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Sample records for 2-10 kev luminosities

  1. Revisiting the relationship between 6 μm and 2-10 keV continuum luminosities of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Rovilos, E.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Della Ceca, R.; Severgnini, P.

    2015-05-01

    We have determined the relation between the AGN luminosities at rest-frame 6 μm associated with the dusty torus emission and at 2-10 keV energies using a complete, X-ray-flux-limited sample of 232 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The objects have intrinsic X-ray luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1 and redshifts from 0.05 to 2.8. The rest-frame 6 μm luminosities were computed using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and are based on a spectral energy distribution decomposition into AGN and galaxy emission. The best-fitting relationship for the full sample is consistent with being linear, L6 μm ∝ L_{2-10 keV}^{0.99± 0.03}, with intrinsic scatter, Δ log L6 μm ˜ 0.35 dex. The L_{6 μ m}/L_{2-10 keV} luminosity ratio is largely independent of the line-of-sight X-ray absorption. Assuming a constant X-ray bolometric correction, the fraction of AGN bolometric luminosity reprocessed in the mid-IR decreases weakly, if at all, with the AGN luminosity, a finding at odds with simple receding torus models. Type 2 AGN have redder mid-IR continua at rest-frame wavelengths <12 μm and are overall ˜1.3-2 times fainter at 6 μm than type 1 AGN at a given X-ray luminosity. Regardless of whether type 1 and type 2 AGN have the same or different nuclear dusty toroidal structures, our results imply that the AGN emission at rest-frame 6 μm is not isotropic due to self-absorption in the dusty torus, as predicted by AGN torus models. Thus, AGN surveys at rest-frame ˜6 μm are subject to modest dust obscuration biases.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2-10keV luminosity function of AGN (Ranalli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-02-01

    The XMM-LSS, XMM-CDFS, and XMM-COSMOS are three surveys with complementary properties in terms of luminosity and redshift coverage. We used these three surveys to derive Bayesian estimates of the unabsorbed luminosity function (LF) of AGN in the 2-10keV band. The LF estimates are presented as a set of samples from the posterior probability distribution of the LF parameters. The LF is parameterised as a double power-law, with either the luminosity and density evolution (LADE) model, or the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE) model. The double power-law is described by Eq.(10) in the paper. The LADE and LDDE models are described by Eqs.(11-14) and Eqs.(15-17), respectively. A Fortran 2008 implementation of these models can be found in file src2/lumf_funcs.f90 of the LFTools package, in the classes doublepowerlaw, ladevol, and lddevol (see the paper). (8 data files).

  3. The 2-10 keV unabsorbed luminosity function of AGN from the LSS, CDFS, and COSMOS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, P.; Koulouridis, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Fotopoulou, S.; Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Comastri, A.; Pierre, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Carrera, F. J.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Gilli, R.; Iwasawa, K.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, E.; Vignali, C.

    2016-05-01

    The XMM-Large scale structure (XMM-LSS), XMM-Cosmological evolution survey (XMM-COSMOS), and XMM-Chandra deep field south (XMM-CDFS) surveys are complementary in terms of sky coverage and depth. Together, they form a clean sample with the least possible variance in instrument effective areas and point spread function. Therefore this is one of the best samples available to determine the 2-10 keV luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their evolution. The samples and the relevant corrections for incompleteness are described. A total of 2887 AGN is used to build the LF in the luminosity interval 1042-1046 erg s-1 and in the redshift interval 0.001-4. A new method to correct for absorption by considering the probability distribution for the column density conditioned on the hardness ratio is presented. The binned luminosity function and its evolution is determined with a variant of the Page-Carrera method, which is improved to include corrections for absorption and to account for the full probability distribution of photometric redshifts. Parametric models, namely a double power law with luminosity and density evolution (LADE) or luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE), are explored using Bayesian inference. We introduce the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion (WAIC) to compare the models and estimate their predictive power. Our data are best described by the LADE model, as hinted by the WAIC indicator. We also explore the recently proposed 15-parameter extended LDDE model and find that this extension is not supported by our data. The strength of our method is that it provides unabsorbed, non-parametric estimates, credible intervals for luminosity function parameters, and a model choice based on predictive power for future data. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and NASA.Tables with the samples of the posterior probability distributions

  4. New constraints on the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function from the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano; Civano, Francesca M.; Elvis, Martin; Urry, C. Megan; Comastri, Andrea; Chandra Cosmos Legacy Team

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, we present new results on number counts and luminosity function in the 0.5-2 and 2-10 keV bands, obtained in the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey. The COSMOS field is the largest (2 deg2) field with a complete coverage at any wavelength, and the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey uniformly covers the 1.7 deg2 COSMOS/HST field to ~160 ksec depth, with a total of 2.8 Ms exposure time. This triples the area of the earlier deep C-COSMOS survey (limiting flux ~3e-16 ergs/cm2/s in the 0.5-2 keV band), and together these two projects cover a total area of 2.2 deg2, yielding a sample of ~4100 X-ray sources, ~2300 of which have been detected in the new observations. We describe how the survey improves our knowledge in the galaxy-super massive black hole co-evolution.

  5. The average 0.5-200 keV spectrum of local active galactic nuclei and a new determination of the 2-10 keV luminosity function at z ≈ 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The broad-band X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contains information about the nuclear environment from Schwarzschild radii scales (where the primary power law is generated in a corona) to distances of ˜1 pc (where the distant reflector may be located). In addition, the average shape of the X-ray spectrum is an important input into X-ray background synthesis models. Here, local (z ≈ 0) AGN luminosity functions (LFs) in five energy bands are used as a low-resolution, luminosity-dependent X-ray spectrometer in order to constrain the average AGN X-ray spectrum between 0.5 and 200 keV. The 15-55 keV LF measured by Swift-BAT is assumed to be the best determination of the local LF, and then a spectral model is varied to determine the best fit to the 0.5-2 keV, 2-10 keV, 3-20 keV and 14-195 keV LFs. The spectral model consists of a Gaussian distribution of power laws with a mean photon-index <Γ> and cutoff energy Ecut, as well as contributions from distant and disc reflection. The reflection strength is parametrized by varying the Fe abundance relative to solar, AFe, and requiring a specific Fe Kα equivalent width (EW). In this way, the presence of the X-ray Baldwin effect can be tested. The spectral model that best fits the four LFs has <Γ> = 1.85 ± 0.15, E_{cut}=270^{+170}_{-80} keV, A_{Fe}=0.3^{+0.3}_{-0.15}. The sub-solar AFe is unlikely to be a true measure of the gas-phase metallicity, but indicates the presence of strong reflection given the assumed Fe Kα EW. Indeed, parametrizing the reflection strength with the R parameter gives R=1.7^{+1.7}_{-0.85}. There is moderate evidence for no X-ray Baldwin effect. Accretion disc reflection is included in the best-fitting model, but it is relatively weak (broad iron Kα EW < 100 eV) and does not significantly affect any of the conclusions. A critical result of our procedure is that the shape of the local 2-10 keV LF measured by HEAO-1 and MAXI is incompatible with the LFs measured in the hard X

  6. The 5-10 keV AGN luminosity function at 0.01 < z < 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Buchner, J.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Georgakakis, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Ranalli, P.; Hsu, L. T.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Miyaji, T.; Nandra, K.; Aird, J.; Paltani, S.

    2016-03-01

    The active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function traces actively accreting supermassive black holes and is essential for the study of the properties of the AGN population, black hole evolution, and galaxy-black hole coevolution. Up to now, the AGN luminosity function has been estimated several times in soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard X-rays (2-10 keV). AGN selection in these energy ranges often suffers from identification and redshift incompleteness and, at the same time, photoelectric absorption can obscure a significant amount of the X-ray radiation. We estimate the evolution of the luminosity function in the 5-10 keV band, where we effectively avoid the absorbed part of the spectrum, rendering absorption corrections unnecessary up to NH ~ 1023 cm-2. Our dataset is a compilation of six wide, and deep fields: MAXI, HBSS, XMM-COSMOS, Lockman Hole, XMM-CDFS, AEGIS-XD, Chandra-COSMOS, and Chandra-CDFS. This extensive sample of ~1110 AGN (0.01 < z < 4.0, 41 < log Lx < 46) is 98% redshift complete with 68% spectroscopic redshifts. For sources lacking a spectroscopic redshift estimation we use the probability distribution function of photometric redshift estimation specifically tuned for AGN, and a flat probability distribution function for sources with no redshift information. We use Bayesian analysis to select the best parametric model from simple pure luminosity and pure density evolution to more complicated luminosity and density evolution and luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). We estimate the model parameters that describe best our dataset separately for each survey and for the combined sample. We show that, according to Bayesian model selection, the preferred model for our dataset is the LDDE. Our estimation of the AGN luminosity function does not require any assumption on the AGN absorption and is in good agreement with previous works in the 2-10 keV energy band based on X-ray hardness ratios to model the absorption in AGN up to redshift three

  7. Decline of the 2-10 keV Emission from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liburd, Jamar; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using processed data from the X-ray Telescope on Swift reveals a peak flux on July 16, 2014 of 0.046 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (3.37+/-0.15×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2). This flux is similar to the previous maximum flux seen by the XRT, 3.53+/-0.13×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (0.049 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2), ATEL #6298). Since this peak on July 16, the most recent Swift XRT quicklook data show a drop in flux. On July 20, 2014 the XRT flux as seen in the quicklook data was 0.011 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (8.3+/-0.5×10(exp -11) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2)). This most likely indicates that the 2-10 keV flux is in its declining phase as Eta Car approaches its deep X-ray minimum stage (Hamaguchi et al., 2014, ApJ, 784, 125) associated with periastron passage of the 2024-day binary orbit. The column density derived from analysis of the July 20 XRT quicklook data is 7.2×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2). This is consistent with the column density seen near the same orbital phase in 2003 (7.7×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2), Hamaguchi et al., 2007, ApJ, 663, 522). Eta Car's deep X-ray minimum phase is expected to begin on July 30, 2014. Weekly Swift/XRT observations of Eta Car in the 2-10 keV band are planned throughout the X-ray minimum.

  8. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  9. Spectral reflectance change and luminescence of selected salts during 2-10 KeV proton bombardment - Implications for Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Nash, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation damage and luminescence caused by magnetospheric charged particles have been suggested by several investigators as mechanisms that are capable of explaining some of the peculiar spectral/albedo features of Io. In the present paper, this possibility is pursued by measuring the UV-visual spectral reflectance and luminescent efficiency of several proposed Io surface constituents during 2 to 10 keV proton irradiation at room and low temperatures. The luminescence efficiencies of pure samples, studied in the laboratory, suggest that charged-particle induced luminescence from Io's surface might be observable by spacecraft such as Voyager when viewing Io's dark side.

  10. 5.9-keV Mn K-shell X-ray luminosity from the decay of 55Fe in Type Ia supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, I. R.; Summa, A.; Krauß, F.; Sim, S. A.; Diehl, R.; Elsässer, D.; Fink, M.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Maeda, K.; Mannheim, K.; Pakmor, R.; Röpke, F. K.; Ruiter, A. J.; Wilms, J.

    2015-02-01

    We show that the X-ray line flux of the Mn Kα line at 5.9 keV from the decay of 55Fe is a promising diagnostic to distinguish between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion models. Using radiation transport calculations, we compute the line flux for two three-dimensional explosion models: a near-Chandrasekhar mass delayed detonation and a violent merger of two (1.1 and 0.9 M⊙) white dwarfs. Both models are based on solar metallicity zero-age main-sequence progenitors. Due to explosive nuclear burning at higher density, the delayed-detonation model synthesizes ˜3.5 times more radioactive 55Fe than the merger model. As a result, we find that the peak Mn Kα line flux of the delayed-detonation model exceeds that of the merger model by a factor of ˜4.5. Since in both models the 5.9-keV X-ray flux peaks five to six years after the explosion, a single measurement of the X-ray line emission at this time can place a constraint on the explosion physics that is complementary to those derived from earlier phase optical spectra or light curves. We perform detector simulations of current and future X-ray telescopes to investigate the possibilities of detecting the X-ray line at 5.9 keV. Of the currently existing telescopes, XMM-Newton/pn is the best instrument for close (≲1-2 Mpc), non-background limited SNe Ia because of its large effective area. Due to its low instrumental background, Chandra/ACIS is currently the best choice for SNe Ia at distances above ˜2 Mpc. For the delayed-detonation scenario, a line detection is feasible with Chandra up to ˜3 Mpc for an exposure time of 106 s. We find that it should be possible with currently existing X-ray instruments (with exposure times ≲5 × 105 s) to detect both of our models at sufficiently high S/N to distinguish between them for hypothetical events within the Local Group. The prospects for detection will be better with future missions. For example, the proposed Athena/X-IFU instrument could detect our delayed

  11. The scaling of X-ray variability with luminosity in ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Martín, O.; Papadakis, I.; Reig, P.; Zezas, A.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the relationship between the X-ray variability amplitude and X-ray luminosity for a sample of 14 bright ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with XMM-Newton/EPIC data, and compare it with the well-established, similar relationship for active galactic nuclei (AGN). Methods: We computed the normalised excess variance in the 2-10 keV light curves of these objects and their 2-10 keV band intrinsic luminosity L2-10 keV. We also determined model "variability-luminosity" relationships for AGN, under several assumptions regarding their power-spectral shape. We compared these model predictions at low luminosities with the ULX data. Results: The variability amplitude of the ULXs is significantly smaller than expected from a simple extrapolation of the AGN "variability-luminosity" relationship at low luminosities. We also find evidence of an anti-correlation between the variability amplitude and L2-10 keV for ULXs. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the AGN data but only if the ULXs data are shifted by four orders of magnitudes in luminosity. Conclusions: Most (but not all) of the ULXs could be "scaled-down" version of AGN if we assume that i) their black hole mass and accretion rate are between ~(2.5-30)× 103 M⊙ and ~1-80% of the Eddington limit and ii) their power spectral density has a doubly broken power-law shape. This shape and accretion rate is consistent with Galactic black hole systems operating in their so-called "low-hard" and "very-high" states.

  12. The Average 0.5-200 keV Spectrum of AGNs at 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The X-ray spectra of AGNs span nearly three decades in energy and are comprised of many separate components: a power-law with a high energy cutoff, reflection from the accretion disk as well as distant material, and, in many cases, a soft excess. Aside from a small number of bright sources observed with BeppoSAX, the full energy range of AGN spectra has only been studied in piecemeal by a fleet of X-ray observatories that can only focus on a small part of the entire spectrum. Therefore, while catalogues of the spectral properties of hundreds of AGNs have been published in different energy bands, these results are isolated from one another and a clear picture of the broadband spectral properties of typical AGNs remains elusive. In this work, we make use of the 0 X-ray luminosity functions of AGNs in the 0.5-2 keV, 2-10 keV, 3-20 keV, 15-55 keV and 14-195 keV bands to construct the spectral model of an average AGN that can simultaneously account for all 5 luminosity functions. Enhanced iron abundances, disk reflection, and the presence or absence of the X-ray Baldwin Effect are considered, along with the traditional parameters of photon index and cutoff energy. Applications to X-ray background modelling and AGN physics are discussed.

  13. Luminosity Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1997-04-01

    In a symmetric or 'energy transparent' relativistic collider, the luminosity is given by L = N{sup 2}f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y} where N is the number of electrons or positrons per bunch, {sigma}*{sub x} ({sigma}*{sub y}) is the horizontal (vertical) rms beam size at the interaction point (IP), and f{sub c} is the collision frequency. If the beam sizes remain constant as the luminosity decreases, then the time dependence of luminosity is contained entirely in the time dependence of the beam currents, i.e., N O N(t), and we can rewrite the equation as L(t) = N{sup 2}(t)f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y}. There are two distinct categories for luminosity loss. In the first category are loss processes due to collisions between the two beams, that is, processes associated directly with the luminosity. In the second category (see below) are single-beam loss processes. The processes in the first category relevant to a high-energy collider are Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}) and 'radiative' Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}). In the first process, a beam particle is lost if its angular deflection is beyond the ring's transverse acceptance; in the second process, loss occurs if the beam particle's momentum change is outside the longitudinal acceptance of the ring (typically determined by the RF bucket height).

  14. Iron K Line Variability in the Low-Luminosity AGN NGC 4579

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Ho, Luis C.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Yaqoob, Tahir; Kunieda, Hideyo; Misaki, Kazutami; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results of new ASCA observations of the low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) NGC 4579 obtained in 1998 December 18 and 28, and we report on detection of variability of an iron K emission line. The X-ray luminosities in the 2-10 keV band for the two observations are nearly identical, L(sub X) approximately = 2 x 10(exp 4l) ergs/s, but they are approximately 35% larger than that measured in 1995 July by Terashima et al. (1998). An Fe K emission line is detected at 6.39 +/- 0.09 keV (source rest frame) which is lower than the line energy 6.73(sup +0.13, sub -0.12) keV in the 1995 observation. If we fit the Fe lines with a blend of two Gaussians centered at 6.4 keV and 6.73 KeV, the intensity of the 6.7 keV line decreased, while the intensity of the 6.4 keV line increased, within an interval of 3.5 years. This variability rules out thermal plasmas in the host galaxy as the origin of the ionized Fe line in this LLAGN. The detection and variability of the 6.4 keV line suggest that an optically thick standard accretion disk is present and subtends a large solid angle viewed from the nucleus at the Eddington ratio of L(sub Bol)/L(sub Eddington) approximately 2 x 10(exp -3) (Ho 1999). A broad disk-line profile is not clearly seen and the structure of the innermost part of accretion disk remains unclear.

  15. The X-ray luminosity function of active galactic nuclei in the redshift interval z=3-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Aird, J.; Buchner, J.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Brandt, W. N.; McGreer, I. D.; Dwelly, T.; Mountrichas, G.; Koki, C.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Hsu, L.-T.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Nandra, K.; Ross, N. P.

    2015-10-01

    We combine deep X-ray survey data from the Chandra observatory and the wide-area/shallow XMM-XXL field to estimate the active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function in the redshift range z = 3-5. The sample consists of nearly 340 sources with either photometric (212) or spectroscopic (128) redshift in the above range. The combination of deep and shallow survey fields also provides a luminosity baseline of three orders of magnitude, LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1043-1046 erg s- 1 at z > 3. We follow a Bayesian approach to determine the binned AGN space density and explore their evolution in a model-independent way. Our methodology properly accounts for Poisson errors in the determination of X-ray fluxes and uncertainties in photometric redshift estimates. We demonstrate that the latter is essential for unbiased measurement of space densities. We find that the AGN X-ray luminosity function evolves strongly between the redshift intervals z = 3-4 and z = 4-5. There is also suggestive evidence that the amplitude of this evolution is luminosity dependent. The space density of AGN with LX(2-10 keV) < 1045 erg s- 1 drops by a factor of 5 between the redshift intervals above, while the evolution of brighter AGN appears to be milder. Comparison of our X-ray luminosity function with that of ultraviolet (UV)/optical selected quasi-stellar objects at similar redshifts shows broad agreement at bright luminosities, LX(2-10 keV) > 1045 erg s- 1. At fainter luminosities X-ray surveys measure higher AGN space densities. The faint-end slope of UV/optical luminosity functions, however, is steeper than for X-ray selected AGN. This implies that the Type I AGN fraction increases with decreasing luminosity at z > 3, opposite to trends established at lower redshift. We also assess the significance of AGN in keeping the hydrogen ionized at high redshift. Our X-ray luminosity function yields ionizing photon rate densities that are insufficient to keep the Universe ionized at redshift z > 4. A

  16. A complete X-ray sample of the high-latitude /absolute value of b greater than 20 deg/ sky from HEAO 1 A-2 - Log N-log S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An all-sky survey of X-ray sources was performed, complete to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x 10 to the -11 ergs/sq cm/s in the 2-10 keV band. The complete sample has allowed construction of luminosity functions based on a flux-limited sample for clusters of galaxies and active galactic nuclei. Integration of the best-fit luminosity functions indicates that clusters of galaxies contribute about 4% of the 2-10 keV DXRB, and active galactic nuclei about 20%. It is predicted that many of the objects seen in the deep survey should be local, relatively low luminosity active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies.

  17. NUSTAR Unveils a Heavily Obscured Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus in the Luminous Infrared Galaxy NGC 6286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Treister, E.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Arevalo, P.; Iwasawa, K.; Privon, G. C.; Sanders, D. B.; Schawinski, K.; Stern, D.; Imanishi, M.

    2016-03-01

    We report the detection of a heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) NGC 6286 identified in a 17.5 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation. The source is in an early merging stage and was targeted as part of our ongoing NuSTAR campaign observing local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies in different merger stages. NGC 6286 is clearly detected above 10 keV and by including the quasi-simultaneous Swift/XRT and archival XMM-Newton and Chandra data, we find that the source is heavily obscured (NH ≃(0.95-1.32) × 1024 cm-2) with a column density consistent with being Compton-thick (CT, {log}({N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2)≥slant 24). The AGN in NGC 6286 has a low absorption-corrected luminosity (L2-10 keV ˜ 3-20 × 1041 erg s-1) and contributes ≲1% to the energetics of the system. Because of its low luminosity, previous observations carried out in the soft X-ray band (<10 keV) and in the infrared did not notice the presence of a buried AGN. NGC 6286 has multiwavelength characteristics typical of objects with the same infrared luminosity and in the same merger stage, which might imply that there is a significant population of obscured low-luminosity AGNs in LIRGs that can only be detected by sensitive hard X-ray observations.

  18. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-Ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, T.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Elvis, M.; Brunner, H.; Fotopoulou, S.; Ueda, Y.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Akiyama, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2-10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field South. We use ˜3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two-power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z ≳0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have also been revealed, where the number density curves have two clear breaks at all luminosity classes above log {{L}X}\\gt 43. The two-break structure is suggestive of two-phase AGN evolution, consisting of major merger triggering and secular processes.

  19. Discovery of an obscured low luminosity active nucleus in the spiral galaxy NGC 4258

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kii, Tsuneo; Loewenstein, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Serlemitsos, Peter; Sonobe, Takashi; Tashiro, Makoto; Yaqoob, Tahir

    1994-01-01

    The spectra and images of the nearby jet galaxy NGC 4258 (M106) obtained with ASCA indicate presence of several distinct X-ray emission components. The emission above 3 keV is pointlike and coincident in position with the optical nucleus, exhibiting a hard (photon index approximately 1.78) and absorbed N(sub H) approximately 1.5 x 10(exp 23) cm(exp -2) spectrum. This provides clear evidence that NGC 4258 hosts an obscured active nucleus of low luminosity, about 4 x 10(exp 40) ergs s(exp -1) in 2-10 keV after removing the absorption. Iron K-line emission with an equivalent width 0.25 +/- 0.10 keV was detected. The emission below 1 keV is dominated by an extended approximately 4 min thin-thermal component with a temperature approximately 0.5 keV exhibiting atomic emission lines, possibly associated with the jet. There exists a third continuum component with an intermediate spectral hardness, which is brightest at approximately 1 min south-east of the nucleus.

  20. THE DISK EVAPORATION MODEL FOR THE SPECTRAL FEATURES OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.; Panessa, Francesca; Liu, J. Y.

    2013-11-10

    Observations show that the accretion flows in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei probably have a two-component structure with an inner, hot, optically thin, advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and an outer, truncated, cool, optically thick accretion disk. As shown by Taam et al., the truncation radius as a function of mass accretion rate is strongly affected by including the magnetic field within the framework of disk evaporation model, i.e., an increase in the magnetic field results in a smaller truncation radius of the accretion disk. In this work, we calculate the emergent spectrum of an inner ADAF + an outer truncated accretion disk around a supermassive black hole based on the prediction by Taam et al.. It is found that an increase in the magnetic field from β = 0.8 to β = 0.5 (with magnetic pressure p{sub m} = B {sup 2}/8π = (1 – β)p{sub tot}, p{sub tot} = p{sub gas} + p{sub m}) results in a factor of ∼8.7 increase in the luminosity from the truncated accretion disk. Meanwhile, results of the peak emission of the truncated accretion disk shift toward a a factor of ∼5 higher frequency. We found that the equipartition of gas pressure to magnetic pressure, i.e., β = 0.5, failed to explain the observed anti-correlation between L{sub 2-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd} and the bolometric correction κ{sub 2-10{sub keV}} (with κ{sub 2-10{sub keV}} = L{sub bol}/L{sub 2-10{sub keV}}). The emergent spectra for larger values of β = 0.8 or β = 0.95 can explain the observed L{sub 2-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd}-κ{sub 2-10{sub keV}} correlation. We argue that in the disk evaporation model, the electrons in the corona are assumed to be heated only by a transfer of energy from the ions to electrons via Coulomb collisions, which is reasonable for accretion with a lower mass accretion rate. Coulomb heating is the dominated heating mechanism for the electrons only if the magnetic field is strongly sub-equipartition, which is roughly consistent with observations.

  1. Effects of variability of X-ray binaries on the X-ray luminosity functions of Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray luminosity functions of galaxies have become a useful tool for population studies of X-ray binaries in them. The availability of long term light-curves of X-ray binaries with the All Sky X-ray Monitors opens up the possibility of constructing X-ray luminosity functions, by also including the intensity variation effects of the galactic X-ray binaries. We have constructed multiple realizations of the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of Milky Way, using the long term light-curves of sources obtained in the 2-10 keV energy band with the RXTE-ASM. The observed spread seen in the value of slope of both HMXB and LMXB XLFs are due to inclusion of variable luminosities of X-ray binaries in construction of these XLFs as well as finite sample effects. XLFs constructed for galactic HMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec is described by a power-law model with a mean power-law index of -0.48 and a spread due to variability of HMXBs as 0.19. XLFs constructed for galactic LMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec has a shape of cut-off power-law with mean power-law index of -0.31 and a spread due to variability of LMXBs as 0.07.

  2. Nuclear mid-infrared properties of nearby low-luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Hönig, S. F.; Gandhi, P.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2012-07-01

    We present ground-based high-spatial resolution mid-infrared (MIR) observations of 20 nearby low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) with VLT/VISIR and the preliminary analysis of a new sample of 10 low-luminosity Seyferts observed with Gemini/Michelle. LLAGN are of great interest because these objects are the most common among active galaxies, especially in the nearby universe. Studying them in great detail makes it possible to investigate the AGN evolution over cosmic timescale. Indeed, many LLAGN likely represent the final stage of an AGN's lifetime. We show that even at low luminosities and accretion rates nuclear unresolved MIR emission is present in most objects. Compared to lower spatial resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra, the high-resolution MIR photometry exhibits significantly lower fluxes and different PAH emission feature properties in many cases. By using scaled Spitzer/IRS spectra of typical starburst galaxies, we show that the star formation contribution to the 12 μm emission is minor in the central parsecs of most LLAGN. Therefore, the observed MIR emission in the VISIR and Michelle data is most likely emitted by the AGN itself, which, for higher luminosity AGN, is interpreted as thermal emission from a dusty torus. Furthermore, the 12 /amemission of the LLAGN is strongly correlated with the absorption corrected 2-10 keV luminosity and the MIR- X-ray correlation found previously for AGN is extended to a range from 1040 to 1045 erg/s. This correlation is independent of the object type, and in particular the low-luminosity Seyferts observed with Michelle fall exactly on the power-law fit valid for brighter AGN. In addition, no dependency of the MIR-X-ray ratio on the accretion rate is found. These results are consistent with the unification model being applicable even in the probed low-luminosity regime.

  3. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  4. Low extreme-ultraviolet luminosities impinging on protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Hendler, N. P.; Ricci, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Brooks, K. J.; Contreras, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (∼2-10 Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 10{sup 42} photons s{sup –1} for all sources without jets and lower than 5 × 10{sup 40} photons s{sup –1} for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [Ne II] 12.81 μm luminosities from three disks with slow [Ne II]-detected winds. This indicates that the [Ne II] line in these sources primarily traces a mostly neutral wind where Ne is ionized by 1 keV X-ray photons, implying higher photoevaporative mass loss rates than those predicted by EUV-driven models alone. In summary, our results suggest that high-energy stellar photons other than EUV may dominate the dispersal of protoplanetary disks around sun-like stars.

  5. Low Extreme-ultraviolet Luminosities Impinging on Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, I.; Ricci, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Hendler, N. P.; Brooks, K. J.; Contreras, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (~2-10 Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 1042 photons s-1 for all sources without jets and lower than 5 × 1040 photons s-1 for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [Ne II] 12.81 μm luminosities from three disks with slow [Ne II]-detected winds. This indicates that the [Ne II] line in these sources primarily traces a mostly neutral wind where Ne is ionized by 1 keV X-ray photons, implying higher photoevaporative mass loss rates than those predicted by EUV-driven models alone. In summary, our results suggest that high-energy stellar photons other than EUV may dominate the dispersal of protoplanetary disks around sun-like stars.

  6. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  7. A luminous hot accretion flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 7213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Ma, Renyi; Yang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 7213 shows a complex correlation between the monochromatic radio luminosity LR and the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity LX, i.e. the correlation is unusually weak with p ˜ 0 (in the form L_R∝ L_X^p) when LX is below a critical luminosity, and steep with p > 1 when LX is above that luminosity. Such a hybrid correlation in individual AGNs is unexpected as it deviates from the fundamental plane of AGN activity. Interestingly, a similar correlation pattern is observed in the black-hole X-ray binary H1743-322, where it has been modelled by switching between different modes of accretion. We propose that the flat LR-LX correlation of NGC 7213 is due to the presence of a luminous hot accretion flow, an accretion model whose radiative efficiency is sensitive to the accretion rate. Given the low luminosity of the source, LX ˜ 10-4 of the Eddington luminosity, the viscosity parameter is determined to be small, α ≈ 0.01. We also modelled the broad-band spectrum from radio to γ-rays, the time lag between the radio and X-ray light curves, and the implied size and the Lorentz factor of the radio jet. We predict that NGC 7213 will enter into a two-phase accretion regime when L_X⪆ 1.5 × 10^{42} erg s^{-1}. When this happens, we predict a softening of the X-ray spectrum with the increasing flux and a steep radio/X-ray correlation.

  8. NuSTAR Resolves the First Dual AGN above 10 keV in SWIFT J2028.5+2543

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael J.; Glidden, Ana; Baloković, Mislav; Stern, Daniel; Lamperti, Isabella; Assef, Roberto; Bauer, Franz; Ballantyne, David; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Farrah, Duncan; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Gehrels, Neil; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Markwardt, Craig; Masini, Alberto; Ricci, Claudio; Treister, Ezequiel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-06-01

    We have discovered heavy obscuration in the dual active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) source SWIFT J2028.5+2543 using Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). While an early XMM-Newton study suggested the emission was mainly from NGC 6921, the superior spatial resolution of NuSTAR above 10 keV resolves the Swift/BAT emission into two sources associated with the nearby galaxies MCG +04-48-002 and NGC 6921 (z = 0.014) with a projected separation of 25.3 kpc (91″). NuSTAR's sensitivity above 10 keV finds both are heavily obscured to Compton-thick levels (N H ≈ (1–2) × 1024 cm‑2) and contribute equally to the BAT detection ({L}10-50 {keV}{{int}} ≈ 6 × 1042 erg s‑1). The observed luminosity of both sources is severely diminished in the 2–10 keV band ({L} 2-10 {keV}{{obs}}\\lt 0.1× {L} 2-10 {keV}{{int}}), illustrating the importance of >10 keV surveys like those with NuSTAR and Swift/BAT. Compared to archival X-ray data, MCG +04-48-002 shows significant variability (>3) between observations. Despite being bright X-ray AGNs, they are difficult to detect using optical emission-line diagnostics because MCG +04-48-002 is identified as a starburst/composite because of the high rates of star formation from a luminous infrared galaxy while NGC 6921 is only classified as a LINER using line detection limits. SWIFT J2028.5+2543 is the first dual AGN resolved above 10 keV and is the second most heavily obscured dual AGN discovered to date in the X-rays other than NGC 6240.

  9. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  10. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-LUMINOSITY RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Cheung, Chi C.; Eracleous, Michael; Kadler, Matthias

    2011-07-15

    We present the results from exploratory (12-23 ks) XMM-Newton observations of six optically selected, radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), together with new radio data and a reanalysis of their archival SDSS spectra. The sources were selected in an effort to expand the current sample of radio-loud AGNs suitable for detailed X-ray spectroscopy studies. The sample includes three broad-line and three narrow-line sources, with X-ray luminosities of the order of L{sub 2-10keV} {approx} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The EPIC spectra of the broad-lined sources can be described by single power laws with photon indices {Gamma} {approx} 1.6 and little to negligible absorption (N{sub H} {approx}<10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}); on the contrary, significant absorption is detected in the narrow-lined objects, N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, one of which displays a prominent (equivalent width {approx}2 keV) Fe K{alpha} emission line. Studying their location in several luminosity-luminosity diagrams for radio-loud AGNs, we find that the sources fall at the lower end of the distribution for bright, classical radio-loud AGNs and close to LINER-like sources. As such, and as indicated by the ratios of their optical emission lines, we conclude that the sources of our sample fall on the border between radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion flows. Future deeper studies of these targets at X-rays and longer wavelengths will expand our understanding of the central engines of radio-loud AGNs at a critical transition region.

  11. Channel electron multiplier efficiency for protons of 0.2-10 keV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Mcgarity, J. O.

    1971-01-01

    The initial results of absolute proton efficiency measurements made in an auroral particle study by sounding rockets are given. The measurements were made at several counting rates from 1000 to 40,000 counts/sec on rocket-borne equipment. The results agree with those of Egidi et al. (1969) in the high energy range and show a disagreement at low energies.

  12. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  13. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  14. The clustering amplitude of X-ray-selected AGN at z ˜ 0.8: evidence for a negative dependence on accretion luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrichas, G.; Georgakakis, A.; Menzel, M.-L.; Fanidakis, N.; Merloni, A.; Liu, Z.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    The northern tile of the wide-area and shallow XMM-XXL X-ray survey field is used to estimate the average dark matter halo mass of relatively luminous X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) [log {L}_X (2-10 keV)= 43.6^{+0.4}_{-0.4} erg s^{-1}] in the redshift interval z = 0.5-1.2. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of X-ray sources in the XMM-XXL field by the Sloan telescope are combined with the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey spectroscopic galaxy survey to determine the cross-correlation signal between X-ray-selected AGN (total of 318) and galaxies (about 20 000). We model the large scales (2-25 Mpc) of the correlation function to infer a mean dark matter halo mass of log M / (M_{{⊙}} h^{-1}) = 12.50 ^{+0.22} _{-0.30} for the X-ray-selected AGN sample. This measurement is about 0.5 dex lower compared to estimates in the literature of the mean dark matter halo masses of moderate-luminosity X-ray AGN [LX(2-10 keV) ≈ 1042-1043 erg s- 1] at similar redshifts. Our analysis also links the mean clustering properties of moderate-luminosity AGN with those of powerful ultraviolet/optically selected QSOs, which are typically found in haloes with masses few times 1012 M⊙. There is therefore evidence for a negative luminosity dependence of the AGN clustering. This is consistent with suggestions that AGN have a broad dark matter halo mass distribution with a high mass tail that becomes subdominant at high accretion luminosities. We further show that our results are in qualitative agreement with semi-analytic models of galaxy and AGN evolution, which attribute the wide range of dark matter halo masses among the AGN population to different triggering mechanisms and/or black hole fuelling modes.

  15. RXTE Observations of Positive Correlations between the Cyclotron Line Parameters and Luminosity in GX 304-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Richard E.; Kühnel, Matthias; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Markowitz, Alex; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern; Staubert, Rüdiger; Klochkov, Dmitry; Postnov, Konstantin; Goronostaev, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observed four outbursts of the accreting X-ray binary transient source GX 304-1 in 2010 and 2011. During the 2010-2011 observations, the HEXTE cluster A viewing direction was fixed aligned with the PCA field of view and HEXTE cluster B was fixed viewing a background region 1.5 degrees off of the source direction. The cluster A background was successfully estimated from cluster B events, and this made possible the measurement of the ~55 keV cyclotron line and an accurate measurement of the continuum. The cyclotron line energy spans 50 to 60 keV throughout each outburst, implying magnetic fields ranging from 4-5 teraGauss as the scattering region reacts to the varying mass accretion rate. We present results of a detailed 3-100 keV spectral analysis of 69 separate observations, and report a greater than 7 sigma measurement of a positive correlation between cyclotron line parameters (energy, width, and depth) and luminosity, as well as other spectral parameters' correlations with luminosity. The three cyclotron line parameters’ correlations with luminosity show a flattening of the relationships with increasing luminosity, and have been fitted by quasi-spherical accretion and disk accretion models. The width and depth correlation exponents follow directly from the energy correlation exponent with only the assumption that the accretion column is in the subcritical (Coulomb-braking) regime and the energy changes in proportion to the characteristic stopping length of protons. Correlations of all spectral parameters with primary 2-10 keV power law flux reveal the mass accretion rate to be the primary driver of the spectral shape. A large enhancement in the line of sight column density lasting about three days is seen just before periastron in one outburst and a smaller enhancement of similar duration at the same orbital phase is seen in a second outburst, suggesting the presence of a dense structure in the stellar wind.

  16. On the variable nature of low luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Lorena

    2015-09-01

    X-ray variability is very common in active galactic nuclei (AGN), but it is still unknown if these variations occur similarly in different families of AGN. The main purpose of this work is to disentangle the true structure of low ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs) compared to Seyfert 2s by the study of their X-ray variations. We assembled the X-ray spectral properties, as well as the X-ray variability pattern(s), which were obtained from simultaneous spectral fittings and letting different parameters to vary in the model, derived from our previous analyses (Hernández-García et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). We find that Seyfert 2s need more complex models to fit their spectra than LINERs. Among the spectral parameters, major differences are observed in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosities, and the Eddington ratios, which are higher in Seyfert 2s. Differences are observed also in the hard column densities, temperatures, and black hole masses, although less significant. Short-term X-ray variations cannot be claimed, while long-term variability is very common in both families. An exception is found for Compton-thick sources, which do not vary, most probably because the AGN is not accesible in the 0.5--10 keV energy band. The changes are mostly related with variations in the nuclear continuum, but other patterns of variability show that variations in the absorbers (more common in Seyfert 2s) and at soft energies can be present in a few cases. Variations at UV frequencies are observed only in LINER nuclei. The X-ray variations occur similarly in LINERs and Seyfert 2s, i.e., they are related to the nuclear continuum, although they might have different accretion mechanisms, being more efficient in Seyfert 2s. Absorption variations and changing-look sources are not usually observed in LINERs. However, UV nuclear variations are common among LINERs, indicating an unobstructed view of the inner disc where the UV emission might take place. We

  17. Hipparcos luminosities and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedding, Timothy R.

    Asteroseismology involves using the resonant frequencies of a star to infer details about its internal structure and evolutionary state. Large efforts have been made and continue to be made to measure oscillation frequencies with both ground- and space-based telescopes, with typical precisions of one part in 103-104. However, oscillation frequencies are most useful when accompanied by accurate measurements of the more traditional stellar parameters such as luminosity and effective temperature. The Hipparcos catalogue provides luminosities with precisions of a few percent or better for many oscillating stars. I briefly discuss the importance of Hipparcos measurements for interpreting asteroseismic data on three types of oscillating stars: δ Scuti variables, rapidly oscillating Ap stars and solar-like stars.

  18. Upper limits to the annihilation radiation luminosity of Centaurus A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Dirouchoux, P.; Hameury, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution observation of the active nucleus galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) was made by the GSFC low energy gamma-ray spectrometer (LEGS) during a balloon flight on 1981 November 19. The measured spectrum between 70 and 500 keV is well represented by a power law of the form 1.05 x 10 (-4) (E/100 keV) (-1.59) ph/sq cm/s with no breaks or line features observed. The 98 percent confidence (2 sigma) flux upper limit for a narrow (3 keV) 511-keV positron annihilation line is 9.9 x 10 (-4) ph/sq cm/s. Using this upper limit, the ratio of the narrow-line annihilation radiation luminosity to the integral or = 511 keV luminosity is estimated to be 0.09 (2 sigma upper limit). This is compared with the measured value for our Galactic center in the Fall of 1979 of 0.10 to 0.13, indicating a difference in the emission regions in the nuclei of the two galaxies.

  19. HEAO 1 observations of the Perseus cluster above 10 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primini, F. A.; Howe, S. K.; Lang, F.; Levine, A. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Rothschild, R.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Knight, F. K.; Basinska, E.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of HEAO 1 observations of the Perseus cluster from 10 to 150 keV in 1977 August and 1978 February and August. The spectrum exhibits a previously unknown hard (greater than 25 keV) component in addition to the previously known thermal bremsstrahlung emission. The data presented show no significant evidence of variability from 10.5 keV to 93.5 keV, and a comparison of our results with earlier results indicates no strong evidence for variability above 25 keV over a time scale of 4 yr. If the hard-component excess is due to NGC 1275, the data imply a 2-6 keV X-ray luminosity of 1 x 10 to the 44th ergs/s for the galaxy, or about 15% of the total cluster emission from 2 to 6 keV and a 25-40 keV luminosity of 8 x 10 to the 43rd ergs/s.

  20. Linking X-ray AGN with dark matter halos: a model compatible with AGN luminosity function and large-scale clustering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütsi, Gert; Gilfanov, Marat; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to find a minimalistic model that describes the luminosity function and large-scale clustering bias of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei in the general framework of the concordance ΛCDM model. Methods: We assume that a simple population-averaged scaling relation between the AGN X-ray luminosity LX and the host dark matter halo mass Mh exists. With such a relation, the AGN X-ray luminosity function can be computed from the halo mass function. Using the concordance ΛCDM halo mass function for the latter, we obtain the Mh - LX relation required to match the redshift-dependent AGN X-ray luminosity function known from X-ray observations. Results: We find that with a simple power-law-scaling Mh ∝ LΓ(z), our model can successfully reproduce the observed X-ray luminosity function. Furthermore, we automatically obtain predictions for the large-scale AGN clustering amplitudes and their dependence on the luminosity and redshift, which seem to be compatible with AGN clustering measurements. Our model also includes the redshift-dependent AGN duty cycle, which peaks at the redshift z ≃ 1, and its peak value is consistent with unity, suggesting that on average there is no more than one AGN per dark matter halo. For a typical X-ray-selected AGN at z ~ 1, our best-fit Mh - LX scaling implies low Eddington ratio LX/LEdd ~ 10-4 - 10-3 (2-10 keV band, no bolometric correction applied) and correspondingly high mass-growth e-folding times, suggesting that typical X-ray AGN are dominantly fueled via relatively inefficient "hot-halo" accretion mode.

  1. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  2. HIGHER LUMINOSITY B-FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, John T

    2002-08-20

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 3-4 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 4fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s{sup -1} appears possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  3. A Relativistic Fe Kα Emission Line in the Intermediate-Luminosity BeppoSAX Spectrum of the Galactic Microquasar V4641 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; in't Zand, J. J. M.; Reynolds, C. S.; Wijnands, R.; Nowak, M. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2002-09-01

    Broad Fe Kα emission lines have recently been reported in a number of Galactic black holes. Such lines are useful accretion flow diagnostics because they may be produced at the inner accretion disk and shaped by relativistic effects, but in general they have been observed only at luminosities of LX~1037-1038 ergs s-1 in soft X-rays. The Galactic microquasar V4641 Sgr-widely known for its 12.2 Crab (1.5-12 keV) outburst in 1999 September-displayed low-level activity in 1999 March. BeppoSAX observed the source in this state, and Fe Kα line emission was found by in 't Zand et al. In reanalyzing these data, we find strong evidence that the Fe Kα line profile is broadened. For the most likely values of the source distance and black hole mass measured by Orosz et al., our fits to the total spectrum indicate that the source was observed at a luminosity of LX=1.9+1.0-0.8×1036 ergs s-1 (2-10 keV), or LX/LEdd=1.8+0.9- 0.8×10-3. Advection-dominated accretion flow models predict a radially recessed disk in this regime. In contrast, fits to the observed Fe Kα emission-line profile with a relativistic line model constrain the inner disk to be consistent with the marginally stable circular orbit of a Schwarzschild black hole.

