María Sordo Juanena, José; Star, Jon R.

    2014-04-01

    The information and communication technologies of Web 2.0 are arriving in our schools, allowing the design and implementation of new learning environments with great educational potential. This article proposes a pedagogical model based on a new geometry technology-integrated learning environment, called Geometry 2.0, which was tested with 39 sixth grade students from a public school in Madrid (Spain). The main goals of the study presented here were to describe an optimal role for the mathematics teacher within Geometry 2.0, and to analyse how dynamic mathematics and communication might affect young students' learning of basic figural concepts in a real setting. The analyses offered in this article illustrate how our Geometry 2.0 model facilitates deeply mathematical tasks which encourage students' exploration, cooperation and communication, improving their learning while fostering geometrical meanings.

  3. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies for Public Outreach on a Simulated Mars Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiro, B.; Palaia, J.; Ferrone, K.

    2009-12-01

    Recent advances in social media and internet communications have revolutionized the ways people interact and disseminate information. Astronauts are already starting to take advantage of these tools by blogging and tweeting from space, and almost all NASA missions now have presences on the major social networking sites. One priority for future human explorers on Mars will be communicating their experiences to the people back on Earth. During July 2009, a six-member crew of volunteers carried out a simulated Mars mission at the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) on Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic. Living in a habitat, conducting EVAs wearing spacesuits, and observing communication delays with “Earth,” the crew endured restrictions similar to those that will be faced by future human Mars explorers. Throughout the expedition, crewmembers posted regular blog entries, reports, photos, videos, and updates to their website and social media outlets Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Picasa Web Albums. During the sixteen EVAs of their field science research campaign, FMARS crewmembers collected GPS track information and took geotagged photos using GPS-enabled cameras. They combined their traverse GPS tracks with photo location information into KML/KMZ files that website visitors can view in Google Maps or Google Earth. Although the crew observed a strict 20-minute communication delay with “Earth” to simulate a real Mars mission, they broke this rule to conduct four very successful live webcasts with student groups using Skype since education and public outreach were important objectives of the endeavor. This presentation will highlight the use of Web 2.0 technologies for public outreach during the simulated Mars expedition and the implications for other remote scientific journeys. The author embarks on a "rover" to carry out an EVA near the FMARS Habitat. The satellite dish to the right of the structure was used for all communications with the remote

  4. WALK 2.0: Examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a ‘real world’ setting: an ecological trial

    PubMed Central

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Savage, Trevor N; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Maeder, Anthony J; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Van Itallie, Anetta; Tague, Rhys; Mummery, W Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of health-enhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Web-based interventions are a popular approach for behaviour change given their wide reach and accessibility. However, challenges with participant engagement and retention reduce the long-term maintenance of behaviour change. Web 2.0 features present a new and innovative online environment supporting greater interactivity, with the potential to increase engagement and retention. In order to understand the applicability of these innovative interventions for the broader population, ‘real-world’ interventions implemented under ‘everyday conditions’ are required. The aim of this study is to investigate the difference in physical activity behaviour between individuals using a traditional Web 1.0 website with those using a novel Web 2.0 website. Methods and analysis In this study we will aim to recruit 2894 participants. Participants will be recruited from individuals who register with a pre-existing health promotion website that currently provides Web 1.0 features (http://www.10000steps.org.au). Eligible participants who provide informed consent will be randomly assigned to one of the two trial conditions: the pre-existing 10 000 Steps website (with Web 1.0 features) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (with Web 2.0 features). Primary and secondary outcome measures will be assessed by self-report at baseline, 3 months and 12 months, and include: physical activity behaviour, height and weight, Internet self-efficacy, website usability, website usage and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination This study has received ethics approval from the University of Western Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (Reference Number H8767) and has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (Reference Number 589903). Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, academic

  5. Building a Library Web Site on the Pillars of Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a project they undertook to reshape the libraries' Web services of the University of Houston site. The site had been in a state of flux and it needed a new structure for both managing and organizing it. She realized the staff was looking for a Web site that was more "Web 2.0" in nature. Web 2.0 is often…

  6. HPIDB 2.0: a curated database for host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Ammari, Mais G; Gresham, Cathy R; McCarthy, Fiona M; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Identification and analysis of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) is essential to study infectious diseases. However, HPI data are sparse in existing molecular interaction databases, especially for agricultural host-pathogen systems. Therefore, resources that annotate, predict and display the HPI that underpin infectious diseases are critical for developing novel intervention strategies. HPIDB 2.0 (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/hpi/main.html) is a resource for HPI data, and contains 45, 238 manually curated entries in the current release. Since the first description of the database in 2010, multiple enhancements to HPIDB data and interface services were made that are described here. Notably, HPIDB 2.0 now provides targeted biocuration of molecular interaction data. As a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium, annotations provided by HPIDB 2.0 curators meet community standards to provide detailed contextual experimental information and facilitate data sharing. Moreover, HPIDB 2.0 provides access to rapidly available community annotations that capture minimum molecular interaction information to address immediate researcher needs for HPI network analysis. In addition to curation, HPIDB 2.0 integrates HPI from existing external sources and contains tools to infer additional HPI where annotated data are scarce. Compared to other interaction databases, our data collection approach ensures HPIDB 2.0 users access the most comprehensive HPI data from a wide range of pathogens and their hosts (594 pathogen and 70 host species, as of February 2016). Improvements also include enhanced search capacity, addition of Gene Ontology functional information, and implementation of network visualization. The changes made to HPIDB 2.0 content and interface ensure that users, especially agricultural researchers, are able to easily access and analyse high quality, comprehensive HPI data. All HPIDB 2.0 data are updated regularly, are publically available for direct

  7. Energy Storage: Breakthrough in Battery Technologies (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Balsara, Nitash

    2016-07-12

    Nitash Balsara speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. ClinicalKey 2.0: Upgrades in a Point-of-Care Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Huslig, Mary Ann; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalKey 2.0, launched September 23, 2014, offers a mobile-friendly design with a search history feature for targeting point-of-care resources for health care professionals. Browsing is improved with searchable, filterable listings of sources highlighting new resources. ClinicalKey 2.0 improvements include more than 1,400 new Topic Pages for quick access to point-of-care content. A sample search details some of the upgrades and content options.

  9. Making Web 2.0 Work--From "Librarian Habilis" to "Librarian Sapiens"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvetkovic, Milica

    2009-01-01

    When people look back at the World Wide Web of 1996, there can be no doubt that today's web is better and more useful. Hyperlinking webpages and bookmarking were two of the most important aspects of the Web 1.0 world. Soon, though, usability and sharing became very high priorities, and Web 2.0 evolved. Information published in the Web 2.0 world…

  10. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Mary Ann Piette: Impact of efficient buildings

    ScienceCinema

    Mary Ann Piette

    2016-07-12

    Mary Ann Piette speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  11. HPIDB 2.0: a curated database for host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Mais G.; Gresham, Cathy R.; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Identification and analysis of host–pathogen interactions (HPI) is essential to study infectious diseases. However, HPI data are sparse in existing molecular interaction databases, especially for agricultural host–pathogen systems. Therefore, resources that annotate, predict and display the HPI that underpin infectious diseases are critical for developing novel intervention strategies. HPIDB 2.0 (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/hpi/main.html) is a resource for HPI data, and contains 45, 238 manually curated entries in the current release. Since the first description of the database in 2010, multiple enhancements to HPIDB data and interface services were made that are described here. Notably, HPIDB 2.0 now provides targeted biocuration of molecular interaction data. As a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium, annotations provided by HPIDB 2.0 curators meet community standards to provide detailed contextual experimental information and facilitate data sharing. Moreover, HPIDB 2.0 provides access to rapidly available community annotations that capture minimum molecular interaction information to address immediate researcher needs for HPI network analysis. In addition to curation, HPIDB 2.0 integrates HPI from existing external sources and contains tools to infer additional HPI where annotated data are scarce. Compared to other interaction databases, our data collection approach ensures HPIDB 2.0 users access the most comprehensive HPI data from a wide range of pathogens and their hosts (594 pathogen and 70 host species, as of February 2016). Improvements also include enhanced search capacity, addition of Gene Ontology functional information, and implementation of network visualization. The changes made to HPIDB 2.0 content and interface ensure that users, especially agricultural researchers, are able to easily access and analyse high quality, comprehensive HPI data. All HPIDB 2.0 data are updated regularly, are publically available for direct