  4. 46 CFR 2.10-5 - Exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exemptions. 2.10-5 Section 2.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Fees § 2.10-5 Exemptions. (a) Vessels owned or operated by a non-profit organization may be exempted from payment of...

  5. 16 CFR 2.10 - Depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Depositions. 2.10 Section 2.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.10 Depositions. In investigations other than those conducted under section 20 of...

  6. STS atmospheric luminosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the STS-8 space shuttle mission special photographic and TV operations were carried out to record the properties of the spacecraft induced luminosities. One of these luminous phenomena is the quiescent vehicle glow which was photographed during the STS-8 mission with an image intensified photographic camera, with and without an objective grating. During the latter part of the mission the altitude of the shuttle was relatively low (120 n.m. = 222 km) and unprecedentedly high intensity of the glow was observed. The crew reported that the glow was easily visible to the naked eye. The proper orientation of the shuttle with respect to the velocity vector and the objective grating permitted the exposure of good objective spectrum of the glow in the visible region. From the results it is clear that the spectrum appears to be a continuum as observed by the image intensifier objective grating camera. Qualitative examination of the data shows that there is very tail little glow ion the wavelength range of 4300 to about 5000 angstroms. Above 5000 angstroms the glow becomes stronger towards the red and then it falls off towards higher wavelength and of the spectrum presumably because of the responsivity of the device.

  7. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  8. Luminosity determination at proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    2015-03-01

    Luminosity is a key parameter in any particle collider, and its precise determination has proven particularly challenging at hadron colliders. After introducing the concept of luminosity in its multiple incarnations and offering a brief survey of the pp and p p bar colliders built to date, this article outlines the various methods that have been developed for relative-luminosity monitoring, as well as the complementary approaches considered for establishing an absolute luminosity scale. This is followed by a survey, from both a historical and a technical perspective, of luminosity determination at the ISR, the S p p ¯ S, the Tevatron, RHIC and the LHC. For each of these, we first delineate the interplay between the experimental context, the specificities of the accelerator, and the precision targets suggested by the physics program. We then detail how the different methods were applied to specific experimental environments and how successfully they meet the precision goals.

  9. 46 CFR 2.10-5 - Exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exemptions. 2.10-5 Section 2.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Fees § 2.10-5 Exemptions. (a) Vessels owned or operated by a non-profit organization may be exempted from payment of the fees required by this subpart, only if...

  10. 46 CFR 2.10-5 - Exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exemptions. 2.10-5 Section 2.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Fees § 2.10-5 Exemptions. (a) Vessels owned or operated by a non-profit organization may be exempted from payment of the fees required by this subpart, only if...

  11. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  12. A complete X-ray sample of the high latitude sky from HEAO-1 A-2: log N lo S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was performed in which a complete X-ray survey of the 8.2 steradians of the sky at galactic latitudes where the absolute value of b is 20 deg down to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x ten to the minus 11th power ergs/sq cm sec in the 2-10 keV band. Of the 85 detected sources 17 were identified with galactic objects, 61 were identified with extragalactic objects, and 7 remain unidentified. The log N - log S relation for the non-galactic objects is well fit by the Euclidean relationship. The X-ray spectra of these objects were used to construct log N - log S in physical units. The complete sample of identified sources was used to construct X-ray luminosity functions, using the absolute maximum likelihood method, for clusters galaxies and active galactic nuclei.

  13. 7 CFR 2.10 - Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limitations. 2.10 Section 2.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND GENERAL... Limitations. The delegations made in this part shall not be construed to confer upon any general officer...

  14. 7 CFR 2.10 - Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limitations. 2.10 Section 2.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND GENERAL... Limitations. The delegations made in this part shall not be construed to confer upon any general officer...

  15. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy √s. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for √s = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for √sNN = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at √s = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determines the luminosity with a precision of 1.16%. This represents the most precise luminosity measurement achieved so far at a bunched-beam hadron collider.

  16. The luminosity function of galactic X-ray sources - A cutoff and a 'standard candle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the 2- to 10-kev luminosity distribution of 36 X-ray sources in the Local Group having known or estimated distances, showing that there exists a luminosity cutoff of approximately 10 to the 37.7th ergs/sec in agreement with the theoretical (Eddington) limit for the luminosity of an approximately 1 solar mass star. Furthermore, among the complete sample of high-luminosity sources, there appears to be a statistically significant group of X-ray 'standard candles' at (within less than 0.8 mag) the critical luminosity. This finding (which is in agreement with the self-consistent mass flow accretion models) presents the possibility that X-ray sources may be used as extragalactic distance indicators in the next generation of X-ray astronomy experiments.

  17. The 0.3-30 keV Spectra of Powerful Starburst Galaxies: NuSTAR and Chandra Observations of NGC 3256 and NGC 3310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Tyler, J. B.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Wik, D. R.; Yukita, M.; Antoniou, V.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Maccarone, T. J.; Ptak, A.; Stern, D.; Zezas, A.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-06-01

    We present nearly simultaneous Chandra and NuSTAR observations of two actively star-forming galaxies within 50 Mpc: NGC 3256 and NGC 3310. Both galaxies are significantly detected by both Chandra and NuSTAR, which together provide the first-ever spectra of these two galaxies spanning 0.3-30 keV. The X-ray emission from both galaxies is spatially resolved by Chandra; we find that hot gas dominates the E < 1-3 keV emission while ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) provide majority contributions to the emission at E > 1-3 keV. The NuSTAR galaxy-wide spectra of both galaxies follow steep power-law distributions with Γ ≈ 2.6 at E > 5-7 keV. Using new and archival Chandra data, we search for signatures of heavily obscured or low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that both NGC 3256 and NGC 3310 have X-ray detected sources coincident with nuclear regions; however, the steep NuSTAR spectra of both galaxies restricts these sources to be either low luminosity AGNs (L2-10 keV/LEdd ≲ 10-5) or non-AGNs in nature (e.g., ULXs or crowded X-ray sources that reach L2-10 keV ˜ 1040 erg s-1 cannot be ruled out). Combining our constraints on the 0.3-30 keV spectra of NGC 3256 and NGC 3310 with equivalent measurements for nearby star-forming galaxies M83 and NGC 253, we analyze the star formation rate (SFR) normalized spectra of these starburst galaxies. The spectra of all four galaxies show sharply declining power-law slopes at energies above 3-6 keV primarily due to ULX populations. Our observations therefore constrain the average spectral shape of galaxy-wide populations of luminous accreting binaries (i.e., ULXs). Interestingly, despite a completely different galaxy sample selection, emphasizing here a range of SFRs and stellar masses, these properties are similar to those of super-Eddington accreting ULXs that have been studied individually in a targeted NuSTAR ULX program. We also find that NGC 3310 exhibits a factor of ≈3-10 elevation of X-ray emission over

  18. On the Correlation of Torque and Luminosity in GX 1+4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, D.; Bildsten, L.; Finger, M. H.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Koh, D. T.; Nelson, R. W.; Prince, T. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Wilson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    Over 5 years of daily hard X-ray (>20 keV) monitoring of the 2 minute accretion-powered pulsar GX 1+4 with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE large-area detectors has found nearly continuous rapid spin-down, interrupted by a bright 200 day spin-up episode. During spin-down, the torque becomes more negative as the luminosity increases (assuming that the 20-60 keV pulsed flux traces bolometric luminosity), the opposite of what is predicted by standard accretion torque theory. No changes in the shape of the 20-100 keV pulsed energy spectrum were detected, so that a very drastic change in the spectrum below 20 keV or the pulsed fraction would be required to make the 20-60 keV pulsed flux a poor luminosity tracer. These are the first observations that flatly contradict standard magnetic disk accretion theory, and they may have important implications for understanding the spin evolution of X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, and protostars. We briefly discuss the possibility that GX 1+4 may be accreting from a retrograde disk during spin-down, as previously suggested.

  19. The CMS pixel luminosity telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmayer, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a new complement to the CMS detector for the LHC Run II data taking period. It consists of eight 3-layer telescopes based on silicon pixel detectors that are placed around the beam pipe on each end of CMS viewing the interaction point at small angle. A fast 3-fold coincidence of the pixel planes in each telescope will provide a bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity. Particle tracking allows collision products to be distinguished from beam background, provides a self-alignment of the detectors, and a continuous in-time monitoring of the efficiency of each telescope plane. The PLT is an independent luminometer, essential to enhance the robustness on the measurement of the delivered luminosity and to reduce its systematic uncertainties. This will allow to determine production cross-sections, and hence couplings, with high precision and to set more stringent limits on new particle production.

  20. Evolutionary variations of solar luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    The Theoretical arguments for a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4.7 billion years are reviewed. A scaling argument shows that this increase can be predicted without detailed numerical calculations. The magnitude of the increase is independent of nuclear reaction rates, as long as conversion of hydrogen to helium provides the basic energy source of the Sun. The effect of the solar luminosity increase on the terrestrial climate is briefly considered. It appears unlikely that an enhanced greenhouse effect, due to reduced gases (NH3, CH4), can account for the long-term paleoclimatic trends.

  1. A UNIFORM CORRELATION BETWEEN SYNCHROTRON LUMINOSITY AND DOPPLER FACTOR IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BLAZARS: A HINT OF SIMILAR INTRINSIC LUMINOSITIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qingwen; Zou Yuanchuan; Wang Dingxiong; Cao Xinwu; Chen Liang E-mail: zouyc@hust.edu.cn E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2011-10-10

    We compile 23 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and 21 blazars with estimated Doppler factors, and the Doppler factors of GRBs are estimated from their Lorentz factors by assuming their jet viewing angles {theta} {yields} 0{sup 0}. Using the conventional assumption that the prompt emission of GRBs is dominated by the synchrotron radiation, we calculate the synchrotron luminosity of GRBs from their total isotropic energy and burst duration. Intriguingly, we discover a uniform correlation between the synchrotron luminosity and Doppler factor, L{sub syn}{proportional_to}D{sup 3.1}, for GRBs and blazars, which suggests that they may share some similar jet physics. One possible reason is that GRBs and blazars have, more or less, similar intrinsic synchrotron luminosities and both of them are strongly enhanced by the beaming effect. After Doppler and redshift correction, we find that the intrinsic peak energy of the GRBs ranges from 0.1 to 3 keV with a typical value of 1 keV. We further correct the beaming effect for the observed luminosity of GRBs and find that a positive correlation exists between the intrinsic synchrotron luminosity and peak energy for GRBs, which is similar to that of blazars. Our results suggest that both the intrinsic positive correlation and the beaming effect may be responsible for the observed tight correlation between the isotropic energy and the peak energy in GRBs (the so-called Amati relation).

  2. ORBITAL PERIOD AND OUTBURST LUMINOSITY OF TRANSIENT LOW MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Yu, W.; Li, T. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Li, X. D.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the maximal luminosity of X-ray outburst and the orbital period in transient low mass X-ray binaries (or soft X-ray transients) observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in the past decade. We find that the maximal luminosity (3-200 keV) in Eddington units generally increases with increasing orbital period, which does not show a luminosity saturation but in general agrees with theoretical prediction. The peak luminosities in ultra-compact binaries might be higher than those with an orbital period of 2-4 hr, but more data are needed to make this claim. We also find that there is no significant difference in the 3-200 keV peak outburst luminosity between neutron star (NS) systems and black hole (BH) systems with orbital periods above 4 hr; however, there might be a significant difference at smaller orbital periods where only NS systems are observed and radiatively inefficient accretion flow is expected to work at low luminosities for BH accreters.

  3. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.; Andreopoulos, C.; Athar, M.; Bodek, A.; Christy, E.; Coopersmith, B.; Dennis, S.; Dytman, S.; Gallagher, H.; Geary, N.; Golan, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hoshina, K.; Liu, J.; Mahn, K.; Marshall, C.; Morrison, J.; Nirkko, M.; Nowak, J.; Perdue, G. N.; Yarba, J.

    2015-12-25

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular, changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  4. The luminosity function of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  5. The 2-79 keV X-ray spectrum of the Circinus galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: a fully Compton-thick active galactic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Puccetti, S.; Walton, D. J.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Madsen, K. K.; Koss, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Madejski, G.; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical parameters for the obscuring material. Chandra's high angular resolution allows a separation of nuclear and off-nuclear galactic emission. In the off-nuclear diffuse emission, we find signatures of strong cold reflection, including high equivalent-width neutral Fe lines. This Compton-scattered off-nuclear emission amounts to 18% of the nuclear flux in the Fe line region, but becomes comparable to the nuclear emission above 30 keV. The new analysis no longer supports a prominent transmitted AGN component in the observed band. We find that the nuclear spectrum is consistent with Compton scattering by an optically thick torus, where the intrinsic spectrum is a power law of photon index Γ = 2.2-2.4, the torus has an equatorial column density of N {sub H} = (6-10) × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}, and the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosity is (2.3-5.1) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}. These values place Circinus along the same relations as unobscured AGNs in accretion rate versus Γ and L{sub X} versus L {sub IR} phase space. NuSTAR's high sensitivity and low background allow us to study the short timescale variability of Circinus at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time. The lack of detected variability favors a Compton-thick absorber, in line with the spectral fitting results.

  6. The 2-79 keV X-Ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: A Fully Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Puccetti, S.; Walton, D. J.; Koss, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Fuerst, F.; Gandhi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Luo, B.; Madejski, G.; Madsen, K. K.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Saez, C.; Stern, D.; Stuhlinger, M.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-08-01

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical parameters for the obscuring material. Chandra's high angular resolution allows a separation of nuclear and off-nuclear galactic emission. In the off-nuclear diffuse emission, we find signatures of strong cold reflection, including high equivalent-width neutral Fe lines. This Compton-scattered off-nuclear emission amounts to 18% of the nuclear flux in the Fe line region, but becomes comparable to the nuclear emission above 30 keV. The new analysis no longer supports a prominent transmitted AGN component in the observed band. We find that the nuclear spectrum is consistent with Compton scattering by an optically thick torus, where the intrinsic spectrum is a power law of photon index Γ = 2.2-2.4, the torus has an equatorial column density of N H = (6-10) × 1024 cm-2, and the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosity is (2.3-5.1) × 1042 erg s-1. These values place Circinus along the same relations as unobscured AGNs in accretion rate versus Γ and LX versus L IR phase space. NuSTAR's high sensitivity and low background allow us to study the short timescale variability of Circinus at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time. The lack of detected variability favors a Compton-thick absorber, in line with the spectral fitting results.

  7. Luminosity Functions for Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Fabio; Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Italo

    1998-12-01

    We present theoretical mass-luminosity relations and luminosity functions (LFs) for globular cluster stars, from luminosities above the horizontal branch down to the minimum luminosity of hydrogen-burning stars. The LFs are available for metal mass fraction Z from Z = 10-4 to Z = 4 × 10-3, in the Johnson V band and in the Bessell-Cousins I band, and are based on tracks especially computed for this program, with the input physics of the models developed recently by D'Antona et al., Mazzitelli et al., and D'Antona & Mazzitelli. Two typical comparisons with observations are presented and discussed: (1) comparisons and statistical analysis with the LFs of the lower giant branch, turnoff region, and upper main sequence of several globular clusters from low to high metallicity, (2) derivation of the initial mass function (IMF) for the stars below the turnoff for several globular clusters for which Hubble Space Telescope data are available. In the first analysis we find that, for relatively large metallicities (Z >= 10-3) a good fit between theoretical and observed LFs can be found, although a simple χ2 statistical analysis shows that it is not possible to derive a strongly preferred age (or, equivalently, distance modulus) from the LF comparison. The fit with lower metallicity [Z ~ (1-2) × 10-4] LFs is less good but statistically acceptable. The main result is that the difference between observed and theoretical LFs of low-metallicity clusters reported by VandenBerg, Bolte, & Stetson appears to be much reduced in present models, and we give the possible reason why this happens and its consequences for the important parameter of the helium core mass at the flash. In the second application, we explore the effect of varying age and distance modulus on the mass function derived for a globular cluster. Distance moduli corresponding to the ``long'' distance scale (and relatively low ages) seem to be preferred based on these comparisons. The resulting index of the IMF is

  8. Sprite Luminosity and Radio Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Evans, A.; Mezentsev, A.; van der Velde, O.; Soula, S.

    2013-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010) with diameters 50-100 m at 60-80 km height (Kanmae et al., 2012). The sprite luminosity coincides in time and space with extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation <3 kHz in excellent agreement with theory (Cummer and Fullekrug, 2001). This theory is based on current flowing in the body of sprites at 70-80 km height associated with large streamer densities (Pasko et al., 1998). A more detailed study shows specifically that the exponential growth and splitting of streamers at 70-80 km height results in an electron multiplication associated with the acceleration of electrons to a few eV. The accelerated electrons radiate a small amount of electromagnetic energy and the incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the observed electromagnetic radiation (Qin et al., 2012). It has been predicted that this newly recognized physical mechanism might also result in low frequency ( 30-300 kHz) electromagnetic radiation emanating from sprite streamers near 40 km height in the stratosphere, albeit with very small magnetic fields 10^{-17}-10^{-12} T from a single streamer (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this predicted radiation was promptly confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). Specifically, it was found that the sprite luminosity coincides with sudden enhancements of the radio noise. These initial observations are extended here with a more detailed analysis to study the spatial coherence of the radio noise recorded with a novel network of sensitive radio receivers deployed during field work in the summer 2013. This network of radio receivers is used to study the relationship between the radio noise and the sprite luminosity observed with video cameras. The sprite luminosity is inferred from video recordings by use of sophisticated image

  9. Unidentified IRAS sources: Ultrahigh luminosity galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Schneider, D. P.; Danielson, G. E.; Beichman, C. A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy measurements were obtained for six of the high galactic latitude infrared sources reported by Houck, et al. (1984) from the IRAS survey to have no obvious optical counterparts on the POSS prints. All are identified with visually faint galaxies that have total luminosities in the range 5 x 10 to the 11th power stellar luminosity to 5 x 10 to the 12th power stellar luminosity. This luminosity emerges virtually entirely in the infrared. The origin of the luminosity, which is one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, is not known at this time.

  10. 2-165 keV observations of active galaxies and the diffuse background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    HEAO 1 spectral observations of 12 active galaxies in the 12-165 keV and 2-50 keV ranges are reported. The spectra of these galaxies in the 2-165 keV range are well represented by a single power law model; within experimental uncertainties a narrow dispersion in power law index attributable to the individual galaxies is observed, while the 2-165 keV luminosities of these galaxies ranged from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 3 x 10 to the 45th ergs/s. An apparent universality of the spectral form is found which can be interpreted as due to a common electron distribution with a temperature of tens of keV in the Compton scattering region or as a common nonthermal power-law distribution generating the observed flux through synchrotron-Compton processes. The data indicate that relativistic particles are likely to be responsible for the X-rays from cores of active galaxies through synchroton-Compton processes. In addition, it is noted that only weak number evolution, if any at all, is present in active galaxies.

  11. Investigating the Lag-Luminosity Relation in the Swift Era with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatikos, Michael; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil; Ukwatta, Tilan N.; Sakamoto, Takanori; Norris, Jay P.

    2008-05-22

    We report on an investigation that confronts the lag-luminosity relation (LLR), i.e. a surrogate redshift parameterization based upon an empirically determined anti-correlation between the observed isotropic luminosity and the temporal lag between the arrivals of photon pulses in low (25-50 keV) and high (100-300 keV) energy bands, with observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Our initial methodology is based upon a cross-correlation function (CCF) analysis of 64 ms BAT light curves (temporal spectra), for a small subset of GRBs with observed spectroscopic redshift (z{sub obs}). Our preliminary results span 4 temporal decades and indicate an agreement with LLR, within the margins of error (excluding GRBs 980425 and 060218)

  12. THE STRUCTURE AND SPECTRAL FEATURES OF A THIN DISK AND EVAPORATION-FED CORONA IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Y.; Mineshige, S. E-mail: bfliu@nao.cas.cn

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the accretion process in high-luminosity active galactic nuclei (HLAGNs) in the scenario of the disk evaporation model. Based on this model, the thin disk can extend down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) at accretion rates higher than 0.02 M-dot{sub Edd} while the corona is weak since part of the coronal gas is cooled by strong inverse Compton scattering of the disk photons. This implies that the corona cannot produce as strong X-ray radiation as observed in HLAGNs with large Eddington ratio. In addition to the viscous heating, other heating to the corona is necessary to interpret HLAGN. In this paper, we assume that a part of accretion energy released in the disk is transported into the corona, heating up the electrons, and is thereby radiated away. For the first time, we compute the corona structure with additional heating, fully taking into account the mass supply to the corona, and find that the corona could indeed survive at higher accretion rates and that its radiation power increases. The spectra composed of bremsstrahlung and Compton radiation are also calculated. Our calculations show that the Compton-dominated spectrum becomes harder with the increase of energy fraction (f) liberating in the corona, and the photon index for hard X-ray (2-10 keV) is 2.2 < {Gamma} < 2.7. We discuss possible heating mechanisms for the corona. Combining the energy fraction transported to the corona with the accretion rate by magnetic heating, we find that the hard X-ray spectrum becomes steeper at a larger accretion rate and the bolometric correction factor (L{sub bol}/L{sub 2-10keV}) increases with increasing accretion rate for f < 8/35, which is roughly consistent with the observational results.

  13. Extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; McBride, R. D.; Jackson, D. P.; Hammer, D. A.

    2006-10-15

    A new configuration for a two-dimensional (2D) imaging x-ray spectrograph based on a conically bent crystal is introduced: extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph (ELICS). The ELICS configuration has important advantages over spectrographs that are based on cylindrically and spherically bent crystals. The main advantages are that a wide variety of large-aperture crystals can be used, and any desired magnification in the spatial direction (the direction orthogonal to spectral dispersion) can be achieved by the use of different experimental arrangements. The ELICS can be set up so that the detector plane is almost perpendicular to the incident rays, a good configuration for time-resolved spectroscopy. ELICSs with mica crystals of 45x90 mm{sup 2} aperture have been successfully used for imaging on the XP and COBRA pulsed power generators, yielding spectra with spatial resolution in 2D of Z pinches and X pinches.

  14. NuSTAR AND CHANDRA INSIGHT INTO THE NATURE OF THE 3-40 keV NUCLEAR EMISSION IN NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, B. D.; Wik, D. R.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Leyder, J.-C.; Venters, T.; Zhang, W. W.; Antoniou, V.; Argo, M. K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Craig, W. W.; Krivonos, R.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Maccarone, T. J.; Stern, D.; Zezas, A.

    2013-07-10

    We present results from three nearly simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Chandra monitoring observations between 2012 September 2 and 2012 November 16 of the local star-forming galaxy NGC 253. The 3-40 keV intensity of the inner {approx}20 arcsec ({approx}400 pc) nuclear region, as measured by NuSTAR, varied by a factor of {approx}2 across the three monitoring observations. The Chandra data reveal that the nuclear region contains three bright X-ray sources, including a luminous (L{sub 2-10{sub keV}} {approx} few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}) point source located {approx}1 arcsec from the dynamical center of the galaxy (within the 3{sigma} positional uncertainty of the dynamical center); this source drives the overall variability of the nuclear region at energies {approx}>3 keV. We make use of the variability to measure the spectra of this single hard X-ray source when it was in bright states. The spectra are well described by an absorbed (N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) broken power-law model with spectral slopes and break energies that are typical of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), but not active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A previous Chandra observation in 2003 showed a hard X-ray point source of similar luminosity to the 2012 source that was also near the dynamical center ({theta} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 arcsec); however, this source was offset from the 2012 source position by Almost-Equal-To 1 arcsec. We show that the probability of the 2003 and 2012 hard X-ray sources being unrelated is >>99.99% based on the Chandra spatial localizations. Interestingly, the Chandra spectrum of the 2003 source (3-8 keV) is shallower in slope than that of the 2012 hard X-ray source. Its proximity to the dynamical center and harder Chandra spectrum indicate that the 2003 source is a better AGN candidate than any of the sources detected in our 2012 campaign; however, we were unable to rule out a ULX

  15. Redshift modifications to HEAO A-1 cluster X-ray luminosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    New redshift measurements for the 24 Abell galactic clusters are presented. The optical observations are described and applied to the cluster X-ray luminosity function, and the results are used to delimit the cluster contribution to the diffuse X-ray background (DXRB). The evolution of the X-ray luminosity function is then investigated. It is found that while simple two-parameter analytic forms do not fit this function very well, three-parameter forms such as the exponential times power law do fit it very well. Future redshift observations will probably not change the volume emissivity significantly, but they may in a statistically significant way affect the parameters of analytic fits which define the shape of the luminosity function. The contribution of rich clusters to the DXRB in the 2-6 keV range is 5.2 percent. Future redshift observations will modify this result by no more than a factor of about 1.1.

  16. One 17-keV Majorana neutrino?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Eric; Randall, Lisa

    1991-06-01

    A model is presented accommodating a 17-keV neutrino with 1 percent mixing with the electron neutrino and bounds on the electron-neutrino mass and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, in contrast to previous models, there is only a single state with mass 17 keV. This model is consistent with cosmological and supernova-cooling constraints, and incorporates the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein explanation of the low solar-neutrino counts. Possible signatures of this model include an excess of muon neutrinos from a supernova explosion, spread over a period of 10-1000 sec, and a Higgs-boson decay signature of leptons plus missing energy.

  17. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  18. Luminosity monitoring in ATLAS with MPX detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopczak, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at √s = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions.

  19. Luminosity Monitoring in ATLAS with MPX Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbah, Nedaa

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at √ s = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions.

  20. Perspectives on Higher Luminosity B-Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J

    2004-04-22

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 4-6 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 4 x 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} may be possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this new accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN X-RAY LUMINOSITY AND MAJOR FLARE LAUNCHING IN GRS 1915+105

    SciTech Connect

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jerome E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com

    2013-02-20

    We perform the most detailed analysis to date of the X-ray state of the Galactic black hole candidate GRS 1915+105 just prior to (0-4 hr) and during the brief (1-7 hr) ejection of major (superluminal) radio flares. A very strong model independent correlation is found between the 1.2 keV-12 keV X-ray flux 0-4 hr before flare ejections with the peak optically thin 2.3 GHz emission of the flares. This suggests a direct physical connection between the energy in the ejection and the luminosity of the accretion flow preceding the ejection. In order to quantify this concept, we develop techniques to estimate the intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosity, L {sub intrinsic}, from RXTE All Sky Monitor data and to implement known methods to estimate the time-averaged power required to launch the radio emitting plasmoids, Q (sometimes called jet power). We find that the distribution of intrinsic luminosity from 1.2 keV-50 keV, L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50), is systematically elevated just before ejections compared to arbitrary times when there are no major ejections. The estimated Q is strongly correlated with L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) 0-4 hr before the ejection, the increase in L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) in the hours preceding the ejection and the time-averaged L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) during the flare rise. Furthermore, the total time-averaged power during the ejection (Q + the time average of L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) during ejection) is strongly correlated with L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) just before launch with near equality if the distance to the source is Almost-Equal-To 10.5 kpc.

  2. SPECTRAL LAGS AND THE LAG-LUMINOSITY RELATION: AN INVESTIGATION WITH SWIFT BAT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Eskandarian, A.; Maximon, L. C.; Parke, W. C.; Stamatikos, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Norris, J. P.

    2010-03-10

    Spectral lag, the time difference between the arrival of high-energy and low-energy photons, is a common feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Norris et al. reported a correlation between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity of GRBs based on a limited sample. More recently, a number of authors have provided further support for this correlation using arbitrary energy bands of various instruments. In this paper, we report on a systematic extraction of spectral lags based on the largest Swift sample to date of 31 GRBs with measured redshifts. We extracted the spectral lags for all combinations of the standard Swift hard X-ray energy bands: 15-25 keV, 25-50 keV, 50-100 keV, and 100-200 keV and plotted the time dilation corrected lag as a function of isotropic peak luminosity. The mean value of the correlation coefficient for various channel combinations is -0.68 with a chance probability of {approx}0.7 x 10{sup -3}. In addition, the mean value of the power-law index is 1.4 +- 0.3. Hence, our study lends support to the existence of a lag-luminosity correlation, albeit with large scatter.

  3. INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald; Lebouteiller, Vianney

    2012-12-20

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L

  4. Contribution of the 6.7 keV Emission line from Stellar Flares to the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwachukwu Eze, Romanus; Eze, Ambrose; Nwafor, Jude; Esaenwi, Sudum; Okeke, Pius; Ebisawa, Ken; Smith, Randall

    2015-08-01

    Stellar flares create sudden bursts of hot plasma that contain a wide range of temperatures, and are capable of generating 6.7 keV Fe XXV emission line via electronic collisional excitation. Using the measured 6.7 keV fluxes from a collection of Suzaku-observed stellar flares as a baseline, we estimate their contribution to the 6.7 keV emission line from the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We modeled the extracted stellar flares’ spectra from our sources with an absorbed Bremstrahlung. We found strong 6.7 keV emission line from the extracted stellar flares’ spectra which is similar to the observed 6.7 keV emission line from the GRXE, while the 6.4 and 7.0 keV lines appear to be faint. The present result supports the earlier result that stellar flares contribute significantly to the total luminosity of the GRXE and that the GRXE luminosity could be primarily explained via hard X-ray emitting symbiotic stars (hSSs), and magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs), along with other white dwarf binary systems and stellar flares.

  5. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  6. Results From the DAFNE High Luminosity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    The DAPHNE collider, based on a new collision scheme including Large Piwinsky angle and Crab-Waist, has been successfully commissioned and is presently delivering luminosity to the SIDDHARTA detector. Large crossing angle and Crab-Waist scheme proved to be effective in: (1) Increasing luminosity, now a factor 2.7 higher than in the past; and (2) controlling transverse beam blow-up due to the beam-beam. Work is in progress to reach the ultimate design luminosity goal 5.0 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The new collision scheme is the main design concept for a new project aimed at building a Super-B factory that is expected to achieve a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and it has been also taken into account to upgrade one of the LHC interaction regions.

  7. Fitting the luminosity decay in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.; Shiltsev, V.; Slaughter, A.J.; Xiao, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    This paper explores how to fit the decay of the luminosity in the Tevatron. The standard assumptions of a fixed-lifetime exponential decay are only appropriate for very short time intervals. A ''1/time'' functional form fits well, and is supported by analytical derivations. A more complex form, assuming a time-varying lifetime-like term, also produces good results. Changes in the luminosity can be factored into two phenomena: The luminosity burn-off rate, and the burn-off rate from non-luminosity effects. This is particularly relevant for the antiprotons in the Tevatron. The luminous and the non-luminous burn rate of the antiprotons are shown for Tevatron stores.

  8. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  9. The X-ray luminosity function of very rich clusters and the luminosity-richness relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltan, A.; Henry, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    For a sample of galactic clusters that includes richness class three, four, and five clusters, the significance of the luminosity-richness relation is estimated using nonparametric methods which are valid for any luminosity function. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to determine the significance at which the X-ray luminosities of clusters in one richness class are statistically equal to those in another. The a priori expectation that the high richness clusters are more luminous on average than lower richness objects is confirmed, but it is found that the luminosity function for clusters of richness class three or higher turns over for luminosities less than about 3 x 10 to the 44th ergs/s, while that for lower richness classes extends to at least an order of magnitude lower luminosity.

  10. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  11. Electron Flux Models at GEO: 30 keV - 600 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R.; Balikhin, M. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walker, S. N.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Forecast models are developed for the electron fluxes measured by the Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MagED) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13. The models employ solar wind and geomagnetic indices as inputs to produce a forecast of the electron flux at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) for five energy ranges from 30 keV - 600 keV. All of these models will be implemented in real time to forecast the electron fluxes on the PROGRESS project website (https://ssg.group.shef.ac.uk/progress2/html/index.phtml).

  12. A study of 2-20 KeV X-rays from the Cygnus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Two rocket-borne proportional counters, each with 650 sq c, met area and 1.8 x 7.1 deg FWHM rectangular mechanical collimation, surveyed the Cygnus region in the 2 to 20 keV energy range on two occasions. X-ray spectral data gathered on 21 September 1970 from discrete sources in Cygnus are presented. The data from Cyg X-1, Cyg X-2, and Cyg X-3 have sufficient statistical significance to indicate mutually exclusive spectral forms for the three. Upper limits are presented for X-ray intensities above 2 keV for Cyg X-4 and Cyg X-5 (Cygnus loop). A search was made on 9 August 1971 for a diffuse component of X-rays 1.5 keV associated with an interarm region of the galaxy at galactic longitudes in the vicinity of 60 degrees. A statistically significant excess associated with a narrow disk component was detected. Several possible emission models are discussed, with the most likely candidate being a population of unresolvable low luminosity discrete sources.

  13. A large scale height galactic component of the diffuse 2-60 keV background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwan, D.; Marshall, F. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Mushotzky, R.; Shafer, R. A.; Stottlemyer, A.

    1982-01-01

    The diffuse 2-60 keV X-ray background has a galactic component clearly detectable by its strong variation with both galactic latitude and longitude. This galactic component is typically 10 percent of the extragalactic background toward the galactic center, half that strong toward the anticenter, and extrapolated to a few percent of the extragalactic background toward the galactic poles. It is acceptably modeled by a finite radius emission disk with a scale height of several kiloparsecs. The averaged galactic spectrum is best fitted by a thermal spectrum of kT about 9 keV, a spectrum much softer than the about 40 keV spectrum of the extragalactic component. The most likely source of this emission is low luminosity stars with large scale heights such as subdwarfs. Inverse Compton emission from GeV electrons on the microwave background contributes only a fraction of the galactic component unless the local cosmic ray electron spectrum and intensity are atypical.

  14. CONTRIBUTION OF THE ACCRETION DISK, HOT CORONA, AND OBSCURING TORUS TO THE LUMINOSITY OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: INTEGRAL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Hickox, R. C.; Gorjian, V.; Werner, M. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.

    2012-10-01

    We estimate the relative contributions of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion disk, corona, and obscuring torus to the bolometric luminosity of Seyfert galaxies, using Spitzer mid-infrared (MIR) observations of a complete sample of 68 nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray (HX) survey. This is the first HX-selected (above 15 keV) sample of AGNs with complementary high angular resolution, high signal-to-noise, MIR data. Correcting for the host galaxy contribution, we find a correlation between HX and MIR luminosities: L{sub 15{mu}m}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.74{+-}0.06}{sub HX}. Assuming that the observed MIR emission is radiation from an accretion disk reprocessed in a surrounding dusty torus that subtends a solid angle decreasing with increasing luminosity (as inferred from the declining fraction of obscured AGNs), the intrinsic disk luminosity, L{sub Disk}, is approximately proportional to the luminosity of the corona in the 2-300 keV energy band, L{sub Corona}, with the L{sub Disk}/L{sub Corona} ratio varying by a factor of 2.1 around a mean value of 1.6. This ratio is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than for typical quasars producing the cosmic X-ray background. Therefore, over three orders of magnitude in luminosity, HX radiation carries a large, and roughly comparable, fraction of the bolometric output of AGNs. We estimate the cumulative bolometric luminosity density of local AGNs at {approx}(1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}. Finally, the Compton temperature ranges between kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 and Almost-Equal-To 6 keV for nearby AGNs, compared to kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 keV for typical quasars, confirming that radiative heating of interstellar gas can play an important role in regulating SMBH growth.

  15. A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01

    In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

  16. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  17. Correlations of the IR Luminosity and Eddington Ratio with a Hard X-ray Selected Sample of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzy, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Tueller, Jack

    2008-01-01

    We use the SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample of hard x-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of 0.03 and the 2MASS J and K band photometry to examine the correlation of hard x-ray emission to Eddington ratio as well as the relationship of the J and K band nuclear luminosity to the hard x-ray luminosity. The BAT sample is almost unbiased by the effects of obscuration and thus offers the first large unbiased sample for the examination of correlations between different wavelength bands. We find that the near-IR nuclear J and K band luminosity is related to the BAT (14 - 195 keV) luminosity over a factor of 10(exp 3) in luminosity (L(sub IR) approx.equals L(sub BAT)(sup 1.25) and thus is unlikely to be due to dust. We also find that the Eddington ratio is proportional to the x-ray luminosity. This new result should be a strong constraint on models of the formation of the broad band continuum.

  18. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  19. Stellar luminosity variations and global warming.

    PubMed

    Foukal, P

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that variation in the sun's luminosity is less than that observed in many other stars of similar magnetic activity. Current findings also indicate that in more active stars, the attenuation by faculae of sunspot luminosity modulation is less effective than in the sun at present. The sun could thus become photometrically more variable (and dimmer) if its magnetic activity exceeded present levels. But the levels of solar activity required for this to occur are not observed in carbon-14 and beryllium-10 records over the past several millennia, which indicates that such an increase in amplitude of surface magnetism-driven variations in solar luminosity is unlikely in the present epoch. PMID:17749020

  20. 10 CFR 960.5-2-10 - Hydrology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrology. 960.5-2-10 Section 960.5-2-10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Ease and Cost of Siting, Construction, Operation, and Closure §...

  1. 10 CFR 960.5-2-10 - Hydrology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydrology. 960.5-2-10 Section 960.5-2-10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE... Hydrology. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that the geohydrologic setting of...

  2. 10 CFR 960.5-2-10 - Hydrology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydrology. 960.5-2-10 Section 960.5-2-10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE... Hydrology. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that the geohydrologic setting of...

  3. 10 CFR 960.5-2-10 - Hydrology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydrology. 960.5-2-10 Section 960.5-2-10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE... Hydrology. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that the geohydrologic setting of...

  4. The luminosity of galactic components and morphological segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Solanes, J. M.; Salvador-Sole, E.; Sanroma, M.; I.E.C., Barcelona )

    1989-09-01

    The luminosities of the bulge and disk components of disk galaxies are analyzed, and the possible correlation of these luminosities with morphological type and local density is explored. Galaxies of different types are found to be located in distinct bands in the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio vs total luminosity diagram, allowing the determination of the typical bulge luminosity function of disk galaxies of different types from their respective total luminosity functions, along with a better characterization of morphological segregation among disk galaxies. No evidence for any bulge luminosity segregation is found, and disks appear to be less luminous with increasing local density. 33 refs.

  5. The 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Prantzos, N.; Boehm, C.; Bykov, A. M.; Diehl, R.; Ferriere, K.; Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Marcowith, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G.

    2011-07-01

    The first {gamma}-ray line originating from outside the Solar System that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990s with OSSE/CGRO (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on GRO satellite/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) showed that the emission is strongly concentrated toward the Galactic bulge. In the 2000s, the spectrometer SPI aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed at any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather ''exotic'' ones (e.g., dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, such as type Ia supernovae, microquasars, or x-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new layers of complexity, since positrons may propagate far away from their production sites, making it difficult to infer the underlying source distribution from the observed map of 511 keV emission. However, in contrast to the rather well-understood propagation of high-energy (>GeV) particles of Galactic cosmic rays, understanding the propagation of low-energy ({approx}MeV) positrons in the turbulent, magnetized interstellar medium still remains a formidable challenge. The spectral and imaging properties of the observed 511 keV emission are reviewed and candidate positron sources and models of positron propagation in the Galaxy are critically discussed.

  6. Origin of the Galactic Disk 6.7 kev Line Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchwell, Ed

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine if the extended FeXXV 6.7 kev line emission might possibly be produced and confined by the hot wind-shocked bubbles to accompany UC HII regions. The main result of this study are: (1) FeXXV is detected in the W3 complex, but at a level that could only explain a small fraction of the galactic disk emission if all UC HII regions emit at about the same intensity as the W3 complex; (2) Two X-ray sources are detected in W3. W3-X 1 coincides with the radio image of this region, but W3-X2 has no radio, optical, or infrared counterpart; (3) There is no evidence for variability of W3-X1 during the period of observations (approx, 40,000 sec); (4) The X-ray spectrum of W3-X1 has no emission shortward of 1 kev, it peaks at approx. 2 kev and show significant emission out to approx. 6 kev. No individual lines are resolved. There is currently no generally accepted theory for extended hard X-ray emission in HII regions. Perhaps the most significant discovery of this program has been the detection of extended hard X-rays and the realization that some entirely new processes must be invoked to understand this; and (5)A minimum (chi)(sup 2) fit of the spectrum implies a H absorbing column of N(sub H) approx, equals to 2.1 x 10(exp 22)/ cm, a temperature of the emitting plasma of 7 x 10(exp 7) K, and a luminosity of approx. equal to 10(33)erg/s.

  7. Summary of symposium: Low luminosity sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    The author summarized certain aspects of the conference. He shares this task with another colleague thereby breaking the task into more manageable proportions. The author covers the low luminosity sources. He begins his review with a summary of some major themes of the conference and ends with a few speculations on possible theoretical mechanisms.

  8. RHIC Proton Luminosity and Polarization Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    The RHIC proton beam polarization can be improved by raising the Booster scraping, which also helps to reduce the RHIC transverse emittance, and therefore to improve the luminosity. By doing this, the beam-beam effect would be enhanced. Currently, the RHIC working point is constrained between 2/3 and 7/10, the 2/3 resonance would affect intensity and luminosity lifetime, and the working point close to 7/10 would enhance polarization decay in store. Run 2013 shows that average polarization decay is merely 1.8% in 8 hours, and most fills have the luminosity lifetime better than 14 hours, which is not a problem. Therefore, even without beam-beam correction, there is room to improve for RHIC polarization and luminosity. The key to push the Booster scraping is to raise the Booster input intensity; for that, two approaches can be used. The first is to extend the LINAC tank 9 pulse width, which has been successfully applied in run 2006. The second is to raise the source temperature, which has been successfully applied in run 2006 and run 2012.

  9. Tevatron Experimental Issues at High Luminosities

    SciTech Connect

    Kreps, Michal; CDF, for the; collaborations, D0

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we describe the detector components, triggers and analysis techniques for flavor physics at the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0. As Tevatron performs very well and runs at higher luminosities regularly we also touch issues related to it and efforts to improve detectors and triggers for such running.

  10. Fermilab Recycler Stochastic Cooling for Luminosity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmelsiek, D.; Gattuso, C.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Recycler began regularly delivering antiprotons for Tevatron luminosity operations in 2005. Methods for tuning the Recycler stochastic cooling system are presented. The unique conditions and resulting procedures for minimizing the longitudinal phase space density of the Recycler antiproton beam are outlined.

  11. LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

  12. Luminosity enhancement in relativistic jets and altered luminosity functions for beamed objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Due to relativistic effects, the observed emission from relativistic jets is quite different from the rest frame emission. Systematic differences between the observed and intrinsic intensities of sources in which jet phenomena are occurring are discussed. Assuming that jets have a power law luminosity function of a slope B, the observed luminosity distribution as a function of the velocity of the jet, the spectral index of the rest frame emission, and the range of angles of the jets relative to our line of sight are calculated. The results is well-approximated by two power laws, the higher luminosity end having the original power law index X and the lower luminosity end having a flattened exponent independent of B and only slightly greater than 1. A model consisting of beamed emission from a jet and unbeamed emission from a stationary central component is investigated. The luminosity functions for these two-component sources are calculated for two ranges of angles. For sources in which beaming is important, the luminosity function is much flatter. Because of this, the relative numbers of ""beamed'' and ""unbeamed'' sources detected on the sky depend strongly on the luminosity at which the comparison is made.

  13. The Luminosity Function of QSO Host Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.; Casertano, Stefano; Turnshek, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present some results from our HST archival image study of 71 QSO host galaxies. The objects are selected to have z less than or equal to 0.46 and total absolute magnitude M(sub v) less than or equal to -23 in our adopted cosmology (H(sub 0) = 50 kilometers per second Mpc(sup-1), q(sub 0) = 0.5, lambda = 0)). The aim of this initial study is to investigate the composition of the sample with respect to host morphology and radio loudness, as well as derive the QSO host galaxy luminosity function. We have analyzed available WFPC2 images in R or I band (U in one case), using a uniform set of procedures. The host galaxies span a narrow range of luminosities and are exceptionally bright, much more so than normal galaxies, usually L greater than L*(sub v). The QSOs are almost equally divided among three subclasses: radio-loud QSOs with elliptical hosts, radio-quiet QSOs with elliptical hosts, and radio-quiet QSOs with spiral hosts. Radio-loud QSOs with spiral hosts are extremely rare. Using a weighting procedure, we derive the combined luminosity function of QSO host galaxies. We find that the luminosity function of QSO hosts differs in shape from that of normal galaxies but that they coincide at the highest luminosities. The ratio of the number of quasar hosts to the number of normal galaxies at a luminosity L*(sub v) is R = (Lv/11.48L*(sub v))(sup 2.46), where L*(sub v) corresponds to M*(sub v)= -22.35, and a QSO is defined to be an object with total nuclear plus host light M(sub v) less than or equal to -23. This ratio can be interpreted as the probability that a galaxy with luminosity L(sub V) will host a QSO at redshift z approximately equal to 0.26.

  14. Relation between the X-ray and optical luminosities in binary systems with accreting nonmagnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M. G.; Filippova, E. V.; Suleimanov, V. F.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the relation between the optical ( g-band) and X-ray (0.5-10 keV) luminosities of accreting nonmagnetic white dwarfs. According to the present-day counts of the populations of star systems in our Galaxy, these systems have the highest space density among the close binary systems with white dwarfs. We show that the dependence of the optical luminosity of accreting white dwarfs on their X-ray luminosity forms a fairly narrow one-parameter curve. The typical half-width of this curve does not exceed 0.2-0.3 dex in optical and X-ray luminosities, which is essentially consistent with the amplitude of the aperiodic flux variability for these objects. At X-ray luminosities L x ˜ 1032 erg s-1 or lower, the optical g-band luminosity of the accretion flow is shown to be related to its X-ray luminosity by a factor ˜2-3. At even lower X-ray luminosities ( L x ≲ 1030 erg s-1), the contribution from the photosphere of the white dwarf begins to dominate in the optical spectrum of the binary system and its optical brightness does not drop below M g ˜ 13-14. Using the latter fact, we show that in current and planned X-ray sky surveys, the family of accreting nonmagnetic white dwarfs can be completely identified to the distance determined by the sensitivity of an optical sky survey in this region. For the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with a limiting sensitivity m g ˜ 22.5, this distance is ˜400-600 pc.

  15. Luminosity of initial breakdown in lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, M.; Marshall, T. C.; Karunarathne, S.; Karunarathna, N.; Vickers, L. E.; Warner, T. A.; Orville, R. E.; Betz, H.-D.

    2013-04-01

    Time correlated high-speed video and electromagnetic data for 15 cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning flashes reveal bursts of light, bright enough to be seen through intervening cloud, during the initial breakdown (IB) stage and within the first 3 ms after flash initiation. Each sudden increase in luminosity is coincident with a CG type (12 cases) or an IC type (3 cases) IB pulse in fast electric field change records. The E-change data for 217 flashes indicate that all CG and IC flashes have IB pulses. The luminosity bursts of 14 negative CG flashes occur 11-340 ms before the first return stroke, at altitudes of 4-8 km, and at 4-41 km range from the camera. In seven cases, linear segments visibly advance away from the first light burst for 55-200 µs, then the entire length dims, then the luminosity sequence repeats along the same path. These visible initial leaders or streamers lengthen intermittently to about 300-1500 m. Their estimated 2-D speeds are 4-18 × 105 m s-1 over the first few hundred microseconds and decrease by about 50% over the first 2 ms. In other cases, only a bright spot or a broad area of diffuse light, presumably scattered by intervening cloud, is visible. The bright area grows larger over 20-60 µs before the luminosity fades in about 100 µs, then this sequence may repeat several times. In several flashes, a 1-2 ms period of little or no luminosity and small E-change is observed following the IB stage prior to stepped leader development.

  16. A Solar-luminosity Model and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of climatic change are not completely understood, the potential causes include changes in the Sun's luminosity. Solar activity in the form of sunspots, flares, proton events, and radiation fluctuations has displayed periodic tendencies. Two types of proxy climatic data that can be related to periodic solar activity are varved geologic formations and freshwater diatom deposits. A model for solar luminosity was developed by using the geometric progression of harmonic cycles that is evident in solar and geophysical data. The model assumes that variation in global energy input is a result of many periods of individual solar-luminosity variations. The 0.1-percent variation of the solar constant measured during the last sunspot cycle provided the basis for determining the amplitude of each luminosity cycle. Model output is a summation of the amplitudes of each cycle of a geometric progression of harmonic sine waves that are referenced to the 11-year average solar cycle. When the last eight cycles in Emiliani's oxygen-18 variations from deep-sea cores were standardized to the average length of glaciations during the Pleistocene (88,000 years), correlation coefficients with the model output ranged from 0.48 to 0.76. In order to calibrate the model to real time, model output was graphically compared to indirect records of glacial advances and retreats during the last 24,000 years and with sea-level rises during the Holocene. Carbon-14 production during the last millenium and elevations of the Great Salt Lake for the last 140 years demonstrate significant correlations with modeled luminosity. Major solar flares during the last 90 years match well with the time-calibrated model.

  17. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF FERMI-DETECTED FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M. S.; Romani, R. W.; Costamante, L.; Reimer, A.; Dermer, C. D.; King, O. G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Richards, J. L.; Stevenson, M. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.edu

    2012-06-01

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray-selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similar to that of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. Also, using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of FSRQs in the 10 keV-300 GeV band and show that there is no correlation between the luminosity at the peak of the {gamma}-ray emission component and its peak frequency. Using this luminosity-independent SED with the derived LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sup +1.6}{sub -1.0}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100 GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sup +3.3}{sub -2.2}, that most are seen within 5 Degree-Sign of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  18. The quasar mass-luminosity plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles Louis

    2010-11-01

    This thesis investigates the quasar mass-luminosity plane, as a new tool to explore the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity over time. Previous techniques used quasar luminosity function and mass functions, which are one-dimensional projections of the mass-luminosity plane. The M --- L plane contains information that cannot be seen in these projections. We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to develop several new constraints on quasar accretion. Black hole masses, based on the widths of their Hbeta, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities, were used assuming using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. In each redshift interval over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, low-mass quasars reach at their Eddington luminosity, but high-mass quasars fall short, even by a factor of ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ˜ 0.2 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. The maximum mass of quasars at each redshift is sharp and evolving. High-mass black holes turn off their luminous accretion at higher redshift than lower-mass black holes. Further, turnoff for quasars at any given mass is synchronized to within 0.7--3 Gyr, tighter than would be expected given the dynamics of their host galaxies. We find potential signatures of the quasar turnoff mechanism, including a dearth of high-mass quasars at low Eddington ratio, low CIV/MgII emission line ratio, and a red spectral tilt. Finally, we use these new constraints to analyze models for the evolution of individual quasars over time. We find a restricted family of tracks that lie within the M --- L plane at all redshifts, suggesting that a single, constant feedback mechanism between all supermassive black holes and their host galaxies might apply

  19. Excess astrophysical photons from a 0.1-1 keV cosmic axion background.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Joseph P; Marsh, M C David

    2013-10-11

    Primordial decays of string theory moduli at z~10(12) naturally generate a dark radiation cosmic axion background with 0.1-1 keV energies. This cosmic axion background can be detected through axion-photon conversion in astrophysical magnetic fields to give quasithermal excesses in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray bands. Substantial and observable luminosities may be generated even for axion-photon couplings <10(-11) GeV(-1). We propose that axion-photon conversion may explain the observed excess emission of soft x rays from galaxy clusters, and may also contribute to the diffuse unresolved cosmic x-ray background. We list a number of correlated predictions of the scenario. PMID:24160588

  20. High luminosity muon scattering at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Bazizi, K. ); Conrad, J.; Fang, G. ); Erdmann, M. ); Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H. ); Guyot, C.; Virchaux, M. ); Holmgren, H. ); Malensek, A.; Melanson, H.; Morfin

    1990-02-01

    The charge of this group was to evaluate the physics that can be done with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment at FNAL using the upgraded Tevatron muon beam, and consider the apparatus required. In this report, the physics that can be accomplished with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment is evaluated. The CERN and FNAL {mu} beams are compared in the context of such an experiment. The expected muon flux with the upgraded machine is estimated. Two possible detectors are compared: the air-core toroid experiment proposed by Guyot et al., and an upgraded version of the E665 double-diode apparatus now in place at FNAL. The relative costs of the detectors are considered. A list of detailed questions that need to be answered regarding the double-diode experiment has be compiled. 2 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. RF TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVED LUMINOSITY IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.BLASKIEWICZ,J.BUTLER,J.DELONG,J.FISCHER,W.HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has improved significantly [1] over the first three physics runs. A number of special rf techniques have been developed to facilitate higher luminosity. The techniques described herein include: an ultra low-noise rf source for the 197 MHz storage rf system, a frequency shift switch-on technique for transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage system, synchronizing the rings during the energy ramp (including crossing the transition energy) to avoid incidental collisions, installation of dedicated 200 MHZ cavities to provide longitudinal Landau damping on the ramp, and the development of a bunch merging scheme in the Booster to increase the available bunch intensity from the injectors.

  2. Optimization of integrated luminosity in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gattuso, C.; Convery, M.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the strategy which has been used recently to optimize the performance of the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We use a relatively simple heuristic model based on the antiproton production rate, which optimizes the number of antiprotons in a store in order to maximize the integrated luminosity. A store is terminated as soon as the target number of antiprotons is reached and the Tevatron quickly resets to load another store. Since this procedure was implemented, the integrated luminosity has improved by {approx} 35%. Other recent operational improvements include decreasing the shot setup time, and reducing beam-beam effects by making the proton and antiproton brightness more compatible, for example by scraping protons to smaller emittances.

  3. Scintillating Fibre Tracking at High Luminosity Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, C.; Haefeli, G.; Leverington, B.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of small diameter scintillating plastic fibres with arrays of SiPM photodetectors has led to a new class of SciFi trackers usable at high luminosity collider experiments. After a short review of the main principles and history of the scintillating fibre technology, we describe the challenges and developments of the large area Scintillating Fibre Tracker currently under development for the upgraded LHCb experiment.

  4. A deep luminosity function for 47 Tucanae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. E.; Hesser, J. E.

    CCD photometry in B and V reaching B(lim) ≅ 25 has been employed to obtain the luminosity function and color-magnitude diagram for the main sequence of 47 Tuc. For 5 < Mv < 10 the authors find that its LF is essentially flat (Δlog n/Δm ≡ 0). The CMD is successfully matched by isochrones with [Fe/H] = -0.5 and t ≅ 15×109y.

  5. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-09-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. [A295 (1991) 391].

  6. X-ray selected quasars and Seyfert galaxies - Cosmological evolution, luminosity function, and contribution to the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of quasars and Seyfert galaxies (active galactic nuclei /AGNs/) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 56 objects extracted from the expanded Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey, and it is exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space of X-ray selected AGNs is confirmed to be strongly nonuniform; the amount of cosmological evolution required by the data is in agreement with a previous determination based on a smaller sample of objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) is derived. The high-luminosity part of the XLF is satisfactorily described by a power law of slope gamma approximately 3.6. A significant flattening is observed at low luminosities. The simultaneous determination of the cosmological evolution and of the X-ray luminosity function of AGNs is then used to estimate the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background. Using the best fit values for the evolution of AGNs and for their volume density, it is found that they contribute approximately 80 percent of the 2 keV diffuse X-ray background. Uncertainties in this estimate are still rather large; however, it seems difficult to reconcile the data with a contribution much less than 50 percent.

  7. New Evidence for a Substellar Luminosity Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, M. C.; Ireland, M.

    2014-01-01

    HD 130948BC was the first field brown dwarf system to have both a dynamically measured mass and precise age constraint, from its solar-type host star, and it was unexpectedly ≈2× more luminous than predicted by substellar evolutionary models. However, because of the difficulty in determining accurate stellar ages, even in this nearly ideal case of a young star where numerous age indicators agree, it has been unclear if the apparent over-luminosity could be due to an erroneous age for this unique system. If such large systematic errors actually exist in substellar evolutionary models it could have wide-ranging implications, from determinations of the initial mass function to the masses estimated for directly imaged planets. We present here a new dynamical mass for a pair of brown dwarfs that also have a well-determined age from their young, solar-type star. This first check on the substellar "luminosity problem" reveals a nearly identical systematic error as was previously observed. We compare predictions from commonly used evolutionary models and present possible explanations for this problem. There are little appreciated, large differences (≈0.2 dex) in the predicted luminosity evolution of substellar objects which, along with the discrepancies of models compared to observations, currently limit our ability to characterize the fundamental properties of both brown dwarfs and directly imaged exoplanets.

  8. EVOLUTION OF THE Halpha LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, Eduard; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a window on the star formation history over the last 4 Gyr. SHELS is a spectroscopically complete survey for R{sub tot} < 20.3 over 4 square{sup 0}. We use the 10k spectra to select a sample of pure star-forming galaxies based on their Halpha emission line. We use the spectroscopy to determine extinction corrections for individual galaxies and to remove active galaxies in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. We use the large volume of SHELS with the depth of a narrowband survey for Halpha galaxies at z approx 0.24 to make a combined determination of the Halpha luminosity function at z approx 0.24. The large area covered by SHELS yields a survey volume big enough to determine the bright end of the Halpha luminosity function from redshift 0.100 to 0.377 for an assumed fixed faint-end slope alpha = -1.20. The bright end evolves: the characteristic luminosity L* increases by 0.84 dex over this redshift range. Similarly, the star formation density increases by 0.11 dex. The fraction of galaxies with a close neighbor increases by a factor of 2-5 for L{sub Ha}lpha approx> L* in each of the redshift bins. We conclude that triggered star formation is an important influence for star-forming galaxies with Halpha emission.

  9. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  10. Neutron resonance parameters of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br up to 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Kawarasaki, Y.; Mizumoto, M.

    1980-09-01

    Resonance parameters of separated isotopes of bromine were measured using TOF spectrometer of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute linear accelerator. Transmission and capture measurements were made with /sup 6/Li-glass and Moxon-Rae detectors, on separated isotopes (approx. 98%) of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br. Resonance analyses were made on transmission data with an area analysis code, and on capture data with a Monte-Carlo program CAFIT. For /sup 79/Br gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ values for 156 levels below 10 keV are obtained, and for /sup 81/Br 100 levels below 15 keV. Strength functions are obtained: for /sup 79/Br S/sub O/ = (1.27 +- 0.14) x10/sup -4/ below 10 keV, and for /sup 81/Br S/sub O/ = (0.86 +- 0.14)10/sup -4/ below 15 keV. Intermediate structures are observed in the resonances of /sup 81/Br showing clusters of levels at 1.2, 10, 11.5, and 14 keV, where the sum of gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ vs. neutron energy shows steep rises.

  11. 36 CFR 2.10 - Camping and food storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Camping and food storage. 2... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.10 Camping and food storage. (a) The superintendent may... revocation of the permit. (d) Food storage. The superintendent may designate all or a portion of a park...

  12. 36 CFR 2.10 - Camping and food storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Camping and food storage. 2... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.10 Camping and food storage. (a) The superintendent may... revocation of the permit. (d) Food storage. The superintendent may designate all or a portion of a park...

  13. 36 CFR 2.10 - Camping and food storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camping and food storage. 2... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.10 Camping and food storage. (a) The superintendent may... revocation of the permit. (d) Food storage. The superintendent may designate all or a portion of a park...

  14. 36 CFR 2.10 - Camping and food storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Camping and food storage. 2... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.10 Camping and food storage. (a) The superintendent may... revocation of the permit. (d) Food storage. The superintendent may designate all or a portion of a park...

  15. 36 CFR 2.10 - Camping and food storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Camping and food storage. 2... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.10 Camping and food storage. (a) The superintendent may... revocation of the permit. (d) Food storage. The superintendent may designate all or a portion of a park...

  16. THE LUMINOSITY PROFILES OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Donzelli, C. J.; Muriel, H.; Madrid, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    We have derived detailed R-band luminosity profiles and structural parameters for a total of 430 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), down to a limiting surface brightness of 24.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Light profiles were initially fitted with a Sersic's R {sup 1/n} model, but we found that 205 ({approx}48%) BCGs require a double component model to accurately match their light profiles. The best fit for these 205 galaxies is an inner Sersic model, with indices n {approx} 1-7, plus an outer exponential component. Thus, we establish the existence of two categories of the BCG luminosity profiles: single and double component profiles. We found that double profile BCGs are brighter ({approx}0.2 mag) than single profile BCGs. In fact, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test applied to these subsamples indicates that they have different total magnitude distributions, with mean values M{sub R} = -23.8 {+-} 0.6 mag for single profile BCGs and M{sub R} = -24.0 {+-} 0.5 mag for double profile BCGs. We find that partial luminosities for both subsamples are indistinguishable up to r = 15 kpc, while for r > 20 kpc the luminosities we obtain are on average 0.2 mag brighter for double profile BCGs. This result indicates that extra-light for double profile BCGs does not come from the inner region but from the outer regions of these galaxies. The best-fit slope of the Kormendy relation for the whole sample is a = 3.13 {+-} 0.04. However, when fitted separately, single and double profile BCGs show different slopes: a{sub single} = 3.29 {+-} 0.06 and a{sub double} = 2.79 {+-} 0.08. Also, the logarithmic slope of the metric luminosity {alpha} is higher in double profile BCGs ({alpha}{sub double} = 0.65 {+-} 0.12) than in single profile BCGs ({alpha}{sub single} = 0.59 {+-} 0.14). The mean isophote outer ellipticity (calculated at {mu} {approx} 24 mag arcsec{sup -2}) is higher in double profile BCGs (e{sub double} = 0.30 {+-} 0.10) than in single profile BCGs (e{sub single} = 0.26 {+-} 0.11). Similarly

  17. CLOC: Cluster Luminosity Order-Statistic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Robert L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Fumagalli, Michele; Fall, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    CLOC computes cluster order statistics, i.e. the luminosity distribution of the Nth most luminous cluster in a population. It is flexible and requires few assumptions, allowing for parametrized variations in the initial cluster mass function and its upper and lower cutoffs, variations in the cluster age distribution, stellar evolution and dust extinction, as well as observational uncertainties in both the properties of star clusters and their underlying host galaxies. It uses Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to search parameter space to find best-fitting values for the parameters describing cluster formation and disruption, and to obtain rigorous confidence intervals on the inferred values.

  18. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  19. A potential cyclotron line signature in low-luminosity X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Wang, John C. L.; Salpeter, E. E.; Wasserman, Ira

    1995-01-01

    Estimates indicate there may be greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 3) low-luminosity X-ray pulsars (L less than or approximately equal to 10(exp 34) ergs/s) in the Galaxy undergoing 'low-state' wind accretion in Be/X-ray binary systems, and approximately 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9) isolated neutron stars which may be accreting directly from the interstellar medium. Despite their low effective temperatures (kT(sub e) less than or approximately equal to 300 eV), low-luminosity accreting neutron stars with magnetic fields B approximately (0.7-7) x 10(exp 12) G could emit a substantial fraction (0.5%-5%) of their total luminosity in a moderately broadened (Epsilon/delta Epsilon approximately 2-4) cyclotron emission line which peaks in the energy range approximately 5-20 keV. The bulk of the thermal emission from these stars will be in the extreme ultraviolet/soft X-ray regime. In sharp contrast, the nonthermal cyclotron component predicted here will not be strongly absorbed, and consequently it may be the only distinguishing signature for the bulk of these low-luminosity sources. We propose a search for this cyclotron emission feature in long pointed observations of the newly discovered candidate isolated neutron star MS 0317.7-6477, and the Be/X-ray transient pulsar 4U 0115+63 in its quiescent state. We note that an emission-like feature similar to the one we predict here has been reported in the energy spectrum of the unusual X-ray pulsar 1E 2259+586.

  20. The X-ray Luminosity Function for Poor Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.; Ledlow, M.; Loken, C.; Klypin, A.; Voges, W.; White, R. A.; Bryan, G.; Norman, M.

    1995-12-01

    We will present the first X-ray Luminosity Function for poor clusters of galaxies. Using a percolation algorithm, White et al. (1996) has compiled a catalog of 600 optically selected groups composed of Zwicky galaxies. This catalog includes MKW and AWM groups (with cD galaxies), many Hickson compact groups, as well as many more loose condensations. We selected a complete,volume-limited subsample of these poor clusters which have at least 4 Zwicky galaxies, b>30deg , a surface density enhancement of ~50, and z <= 0.03. We then cross-correlated this sample with the ROSAT all-sky X-ray survey. About 50% of this sample of 50 clusters was detected with 0.5-2.0 keV X-ray luminosities >4 x 10(41) h75(-2) ergs/sec. These are the X-ray brightest groups in the northern sky. From this sample, we constructed an X-ray Luminosity Function. We find that this poor cluster luminosity function matches well with that derived for Abell clusters by Briel & Henry (1993). It appears that these groups are low mass extensions of rich clusters. We have also derived a mass function for these groups assuming that the X-ray emission is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the clusters. We will compare this mass function with those expected from different cosmological models with different values of Omega . This research was funded by NSF grant AST93-17596 and NASA grant NAGW-3152.

  1. Physics of a 17 keV neutrino.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, B.

    The possible 17 keV neutrino, if real, cannot be νμ but could be essentially ντ. Relic 17 keV neutrinos from the big bang must have disappeared, through a non-Standard-Model decay or annihilation process, before the present epoch. If one assumes that the 17 keV neutrino is not a Dirac neutrino of the conventional kind, then one is led to picture it as a Dirac neutrino of the unconventional Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud kind. It is then an amalgam of ντ and ν¯μ.

  2. LUMINOSITY INCREASES IN GOLD-GOLD OPERATION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.AHERNS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    After an exploratory phase, during which a number of beam parameters were varied, the RHIC experiments now demand higher luminosity to study heavy ion collisions in detail. In gold-gold, operation, RHIC delivers now twice the design luminosity. During the last gold-gold operating period (Run-4) the machine delivered 15 times more luminosity than during the previous gold-gold operating period (Run-2), two years ago. We give an overview of the changes that increased the instantaneous luminosity and luminosity lifetime, raised the reliability, and improved the operational efficiency.

  3. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Yu Guisheng

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  4. The Physical Nature of the Sharp Spectral Feature at 7 keV Detected in 1H0707-495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Niel

    2005-01-01

    XMM-Newton acquired data on the accepted target, 1H0707-495, on 2002 October 13 during revolution 0521. The observation was successful, with only about 5% data loss due to background flaring. We compared the data from this observation with earlier data taken on this Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 about two years before, performing interpretation studies in the context of the partial-covering model. Our second longer observation once again displays a sharp (< 200 eV) spectral drop above 7 keV. However, in comparison to the first observation, the edge depth and energy have changed significantly. In addition to changes in the edge parameters, the high-energy spectrum appears steeper. The changes in the high-energy spectrum can be adequately explained in terms of a partial-covering absorber out-flowing from the central region. The low-energy spectrum also shows significant long-term spectral variability, including (1) a substantial increase in the disk temperature, (2) detection of an approx. 0.9 keV emission feature, and (3) the presence of ionized absorption that was detected during the ASCA mission. The large increase in disk temperature, and the more modest rise in luminosity, can be understood if we consider a slim-disk model for 1H0707-495. In addition, the higher disk luminosity could be the driving force behind the outflow and the re-appearance of an ionized medium during the second XMM-Newton observation.

  5. Solar luminosity variations in solar cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Richard C.; Hudson, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term variations in the solar total irradiance found in the ACRIM I experiment on the SMM satellite have revealed a downward trend during the declining phase of solar cycle 21 of the sunspot cycle, a flat period between mid-1095 and mid-1987, and an upturn in late 1987 which suggests a direct correlation of luminosity and solar active region population. If the upturn continues into the activity maximum of solar cycle 22, a relation between solar activity and luminosity of possible climatological significance could be ascertained. The best-fit relationship for the variation of total irradiance S with sunspot number Rz and 10-cm flux F(10) are S = 1366.82 + 7.71 x 10 to the -3rd Rz and S = 1366.27 + 8.98 x 10 to the -3rd F(10)(W/sq m). These findings could be used to approximate total irradiance variations over the periods for which these indices have been compiled.

  6. Luminosity Function Evolution of Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Kao, K. C.; Hu, J. Y.

    The luminosity function of a star cluster evolves markedly during the pre-main sequence phase. With an assumed initial mass function (Miller & Scalo, 1979) and pre-main sequence tracks (D'Antona & Mazzitelli, 1994), we calculate a set of monochromatic luminosity functions which, when compared with observations, can be used to infer the age and star formation history (coeval versus intermittent) of a star cluster. Applied to the Trapezium cluster (2.2 micron imaging data by Zinncker et al 1993), our model suggests an age close to 10^6 years, whereas in IC 348 (2 micron data from Lada & Lada, 1995) the age estimate yields 4--6 times 10^6 years and continual bursts of star formation seem to have occurred in this cluster. CCD imaging observations at optical-infrared I band are presented for NGC 663, for which an age of 1--3 times 10^7 years is inferred. The initial mass function for NGC 663 in the range 2--7.1 {Modot} has a slope of -0.77 plus or minus 0.20, much shallower than that for the solar neighborhood field stars. We interpret this being due to the mass segregation in the cluster.

  7. Probing the Luminosity Function of Young Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Glikman, E.; Lacy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last year, we have been using the Triple Spec Near-Infrared spectrograph on the Palomar Observatory to identify candidate dust-reddened quasars using the FIRST radio survey, the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and the SDSS optical survey. A previous campaign using the shallow near-infrared 2MASS survey, was very successful in finding dust obscured quasars by finding very red (R-K > 4, J-K > 1.7) radio sources (Glikman et al. 2007). Among them are many young, interacting galaxies (Urrutia, Lacy & Becker 2008) and a large fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (Urrutia et al. 2009), implying that the red quasar population probes a young phase in the lifetime of an AGN. By using the same color criteria on the deeper UKIDSS survey, we are able to probe into higher redshifts and lower luminosity red quasars. This is a first step to build a luminosity function for dust-obscured quasars. We then will be able to answer the question if young quasars are more generally more luminous as their older counterparts, perhaps because of higher accretion efficiency.

  8. Low luminosity AGNs in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikiz, Tuba; Peletier, Reynier F.; Yesilyaprak, Cahit

    2016-04-01

    Galaxies are known to contain black holes (e.g. Ferrarese & Merritt 2000), whose mass correlates with the mass of their bulge. A fraction of them also has an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), showing excess emission thought to be due to accretion of mass by the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. It is thought that AGNs play a very important role during the formation of galaxies by creating large outflows that stop star formation in the galaxy (see e.g. Kormendy & Ho 2013). The aim is to detect the fraction of Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus (LLAGN) in the nearby Universe. At present, they are typically found using optical spectroscopy (e.g. Kauffmann, Heckman et al. 2003), who discuss the influence of the AGN on the host galaxy and vice versa. However, optical spectra are seriously affected by extinction in these generally very dusty objects, and therefore can only give us partial information about the AGN. I used a newly-found method, and apply it to the S4G sample, a large, complete, sample of nearby galaxies, which I am studying in detail with a large collaboration, to detect the fraction of low luminosity AGNs, and to better understand the relation between AGNs and their host galaxy which is thought to be crucial for their formation.

  9. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Benrong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ``Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ``Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E2 = m2+p2[1-η(E/mp)n] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n >= 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  10. Operation of the Run IIB D0 Luminosity System and Determination of the Run IIB Luminosity Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Prewitt, Michelle Victoria; /Rice U.

    2010-04-01

    The luminosity system is an integral part of the D0 detector that must be properly maintained to provide accurate luminosity measurements for physics analysis. After the addition of a readout layer to the silicon vertex detector in 2006, it was necessary to re-calculate the effective inelastic cross section to which the luminosity monitor is sensitive. The preliminary analysis showed that the luminosity constant did not change with the addition of the extra layer of silicon. A full study of the revised luminosity constant including a complete analysis of systematic uncertainties has been completed. The luminosity constant was determined to be {sigma}{sub eff} = 48.3 {+-} 1.9 {+-} 0.6 mb, which reduces the D0 contribution to the luminosity measurement uncertainty by almost 3%.

  11. Luminosity Distributions of Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Meegan, Charles A.; Horack, John M.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Thomas M.; Preece, Robert D.; Paciesas, William S.

    1996-05-01

    The intrinsic luminosities of gamma-ray bursts are found to be constrained by the BATSE/PVO combined intensity distribution, assuming that (1) bursts originate in {LAMBDA} = 0, {OMEGA} = 1 Friedmann cosmology with a nonevolving density distribution, (2) the nonevolving intrinsic luminosity function can be modeled as a truncated power law, and (3) burst spectra are modeled as power laws with identical spectral indices. These simplifying assumptions allow constraints to be placed on luminosity functions in cosmological gamma-ray burst scenarios and indicate that standard-candle sources are not favored. In general, either the minimum burst luminosity L_min_ or the maximum burst luminosity L_max_ are known, with the opposite end of the luminosity function unconstrained. Both L_max_ and L_min_ must be specified for luminosity power-law indices near 2. When these results are combined with other studies measuring other cosmological burst signatures, it is possible that the intrinsic luminosity function contains more low-luminosity bursts than high-luminosity ones.

  12. TRANSIENT EXTREMELY SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M3: A NEW CV X-RAY LUMINOSITY RECORD?

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. S.; Heinke, C. O.; Elsner, R. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Edmonds, P. D.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2011-05-01

    We observed the accreting white dwarf (WD) 1E1339.8+2837 (1E1339) in the globular cluster M3 in 2003 November, 2004 May, and 2005 January, using the Chandra ACIS-S detector. The source was observed in 1992 to possess traits of a supersoft X-ray source (SSS), with a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity as large as 2 x 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, after which time the source's luminosity fell by roughly two orders of magnitude, adopting a hard X-ray spectrum more typical of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our observations confirm 1E1339's hard CV-like spectrum, with photon index {Gamma} = 1.3 {+-} 0.2. We found 1E1339 to be highly variable, with a 0.5-10 keV luminosity ranging from (1.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} to 8.5{sup +4.9}{sub -4.6} x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}, with 1E1339's maximum luminosity being perhaps the highest yet recorded for hard X-ray emission from a WD. In 2005 January, 1E1339 displayed substantial low-energy emission below {approx}0.3 keV. Although current Chandra responses cannot properly model this emission, its bolometric luminosity appears comparable to or greater than that of the hard spectral component. This raises the possibility that the supersoft X-ray emission seen from 1E1339 in 1992 may have shifted to the far-UV.

  13. Starbursts in Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (LLAGN), which comprise low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and transition-type objects (TOs), represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, we search for spectroscopic signatures of starbursts and post-starbursts in LLAGN, and investigate their relationship to the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the circumnuclear optical continuum of these galaxies. We have found that intermediate-age populations (108-109 yr) are very common in weak-[O I] LLAGN, but that very young stars (≤107 yr) contribute very little to the central optical continuum of these objects. However, ˜ 1 Gyr ago these nuclei harboured starbursts of size ˜ 100 pc and masses 107-108 M⊙. Meanwhile, most of the strong-[O I] LLAGN have predominantly old stellar populations.

  14. Evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1985-01-01

    A nonparametric procedure for determination of the evolution of the luminosity function of extragalactic objects and use of this for prediction of expected redshift and luminosity distribution of objects is described. The relation between this statistical evolution of the population and their physical evolution, such as the variation with cosmological epoch of their luminosity and formation rate is presented. This procedure when applied to a sample of optically selected quasars with redshifts less than two shows that the luminosity function evolves more strongly for higher luminosities, indicating a larger quasar activity at earlier epochs and a more rapid evolution of the objects during their higher luminosity phases. It is also shown that absence of many quasars at redshifts greater than three implies slowing down of this evolution in the conventional cosmological models, perhaps indicating that this is near the epoch of the birth of the quasar (and galaxies).

  15. Luminosity Correlations for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications for Their Prompt and Afterglow Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K.

    2012-10-01

    We present the relation between the (z- and k-corrected) spectral lags, τ, for the standard Swift energy bands 50-100 keV and 100-200 keV and the peak isotropic luminosity, L iso (a relation reported first by Norris et al.), for a subset of 12 long Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) taken from a recent study of this relation by Ukwatta et al. The chosen GRBs are also a subset of the Dainotti et al. sample, a set of Swift GRBs of known redshift, employed in establishing a relation between the (GRB frame) luminosity, LX , of the shallow (or constant) flux portion of the typical X-Ray Telescope GRB-afterglow light curve and the (GRB frame) time of transition to the normal decay rate, T brk. We also present the LX -T brk relation using only the bursts common in the two samples. The two relations exhibit a significant degree of correlation (ρ = -0.65 for the L iso-τ and ρ = -0.88 for the LX -T brk relation) and have surprisingly similar best-fit power-law indices (-1.19 ± 0.17 for L iso-τ and -1.10 ± 0.03 for LX -T brk). Even more surprisingly, we noted that although τ and T brk represent different GRB time variables, it appears that the first relation (L iso-τ) extrapolates into the second one for timescales τ ~= T brk. This fact suggests that these two relations have a common origin, which we conjecture to be kinematic. This relation adds to the recently discovered relations between properties of the prompt and afterglow GRB phases, indicating a much more intimate relation between these two phases than hitherto considered.

  16. Luminosity Correlations for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Implications for Their Prompt and Afterglow Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Fukumura, K

    2013-01-01

    We present the relation between the (z- and k-corrected) spectral lags, tau, for the standard Swift energy bands 50 - 100 keV and 100 - 200 keV and the peak isotropic luminosity, L(sub iso) (a relation reported first by Norris et al.), for a subset of 12 long Swift GRBs taken from a recent study of this relation by Ukwatta et al. The chosen GRBs are also a subset of the Dainotti et al. sample, a set of Swift GRBs of known redshift, employed in establishing a relation between the (GRB frame) luminosity, L(sub x), of the shallow (or constant) flux portion of the typical XRT GRB-afterglow light curve and the (GRB frame) time of transition to the normal decay rate, T(sub brk). We also present the L(sub x) - T(sub brk) relation using only the bursts common in the two samples. The two relations exhibit a significant degree of correlation (rho = -0.65 for the L(sub iso) - tao and rho = -0.88 for the L(sub x) -T(sub brk) relation) and have surprisingly similar best-fit power law indices (-1.19 +/- 0.17 for L(sub iso) - tau and -1.10 +/- 0.03 for L(sub x) - T(sub brk)). Even more surprisingly, we noted that although tau and T(sub brk) represent different GRB time variables, it appears that the first relation (L(sub iso) - tao) extrapolates into the second one for timescales tau similar to T(sub brk) This fact suggests that these two relations have a common origin, which we conjecture to be kinematic. This relation adds to the recently discovered relations between properties of the prompt and afterglow GRB phases, indicating a much more intimate relation between these two phases than hitherto considered.

  17. Extended structure and fate of the nucleus in Henize 2-10

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dieu D.; Seth, Anil C.; Den Brok, Mark; Reines, Amy E.; Sand, David; McLeod, Brian E-mail: aseth@astro.utah.edu E-mail: areines@nrao.edu E-mail: bmcleod@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    We investigate the structure and nuclear region of the black hole (BH) hosting galaxy Henize 2-10. Surface brightness profiles are analyzed using Magellan/Megacam g- and r-band images. Excluding the central starburst, we find a best-fit two-component Sérsic profile with n {sub in} ∼ 0.6, r {sub eff,} {sub in} ∼ 260 pc and n {sub out} ∼ 1.8, r ∼ 1 kpc. Integrating out to our outermost data point (100'' ∼ 4.3 kpc), we calculate M{sub g} = –19.2 and M{sub r} = –19.8. The corresponding enclosed stellar mass is M {sub *} ∼ (10 ± 3) × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, ∼3 × larger than previous estimates. Apart from the central ≲500 pc, with blue colors and an irregular morphology, the galaxy appears to be an early-type system. The outer color is quite red, (g – r){sub 0} = 0.75, suggesting a dominant old population. We study the nuclear region of the galaxy using archival Gemini/NIFS K-band adaptive optics spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We place an upper limit on the BH mass of ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} from the NIFS data, consistent with that from the M {sub BH}-radio-X-ray fundamental plane. No coronal lines are seen, but a Brγ source is located at the position of the BH with a luminosity consistent with the X-ray emission. The starburst at the center of Henize 2-10 has led to the formation of several super star clusters, which are within ∼100 pc of the BH. We examine the fate of the nucleus by estimating the dynamical masses and dynamical friction timescales of the clusters. The most massive clusters (∼10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) have τ{sub dyn} ≲ 200 Myr, and thus Henize 2-10 may represent a rare snapshot of nuclear star cluster formation around a preexisting massive BH.

  18. Burst Statistics Using the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D. L.; Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Using the lag-luminosity relation and various BATSE catalogs we create a large catalog of burst redshifts, peak luminosities and emitted energies. These catalogs permit us to evaluate the lag-luminosity relation, and to study the burst energy distribution. We find that this distribution can be described as a power law with an index of alpha = 1.76 +/- 0.05 (95% confidence), close to the alpha = 2 predicted by the original quasi-universal jet model.

  19. The Low-Luminosity End of the Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, K.; Grier, C.; Barth, A. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Vestergaard, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the Hβ broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the Hβ time lag, which is assumed to yield the average Hβ BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of α = 0.533^{+0.035}_{-0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 ± 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  20. The Low-luminosity End of the Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Grier, Catherine J.; Barth, Aaron J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; De Rosa, Gisella; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Pogge, Richard W.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-04-01

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the Hβ broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the Hβ time lag, which is assumed to yield the average Hβ BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R BLR-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of \\alpha = 0.533^{+0.035}_{-0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 ± 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R BLR-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  1. THE LOW-LUMINOSITY END OF THE RADIUS-LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Grier, Catherine J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; De Rosa, Gisella; Pogge, Richard W.; Barth, Aaron J.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Gates, Elinor L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-04-20

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the H{beta} broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create ''AGN-free'' images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the H{beta} time lag, which is assumed to yield the average H{beta} BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R{sub BLR}-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of {alpha}= 0.533{sup +0.035}{sub -0.033}, consistent with previous work and with simple photoionization arguments. Only two AGNs appear to be outliers from the relationship, but both of them have monitoring light curves that raise doubt regarding the accuracy of their reported time lags. The scatter around the relationship is found to be 0.19 {+-} 0.02 dex, but would be decreased to 0.13 dex by the removal of these two suspect measurements. A large fraction of the remaining scatter in the relationship is likely due to the inaccurate distances to the AGN host galaxies. Our results help support the possibility that the R{sub BLR}-L relationship could potentially be used to turn the BLRs of AGNs into standardizable candles. This would allow the cosmological expansion of the universe to be probed by a separate population of objects, and over a larger range of redshifts.

  2. Luminosity distributions of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashall, C.; Mazzali, P.; Sasdelli, M.; Prentice, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have assembled a dataset of 165 low redshift, $z<$0.06, publicly available type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We produce maximum light magnitude ($M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$) distributions of SNe Ia to explore the diversity of parameter space that they can fill. Before correction for host galaxy extinction we find that the mean $M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$ of SNe Ia are $-18.58\\pm0.07$mag and $-18.72\\pm0.05$mag respectively. Host galaxy extinction is corrected using a new method based on the SN spectrum. After correction, the mean values of $M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$ of SNe Ia are $-19.10\\pm0.06$ and $-19.10\\pm0.05$mag respectively. After correction for host galaxy extinction, `normal' SNeIa ($\\Delta m_{15}(B)<1.6$mag) fill a larger parameter space in the Width-Luminosity Relation (WLR) than previously suggested, and there is evidence for luminous SNe Ia with large $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$. We find a bimodal distribution in $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$, with a pronounced lack of transitional events at $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$=1.6 mag. We confirm that faster, low-luminosity SNe tend to come from passive galaxies. Dividing the sample by host galaxy type, SNe Ia from star-forming (S-F) galaxies have a mean $M_{B}=-19.20 \\pm 0.05$ mag, while SNe Ia from passive galaxies have a mean $M_{B}=-18.57 \\pm 0.24$ mag. Even excluding fast declining SNe, `normal' ($M_{B}<-18$ mag) SNe Ia from S-F and passive galaxies are distinct. In the $V$-band, there is a difference of 0.4$ \\pm $0.13 mag between the median ($M_{V}$) values of the `normal' SN Ia population from passive and S-F galaxies. This is consistent with ($\\sim 15 \\pm $10)% of `normal' SNe Ia from S-F galaxies coming from an old stellar population.

  3. Luminosity distributions of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashall, C.; Mazzali, P.; Sasdelli, M.; Prentice, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have assembled a data set of 165 low redshift, z < 0.06, publicly available Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We produce maximum light magnitude (MB and MV) distributions of SNe Ia to explore the diversity of parameter space that they can fill. Before correction for host galaxy extinction we find that the mean MB and MV of SNe Ia are -18.58 ± 0.07 and -18.72 ± 0.05 mag, respectively. Host galaxy extinction is corrected using a new method based on the SN spectrum. After correction, the mean values of MB and MV of SNe Ia are -19.10 ± 0.06 and -19.10 ± 0.05 mag, respectively. After correction for host galaxy extinction, `normal' SNe Ia (Δm15(B) < 1.6 mag) fill a larger parameter space in the width-luminosity relation than previously suggested, and there is evidence for luminous SNe Ia with large Δm15(B). We find a bimodal distribution in Δm15(B), with a pronounced lack of transitional events at Δm15(B) = 1.6 mag. We confirm that faster, low-luminosity SNe tend to come from passive galaxies. Dividing the sample by host galaxy type, SNe Ia from star-forming (S-F) galaxies have a mean MB = -19.20 ± 0.05 mag, while SNe Ia from passive galaxies have a mean MB = -18.57 ± 0.24 mag. Even excluding fast declining SNe, `normal' (MB < -18 mag) SNe Ia from S-F and passive galaxies are distinct. In the V band, there is a difference of 0.4 ± 0.13 mag between the median (MV) values of the `normal' SN Ia population from passive and S-F galaxies. This is consistent with (˜15 ± 10) per cent of `normal' SNe Ia from S-F galaxies coming from an old stellar population.

  4. Study of torus structure of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, T.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the nature of the torus structure of eight low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; NGC 1566, NGC 2655, NGC 3718, NGC 3998, NGC 4138, NGC 4941, NGC 5273 and NGC 5643) based on the broad band X-ray spectra (0.5-200 keV) obtained with Suzaku and Swift/BAT. Their X-ray luminosities are smaller than 1e 42 erg/s, while the Eddington ratios span a range from 1e-4 to 1e-2. No significant iron- Kalpha line is detected in the spectra of two LLAGNs with the lowest Eddington ratios (<3e-4) in our sample (NGC 3718 and NGC 3998), suggesting that their tori are little developed. The others show the iron-Kalpha equivalent widths larger than 100 eV. For these six LLAGNs, we utilize the Monte-Carlo based simulation code by Ikeda 09 to constrain the torus parameters by assuming a nearly spherical geometry. The torus solid- angles in three sources (NGC 2655, NGC 4138, and NGC 4941) are constrained to be Omega/2pi > 0.34, and the rest are found to have torus column-densities of logNrmH > 22.7. These results suggest that there are two types of LLAGNs, (1) those where the torus is very small and little mass accretion takes place, and (2) those where the torus is moderately developed and a sufficient amount of gas is supplied to the black hole.

  5. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Molvik, Arthur W.

    1980-01-01

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  6. Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Seggebrock, T.; Habs, D.