  12. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Mary Ann Piette: Impact of efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Ann Piette

    2010-02-09

    Mary Ann Piette speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  13. The "Long Tale": Using Web 2.0 Concepts to Enhance Digital Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullen, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The wonderful Web 2.0 is a famously slippery concept to define. The very ambiguity of the term is Escheresque, self-referential to its ever-changing meaning. As Tim O'Reilly, CEO of O'Reilly Media, described it, "Like many important concepts, Web 2.0 doesn't have a hard boundary, but rather, a gravitational core." As Illinois State Library's…

  14. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0: A Further Step towards Accessible Digital Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribera, Mireia; Porras, Merce; Boldu, Marc; Termens, Miquel; Sule, Andreu; Paris, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the changes in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 compared with WCAG 1.0 within the context of its historical development. Design/methodology/approach: In order to compare WCAG 2.0 with WCAG 1.0 a diachronic analysis of the evolution of these standards is done. Known authors and…

  15. The Logic of Wikis: The Possibilities of the Web 2.0 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Michael; Kang, Min Ju

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of Web 2.0 and some of its ascendant tools such as blogs and wikis have the potential to dramatically change education, both in how we conceptualize and operationalize processes and strategies. We argue in this paper that it is a change that has been over a century in coming. The promise of the Web 2.0 is similar to ideas proposed by…

  16. Education 2.0 - How has social media and Web 2.0 been integrated into medical education? A systematical literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hollinderbäumer, Anke; Hartz, Tobias; Ückert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Present-day students have grown up with considerable knowledge concerning multi-media. The communication modes they use are faster, more spontaneous, and independent of place and time. These new web-based forms of information and communication are used by students, educators, and patients in various ways. Universities which have already used these tools report many positive effects on the learning behaviour of the students. In a systematic literature review, we summarized the manner in which the integration of Social Media and Web 2.0 into education has taken place. Method: A systematic literature search covering the last 5 years using MeSH terms was carried out via PubMed. Result: Among the 20 chosen publications, there was only one German publication. Most of the publications are from the US and Great Britain. The latest publications report on the concrete usage of the tools in education, including social networking, podcasts, blogs, wikis, YouTube, Twitter and Skype. Conclusion: The integration of Web 2.0 and Social Media is the modern form of self-determined learning. It stimulates reflection and actively integrates the students in the construction of their knowledge. With these new tools, the students acquire skills which they need in both their social and professional lives. PMID:23467509

  17. Education 2.0 -- how has social media and Web 2.0 been integrated into medical education? A systematical literature review.

    PubMed

    Hollinderbäumer, Anke; Hartz, Tobias; Uckert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Die Studierenden sind mit einem hohen multimedialen Bezug aufgewachsen. Die von ihnen genutzten Kommunikationswege sind schneller, spontaner und unabhängig von Ort und Zeit geworden. Diese neuen webbasierten Informations- und Kommunikationswege werden von Studierenden, Lehrenden und Patienten in vielfältigen Weisen genutzt. Universitäten, die diese Tools in der Lehre einsetzten, berichten über viele positive Auswirkungen auf das Lernverhalten der Studierenden. In einer systematischen Literaturübersicht wird zusammengestellt, für welche Lehr- und Lernformen Social Media und Web 2.0 Tools in der derzeitigen medizinischen Ausbildung eingesetzt werden.Methode: Es wurde eine systematische Literaturrecherche über die letzten 5 Jahre mit MeSH in PubMed durchgeführt. Ergebnis: Unter den 20 identifizierten Publikationen konnte nur ein deutscher Artikel identifiziert werden. Mehrheitlich stammen die Artikel aus USA und England. Neuere Veröffentlichungen befassen sich mit dem konkreten Einsatz der Tools in der Lehre. Hierzu zählen Social Networking, Podcasts, Blogs, Wikis, YouTube, Twitter und Skype.Schlussfolgerung: Die Einbindung von Web 2.0 und Social Media stellt die heutige Form des selbstbestimmten Lernens dar. Es stimuliert die Reflektion und bindet die Lernenden aktiv, ein Wissen zu konstruieren. Mit diesen neuen Tools lernen Studierende Fertigkeiten, die sie sowohl im sozialen als auch im beruflichen Kontext benötigen.

  18. Development of the Yale Food Addiction Scale Version 2.0.

    PubMed

    Gearhardt, Ashley N; Corbin, William R; Brownell, Kelly D

    2016-02-01

    Parallels in biological, psychological, and behavioral systems have led to the hypothesis that an addictive process may contribute to problematic eating. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) was developed to provide a validated measure of addictive-like eating behavior based upon the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence. Recently, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) was released, which included significant changes to the substance-related and addictive disorders (SRAD) section. In the current study, the YFAS 2.0 was developed to maintain consistency with the current diagnostic understanding of addiction and to improve the psychometric properties of the original YFAS. In a sample of 550 participants, 14.6% met criteria for food addiction. The YFAS 2.0 demonstrated good internal consistency, as well as convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity. Elevated scores on the YFAS 2.0 were associated with higher rates of obesity and more severe pathological eating (e.g., binge eating). The YFAS 2.0 also appeared to capture a related, but unique construct relative to traditional eating disorders. In a separate sample of 209 participants, the YFAS and YFAS 2.0 were directly compared. Both versions of the YFAS were similarly associated with elevated body mass index, binge eating, and weight cycling. However, exceeding the food addiction threshold was more strongly associated with obesity for the YFAS 2.0 than the original YFAS. Thus, the YFAS 2.0 appears to by a psychometrically sound measure that reflects the current diagnostic understanding of addiction to further investigate the potential role of an addictive process in problematic eating behavior.

  19. Development of the Yale Food Addiction Scale Version 2.0.

    PubMed

    Gearhardt, Ashley N; Corbin, William R; Brownell, Kelly D

    2016-02-01

    Parallels in biological, psychological, and behavioral systems have led to the hypothesis that an addictive process may contribute to problematic eating. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) was developed to provide a validated measure of addictive-like eating behavior based upon the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence. Recently, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) was released, which included significant changes to the substance-related and addictive disorders (SRAD) section. In the current study, the YFAS 2.0 was developed to maintain consistency with the current diagnostic understanding of addiction and to improve the psychometric properties of the original YFAS. In a sample of 550 participants, 14.6% met criteria for food addiction. The YFAS 2.0 demonstrated good internal consistency, as well as convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity. Elevated scores on the YFAS 2.0 were associated with higher rates of obesity and more severe pathological eating (e.g., binge eating). The YFAS 2.0 also appeared to capture a related, but unique construct relative to traditional eating disorders. In a separate sample of 209 participants, the YFAS and YFAS 2.0 were directly compared. Both versions of the YFAS were similarly associated with elevated body mass index, binge eating, and weight cycling. However, exceeding the food addiction threshold was more strongly associated with obesity for the YFAS 2.0 than the original YFAS. Thus, the YFAS 2.0 appears to by a psychometrically sound measure that reflects the current diagnostic understanding of addiction to further investigate the potential role of an addictive process in problematic eating behavior. PMID:26866783

  20. IntelligentFreight: A Tracking 2.0 Prototype for Global Supply Chain Transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Gorman, Bryan L.

    2009-01-01

    Imagine a world where boxes talk to containers, containers talk to trucks and trucks talk to forklifts that talk to people. Each box would be smart, carrying all the information about its contents, its shipping history, its handling instructions, and where it is supposed to be. This world is within our reach as a result of Web 2.0 innovations on the Internet. While technologies such as RFID, GPS, cellular phones and barcodes have become ever more prevalent in the freight supply chain, there is still an invisible curtain blocking information flow between proprietary and legacy enterprise systems. Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are working with academia, the U.S. Government, and commercial companies to apply Web 2.0 technologies to the challenge of tracking and monitoring hazardous materials and nuclear sources in the international supply chain. Under the rubric of Tracking 2.0, a term for the use of Web 2.0 technologies for tracking applications, ORNL is developing a prototype called IntelligentFreight. IntelligentFreight interfaces sensors, legacy databases, and proprietary commercial tracking systems. The prototype combines Web 2.0 s social networking and tagging concepts with a classical faceted classification (a way of describing the same object in multiple ways) model to track a shipment across incompatible enterprise systems.