    2012-07-09

    We present for the first time the concept of a seeded {gamma} quantum Free-Electron-Laser (QFEL) at 478 keV, which has very different properties compared to a classical. The basic concept is to produce a highly brilliant {gamma} beam via SASE. To produce highly intense and coherent {gamma} beam, we intend to use a seeded FEL scheme. Important for the production of such a {gamma} beam are novel refractive {gamma}-lenses for focusing and an efficient monochromator, allowing to generate a very intense and coherent seed beam. The energy of the {gamma} beam is 478 keV, corresponding to a wavelength in the sub-Angstrom regime (1/38 A). To realize a coherent {gamma} beam at 478 keV, it is necessary to use a quantum FEL design. At such high radiation energies a classical description of the {gamma}-FEL becomes wrong.

  7. CPLOAS_2 V2.10 verification report.

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, Katrina M.

    2014-07-01

    A series of test cases designed to verify the correct implementation of several features of the CPLOAS_2 program are documented. CPLOAS_2 is used to calculate the probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS) for a weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) system. CPLOAS_2 takes physical properties (e.g., temperature, pressure, etc.) of a WL/SL system and uses these properties and definitions of link failure properties in probabilistic calculations to determine PLOAS. The features being tested include (i) six aleatory distribution forms, (ii) five numerical procedures for the determination of PLOAS (i.e., one quadrature procedure, two simple random sampling procedures, and two importance sampling procedures), and (iii) time and environmental margin calculations. All tests were performed with CPLOAS_2 version 2.10.

  8. Higher luminosities via alternative incident channels

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1985-04-01

    We show that PEP provides some unique opportunities for one and two photon physics with real photons as well as for QCD studies with internal targets. Photon beams would avoid the major limitation on the luminosity of present machines and could provide PEP an ideal b-physics factory producing the full range of J/sub c//sup PC/ and J/sub b//sup PC/ states that may not be observable otherwise as well as allow a whole new class of ''missing-mass'' experiments. These latter particles are the pseudo-Goldstone bosons and their supersymmetric counterparts. These and related possibilities like a single-pass, ''free electron laser'' facility or even synchrotron radiation beam lines all favor a mini-maxi configuration for the low-beta insertions in PEP. This allows more diverse experiments without excluding any ongoing experimental programs. Such possibilities have interesting implications for a number of proposed facilities including the SSC. Some systematic machine physics studies over a range of energies are suggested. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Intrinsic luminosities of the Jovian planets

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.

    1980-02-01

    We review available data and theories on the size and nature of interior power sources in the Jovian planets. Broad band infrared measurements indicate that Jupiter and Saturn have interior heat fluxes about 150 and 50 times larger, respectively, than the terrestrial value. While Neptune has a modest heat flux (approx.5 times terrestrial), it is clearly detected by earth-based measurements. Only Uranus seems to lack a detectable interior heat flow. Various models, ranging from simple cooling to gravitational layering to radioactivity, are discussed. Current evidence seems to favor a cooling model in which the escape of heat is regulated by the atmosphere. This model seems capable of explaining phenomena such as the uniformity of effective temperature over Jupiter's surface and the different emission rates of Uranus and Neptune. In such a model the heat radiated from the atmosphere may derived from depletion of a thermal reservoir in the interior, or it may derive from separation of chemical elements during formation of a core. Calculations indicate that in the earlier stages of cooling, Jupiter and Saturn may have more homogeneous abundances of hydrogen and helium and radiate energy derived from simple cooling. At a subsequent phase (which may be later than the present time), hydrogen and helium will separate and supply grativational energy. Either model is consistent with a hot, high-luminosity origin for the Jovian Planets.

  10. A Compton-thick Wind in the High Luminosity Quasar, PDS 456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Behar, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaspi, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    PDS 456 is a nearby (z=0.184), luminous (L(sub bol) approximately equal to 10(exp 47) ergs(exp -1) type I quasar. A deep 190 ks Suzaku observation in February 2007 revealed the complex, broad band X-ray spectrum of PDS 456. The Suzaku spectrum exhibits highly statistically significant absorption features near 9 keV in the quasar rest-frame. We show that the most plausible origin of the absorption is from blue-shifted resonance (1s-2p) transitions of hydrogen-like iron (at 6.97 keV in the rest frame). This indicates that a highly ionized outflow may be present moving at near relativistic velocities (0.26-0.31c). A possible hard X-ray excess is detected above 15 keV with HXD (at 99.8% confidence), which may arise from high column density gas (N(sub H) greater than 10(exp 24)cm(exp -2) partially covering the X-ray emission, or through strong Compton reflection. Here we propose that the iron K-shell absorption in PDS 456 is associated with a thick, possibly clumpy outflow, covering about 20% of 4(pi) steradian solid angle. The outflow is likely launched from the inner accretion disk, within 15-100 gravitational radii of the black hole. The kinetic power of the outflow may be similar to the bolometric luminosity of PDS 456. Such a powerful wind could have a significant effect on the co-evolution of the host galaxy and its supermassive black hole, through feedback.

  11. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bachetti, Matteo; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William

    2014-01-10

    We present NuSTAR observations of Vela X-1, a persistent, yet highly variable, neutron star high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). Two observations were taken at similar orbital phases but separated by nearly a year. They show very different 3-79 keV flux levels as well as strong variability during each observation, covering almost one order of magnitude in flux. These observations allow, for the first time ever, investigations on kilo-second time-scales of how the centroid energies of cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) depend on flux for a persistent HMXB. We find that the line energy of the harmonic CRSF is correlated with flux, as expected in the sub-critical accretion regime. We argue that Vela X-1 has a very narrow accretion column with a radius of around 0.4 km that sustains a Coulomb interaction dominated shock at the observed luminosities of L {sub x} ∼ 3 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. Besides the prominent harmonic line at 55 keV the fundamental line around 25 keV is clearly detected. We find that the strengths of the two CRSFs are anti-correlated, which we explain by photon spawning. This anti-correlation is a possible explanation for the debate about the existence of the fundamental line. The ratio of the line energies is variable with time and deviates significantly from 2.0, also a possible consequence of photon spawning, which changes the shape of the line. During the second observation, Vela X-1 showed a short off-state in which the power-law softened and a cut-off was no longer measurable. It is likely that the source switched to a different accretion regime at these low mass accretion rates, explaining the drastic change in spectral shape.

  12. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  13. Cosmological parameters and evolution of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caditz, David; Petrosian, Vahe

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the observed distribution of discrete sources of a flux limited sample, the luminosity function of these sources, and the cosmological model is discussed. It is stressed that some assumptions about the form and evolution of the luminosity function must be made in order to determine the cosmological parameters from the observed distribution of sources. Presented is a method to test the validity of these assumptions using the observations. It is shown how, using higher moments of the observed distribution, one can determine, independently of the cosmological model, all parameters of the luminosity function except those describing evolution of the density and the luminosity of the luminosity function. These methods are applied to the sample of approximately 1000 galaxies recently used by Loh and Spillar to determine a value of the cosmological density parameter Omega approx = 1. It is shown that the assumptions made by Loh and Spillar about the luminosity function are inconsistent with the data, and that a self-consistent treatment of the data indicates a lower value of Omega approx = 0.2 and a flatter luminosity function. It should be noted, however, that incompleteness in the sample could cause a flattening of the luminosity function and lower the calculated value of Omega and that uncertainty in the values of these parameters due to random fluctuations is large.

  14. Luminosity with Intracloud-Type Initial Breakdown Pulses and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Orville, Richard

    2016-04-01

    High-speed video data for three hybrid lightning flashes show luminosity increases at visible wavelengths that are time-correlated with large, intracloud (IC) type initial breakdown (IB) pulses in electric field change (E-change) data. In one case, a diffuse luminosity increase is visible for 280-300 us, apparently centered near 9 km altitude. At the same time, locations of VHF sources and E-change pulses indicate breakdown activity occurring at altitudes of 9.2-10.2 km altitude, and the initial leader was developing rapidly upward. The second case has a diffuse luminosity increase at the time of three large IC-type IB pulses, while the initial leader is advancing upward from about 7 km altitude. In the third example, a series of luminosity bursts are visible at the times of several large-amplitude IC-type IB pulses, although the center of the activity is apparently above the video frame. In all three hybrid flashes, the luminous IC-type IB pulses are relatively complicated and large in E-change amplitude, and most have distinct electrostatic offset at horizontal distances of 20-25 km from a sensor. Such large amplitude IB pulses have been associated with the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) in prior work [Marshall et al., 2013, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50866]. No satellite or ground-based TGF observations were available for these events, hence it is not known if these TGF candidates produced gammas or other high energy radiation. This presentation describes the video and E-change observations during the intracloud and cloud-to-ground initial breakdown periods of these flashes and implications for TGF production.

  15. Upgrade of the D0 luminosity monitor readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, John; Bridges, Lloyd; Casey, Brendan; Enari, Yuji; Green, Johnny; Johnson, Marvin; Kwarciany, Rick; Miao, Chyi-Chiang; Partridge, Richard; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Wang, Jigang; /Brown U. /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We describe upgrades to the readout system for the D0 Luminosity Monitor. The D0 Luminosity Monitor consists of plastic scintillation detectors with fine-mesh photomultiplier readout that cover the pseudorapidity range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4. The detector is designed to provide a precise measurement of the rate for non-diffractive inelastic collisions that is used to calculate the TeVatron luminosity at D0. The new readout system is based on custom VME electronics that make precise time-of-flight and charge measurements for each luminosity counter. These measurements are used to identify beam crossings with non-diffractive interactions by requiring in-time hits in both the forward and backward luminosity counters. We have also significantly increased signal/noise for the photomultiplier signals by developing a new front-end preamplifier and improving the grounding scheme.

  16. Assessing the contribution of centaur impacts to ice giant luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Voyager 2 observations revealed that Neptune's internal luminosity is an order of magnitude higher than that of Uranus. If the two planets have similar interior structures and cooling histories, Neptune's luminosity can only be explained by invoking some energy source beyond gravitational contraction. This paper investigates whether centaur impacts could provide the energy necessary to produce Neptune's luminosity. The major findings are (1) that impacts on both Uranus and Neptune are too infrequent to provide luminosities of order Neptune's observed value, even for optimistic impact-rate estimates and (2) that Uranus and Neptune rarely have significantly different impact-generated luminosities at any given time. Uranus and Neptune most likely have structural differences that force them to cool and contract at different rates.

  17. The D0 experiment's integrated luminosity for Tevatron Run IIa

    SciTech Connect

    Andeen, T.; Casey, B.C.K.; DeVaughan, K.; Enari, Y.; Gallas, E.; Krop, D.; Partridge, R.; Schellman, H.; Snow, G.R.; Yacoob, S.; Yoo, H.D.; /Brown U. /Fermilab /Indiana U. /Northwestern U. /Nebraska U.

    2007-04-01

    An essential ingredient in all cross section measurements is the luminosity used to normalize the data sample. In this note, we present the final assessment of the integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment during Tevatron Run IIa. The luminosity measurement is derived from hit rates from the products of inelastic proton-antiproton collisions registered in two arrays of scintillation counters called the luminosity monitor (LM) detectors. Measured LM rates are converted to absolute luminosity using a normalization procedure that is based on previously measured inelastic cross sections and the geometric acceptance and efficiency of the LM detectors for registering inelastic events. During Run IIa, the LM detector performance was improved by a sequence of upgrades to the electronic readout system and other factors summarized in this note. The effects of these changes on the reported luminosity were tracked carefully during the run. Due to the changes, we partition the run into periods for which different conversions from measured LM rates to absolute luminosity apply. The primary upgrade to the readout system late in Run IIa facilitated a reevaluation of the overall normalization of the luminosity measurement for the full data sample. In this note, we first review the luminosity measurement technique employed by D0. We then summarize the changes to the LM system during Run IIa and the corresponding normalization adjustments. The effect of the adjustments is to increase D0's assessment of its recorded integrated luminosity compared to what was initially reported during Run IIa. The overall increase is 13.4% for data collected between April 20, 2002 (the beginning of Run IIa data used for physics analysis) and February 22, 2006 (the end of Run IIa).

  18. The Luminosities of the Coldest Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinney, C. G.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Mike; Morley, Caroline V.; Wright, Edward L.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, brown dwarfs have been extended to a new Y-dwarf class with effective temperatures colder than 500 K and masses in the range of 5-30 Jupiter masses. They fill a crucial gap in observable atmospheric properties between the much colder gas-giant planets of our own solar system (at around 130 K) and both hotter T-type brown dwarfs and the hotter planets that can be imaged orbiting young nearby stars (both with effective temperatures in the range of 1500-1000 K). Distance measurements for these objects deliver absolute magnitudes that make critical tests of our understanding of very cool atmospheres. Here we report new distances for nine Y dwarfs and seven very late T dwarfs. These reveal that Y dwarfs do indeed represent a continuation of the T-dwarf sequence to both fainter luminosities and cooler temperatures. They also show that the coolest objects display a large range in absolute magnitude for a given photometric color. The latest atmospheric models show good agreement with the majority of these Y-dwarf absolute magnitudes. This is also the case for WISE0855-0714, the coldest and closest brown dwarf to the Sun, which shows evidence for water ice clouds. However, there are also some outstanding exceptions, which suggest either binarity or the presence of condensate clouds. The former is readily testable with current adaptive optics facilities. The latter would mean that the range of cloudiness in Y dwarfs is substantial with most hosting almost no clouds—while others have dense clouds, making them prime targets for future variability observations to study cloud dynamics. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  19. The luminosities of the coldest brown dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Tinney, C. G.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Mike; Morley, Caroline V.; Wright, Edward L.

    2014-11-20

    In recent years, brown dwarfs have been extended to a new Y-dwarf class with effective temperatures colder than 500 K and masses in the range of 5-30 Jupiter masses. They fill a crucial gap in observable atmospheric properties between the much colder gas-giant planets of our own solar system (at around 130 K) and both hotter T-type brown dwarfs and the hotter planets that can be imaged orbiting young nearby stars (both with effective temperatures in the range of 1500-1000 K). Distance measurements for these objects deliver absolute magnitudes that make critical tests of our understanding of very cool atmospheres. Here we report new distances for nine Y dwarfs and seven very late T dwarfs. These reveal that Y dwarfs do indeed represent a continuation of the T-dwarf sequence to both fainter luminosities and cooler temperatures. They also show that the coolest objects display a large range in absolute magnitude for a given photometric color. The latest atmospheric models show good agreement with the majority of these Y-dwarf absolute magnitudes. This is also the case for WISE0855-0714, the coldest and closest brown dwarf to the Sun, which shows evidence for water ice clouds. However, there are also some outstanding exceptions, which suggest either binarity or the presence of condensate clouds. The former is readily testable with current adaptive optics facilities. The latter would mean that the range of cloudiness in Y dwarfs is substantial with most hosting almost no clouds—while others have dense clouds, making them prime targets for future variability observations to study cloud dynamics.

  20. Constraining the Warm Dark Matter Particle Mass through Ultra-deep UV Luminosity Functions at z=2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Sanchez, N. G.; Castellano, M.; Grazian, A.

    2016-02-01

    We compute the mass function of galactic dark matter halos for different values of the warm dark matter (WDM) particle mass mX and compare it with the number density of ultra-faint galaxies derived from the deepest UV luminosity function available so far at redshift z ≈ 2. The magnitude limit MUV = -13 reached by such observations allows us to probe the WDM mass functions down to scales close to or smaller than the half-mass mode mass scale ˜109 M⊙. This allowed for an efficient discrimination among predictions for different mX which turn out to be in practice independent of the star formation efficiency η adopted to associate the observed UV luminosities of galaxies to the corresponding dark matter halo masses. Adopting a conservative approach to take into account the existing theoretical uncertainties in the galaxy halo mass function, we obtain a robust limit mX ≥ 1.8 keV for the mass of thermal relic WDM particles when comparing with the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies, while mX ≥ 1.5 keV is obtained when we compare with the Schechter fit to the observed luminosity function. The corresponding lower limit for sterile neutrinos depends on the modeling of the production mechanism; for instance msterile ≳ 4 keV holds for the Shi-Fuller mechanism. We discuss the impact of observational uncertainties on the above bound on mX. In the cold dark matter (CDM) limit {m}X\\gg 1 {{keV}} we recover the generic CDM result that very inefficient star formation efficiency is required to match the observed galaxy abundances. As a baseline for comparison with forthcoming observational results from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field project, we provide predictions for the number density of faint galaxies with MUV = -13 for different values of the WDM particle mass and of the star formation efficiency η, which are valid up to z ≈ 4.

  1. KevJumba and the Adolescence of YouTube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the significance of YouTube as a pedagogical space from which young people can play participatory roles as theorists in their own constructions as popular cultural subjects. Drawing upon the public profile of "KevJumba," a teenager who makes videos of himself on YouTube, the article suggests that representational practices…

  2. HEXIT-SAT: a mission concept for x-ray grazing incidence telescopes from 0.5 to 70 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; Perola, Giuseppe C.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Citterio, Oberto; Anselmi, Alberto; Comastri, Andrea

    2004-10-01

    While the energy density of the Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB) provides a statistical estimate of the super massive black hole (SMBH) growth and mass density in the Universe, the lack, so far, of focusing instrument in the 20-60 keV (where the CXB energy density peaks), frustrates our effort to obtain a comprehensive picture of the SMBH evolutionary properties. HEXIT-SAT (High Energy X-ray Imaging Telescope SATellite) is a mission concept capable of exploring the hard X-ray sky with focusing/imaging instrumentation, to obtain an unbiased census of accreting SMBH up to the redshifts where galaxy formation peaks, and on extremely wide luminosity ranges. This will represent a leap forward comparable to that achieved in the soft X-rays by the Einstein Observatory in the late 70'. In addition to accreting SMBH, and very much like the Einstein Observatory, this mission would also have the capabilities of investigating almost any type of the celestial X-ray sources. HEXIT-SAT is based on high throughput (>400 cm2 @ 30 keV; >1200 cm2 @ 1 keV), high quality (15 arcsec Half Power Diameter) multi-layer optics, coupled with focal plane detectors with high efficiency in the full 0.5-70keV range. Building on the BeppoSAX experience, a low-Earth, equatorial orbit, will assure a low and stable particle background, and thus an extremely good sensitivity for faint hard X-ray sources. At the flux limits of 1/10 microCrab (10-30 keV) and 1/3 microCrab (20-40 keV) (reachable in one Msec observation) we should detect ~100 and ~40 sources in the 15 arcmin FWHM Field of View respectively, thus resolving >80% and ~65% of the CXB where its energy density peaks.

  3. On the dependence of the X-ray continuum variations with luminosity in accreting X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Gornostaev, M. I.; Klochkov, D.; Laplace, E.; Lukin, V. V.; Shakura, N. I.

    2015-09-01

    Using RXTE/ASM archival data, we investigate the behaviour of the spectral hardness ratio as a function of X-ray luminosity in a sample of six transient X-ray pulsars (EXO 2030+375, GX 304-1, 4U 0115+63, V 0332+63, A 0535+26 and MXB 0656-072). In all sources we find that the spectral hardness ratio defined as F5-12 keV/F1.33-3 keV increases with the ASM flux (1.33-12 keV) at low luminosities and then saturates or even slightly decreases above some critical X-ray luminosity falling into the range ˜(3-7) × 1037 erg s-1. Two-dimensional structure of accretion columns in the radiation-diffusion limit is calculated for two possible geometries (filled and hollow cylinder) for mass accretion rates dot{M} ranging from 1017 to 1.2 × 1018 g s-1. The observed spectral behaviour in the transient X-ray pulsars with increasing dot{M} can be reproduced by a Compton-saturated sidewall emission from optically thick magnetized accretion columns with taking into account the emission reflected from the neutron star atmosphere. At dot{M} above some critical value dot{M}_cr˜ (6-8)× 10^{17} g s-1, the height of the column becomes such that the contribution of the reflected component to the total emission starts decreasing, which leads to the saturation and even slight decrease of the spectral hardness. Hollow-cylinder columns have a smaller height than the filled-cylinder ones, and the contribution of the reflected component in the total emission does not virtually change with dot{M} (and hence the hardness of the continuum monotonically increases) up to higher mass accretion rates than dot{M}_cr for the filled columns.

  4. A Deep 0.3-10 keV Spectrum of the H2O Maser Galaxy IC 2560

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilak, Avanti; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Done, Chris; Madejski, Grzegorz

    2008-05-01

    We present a new XMM-Newton spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of IC 2560, which hosts H2O maser emission from an inclined Keplerian accretion disk. The X-ray spectrum shows soft excess due to multitemperature ionized plasma, a hard continuum, and strong emission features, from Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, and Ni, mainly due to fluorescence. It is consistent with reflection of the continuum from a mostly neutral medium and obscuration due to a high column density, >1024 cm-2. The amplitude of the reflected component may exceed 10% of the central unobscured luminosity. This is higher than the reflected fraction of a few percent observed in other Seyfert 2 sources such as NGC 4945. We observe an emission line at 6.7 keV, possibly due to Fe XXV, undetected in previous Chandra observations. The absorption column density associated with this line is less than 1023 cm-2, which is lower than the obscuration of the central source. We hypothesize that this highly ionized Fe line emission originates in warm gas, which is also responsible for a scattered component of continuum emission that may dominate the spectrum between 1 and 3 keV. We compare X-ray and maser emission characteristics of IC 2560 and other AGNs that exhibit water maser emission originating in disk structures around central engines. The temperature for the region of the disk associated with maser action is consistent with the expected 400-1000 K range. The clumpiness of disk structures (inferred from the maser distribution) may depend on the unobscured luminosities of the central engines.

  5. The stellar content of low luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid Fernandes, R.; Gonzalez-Delgado, R.; Schmitt, H.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Martins, L. P.

    2003-08-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the stellar populations of LINERs and LINER/HII Transition Objects (TOs). Our main goal is to determine whether the stars who live in the innermost regions of these low luminosity active galaxies are in some way related to their emission line properties, which would imply in a link between the stellar population and the gas excitation mechanism. High sinal to noise long-slit spectra in the 3500-5400 Å interval were collected for over 50 galaxies. The sample was selected out of the magnitude limited survey of ~ 500 galaxies of Ho et al (1997), which provides a representative sample of the local universe. The stellar content of these galaxies was examined in entirely empirical terms, both by the measurement of colors and absorption features and by a comparison with non-active galaxies spanning a wide range of stellar populations, from young starbursts to old elliptical galaxies. Our main findings are: No features due to Wolf-Rayet stars were detected in either LINERs or TOs. On the other hand, strong High order Balmer lines (HOBLs) of HI in absorption are ubiquitous in TOs but not in LINERs. About 50% of the TOs exihibit these features, which indicate the presence of 108-109 yr populations. These TOs also have diluted metal absorption lines and somewhat bluer colors than other objects in the sample. Most LINERs and the remaining 50% TOs, on the other hand, have deep metal lines typical of old stellar populations. The presence of intermediate age populations anti-correlates strongly with [OI]/Ha, a critical diagnostic line ratio. For instance, over 90% of nuclei with conspicuous intermediate age populations are weak [OI]-emitters. These findings strongly suggest a link between the stellar populations and the ionization mechanism in TOs. Possible scenarios, including weak circumnuclear starbursts, supernova-remnannts and evolved post-starburst populations, are being examined. By analogy with previous work on starburst + Seyfert 2

  6. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) ≳ 10{sup 47} erg s{sup –1}; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc{sup –3} having νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) > 10{sup 46.6} erg s{sup –1} for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL{sub ν}(0.25 μm)/νL{sub ν}(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  7. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-08-01

    Infrared luminosities νL ν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z >~ 3 with maximum luminosity νL ν(7.8 μm) >~ 1047 erg s-1 luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc-3 having νL ν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s-1 for all 2 luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νL ν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νL ν(0.25 μm)/νL ν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define "obscured" quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ~ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ~ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  8. Fossil group origins. III. The relation between optical and X-ray luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; De Grandi, S.; D'Onghia, E.; Barrena, R.; Boschin, W.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Zarattini, S.; Biviano, A.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Corsini, E. M.; del Burgo, C.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: This study is part of the Fossil group origins (FOGO) project which aims to carry out a systematic and multiwavelength study of a large sample of fossil systems. Here we focus on the relation between the optical luminosity (Lopt) and X-ray luminosity (LX). Methods: Out of a total sample of 28 candidate fossil systems, we consider a sample of 12 systems whose fossil classification has been confirmed by a companion study. They are compared with the complementary sample of 16 systems whose fossil nature has not been confirmed and with a subsample of 102 galaxy systems from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster survey. Fossil and normal systems span the same redshift range 0 keV band is computed using data from the ROSAT All Sky Survey to be comparable to the estimates of the comparison sample. For each fossil and normal system we homogeneously compute Lopt in the r-band within the characteristic cluster radius, using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. Results: We sample the LX-Lopt relation over two orders of magnitude in LX. Our analysis shows that fossil systems are not statistically distinguishable from the normal systems through the 2D Kolmogorov-Smirnov test nor the fit of the LX-Lopt relation. Thus, the optical luminosity of the galaxy system does strongly correlate with the X-ray luminosity of the hot gas component, independently of whether the system is fossil or not. We discuss our results in comparison with previous literature. Conclusions: We conclude that our results are consistent with the classical merging scenario of the brightest galaxy formed via merger/cannibalism of other group galaxies with conservation of the optical light. We find no evidence for a peculiar state of the hot intracluster medium. Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Masses, luminosities and dynamics of galactic molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Rivolo, A. R.; Mooney, T. J.; Barrett, J. W.; Sage, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies takes place in molecular clouds and the Milky Way is the only galaxy in which it is possible to resolve and study the physical properties and star formation activity of individual clouds. The masses, luminosities, dynamics, and distribution of molecular clouds, primarily giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way are described and analyzed. The observational data sets are the Massachusetts-Stony Brook CO Galactic Plane Survey and the IRAS far IR images. The molecular mass and infrared luminosities of glactic clouds are then compared with the molecular mass and infrared luminosities of external galaxies.

  10. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  11. Luminosity Optimization With Offset, Crossing Angle, and Distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC

    2005-06-15

    In a linear collider, sources of beam jitter due to kicker noise, quadrupole vibration and long-range transverse wakefields will lead to beam offsets and tilts at the Intersection Point (IP). In addition, sources of emittance dilution such as short-range transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will lead to internal beam distortions. When the IP disruption parameter is large, these beam imperfections will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. In this paper, we study the luminosity loss and then the optimization required to partially cancel the luminosity loss both analytically and with direct simulation.

  12. Notes on Van der Meer scan for absolute luminosity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagura, Vladislav

    2011-10-01

    The absolute luminosity can be measured in an accelerator by sweeping beams transversely across each other in the so-called van der Meer scan. We prove that the method can be applied in the general case of arbitrary beam directions and a separation scan plane. A simple method to develop an image of the beam in its transverse plane from spatial distributions of interaction vertexes is also proposed. From the beam images one can determine their overlap and the absolute luminosity. This provides an alternative way of the luminosity measurement during van der Meer scan.

  13. Deriving an X-ray luminosity function of dwarf novae

    SciTech Connect

    Byckling, Kristiina; Osborne, Julian; Mukai, Koji

    2010-07-15

    Current measurements of X-ray luminosity functions of dwarf novae contain biases due to high X-ray flux sources. We have obtained Suzaku, XMM-Newton and ASCA observations of nearby DNe which have parallax-based distance measurements, and carried out X-ray spectral analysis for these sources. Our primary goal is to derive a reliable X-ray luminosity function for this sample, and to compare it with existing X-ray luminosity functions. We briefly introduce the source sample and preliminary results.

  14. 40-keV electron durable trapping electron

    SciTech Connect

    Feynman, J.; Hardy, D.A.; Mullen, E.G.

    1984-03-01

    The positron and extent of the region in which electrons with energies less than 40-keV are durably trapped in the nightside magnetosphere is found for both normal and disturbed geomagnetic conditions by using data from the P78-2 (SCATHA) satellite. The region of the magnetosphere from 5.3 to 7.9 R/sub E/ was studied. In this region neither solar-magnetic nor geocentric-solar magnetospheric coordinates order the data satisfactorily. A new coordinate systems called composite coordinates is introduced. It takes account of the fact that this region of the magnetosphere is strongly influenced by both the earth's ddipole field and the direction of the solar wind. In composite coordinates when Kp< or =4+, 40-keV electron fluxes were almost continuously present in a region centered on the equatorial palne and 1.2 R/sub E/ in half width. At larger composite coordinate latitudes there is another region more than 1 R/sub E/ thick within which 40-keV electron fluxes routinely appear and disappear on time scales of one hour as the trapping boundary actively moves over the satellite. We have no evidence that SCATHA over entered the tail lobes where no particles are trapped. When Kp> or =6- the region in which 40-keV electron fluxes were always present moved earthward and/or thinned but remained ordered in composite coordinates. We suggest that the new coordinate system will be useful for ordering other data sets taken in this region of the magnetosphere.

  15. The Kinematics of the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D

    2004-03-17

    Herein I review the argument that kinematics, i.e. relativistic motions of the emitting source in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are the cause of the lag-luminosity relationship observed in bursts with known redshifts.

  16. A bimodal model for the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The galaxy luminosity function in the Virgo cluster has been recently found to show a clear separation between bright galaxies and dwarf galaxies. Here, consideration is given to the effect on the luminosity function of galaxy binding energy which allows gas to be retained and star formation to proceed over about 1 Gyr in massive galaxies, but implies wind-driven mass loss and inefficient star formation in dwarf galaxies.

  17. Luminosity and carbon enhancement in N-type carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Recent observational data indicate the likelihood of a relation between luminosity and carbon enhancement in N-type irregularly variable carbon stars in the sense that the more luminous carbon stars appear to have smaller enhancements of carbon. No relation appears between carbon enhancement and red colors. The observational data are the luminosities of Peery (1975), the colors and CN band indices of Baumert (1972), the CO indices of Fay and Ridgway (1976), and the C2 indices of Gow (1977).

  18. Luminosity function and jet structure of Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Nappo, F.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. The jet of GRBs could be uniform, with constant energy per unit solid angle within the jet aperture, or it could be structured, namely with energy and velocity that depend on the angular distance from the axis of the jet. We try to get some insight about the still unknown structure of GRBs by studying their luminosity function. We show that low (1046-48 erg s-1) and high (i.e. with L ≥ 1050 erg s-1) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique luminosity function, which is also consistent with current lower limits in the intermediate luminosity range (1048-50 erg s-1). We derive analytical expressions for the luminosity function of GRBs in uniform and structured jet models and compare them with the data. Uniform jets can reproduce the entire luminosity function with reasonable values of the free parameters. A structured jet can also fit adequately the current data, provided that the energy within the jet is relatively strongly structured, i.e. E ∝ θ-k with k ≥ 4. The classical E ∝ θ-2 structured jet model is excluded by the current data.

  19. XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic Centre Region - I. The distribution of low-luminosity X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, V.; Warwick, R. S.

    2013-02-01

    We exploit XMM-Newton archival data in a study of the extended X-ray emission emanating from Galactic Centre (GC) region. XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and EPIC-MOS observations, with a total exposure time approaching 0.5 and 1 Ms, respectively, were used to create mosaicked images of a 100 pc × 100 pc region centred on Sgr A* in four bands covering the 2-10 keV energy range. We have also constructed a set of narrow-band images corresponding to the neutral iron fluorescence line (Fe i Kα) at 6.4 keV and the K-shell lines at 6.7 and 6.9 keV from helium-like (Fe xxv Kα) and hydrogenic (Fe xxvi Lyα) iron ions. We use a combination of spatial and spectral information to decompose the GC X-ray emission into three distinct components. These comprise: first the emission from hard X-ray emitting unresolved point sources; secondly the reflected continuum and fluorescent line emission from dense molecular material and, thirdly, the soft diffuse emission from thermal plasma in the temperature range kT ≈ 0.8-1.5 keV. We show that the unresolved-source component accounts for the bulk of the 6.7- and 6.9-keV line emission and also makes a major contribution to both the 6.4-keV line emission and the 7.2-10 keV continuum flux. We fit the observed X-ray surface-brightness distribution with an empirical 2D model, which we then compare with a prediction based on an NIR-derived 3D mass model for the old stellar population in the GC. The X-ray surface brightness falls-off more rapidly with angular offset from Sgr A* than the mass-model prediction. One interpretation is that the 2-10 keV X-ray emissivity increases from ≈ 5 × 1027 erg s- 1 M- 1⊙ at 20 arcmin up to almost twice this value at 2 arcmin. Alternatively, some refinement of the mass model may be required, although it is unclear whether this applies to the Nuclear Stellar Cluster, the Nuclear Stellar Disc or a combination of both components. The unresolved hard X-ray emitting source population, on the basis of spectral

  20. Internal Absorption and the Luminosity of Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Boqi; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the correlation of the optical depth of dust in galactic disks with galaxy luminosity. We examine normal late-type (spiral and irregular) galaxies with measured far-ultraviolet (UV, λ ˜ 2000 Å) fluxes and compile the corresponding fluxes in the far-infrared (FIR, λ ˜ 40-120 μm) as measured by IRA S. The UV-to-FIR flux ratio is found to decrease rapidly with increasing FIR and FIR + UV luminosities. Since both the UV and FIR radiation originate mostly from the young stellar population in late-type galaxies, the UV-to-FIR flux ratio is a measure of the fraction of the light produced by young stars escaping from galaxy disks. Thus, the strong correlations above imply that the dust opacity increases with the luminosity of the young stellar population. We also find that the ratio of the UV-to-FIR flux decreases with increasing galaxy blue luminosity (a tracer of the intermediate-age stellar population) and with galaxy rotation speed (an indicator of galaxy mass). We supplement the UV sample of galaxies with an optically selected sample and find that the blue-to-FIR flux ratio declines with both FIR luminosity and galaxy rotation speed. We also examine a sample of galaxies for which the Hβ/Hα flux ratios can be obtained and find that the Hβ/Hα ratio, which also measures the extinction, decreases with the increasing FIR luminosity. We model the absorption and emission of radiation by dust to normal galactic disks with a simple model of a uniform plane-parallel slab in which the dust that radiates in the IRAS band is heated exclusively by UV light from relatively nearby hot stars. We then find that the relation between the UV-to-FIR flux ratio and the observed luminosities can be explained by the face-on extinction optical depth τ varying with the intrinsic luminosity as a power law in the intrinsic UV luminosity: τ = τ1(L/L1)β. The same scaling law may also account for the various correlations found between the blue-to-FIR flux ratio and

  1. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  2. MAGNITUDE GAP STATISTICS AND THE CONDITIONAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2012-12-20

    In a recent preprint, Hearin et al. (H12) suggest that the halo mass-richness calibration of clusters can be improved by using the difference in the magnitude of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy (magnitude gap) as an additional observable. They claim that their results are at odds with the results from Paranjape and Sheth (PS12) who show that the magnitude distribution of the brightest and second brightest galaxies can be explained based on order statistics of luminosities randomly sampled from the total galaxy luminosity function. We find that a conditional luminosity function (CLF) for galaxies which varies with halo mass, in a manner which is consistent with existing observations, naturally leads to a magnitude gap distribution which changes as a function of halo mass at fixed richness, in qualitative agreement with H12. We show that, in general, the luminosity distribution of the brightest and the second brightest galaxy depends upon whether the luminosities of galaxies are drawn from the CLF or the global luminosity function. However, we also show that the difference between the two cases is small enough to evade detection in the small sample investigated by PS12. This shows that the luminosity distribution is not the appropriate statistic to distinguish between the two cases, given the small sample size. We argue in favor of the CLF (and therefore H12) based upon its consistency with other independent observations, such as the kinematics of satellite galaxies, the abundance and clustering of galaxies, and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  3. ON THE RADIO AND OPTICAL LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.

    2011-12-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux-limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multi-variate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities. With this correlation, whether intrinsic or observationally induced accounted for, we find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio-loud (R > 10) and radio-quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution for the range of R values considered. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio-quiet and very radio-loud quasars, but rather a

  4. An extended galactic population of low-luminosity x-ray sources (CVs?) and the diffuse x-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, Eyal; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1995-01-01

    The incompatibility of the properties of the X-ray background (XRB) with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contributing approximately greater than 60% at energies of a few keV has often been interpreted as being due to a substantial contribution of a new population of yet unrecognized X-ray sources. The existence of such population has been recently suggested also by an analysis of very deep ROSAT observations which revealed a considerable excess of faint X-ray sources over that expected from QSO evolution models, and that the average spectrum of the resolved sources becomes harder with decreasing flux limit. These sources could be extragalactic in origin, but if they make a substantial contribution to the XRB then they must exhibit much weaker clustering than galaxies or QSOs in order to be consistent with the stringent constraints on source clustering imposed by autocorrelation analyses of the unresolved XRB. We investigate the possibility that the indicated new population of X-ray sources is Galactic in origin. Examining spherical halo and thick disk distributions, we derive the allowed properties of such populations which would resolve the discrepancy found in the number counts of faint sources and be consistent with observational constraints on the total background intensity, the XRB anisotropy, the number of unidentified bright sources, the Galaxy's total X-ray luminosity, and with the results of fluctuation analyses of the unresolved XRB. We find that a flattened Galactic halo (or a thick disk) distribution with a scale height of a few kpc is consistent with all the above requirements. The typical X-ray luminosity of the sources is approximately equal to 10(exp 30-31)ergs/s in the 0.5-2 keV band, the number density of sources in the solar vicinity is approximately 10(exp -4.5)pc(exp -3), their total number in the Galaxy is approximately 10(exp 8.5), and their total contribution to the Galaxy's X-ray luminosity is approximately 10(exp 39) ergs/s. We discuss the

  5. Activity from the Be/X-ray binary system V0332+53 during its intermediate-luminosity outburst in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-García, M. D.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Özbey Arabacı, M.; Zurita, C.; Suso, J.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Beklen, E.; Kiaeerad, F.; Garrido, R.; Hudec, R.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a study of the Be/X-ray binary system V 0332+53 with the main goal of characterizing its behaviour mainly during the intermediate-luminosity X-ray event in 2008. In addition, we aim to contribute to the understanding of the behaviour of the donor companion by including optical data from our dedicated campaign starting in 2006. Methods: V 0332+53 was observed by RXTE and Swift during the decay of the intermediate-luminosity X-ray outburst of 2008, and with Suzaku before the rising of the third normal outburst of the 2010 series. In addition, we present recent data from the Spanish ground-based astronomical observatories of El Teide (Tenerife), Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma), and Sierra Nevada (Granada), and since 2006 from the Turkish TÜBİTAK National Observatory (Antalya). We have performed temporal analyses to investigate the transient behaviour of this system during several outbursts. Results: Our optical study revealed that continuous mass ejection episodes from the Be star have been taking place since 2006 and another is currently ongoing. The broad-band 1-60 keV X-ray spectrum of the neutron star during the decay of the 2008 outburst was well fitted with standard phenomenological models that were enhanced by an absorption feature of unknown origin at about 10 keV and a narrow iron K-alpha fluorescence line at 6.4 keV. For the first time in V 0332+53 we tentatively see an increase in the cyclotron line energy with increasing flux (although further and more sensitive observations are needed to confirm this). The fast aperiodic variability shows a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) at 227 ± 9 mHz only during the lowest luminosities, which might indicate that the inner regions surrounding the magnetosphere are more visible during the lowest flux states.

  6. A low-luminosity soft state in the short-period black hole X-ray binary Swift J1753.5-0127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A. W.; Gandhi, P.; Altamirano, D.; Uttley, P.; Tomsick, J. A.; Charles, P. A.; Fürst, F.; Rahoui, F.; Walton, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from the spectral fitting of the candidate black hole X-ray binary Swift J1753.5-0127 in an accretion state previously unseen in this source. We fit the 0.7-78 keV spectrum with a number of models, however the preferred model is one of a multitemperature disc with an inner disc temperature kTin = 0.252 ± 0.003 keV scattered into a steep power-law with photon index Γ =6.39^{+0.08}_{-0.02} and an additional hard power-law tail (Γ = 1.79 ± 0.02). We report on the emergence of a strong disc-dominated component in the X-ray spectrum and we conclude that the source has entered the soft state for the first time in its ˜10 yr prolonged outburst. Using reasonable estimates for the distance to the source (3 kpc) and black hole mass (5 M⊙), we find the unabsorbed luminosity (0.1-100 keV) to be ≈0.60 per cent of the Eddington luminosity, making this one of the lowest luminosity soft states recorded in X-ray binaries. We also find that the accretion disc extended towards the compact object during its transition from hard to soft, with the inner radius estimated to be R_{in}=28.0^{+0.7}_{-0.4} R_g or ˜12Rg, dependent on the boundary condition chosen, assuming the above distance and mass, a spectral hardening factor f = 1.7 and a binary inclination i = 55°.

  7. Astrophysics and cosmology confront the 17-keV neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    A host of astrophysical and cosmological arguments severely constrain the properties of a 17 keV Dirac neutrino. Such a neutrino must have interactions beyond those of the standard electroweak theory to reduce its cosmic abundance (through decay or annihilation) by a factor of two hundred. A predicament arises because the additional helicity states of the neutrino necessary to construct a Dirac mass must have interactions strong enough to evade the astrophysical bound from SN 1987A, but weak enough to avoid violating the bound from primordial nucleosynthesis.

  8. Astrophysics and cosmology confront the 17 keV neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    A host of astrophysical and cosmological arguments severely constrain the properties of a 17 keV Dirac neutrino. Such a neutrino must have interactions beyond those of the standard electroweak theory to reduce its cosmic abundance (through decay or annihilation) by a factor of two hundred. A predicament arises because the additional helicity states of the neutrino necessary to construct a Dirac mass must have interactions strong enough to evade the astrophysical bound from SN 1987A, but weak enough to avoid violating the bound from primordial nucleosynthesis.

  9. Gel behavior of keV ion irradiated polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.; Licciardello, A.; Puglisi, O.

    1988-10-17

    Among the chemical and physical modifications induced by ion bombardment of polymers, the solubility changes are very important because of technological application for lithography in microelectronic devices. Solubility changes due to the occurrence of crosslinkings have been followed on monodisperse and polydisperse polystyrene after ion irradiations (10/sup 11/--10/sup 14/ ions/cm/sup 2/, keV energy). By using the Inokuty gel theory (M. Inokuti J. Appl. Phys. 38, 2999 (1963)), the chemical yield (crosslinking/eV) has been determined for different molecular weights and molecular weight distributions.

  10. 511 keV photons from superconducting cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2005-12-31

    We show that a tangle of light superconducting strings in the Milky Way could be the source of the observed 511 keV emission from electron-positron annihilation in the Galactic bulge. The scenario predicts a flux that is in agreement with observations if the strings are at the approximately 1 TeV scale, making the particle physics within reach of planned accelerator experiments. The emission is directly proportional to the galactic magnetic field, and future observations should be able to differentiate the superconducting string scenario from other proposals. PMID:16486335

  11. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Green, R. F.

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  12. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  13. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  14. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC Luminosity Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Speziali, V.; Beche, J.F.; Burks, M.T.; Datte, P.S.; Haguenauer, M.; manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Riot, V.J.; Schmickler, H.; Turner, W.C.

    2000-10-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~;;235W at design luminosity 1034cm-2s-1). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/ electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desired statistical accuracy is obtained. At design luminosity approximately 2x103 bunch crossings will suffice for a 1percent luminosity measurement. In this paper we report the first experimental results of the ionization chamber and analog electronics. Single 450GeV protons from the SPS at CERN are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC.

  15. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ∼ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  16. Toward the Standard Population Synthesis Model of the X-Ray Background: Evolution of X-Ray Luminosity and Absorption Functions of Active Galactic Nuclei Including Compton-thick Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-01

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ~ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  17. Choked jets and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts as hidden neutrino sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We consider gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets that are choked by extended material as sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. We take into account the jet propagation physics both inside the progenitor star and the surrounding dense medium. Radiation constraints, which are relevant for high-energy neutrino production, are considered as well. Efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays is possible for sufficiently low-power jets and/or jets buried in a dense, extended wind or outer envelope. Such conditions also favor GRB jets to become stalled, and the necessary conditions for stalling are explicitly derived. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic supernovae (SNe) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs, giving a unified picture of GRBs and GRB-SNe. Focusing on this unified scenario for GRBs, we calculate the resulting neutrino spectra from choked jets, including the relevant microphysical processes such as multipion production in p p and p γ interactions, as well as the energy losses of mesons and muons. We obtain diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results for the luminosity function of LL GRBs. Although uncertainties are large, we confirm that LL GRBs can potentially give a significant contribution to the diffuse neutrino flux. Our results are consistent with the present IceCube data and do not violate the stacking limits on classical high-luminosity GRBs. We find that high-energy neutrino production in choked jets is dominated by p γ interactions. These sources are dark in GeV-TeV gamma rays and do not contribute significantly to the Fermi diffuse gamma-ray background. Assuming stalled jets can launch a quasispherical shock in the dense medium, "precursor" TeV neutrinos emerging prior to the shock breakout gamma-ray emission can be used as smoking-gun evidence for a choked jet model for LL GRBs. Our results strengthen the relevance of wide field-of-view sky monitors with better sensitivities in the 1-100 keV range.

  18. A MULTIVARIATE FIT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND WORLD MODEL FOR LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmoradi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    It is proposed that the luminosity function, the rest-frame spectral correlations, and distributions of cosmological long-duration (Type-II) gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may be very well described as a multivariate log-normal distribution. This result is based on careful selection, analysis, and modeling of LGRBs' temporal and spectral variables in the largest catalog of GRBs available to date: 2130 BATSE GRBs, while taking into account the detection threshold and possible selection effects. Constraints on the joint rest-frame distribution of the isotropic peak luminosity (L{sub iso}), total isotropic emission (E{sub iso}), the time-integrated spectral peak energy (E{sub p,z}), and duration (T{sub 90,z}) of LGRBs are derived. The presented analysis provides evidence for a relatively large fraction of LGRBs that have been missed by the BATSE detector with E{sub iso} extending down to {approx}10{sup 49} erg and observed spectral peak energies (E{sub p} ) as low as {approx}5 keV. LGRBs with rest-frame duration T{sub 90,z} {approx}< 1 s or observer-frame duration T{sub 90} {approx}< 2 s appear to be rare events ({approx}< 0.1% chance of occurrence). The model predicts a fairly strong but highly significant correlation ({rho} = 0.58 {+-} 0.04) between E{sub iso} and E{sub p,z} of LGRBs. Also predicted are strong correlations of L{sub iso} and E{sub iso} with T{sub 90,z} and moderate correlation between L{sub iso} and E{sub p,z}. The strength and significance of the correlations found encourage the search for underlying mechanisms, though undermine their capabilities as probes of dark energy's equation of state at high redshifts. The presented analysis favors-but does not necessitate-a cosmic rate for BATSE LGRBs tracing metallicity evolution consistent with a cutoff Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.2-0.5, assuming no luminosity-redshift evolution.

  19. BROADBAND X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI NGC 1566 AND NGC 4941 OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi

    2013-06-20

    We report the first broadband X-ray spectra of the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), NGC 1566 (type 1.5) and NGC 4941 (type 2), observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT covering the 0.5-195 keV band. Both targets have hard X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 41-42} erg s{sup -1} in the 15-55 keV band. The spectra of the nucleus are well reproduced by a sum of partially or fully covered transmitted emission and its reflection from the accretion disk, reprocessed emission from the torus accompanied by a strong narrow iron-K{alpha} line, and a scattered component (for NGC 4941). We do not significantly detect a broad iron-K{alpha} line from the inner accretion disk in both targets, and obtain an upper limit on the corresponding solid angle of {Omega}/2{pi} < 0.3 in NGC 1566. The reflection strength from the torus is moderate, {Omega}/2{pi}=0.45{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10} in NGC 1566 and {Omega}/2{pi}=0.64{sup +0.69}{sub -0.27} in NGC 4941. Comparison of the equivalent width of the narrow iron-K{alpha} line with a model prediction based on a simple torus geometry constrains its half-opening angle to be {theta}{sub oa} {approx_equal} 60 Degree-Sign -70 Degree-Sign in NGC 4941. These results agree with the obscured AGN fraction obtained from hard X-ray and mid-infrared selected samples at similar luminosities. Our results support the implication that the averaged covering fraction of AGN tori is peaked at L {approx} 10{sup 42-43} erg s{sup -1} but decreases toward lower luminosities.

  20. The luminosity of the double-mode Cepheid Y Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Nancy R.

    1992-01-01

    IUE spectra of the double-mode Cepheid Y Carinae have been used to determine the spectral type of the binary companion. From the companion spectral type (B9.O V), the absolute magnitude of the Cepheid is found to be -2.94 mag, with an estimated uncertainty of +/-0.3. This luminosity is in good agreement with that from the period-luminosity-color relation of Feast and Walker for the fundamental mode. This agreement, together with the large magnitude difference between the B9.0 V star and the Cepheid, confirm that the Cepheid is a normal classical Cepheid with a mass much larger than that inferred from the ratio of the two periods (beat mass). The two double-mode Cepheids with independently determined luminosities (Y Car and V 367 Sct) both fall on the blue edge of the instability strip.

  1. LUMINOSITY OPTIMIZATION USING AUTOMATED IR STEERING AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.D'OTTAVIO,T.

    2004-07-05

    The goal of the RHIC 2004 Au-Au run was to maximize the achieved integrated luminosity. One way is to increase beam currents and minimize beam transverse emittances. Another important ingredient is the minimization of time spent on activities postponing the declaration of ''physics conditions'', i.e. stable beam conditions allowing the experimental detectors to take data. Since collision rates are particularly high in the beginning of the store the integrated luminosity benefits considerably from any minute saved early in the store. In the RHIC run 2004 a new IR steering application uses luminosity monitor signals as a feedback for a fully automated steering procedure. This report gives an overview of the used procedure and summarizes the achieved results.

  2. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat,F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The reduction of {beta}* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the {beta}*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze.

  3. The faintest stars - From Schmidt plates to luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, C. G.; Reid, I. N.; Mould, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the construction of a photometric catalog from scans of IIIaF and IVN plate material in 11 fields of the UKSRC and POSSII surveys. The procedures used and quality checks applied are described in detail, and should be considered as illustrative for those planning scientific programs with the forthcoming scans of these surveys. We find our plate material is complete to I of about 18 and R of about 20.5 with photometric uncertainties of +/- 0.20 and +/- 0.25 magnitudes (respectively) at those limits. These data are used to construct luminosity functions for stars within 150 pc of the sun in four distinct directions. We find no significant evidence for variations in the form of the luminosity function in different locations within the Galactic disk. Approximately 10-20 percent variations are seen in the normalization of the luminosity function.

  4. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, A.C.; Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  5. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  6. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, I. C.; Engler, A.; Ferguson, T.; Filthaut, F.; Kraemer, R. W.; Merk, M.; Rippich, C.; Shi, X.; Shukla, J.; Sutton, R. B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Vogel, H.; You, J.; Lecoq, P.; Bobbink, G. J.; Buskens, J.; Cerjak, I.; Groenstege, H.; Koffeman, E.; Linde, F. L.; Raven, G.; Rewiersma, P.; Schuijlenberg, H. W. A.; de Waard, A.; Commichau, V.; Hangarter, K.; Schmitz, P.

    1996-02-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e +e - annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e +e - (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry.

  7. The luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; De Carvalho, R. R.; Zepf, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We use counts of faint galaxies in the regions of compact groups to extend the study of the luminosity function of galaxies in compact groups to absolute magnitudes as faint as M(sub B) = -14.5 + 5 log h. We find a slope of the faint end of the luminosity function of approximately alpha = -0.8, with a formal uncertainty of 0.15. This slope is not significantly different from that found for galaxies in other environments. Our results do not support previous suggestions of a dramatic underabundance of intrinsically faint galaxies in compact groups, which were based on extrapolations from fits at brighter magnitudes. The normal faint-end slope of the luminosity function in compact groups is in agreement with previous evidence that most galaxies in compact groups have not been dramatically affected by recent merging.

  8. The LUCID detector ATLAS luminosity monitor and its electronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, F. Lasagni

    2016-07-01

    In 2015 LHC is starting a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely rebuilt, both the detector and the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics features a new read-out board (LUCROD) for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and a revisited LUMAT board for combination of signals from the two detectors. This note describes the new board design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  9. High time resolution luminosity profiles of Jellyfish (Super) Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Ahrns, J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Kammae, T.; Haaland, R. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Li, J.; Liu, N.; Yukman, P.

    2011-12-01

    We compare the time history of luminosity and VLF measurements associated with different classes of sprites. In particular we are interested in the larger "jellyfish, or super" sprites that are very bright, very brief duration sprites. Optical observations reveal these sprites are collections of multiple carrot sprites, comprised of both downward and upward propagating streamers. We find the time scales of super sprites are shorter than that for carrot sprites and column sprites. The exponential decrease in sprite luminosity has been related to the conductivity profile assumed for the middle atmosphere by [Barrington-Leigh et. al. (2002), doi: 10.1029/2001JA900117]. We investigate the possibility that the overall brighter and rapid decrease in jellyfish sprite luminosity compared to other types of sprites may be related to changes in the middle atmosphere conductivity, and/or in the driving electrostatic field associated with the causative lightning flash.

  10. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, A. C.; Burt, G.; Ambattu, P. K.; Dolgashev, V.; Jones, R.

    2011-11-01

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  11. The luminosity distribution and total space density of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The detailed distribution of dispersion measures and spectral fluxes for a sample of 50 pulsars in part of the galactic plane near longitude 50 deg is analyzed, and the intrinsic luminosity distribution of the pulsars is obtained along with some constraints on their spatial distribution. Expressions for the observed distributions of spectral fluxes, distances, and directions are given in terms of the spatial and luminosity distributions of the sources as well as the sensitivity of the detector. A previous analysis of the same sample is reviewed, and the intrinsic luminosity distribution is determined from the distribution of observed distances as well as from the observed distribution of spectral fluxes. The results indicate that the scale height of pulsars cannot be significantly less than 400 pc, the total space density of active pulsars is about 30 per cu kpc, and the birthrate required to maintain this population is about one in the Galaxy every 980 (450-2600) years.

  12. Luminosity Coincident with Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, M.; Marshall, T.; Karunarathne, S.; Karunarathna, N.; Vickers, L.; Warner, T. A.; Orville, R. E.; Betz, H.

    2012-12-01

    Time correlated high-speed video and electromagnetic data for 15 cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning flashes reveal bursts of light, bright enough to be seen through intervening cloud, during the initial breakdown (IB) stage and within the first 3 ms after flash initiation. Each sudden increase in luminosity is coincident with a CG-type (12 cases) or IC-type (3 cases) IB pulse in fast electric field change records. Some of these IB pulses have a coincident VLF/LF (LINET) or a VHF (LDAR2) radiation source. The luminosity bursts of 14 CG flashes occur 11-340 ms before the first return stroke, at altitudes of 4-8 km, and at 4-41 km range from the camera. In seven cases, streamer-type linear segments visibly advance away from the first light burst for 55-200 μs, then the entire length dims, then the luminosity sequence repeats along the same path. These visible initial streamers lengthen intermittently to about 300-1500 m. Their estimated 2-D speeds are 4 to 18 x 10^5 m/s over the first few hundred microseconds and decrease by about 50% over the first 2 ms. In other cases, only a bright spot or a broad area of diffuse light, presumably scattered by intervening cloud, is visible. The bright area grows larger over 20-60 μs before the luminosity fades in about 100 μs, then this sequence may repeat several times. In several of the flashes a 1-2 ms period of little or no luminosity and small E-change is observed following the IB stage prior to stepped leader development. In this presentation we will show examples of the IB luminosity and coincident electromagnetic data.

  13. MODELING THE RED SEQUENCE: HIERARCHICAL GROWTH YET SLOW LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the effects of mergers on the evolution of massive early-type galaxies by modeling the evolution of their stellar populations in a hierarchical context. We investigate how a realistic red sequence population set up by z {approx} 1 evolves under different assumptions for the merger and star formation histories, comparing changes in color, luminosity, and mass. The purely passive fading of existing red sequence galaxies, with no further mergers or star formation, results in dramatic changes at the bright end of the luminosity function and color-magnitude relation. Without mergers there is too much evolution in luminosity at a fixed space density compared to observations. The change in color and magnitude at a fixed mass resembles that of a passively evolving population that formed relatively recently, at z {approx} 2. Mergers among the red sequence population ('dry mergers') occurring after z = 1 build up mass, counteracting the fading of the existing stellar populations to give smaller changes in both color and luminosity for massive galaxies. By allowing some galaxies to migrate from the blue cloud onto the red sequence after z = 1 through gas-rich mergers, younger stellar populations are added to the red sequence. This manifestation of the progenitor bias increases the scatter in age and results in even smaller changes in color and luminosity between z = 1 and z = 0 at a fixed mass. The resultant evolution appears much slower, resembling the passive evolution of a population that formed at high redshift (z {approx} 3-5), and is in closer agreement with observations. We conclude that measurements of the luminosity and color evolution alone are not sufficient to distinguish between the purely passive evolution of an old population and cosmologically motivated hierarchical growth, although these scenarios have very different implications for the mass growth of early-type galaxies over the last half of cosmic history.

  14. The AGN Contribution to Galaxy Merger Infrared Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Lee; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard; Ashby, Matthew; Hung, Chao-Ling; Martinez-Galarza, Rafael; Weiner, Aaron; Zezas, Andreas; Lanz, Lauranne

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of AGN activity to the infrared luminosity of interacting galaxies by analyzing dust radiative transfer calculations of a hydrodynamically simulated merger, created with the code GADGET-2. We focus on emission in the mid-IR to far-IR wavelength ranges, and trace the luminosity density of an interacting gas-rich galaxy pair throughout its evolution. We find that the AGN contribution to IR luminosity is greatest during and immediately after coalescence of the galaxies' central black holes. This period lasts roughly 80 Myr, during which time the increased influx of gas to the center of the merger increases the total luminosity by a factor of a thousand or more due to both increased star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion. We compare different interstellar medium models used to describe sub-resolution gas and dust clouds in the radiative transfer calculations by studying the color evolution of our merger in the Herschel Space Observatory photometric filter bands, and compare the results to Herschel observations. We conclude that using infrared luminosity as a simple surrogate for SFR can overestimate the true rate, due to the contribution of AGN or other dust heating mechanisms. This conclusion has an especially significant impact in assessing the star formation activity in high-redshift galaxies for which luminosity (the best measured property) may not accurately measure the SFR, and in cases where the molecular gas content can differ from that of local systems. Further work will extend this analysis to simulations of mergers between late-type galaxies. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851, by the Smithsonian Institution and by NASA grant NNX14AJ6IG.

  15. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  16. 9 CFR 2.10 - Licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked. 2.10 Section 2.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Licensing § 2.10 Licensees whose...

  17. 41 CFR 60-2.10 - General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contents of affirmative action programs. 60-2.10 Section 60-2.10 Public Contracts and Property Management... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of Affirmative Action Programs § 60-2.10 General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs. (a) Purpose....

  18. 41 CFR 60-2.10 - General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... contents of affirmative action programs. 60-2.10 Section 60-2.10 Public Contracts and Property Management... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of Affirmative Action Programs § 60-2.10 General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs. (a) Purpose....

  19. 41 CFR 60-2.10 - General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contents of affirmative action programs. 60-2.10 Section 60-2.10 Public Contracts and Property Management... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of Affirmative Action Programs § 60-2.10 General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs. (a) Purpose....

  20. 41 CFR 60-2.10 - General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... contents of affirmative action programs. 60-2.10 Section 60-2.10 Public Contracts and Property Management... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of Affirmative Action Programs § 60-2.10 General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs. (a) Purpose....

  1. 46 CFR 2.10-105 - Prepayment of annual vessel inspection fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prepayment of annual vessel inspection fees. 2.10-105 Section 2.10-105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Fees § 2.10-105 Prepayment of annual vessel inspection fees. (a) Vessel owners...

  2. 46 CFR 2.10-105 - Prepayment of annual vessel inspection fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prepayment of annual vessel inspection fees. 2.10-105 Section 2.10-105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Fees § 2.10-105 Prepayment of annual vessel inspection fees. (a) Vessel owners...

  3. Radiation damage to scintillator in the D0 luminosity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Brendan; DeVaughan, Kayle; Enari, Yuji; Partridge, Richard; Yacoob, Sahal; /Northwestern U.

    2006-12-01

    We report the result of evaluating radiation damage to Bicron BC408 plastic scintillator used in the D0 Luminosity Monitor during Run IIa. The Luminosity Monitor provides pseudo-rapidity coverage over the range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4, with the radiation dose in Run IIa estimated to be 0.5 MRad for the region closest to the beams. We find the light yield is degraded by 10-15% due to radiation damage by comparing new and old scintillator in four observables: (1) visual inspection, (2) optical transmittance, (3) response to the radioactive source of {sup 90}Sr and (4) light yield for cosmic rays.

  4. Solar luminosity variations and the climate of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Gierasch, P. J.; Sagan, C.

    1975-01-01

    A simple climatological model of Mars indicates that its climate may be more sensitive to luminosity changes than earth's because of strong positive feedback mechanisms at work on Mars. Mariner 9 photographs of Mars show an abundance of large sinuous channels that point to an epoch of higher atmospheric pressures and abundant liquid water. Such an epoch could have been the result of large-scale solar luminosity variations. The climatological model suggests that other less controversial mechanisms, such as obliquity or polar albedo changes, also could have led to such an epoch.

  5. The X-ray luminosity temperature relation of a complete sample of low mass galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Maughan, B. J.; Giles, P. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Pacaud, F.; Burenin, R.; Hornstrup, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present Chandra observations of 23 galaxy groups and low-mass galaxy clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.15 with a median temperature of ˜2 KeV. The sample is a statistically complete flux-limited subset of the 400 deg2 survey. We investigated the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L) and temperature (T), taking selection biases fully into account. The logarithmic slope of the bolometric L - T relation was found to be 3.29 ± 0.33, consistent with values typically found for samples of more massive clusters. In combination with other recent studies of the L - T relation we show that there is no evidence for the slope, normalisation, or scatter of the L - T relation of galaxy groups being different than that of massive clusters. The exception to this is that in the special case of the most relaxed systems, the slope of the core-excised L - T relation appears to steepen from the self-similar value found for massive clusters to a steeper slope for the lower mass sample studied here. Thanks to our rigorous treatment of selection biases, these measurements provide a robust reference against which to compare predictions of models of the impact of feedback on the X-ray properties of galaxy groups.

  6. High resolution 17 keV to 75 keV backlighters for High Energy Density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Maddox, B R; Giraldez, E; Hatchett, S P; Hudson, L; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Pape, S L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Remington, B A; Seely, J F; Tommasini, R; Town, R; Workman, J

    2008-02-25

    We have developed 17 keV to 75 keV 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional high-resolution (< 10 {micro}m) radiography using high-intensity short pulse lasers. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by fluorescence from hot electrons interacting in the target material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have achieved high resolution point projection 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional radiography using micro-foil and micro-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The micro-wire size was 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m on a 300 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m x 5 {micro}m CH substrate. The radiography performance was demonstrated using the Titan laser at LLNL. We observed that the resolution is dominated by the micro-wire target size and there is very little degradation from the plasma plume, implying that the high energy x-ray photons are generated mostly within the micro-wire volume. We also observe that there are enough K{alpha} photons created with a 300 J, 1-{omega}, 40 ps pulse laser from these small volume targets, and that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high, for single shot radiography experiments. This unique technique will be used on future high energy density (HED) experiments at the new Omega-EP, ZR and NIF facilities.

  7. Potential for luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov A. V.

    2012-05-20

    At the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a physics program, motivated by the search of the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at very low beam energies corresponding to 2.5-20 GeV/n. Several physics runs were already successfully performed at these low energies. However, the luminosity is very low at lowest energies of interest (< 10 GeV/n) limited by the intra-beam scattering and space-charge, as well as by machine nonlinearities. At these low energies, electron cooling could be very effective in counteracting luminosity degradation due to the IBS, while it is less effective against other limitations. Overall potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation from cooling is summarized for various energies, taking into account all these limitations as well as beam lifetime measured during the low-energy RHIC runs. We also explore a possibility of further luminosity improvement under the space-charge limitation.

  8. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

  9. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  10. On the temporal fluctuations of pulsating auroral luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tatsundo )

    1988-02-01

    From a study of all-sky TV records, it is shown that the luminosity fluctuations of pulsating auroras can be understood in terms of a series of pulses with rapid on-off switchings in burstlike fashion and that the widths of successive pulses (pulsation on times) are fairly constant. This is common even when luminosity fluctuations consist of complex-irregular variations, in contrast to the pulsation off time that is significantly variable. Complex-irregular variations are ground to be due to simultaneous appearance of more pulsating patches that exhibit movements eastward and westward over the site, and each of the patches shows primarily isolated luminosity pulses. Several examples are presented and described in detail. A natural consequence of these observations is that the classical concept of period does not mean much and the luminosity fluctuations should be treated as a series of individual isolated pulses where the pulsation on time is the most essential quantity. These characteristics are briefly discussed in relation to VLF/ELF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere. Then a new interpretation of the nonlinear relaxation oscillation model is proposed, where the propagation effect of VLF/ELF waves in low energy plasm irregularities near the magnetospheric equatorial plane plays an essential role to produce rapid on-off switchings of precipitating energetic electron fluxes. Both electromagnetic and electrostatic waves are possibly related to the precipitation pulsations.

  11. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.

  12. Absolute luminosity measurements with the LHCb detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. Using data taken in 2010, LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer scan'' method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using beam-gas and beam-beam interactions. This beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. The results of the two methods have comparable precision and are in good agreement. Combining the two methods, an overal precision of 3.5% in the absolute luminosity determination is reached. The techniques used to transport the absolute luminosity calibration to the full 2010 data-taking period are presented.

  13. Luminosity Variations Along Bunch Trains in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Boyes, M.; Colocho, W.S.; Novokhatski, A.; Sullivan, M.K.; Turner, J.L.; Weathersby, S.P.; Wienands, U.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18

    In the spring of 2005 after a long shut-down, the luminosity of the B-Factory PEP-II decreased along the bunch trains by about 25-30%. There were many reasons studied which could have caused this performance degradation, like a bigger phase transient due to an additional RF station in the Low-Energy-Ring (LER), bad initial vacuum, electron cloud, chromaticity, steering, dispersion in cavities, beam optics, etc. The initial specific luminosity of 4.2 sloped down to 3.2 and even 2.8 for a long train (typical: 130 of 144), later in the run with higher currents and shorter trains (65 of 72) the numbers were more like 3.2 down to 2.6. Finally after steering the interaction region for an unrelated reason (overheated BPM buttons) and the consequential lower luminosity for two weeks, the luminosity slope problem was mysteriously gone. Several parameters got changed and there is still some discussion about which one finally fixed the problem. Among others, likely candidates are: the LER betatron function in x at the interaction point got reduced, making the LER x stronger, dispersion reduction in the cavities, and finding and fixing a partially shorted magnet.

  14. Solar luminosity variations and the climate of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Gierasch, P. J.; Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    Attempts to resolve the solar neutrino flux problem have led to suggestions of large scale oscillations in the solar luminosity on a geological time scale. A simple climatological model of Mars indicates that its climate may be much more sensitive to luminosity changes than the earth's because of strong positive feedback mechanisms at work on Mars. Mariner-9 photographs of Mars show an abundance of large sinuous channels that point to an epoch of higher atmospheric pressures and abundant liquid water. Such an epoch could have been the result of large-scale, solar luminosity variations. However, our climatological model suggests that other less controversial mechanisms, such as obliquity or polar albedo changes, also could have led to such an epoch. As more becomes known about Mars, it may prove possible to formulate a history of Martian climate. By discovering effects that cannot be due to other mechanisms one may be able to form a chronology of solar luminosity variations to compare with data from the earth.

  15. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BRIGHT SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. SAMPLE PRESENTATION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Salvaterra, R.; Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Nava, L.; Flores, H.; Piranomonte, S.

    2012-04-10

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity ({delta}{sub l} = 2.3 {+-} 0.6) or in density ({delta}{sub d} = 1.7 {+-} 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  16. An Unlikely Radio Halo in the Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Cluster RXCJ1514.9-1523

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marketvitch, M.; ZuHone, J. A.; Lee, D.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Venturi, T.; Brunetti, G.; Cassano, R.; Markevitch, M.; Athreya, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: We report the discovery of a giant radio halo in the galaxy cluster RXCJ1514,9-1523 at z=0.22 with a relatively low X-ray luminosity, L(sub X) (0.1-2.4kev) approx. 7 x 10(exp 44) ergs/s. Methods: This faint, diffuse radio source is detected with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope at 327 MHz. The source is barely detected at 1.4 GHz in a NVSS pointing that we have reanalyzed. Results: The integrated radio spectrum of the halo is quite steep, with a slope alpha = 1.6 between 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz. While giant radio halos are common in more X-ray luminous cluster mergers, there is a less than 10% probability to detect a halo in systems with L(sub X) < 8 x 10(exp 44) ergs/s. The detection of a new giant halo in this borderline luminosity regime can be particularly useful for discriminating between the competing theories for the origin of ultrarelativistic electrons in clusters. Furthermore, if our steep radio spectral index is confirmed by future deeper radio observations, this cluster would provide another example of the very rare, new class of ultra-steep spectrum radio halos, predicted by the model in which the cluster cosmic ray electrons are produced by turbulent reacceleration.

  17. Status and Outlook for the RHIC Luminosity Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2010-02-01

    As the world highest energy heavy ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been the center for exploring the universe at its infant stage. The operations of RHIC over the past decade has produced many results. A new state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma which is believed to only have existed right after the birth of the universe, was first observed at RHIC during the collisions of Au ions. The experimental data also revealed that this new state of matter behaves like a perfect fluid. In addition to the heavy ion program, RHIC is also capable to accelerate polarized proton beams to high energy, which allows one to explore the spin structure of polarized protons. Both the heavy ion program and spin physics program require high luminosities at RHIC. Various efforts aimed at increasing the RHIC luminosity of heavy ion and polarized proton collisions, such as NEG coating beam pipes to reduce electron clouds, using intrabeam scattering lattice for heavy ion operations as well as longitudinal stochastic cooling. The average store luminosity of Au collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV/u has reached 1027cm-2s-1. The average store luminosity of RHIC polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV reached 28x1030cm-2s-1 and 55x1030 cm-2s-1 for the polarized proton collisions at a beam energy 250 GeV. Currently, the luminosity is limited by beam-beam effects for polarized proton collisions and intrabeam scattering for heavy ion collisions. Novel techniques are explored and under development to address these issues. The addition of transverse stochastic cooling will minimize the beam size growth due to intrabeam scattering and increase the heavy ion luminosity lifetime. The technique of using 9MHz cavity to accelerate polarized protons minimizes the electron cloud effect, which can cause emittance blowup. It also helps to preserve the longitudinal emittance and yields shorter bunches. The technique of employing an

  18. DIRECT OXYGEN ABUNDANCES FOR LOW-LUMINOSITY LVL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Marble, Andrew R.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Janice C.; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Calzetti, Daniela; Dale, Daniel A.; Johnson, Benjamin D. E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: amarble@nso.edu E-mail: jlee@stsci.edu E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu

    2012-08-01

    We present MMT spectroscopic observations of H II regions in 42 low luminosity galaxies in the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey. For 31 of the 42 galaxies in our sample, we were able to measure the temperature sensitive [O III] {lambda}4363 line at a strength of 4{sigma} or greater, and thus determine oxygen abundances using the 'direct' method. Our results provide the first 'direct' estimates of oxygen abundance for 19 of these galaxies. 'Direct' oxygen abundances were compared to B-band luminosities, 4.5 {mu}m luminosities, and stellar masses in order to characterize the luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity relationships at low luminosity. We present and analyze a 'Combined Select' sample composed of 38 objects (drawn from a sub-set of our parent sample and the literature) with 'direct' oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (based on the tip of the red giant branch or Cepheid variables). Consistent with previous studies, the B band and 4.5 {mu}m luminosity-metallicity relationships for the 38 objects were found to be 12 + log(O/H) = (6.27 {+-} 0.21) + (- 0.11 {+-} 0.01)M{sub B} and 12 + log(O/H) = (6.10 {+-} 0.21) + (- 0.10 {+-} 0.01)M{sub [4.5]} with dispersions of {sigma} = 0.15 and 0.14, respectively. The slopes of the optical and near-IR L-Z relationships have been reported to be different for galaxies with luminosities greater than that of the LMC. However, the similarity of the slopes of the optical and near-IR L-Z relationships for our sample probably reflects little influence by dust extinction in the low luminosity galaxies. For this sample, we derive a mass-metallicity relationship of 12 + log(O/H) = (5.61 {+-} 0.24) + (0.29 {+-} 0.03)log (M{sub *}), which agrees with previous studies; however, the dispersion ({sigma} = 0.15) is not significantly lower than that of the L-Z relationships. Because of the low dispersions in these relationships, if an accurate distance is available, the luminosity of a low luminosity galaxy is

  19. The Luminosity Function of OB Associations in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    1997-02-01

    OB associations ionize the interstellar medium, producing both localized H II regions and diffuse ionized gas. The supernovae resulting from these associations pressurize and stir the interstellar medium. Using Smith, Biermann, & Mezger's compilation of radio H II regions in the Galaxy, and Kennicutt, Edgar, & Hodge's optical study of H II regions in nearby galaxies, we show that the luminosity distribution of giant OB associations in the Galaxy can be fit by a truncated power law of the form \\Nscra(>S)=\\Nscrau[(Su/S)-1], where S is the ionizing photon luminosity, \\Nscra(>S) is the number of associations with a luminosity of at least S, and Su is the upper limit to the distribution. The coefficient \\Nscrau is the number of the most luminous associations, with a luminosity between 0.5Su and Su. For the Galaxy, \\Nscrau=6.1 the fact that the number of the most luminous associations is significantly larger than unity indicates that there is a physical limit to the maximum size of H II regions in the Galaxy. To extend the luminosity distribution to small H II regions, we assume that the birthrate of associations, \\Nscr\\dota(>\\Nscr*), is also a truncated power law, \\Nscr\\dota(>\\Nscr*)~[(\\Nscr*u/\\Nscr*)-1], where \\Nscr* is the number of stars in the association. For large associations, the ionizing luminosity is proportional to the number of stars, S~\\Nscr* for smaller associations, we use both an analytic and a Monte Carlo approach to find the resulting luminosity distribution \\Nscra(>S). H II regions are generally centrally concentrated, with only the dense central regions being bright enough to appear in radio catalogs. Anantharamaiah postulated that radio H II regions have extended envelopes in order to account for diffuse radio recombination line emission in the Galaxy. Some of these envelopes are visible as the ionized ``worms'' discussed by Heiles and coworkers. We estimate that on the average the envelopes of radio H II regions absorb about twice

  20. Cosmic Evolution of Long Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Can-Min; Wang, Xiang-Gao; Guo, Bei-Bei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity is essential for revealing the GRB physics and for using GRBs as cosmological probes. We investigate the luminosity evolution of long GRBs with a large sample of 258 Swift/BAT GRBs. By describing the peak luminosity evolution of individual GRBs as {L}{{p}}\\propto \\text{}{(1+z)}k, we get k=1.49+/- 0.19 using the nonparametric τ statistics method without considering observational biases of GRB trigger and redshift measurement. By modeling these biases with the observed peak flux and characterizing the peak luminosity function of long GRBs as a smoothly broken power law with a break that evolves as {L}{{b}}\\propto {(1+z)}{k{{b}}}, we obtain {k}{{b}}={1.14}-0.47+0.99 through simulations based on the assumption that the long GRB rate follows the star formation rate incorporating the cosmic metallicity history. The derived k and kb values are systematically smaller than those reported in previous papers. By removing the observational biases of the GRB trigger and redshift measurement based on our simulation analysis, we generate mock complete samples of 258 and 1000 GRBs to examine how these biases affect the τ statistics method. We get k=0.94+/- 0.14 and k=0.80+/- 0.09 for the two samples, indicating that these observational biases may lead to overestimating the k value. With the large uncertainty of kb derived from our simulation analysis, one cannot even convincingly argue for a robust evolution feature of the GRB luminosity.

  1. DISK GALAXIES WITH BROKEN LUMINOSITY PROFILES FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Serrano, F. J.; Serna, A.; Domenech-Moral, M.; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R.

    2009-11-10

    We present smoothed particle hydrodynamics cosmological simulations of the formation of three disk galaxies with a detailed treatment of chemical evolution and cooling. The resulting galaxies have properties compatible with observations: relatively high disk-to-total ratios, thin stellar disks, and good agreement with the Tully-Fisher and the luminosity-size relations. They present a break in the luminosity profile at 3.0 +- 0.5 disk scale lengths while showing an exponential mass profile without any apparent breaks, which is in line with recent observational results. Since the stellar mass profile is exponential, only differences in the stellar populations can be the cause of the luminosity break. Although we find a cutoff for the star formation rate (SFR) imposed by a density threshold in our star formation model, it does not coincide with the luminosity break and is located at 4.3 +- 0.4 disk scale lengths, with star formation going on between both radii. The color profiles and the age profiles are 'U-shaped', with the minimum for both profiles located approximately at the break radius. The SFR to stellar mass ratio increases until the break, explaining the coincidence of the break with the minimum of the age profile. Beyond the break, we find a steep decline in the gas density and, consequently, a decline in the SFR and redder colors. We show that most stars (64%-78%) in the outer disk originate in the inner disk and afterward migrate there. Such stellar migrations are likely the main origin of the U-shaped age profile and, therefore, of the luminosity break.

  2. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel; Myers, Adam D.; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  3. Low Luminosity States of the Black Hole Candidate GX 339-4. 1; ASCA and Simultaneous Radio/RXTE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Dove, James B.; Fender, Robert P.; DiMatteo, Tiziana

    1998-01-01

    We discuss a series of observations of the black hole candidate GX 339-4 in low luminosity, spectrally hard states. We present spectral analysis of three separate archival Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data sets and eight separate Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data sets. Three of the RXTE observations were strictly simultaneous with 843 Mega Hertz and 8.3-9.1 Giga Hertz radio observations. All of these observations have (3-9 keV) flux approximately less than 10(exp-9) ergs s(exp-1) CM(exp -2). The ASCA data show evidence for an approximately 6.4 keV Fe line with equivalent width approximately 40 eV, as well as evidence for a soft excess that is well-modeled by a power law plus a multicolor blackbody spectrum with peak temperature approximately equals 150-200 eV. The RXTE data sets also show evidence of an Fe line with equivalent widths approximately equal to 20-1OO eV. Reflection models show a hardening of the RXTE spectra with decreasing X-ray flux; however, these models do not exhibit evidence of a correlation between the photon index of the incident power law flux and the solid angle subtended by the reflector. 'Sphere+disk' Comptonization models and Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF) models also provide reasonable descriptions of the RXTE data. The former models yield coronal temperatures in the range 20-50 keV and optical depths of r approximately equal to 3. The model fits to the X-ray data, however, do not simultaneously explain the observed radio properties. The most likely source of the radio flux is synchrotron emission from an extended outflow of extent greater than O(10 (exp7) GM/c2).

  4. The 0.3-30 keV spectra of Powerful Starburst Galaxies: NuSTAR and Chandra observations ofNGC 3256 and NGC 3310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Joshua; Lehmer, Bret; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Wik, Daniel R.; Ptak, Andrew; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona; Maccarone, Tom; Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; NuSTAR Starburst Team

    2015-01-01

    We present nearly simultaneous Chandra and NuSTAR observations of two actively star-forming galaxies: NGC 3256 and NGC 3310. The NuSTAR galaxy-wide spectra of both galaxies follow steep power law distributions, similar to the spectra of bright individual ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have been studied by NuSTAR. The X-ray emission from both galaxies is spatially resolved by Chandra, which indicates that hot gas dominates the E < 1 - 3 keV emission, while ULXs make up a majority of the emission at E > 1-3 keV. Using new and archival Chandra data we found that both galaxies have candidate AGNs coincident with nuclear regions. However, the steep NuSTAR spectra of both galaxies restricts these candidates to be low luminosity AGN, and a non-AGN nature cannot be ruled out. We find the average 0.3 -30 keV SFR-normalized spectra of NGC 3256 and NGC 3310, combined with equivalent measurements for M83 and NGC 253, show sharpening power-law slopes at energies above 3 - 6 keV due to ULX populations. Our observations therefore constrain the average spectral shape of an unbiased population of ULXs to be similar to the super-Eddington accreting ULXs that have been studied by NuSTAR. We also find that for NGC 3310, there is a factor of 5 times excess X-ray emission, due to an overabundance of ULXs in the galaxy compared to typical galaxies. We argue that the excess is due to the relatively low metallicity of the young stellar population in the galaxy.

  5. Appearance of chromosomal aberrations in females heterozygous for deletion MS2-10: Maternal effect

    SciTech Connect

    Artemova, E.V.; Chadov, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    The mutagenic effect of the paracentromeric heterochromatin deletion MS2-10 was studied in direct and reciprocal crosses of laboratory and wild-type lines of Drosophila melanogaster. The effect of deletion MS2-10 depended on the opposite chromosome. This was shown for the combination of autosome MS2-10 with autosome 2 from the Berlin wild line, but when MS2-10 was combined with an autosome 2 from lines Canton S and pr pk cn, the effect was absent. When deletion MS2-10 was inherited from the female parent and the opposite chromosome from the male parent, the effect of the deletion was present, but it was absent in males heterozygous for MS2-10, obtained in reciprocal crosses. In maternal effect, this case of mutagenesis is similar to hybrid dysgenesis. However, the pattern of P-M dysgenesis was shown to differ from the type of mutagenesis described in the present work.

  6. Direct Oxygen Abundances for the Lowest Luminosity LVL Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Danielle; Skillman, E. D.; Marble, A. R.; van Zee, L.; Engelbracht, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    We present new MMT spectroscopic observations of HII regions in 42 of the lowest luminosity galaxies in the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey. For 31 of the galaxies in our sample we were able to measure the [OIII] ? auroral line at a strength of 4σ or greater, and thus determine oxygen abundances using the direct method. Direct oxygen abundances were compared to B-band luminosity, 4.5 μm luminosity, and stellar mass to characterize the luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) and mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationships at low-luminosity. We examined a "Combined Select” sample composed of 38 objects, from the present sample and the literature, with direct oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (based on the tip of the red giant branch or Cepheid variables). The B-band and 4.5 μm L-Z relationships were found to be 12+log(O/H) = (6.19±0.07) + (-0.12±0.01)MB and 12+log(O/H) = (5.93±0.11) + (-0.11±0.01)M[4.5] with dispersions of σ = 0.17 and σ = 0.14 respectively. Since the slope of the L-Z relationship doesn't seem to vary from the optical to the near-IR, as has been observed in studies of more luminous galaxies, we propose that less extinction due to dust is created in the lowest luminosity galaxies. We subsequently derived a M-Z relationship of 12+log(O/H) = (5.49±0.23) + (0.31±0.03)log M*, with a dispersion of σ = 0.16. None of the relationships seem to hold an advantage with respect to dispersion, supporting the idea of minimized dust. Additionally, the trend of N/O abundance with respect to B-V color and oxygen abundance was examined. Similar to the conclusions of van Zee & Haynes (2006), we find a positive correlation between N/O ratio and B-V color: log(N/O) = 0.92 (B-V) - 1.83. Furthermore, there are no objects with high N/O ratio below 12+log(O/H)=7.9.

  7. Evolution of the solar luminosity during solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. A.; Schrijver, C.; DeRosa, M. L.; Norton, A.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Da Silva, L.; Vuets, A.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the solar activity on the solar luminosity, which is the total electromagnetic solar output, is one of the fundamental questions in solar physics. Changes of the solar luminosity can arise from changes of the energy flux in the convection zone that can also affects other solar parameters such as the surface temperature, the apparent radius and shape, and the symmetry of the radiative field itself. Additionally, understanding the latitudinal distribution of the flux density is needed to compare the solar variability and its stellar analogues. Nevertheless, our observations of the solar flux density are limited to a region near the ecliptic plane, which have provided just a raw estimate of the variability of the solar luminosity. Here we present a reconstruction of the solar flux density and solar luminosity for the solar cycle 23 and ascending phase of cycle 24. The reconstruction is based on a combination of a state-of-art solar surface magnetic flux transport model and a semi-empirical total and spectral irradiance model. The flux transport model is based on assimilation of MDI/SOHO and HMI/SDO magnetograms. The irradiance model's free parameters are estimated by minimizing the difference between the model's output and the PMOD Composite of TSI measurements. We have obtained a good agreement between the model's output and the measurements. The distribution of active regions leads to a clear low latitude brightening during the solar maximum. This brightening results from the balance of the contributions from bright (faculae and network) and dark features (sunspots) located in the solar surface, which peaks near the solar equator. As the effects of dark features are limited to a narrower region, the variability of the flux density at the poles is dominated by the evolution of faculae and network. The preliminary results indicate that the heat flux blocked by sunspots is lower than the flux leaked by bright features. Consequently, an increase of the

  8. Differential Spectral Synthesis of Low-Luminosity Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lewis Alexander

    In this thesis, a study of the spectral variations in the integrated light of eight low-luminosity elliptical galaxies is presented. The unique opportunity provided by low-luminosity elliptical galaxies to study integrated spectra at high line definition is the motivation behind the observational approach for this study. A long wavelength baseline is sacrificed in favor of working at high resolution (~2 Å FWHM) with a large variety of narrow absorption features in a smaller wave-length window. A new spectral library has been developed with this approach in mind. The library consists of spectra of 684 stars all observed with the Coudé Feed Telescope and Spectrograph at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, covering the spectral ranges 3820-4500 Å and 4780-5450 Å and at a spectral resolution of ~2 Å FWHM. The coverage of the library is complete for spectral types A-K and luminosity classes I-V, in the range -2.5 <= FeH; <= +0.5, while the O, B, and M stars are near solar. The empirical investigation of the galaxy spectra in reference to the stellar sequences of the spectral library yields several key results. (1) There is a spread in the mean spectral types of the low-luminosity ellliptical galaxies. (2) The galaxies are similar in evolved star content, Fe line strengths, and their evolved star light is dominated by solar type giants. (3) Five of the eight galaxies are shown to contain less than a 5% hot star contribution, which is inconsistent with the prediction of ~10% from the simple model of chemical evolution (Worthey, Dorman, and Jones 1996). (4) From variations in the balance of dwarf and giant light in the galaxy spectra it is claimed that there is a spread in the mean stellar ages of the low-luminosity elliptical galaxies. These results are interpreted in the context of the evolutionary synthesis models of Worthey (1994). The main result from the comparison of the galaxies and models is that the low-luminosity elliptical galaxies show a large spread in

  9. Measurements of total atomic attenuation cross sections of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os Elements at 122keV and 136keV

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, N.; Tirasoglu, E.; Apaydin, G.; Kobya, A. I.

    2007-04-23

    The aim of this study was to measure the total atomic attenuation cross sections ({sigma}t) in eighth elements (69{<=}Z{<=}76) at 122 keV and 136 keV. The experimental values of the cross sections were determined using the transmission geometry. Measurements have been performed using an annular source (Co-57) and Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values and other available experimental results. Good agreement was observed among the experimental, theoretical and other experimental values.

  10. Mass-luminosity relation of low mass stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Piskunov, A. E.; Shpil'Kina, D. A.