  1. Development of grid-like applications for public health using Web 2.0 mashup techniques.

    PubMed

    Scotch, Matthew; Yip, Kevin Y; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2008-01-01

    Development of public health informatics applications often requires the integration of multiple data sources. This process can be challenging due to issues such as different file formats, schemas, naming systems, and having to scrape the content of web pages. A potential solution to these system development challenges is the use of Web 2.0 technologies. In general, Web 2.0 technologies are new internet services that encourage and value information sharing and collaboration among individuals. In this case report, we describe the development and use of Web 2.0 technologies including Yahoo! Pipes within a public health application that integrates animal, human, and temperature data to assess the risk of West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks. The results of development and testing suggest that while Web 2.0 applications are reasonable environments for rapid prototyping, they are not mature enough for large-scale public health data applications. The application, in fact a "systems of systems," often failed due to varied timeouts for application response across web sites and services, internal caching errors, and software added to web sites by administrators to manage the load on their servers. In spite of these concerns, the results of this study demonstrate the potential value of grid computing and Web 2.0 approaches in public health informatics.

  2. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  3. Geosynchronous region orbital debris modeling with GEO_EVOLVE 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Hall, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    GEO_EVOLVE, the NASA/JSC orbital debris simulation model for Earth's geosynchronous region, is in the process of being upgraded to version 2.0. The historical period of geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) growth is mimicked with the addition of a set of updated and expanded launch/breakup files, and two new orbital propagators servicing objects in GEO and geosynchronous transfer orbits (GTO). This results in a GEO_EVOLVE 2.0 generated environment that is comparable with data from the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog and NASA's CDT (CCD Debris Telescope). The slow precession of the node and argument of perigee of objects near GEO has driven the development of a pair-wise collision probability algorithm for use in the projection phase of GEO_EVOLVE 2.0. This module is still in the preliminary testing phase.

  4. Health 2.0-Lessons Learned: Social Networking With Patients for Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suparna; Kilian, Reena; Leung, Fok-Han

    2014-07-01

    The advent of social networking as a major platform for human interaction has introduced a new dimension into the physician-patient relationship, known as Health 2.0. The concept of Health 2.0 is young and evolving; so far, it has meant the use of social media by health professionals and patients to personalize health care and promote health education. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter offer promising platforms for health care providers to engage patients. Despite the vast potential of Health 2.0, usage by health providers remains relatively low. Using a pilot study as an example, this commentary reviews the ways in which physicians can effectively harness the power of social networking to meaningfully engage their patients in primary prevention. PMID:24522931

  5. Obtaining miRNA-Target Interaction Information from miRWalk2.0.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Alisha; Gretz, Norbert; Dweep, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    miRWalk2.0 (http://zmf.umm.uni-heidelberg.de/mirwalk2) is a freely accessible, regularly updated comprehensive archive supplying the largest available collection of predicted and experimentally verified miRNA-target interactions, with various novel and unique features to assist the scientific community. Approximately 949 million interactions between 11,748 miRNAs, 308,700 genes, and 68,460 lncRNAs are documented in miRWalk2.0 with 5,146,217 different kinds of identifiers to offer a one-stop site to collect an abundance of information. This article describes a schematic workflow on how to obtain miRNA-target interactions from miRWalk2.0. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27603021

  6. Paradigm shift or annoying distraction: emerging implications of web 2.0 for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Spallek, H; O'Donnell, J; Clayton, M; Anderson, P; Krueger, A

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies, known as social media, social technologies or Web 2.0, have emerged into the mainstream. As they grow, these new technologies have the opportunity to influence the methods and procedures of many fields. This paper focuses on the clinical implications of the growing Web 2.0 technologies. Five developing trends are explored: information channels, augmented reality, location-based mobile social computing, virtual worlds and serious gaming, and collaborative research networks. Each trend is discussed based on their utilization and pattern of use by healthcare providers or healthcare organizations. In addition to explorative research for each trend, a vignette is presented which provides a future example of adoption. Lastly each trend lists several research challenge questions for applied clinical informatics. PMID:23616830

  7. Gen 2.0 Mixer/Ejector Nozzle Test at LSAF June 1995 to July 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arney, L. D.; Sandquist, D. L.; Forsyth, D. W.; Lidstone, G. L.; Long-Davis, Mary Jo (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Testing of the HSCT Generation 2.0 nozzle model hardware was conducted at the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, LSAF. Concurrent measurements of noise and thrust were made at critical takeoff design conditions for a variety of mixer/ejector model hardware. Design variables such as suppressor area ratio, mixer area ratio, liner type and thickness, ejector length, lobe penetration, and mixer chute shape were tested. Parallel testing was conducted at G.E.'s Cell 41 acoustic free jet facility to augment the LSAF test. The results from the Gen 2.0 testing are being used to help shape the current nozzle baseline configuration and guide the efforts in the upcoming Generation 2.5 and 3.0 nozzle tests. The Gen 2.0 results have been included in the total airplane system studies conducted at MDC and Boeing to provide updated noise and thrust performance estimates.

  8. A patient centred framework for improving LTC quality of life through Web 2.0 technology.

    PubMed

    Pulman, Andy

    2010-03-01

    The NHS and Social Care Model - a blueprint supporting organisations in improving services for people with long-term conditions (LTCs) - noted options to support people with LTCs might include technological tools supporting personalised care and choice and providing resources for patients to self-care and self-manage. Definitions concerning the integration of health information and support with Web 2.0 technology are primarily concerned with approaches from the healthcare perspective. There is a need to design a patient centred framework, encapsulating the use of Web 2.0 technology for people with LTCs who want to support, mitigate or improve quality of life. Existing theoretical frameworks offer a means of informing the design and measurement of this framework. This article describes how Web 2.0 technology could impact on the quality of life of individuals with LTCs and suggests a starting point for developing a theoretically informed patient centred framework.

  9. Paradigm shift or annoying distraction: emerging implications of web 2.0 for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Spallek, H; O'Donnell, J; Clayton, M; Anderson, P; Krueger, A

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies, known as social media, social technologies or Web 2.0, have emerged into the mainstream. As they grow, these new technologies have the opportunity to influence the methods and procedures of many fields. This paper focuses on the clinical implications of the growing Web 2.0 technologies. Five developing trends are explored: information channels, augmented reality, location-based mobile social computing, virtual worlds and serious gaming, and collaborative research networks. Each trend is discussed based on their utilization and pattern of use by healthcare providers or healthcare organizations. In addition to explorative research for each trend, a vignette is presented which provides a future example of adoption. Lastly each trend lists several research challenge questions for applied clinical informatics.

  10. MOLEonline 2.0: interactive web-based analysis of biomacromolecular channels.

    PubMed

    Berka, Karel; Hanák, Ondrej; Sehnal, David; Banás, Pavel; Navrátilová, Veronika; Jaiswal, Deepti; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Svobodová Vareková, Radka; Koca, Jaroslav; Otyepka, Michal

    2012-07-01

    Biomolecular channels play important roles in many biological systems, e.g. enzymes, ribosomes and ion channels. This article introduces a web-based interactive MOLEonline 2.0 application for the analysis of access/egress paths to interior molecular voids. MOLEonline 2.0 enables platform-independent, easy-to-use and interactive analyses of (bio)macromolecular channels, tunnels and pores. Results are presented in a clear manner, making their interpretation easy. For each channel, MOLEonline displays a 3D graphical representation of the channel, its profile accompanied by a list of lining residues and also its basic physicochemical properties. The users can tune advanced parameters when performing a channel search to direct the search according to their needs. The MOLEonline 2.0 application is freely available via the Internet at http://ncbr.muni.cz/mole or http://mole.upol.cz.