    1997-04-01

    The data on dynamic masses and multicolor photometry of 56 M-type components of binary/multiple systems was collected. Critical evaluation of late type stars bolometric correction scales have been performed. Our refined and reduced data is compared with published empirical and theoretical mass-luminosity relations. Our data does not exclude the existence of a step-like feature at M_V_=12mag. The best agreement between observations and theoretical models is found for recent calculations of D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994ApJS...90..467D) with Alexander opacities. We conclude that present-day knowledge of the mass-luminosity relation at faintest magnitudes is not sufficient for making definite conclusions on the initial mass function of low mass stars.

  11. SLHC, the High-Luminosity Upgrade (public event)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    In the morning of June 23rd a public event is organised in CERN's Council Chamber with the aim of providing the particle physics community with up-to-date information about the strategy for the LHC luminosity upgrade and to describe the current status of preparation work. The presentations will provide an overview of the various accelerator sub-projects, the LHC physics prospects and the upgrade plans of ATLAS and CMS. This event is organised in the framework of the SLHC-PP project, which receives funding from the European Commission for the preparatory phase of the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade project. Informing the public is among the objectives of this EU-funded project. A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast, available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  12. Evidence of an infrared luminosity indicator for galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Isobe, Takashi; Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the nature of infrared-luminous galaxies discovered with the IRAS satellite, the optical and infrared luminosities of 1161 Markarian galaxies and 2146 'normal' galaxies from the CfA redshift survey are compared. Survival analysis statistical methods that take upper limits fully into account are used. It is found that L(IR)/L(B) is statistically correlated with L(60) in both samples, though they differ in the distribution at low luminosities. The derived correlation shows that L(IR)/L(B) provides an indicator for L(60). Since galaxies selected in unbiased IRAS surveys will have higher L(IR)/L(B) than optically selected galaxies, they are therefore also selected for high L(60).

  13. Estimating the Internal Luminosities of Protostars with SOFIA/FORCAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huard, Tracy L.; Terebey, Susan

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Telescope enabled large infrared surveys of nearby molecular clouds forming low mass stars. The 70 micron observations obtained by those facilities provide estimates of the internal luminosities of protostars that are reliable to within a factor of 2, in general. Spitzer observations at shorter wavelengths yield estimates that are much less constrained, reliable only to within an order of magnitude, at best. With the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) routinely operating science flights, this facility may be used to further study protostellar populations. We demonstrate that mid-infrared images obtained with the Faint Object infraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) achieve internal luminosities with reliability comparable to that achieved by 70 micron observations. With its dynamic range and greater angular resolution, FORCAST may be used to characterize protostars that were either saturated or merged with other sources in previous surveys.

  14. Luminosity variations in several parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safargaleev, V.; Lyatsky, W.; Tagirov, V.

    1997-08-01

    Variation of the luminosity in two parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup has been studied by using digitised TV-data with high temporal and spatial resolution. The intervals when a new arc appears near already existing one were chosen for analysis. It is shown, for all cases, that the appearance of a new arc is accompanied by fading or disappearance of another arc. We have named these events out-of-phase events, OP. Another type of luminosity variation is characterised by almost simultaneous enhancement of intensity in the both arcs (in-phase event, IP). The characteristic time of IP events is 10-20 s, whereas OP events last about one minute. Sometimes out-of-phase events begin as IP events. The possible mechanisms for OP and IP events are discussed.

  15. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN STELLAR SYSTEMS: 'QUIESCENT' ACCRETION AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Volonteri, M.; Campbell, D.; Mateo, M.; Dotti, M.

    2011-04-01

    Only a small fraction of local galaxies harbor an accreting black hole, classified as an active galactic nucleus. However, many stellar systems are plausibly expected to host black holes, from globular clusters to nuclear star clusters, to massive galaxies. The mere presence of stars in the vicinity of a black hole provides a source of fuel via mass loss of evolved stars. In this paper, we assess the expected luminosities of black holes embedded in stellar systems of different sizes and properties, spanning a large range of masses. We model the distribution of stars and derive the amount of gas available to a central black hole through a geometrical model. We estimate the luminosity of the black holes under simple, but physically grounded, assumptions on the accretion flow. Finally, we discuss the detectability of 'quiescent' black holes in the local universe.

  16. Searching for Tight Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shi; Lu, Tan

    2015-01-01

    With the latest sample of 116 GRBs with measured redshift and spectral parameters, we investigate 6 2D correlations and 14 derived 3D correlations of GRBs to explore the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic scatters of the luminosity relations of GRBs. We find the 3D correlation of Epeak-τRT-L to be evidently tighter than its corresponding 2D correlations, i.e., the Epeak-L and τRT-L correlations. In addition, the coefficients before the logarithms of Epeak and τRT in the Epeak-τRT-L correlation are almost exact opposites of each other. We discuss how our findings can be interpreted/understood in the framework of the definition of the luminosity (energy released in units of time).

  17. Intermediate-Band Photometric Luminosity Descrimination for M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, T. H.; Furiak, N. M.

    1995-12-01

    Synthetic photometry has been used to design an intermediate-band filter to be used with CCD cameras to facilitate the luminosity classification of M stars. Spectrophotometric data published by Gunn & Stryker (1983) were used to test various bandwidths and centers. Based on these calculations an intermediate-band filter has been purchased. This filter is being used in conjunction with standard BVRI filters to test its effectiveness in luminosity classification of M stars having a wide range of temperatures and different chemical compositions. The results of the theoretical calculations, filter design specifications and preliminary results of the testing program are presented. This research is supported in part by funds provided by Ball State University, The Fund for Astrophysical Research and the Indiana Academy of Science.

  18. Flame luminosity and unburned hydrocarbon measurements in swirling combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanetti, A.J.; Hoult, D.P.; Keck, J.C.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1980-07-01

    The relationship between flame luminosity and unburned hydrocarbon concentration was studied using an atmospheric, tubular burner. Spectroscopic studies were conducted for different fuels, including kerosene, nitrogen-doped kerosene, and shale oil. Independent exhaust gas analyses were performed on shale oil and nitrogen-doped kerosene. At a particular fuel equivalence ratio, measurements showed flame luminosity to be a function of unburned hydrocarbons. Unburned hydrocarbons were found to become significant prior to an equivalence ratio corresponding to the flame's change from blue to yellow. This critical condition is a function of fuel-air mixing and inlet air preheat temperature. Spectroscopic work revealed presence of strong carbon, hydrocarbon, amine, and cyanide band spectra for the nitrogen-containing fuels. Exhaust gas analyses for shale oil and a comparable nitrogen-doped kerosene were similar.

  19. Anchoring the AGN X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, John

    2003-09-01

    Knowledge of the AGN LF over a range of luminosities and redshifts is crucial to understanding the accretion history of supermassive blackholes. Much of the CXRB has been resolved and spectroscopic follow-up has revealed a mixed bag of object types at moderate to high redshifts. For the deep Chandra survey results to be useful in studying the evolution of the XLF, a representative sample of local AGNs of various types with known X-ray luminosities is needed. The new KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) provides the best available sample of H-alpha selected Type 1 and 2 AGNs to serve as the baseline for XLF evolution studies. We propose to observe a volume-limited sample of 28 KISS AGNs to assess their X-ray emission characteristics and establish the local AGN XLF.

  20. Dynamic aperture studies for the LHC high luminosity lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Maria, R. de; Giovannozzi, M.; McIntosh, E.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Wang, M. -H.

    2015-07-14

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  1. z ~ 1 Lyα Emitters. I. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Isak G. B.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a flux-limited sample of 135 candidate z ~ 1 Lyα emitters (LAEs) from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data using a new data cube search method. These LAEs have luminosities comparable to those at high redshifts and lie within a 7 Gyr gap present in existing LAE samples. We use archival and newly obtained optical spectra to verify the UV redshifts of these LAEs. We use the combination of the GALEX UV spectra, optical spectra, and X-ray imaging data to estimate the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and its dependence on Lyα luminosity. We remove the AGNs and compute the luminosity function (LF) from 60 z ~ 1 LAE galaxies. We find that the best-fit LF implies a luminosity density increase by a factor of ~1.5 from z ~ 0.3 to z ~ 1 and ~20 from z ~ 1 to z ~ 2. We find a z ~ 1 volumetric Lyα escape fraction of 0.7% ± 0.4%. Based in part on data obtained from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NNX09AF08G and by other grants and contracts. Based in part on zCOSMOS observations carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under Program ID: LP175.A-0839.

  2. Mass-to-luminosity ratio in binary galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Junqueira, Selma

    1988-11-01

    The authors have compared the observed distribution of the quantity log (Vz2rP) for a sample of 233 pairs of galaxies with Monte-Carlo simulations. They have derived an average mass-to-luminosity ratio M/LB = 18±11. The result is consistent with a linear increase of the mass with radius at least until distances of about 30 kpc.

  3. THE GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DURING THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, M.; Shull, J. M.; Stiavelli, M.; Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P.; Carollo, C. M.

    2010-05-10

    The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z = 6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function (LF) measured at z = 5 and z = 4. We then predict the LF at z {>=} 7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z {approx_gt} 7 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the LF: {alpha}(z {approx_gt} 8) {approx_lt} -1.9 compared to {alpha} = -1.74 at z = 6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L {sub *} {approx_gt} 10{sup -4}) might provide {approx_gt}75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f {sub esc} {approx} 0.2, clumping factor C {approx} 5, top-heavy initial mass function (IMF), and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z {approx_gt} 8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z {approx_gt} 6, but a smaller C/f {sub esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L {sub *} galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z {>=} 6 than today.

  4. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning Studies During Luminosity Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Bartmann, W.; Boccardi, A.; Bracco, C.; Bravin, E.; Goddard, B.; Hofle, W.; Jacquet, D.; Jeff, A.; Kain, V.; Meddahi, M.; /CERN

    2012-05-11

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  5. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W.; Marshall, P. J.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Busha, Michael T.

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  6. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  7. Liners and Low Luminosity AGN in the ROSAT Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This program has led to a series of papers being written and published in the Astrophysical Journal. Together these papers try to explain major parts of the LINER and low luminosity AGN puzzle. One paper ('Accretion Disk Instabilities, Cold Dark Matter Models, and Their Role in Quasar Evolution', Hatziminaoglou E., Siemiginowska A., & Elvis M., 2001, ApJ, 547, 90) describes an analytical model for the evolution of the quasar luminosity function. By combining the Press-Schechter formalism for the masses of initial structures with the luminosity distribution for a population of single mass black holes given by an unstable accretion disk an almost complete end-to-end physics-based model of quasar evolution is produced. In this model black holes spend 75% of their time in a low accretion state (at L(Edd)). This low state population of black holes is likely to be observed as the LINER and low luminosity AGNs in the local universe. Another paper ('Broad Emission Line Regions in AGN: the Link with the Accretion Power', Nicastro F., 2000, ApJ Letters, 530, L65) gives a physical basis for why low state black holes appear as LINERS. By linking the Lightman-Eardley instability in an accretion disk to the ori.gin of a wind that contains the broad emission line cloud material this model explains the large widths seen in these lines as being the Keplerian velocity of the disk at the instability radius. For LINERS the key is that below an accretion rate of 10(exp -3)M(sub Edd)the Lightman-Eardley instability falls within the innermost stable orbit of the disk, and so leaves the entire disk stable. No wind occurs, and so no broad emission lines are seen. Most LINERS are likely to be black holes in this low state. Tests of this model are being considered.

  8. Near-UV Snapshot Survey of Low Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Rosa

    2005-07-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei {LLAGNs} comprise 30% of all bright galaxies {B<12.5} and are the most common type of AGN. These include low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies, LINERs, and transition-type objects {TOs, also called weak-[OI] LINERs}. What powers them is still at the forefront of AGN research. To unveil the nature of the central source we propose a near-UV snapshot survey of 50 nearby LLAGNs using ACS/HRC and the filter {F330W}, a configuration which is optimal to detect faint star forming regions around their nuclei. These images will complement optical and near-IR images available in the HST archive, providing a panchromatic atlas of the inner regions of these galaxies, which will be used to study their nuclear stellar population. Our main goals are to: 1} Investigate the presence of nuclear unresolved sources that can be attributed to an AGN; 2} Determine the frequency of nuclear and circumnuclear stellar clusters, and whether they are more common in Transition Objects {TOs} than in LINERs; 3} Characterize the sizes, colors, luminosities, masses and ages of these clusters; 4} Derive the luminosity function of star clusters and study their evaporation over time in the vicinity of AGNs. Finally, the results of this project will be combined with those of a previous similar one for Seyfert galaxies in order to compare the nature of the nuclear sources and investigate if there could be an evolution from Seyferts to TOs and LINERs. By adding UV images to the existing optical and near-IR ones, this project will also create an extremely valuable database for astronomers with a broad range of scientific interests.

  9. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  10. Luminosities for two yellow supergiants - Nonvariables and the instability strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Nancy R.

    1993-01-01

    The luminosities for two yellow supergiants HD 183864 and Psi And = HD 223047 are determined from the IUE spectra of their hot companions. The absolute magnitudes of HD 183864 and HD 223047 are -2.3 and -2.1 mag, respectively, and their companions have spectral types of A0.0 V and B8.8 V. The companion of Psi And is compatible with the orbital motion tentatively detected by speckle interferometric observations. The supergiant luminosities are combined with the Cepheid luminosities determined in the same way, and also the variables and nonvariables from Schmidt's studies of open clusters. As found by Schmidt, the variable and nonvariable supergiants have almost no overlap in the HR diagram. The combined sample defines the locus of the helium burning blue loops of evolutionary tracks. Because no nonvariables are found to the blue of fainter Cepheids, the observed blue edge of the Cepheid region may be partly determined by the blue loops rather than by the region of pulsational instability.

  11. Generalized Continuity Equation Solutions for the QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caditz, David M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized continuity equation that describes the relationship between the statistical and physical evolution of populations of astronomical objects. This equation allows us to parameterize the luminosity function (LF) in terms of physically meaningful quantities, such as creation timescale, τs, object evolutionary timescale, τg, and lifetime, am. The shape and evolution of the LF are shown to be sensitive to these physical parameters, with large regions of the parameter space producing relatively simple evolutionary scenarios such as density evolution (DE) or luminosity evolution (LE). Regions of parameter space where τs ≲ 0.3tH and τg ≲ 0.5tH, where tH is the Hubble time, may be characterized by more complex evolution including the natural formation of a double power-law shape and mixed density and luminosity evolution (ME). This result has important consequences for the interpretation of the quasi-stellar object (QSO) LF, implying that the timescales for creation and physical evolution may fall near the above range. A fit to QSO survey data for redshifts 0.68 < z < 4 implies that τs ∼ 0.2tH and τg ∼ 0.05tH with QSOs having a maximum lifetime of am ∼ 0.25tH.

  12. Gamma-ray luminosity function of BL Lac objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    The gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) of BL Lac objects is constructed by using a sample of BL Lac objects with redshifts selected from the Second LAT AGN catalog. The GLFs of BL Lacs in the frame of the pure density evolution (PDE), the pure luminosity evolution (PLE), and the luminosity-dependent density (LDDE) models are determined by using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, respectively. Our results suggest that the PDE model can give best description for BL Lac GLF based on the combination of constraints of model parameters and good fits to the observed data of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) BL Lacs, but other two models (PLE and LDDE) cannot be excluded. Based on our constructed GLFs, the contribution to the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) from BL Lacs is estimated, and ˜1-5 per cent of the EGRB in the 0.1-100 GeV band is found to come from unresolved BL Lacs (including the cascade emission). In addition, it is found that the BL Lac GLF is very different from flat spectrum radio quasar GLF and then the contribution of blazars to the EGRB should be estimated separately.

  13. Disc outflows and high-luminosity true type 2 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Netzer, Hagai

    2016-06-01

    The absence of intrinsic broad-line emission has been reported in a number of active galactic nuclei (AGN), including some with high Eddington ratios. Such `true type 2 AGN' are inherent to the disc-wind scenario for the broad-line region: broad-line emission requires a minimal column density, implying a minimal outflow rate and thus a minimal accretion rate. Here we perform a detailed analysis of the consequences of mass conservation in the process of accretion through a central disc. The resulting constraints on luminosity are consistent with all the cases where claimed detections of true type 2 AGN pass stringent criteria, and predict that intrinsic broad-line emission can disappear at luminosities as high as ˜4 × 1046 erg s-1 and any Eddington ratio, though more detections can be expected at Eddington ratios below ˜1 per cent. Our results are applicable to every disc outflow model, whatever its details and whether clumpy or smooth, irrespective of the wind structure and its underlying dynamics. While other factors, such as changes in spectral energy distribution or covering factor, can affect the intensities of broad emission lines, within this scenario they can only produce true type 2 AGN of higher luminosity then those prescribed by mass conservation.

  14. The graviton luminosity of the sun and other stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Graviton production in electron-electron (e-e) and electron-ion (e-z) scattering is evaluated in the Born approximation. The calculation is compared with that for photon production, that is, Coulomb quadrupole bremsstrahlung, and a number of results are taken over from that problem. Application is made to the sun, and it is found that for the solar plasma the main contribution to the graviton luminosity comes from the central core at r/R approximately 0.1. The total luminosity (Lg) in gravitons is about 7.9 x 10 to the 14th ergs/s, close to an earlier estimate by Weinberg (1965, 1972); about 33 percent of the total results from e-e collisions with the rest from e-z collisions (mainly e-p and e-alpha). Approximate corrections to Born formulas are evaluated, and this Lg includes the associated (approximately + or - 10 percent, respectively) modification. The quantum-mechanical aspects of the solar Lg problem are discussed, and it is shown why a previous classical calculation overestimated Lg by about an order of magnitude. Production of gravitons in binary collisions in other types of stars is discussed briefly. It is found that Lg varies very little along the main sequence. White dwarfs have a typical graviton luminosity LWD approximately 10 to the 19th ergs/s, while neutron stars have LNS approximately 10 to the 25th ergs/s; these estimates are very rough.

  15. Applying the luminosity function statistics in the fireshell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Lemos, L. J.; Bianco, C. L.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied to the data of BATSE, GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We applied the tool of the LF statistics to three GRB classes predicted by the Fireshell model. We produced, by LF statistics, predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fph pk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk) for the three GRB classes predicted by Fireshell model; we also used three GRB rates. We looked for differences among the distributions, and in fact we found. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with 217 GRBs with known redshifts. Our goal is transform the GRBs in a standard candle, where a alternative is find a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy (Liso - Epk).

  16. Tidal dwarf galaxies and the luminosity-metallicity relation .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, S. M.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Meurer, G.; Bekki, K.; Dopita, M. A.; Kilborn, V.; Nicholls, D.

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M_R˜ -13. We use the \\citet{Dopita2013} metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all of the data in this analysis. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M_R = -16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity. Our hydrodynamical simuations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M_R˜ -16 our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 HI gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes there is an increase in dispersion in metallicity of our sample. In our sample we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6), and four (21%) very metal poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation. Further details of this analysis are available in Sweet et al. (2013, ApJ submitted).

  17. Commissioning and Alignment of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope of CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Grant; CMS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is one of the newest additions to the CMS detector at the LHC. It consists of 16 3-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors pointing toward the interaction point at the center of CMS. The pixel detectors are based on the same technology as the silicon pixel detector of CMS. The chips have an additional output, called a fast-out. This fast-out is sent whenever a hit is detected, and will be used to measure the luminosity. The fast-out can also be used to self trigger the the PLT allowing for measurement of the systematics and beam backgrounds. The PLT is expected to significantly improve the precision of the luminosity measurement that is fundamental for particle searches and cross section measurements with the CMS detector. Furthermore, with reconstructed particle trajectories, measurements of beam backgrounds and the location of the interaction point centroid can be obtained. First experiences with the PLT detector before and after installation are presented and the track reconstruction is discussed.

  18. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  19. A New Population of Compton-thick AGNs Identified Using the Spectral Curvature above 10 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael J.; Assef, R.; Baloković, M.; Stern, D.; Gandhi, P.; Lamperti, I.; Alexander, D. M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Berney, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Comastri, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harrison, F. A.; Lansbury, G.; Markwardt, C.; Ricci, C.; Rivers, E.; Schawinski, K.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. Megan

    2016-07-01

    We present a new metric that uses the spectral curvature (SC) above 10 keV to identify Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in low-quality Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) X-ray data. Using NuSTAR, we observe nine high SC-selected AGNs. We find that high-sensitivity spectra show that the majority are Compton-thick (78% or 7/9) and the remaining two are nearly Compton-thick (N H ≃ (5–8) × 1023 cm‑2 ). We find that the SC BAT and SC NuSTAR measurements are consistent, suggesting that this technique can be applied to future telescopes. We tested the SC method on well-known Compton-thick AGNs and found that it is much more effective than broadband ratios (e.g., 100% using SC versus 20% using 8–24 keV/3–8 keV). Our results suggest that using the >10 keV emission may be the only way to identify this population since only two sources show Compton-thick levels of excess in the Balmer decrement corrected [O iii] to observed X-ray emission ratio ({F}[{{O}{{III}}]}/{F}2{--10 {keV}}{obs}\\gt 1) and WISE colors do not identify most of them as AGNs. Based on this small sample, we find that a higher fraction of these AGNs are in the final merger stage (<10 kpc) than typical BAT AGNs. Additionally, these nine obscured AGNs have, on average, ≈4× higher accretion rates than other BAT-detected AGNs (< {λ }{Edd}> \\=\\0.068+/- 0.023 compared to < {λ }{Edd}> \\=\\0.016+/- 0.004). The robustness of SC at identifying Compton-thick AGNs implies that a higher fraction of nearby AGNs may be Compton-thick (≈22%) and the sum of black hole growth in Compton-thick AGNs (Eddington ratio times population percentage) is nearly as large as mildly obscured and unobscured AGNs.

  20. 9 CFR 2.10 - Licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... suspended or revoked. 2.10 Section 2.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... have been suspended or revoked. (a) Any person whose license has been suspended for any reason shall....12. (b) Any person whose license has been revoked shall not be licensed in his or her own name or...

  1. The luminosity structure and objective classification of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Mingshen

    1995-01-01

    The luminosity structure of spiral galaxies is studied using the technique of principal component analysis. It is found that approximately 94% of the variation in the luminosity distribution of galaxies can be accounted for by just two principal components. The principal luminosity components may contain valuable information about star formation history or whatever luminosity-regulating process occurs in galaxies. Practically, these principal components provide a new approach for the investigation of the luminosity structures of galaxies and their dependence on other properties. They also serve as an excellent objective classification system for galaxies. We introduce in this paper such a classification scheme and explore its various properties. The new system shows a number of very impressive characteristics. Most important, it can well segregate virtually all the important galactic properties we tested and does so much better than the conventional morphological classification systems. Of particular interest is that some distance-dependent parameters can also be determined to a surprisingly good accuracy; for example, absolute magnitude may be determined to an accuracy of approximately 0.6 mag (yet further improvement is believed to be highly possible). Second, the system is objective, and the classification procedure can be automated to a large degree; also the new system can apply to much smaller and fainter images than do eye-based clasification systems. These properties make the new system suitable for practical application, especially on very large (and deeper) digital image catalogs. Third, the classification is expressed in dimensionless numbers, yet the simple notation bears significant and easily understandable meaning, making it easy and convenient to use. Finally, the new system has another extremely useful feature: it provides a very powerful and convenient platform not only for classification, but also for easily recording, examining, and studying the

  2. Characterization of the PILATUS photon-counting pixel detector for X-ray energies from 1.75 keV to 60 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, T.; Brandstetter, S.; Cibik, L.; Commichau, S.; Hofer, P.; Krumrey, M.; Lüthi, B.; Marggraf, S.; Müller, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Wernecke, J.

    2013-03-01

    The PILATUS detector module was characterized in the PTB laboratory at BESSY II comparing modules with 320 μm thick and newly developed 450 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon sensors. Measurements were carried out over a wide energy range, in-vacuum from 1.75 keV to 8.8 keV and in air from 8 keV to 60 keV. The quantum efficiency (QE) was measured as a function of energy and the spatial resolution was measured at several photon energies both in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from edge profile measurements and by directly measuring the point spread function (PSF) of a single pixel in a raster scan with a pinhole beam. Independent of the sensor thickness, the measured MTF and PSF come close to those for an ideal pixel detector with the pixel size of the PILATUS detector (172 × 172 μm2). The measured QE follows the values predicted by calculation. Thicker sensors significantly enhance the QE of the PILATUS detectors for energies above 10 keV without impairing the spatial resolution and noise-free detection. In-vacuum operation of the PILATUS detector is possible at energies as low as 1.75 keV.

  3. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS TOWARD CANDIDATE LOW-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND VERY LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Dunham, Michael M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of nine candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; L{sub int} {<=} 0.1 L{sub Sun }). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope cataloged by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star-forming regions. Each object was observed in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J = 2 {yields} 1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30'' resolution. Using five-point grid maps, we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A-IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows from VeLLOs. The accretion luminosities derived from the outflow properties of the VeLLOs with detected CO outflows are higher than the observed internal luminosity of the protostars, indicating that these sources likely had higher accretion rates in the past. The known L1251-A-IRS3 outflow is detected but not re-mapped. We do not detect clear, unconfused signatures of red and blue molecular wings toward the other 31 sources in the survey indicating that large-scale, distinct outflows are rare toward this sample of candidate protostars. Several potential outflows are confused with the kinematic structure in the surrounding core and cloud. Interferometric imaging is needed to disentangle large-scale molecular cloud kinematics from these potentially weak protostellar outflows.

  4. AMMONIA AND CO OBSERVATIONS TOWARD LOW-LUMINOSITY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. W.; Xu, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. B.; Pandian, J. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether distinctions exist between low- and high-luminosity Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers, we have undertaken multi-line mapping observations of various molecular lines, including the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), and {sup 12}CO (1-0) transitions, toward a sample of nine low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers and {sup 12}CO (1-0) observations toward a sample of eight high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers, for which we already had NH{sub 3} spectral line data. Emission in the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) transitions was detected in eight out of nine low-luminosity maser sources, in which 14 cores were identified. We derive densities, column densities, temperatures, core sizes, and masses of both low- and high-luminosity maser regions. A comparative analysis of the physical quantities reveals marked distinctions between the low-luminosity and high-luminosity groups: in general, cores associated with high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers are larger and more massive than those traced by low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers; regions traced by the high-luminosity masers have larger column densities but lower densities than those of the low-luminosity maser regions. Further, strong correlations between 6.7 GHz maser luminosity and NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line widths are found, indicating that internal motions in high-luminosity maser regions are more energetic than those in low-luminosity maser regions. A {sup 12}CO (1-0) outflow analysis also shows distinctions in that outflows associated with high-luminosity masers have wider line wings and larger sizes than those associated with low-luminosity masers.

  5. The CMS Luminosity Measurement and Results of its First Calibration using Van de Meer Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Jeremy; Adam, Nadia; Halyo, Valerie; Hunt, Adam; Jones, John; Marlow, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We present an overview of the hadronic forward calorimeter (HF) based luminosity measurement at CMS, with an emphasis on the results of the recent Van de Meer scans. We describe the HF luminosity readout along with the methods used to extract the relative luminosity measurement at CMS. Finally, we review the procedure to calibrate the luminosity measurement and present the results from the first collisions. )

  6. Discovery of multiple low-luminosity X-ray sources in NGC 6397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Krockenberger, Martin; Bailyn, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    New low-luminosity X-ray sources have been discovered in NGC 6397 with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager. These sources have a total number, spatial distribution, and X-ray luminosities consistent with their being CVs. The findings supports the hypothesis that the low-luminosity X-ray sources in clusters are generally dominated by CVs.

  7. Revisiting the luminosity function of single halo white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Ruxandra; Torres, Santiago; Althaus, Leandro G.; Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Context. White dwarfs are the fossils left by the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, and have very long evolutionary timescales. This allows us to use them to explore the properties of old populations, like the Galactic halo. Aims: We present a population synthesis study of the luminosity function of halo white dwarfs, aimed at investigating which information can be derived from the currently available observed data. Methods: We employ an up-to-date population synthesis code based on Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporates the most recent and reliable cooling sequences for metal-poor progenitors as well as an accurate modeling of the observational biases. Results: We find that because the observed sample of halo white dwarfs is restricted to the brightest stars, only the hot branch of the white dwarf luminosity function can be used for these purposes, and that its shape function is almost insensitive to the most relevant inputs, such as the adopted cooling sequences, the initial mass function, the density profile of the stellar spheroid, or the adopted fraction of unresolved binaries. Moreover, since the cutoff of the observed luminosity has not yet been determined only the lower limits to the age of the halo population can be placed. Conclusions: We conclude that the current observed sample of the halo white dwarf population is still too small to obtain definite conclusions about the properties of the stellar halo, and the recently computed white dwarf cooling sequences, which incorporate residual hydrogen burning, should be assessed using metal-poor globular clusters.

  8. A statistical analysis of the broadband 0.1 to 3.5 keV spectral properties of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Cordova, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    We survey the broadband spectral properties of approximately 500 X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the Einstein Observatory. Included in this survey are the approximately 450 AGNs in the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) of Gioia et al. (1990) and the approximately 50 AGNs in the Ultrasoft Survey of Cordova et al. (1992). We present a revised version of the latter sample, based on the post publication discovery of a software error in the Einstein Rev-1b processing. We find that the mean spectral index of the AGNs between 0.1 and 0.6 keV is softer, and the distribution of indices wider, than previous estimates based on analyses of the X-ray spectra of optically selected AGNs. A subset of these AGNs exhibit flux variabiulity, some on timescales as short as 0.05 days. A correlation between radio and hard X-ray luminosity is confirmed, but the data do not support a correlation between the radio and soft X-ray luminosities, or between radio loudness and soft X-ray spectral slope. Evidence for physically distinct soft and hard X-ray components is found, along with the possibility of a bias in previous optically selected samples toward selection of AGNs with flatter X-ray spectra.

  9. The response of a radiation resistant ceramic scintillator (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr) to low energy ions (0-60 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Rey, D.; Zurro, B.; McCarthy, K. J.; Baciero, A.; Garcia, G.

    2008-10-15

    This work extends a previous study on ionoluminescence of a radiation-hard ceramic scintillator, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr, to ions accelerated to keV energies [K. J. McCarthy et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 321, 78 (2003)]. It is motivated by the identification of this material as a promising candidate for use in the fast-ion-loss detector for ITER [for the range of thermal (low energy) and suprathermal ions]. In the paper we quantify and compare its ionoluminescence with that of some common luminescent materials (YAG:Ce and ruby) when irradiated by H{sup +} ions accelerated to {<=}60 keV using a purpose built laboratory setup. Next, studies are made on the ceramic to quantify its response as a function of incident ion mass, i.e., to He{sup +}. For this, the absolute luminosities of the material are estimated in terms of the number of photons emitted per incident ion as a function of energy. Moreover, the radiation hardness and postirradiation recovery of the ceramic are investigated. Finally, from the studies it can be concluded that the ceramic ruby is a good candidate for detecting low energy ions as long as its temporal response (approximately several milliseconds) is not a constraint for specific ion measurements.

  10. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  11. Redshifts of low-X-ray luminosity clusters of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, M.P.; Ulmer, M.P.; Hintzen, P.

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for Abell clusters A539, A1185, and A1228, and the southern clusters S1840-623, S1904-618, S1908-566, and S2000-561. All these clusters have reported X-ray luminosities or upper limits. Finding charts for the clusters are presented, and the measured heliocentric redshifts are given along with redshifts obtained by other investigators. Comments are made about each cluster. The technique used to derive the redshifts is summarized. 32 references.

  12. Redshifts of low-X-ray luminosity clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.; Hintzen, P.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for Abell clusters A539, A1185, and A1228, and the southern clusters S1840-623, S1904-618, S1908-566, and S2000-561. All these clusters have reported X-ray luminosities or upper limits. Finding charts for the clusters are presented, and the measured heliocentric redshifts are given along with redshifts obtained by other investigators. Comments are made about each cluster. The technique used to derive the redshifts is summarized.

  13. Redshifts of low-X-ray luminosity clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.; Hintzen, P.

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for Abell clusters A539, A1185, and A1228, and the southern clusters S1840-623, S1904-618, S1908-566, and S2000-561. All these clusters have reported X-ray luminosities or upper limits. Finding charts for the clusters are presented, and the measured heliocentric redshifts are given along with redshifts obtained by other investigators. Comments are made about each cluster. The technique used to derive the redshifts is summarized.

  14. On Schmidt's Vm estimator and other estimators of luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Schmidt's (1968) estimator, sometimes used to calculate the luminosity function from a complete sample of observed objects, can be generalized naively to the case in which the maximum distance for detection is a function of the direction. Though unbiased, this estimator then does not have minimum variance and, in some cases, is inferior to the classical estimator. The classical estimator, however, is biased when the magnitude boxes are not infinitesimal. A generalization of Schmidt's estimator is proposed which is unbiased and usually superior to both Schmidt's and the classical estimator. Variance formulas and numerical examples are given. The results can be used in combining several catalogs.

  15. HERA LUMINOSITY UPGRADE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET PRODUCTION AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GHOSH,A.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PRODELL,A.; THOMPSON,P.; WANDERER,P.; WU,K.C.

    2000-09-17

    Production of two types of superconducting multi-function magnets, needed for the HEX4 Luminosity Upgrade is underway at BNL. Coil winding is now completed and cryostat assembly is in progress. Magnet type GO and type GG cold masses have been satisfactorily cold tested in vertical dewars and the first fully assembled GO magnet system has been horizontally cold tested and shipped to DESY. Warm measurements confirm that the coils meet challenging harmonic content targets. In this paper we discuss GO and GG magnet design and construction solutions, field harmonic measurements and quench test results.

  16. Elevated Optical Luminosity for Gamma-ray Blazar BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Fumagalli, M.; Hogan, M.; Kaplan, K.; Prochaska, P. X.; Williams, D. A.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the increased optical luminosity of BL Lacertae (RA=22h02m43.29s, dec=42d16m39.98s), a low-frequency-peaked gamma-ray emitting blazar at a redshift of 0.068 (3EG J2202+4225, 2FGL J2202.8+4216). We have collected regular R-band exposures for BL Lacertae as part of a larger optical monitoring program of gamma-ray-bright blazars using the Super-LOTIS (Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System) robotic telescope at the Steward Observatory on Kitt Peak, near Tucson Arizona.

  17. Radiation environment and shielding for a high luminosity collider detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M.V.; Fisyak, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-12-01

    Detectors now under design for use in the proposed high energy high luminosity colliders must deal with unprecedented radiation levels. We have performed a comprehensive study for the GEM detector at the SSC to determine the best way to shield critical detector components from excessive radiation, with special attention paid to the low energy neutrons and photons. We have used several detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the particle fluxes in the detector. We describe these methods and demonstrate that two orders of magnitude reduction in the neutron and photon fluxes can be obtained with appropriate shielding of critical forward regions such as the low beta quadrupoles and the forward calorimeter.

  18. IUE observations of blue halo high luminosity stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Franco, M. L.; Stalio, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two high luminosity population II blue stars of high galactic latitude, BD+33 deg 2642 and HD 137569 were observed at high resolution. The stellar spectra show the effect of mass loss in BD+33 deg 2642 and abnormally weak metallic lines in HD 137569. The interstellar lines in the direction of BD+33 deg 2642, which lies at a height z greater than or equal to 6.2 kpc from the galactic plane, are split into two components. No high ionization stages are found at the low velocity component; nor can they be detected in the higher velocity clouds because of mixing with the corresponding stellar/circumstellar lines.

  19. A multiparametric analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies. 1: Luminosity and ISM parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Paul B.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Kim, Dong-Woo

    1995-01-01

    We have conducted bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis of data measuring the luminosity and interstellar medium of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies (presented by Fabbiano, Kim, & Trinchieri 1992). We find a strong nonlinear correlation between L(sub B) and L(sub X), with a power-law slope of 1.8 +/- 0.1, steepening to 2.0 +/- if we do not consider the Local Group dwarf galaxies M32 and NGC 205. Considering only galaxies with log L(sub X) less than or equal to 40.5, we instead find a slope of 1.0 +/- 0.2 (with or without the Local Group dwarfs). Although E and S0 galaxies have consistent slopes for their L(sub B)-L(sub X) relationships, the mean values of the distribution functions of both L(sub X) and L(sub X)/L(sub B) for the S0 galaxies are lower than those for the E galaxies at the 2.8 sigma and 3.5 sigma levels, respectively. We find clear evidence for a correlation between L(sub X) and the X-ray color C(sub 21), defined by Kim, Fabbiano, & Trinchieri (1992b), which indicates that X-ray luminosity is correlated with the spectral shape below 1 keV in the sense that low-L(sub X) systems have relatively large contributions from a soft component compared with high-L(sub X) systems. We find evidence from our analysis of the 12 micron IRAS data for our sample that our S0 sample has excess 12 micron emission compared with the E sample, scaled by their optical luminosities. This may be due to emission from dust heated in star-forming regions in S0 disks. This interpretation is reinforced by the existence of a strong L(sub 12)-L(sub 100) correlation for our S0 sample that is not found for the E galaxies, and by an analysis of optical-IR colors. We find steep slopes for power-law relationships between radio luminosity and optical, X-ray, and far-IR (FIR) properties. This last point argues that the presence of an FIR-emitting interstellar medium (ISM) in early-type galaxies is coupled to their ability to generate nonthermal radio continuum, as

  20. 43 CFR 2.10 - Where do I send my request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INFORMATION ACT Requests for Records under the FOIA § 2.10 Where do I send my request? (a) DOI does not have a... of documents in its possession. DOI's files are decentralized and are maintained by various...

  1. The luminosity function of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Madore, B. F.; Neugebauer, G.; Persson, C. J.; Persson, S. E.; Rice, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a study of the far infrared properties of the brightest galaxies in the IRAS survey are described. There is a correlation between the infrared luminosity and the infrared to optical luminosity ratio and between the infrared luminosity and the far infrared color temperature in these galaxies. The infrared bright galaxies represent a significant component of extragalactic objects in the local universe, being comparable in space density to the Seyferts, optically identified starburst galaxies, and more numerous than quasars at the same bolometric luminosity. The far infrared luminosity in the local universe is approximately 25% of the starlight output in the same volume.

  2. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  3. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-01

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of ɛ = AΕa+BΕb, where ɛ is efficiency, Ε is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a "knee" at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  4. The cosmological evolution and luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Avni, Y.; Giommi, P.; Griffiths, R. E.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Danziger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are derived and discussed. The sample used consists of 31 AGNs extracted from a fully identified sample of X-ray sources from the Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey and is therefore exclusively defined by its X-ray properties. The distribution in space is found to be strongly nonuniform. The amount of cosmological evolution required by the X-ray data is derived in the framework of pure luminosity evolution and is found to be smaller than the amount determined from optically selected samples. The X-ray luminosity function is derived. It can be satisfactorily represented by a single power law only over a limited range of absolute luminosities. Evidence that the luminosity function flattens at low luminosity or steepens at high luminosity, or both, is presented and discussed.

  5. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-22

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6{+-}0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  6. The luminosity function of the CfA Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzke, R. O.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We use the CfA Reshift Survey of galaxies with m(sub z) less than or equal to 15.5 to calculate the galaxy luminosity function over the range -13 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -22. The sample includes 9063 galaxies distributed over 2.1 sr. For galaxies with velocities cz greater or equal to 2500 km per sec, where the effects of peculiar velocities are small, the luminosity function is well represented by a Schechter function with parameters phi(sub star) = 0.04 +/- 0.01 per cu Mpc, M(sub star) = -18.8 +/- 0.3, and alpha = -1.0 +/- 0.2. When we include all galaxies with cz greater or equal to 500 km per sec, the number of galaxies in the range -16 less than or equal to M(sub z) less than or equal to -13 exceeds the extrapolation of the Schechter function by a factor of 3.1 +/- 0.5. This faint-end excess is not caused by the local peculiar velocity field but may be partially explained by small scale errors in the Zwicky magnitudes. Even with a scale error as large as 0.2 mag per mag, which is unlikely, the excess is still a factor of 1.8 +/- 0.3. If real, this excess affects the interpretation of deep counts of field galaxies.

  7. QSO Narrow [OIII] Line Width and Host Galaxy Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonning, E. W.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.

    2004-05-01

    Established correlations between galaxy bulge luminosity L, black hole mass MBH, and stellar velocity dispersion sigma in galaxies suggest a close relationship between the growth of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. Measurements of the MBH - sigma relationship as a function of cosmic time may shed light on the origin of this relationship. One approach is to derive MBH and sigma from the widths of QSO broad and narrow lines, respectively (Shields et al. 2003, ApJ, 583, 124; Nelson 2000, ApJ, 544, L91). We investigate the utility of using the velocity of the narrow line emitting gas as a surrogate for stellar velocity dispersion in QSOs by examining host magnitudes and [OIII] line widths for low redshift QSOs. For our limited range of L, the increase in sigma with L predicted by the Faber-Jackson relation is substantially obscured by scatter. However, sigma([O III]) is consistent in the mean with host galaxy luminosity. EWB is a NASA GSRP fellow. GAS and SS are supported under Texas Advanced Research Program grant 003658-0177-2001 and NSF grant AST-0098594.

  8. Colorblind vision; luminosity losses in the spectrum for dichromats.

    PubMed

    HECHT, S; HSIA, Y

    1947-11-20

    1. Measurements have been made of the dark-adapted foveal threshold of normal and colorblind persons in five parts of the spectrum using a 1 degrees circular test field. 2. Compared to normals, protanopes (red-blinds) show an elevation of the threshold which increases slowly from blue to yellow and rises rapidly thereafter until in the red the threshold is more than ten times as high as normal. Deuteranopes (green-blinds) do not show so high an elevation, their maximum in the green being only about 70 per cent above normal. 3. These threshold elevations correspond to luminosity losses in the spectrum. For the protanope the total loss in the spectrum is nearly one-half of the normal luminosity; for the deuteranope it is nearly two-fifths of normal. 4. Such losses support the idea that colorblindness corresponds to the loss of one of the three receptor systems usually postulated to account for normal color vision. However, the color sensations reported by colorblind persons, especially monocular colorblinds, do not support the idea of a lost or inactivated receptor system. A fresh explanation for colorblindness is called for to reconcile these conflicting kinds of evidence. PMID:18896937

  9. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  10. Radio variability survey of very low luminosity protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2014-07-01

    Ten very low luminosity objects were observed multiple times in the 8.5 GHz continuum in search of protostellar magnetic activities. A radio outburst of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS was detected, and the variability timescale was about 20 days or shorter. The results of this survey and archival observations suggest that IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is in active states about half the time. Archival data show that L1014 IRS and L1148 IRS were detectable previously and suggest that at least 20%-30% of very low luminosity protostars are radio variables. Considering the variability timescale and flux level of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS and the previous detection of the circular polarization of L1014 IRS, the radio outbursts of these protostars are probably caused by magnetic flares. However, IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is too young and small to develop an internal convective dynamo. If the detected radio emission is indeed coming from magnetic flares, the discovery implies that the flares may be caused by the fossil magnetic fields of interstellar origin.

  11. Stacked depth graded multilayer for hard X-rays measured up to 130 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. P.; Christensen, F. E.; Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Zhong, Z.

    2007-09-01

    Depth graded multilayer designs for hard x-ray telescopes in the 10 keV to 70-80 keV energy range have had either W or Pt as the heavy element. These materials have been chosen because of reasonable optical constants, the possibility to grow smooth interfaces with the spacer material, and the stability over time. On the flip side both W and Pt have an absorption edge -- 69.5 keV (W) and 78.4 keV (Pt) -- which is very close to the two 44Ti lines at 67.9 keV and 78.4 keV that are produced in the envelope of a super nova explosion. Other materials have better optical constants and no absorption edges in this energy range, for example Ni 0.93V 0.07, but are not used because of high interface roughness. By using a WC/SiC multilayer for the bottom and a Ni 0.93V 0.07/SiC multilayer for the thicker top layers of a depth graded multilayer we have made a reflector that doesn't have a clear absorption edge. This reflector has been measured at energies between 8 keV and 130 keV. At a graze angle of 0.11 degree there is still nearly the same reflectivity below the W absorption edge as for a traditional W based coating, and above the W absorption edge there is still 48% reflection at 80 keV.

  12. Measurement of the mass attenuation coefficient from 81 keV to 1333 keV for elemental materials Al, Cu and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjorgieva, Slavica; Barandovski, Lambe

    2016-03-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) for 3 high purity elemental materials Al, Cu and Pb were measured in the γ-ray energy range from 81 keV up to 1333 keV using 22Na, 60Co 133Ba and 133Cs as sources of gamma radiation. Well shielded detector (NaI (Tl) semiconductor detector) was used to measure the intensity of the transmitted beam. The measurements were made under condition of good geometry, assuring that any photon absorbed or deflected appreciably does not reach the detector. The measured values are compared with the theoretical ones obtained by Seltzer (1993).

  13. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients for four mixtures using X-rays from 13 keV up to 40 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Esposito, A.; Chiti, M.; Gentile, A.

    2001-06-01

    The total absorption coefficients for some selected organic compounds relevant to health physics, Triaflol BN (C 3H 4O 2) n, Triaflol TN (C 12H 18O 7) n, Kapton (C 44H 20O 10) n, and Melinex (C 10H 8N 4O 4) n were measured in the X-ray energy range from 13 keV up to about 40 keV using a collimator, high purity germanium detector with thin Be window and variable energy X-ray source. The measured values are compared with the theoretical ones obtained using the XCOM code. The agreement is generally good within a few percent.

  14. Variations of the core luminosity and solar neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the geological and astrophysical data as well as presenting theoretical considerations indicating the presence of dynamic processes present in the solar core. The dynamic solar model (DSM) is suggested to take into account the presence of cyclic variations in the temperature of the solar core. Comparing the results of calculations of the CO2 content, albedo and solar evolutionary luminosity changes with the empirically determined global earthly temperatures, and taking into account climatic models, I determined the relation between the earthly temperature and solar luminosity. These results indicate to the observed maximum of 10o change on the global terrestrial surface temperature a related solar luminosity change around 4-5 % on a ten million years timescale, which is the timescale of heat diffusion from the solar core to the surface. The related solar core temperature changes are around 1 % only. At the same time, the cyclic luminosity changes of the solar core are shielded effectively by the outer zones since the radiation diffusion takes more than 105 years to reach the solar surface. The measurements of the solar neutrino fluxes with Kamiokande 1987-1995 showed variations higher than 40 % around the average, at the Super-Kamiokande the size of the apparent scatter decreased to 13 %. This latter scatter, if would be related completely to stochastic variations of the central temperature, would indicate a smaller than 1 % change. Fourier and wavelet analysis of the solar neutrino fluxes indicate only a marginally significant period around 200 days (Haubold, 1998). Helioseismic measurements are known to be very constraining. Actually, Castellani et al. (1999) remarked that the different solar models lead to slightly different sound speeds, and the different methods of regularization yield slightly different sound speeds, too. Therefore, they doubled the found parameter variations, and were really conservative assuming

  15. K+ charge transfer in H2 at low keV collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, F. B.; Martinez, H.; Fuentes, B. E.; Yousif, F. B.

    2013-08-01

    Absolute electron capture cross sections for the K+-H2 pair, employing beam collision spectroscopy for 0.4-4 keV energy were measured. The capture cross section increased with the increase in collision energy. The results below 2 keV overlap with previously measured data of other investigators and extend down in energy to 400 eV, where no previous data have been reported. Experimental data were compared with calculations employing the Olson model, which were found to agree in behavior as well as with an absolute value above 100 keV.

  16. Implications of Lag-Luminosity Relationship for Unified GRB Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Spectral lags (tau(sub lag)) are deduced for 1437 long (T(sub 90) greater than 2 s) BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with peak flux F(sub p) greater than 0.25 photons cm(sup -2)/s, near to the BATSE trigger threshold. The lags are modeled to approximate the observed distribution in the F(sub p)-T(sub lag) plane, realizing a noise-free representation. Assuming a two-branch lag-luminosity relationship, the lags are self-consistently corrected for cosmological effects to yield distributions in luminosity, distance, and redshift. The results have several consequences for GRB populations and for unified gamma-ray/afterglow scenarios which would account for afterglow break times and gamma-ray spectral evolution in terms of jet opening angle, viewing angle, or a profiled jet with variable Lorentz factor: A component of the burst sample is identified - those with few, wide pulses, lags of a few tenths to several seconds, and soft spectra - whose Log[N]-Log[F(sub p)] distribution approximates a -3/2 power-law, suggesting homogeneity and thus relatively nearby sources. The proportion of these long-lag bursts increases from negligible among bright BATSE bursts to approx. 50% at trigger threshold. Bursts with very long lags, approx. 1-2 less than tau(sub lag) (S) less than 10, show a tendency to concentrate near the Supergalactic Plane with a quadrupole moment of approx. -0.10 +/- 0.04. GRB 980425 (SN 1998bw) is a member of this subsample of approx. 90 bursts with estimated distances less than 100 Mpc. The frequency of the observed ultra-low luminosity bursts is approx. 1/4 that of SNe Ib/c within the same volume. If truly nearby, the core-collapse events associated with these GRBs might produce gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO-II. Such nearby bursts might also help explain flattening of the cosmic ray spectrum at ultra-high energies, as observed by AGASA.

  17. Type Ia Supernova Spectral Line Ratios as LuminosityIndicators

    SciTech Connect

    Bongard, Sebastien; Baron, E.; Smadja, G.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2005-12-07

    Type Ia supernovae have played a crucial role in thediscovery of the dark energy, via the measurement of their light curvesand the determination of the peak brightness via fitting templates to theobserved lightcurve shape. Two spectroscopic indicators are also known tobe well correlated with peak luminosity. Since the spectroscopicluminosity indicators are obtained directly from observed spectra, theywill have different systematic errors than do measurements usingphotometry. Additionally, these spectroscopic indicators may be usefulfor studies of effects of evolution or age of the SNe~;Ia progenitorpopulation. We present several new variants of such spectroscopicindicators which are easy to automate and which minimize the effects ofnoise. We show that these spectroscopic indicators can be measured byproposed JDEM missions such as snap and JEDI.

  18. The Infrared Signature of Accretion Luminosity in Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Villarama, Ethan G.; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra

    2016-06-01

    Mass accretion from the disk onto the star is an important mechanism by which a star increases in mass during the formation phase. If the mass accretion rate is time variable then the brightness of the star should also change with time. We use the HOCHUNK3D radiative transfer code to investigate how disk accretion rate (Mdot) affects the protostar spectral energy distribution (SED). The biggest changes in brightness occur at infrared wavelengths ranging from approximately 5 to 100 microns. The results show that the protostar luminosity doubles from 1 to 2 L⊙ when the disk accretion rate is increased to Mdot=3.0e-7 M⊙/year. We conclude that the models are a useful tool to study mass accretion rates and time variability in protostars.

  19. Distances, luminosities, and temperatures of the coldest known substellar objects.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Trent J; Kraus, Adam L

    2013-09-27

    The coolest known brown dwarfs are our best analogs to extrasolar gas-giant planets. The prolific detections of such cold substellar objects in the past 2 years have spurred intensive follow-up, but the lack of accurate distances is a key gap in our understanding. We present a large sample of precise distances based on homogeneous mid-infrared astrometry that robustly establishes absolute fluxes, luminosities, and temperatures. The coolest brown dwarfs have temperatures of 400 to 450 kelvin and masses almost equal to 5 to 20 times that of Jupiter, showing they bridge the gap between hotter brown dwarfs and gas-giant planets. At these extremes, spectral energy distributions no longer follow a simple correspondence with temperature, suggesting an increasing role of other physical parameters, such as surface gravity, vertical mixing, clouds, and metallicity. PMID:24009359

  20. The evolution of solar ultraviolet luminosity. [influence on planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Astronomical observations of stars analogous to the sun are used to construct a tentative account of the evolution of solar UV luminosity. Evidence exists that the young sun was a much more powerful source of energetic particles and radiation than it is today, and while on the main sequence, solar activity has declined as an inverse power law of age as a consequence of angular momentum loss to the solar wind. Observations of pre-main sequence stars indicate that before the sun reached the main sequence, it may have emitted as much as ten thousand times the amount of ultraviolet radiation that it does today. The impact of the results on knowledge of photochemistry and escape of constituents of primordial planetary atmospheres is discussed.

  1. The radio luminosity distribution of pulsars in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, D.; Deshpande, A. A.; Connors, T.; Ables, J. G.

    2004-03-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to seek the integrated radio flux from all the pulsars in the core of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We have detected an extended region of radio emission and have calibrated its flux against the flux distribution of the known pulsars in the cluster. We find the total 20-cm radio flux from the pulsars in the cluster to be S= 2.0 +/- 0.3 mJy. This implies the lower limit to the radio luminosity distribution to be minL1400= 0.4 mJy kpc2 and the size of the observable pulsar population to be N<~ 30.

  2. Intermediate luminosity optical transients during the grazing envelope evolution (GEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-08-01

    By comparing photon diffusion time with gas outflow time, I argue that a large fraction of the energy carried by the jets during the grazing envelope evolution (GEE) might end in radiation, hence leading to an intermediate luminosity optical transient (ILOT). In the GEE a companion orbiting near the outskirts of the larger primary star accretes mass through an accretion disk, and launches jets that efficiently remove the envelope gas from the vicinity of the secondary star. In cases of high mass accretion rates onto the stellar companion the energy carried by the jets surpass the recombination energy from the ejected mass, and when the primary star is a giant this energy surpasses also the gravitational binding energy of the binary system. Some future ILOTs of giant stars might be better explained by the GEE than by merger and common envelope evolution without jets.

  3. UPGRADE OF RHIC VACUUM SYSTEMS FOR HIGH LUMINOSITY OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; SMART, L.A.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, rapid pressure rises of several decades were observed at most warm sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping and anti-grazing ridges have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and logging were enhanced. Preventive measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed and summarized.

  4. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Maciek; Sądowski, Aleksander; Kluźniak, Włodek; Abramowicz, Marek; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    We construct models of static, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation flux of a luminous neutron star in the Schwarzschild metric. The atmospheres are disconnected from the star and levitate above its surface. Gas pressure and density inversion appear in the inner region of these atmospheres, which is a purely relativistic phenomenon. We account for the scattering opacity dependence on temperature green by using the Klein-Nishina formula. The relativistic M1 closure scheme for the radiation tensor provides a general relativity-consistent treatment of the photon flux and radiation tensor anisotropy. In this way, we are able to address atmospheres of both large and moderate/low optical depths with the same set of equations. We discuss properties of the levitating atmospheres and find that they may indeed be optically thick, with the distance between star surface and the photosphere expanding as luminosity increases. These results may be relevant for the photosphereric radius expansion X-ray bursts.

  5. 60 micron luminosity evolution of rich clusters of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.M.; Rieke, G.H. )

    1990-10-01

    The average 60-micron flux has been determined for a collection of optically selected galaxy clusters at redshifts ranging from 0.30 to 0.92. The result, 26 mJy per cluster, represents the faintest flux determination known of using the IRAS data base. The flux from this set of clusters has been compared to the 60-micron flux from a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. It is found that the far-infrared luminosity evolution in cluster galaxies can be no more than a factor of 1.7 from z = 0.4 to the present epoch. This upper limit is close to the evolution predicted for simple aging of the stellar populations. Additional processes such as mergers, cannibalism, or enhanced rates of starbursts appear to occur at a low enough level that they have little influence on the far-infrared emission from clusters over this redshift range. 38 refs.

  6. 60 micron luminosity evolution of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Douglas M.; Rieke, George H.

    1990-01-01

    The average 60-micron flux has been determined for a collection of optically selected galaxy clusters at redshifts ranging from 0.30 to 0.92. The result, 26 mJy per cluster, represents the faintest flux determination known of using the IRAS data base. The flux from this set of clusters has been compared to the 60-micron flux from a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. It is found that the far-infrared luminosity evolution in cluster galaxies can be no more than a factor of 1.7 from z = 0.4 to the present epoch. This upper limit is close to the evolution predicted for simple aging of the stellar populations. Additional processes such as mergers, cannibalism, or enhanced rates of starbursts appear to occur at a low enough level that they have little influence on the far-infrared emission from clusters over this redshift range.

  7. On the maximum luminosity in X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Paradijs, J.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative model is proposed which relates the burst behavior of 1608-52 observed by Murakami et al (1980) to the composition of the envelope in which the X-ray bursts occur. The model provides an explanation for the large scatter in the peak fluxes when the accretion rate is high. A flux would be transported outward at the top of the convective region which equals 1.5 to 2 times the Eddington limit appropriate to a helium-rich gas. Upon traversing the outer part of the accreted layer, which is not affected by the nuclear processes and is therefore hydrogen-rich, this flux is about a factor of 3 to 4 higher than the local value of the Eddington luminosity.

  8. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher; Chevalier, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We consider a model for the long-duration, low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The components of our model are: (1) a long-lived (tj ~ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ~ 1045 erg s-1), mildly relativistic jet; (2) a low-mass (~ 10-2 Msun) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ~ 0.1) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the prompt nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ~ 1013 cm can explain the early optical peak. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ~ 30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that ultra-long bursts such as GRB 060218 and GRB 100316D may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt high-energy emission from the supernova.

  9. The Origin of Intermediate-Luminosity Red Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard

    2014-10-01

    Intermediate-luminosity red transients (ILRTs) are a new class of optical transients. They have maximum luminosities between novae and SNe, and outbursts lasting several months, becoming cool, dusty, and extremely red as the eruptions proceed. A prototype is V838 Mon, which illuminated a spectacular light echo. Their outbursts may be due to catastrophic stellar collisions and mergers. This is demonstrably true for V1309 Sco, which was a contact binary before its eruption and is now a single star. However, it is not yet clear whether all ILRTs are due to mergers.I propose WFC3 imaging of 3 ILRTs: (1) V4332 Sgr, which erupted in the Galactic bulge in 1994, is now a 19th-mag, very red remnant. Based on a high degree of linear polarization in ground-based measurements, it has been proposed that it is surrounded and obscured by a dusty, edge-on envelope, ejected during a stellar merger. If so, V4332 Sgr ought to display a dark lane at HST imaging resolution. (2) M31 RV is an ILRT that occurred in the bulge of M31 in 1988. HST images of the site taken between 1999 and 2010 failed to reveal a credible remnant of this event. However, models of expanding dusty envelopes predict that eventually, as the optical depth diminishes, the remnant should brighten. The passage of 5 years since the last HST observation of the field justifies another attempt to identify the putative merged binary. (3) CK Vul, the bright "nova" of 1670, is a candidate ILRT because of its red color and an outburst light curve resembling that of V838 Mon. A faint bipolar nebula lies at the site of CK Vul, but no credible remnant star has been found in ground-based images. HST resolution may reveal it.

  10. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function before the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Trenti, Michele; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass-dependent, but redshift-independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at z > 10 (lookback time ≲500 Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations (0 ≲ z ≲ 10). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond z ˜ 8 is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth τ ={0.056}-0.010+0.007, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at z={7.84}-0.98+0.65. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with L ≲ L* in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at z > 10 we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope (α ˜ -3.5 at z ˜ 16). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and predict that galaxies out to z ˜ 14 will be observed. Galaxies at z > 15 will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.

  11. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  12. Jet or shock breakout? The low-luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3 M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  13. Relativistic cosmology number densities and the luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarrem, A. S.; Lopes, A. R.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, ApJ, 657, 760), where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z = 1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, ApJ, 592, 1), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Methods: Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy LF obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS deep field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 5.0 for its blue bands and 0.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 for its red ones. Differential number counts, densities and other related observables are obtained, and then used with the calculated selection functions to study the empirical radial distribution of the galaxies in a fully relativistic framework. Results: The redshift range of the dataset used in this work, which is up to five times larger than the one used in previous studies, shows an increased relevance of the relativistic effects of expansion when compared to the evolution of the LF at the higher redshifts. The results also agree with the preliminary ones presented in Albani et al., suggesting a power-law behavior of relativistic densities at high redshifts when they are defined in terms of the luminosity distance.

  14. The Luminosities of Type II Cepheids and RR Lyrae Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feast, Michael W.

    2010-02-01

    Recent work on the luminosities of type II Cepheids (CephIIs) and RR Lyrae variables is reviewed. In the near infrared (JHK_{s}) the CephIIs in globular clusters show a narrow, linear, period-luminosity relation over their whole period range (˜ 1 to 100 days). The CephIIs in the general field of the LMC follow this relation for periods shorter than ˜ 20 days. At longer period (the region of the RV Tau stars), the LMC field stars have a significant scatter and in the mean are more luminous than the PL relation. The OGLEIII optical data for the LMC field variables show similar trends. Infrared colours of stars in the RV Tau period range show marked mean differences between three groupings; the Galactic field, the LMC field, and globular clusters. In the case of the Galactic field, at least, this may be strongly influenced by selection effects. In the period range ˜ 4 to 20 days (the W Vir range) there are stars lying above the PL relation which may be recognized by their light curves and are all likely to be binaries. The bright Galactic variable, κ Pav probably belongs to this group. There is evidence that CephIIs in the general field (LMC and Galaxy) have a wider range of masses than those in globular clusters. At present the CephII PL zero-point depends on the pulsation parallaxes of two stars. Zero-points of RR Lyrae M_{V}-[Fe/H] and K_{s}-log P relations can be obtained from trigonometrical, statistical and pulsation parallaxes. These zero-points are compared with those for CephIIs and with the classical Cepheid scale using variables of these three types in the LMC. Within the uncertainties (˜ 0.1m) the various scales are in agreement.

  15. Tracing galaxy evolution by their present-day luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2011-04-01

    Galaxies, which are complex objects containing up to several tens of billions stars, as well as gas and dust, are remarkable objects. The Universe contains a very diverse "zoo" of galaxies: there are galaxies with a discy shape and spiral structure, elliptical galaxies, and even galaxies, which show no sign of structure. This variety of galaxies leads to the basic question: how the galaxies form and evolve and which processes shape the structure of galaxies? Due to the complexity of galaxy formation and evolution, this question is still an unresolved puzzle and it is one of the biggest challenges in modern cosmology. The present thesis is based on large galaxy surveys and concentrates on the large-scale structure: how galaxy evolution is related to the surrounding large-scale environment of superclusters and voids. To study the evolution of galaxies, we use the luminosity function, which is in this respect one of the most fundamental of all cosmological observables. One of the principal results of the present study was the conclusion that the evolution of spiral galaxies is almost independent of the global environment, especially for blue and red spirals separately, showing that the formation of spiral galaxies has to be similar in all environments. Meanwhile, the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies depends strongly on the environment. This shows that the global environmental density is an important factor (via merging history) in the formation of elliptical galaxies. The results of the present study show clearly, that besides the local/group environment, the global (supercluster-void) environment plays also an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Accounting for the role of global environment can help to solve several problems in the present picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. Masses and Luminosities of X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Frink, Sabine; Tomsick, John

    2004-01-01

    Using SIM, we will perform narrow-angle observations of several X-ray binaries to determine their orbits, and we will observe about 50 X-ray binary systems in wide-angle mode to measure their distances and proper motions. Sources with mass estimates for the compact component of greater than 3 solar masses are generally called black hole candidates since this mass is above the theoretical neutron star limit. Narrow-angle observations of these sources provide a direct test of the dynamical mass estimates on which the black hole evidence is based. Better measurements of the black hole masses will provide constraints on possible evolutionary paths that lead to black hole formation. When combined with X-ray data, mass measurements may provide additional constraints on the black hole spin. Precise mass determinations of neutron star systems can address the question of whether neutron stars can be significantly more massive than 1.4 solar masses, which would eliminate soft models of the neutron star equations of state. The wide-angle observations will probe the Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries through parallaxes and proper motions. They will also eliminate the uncertainties in the luminosities of individual sources, which is currently up to a full order of magnitude. This will enable more detailed comparisons of X-ray observations to physical models such as advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). We intend to carry out the following measurements: 1) Determine the orbits of two black hole candidates to measure the black hole masses; 2) Obtain precise mass measurements for two neutron star systems to constrain neutron star equations of state; 3) Determine the distances and thus luminosities of selected representatives of various classes of X-ray binaries (black hole candidates, neutron stars, jet sources); 4) In the process of distance determination, proper motions will also be measured, from which the age of the population can be estimated.

  17. Precision Measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borowski, M.; Lieb, K. P.; Uhrmacher, M.; Bolse, W.

    2009-01-28

    In thin film technology, analytical methods for monitoring the deposition of oxide and nitride coatings and the effects of corrosive, laser and ion-beam treatments have attracted considerable attention. For depth-profiling the concentrations of light isotopes, resonant nuclear reaction analysis is an excellent non-destructive ion-beam analytical tool. We report here on precision measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonances using the high-resolution proton beam of the Goettingen IONAS accelerator. The deduced resonance energies E{sub R} and total widths {gamma}(in the laboratory system) are E{sub R} = 277.60(27) keV and {gamma} = 1115(33) eV for the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) resonance, and E{sub R} = 150.97(26) keV and {gamma} = 178(35) eV for the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonance. These values are significantly more precise than the ones quoted in the literature.

  18. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Mo, Houjun

    2016-07-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in z ˜ 0 groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about Mr = -12 mag or L = 107 L⊙, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from 1012 to 1015 M⊙. We find a characteristic scale, Mr ˜ -18 mag or L ˜ 109 L⊙, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellites. This ubiquitous faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the satellite luminosity functions can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over the entire range of observables. Combining these conditional luminosity functions with the dark matter halo mass function, we accurately recover the entire field luminosity function over 10 visual magnitudes and reveal that satellite galaxies dominate the field luminosity function at magnitudes fainter than -17. We find that the luminosity functions of blue and red satellite galaxies show distinct shapes and we present estimates of the stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass and galaxy type. Finally, using a simple model, we demonstrate that the abundances and the faint-end slopes of blue and red satellite galaxies can be interpreted in terms of their formation history, with two distinct modes separated by some characteristic time.

  19. Measurement of photon mass attenuation coefficients of plutonium from 60 to 2615 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettschlag, M.; Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements have been made to determine plutonium photon mass attenuation coefficients by using a collimated-beam transmission method in the energy range from 60 to 2615 keV. These experimental results were compared with previous experimental and theoretical data. Good agreements are observed in the 240-800 keV energy range, whereas differences up to maximum 10% are observed out of these limits.

  20. A reexamination of luminosity sources in T Tauri stars. I - Taurus-Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Emerson, J. P.; Beichman, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented of 72 T Tau stars identified by IRAS in the Tau-Aur complex. The composite energy distributions of the stars are constructed to define bolometric luminosities and the luminosity components in different spectral regimes are separated. The near- to far-IR spectral indices of these stars are analyzed. It is shown that 2/3 of typical T Tau stars have a bolometric to stellar luminosity ratio of about 1.0, which implies no appreciable disks. The distribution is bimodal, however, with a second peak at about 2.0, suggesting that 1/3 of the stars have disks. The bolometric luminosities of the north and south components of T Tau are found to be in the range of 9-21 solar luminosities and 1.5-14 solar luminosities for T Tau N and T Tau S, respectively.

  1. The jets-accretion relation, mass-luminosity relation in Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Haojing; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Cha, Yongjuan; Chen, Yongyun; Huang, Xia; Wang, Yuwei

    2015-05-01

    A sample of 111 Fermi blazars each with a well-established radio core luminosity, broad-line luminosity, bolometric luminosity and black hole mass has been compiled from the literatures. We present a significant correlation between radio core and broad-line emission luminosities that supports a close link between accretion processes and relativistic jets. Analysis reveals a relationship of which is consistant with theoretical predicted coefficient and supports that blazar jets are powered by energy extraction from a rapidly spinning Kerr black hole through the magnetic field provided by the accretion disk. Through studying the correlation between the intrinsic bolometric luminosity and the black hole mass, we find a relationship of which supports mass-luminosity relation for Fermi blazars derived in this work is a powerlaw relation similar to that for main-sequence stars. Finally, EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE OF BLAZARS is discussed.

  2. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of \

  3. The luminosities of the brightest cluster galaxies and brightest satellites in SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-06-01

    We show that the distribution of luminosities of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-based group catalogue suggests that BCG luminosities are just the statistical extremes of the group galaxy luminosity function. The latter happens to be very well approximated by the all-galaxy luminosity function (restricted to Mr < -19.9), provided one uses a parametrization of this function that is accurate at the bright end. A similar analysis of the luminosity distribution of the brightest satellite galaxies (BSGs) suggests that they are best thought of as being the second brightest pick from the same luminosity distribution of which BCGs are the brightest. That is, BSGs are not the brightest of some universal satellite luminosity functions, in contrast to what halo model analyses of the luminosity dependence of clustering suggest. However, we then use mark correlations to provide a novel test of these order statistics, showing that the hypothesis of a universal luminosity function (i.e. no halo mass dependence) from which the BCGs and BSGs are drawn is incompatible with the data, despite the fact that there was no hint of this in the BCG and BSG luminosity distributions themselves. We also discuss why, since extreme value statistics are explicitly a function of the number of draws, the consistency of BCG luminosities with extreme value statistics is most clearly seen if one is careful to perform the test at fixed group richness N. Tests at e.g. fixed total group luminosity Ltot will generally be biased and may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  4. Testing and Improving the Luminosity Relations for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collazzi, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have several luminosity relations where a measurable property of a burst light curve or spectrum is correlated with the burst luminosity. These luminosity relations are calibrated for the fraction of bursts with spectroscopic redshifts and hence the known luminosities. GRBs have thus become known as a type of "standard candle” where standard candle is meant in the usual sense that luminosities can be derived from measurable properties of the bursts. GRBs can therefore be used for the same cosmology applications as Type Ia supernovae, including the construction of the Hubble Diagram and measuring massive star formation rate. The greatest disadvantage of using GRBs as standard candles is that their accuracy is lower than desired. With the recent advent of GRBs as a new standard candle, every effort must be made to test and improve the distance measures. Here, methods are employed to do just that. First, generalized forms of two tests are performed on the luminosity relations. All the luminosity relations pass one of these tests, and all but two pass the other. Even with this failure, redundancies in using multiple luminosity relations allows all the luminosity relations to retain value. Next, the "Firmani relation” is shown to have poorer accuracy than first advertised. It is also shown to be derivable from two other luminosity relations. For these reasons, the Firmani relation is useless for cosmology. The Amati relation is then revisited and shown to be an artifact of a combination of selection effects. Therefore, the Amati relation is also not good for cosmology. Fourthly, the systematic errors involved in measuring a luminosity indicator (Epeak) are measured. The result is an irreducible systematic error of 28%. Finally, the work concludes with a discussion about the impact of the work and the future of GRB luminosity relations.

  5. Imaging of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy He 2-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Korista, Kirk T.; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    We present B, V, and emission-line CCD images of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy He 2-10. The broad band images reveal the galaxy to consist of two starburst regions at the center of an elliptical stellar envelope about 10 times their size, with a major axis diameter of approximately 3.8 kpc. Previous imaging detected only the starburst regions, leading to the erroneous description of the object as an interacting pair. Morphologically, He 2-10 resembles the majority of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs), some of which also show Wolf-Rayet features in their spectra. The lack of nearby neighbors to He 2-10 suggests that its star formation is proceeding stochastically, rather than as the result of interaction, and its morphological similarity to other BCDGs suggests that all such galaxies may pass through a Wolf-Rayet phase. The similarity of the outer regions of He 2-10 and other BCDGs to normal dwarf ellipticals also supports models in which the former evolve into the latter.

  6. IET. Inside the coupling station during Snaptran tests. Snaptran 2/10A1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Inside the coupling station during Snaptran tests. Snaptran 2/10A-1 plug and flexible hoses make connections with experiment on other side. Photographer: Page Comiskey. Date: August 11, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-4060 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. 46 CFR 2.10-130 - Fees for examination of foreign mobile offshore drilling units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Certificate of Compliance indicating compliance with the design and equipment standards of 46 CFR part 108... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fees for examination of foreign mobile offshore drilling... APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Fees § 2.10-130 Fees for examination of foreign mobile...

  8. GAMMA-RAY BURST LUMINOSITY RELATIONS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL VERSUS THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Bo; Qi Shi; Lu Tan

    2009-11-01

    The large scatters of luminosity relations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been one of the most important reasons that prevent the extensive applications of GRBs in cosmology. In this paper, we extend the two-dimensional (2D) luminosity relations with tau{sub lag}, V, E {sub peak}, and tau{sub RT} as the luminosity indicators to three dimensions (3D) using the same set of luminosity indicators to explore the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic scatters. We find that, for the 3D luminosity relations between the luminosity and an energy scale (E{sub peak}) and a timescale (tau{sub lag} or tau{sub RT}), their intrinsic scatters are considerably smaller than those of corresponding 2D luminosity relations. Enlightened by the result and the definition of the luminosity (energy released in units of time), we discussed possible reasons behind this result, which may give us helpful suggestions on seeking more precise luminosity relations for GRBs in the future.

  9. The luminosity function for the CfA redshift survey slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, Valerie; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The luminosity function for two complete slices of the extension of the CfA redshift survey is calculated. The nonparametric technique of Lynden-Bell (1971) and Turner (1979) is used to determine the shape for the luminosity function of the 12 deg slice of the redshift survey. The amplitude of the luminosity function is determined, taking large-scale inhomogeneities into account. The effects of the Malmquist bias on a magnitude-limited redshift survey are examined, showing that the random errors in the magnitudes for the 12 deg slice affect both the determination of the luminosity function and the spatial density constrast of large scale structures.

  10. The Herschel ATLAS: Evolution of the 250 Micrometer Luminosity Function Out to z = 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A. W.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bremer, M.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Frayer, D.; Leeuw, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the luminosity function of 250 micrometer-selected galaxies detected in the approximately equal to 14 deg(sup 2) science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z = 0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250 micrometer luminosity density out to z = 0.2 where it is 3.6(sup +1.4) (sub -0.9) times higher than the local value.

  11. The galaxy luminosity function and the redshift-distance controversy (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Salpeter, E. E.; Hoffman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The mean relation between distance and redshift for galaxies is reviewed as an observational question. The luminosity function for galaxies is an important ingredient and is given explicitly. We discuss various observational selection effects that are important for comparison of the linear and quadratic distance-redshift laws. Several lines of evidence are reviewed, including the distribution of galaxy luminosities in various redshift ranges, the luminosities of brightest galaxies in groups and clusters at various redshifts, and the Tully-Fisher correlation between neutral hydrogen velocity widths and luminosity. All of these strongly favor the linear law over the quadratic. PMID:16593693

  12. Soft band X/K luminosity ratios for gas-poor early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdán, Á.; Gilfanov, M.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We aim to place upper limits on the combined X-ray emission from the population of steady nuclear-burning white dwarfs in galaxies. In the framework of the single-degenerate scenario, these systems, known as supersoft sources, are believed to be likely progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Methods: From the Chandra archive, we selected normal early-type galaxies with the point source detection sensitivity better than 1037 erg s-1 in order to minimize the contribution of unresolved low-mass X-ray binaries. The galaxies, contaminated by emission from ionized ISM, were identified based on the analysis of radial surface brightness profiles and energy spectra. The sample was complemented by the bulge of M 31 and the data for the solar neighborhood. To cover a broad range of ages, we also included NGC 3377 and NGC 3585 which represent the young end of the age distribution for elliptical galaxies. Our final sample includes eight gas-poor galaxies for which we determine LX/LK ratios in the 0.3-0.7 keV energy band. This choice of the energy band was optimized to detect soft emission from thermonuclear-burning on the surface of an accreting white dwarf. In computing the LX we included both unresolved emission and soft resolved sources with the color temperature of kTbb ≤ 200 eV. Results: We find that the X/K luminosity ratios are in a rather narrow range of (1.7-3.2) × 1027 erg s-1 LK,⊙. The data show no obvious trends with mass, age, or metallicity of the host galaxy, although a weak anti-correlation with the Galactic NH appears to exist. It is much flatter than predicted for a blackbody emission spectrum with temperature of ~ 50-75 eV, suggesting that sources with such soft spectra contribute significantly less than a half to the observed X/K ratios. However, the correlation of the X/K ratios with NH has a significant scatter and in the strict statistical sense cannot be adequately described by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody components with

  13. sup 56 Fe resonance parameters for neutron energies up to 850 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1990-12-01

    High-resolution neutron measurements for {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron targets were made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in transmission below 20 MeV and in differential elastic scattering below 5 MeV. Transmission measurements were also performed with a natural iron target below 160 keV. The transmission data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY which uses Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 5- to 850-keV energy region, as well as possible parameterization for resonances external to the analyzed region to describe the smooth cross section from a few eV to 850 keV. The resulting set of resonance parameters yields the accepted values for the thermal total and capture cross sections. The differential elastic-scattering data at several scattering angles were compared to theoretical calculations from 40 to 850 keV using the R-matrix code RFUNC based on the Blatt-Biedenharn formalism. Various combinations of spin and parity were tried to predict cross sections for the well defined {ell} > 0 resonances; comparison of these predictions with the data allowed us to determine the most likely spin and parity assignments for these resonances. The results of a capture data analysis by Corvi et al. (COR84), from 2 to 350 keV, were combined with our results to obtain the radiation widths of the resonances below 350 keV observed in transmission, capture, and differential elastic-scattering experiments.

  14. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  15. Lightning current and luminosity at and above channel bottom for return strokes and M-components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F. L.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Ngin, T.

    2015-10-01

    We measured current and luminosity at the channel bottom of 12 triggered lightning discharges including 44 return strokes, 23 M-components, and 1 initial continuous current pulse. Combined current and luminosity data for impulse currents span a 10-90% risetime range from 0.15 to 192 µs. Current risetime and luminosity risetime at the channel bottom are roughly linearly correlated (τr,I = 0.71τr,L1.08). We observed a time delay between current and the resultant luminosity at the channel bottom, both measured at 20% of peak amplitude, that is approximately linearly related to both the luminosity 10-90% risetime (Δt20,b = 0.24τr,L1.12) and the current 10-90% risetime (Δt20,b = 0.35τr,I1.03). At the channel bottom, the peak current is roughly proportional to the square root of the peak luminosity (IP = 21.89LP0.57) over the full range of current and luminosity risetimes. For two return strokes we provide measurements of stroke luminosity vs. time for 11 increasing heights to 115 m altitude. We assume that measurements above the channel bottom behave similarly to those at the bottom and find that (1) one return stroke current peak decayed at 115 m to about 47% of its peak value at channel bottom, while the luminosity peak at 115 m decayed to about 20%, and for the second stroke 38% and 12%, respectively; and (2) measured upward return stroke luminosity speeds of the two strokes of 1.10 × 108 and 9.7 × 107 ms-1 correspond to current speeds about 30% faster. These results represent the first determination of return stroke current speed and current peak value above ground derived from measured return stroke luminosity data.

  16. A two-mode planetary nebula luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, A.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Stasińska, G.; Peña, M.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Context. We propose a new planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) that includes two populations in the distribution. Our PNLF is a direct extension of the canonical function proposed by Jacoby et al. (1987), in order to avoid problems related with the histogram construction, it is cast in terms of cumulative functions. Aims: We are interested in recovering the shape of the faint part of the PNLF in a consistent manner, for galaxies with and without a dip in their PNLFs. Methods: The parameters for the two-mode PNLF are obtained with a genetic algorithm, which obtains a best fit to the PNLF varying all of the parameters simultaneously in a broad parameter space. Results: We explore a sample of nine galaxies with various Hubble types and construct their PNLF. All of the irregular galaxies, except one, are found to be consistent with a two-mode population, while the situation is less clear for ellipticals and spirals.For the case of NGC 6822, we show that the two-mode PNLF is consistent with previous studies of the star formation history within that galaxy. Our results support two episodes of star formation, in which the second episode is significantly stronger.

  17. 'Harder when Brighter' Spectral Variability in Low-Luminosity AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S.; McHardy, I.; Skipper, C.; Dwelly, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present X-ray spectral variability of four low accretion rate AGN - M81, NGC 1097, NGC 1052 and NGC 3998 - as observed by Swift and RXTE. All four objects were selected due to having spectra which hardened with increasing count rate, converse to the `softer when brighter' behaviour normally observed in AGN with higher accretion rates. The spectra were summed in flux bins and fitted with a variety of models. A simple absorbed power law model was found to fit the spectra of M81, NGC 1097 and NGC 3998 well, whilst NGC 1052 required a partially covered power law model. In all four cases, the most likely main source of spectral variability is found to be luminosity-dependent changes in the photon index of the power law component. An anticorrelation between the photon index and the count rate is found in all of the sources. The anticorrelation is likely to be caused by accretion via a radiatively-inefficient accretion flow, expected in low-Eddington ratio systems such as these, and/or due to the presence of a jet. This behaviour is similar to that seen in the `hard state' of X-ray binaries, implying that these LLAGN are in a similar state.

  18. On the luminosity distance and the epoch of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Will; Rothnie, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Standard cosmological models based on general relativity (GR) with dark energy predict that the Universe underwent a transition from decelerating to accelerating expansion at a moderate redshift zacc ˜ 0.7. Clearly, it is of great interest to directly measure this transition in a model-independent way, without the assumption that GR is the correct theory of gravity. We explore to what extent supernova (SN) luminosity distance measurements provide evidence for such a transition: we show that, contrary to intuition, the well-known `turnover' in the SN distance residuals Δμ relative to an empty (Milne) model does not give firm evidence for such a transition within the redshift range spanned by SN data. The observed turnover in that diagram is predominantly due to the negative curvature in the Milne model, not the deceleration predicted by Λ cold dark matter and relatives. We show that there are several advantages in plotting distance residuals against a flat, non-accelerating model (w = -1/3), and also remapping the z-axis to u = ln (1 + z); we outline a number of useful and intuitive properties of this presentation. We conclude that there are significant complementarities between SNe and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs): SNe offer high precision at low redshifts and give good constraints on the net amount of acceleration since z ˜ 0.7, but are weak at constraining zacc; while radial BAO measurements are probably superior for placing direct constraints on zacc.

  19. The winds of high luminosity late-type bright stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Carpenter, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of the Fe II line asymmetries were studied to determine the radial dependence of the wind velocity for each star. The dependence of the Fe II profiles on spectral type and luminosity class and thus the variation of the velocity fields with stellar type was also investigated. This allows the generality of the results reported for alpha Ori by Carpenter (1984b) to be judged. In addition, new atomic data was used along with observations of the C II (UV 0.01) multiplet to estimate N(sub e) in the stellar winds. Measures of relative Fe II fluxes can be used in a probability-of-escape model to determine the opacity and hydrogen column density versus height in the chromosphere of each star. Finally, analysis of the fluorescent Fe II lines (pumped by Ly alpha) near 2507 A will yield estimates of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha flux that cannot be measured directly because of interstellar and circumstellar absorption. One important goal of the effort was to acquire high resolution spectra of the whole 2300 to 3200 A region of 13 luminous K and M stars as a data base that will be enormously valuable in planning observations with the Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph. It is also proposed to follow up the recent discovery of significant variations in the Fe II chromospheric emission line profiles from the M-giant Gamma Cru for the purpose of determining the underlying cause of the variations.

  20. Radio-Optical Alignments in a Low Radio Luminosity Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Mark; Ridgway, Susan E.; Wold, Margrethe; Lilje, Per B.; Rawlings, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present an optically-based study of the alignment between the radio axes and the optical major axes of eight z approximately 0.7 radio galaxies in a 7C sample. The radio galaxies in this sample are approximately 20-times less radio luminous than 3C galaxies at the same redshift, and are significantly less radio-luminous than any other well-defined samples studied to date. Using Nordic Optical Telescope images taken in good seeing conditions at rest-frame wavelengths just longward of the 4000A break, we find a statistically significant alignment effect in the 7C sample. Furthermore, in two cases where the aligned components are well separated from the host we have been able to confirm spectroscopically that they are indeed at the same redshift as the radio galaxy. However, a quantitative analysis of the alignment in this sample and in a corresponding 3C sample from HST (Hubble Space Telescope) archival data indicates that the percentage of aligned flux may be lower and of smaller spatial scale in the 7C sample. Our study suggests that alignments on the 50-kpc scale are probably closely related to the radio luminosity, whereas those on the 15 kpc scale are not. We discuss these results in the context of popular models for the alignment effect.

  1. Peak luminosity correlated low-frequency oscillations in black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Gao, H. Q.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Qu, J. L.; Zhang, C. M.; Song, L. M.

    2014-05-01

    Based on Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observational data, we study the timing and spectral properties of some peculiar low-frequency (LF) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), which have been found at the peak luminosity of the outburst of some transient black hole (BH) binaries: the 2005 outburst of GRO J1655-40, the 2003 outburst of H1743-322 and the 1998 outburst of XTE J1550-564. Appearing in the ultraluminous state, these QPOs from different sources show some common properties. The amplitude is very weak (less than 1 per cent) and the quality factor is larger than 6. Moreover, these QPOs (about several Hz) sometimes show up simultaneously with another QPO (about 10 Hz), but their frequencies are not harmonically related. We also find that the frequencies of these QPOs are inversely correlated with the mass of the BH, which implies that these QPOs might be correlated with the innermost stable circular orbit. The QPO frequency is also negative correlated with the inner disc radius among BHs. However, its frequency is too low to ascribe it to the Keperlian orbit frequency. Moreover, we discuss the physical origin of these QPOs and we suggest that they are not produced by the viscous variability of the inner disc either.

  2. Period-Luminosity Relation for Type II Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Feast, Michael W.; Menzies, John W.

    2009-09-01

    We have estimated JHKs magnitudes corrected to mean intensity for LMC type II Cepheids found in the OGLE-III survey. Period-luminosity relations (PLRs) are derived in JHKs as well as in a reddening-free VI parameter. The BL Her stars (P<4 d) and the W Vir stars (P = 4 to 20 d) are co-linear in these PLRs. The slopes of the infrared relations agree with those found previously for type II Cepheids in globular clusters within the uncertainties. Using the pulsation parallaxes of V553 Cen and SW Tau, the data lead to an LMC modulus of 18.46+/-0.10 mag, uncorrected for any metallicity effects. We have now established the PLR of type II Cepheids as a distance indicator by confirming that (almost) the same PLR satisfies the distributions in the PL diagram of type II Cepheids in (at least) two different systems, i.e. the LMC and Galactic globular clusters, and by calibrating the zero point of the PLR. RV Tau stars in the LMC, as a group, are not co-linear with the shorter-period type II Cepheids in the infrared PLRs in marked contrast to such stars in globular clusters. We note differences in period distribution and infrared colors for RV Tau stars in the LMC, globular clusters and Galactic field. We also compare the PLR of type II Cepheids with that of classical Cepheids.

  3. Confirmation of IGR J01363 plus 6610 as a Be X-Ray Binary with Very Low Quiescent X-Ray Luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Heinke, Craig; Halpern, Jules; Kaaret, Philip; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Bodaghee, Arash

    2011-01-01

    The field containing the candidate High Mass X-ray Binary IGR J01 363+6610 was observed by XMM-Newton on 2009 July 31 for 28 ks. A Be star was previously suggested as the possible counterpart of the INTEGRAL source, and although Chandra, during a 2007 observation, did not detect an X-ray source at the position of the Be star, we find a variable source (XMMU 101 3549.5+661243) with an average X-ray flux of 2 x 10(exp -13)ergs/sq cm/s (0.2-12 keV, unabsorbed) at this position with XMM-Newton. The spectrum of this source is consistent with a hard power law with a photon index of r = 1.4+/-0.3 and a column density of N(sub H) = (15(+0.7/-0.5)) x 10(exp 22)/sq cm (90% confidence errors). These results, along with our optical investigation of other X-ray sources in the field, make the association with the Be star very likely, and the 2 kpc distance estimate for the Be star indicates an X-ray luminosity of 9.1 x 10(exp 31) ergs/s. This is lower than typical for a Be X-ray binary, and the upper limit on the luminosity was even lower ( < 1.4 x 10(exp 3)ergs/s assuming the same spectral model) during the Chandra observation. We discuss possible implications of the very low quiescent luminosity for the physical properties of IGR 101363+6610.