  11. KOBAS 2.0: a web server for annotation and identification of enriched pathways and diseases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Mao, Xizeng; Huang, Jiaju; Ding, Yang; Wu, Jianmin; Dong, Shan; Kong, Lei; Gao, Ge; Li, Chuan-Yun; Wei, Liping

    2011-07-01

    High-throughput experimental technologies often identify dozens to hundreds of genes related to, or changed in, a biological or pathological process. From these genes one wants to identify biological pathways that may be involved and diseases that may be implicated. Here, we report a web server, KOBAS 2.0, which annotates an input set of genes with putative pathways and disease relationships based on mapping to genes with known annotations. It allows for both ID mapping and cross-species sequence similarity mapping. It then performs statistical tests to identify statistically significantly enriched pathways and diseases. KOBAS 2.0 incorporates knowledge across 1327 species from 5 pathway databases (KEGG PATHWAY, PID, BioCyc, Reactome and Panther) and 5 human disease databases (OMIM, KEGG DISEASE, FunDO, GAD and NHGRI GWAS Catalog). KOBAS 2.0 can be accessed at http://kobas.cbi.pku.edu.cn.

  12. Health 2.0-Lessons Learned: Social Networking With Patients for Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suparna; Kilian, Reena; Leung, Fok-Han

    2014-07-01

    The advent of social networking as a major platform for human interaction has introduced a new dimension into the physician-patient relationship, known as Health 2.0. The concept of Health 2.0 is young and evolving; so far, it has meant the use of social media by health professionals and patients to personalize health care and promote health education. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter offer promising platforms for health care providers to engage patients. Despite the vast potential of Health 2.0, usage by health providers remains relatively low. Using a pilot study as an example, this commentary reviews the ways in which physicians can effectively harness the power of social networking to meaningfully engage their patients in primary prevention.

  13. DREM 2.0: Improved reconstruction of dynamic regulatory networks from time-series expression data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modeling dynamic regulatory networks is a major challenge since much of the protein-DNA interaction data available is static. The Dynamic Regulatory Events Miner (DREM) uses a Hidden Markov Model-based approach to integrate this static interaction data with time series gene expression leading to models that can determine when transcription factors (TFs) activate genes and what genes they regulate. DREM has been used successfully in diverse areas of biological research. However, several issues were not addressed by the original version. Results DREM 2.0 is a comprehensive software for reconstructing dynamic regulatory networks that supports interactive graphical or batch mode. With version 2.0 a set of new features that are unique in comparison with other softwares are introduced. First, we provide static interaction data for additional species. Second, DREM 2.0 now accepts continuous binding values and we added a new method to utilize TF expression levels when searching for dynamic models. Third, we added support for discriminative motif discovery, which is particularly powerful for species with limited experimental interaction data. Finally, we improved the visualization to support the new features. Combined, these changes improve the ability of DREM 2.0 to accurately recover dynamic regulatory networks and make it much easier to use it for analyzing such networks in several species with varying degrees of interaction information. Conclusions DREM 2.0 provides a unique framework for constructing and visualizing dynamic regulatory networks. DREM 2.0 can be downloaded from: www.sb.cs.cmu.edu/drem. PMID:22897824

  14. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  15. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  16. CSDMS2.0: Computational Infrastructure for Community Surface Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Hutton, E.; Peckham, S. D.; Overeem, I.; Kettner, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamic Modeling System (CSDMS) is an NSF-supported, international and community-driven program that seeks to transform the science and practice of earth-surface dynamics modeling. CSDMS integrates a diverse community of more than 850 geoscientists representing 360 international institutions (academic, government, industry) from 60 countries and is supported by a CSDMS Interagency Committee (22 Federal agencies), and a CSDMS Industrial Consortia (18 companies). CSDMS presently distributes more 200 Open Source models and modeling tools, access to high performance computing clusters in support of developing and running models, and a suite of products for education and knowledge transfer. CSDMS software architecture employs frameworks and services that convert stand-alone models into flexible "plug-and-play" components to be assembled into larger applications. CSDMS2.0 will support model applications within a web browser, on a wider variety of computational platforms, and on other high performance computing clusters to ensure robustness and sustainability of the framework. Conversion of stand-alone models into "plug-and-play" components will employ automated wrapping tools. Methods for quantifying model uncertainty are being adapted as part of the modeling framework. Benchmarking data is being incorporated into the CSDMS modeling framework to support model inter-comparison. Finally, a robust mechanism for ingesting and utilizing semantic mediation databases is being developed within the Modeling Framework. Six new community initiatives are being pursued: 1) an earth - ecosystem modeling initiative to capture ecosystem dynamics and ensuing interactions with landscapes, 2) a geodynamics initiative to investigate the interplay among climate, geomorphology, and tectonic processes, 3) an Anthropocene modeling initiative, to incorporate mechanistic models of human influences, 4) a coastal vulnerability modeling initiative, with emphasis on deltas and

  17. Supersymmetric solutions of N = (2, 0) topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik Deger, Nihat; Moutsopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    We first make a Killing spinor analysis for a general three-dimensional off-shell N=(2,0) supergravity and find conditions for a bosonic background to preserve at least one real supercharge. We then consider a particular model, namely N=(2,0) topologically massive supergravity and impose its field equations. By making a suitable ansatz on metric functions we find a large class of solutions that include spacelike, timelike and null warped AdS 3 among others. Isometric quotients of spacelike and timelike squashed AdS 3 solutions yield extremal black holes without closed causal curves.

  18. NuDat 2.0: Nuclear Structure and Decay Data on the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Sonzogni, A.A.

    2005-05-24

    NuDat 2.0 is a software product developed by the National Nuclear Data Center. It provides an interface between web users and several NNDC nuclear structure and decay databases. NuDat 2.0 can be used to search for ground and excited states level properties, gamma-ray information, and decay radiation information. In addition to the search capabilities, an interactive chart of nuclei is displayed. Different examples highlighting NuDat 2 search capabilities and display options are presented.

  19. Adoption and use of Web 2.0 in scholarly communications.

    PubMed

    Procter, Rob; Williams, Robin; Stewart, James; Poschen, Meik; Snee, Helene; Voss, Alex; Asgari-Targhi, Marzieh

    2010-09-13

    Sharing research resources of different kinds, in new ways, and on an increasing scale, is a central element of the unfolding e-Research vision. Web 2.0 is seen as providing the technical platform to enable these new forms of scholarly communications. We report findings from a study of the use of Web 2.0 services by UK researchers and their use in novel forms of scholarly communication. We document the contours of adoption, the barriers and enablers, and the dynamics of innovation in Web services and scholarly practices. We conclude by considering the steps that different stakeholders might take to encourage greater experimentation and uptake.

  20. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Unmanned Vacuum Environment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in more than 30 years, an advanced space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design was operated inside a vacuum chamber representative of the flight operating environment. The test article, PLSS 2.0, was the second system-level integrated prototype of the advanced PLSS design, following the PLSS 1.0 Breadboard that was developed and tested throughout 2011. Whereas PLSS 1.0 included five technology development components with the balance the system simulated using commercial-off-the-shelf items, PLSS 2.0 featured first generation or later prototypes for all components less instrumentation, tubing and fittings. Developed throughout 2012, PLSS 2.0 was the first attempt to package the system into a flight-like representative volume. PLSS 2.0 testing included an extensive functional evaluation known as Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) testing, Human-in-the-Loop testing in which the PLSS 2.0 prototype was integrated via umbilicals to a manned prototype space suit for 19 two-hour simulated EVAs, and unmanned vacuum environment testing. Unmanned vacuum environment testing took place from 1/9/15-7/9/15 with PLSS 2.0 located inside a vacuum chamber. Test sequences included performance mapping of several components, carbon dioxide removal evaluations at simulated intravehicular activity (IVA) conditions, a regulator pressure schedule assessment, and culminated with 25 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). During the unmanned vacuum environment test series, PLSS 2.0 accumulated 378 hours of integrated testing including 291 hours of operation in a vacuum environment and 199 hours of simulated EVA time. The PLSS prototype performed nominally throughout the test series, with two notable exceptions including a pump failure and a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) leak, for which post-test failure investigations were performed. In addition to generating an extensive database of PLSS 2.0 performance data, achievements included requirements and

  1. Teaching a Foreign Language to Deaf People via Vodcasting & Web 2.0 Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drigas, Athanasios; Vrettaros, John; Tagoulis, Alexandors; Kouremenos, Dimitris

    This paper presents the design and development of an e-learning course in teaching deaf people in a foreign language, whose first language is the sign language. The course is based in e-material, vodcasting and web 2.0 tools such as social networking and blog The course has been designed especially for deaf people and it is exploring the possibilities that e-learning material vodcasting and web 2.0 tools can offer to enhance the learning process and achieve more effective learning results.

  2. In vitro mechanical assessment of 2.0-mm system three-dimensional miniplates in anterior mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, K P; de Moraes, P H; da Silva, J S P; de Queiroz, W F; Germano, A R

    2014-05-01

    This study constituted a comparative assessment of the mechanical resistance of square and rectangular 2.0-mm system three-dimensional miniplates as compared to the standard configuration using two straight miniplates. 90 polyurethane replica mandibles were used for the mechanical trials. Groups 1, 2, and 3 simulated complete symphyseal fractures characterized by linear separation of the central incisors; groups 4, 5, and 6 simulated parasymphyseal fractures with an oblique configuration. Groups 1 and 4 represented the standard method with two straight miniplates set parallel to one another. Square miniplates were used in groups 2 and 5, and rectangular miniplates in groups 3 and 6. A universal testing machine set to a velocity of 10mm/min and delivering a vertical linear load to the first left molar was used to test each group. Maximum load values and load values with pre-established dislocation of 5mm were obtained and submitted to statistical analysis using a calculated reliability interval of 95%. The mechanical performances of the devices were similar, except in the case of rectangular plates used in the parasymphyseal fractures. The innovative fixation methods used showed significantly better results in the case of symphyseal fractures.

  3. Implementing Web 2.0 Tools in the Classroom: Four Teachers' Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Cummins, Megan; Dipzinski, Erin; Joseph, Paula; Laskey, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, four teachers shared their experiences using the following free Web 2.0 tools with their students: Jing, Wix, Google Sites, and Blogger. The teachers found that students reacted positively to lessons in which these tools were used, and also noted improvements they could make when using them in the future.

  4. Flipping the Online Classroom with Web 2.0: The Asynchronous Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Lance

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how Web 2.0 technologies can be used to "flip" the online classroom by creating asynchronous workshops in social environments where immediacy and social presence can be maximized. Using experience teaching several communication and writing classes in Google Apps (Google+, Google Hangouts, Google Drive, etc.), I…

  5. Intelligent Libraries and Apomediators: Distinguishing between Library 3.0 and Library 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwanya, Tom; Stilwell, Christine; Underwood, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Using the "point oh" naming system for developments in librarianship is attracting debate about its appropriateness, basis and syntax and the meaning and potential of Library 2.0. Now a new term, Library 3.0, has emerged. Is there is any significant difference between the two models? Using documentary analysis to explore the terms, the…

  6. Students as Web 2.0 Authors: Implications for Assessment Design and Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Thompson, Celia; Sheard, Judithe; Clerehan, Rosemary; Hamilton, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students now have at their disposal a range of Web 2.0 authoring forms such as audio and video podcasting, blogging, social bookmarking, social networking, virtual world activities and wiki writing. Many university educators are interested in enabling students to demonstrate their learning by creating content in these forms. However, the design…

  7. Examining Web 2.0 Tools Usage of Science Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkan Kiyici, Fatime

    2012-01-01

    Using technology in a science teaching is so important. Only the person, who can use these tools in expert level, can use these tools in their teaching activities. In this research it is aimed firstly identifying science teacher candidates web 2.0 tools usage experience level and factors affecting experience level. In this research survey method…

  8. The Gypsy Database (GyDB) of mobile genetic elements: release 2.0.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Covelli, Laura; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Viu, Jose M; Tamarit, Daniel; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Jose; Vicente-Ripolles, Miguel; Fuster, Gonzalo; Bernet, Guillermo P; Maumus, Florian; Munoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Sempere, Jose M; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andres

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the second release of the Gypsy Database of Mobile Genetic Elements (GyDB 2.0): a research project devoted to the evolutionary dynamics of viruses and transposable elements based on their phylogenetic classification (per lineage and protein domain). The Gypsy Database (GyDB) is a long-term project that is continuously progressing, and that owing to the high molecular diversity of mobile elements requires to be completed in several stages. GyDB 2.0 has been powered with a wiki to allow other researchers participate in the project. The current database stage and scope are long terminal repeats (LTR) retroelements and relatives. GyDB 2.0 is an update based on the analysis of Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia and Bel/Pao LTR retroelements and the Caulimoviridae pararetroviruses of plants. Among other features, in terms of the aforementioned topics, this update adds: (i) a variety of descriptions and reviews distributed in multiple web pages; (ii) protein-based phylogenies, where phylogenetic levels are assigned to distinct classified elements; (iii) a collection of multiple alignments, lineage-specific hidden Markov models and consensus sequences, called GyDB collection; (iv) updated RefSeq databases and BLAST and HMM servers to facilitate sequence characterization of new LTR retroelement and caulimovirus queries; and (v) a bibliographic server. GyDB 2.0 is available at http://gydb.org.

  9. Seeing Web 2.0 in Context: A Study of Academic Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study at a research intensive University in the North of the UK exploring academics' perceptions of the potential of Web 2.0 for their teaching and any influences shaping those perceptions. It looks at the perceptions of academics "on the ground" as well as those leading teaching and learning strategies at the University.…

  10. Where We Are: Disability and Accessibility--Moving beyond Disability 2.0 in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Tara; Dolmage, Jay; Price, Margaret; Lewiecki-Wilson, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The authors' perception, as specialists at the intersection of disability studies and composition studies, is that disability has arrived--in the sense that it is now on most peoples' radar. Most have come to think of it as "Disability 2.0": the state where acceptance of disabled students and teachers as belonging in our…

  11. 76 FR 19023 - Commercial Driver's License Information System State Procedures Manual, Release 5.2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... Information System State Procedures Manual, Release 5.2.0 AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration... Driver's License Information System (CDLIS) State Procedures Manual (the Manual). All State driver... published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Robert Redmond,...

  12. 76 FR 68328 - Commercial Driver's License Information System State Procedures Manual, Release 5.2.0

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Information System State Procedures Manual, Release 5.2.0 AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration... Administrators, Inc.'s (AAMVA) Commercial Driver's License Information System (CDLIS) State Procedures Manual... information system that serves as the clearinghouse and depository of information about the...

  13. Collaborative Writing with Web 2.0 Technologies: Education Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodahl, Cornelia; Hadjerrouit, Said; Hansen, Nils Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are becoming popular in teaching and learning environments. Among them several online collaborative writing tools, like wikis and blogs, have been integrated into educational settings. Research has been carried out on a wide range of subjects related to wikis, while other, comparable tools like Google Docs and EtherPad remain…

  14. Algebra I California Content Standards: Standards Deconstruction Project. Version 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preibisius, Eric; Boswell, Bonnie; Capacia, Nemie; Dreher, Dolores; Hartman, Jim; Hovde, Peg; Nichols, Terrie; Orr, Michael; Parvini, Shahrokh; Teegarden, Terrie; Vargas, Mailei

    2008-01-01

    The original version, Version 1.0, of this document was first published in 2005. This current version, Version 2.0, includes updates based on feedback from faculty across the state. Also a listing of the Algebra I California Content Standards organized into clusters has been added in Appendix #1. Cal-PASS is unique in that it is the only data…

  15. Using Web 2.0 for Tracking and Assessing the Impacts of Civic Engagement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    The interactive Internet, or Web 2.0, has created opportunities for civic engagement research and information management. This article presents a case describing one university's experience of such research. This article also provides a literature review on the evaluation of civic engagement and a description of the approach used at Widener…

  16. Social Dimension of WEB 2.0 in Teacher Education: Focus on Peer-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Ahrens, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The research deals with the analysis of efficiency of teaching techniques with the use of the social dimension of Web 2.0 within the English for Specific Purposes course in pre-school and primary teacher education that would help students to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for educational services and…

  17. Transforming School Communities: Creating Dialogue Using Web 2.0 Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soule, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools should be an important part of every district's communication strategy, creating environments for collaboration in ways never possible before. Most of them are free, inexpensive, easy to use, and require little set up. When combined with basic communication principles and careful planning, they can expand a district's reach, increase…

  18. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ramamoorthy Ramesh: Low-cost Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh:

    2016-07-12

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  19. An Initial Approach to the Integration of Web 2.0 Technologies in the Research Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millan, Nandy; Bromage, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper comprises an extended discussion of the possibilities that Web 2.0 applications offer to doctoral researchers, and where such applications fit in the early twenty-first century in the research environment. It explores the main issues associated with their use by doctoral researchers, and how these factors have influenced the…

  20. Smartphones Give You Wings: Pedagogical Affordances of Mobile Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Bateman, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Built on the foundation of four years of research and implementation of mobile learning projects (m-learning), this paper provides an overview of the potential of the integration of mobile Web 2.0 tools (based around smartphones) to facilitate social constructivist pedagogies and engage students in tertiary education. Pedagogical affordances of…

  1. Angel or Devil: Face-Off of Web 2.0 Technologies for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Eunjyu

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at empowering students with the NCTE's 21st century literacies, this discussion investigated what role Web 2.0 technologies play in first-year college students' writing practices and what challenges students face while using computer technology for writing. Based on input from a national sample of 37 writing teachers, pedagogical…

  2. Using Web2.0 Applications to Close the Digital Divide in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinidad, Sue; Broadley, Tania

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this paper documents the use of Web2.0 applications with six Western Australian schools that are considered to be regional and/or remote. With a population of two million people within an area of 2,525,500 square kilometres Western Australia has a number of towns that are classified as regional and remote. Each of the…

  3. Designing a Virtual Olympic Games Framework by Using Simulation in Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilescu, Dorian

    2013-01-01

    Instructional simulation had major difficulties in the past for offering limited possibilities in practice and learning. This article proposes a link between instructional simulation and Web 2.0 technologies. More exactly, I present the design of the Virtual Olympic Games Framework (VOGF), as a significant demonstration of how interactivity in…

  4. Narrative and Learning with Web 2.0 Technologies: Towards a Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pachler, N.; Daly, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of Web. 2.0 technologies on the ways learning can be conceived of as a narrative process within contemporary contexts, using blogs as an illustrative example. It is premised on the concept of narrative as a way in which individuals represent and organize experience in order to learn from it and make it shareable…

  5. Teacher Quality 2.0: Toward a New Era in Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M., Ed.; McShane, Michael Q., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    In "Teacher Quality 2.0," American Enterprise Institute (AEI) education experts Frederick M. Hess and Michael Q. McShane convene a diverse array of contributors to examine fruitful innovations that promise to improve teacher quality in a more strategic way. Much of the cutting-edge work in teacher quality is happening in nontraditional…

  6. Promoting Reflective Thinking Skills by Using Web 2.0 Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate are using Web 2.0 applications promoting reflective thinking skills for higher education student in faculty for education. Although the literature reveals that technology integration is a trend in higher education and researchers and educators have increasingly shared their ideas and examples of implementations of Web…

  7. Personalized Learning Support through Web 2.0: A South African Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Emmanuel L.; Kekwaletswe, Raymond M.

    2012-01-01

    In a typical South African contact university, where learning and instruction is done following a strict class schedule, the challenge of providing personalized learning support is still prevalent. This paper argues that the advent of Web 2.0 affords varied opportunities to cushion this challenge, faced by learners. In this paper, social presence…

  8. Supporting Self-Regulated Learning in Web 2.0 Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yong-Ming; Huang, Yueh-Min; Wang, Chia-Sui; Liu, Chien-Hung; Sandnes, Frode Eika

    2012-01-01

    Web-based self-learning (WBSL) provides learners with a powerful means of acquiring knowledge. However, WBSL may disorient learners, especially when their skills are inadequate for regulating their learning. In this paper, a Web 2.0 self-regulated learning (Web2SRL) system based on the theory of self-regulated learning is proposed. Learners use…

  9. Web 2.0: A New Generation of Learners and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Dina; Nelson, Charles

    2008-01-01

    New social-sharing applications are transforming the Internet from a "read-only" (Web 1.0) environment to a "read-write" ecology that many are calling Web 2.0. These tools (e.g., weblogs and wikis) enable Internet users to publish information online almost as easily as they can read online, and they have tremendous potential for learning. This…

  10. What Is Librarian 2.0--New Competencies or Interactive Relations? A Library Professional Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Holmberg, Kim; Kronqvist-Berg, Maria; Nivakoski, Outi; Widén, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Library 2.0 is a change in the way libraries interact with their users. Technological developments on the Web have had a major influence on these changes. The change also places new requirements on librarians' competencies and skills. This research investigates how librarians themselves see this change in terms of their work identity and…

  11. The Open Ed Tech: Never Mind the Edupunks; or, The Great Web 2.0 Swindle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Brian; Groom, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Has the wave of the open web crested? What does "open educational technology" look like, and does it stand for anything? In this article, the authors discuss the rise of open educational technology. The present range of Web 2.0 service providers offers a self-evident strategic technology framework. Without much effort, online teachers and learners…

  12. Do Students Want Web 2.0? An Investigation into Student Instructional Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Lash Keith

    2012-01-01

    The critical literature abounds with examples of possible educational uses of Web 2.0 technology in which students become active participants in the production of knowledge through blogging, social networking, creation of podcasts, and other forms of constructivist education. At the same time, teachers, whom the data indicate are somewhat…

  13. Games and Web 2.0: A Winning Combination for Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegelman, Marsha; Glass, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Gaming and social networking define the millennial student. This research focuses on an evolving collaboration between 2 faculty members of different disciplines who merged Web 2.0 and game scenarios to infuse research techniques as integral components of math/computer science courses. Blogs and wikis facilitated student-faculty interaction beyond…

  14. Brassica database (BRAD) version 2.0: integrating and mining Brassicaceae species genomic resources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobo; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The Brassica database (BRAD) was built initially to assist users apply Brassica rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic data efficiently to their research. However, many Brassicaceae genomes have been sequenced and released after its construction. These genomes are rich resources for comparative genomics, gene annotation and functional evolutionary studies of Brassica crops. Therefore, we have updated BRAD to version 2.0 (V2.0). In BRAD V2.0, 11 more Brassicaceae genomes have been integrated into the database, namely those of Arabidopsis lyrata, Aethionema arabicum, Brassica oleracea, Brassica napus, Camelina sativa, Capsella rubella, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and three extremophiles Schrenkiella parvula, Thellungiella halophila and Thellungiella salsuginea. BRAD V2.0 provides plots of syntenic genomic fragments between pairs of Brassicaceae species, from the level of chromosomes to genomic blocks. The Generic Synteny Browser (GBrowse_syn), a module of the Genome Browser (GBrowse), is used to show syntenic relationships between multiple genomes. Search functions for retrieving syntenic and non-syntenic orthologs, as well as their annotation and sequences are also provided. Furthermore, genome and annotation information have been imported into GBrowse so that all functional elements can be visualized in one frame. We plan to continually update BRAD by integrating more Brassicaceae genomes into the database. Database URL: http://brassicadb.org/brad/.

  15. Web 2.0: Challenges and Opportunities for Media Education and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chi-Kim

    2010-01-01

    The nature of knowledge is being redefined by a new media landscape that allows all participants to be media producers and owners. Without a comprehensive strategy to include Web 2.0 tools and social media practices within schools, powerful new skills will be neither harnessed, nor developed. Despite the challenge to the relationship between…

  16. E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelet, Jean-Eric, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered the traditional approach to education, brick and mortar institutions are no longer the norm due to e-learning technologies. Populations are turning into ubiquitous human beings, and educational practices are reflecting this change. "E-Learning 2.0 Technologies and Web Applications in Higher Education" compiles the latest…

  17. Brassica database (BRAD) version 2.0: integrating and mining Brassicaceae species genomic resources

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobo; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The Brassica database (BRAD) was built initially to assist users apply Brassica rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic data efficiently to their research. However, many Brassicaceae genomes have been sequenced and released after its construction. These genomes are rich resources for comparative genomics, gene annotation and functional evolutionary studies of Brassica crops. Therefore, we have updated BRAD to version 2.0 (V2.0). In BRAD V2.0, 11 more Brassicaceae genomes have been integrated into the database, namely those of Arabidopsis lyrata, Aethionema arabicum, Brassica oleracea, Brassica napus, Camelina sativa, Capsella rubella, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and three extremophiles Schrenkiella parvula, Thellungiella halophila and Thellungiella salsuginea. BRAD V2.0 provides plots of syntenic genomic fragments between pairs of Brassicaceae species, from the level of chromosomes to genomic blocks. The Generic Synteny Browser (GBrowse_syn), a module of the Genome Browser (GBrowse), is used to show syntenic relationships between multiple genomes. Search functions for retrieving syntenic and non-syntenic orthologs, as well as their annotation and sequences are also provided. Furthermore, genome and annotation information have been imported into GBrowse so that all functional elements can be visualized in one frame. We plan to continually update BRAD by integrating more Brassicaceae genomes into the database. Database URL: http://brassicadb.org/brad/ PMID:26589635

  18. Social Dimension of Web 2.0 in Engineering Education: Students' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Bassus, Olaf; Ahrens, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary engineers need to become more cognizant and more responsive to the emerging needs of the market for engineering and technology services. Social dimension of Web 2.0 which penetrates our society more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services has the potential to contribute decisively to the sustainable development of…

  19. Making (and Not Making) Connections with Web 2.0 Technology in the ESL Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamaru, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes her own attempt at incorporating Web 2.0 technology into her teaching: a wiki project that she used in her English as a second language (ESL) composition course. The theme she traces throughout the rest of this essay is the wiki's ability (or inability) to make "connections" of various kinds. Like any text, the…

  20. The Challenges of Web 2.0 for Education in Greece: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasiades, Panagiotes S.; Kotsidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The pedagogical use of informational communication technology (ICT) in contemporary schools is an important issue in today's era of online learning environments. The internet is constantly evolving and it is transformed from a space of searching for information into a space of content creation and collaboration among users. Web 2.0 applications…

  1. Building Project Management Communities: Exploring the Contribution of Patterns Supported by Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Elizabeth L.; Hatch, Andrew; Ashurst, Colin; Jessop, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an approach whereby patterns are used to describe management issues and solutions to be used during the project management of team-based software development. The work describes how web 2.0 technologies have been employed to support the use and development of such patterns. To evaluate the success of patterns and the…

  2. Facilitating Student-Generated Content Using Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunbae

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies have created a trend of user-generated content by supporting media production, collaboration, communication, and dissemination. User-generated content is translated into student-generated content (SGC) in education. SGC engages learners in an authentic project that fosters students' autonomy, creativity, and real-world…

  3. FAST - A Framework for Agile Software Testing v. 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    HART, WILLIAM; BERRY, JONATHAN; PHILLIPS, CYNTHIA

    2009-03-25

    The FAST software package contains a variety of Python packages for applying and managing software tests. In version 2.0, FAST includes (1) the EXACT package, which supports the definition and execution of computational experiments, (2) the FAST package, which manages the distributed execution of software builds, and (3) general tools related to the PyUnit testing framework.

  4. Research on Learning and Teaching with Web 2.0: Bridging Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhow, Christine; Robelia, Beth; Hughes, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, significant shifts have occurred in the nature of the Internet and the conceptualization of classrooms. Such shifts have affected constructs of learning and instruction and paths for future research. In this article, the authors build on three ideas set forth in comments on their article "Web 2.0 and Classroom Research: What…

  5. Organizational and Social Factors in the Adoption of Intranet 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bohyun

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the intranet implementation and adoption process of a SharePoint intranet at a small academic library and investigates why the many Web 2.0 tools of the library intranet are currently underused. Staff interviews showed that common goals for an intranet, such as information dissemination, knowledge sharing,…

  6. Learning with Web 2.0: Social Technology and Discursive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm; Lowe, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of Internet technologies which facilitate activities that are, above all, social and participatory, allowing children and adults to create and share their own content, and to communicate in a wide range of forums. Correspondingly, there has been great popular and expert interest in the potential of Web 2.0

  7. Web 2.0: Inherent Tensions and Evident Challenges for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohn, Nina Bonderup

    2009-01-01

    In upper tertiary educational programmes around the world, the new Web-mediated communication practices termed Web 2.0 are introduced as learning activities with the goal of facilitating learning through collaborative knowledge construction. The aim of this paper is to point to discrepancies in the views of learning, knowledge, and the goals of…

  8. Upgrading to Web 2.0: An Experiential Project to Build a Marketing Wiki

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Wikis are one of the newest features of Web 2.0. This article describes the implementation of a project in a marketing course in which students created an interactive textbook using wiki software. Several surprises encountered along the way are described, and the unique problem of grading individual contributions to a wiki is discussed. The author…

  9. On Its Way to K-12 Classrooms, Web 2.0 Goes to Graduate School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Priscilla; Hathaway, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    As corporate and higher education settings increasingly use Web 2.0 tools, the time has come to think about preparing K-12 in-service teachers to find ways in which these tools might support classroom teaching and learning goals. This article describes a graduate course designed and taught in spring 2007. Using a modeling and situated learning…

  10. TSGene 2.0: an updated literature-based knowledgebase for tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Kim, Pora; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are a major type of gatekeeper genes in the cell growth. A knowledgebase with the systematic collection and curation of TSGs in multiple cancer types is critically important for further studying their biological functions as well as for developing therapeutic strategies. Since its development in 2012, the Tumor Suppressor Gene database (TSGene), has become a popular resource in the cancer research community. Here, we reported the TSGene version 2.0, which has substantial updates of contents (e.g. up-to-date literature and pan-cancer genomic data collection and curation), data types (noncoding RNAs and protein-coding genes) and content accessibility. Specifically, the current TSGene 2.0 contains 1217 human TSGs (1018 protein-coding and 199 non-coding genes) curated from over 9000 articles. Additionally, TSGene 2.0 provides thousands of expression and mutation patterns derived from pan-cancer data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. A new web interface is available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/TSGene/. Systematic analyses of 199 non-coding TSGs provide numerous cancer-specific non-coding mutational events for further screening and clinical use. Intriguingly, we identified 49 protein-coding TSGs that were consistently down-regulated in 11 cancer types. In summary, TSGene 2.0, which is the only available database for TSGs, provides the most updated TSGs and their features in pan-cancer.

  11. Integrate Web 2.0 Technology to Facilitate Online Professional Community: EMI Special Editing Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Blocher, Michael; Ntoruru, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative journal review of an online professional community that was established to prepare this special edition for publication. The focus is on how Web 2.0 technology can be used to support a professional journal review community and to enhance active social interaction among reviewers. The theme of this special…

  12. Online Tutor 2.0: Methodologies and Case Studies for Successful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco José, Ed.; Seoane-Pardo, Antonio Miguel, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    After centuries of rethinking education and learning, the current theory is based on technology's approach to and affect on the planned interaction between knowledge trainers and trainees. "Online Tutor 2.0: Methodologies and Case Studies for Successful Learning" demonstrates, through the exposure of successful cases in online education…

  13. Strategy Approach for eLearning 2.0 Deployment in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casquero, Oskar; Portillo, Javier; Ovelar, Ramon; Romo, Jesus; Benito, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The institutionally powered Personal Learning Environment (iPLE) constitutes our vision of how Web 2.0 technologies, people arrangement and data sharing could be applied for delivering open, flexible, distributed and learner-centred learning environments to university members. Based on the iPLE, this paper explores a strategy approach that…

  14. Printing AppleWorks V2.0 Spreadsheet Files Using the Apple IIGS Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for printing AppleWorks version 2.0 spreadsheet files using the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading spreadsheet files; selecting the print option; printing entire files; and for printing specific rows, columns, or blocks of the file. For…

  15. Worth It? Findings from a Study of How Academics Assess Students' Web 2.0 Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Waycott, Jenny; Clerehan, Rosemary; Hamilton, Margaret; Richardson, Joan; Sheard, Judithe; Thompson, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Educational commentators have offered many pedagogical rationales for using Web 2.0 to support learning in higher education, and academics are being encouraged to find ways for their students to use social web technologies. Questions arise as to the value of these activities compared to more conventional assignments, and whether implementing such…

  16. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  17. Adoption of Web 2.0 in US Academic Libraries: A Survey of ARL Library Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Khalid; Richardson, John V., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to survey the web sites of the academic libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (USA) regarding the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: The websites of 100 member academic libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (USA) were surveyed. Findings: All libraries were found to be…

  18. Implementing E-Learning and Web 2.0 Innovation: Didactical Scenarios and Practical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkee, David; Brant, Stephen; Nevin, Pete; Odell, Annette; Williams, Godfried; Melomey, Divina; Roberts, Hedley; Imafidon, Chris; Perryman, Roy; Lopes, Anna

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the practical implications for teachers wishing to incorporate e-learning and Web 2.0 technologies into their pedagogy. The authors concentrate on applied didactical scenarios and the impacts of e-learning innovations. The methods applied stem from grounded theory and action research. An analytical framework was derived by…

  19. A Comparison of Web 2.0 Tools in a Doctoral Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2010-01-01

    Adult, professional students in a doctoral-level course used Web 2.0 tools such as wikis, blogs, and online discussions to develop answers to six "Big Questions" related to higher education finance and also produced a research paper that used original data or the research literature to improve understanding of a specific topic. At the close of the…

  20. Pervasive Knowledge, Social Networks, and Cloud Computing: E-Learning 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anshari, Muhammad; Alas, Yabit; Guan, Lim Sei

    2015-01-01

    Embedding Web 2.0 in learning processes has extended learning from traditional based learning-centred to a collaborative based learning-centred institution that emphasises learning anywhere and anytime. While deploying Semantic Web into e-learning offers a broader spectrum of pervasive knowledge acquisition to enrich users' experience in learning.…

  1. Web 2.0 Tools and Processes in Higher Education: Quality Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Moonen, Jef

    2008-01-01

    A major change has occurred in the way Web technology is being used in society. The change is grounded in user empowerment using Web 2.0 tools and processes. Students are already sophisticated users of these tools and processes, but outside of the mainstream instructional practices in higher education. In this reflection, the educational potential…

  2. Web 2.0 technology: how is it impacting your employer brand?

    PubMed

    Russell, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 and social media have exploded in the past 12 to 18 months. The downturn in the economy has had a significant bearing on this growth. Health care organizations are beginning to embrace this technology to engage candidates and enhance their brands. More importantly, they are beginning to see the importance of monitoring their brands as well. PMID:19927449

  3. Self-Arrangement of Fleeting Student Pairs: A Web 2.0 Approach for Peer Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westera, Wim; de Bakker, Gijs; Wagemans, Leo

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a Web 2.0 approach for the arrangement of peer tutoring in online learning. In online learning environments, the learners' expectations of obtaining frequent, one-to-one support from their teachers tend to increase the teachers' workloads to unacceptably high levels. To address this problem of workload a self-organised peer…

  4. Journey to Library 2.0: One Library Trains Staff on the Social Tools Users Employ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Robin

    2007-01-01

    In December 2006, the Missouri River Regional Library (MRRL) in Jefferson City, embarked on a journey. They had been watching the Public Library of Charlotte-Mecklenburg County (PLCMC), NC, on its adventure through the wilds of Web 2.0, and they decided to follow the trail it had blazed. What PLCMC had done was pretty revolutionary. The library…

  5. Integrating Web 2.0 Tools into the Classroom: Changing the Culture of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Daniel; Polin, Deborah Keisch

    2010-01-01

    This report presents findings from a two-year investigation of the ways in which Web 2.0 tools and social networking technologies are being used to support teaching and learning in classrooms across the United States. With funding from Intel[R], the Education Development Center's Center for Children and Technology (EDC/CCT) interviewed or visited…

  6. The Influence of LIS Students' Personality Characteristics on Their Perceptions towards Web 2.0 Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2009-01-01

    The information world in which library and information science (LIS) students study and are being educated is in a state of constant change. As Web 2.0 is becoming an important and central topic in our information world, the research reported here explores whether LIS students are familiar with technological changes and innovations, and whether…

  7. Ethics from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0: Standing outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frances Jacobson

    2009-01-01

    In today's schools and library media centers, emotion-laden concerns about new modes of information and communication technology can hijack librarians' attention, even taking center stage. Something about the online revolution and, more recently, the advent of Web 2.0 tools and their ability to create connections among users, as well as between…

  8. The Role of Web 2.0 Technologies in Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitsantas, Anastasia; Dabbagh, Nada

    2011-01-01

    Recent research shows that Web 2.0 technologies are not only shaping how college students connect to the world and each other but also are affecting their learning and performance. Additionally, some research evidence suggests that faculty can use social software tools to facilitate student self-regulated learning processes, such as goal setting,…

  9. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

  10. Web 2.0: A New Wave of Innovation for Teaching and Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Web 1.0 has demonstrated immense powers for connecting learners, teachers, and materials. How much more broadly will this connective matrix grow under the impact of the openness, ease of entry, and social nature of Web 2.0? This article examines openness, microcontent, social software, and social bookmarking (blogs, wikis, trackback, podcasting,…

  11. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Don DePaolo: Geo and Bio Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Don DePaolo:

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  12. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ramamoorthy Ramesh: Low-cost Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy Ramesh:

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  13. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  14. Making Learning and Web 2.0 Technologies Work for Higher Learning Institutions in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the extent to which learning and Web 2.0 technologies are utilised to support learning and teaching in Africa's higher learning institutions, with a specific focus on Tanzania's public universities. Design/methodology/approach: A combination of content analysis and semi-structured interviews was used to collect…

  15. A Web 2.0-Based Collaborative Model for Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Md. Mokter; Aydin, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Web 2.0 is a collaborative web development platform that has had tremendous usage in building effective, interactive, and collaborative virtual societies at home and abroad. Multicultural study is another trend that has tremendous possibilities to help people in the fight against racism and enables them to become active members of a…

  16. Faculty Instructional Attitudes, Interest, and Intention: Predictors of Web 2.0 Use in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Jana; Karvonen, Meagan

    2011-01-01

    Higher educational institutions face mounting challenges to the way they operate, including a growing population of demographically diverse students who demand flexibility in course delivery, timing, and content. Web 2.0 applications can be important components in implementing the required change. Implementation, however, requires faculty…

  17. Web 2.0 in the Professional LIS Literature: An Exploratory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical descriptive analysis and a thorough content analysis of descriptors and journal titles extracted from the Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA) database, focusing on the subject of Web 2.0 and its main applications: blog, wiki, social network and tags.The primary research questions include: whether the…

  18. The Status of Web 2.0 in Iran's LIS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrafzadeh, Maryam; Hazeri, Afsaneh; Alavi, Soheila

    2011-01-01

    The present paper discusses results of a study which aimed to explore the knowledge and use of Web 2.0 technologies by LIS academics in Iran and to explore the challenges they face for using these technologies. The research method was explorative and empirical. Data was collected through a web-based survey questionnaire containing both open and…

  19. Beyond the Book: Using Web 2.0 Tools to Develop 21st Century Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judith J.; Dobson, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    New information and communications technologies (ICT) are redefining teacher education. A university faculty member and an instructional technology consultant incorporated information and communications technologies within a graduate university methods course. The following research questions explored student perceptions of using Web 2.0 tools as…

  20. Integrating web 2.0 in clinical research education in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Amgad, Mohamed; AlFaar, Ahmad Samir

    2014-09-01

    The use of Web 2.0 tools in education and health care has received heavy attention over the past years. Over two consecutive years, Children's Cancer Hospital - Egypt 57357 (CCHE 57357), in collaboration with Egyptian universities, student bodies, and NGOs, conducted a summer course that supports undergraduate medical students to cross the gap between clinical practice and clinical research. This time, there was a greater emphasis on reaching out to the students using social media and other Web 2.0 tools, which were heavily used in the course, including Google Drive, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Mendeley, Google Hangout, Live Streaming, Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), and Dropbox. We wanted to investigate the usefulness of integrating Web 2.0 technologies into formal educational courses and modules. The evaluation survey was filled in by 156 respondents, 134 of whom were course candidates (response rate = 94.4 %) and 22 of whom were course coordinators (response rate = 81.5 %). The course participants came from 14 different universities throughout Egypt. Students' feedback was positive and supported the integration of Web 2.0 tools in academic courses and modules. Google Drive, Facebook, and Dropbox were found to be most useful.