  4. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions’ range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uranium’s and uranium carbide’s surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U₈₆Ga₁₄, (UC)₇₀Ga₃₀ and U₈₁Cs₉, (UC)₇₉Cs₂₁, respectively.

  5. HEAO 3 upper limits to the expected 1634 KeV line from SS 483

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    A model based on 24 Mg(1369) was developed as the source of the lines in which refractory grains in the jets, containing Mg and 0, are bombarded, by ambient protons in the local ISM. The narrowness of the features results because the recoil Mg nucleus is stopped in the grain before the 1369 keV excited state decays. A consequence of the 24 Mg interpretation is the expected appearance of other emission lines, due to 20 Ne and 20 Na, which are produced by proton bombardment of 24 Mg at the 33 MeV/nucleon energy corresponding to the velocity of the jets. These lines appear at rest energies of 1634 keV and 1636 keV, respectively, and should have essentially the same total flux as that emited at 1369 keV. The HEAO 3 data are examined to search for the 1634 keV (rest) emission. The observation and analysis, the results, and the implications for the understanding of SS 433 are discussed.

  6. Influence of ~7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter on the process of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakovskyi, Anton; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports of a weak unidentified emission line at ~3.5 keV found in spectra of several matter-dominated objects may give a clue to resolve the long-standing problem of dark matter. One of the best physically motivated particle candidate able to produce such an extra line is sterile neutrino with the mass of ~7 keV . Previous works show that sterile neutrino dark matter with parameters consistent with the new line measurement modestly affects structure formation compared to conventional cold dark matter scenario. In this work, we concentrate for the first time on contribution of the sterile neutrino dark matter able to produce the observed line at ~3.5 keV, to the process of reionization. By incorporating dark matter power spectra for ~7 keV sterile neutrinos into extended semi-analytical `bubble' model of reionization we obtain that such sterile neutrino dark matter would produce significantly sharper reionization compared to widely used cold dark matter models, impossible to `imitate' within the cold dark matter scenario under any reasonable choice of our model parameters, and would have a clear tendency of lowering both the redshift of reionization and the electron scattering optical depth (although the difference is still below the existing model uncertainties). Further dedicated studies of reionization (such as 21 cm measurements or studies of kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) will thus be essential for reconstruction of particle candidate responsible the ~3.5 keV line.

  7. Spatial distribution of upstream magnetospheric geq50 keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Argyropoulos, G.; Kaliabetsos, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present for the first time a statistical study of geq50 keV ion events of a magnetospheric origin upstream from Earth's bow shock. The statistical analysis of the 50-220 keV ion events observed by the IMP-8 spacecraft shows: (1) a dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion distributions, with most events and lower intensities upstream from the quasi-parallel pre-dawn side (4 LT-6 LT) of the bow shock, (2) highest ion fluxes upstream from the nose/dusk side of the bow shock under an almost radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) configuration, and (3) a positive correlation of the ion intensities with the solar wind speed and the index of geomagnetic index Kp, with an average solar wind speed as high as 620 km s-1 and values of the index Kp > 2. The statistical results are consistent with (1) preferential leakage of sim50 keV magnetospheric ions from the dusk magnetopause, (2) nearly scatter free motion of sim50 keV ions within the magnetosheath, and (3) final escape of magnetospheric ions from the quasi-parallel dawn side of the bow shock. An additional statistical analysis of higher energy (290-500 keV) upstream ion events also shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the occurrence frequency of these events, with the occurrence frequency ranging between sim16%-sim34% in the upstream region.

  8. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    PubMed

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids. PMID:21217688

  9. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first `seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  10. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-03-20

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing /beta/ function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  12. Size dependence of the radio-luminosity-mechanical-power correlation in radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in active galactic nucleus jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of Fanaroff-Riley Type II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, (Q{sub jet}/10{sup 36} W)=1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +1.8}(L{sub 151}/10{sup 27} W Hz{sup −1}){sup 0.8}(1+z){sup 1.0}(D/kpc){sup 0.58±0.17}, where D is source size and L {sub 151} the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio-luminosity-jet-power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent in the sample. Such bias will affect the accuracy of the kinetic luminosity function derived from lobe radio luminosities and should be treated with caution.

  13. Luminosity Improvement at PEP-II Based on Optics Model and Beam-Beam Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Colocho, W.; Diecker, F-J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Raimondi, P.; Seeman, J.; Sonnad, K.; Sullivan, M.; Turner, J.; Weaver, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yan, Y.; Yock, G.; /SLAC

    2006-06-21

    Since the beginning of this year, we have made significant improvements in the machine optics at PEP-II. As a result, the specific luminosity increased nearly 20%. The largest luminosity gain actually came from minimizing nonlinear chromatic effects and running both rings much closer to the half integer resonance in the horizontal plane.

  14. A clumpy stellar wind and luminosity-dependent cyclotron line revealed by the first Suzaku observation of the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1538–522

    SciTech Connect

    Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Markowitz, Alex; Fürst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-09-01

    We present results from the first Suzaku observation of the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1538–522. The broadband spectral coverage of Suzaku allows for a detailed spectral analysis, characterizing the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at 23.0 ± 0.4 keV and the iron Kα line at 6.426 ± 0.008 keV, as well as placing limits on the strengths of the iron Kβ line and the iron K edge. We track the evolution of the spectral parameters both in time and in luminosity, notably finding a significant positive correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity. A dip and spike in the light curve is shown to be associated with an order-of-magnitude increase in column density along the line of sight, as well as significant variation in the underlying continuum, implying the accretion of a overdense region of a clumpy stellar wind. We also present a phase-resolved analysis, with most spectral parameters of interest showing significant variation with phase. Notably, both the cyclotron line energy and the iron Kα line intensity vary significantly with phase, with the iron line intensity significantly out of phase with the pulse profile. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of recent work in the areas of accretion column physics and cyclotron resonance scattering feature formation.

  15. Luminosity excesses in low-mass young stellar objects - A statistical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Karen M.; Strom, Stephen E.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hartmann, Lee

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study in which the observed total luminosity is compared quantitatively with an estimate of the stellar luminosity for a sample of 59 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Taurus-Auriga complex. In 13 of the analyzed YSOs, luminosity excesses greater than 0.20 are observed together with greater than 0.6 IR excesses, which typically contribute the bulk of the observed excess luminosity and are characterized by spectral energy distributions which are flat or rise toward long wavelengths. The analysis suggests that YSOs showing the largest luminosity excesses typically power optical jets and/or molecular outflows or have strong winds, as evidenced by the presence of O I emission, indicating a possible correlation between accretion and mass-outflow properties.

  16. Optical Variability of Quasars as a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. M.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kwon, T.-Y.; Liang, Y.; Scott, J. H.; Wysota, A.

    1987-09-01

    Various models of the "central engine" in quasars make different predictions of how the degree of variability and its timescale vary with luminosity. In the past there have been conflicting claims about the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar variability. We have examined the photographic light curves obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory (U. of Florida) and the Royal Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux) for over a hundred quasars (both radio-loud and radio-quiet). We demonstrate how the previously-reported redshift dependence is a consequence of time dilation, and find that, after allowance for this, there is no luminosity dependence in the amplitude of variability. High-luminosity quasars are not less variable than their low-luminosity counterparts. This creates major difficulties for some classes of quasar model with discrete accretion events (e.g., gas cloud or disrupted stars being "swallowed" directly).

  17. Very low luminosity active galaxies and the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Soltan, A.; Keel, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of very low luminosity active galactic nuclei are not well studied, and, in particular, their possible contribution to the diffuse X-ray background is not known. In the present investigation, an X-ray luminosity function for the range from 10 to the 39th to 10 to the 42.5th ergs/s is constructed. The obtained X-ray luminosity function is integrated to estimate the contribution of these very low luminosity active galaxies to the diffuse X-ray background. The construction of the X-ray luminosity function is based on data obtained by Keel (1983) and some simple assumptions about optical and X-ray properties.

  18. Galaxy luminosity function and Tully-Fisher relation: reconciled through rotation-curve studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Andrea; Salucci, Paolo; Papastergis, Emmanouil E-mail: salucci@sissa.it

    2014-03-10

    The relation between galaxy luminosity L and halo virial velocity v {sub vir} required to fit the galaxy luminosity function differs from the observed Tully-Fisher relation between L and disk speed v {sub rot}. Because of this, the problem of reproducing the galaxy luminosity function and the Tully-Fisher relation simultaneously has plagued semianalytic models since their inception. Here we study the relation between v {sub rot} and v {sub vir} by fitting observational average rotation curves of disk galaxies binned in luminosity. We show that the v {sub rot}-v {sub vir} relation that we obtain in this way can fully account for this seeming inconsistency. Therefore, the reconciliation of the luminosity function with the Tully-Fisher relation rests on the complex dependence of v {sub rot} on v {sub vir}, which arises because the ratio of stellar mass to dark matter mass is a strong function of halo mass.

  19. Correlations between the far-infrared, radio, and blue luminosities of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, J. J.; Anderson, M. L.; Helou, G.

    1991-01-01

    FIR-radio luminosity correlations are presently derived for two statistically complete samples spanning a wide luminosity range. While observed correlations are tight, they are not linear; the observed scattering is mostly intrinsic. An empirical correction to the radio luminosities, based on observed blue luminosities, makes the corrected FIR-radio correlation linear and eliminates most of the residual variance. A two-component model that is consistent with the improved correlation is proposed for the heating luminosity within galaxies. The first, radio-loud component contains young massive stars that heat the dust, while contributing to the cool cirrus dust-heating interstellar radiation field. The second, radio-quiet component is made up of less massive older stars.

  20. THE LUMINOSITY PROFILE AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, Stephane; Widrow, Lawrence M.; McDonald, Michael; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhu Yucong

    2011-09-20

    We have constructed an extended composite luminosity profile for the Andromeda galaxy, M31, and have decomposed it into three basic luminous structural components: a bulge, a disk, and a halo. The dust-free Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging and extended spatial coverage of ground-based optical imaging and deep star counts allow us to map M31's structure from its center to 22 kpc along the major axis. We apply, and address the limitations of, different decomposition methods for the one-dimensional luminosity profiles and two-dimensional images. These methods include nonlinear least-squares and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain analyses. The basic photometric model for M31 has a Sersic bulge with shape index n {approx_equal} 2.2 {+-} .3 and effective radius R{sub e} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2 kpc, and a dust-free exponential disk of scale length R{sub d} = 5.3 {+-} .5 kpc; the parameter errors reflect the range between different decomposition methods. Despite model covariances, the convergence of solutions based on different methods and current data suggests a stable set of structural parameters. The ellipticities ({epsilon} = 1 - b/a) of the bulge and the disk from the IRAC image are 0.37 {+-} 0.03 and 0.73 {+-} 0.03, respectively. The bulge parameter n is rather insensitive to bandpass effects and its value (2.2) suggests a first rapid formation via mergers followed by secular growth from the disk. The M31 halo has a two-dimensional power-law index {approx_equal} - 2.5 {+-} 0.2 (or -3.5 in three-dimensional), comparable to that of the Milky Way. We find that the M31 bulge light is mostly dominant over the range R{sub min} {approx}< 1.2 kpc. The disk takes over in the range 1.2 kpc {approx}< R{sub min} {approx}< 9 kpc, whereas the halo dominates at R{sub min} {approx}> 9 kpc. The stellar nucleus, bulge, disk, and halo components each contribute roughly 0.05%, 23%, 73%, and 4% of the total light of M31 out to 200 kpc along the minor axis. Nominal errors for the

  1. The Luminosity-Metallicity relation of distant luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y. C.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H.; Elbaz, D.; Marcillac, D.; Cesarsky, C. J.

    2004-09-01

    One hundred and five 15 \\mum-selected objects in three ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) deep survey fields (CFRS 3h, UDSR and UDSF) are studied on the basis of their high-quality optical spectra with resolution R>1000 from VLT/FORS2. ˜92 objects (88%) have secure redshifts, ranging from 0 to 1.16 with a median value of z_med=0.587. Considerable care is taken in estimating the extinction properties of individual galaxy, which can seriously affect diagnostic diagrams and estimates of star formation rates (SFRs) and of metal abundances. Two independent estimates of the extinction have been made, e.g. Balmer line ratio and energy balance between infrared (IR) and H\\beta luminosities. For most of the sources, we find a good agreement between the two extinction coefficients (within ±0.64 rms in AV, the extinction in V band), with median values of A_V(IR) = 2.36 and A_V(Balmer)= 1.82 for z>0.4 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs). At z >0.4, our sample show many properties (IR luminosity, continuum color, ionization and extinction) strikingly in common with those of local (IRAS) LIRGs studied by Veilleux et al. (\\cite{Veilleux1995}). Thus, our sample can provide a good representation of LIRGs in the distant Universe. We confirm that most (>77%) ISO 15 μm-selected galaxies are dominated by star formation. Oxygen abundances in interstellar medium in the galaxies are estimated from the extinction-corrected ``strong'' emission line ratios (e.g. \\ion{[O}{ii]}/Hβ, \\ion{[O}{iii]}/Hβ and \\ion{[O}{iii]}/\\ion{[O}{ii]}). The derived 12+log(O/H) values range from 8.36 to 8.93 for the z>0.4 galaxies with a median value of 8.67. Distant LIRGs present a metal content less than half of that of the local bright disks (i.e. L*). Their properties can be reproduced with infall models although one has to limit the infall time to avoid overproduction of metals at late times. The models predict that total masses (gas + stars) of the distant LIRGs are from 1011 M⊙ to ≤1012 M⊙. A

  2. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  3. Ion-chain interaction in keV ion-beam-irradiated polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.; Licciardello, A.; Puglisi, O.

    1987-09-21

    Molecular weight distribution has been measured in monodisperse polystyrene film (MW = 9 000 amu) after ion bombardment, in the ion fluence range 10/sup 11/--10/sup 13/ ions/cm/sup 2/. The chosen beams are 100 keV He, 200 keV Ne, and 400 keV Ar. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of a simple statistical model for cross-links. The chemical yield is found to be very high and equal to 0.30, about a factor of 10 higher than the values given in the literature for gamma irradiation (M. Dole, in The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules (Academic, New York, 1973), Vol. 2, Chap. 5, p. 57).

  4. Width of the 511 keV line from the bulge of the galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2007-11-15

    In this paper I present the detail estimations for the width of the 511 keV line produced by a mechanism when dark matter is represented by macroscopically large dense nuggets. I argue that the width of 511 keV emission in this mechanism is very narrow (in a few keV range) in agreement with all observations. The dominant mechanism of the annihilation in this case is the positronium formation e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}2{gamma} rather than a direct e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}2{gamma} annihilation. I also discuss some generic features of the {gamma} rays spectrum (in few MeV range) resulting from this mechanism.

  5. Guidelines for using a 10-keV x-ray source for hardness assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, work done at Sandia is summarized that demonstrates that it is possible to use a 10-keV x-ray source for hardness assurance. Transistor data is presented that shows that a 10-keV x-ray source can be used as a reliable process monitor, in the sense that Co-60 part response can be predicted easily and reliably from x-ray part response. Further, test structure and functional part data is presented that illustrates how an x-ray source may be employed for wafer lot acceptance for silicon-gate CMOS devices that either employ quardbands or hardened field oxides for device isolation. Finally, a few words are said about the use of high-Z gate metallizations. These results should provide guidelines for implementation of lot acceptance testing with a 10-keV x-ray source.

  6. Evaluation of the 1077 keV γ-ray emission probability from 68Ga decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Li-Yang; Chen, Xiong-Jun; Chen, Guo-Chang

    2014-04-01

    68Ga decays to the excited states of 68Zn through the electron capture decay mode. New recommended values for the emission probability of 1077 keV γ-ray given by the ENSDF and DDEP databases all use data from absolute measurements. In 2011, JIANG Li-Yang deduced a new value for 1077 keV γ-ray emission probability by measuring the 69Ga(n,2n) 68Ga reaction cross section. The new value is about 20% lower than values obtained from previous absolute measurements and evaluations. In this paper, the discrepancies among the measurements and evaluations are analyzed carefully and the new values are re-recommended. Our recommended value for the emission probability of 1077 keV γ-ray is (2.72±0.16)%.

  7. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  8. Hydrogenation kinetics in oxidized boron-doped silicon irradiated by keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wallace Wan-Li; Sah, Chih-Tang

    1988-08-01

    Hydrogenation kinetics of boron acceptors in oxidized silicon during and after repeated 8-keV electron irradiation (225-2700-μC/cm2 stresses and 10-168-h interirradiation anneals) at room temperature are reported. Hydrogenation proceeds rapidly during irradiation but continues for many hours after the 8-keV electron beam is removed. Postoxidation process dependencies show that postoxidation and postmetallization annealing processes reduce the hydrogenation effect during the 8-keV electron irradiation, while exposure of the oxide to water prior to aluminum electrode deposition enhances it. The data can be interpreted by our two-reaction model consisting of the hydrogen capture reaction by the boron acceptor and the hydrogen recombination reaction to form hydrogen molecule.

  9. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Luminosity Function in the ECO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Hayley; Andreas A. Berlind, Victor Calderon, Kathleen D. Eckert, Sheila J. Kannappan, Amanda J. Moffett, David V. Stark

    2016-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy luminosity function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy luminosity distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that luminous galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low luminosity galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the correlation of galaxy luminosity and dark matter halo mass combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the luminosity of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo's larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign luminosities to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect luminosity to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO luminosity function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. Though our mock catalog luminosity functions display similar qualitative trends as those from the ECO data, the trends are not in agreement quantitatively. Our results thus suggest that the simple models used to build the mocks are incomplete and that galaxy luminosity is possibly correlated with the larger scale density field.

  10. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artifact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  11. Evidence Of Episodic Mass Accretion In Low-luminosity, Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Evans, N. J., II; Dunham, M. M.; Lee, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present Spitzer IRS spectroscopy of CO2 ice toward 19 young stellar objects (YSOs) with luminosity lower than 1 Lsun. Pure CO2 ice forms only at elevated temperature, T > 20 K, and thus at higher luminosity. Pure CO2 ice formation processes are irreversible. It will not disappear unless it evaporates. Current internal luminosities of YSOs with L < 1 Lsun do not provide such conditions out to radii of typical envelopes. Significant amounts of pure CO2 ice would signify a higher past luminosity. We analyze 15.2 micron CO2 ice bending mode absorption lines in comparison to the laboratory data. We decompose pure CO2 ice from 15 out of 19 young low luminosity sources. Eight sources show a significant double peak in the optical depth, which provides unambiguous evidence for pure CO2 ice. The presence of the pure CO2 ice component indicate high dust temperature and hence high luminosity in past. The total CO2 ice amount can be explained by long period of low luminosity stage between episodic accretion bursts as predicted in an episodic accretion scenario. Chemical modeling shows that the episodic accretion scenario explains the observed total CO2 ice amount best. A detailed analysis has been performed for one low luminosity Class 0 object CB130-1-IRS1. A full SED fitting with a radiative transfer model shows that the internal luminosity of CB130-1-IRS1 is as low as 0.14 - 0.16 Lsun. The best fitting chemical evolution model requires episodic accretion and the formation of CO2 ice from CO ice during the low luminosity periods. This process removes C from the gas phase, providing a much improved fit to the observed gas-phase molecular lines and the CO2 ice absorption feature. Also we detected the pure CO2 ice component around CB130-1-IRS1, which is an evidence of past heating.

  12. Questions on Pure Luminosity Evolution for Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Zhang, Yuan-Zhong

    1999-02-01

    The explanation for the existence of an excess population of faint blue galaxies (FBGs) has been a mystery for nearly two decades and remains one of the grand astronomical issues to date. Existing models cannot explain all of the observational data, such as galaxy number counts in the optical and infrared passbands and the redshift distributions of galaxies. Here, by modeling the morphological number counts derived from the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the number counts in optical and infrared passbands and the redshift and color distributions of galaxies obtained from ground-based observations, we show that the ``FBG problem'' cannot be resolved if elliptical galaxies are assumed to have formed in an instantaneous burst of star formation at high redshift with no subsequent star formation events, which is the conventional scenario for formation and evolution of ellipticals. There exist great discrepancies between the observed B-K color distribution and the predicted distribution for ellipticals by such a pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model in the context of the conventional scenario. Neither can the mild evolution (i.e., the star formation events have lasted for a longer time than those of the instantaneous burst and passive evolution since the formation of galaxies) for ellipticals be accepted in the context of PLE assumption. The introduction of dust extinction also cannot save the PLE models. This conclusion holds for each of the three cosmological models under consideration: flat, open, and Λ-dominated. Hence, our investigation suggests that PLE assumption for elliptical galaxies is questionable, and number evolution may be essential for ellipticals.

  13. On the perturbation of the luminosity distance by peculiar motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick; Hudson, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    We consider some aspects of the perturbation to the luminosity distance d(z) that are of relevance for SN1a cosmology and for future peculiar velocity surveys at non-negligible redshifts. (1) Previous work has shown that the correction to the lowest order perturbation δd/d = -δv/cz has the peculiar characteristic that it appears to depend on the absolute state of motion of sources, rather than on their motion relative to that of the observer. The resolution of this apparent violation of the equivalence principle is that it is necessary to allow for evolution of the velocities with time, and also, when considering perturbations on the scale of the observer-source separation, to include the gravitational redshift effect. We provide an expression for δd/d that provides a physically consistent way to measure peculiar velocities and determine their impact for SN1a cosmology. (2) We then calculate the perturbation to the redshift as a function of source flux density, which has been proposed as an alternative probe of large-scale motions. We show how the inclusion of surface brightness modulation modifies the relation between δz(m) and the peculiar velocity, and that, while the noise properties of this method might appear promising, the velocity signal is swamped by the effect of galaxy clustering for most scales of interest. (3) We show how, in linear theory, peculiar velocity measurements are biased downwards by the effect of smaller scale motions or by measurement errors (such as in photometric redshifts). Our results nicely explain the effects seen in simulations by Koda et al. We critically examine the prospects for extending peculiar velocity studies to larger scales with near-term future surveys.

  14. SuperB: a Linear High-Luminosity B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Bettarini, S.; Biagini, M.; Bonneaud, G.; Cai, Y.; Calderini, G.; Ciuchini, M.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Forti, F.; Gershon, T.J.; Giorgi, M.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lusiani, A.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Neri, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; /Caltech /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Frascati /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Warwick U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Edinburgh U. /Orsay, LAL

    2006-02-08

    This paper is based on the outcome of the activity that has taken place during the recent workshop on ''SuperB in Italy'' held in Frascati on November 11-12, 2005. The workshop was opened by a theoretical introduction of Marco Ciuchini and was structured in two working groups. One focused on the machine and the other on the detector and experimental issues.. The present status on CP is mainly based on the results achieved by BABAR and Belle. Establishment of the indirect CP violation in B sector in 2001 and of the direct CP violation in 2004 thanks to the success of PEP-II and KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factories operating at the center of mass energy corresponding to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S ). With the two B Factories taking data, the Unitarity Triangle is now beginning to be over constrained by improving the measurements of the sides and now also of the angles {alpha}, and {gamma}. We are also in presence of the very intriguing results about the measurements of sin2{beta} in the time dependent analysis of decay channels via penguin loops, where b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} s{bar d}d. {tau} physics, in particular LFV search, as well as charm and ISR physics are important parts of the scientific program of a SuperB Factory. The physics case together with possible scenarios for the high luminosity SuperB Factory based on the concepts of the Linear Collider and the related experimental issues are discussed.

  15. Study on high rate MRPC for high luminosity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Huang, X.; Lv, P.; Zhu, W.; Shi, L.; Xie, B.; Cheng, J.; Li, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) has been used to construct time-of-flight system in the field of nuclear and particle physics, due to their high-precision timing properties, high efficiency, reliability and coverage of large area. With the increase of accelerator luminosity, MRPCs have to withstand particle fluxes up to several tens of kHz/cm2 in view of the next generation physics experiments, such as the SIS-100/300 at FAIR-CBM, SoLID at JLab and NICA at JINR. But the MRPC assembled with float glass has very low rate capability not exceeding some hundreds of Hz/cm2. Two possible solutions for increasing rate capability, one is to reduce the bulk resistivity of glass and the other is to reduce the electrode thickness. Tsinghua University has done R&D on high rate MRPC for many years. A special low resistive glass with bulk resistivity around 1010Ω.cm was developed. We also studied the rate capability changes with glass thickness. In this paper we describe the performance of low resistive glass and two kinds of high rate MRPC (Pad readout and Strip readout) tested by deuterium beams. The results show that the tolerable particle flux can reach 70 kHz/cm2. In the mean time, MRPCs assembled with three thickness (0.7 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.35 mm) of float glass were also tested with deuteron beams, the results show that the three detectors can afford particle rate up to 500 Hz/cm2, 0.75 kHz/cm2 and 3 kHz/cm2, respectively.

  16. Charge dynamics of MgO single crystals subjected to KeV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughariou, A.; Blaise, G.; Braga, D.; Kallel, A.

    2004-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope has been equipped to study the fundamental aspects of charge trapping in insulating materials, by measuring the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield σ with a high precision (a few percent), as a function of energy, electron current density, and dose. The intrinsic secondary electron emission yield σ0 of uncharged MgO single crystals annealed at 1000 °C, 2 h, has been studied at four energies 1.1, 5, 15, and 30 keV on three different crystal orientations (100), (110), and (111). At low energies (1.1 and 5 keV) σ0 depends on the crystalline orientation wheras at high energies (30 keV) no differentiation occurs. It is shown that the value of the second crossover energy E2, for which the intrinsic SEE yield σ0=1, is extremely delicate to measure with precision. It is about 15 keV±500 eV for the (100) orientation, 13.5 keV±500 eV for the (110), and 18.5 keV±500 eV for the (111) one. At low current density J⩽105 pA/cm2, the variation of σ with the injected dose makes possible the observation of a self-regulated regime characterized by a steady value of the SEE yield σst=1. At low energies 1.1 and 5 keV, there is no current density effects in MgO, but at high energies ≈30 keV, apparent current density effects come from a bad collect of secondary electrons, due to very high negative surface potential. At 30 keV energy, an intense erratic electron exoemission was observed on the MgO (110) orientation annealed at 1500 °C. This phenomenon is the result of a disruptive process similar to flashover, which takes place at the surface of the material.

  17. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING WEAK Mg II QUASAR ABSORBERS AND A CURIOUS DEPENDENCE ON QUASAR LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jessica L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Klimek, Elizabeth S.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2013-05-01

    We have identified 469 Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet systems having W{sub r} {>=} 0.02 A in 252 Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer and UVES/Very Large Telescope quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 2.6. Using the largest sample yet of 188 weak Mg II systems (0.02 A {<=}W{sub r} < 0.3 A), we calculate their absorber redshift path density, dN/dz. We find clear evidence of evolution, with dN/dz peaking at z {approx} 1.2, and that the product of the absorber number density and cross section decreases linearly with increasing redshift; weak Mg II absorbers seem to vanish above z {approx_equal} 2.7. If the absorbers are ionized by the UV background, we estimate number densities of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} Mpc{sup -3} for spherical geometries and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} Mpc{sup -3} for more sheetlike geometries. We also find that dN/dz toward intrinsically faint versus bright quasars differs significantly for weak and strong (W{sub r} {>=} 1.0 A) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is {approx}25% higher than toward faint quasars (10{sigma} at low redshift, 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, and 4{sigma} at high redshift, 1.4 < z {<=} 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being {approx}20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10{sigma} at low redshift and 4{sigma} at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  18. 3.55 keV line in minimal decaying dark matter scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico

    2015-07-20

    We investigate the possibility of reproducing the recently reported 3.55 keV line in some simple decaying dark matter scenarios. In all cases a keV scale decaying DM is coupled with a scalar field charged under SM gauge interactions and thus capable of pair production at the LHC. We will investigate how the demand of a DM lifetime compatible with the observed signal, combined with the requirement of the correct DM relic density through the freeze-in mechanism, impacts the prospects of observation at the LHC of the decays of the scalar field.

  19. Realistic Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter with KeV Mass does not Contradict Cosmological Bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Lesgourgues, Julien; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2009-05-22

    Previous fits of sterile neutrino dark matter (DM) models to cosmological data ruled out masses smaller than {approx}8 keV, assuming a production mechanism that is not the best motivated from a particle physics point of view. Here we focus on a realistic extension of the standard model with three sterile neutrinos, consistent with neutrino oscillation data and baryogenesis, with the lightest sterile neutrino being the DM particle. We show that for each mass {>=}2 keV there exists at least one model accounting for 100% of DM and consistent with Lyman-{alpha} and other cosmological, astrophysical, and particle physics data.

  20. Observations of 12-200 keV X-rays from GX 339-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.; Levine, A. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Primini, F. A.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray spectra of GX 339-4 measured on three occasions in 1977 and 1978 are presented. These are the first reported measurements above 10 keV. The spectra can be described as the superposition of a soft component, which is dominant below about 20 keV, and a hard component at higher energy. Simultaneous measurements at lower energy show that the soft component vanished during the observation in early 1978. The behavior of these two components is similar to that of the spectrum of Cygnus X-1; this reinforces the previously noted resemblance in rapid X-ray variability.

  1. 511 keV line from Q balls in the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2005-10-15

    The 511 keV photons from the galactic center can be explained by positrons produced through Q-ball decay. In the scheme of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking, large Q balls with lepton charge are necessarily long-lived. In particular, the lifetime can be as long as (or even longer than) the age of the Universe. If kinematically allowed, such large Q balls decay into positrons, which eventually annihilate with electrons into 511 keV photons. Our scenario is realized within the minimal supersymmetric standard model in the inflationary universe, which is very plausible.

  2. Tomographic scanning microscope for 1-4 KeV x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, I.; Feng, Y.P.; Hadda, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    X-ray microtomography enables three-dimensional imaging at submicron resolution with elemental and chemical state contrast. The 1-4 KeV energy region is promising for microtomography of biological, microelectronics, and materials sciences specimens. To capitalize on this potential, we are constructing a tomographic scanning x-ray microscope for 1-4 KeV x-ray on a spherical grating monochromator beamline at the Advance Photon Source. The microscope, which uses zone plate optics, has an anticipated spatial resolution of 100 nm and an energy resolution of better than 1 eV.

  3. Detection of interplanetary electrons from 18 keV to 1.8 MeV during solar quiet times, 1. On the origin of 200 KeV interplanetary electrons, 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Cline, T. L.; Ramaty, R.; Fisk, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    A quiet time component of interplanetary electrons having energies above solar wind energies and below those characterized as cosmic radiation was observed. Its energy spectrum falls with energy from 18 keV to 1.8 MeV, but it shows a feature in the 100 to 300 keV range. The observed temporal variations of the intensity suggest that the 18 to 100 keV portion is solar and the 0.3 to 1.8 MeV portion is galactic in origin. Solar and terrestrial neutron decay electrons appear inadequate to explain the 100 to 300 keV feature.

  4. A Proposed Fast Luminosity Feedback for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Field, R.Clive; Fisher, Alan; Sullivan, Michael; Drago, Alessandro; /Frascati

    2009-05-15

    We present a possible design for a fast luminosity feedback for the SuperB Interaction Point (IP). The design is an extension of the fast luminosity feedback installed on the PEP-II accelerator. During the last two runs of PEP-II and BaBar (2007-2008), we had an improved luminosity feedback system that was able to maintain peak luminosity with faster correction speed than the previous system. The new system utilized fast dither coils on the High-Energy Beam (HEB) to independently dither the x position, the y position and the y angle at the IP, at roughly 100 Hz. The luminosity signal was then read out with three independent lock-in amplifiers. An overall correction was computed based on the lock-in signal strengths and beam corrections for position in x and y and in the y angle at the IP were simultaneously applied to the HEB. With the 100 times increase in luminosity for the SuperB design, we propose using a similar fast luminosity feedback that can operate at frequencies between DC and 1 kHz, high enough to follow any beam motion from the final focusing magnets.

  5. Variations of cyclotron line energy with luminosity in accreting X-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Osamu

    2014-01-20

    I develop a new model for changes of cyclotron line energy with luminosity based on changes in polar cap dimensions and the direction of photon propagation as well as a shock height. In X0115+63 and V0332+53, the fundamental cyclotron line energy has been observed to decrease with increasing luminosity. This phenomenon has been interpreted as a change of a shock height with luminosity. However, the rates of the observed changes are quite different, in which the line energy in V0332+53 varies slowly with luminosity compared with that in X0115+63. I demonstrate that a new model successfully reproduces the changes of the fundamental cyclotron line energies with luminosity in both X0115+63 and V0332+53. On the other hand, the cyclotron line energies in Her X–1, GX301–2, and GX304–1 were reported to increase with increasing luminosity. I discuss the positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity based on changes in a beam pattern for Her X–1, GX301–2, and GX304–1. In addition, I discuss how a switch of the predominant, observed emission region from pole1 to pole2 influences cyclotron line energy for GX304–1 and A0535+26.

  6. Correlations of Circumnuclear Water Maser Luminosity with AGN Activity and SMBH Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Ming-Yi Jeffrey; Zaw, I.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    We examine 53 water masers, the only known resolvable tracers of gas in the sub-parsec disks of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We test if there is a relationship between the isotropic maser luminosity and black hole mass and AGN activity. Black hole mass is estimated from velocity dispersion, sigma, and AGN bolometric luminosity from [OIII]5007 luminosity, from SDSS spectra. The maser are sorted, based on their radio spectra, into disk-type masers, located in the accretion disk, jet-type masers, located in a jet/outflow, or other-type masers, where the location of the masers is unclear. The maser luminosity is fit against black hole mass and AGN luminosity and compared with the theoretical predictions from Neufeld and Maloney (1995). This builds on the result from Zhu et al. (2011) with a doubled sample size and fitting for both variables at the same time. The dependence of isotropic maser luminosity of the disk and jet masers on black hole mass and AGN luminosity agree within error to the model, while the "other" masers show no correlation.

  7. Luminosity in the initial breakdown stage of cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, R. A.; Uman, M. A.; Pilkey, J. T.; Jordan, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present simultaneously measured luminosity and electric field data from the initial breakdown (IB) stage in seven cloud-to-ground (CG) and eight intracloud (IC) lightning discharges along with, in three cases, radar and Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data. The data were taken in north-central Florida in 2013 and 2014. Seven CG discharges had an arithmetic mean (standard deviation, SD) IB stage luminosity pulse train duration of 3 ms (2 ms), and within the seven CG discharges, 30 luminosity pulses had the following means (SD): 10% to 90% risetime 25 µs (16 µs), full width at half maximum 68 µs (21 µs), and delay between onset of the electric field pulse and associated luminosity pulse 8 µs (8 µs). Eight IC discharges had a mean (SD) IB stage luminosity pulse train duration of 11 ms (4 ms), and within the 8 IC discharges, 37 luminosity pulses exhibited mean risetimes, widths, and delays of 59 µs (36 µs), 176 µs (70 µs), and 34 µs (20 µs), all significantly greater than in the CG case. The roughly 10 LMA sources associated with each of the three IB stages in 2014 are grouped horizontally within about 1 km2. The mean altitude (SD) of the LMA points during two CG IB stages is 5 km (600 m) and 4.3 km (250 m) and during one IC discharge is 6.2 km (550 m). We discuss the role of optical scattering in delaying and distorting the observed luminosity waveforms.

  8. Characterizing Quasar Outflows III: SEDs, and Bolometric Luminosity Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph; Robbins, J. M.; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Christenson, D. H.; Derseweh, J. A.; Townsend, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). For this purpose, we are examining a sample of 11000 z=1.7-2.0 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This redshift range permits the following from the SDSS spectra: (1) separation of objects that do and do not exhibit outflows; (2) classification/measurement of outflow properties (ionization, velocity, velocity width); and (3) measurements of UV emission line and continuum parameters. In this poster, we add photometry from both the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). 2MASS photometry covers the rest-frame optical regime of these qusars, while the WISE W1, W2, and W3 bands cover the rest-frame wavelength ranges 0.9-1.27 micron, 1.35-1.75 micron, and 2.52-5.51 micron, respectively. The preliminary release of WISE data cover 3800 of our quasars. In an accompnying poster, we have subjectively divided these quasars into four categories: broad absorption-line quasars (2700 objects), associated absorption-line quasars (1700 objects), reddened quasars (160 objects), and unabsorbed/unreddened quasars (6300 objects). Here, we present average SEDs for these subsamples, estimates of bolometric luminosity, and explore changes in SED based on both outflow properties and quasar physical properties. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the

  9. Constraining models for keV sterile neutrinos by quasidegenerate active neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    We present a no-go theorem for keV sterile neutrino dark matter: if sterile neutrinos at the keV scale play the role of dark matter, they are typically unstable and their decay produces an astrophysical monoenergetic x-ray line. It turns out that the observational bound on this line is so strong that it contradicts the existence of a quasidegenerate spectrum of active neutrinos in a seesaw type I framework where the Casas-Ibarra matrix R is real. This is the case in particular for models without CP violation. We give a general proof of this theorem. While the theorem (like every no-go theorem) relies on certain assumptions, the situation under which it applies is still sufficiently general to lead to interesting consequences for keV neutrino model building. In fact, depending on the outcome of the next generation experiments, one might be able to rule out whole classes of models for keV sterile neutrinos.

  10. Field aligned currents and the auroral spectrum below 1 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements during auroral events were conducted with the aid of detectors flown aboard three Nike-Tomahawk rocket flights. The detectors used to measure the auroral spectrum below 1 keV consisted of electrostatic analyzers positioned in the rocket to measure particles moving up and down the magnetic field lines. The analyzers measured electrons and protons simultaneously during a given sweep.

  11. Using a 10-keV x-ray source for hardness assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Beegle, R.W.; Sexton, F.W.; Winokur, P.S.; Miller, S.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Jones, R.V.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that a 10 keV x-ray source can be used to predict the responses of microelectronic circuits to Co-60 irradiation. Guidelines for using an x-ray tester in a hardness assurance program for VLSI CMOS circuits are suggested. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tbl.

  12. Interstellar photoelectric absorption cross sections, 0.03-10 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R.; Mccammon, D.

    1983-01-01

    An effective absorption cross section per hydrogen atom has been calculated as a function of energy in the 0.03-10 keV range using the most recent atomic cross section and cosmic abundance data. Coefficients of a piecewise polynomial fit to the numerical results are given to allow convenient application in automated calculations.

  13. Heliospheric Neutral Atom Spectra Between 0.01 and 6 keV fom IBEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Gloeckler, G.; Heirtzler, D.; Janzen, P.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Moore, T. E.; Petrinec, S. M.; Quinn, M.; Reisenfeld, D.; Saul, L. A.; Scheer, J. A.; Schwardron, N.; Trattner, K. J.; Vanderspek, R.; Wurz, P.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008 December, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has been making detailed observations of neutrals from the boundaries of the heliosphere using two neutral atom cameras with overlapping energy ranges. The unexpected, yet defining feature discovered by IBEX is a Ribbon that extends over the energy range from about 0.2 to 6 keV. This Ribbon is superposed on a more uniform, globally distributed heliospheric neutral population. With some important exceptions, the focus of early IBEX studies has been on neutral atoms with energies greater than approx. 0.5 keV. With nearly three years of science observations, enough low-energy neutral atom measurements have been accumulated to extend IBEX observations to energies less than approx. 0.5 keV. Using the energy overlap of the sensors to identify and remove backgrounds, energy spectra over the entire IBEX energy range are produced. However, contributions by interstellar neutrals to the energy spectrum below 0.2 keV may not be completely removed. Compared with spectra at higher energies, neutral atom spectra at lower energies do not vary much from location to location in the sky, including in the direction of the IBEX Ribbon. Neutral fluxes are used to show that low energy ions contribute approximately the same thermal pressure as higher energy ions in the heliosheath. However, contributions to the dynamic pressure are very high unless there is, for example, turbulence in the heliosheath with fluctuations of the order of 50-100 km/s.

  14. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  15. 20-keV undulators for a 6-GeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Cho, Y.

    1985-10-01

    The main goal of the future 6-GeV electron storage ring is to provide 20-keV fundamental harmonic radiations from insertion devices. Parameter restrictions of REC-vanadium permendur hybrid undulators have been examined. The critical factor is the achieveable minimum gap of the undulator. Variations of the spectral brilliance for different beam parameters are also shown.

  16. The 20 keV undulators for a 6-GeV storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Cho, Y.

    The main goal of the future 6-GeV electron storage ring is to provide 20-keV fundamental harmonic radiations from insertion devices. Parameter restrictions of REC-Vanadium permendur hybrid undulators were examined. The critical factor is the achievable minimum gap of the undulator. Variations of the spectral brilliance for different beam parameters are also shown.

  17. Dynamical framework for KeV Dirac neutrino warm dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Dean J.; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2014-08-01

    If the source of the reported 3.5 keV x-ray line is a sterile neutrino, comprising an O(1) fraction of the dark matter (DM), then it exhibits the property that its mass times mixing angle is ˜ few×10-2 eV, a plausible mass scale for the active neutrinos. This property is a common feature of Dirac neutrino mixing. We present a framework that dynamically produces light active and keV sterile Dirac neutrinos, with appropriate mixing angles to be the x-ray line source. The central idea is that the right-handed active neutrino is a composite state, while elementary sterile neutrinos gain keV masses similarly to the quarks in extended technicolor. The entire framework is fixed by just two dynamical scales and may automatically exhibit a warm dark matter (WDM) production mechanism—dilution of thermal relics from late decays of a heavy composite neutrino—such that the keV neutrinos may comprise an O(1) fraction of the DM. In this framework, the WDM is typically quite cool and within structure formation bounds, with temperature ˜ few×10-2Tν and free-streaming length ˜ few kpc. A toy model that exhibits the central features of the framework is also presented.

  18. European Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound emissions estimate using MEGAN v2.10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawoud, M.; Pozzoli, L.; Unal, A.; Kindap, T.; Poupkou, A.; Katragou, E.; Melas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions estimations are essential to obtain a comprehensive understanding of both anthropogenic and biogenic contributions of the emissions. In this paper we have calculated the Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from vegetation over Europe using the newly developed Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.10 (MEGAN2.10). We performed a simulation of the entire year 2008 for a domain covering all Europe at a resolution of 30 x 30 km. The meteorological fields needed to calculate the BVOC emissions (surface temperature and shortwave radiation) were provided by a WRFv3.3 simulation (driven by NCEP/FNL global reanalysis data at 1° x 1°) and interfaced to MEGAN with MCIPv3.6. We used the global dataset provided with the MEGAN2.10 model containing the Plant Functional Types (PFT, at 0.5° x 0.5°), Leaf Area Indices (LAI, at 30s resolution) and Emission Factors (EF, at 0.01° x 0.01°). The motivation behind this study is to quantify the biogenic emissions as calculated from the new version of MEGAN over Europe for the entire annual cycle, and in second step to quantify the impact of biogenic emissions on air quality, using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ). Isoprene emissions comprise about half of the total global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) estimated using MEGAN2.10, while all Terpenes comprise about 18% of the estimated total global BVOC emissions. Our simulations showed that Isoprene emissions are ranging from 10.7 Gg/month in December to 6572.8 Gg/month over Europe in July, while Terpenes emissions range from 38 Gg/month in January and 1598.23 Gg/month in July. Around 15 Tg/year and 5 Tg/year are estimated as total annual emissions of Isoprene and Terpenes, respectively. In comparison with a previous study using the Natural Emission Model (NEMO), for the same period and the similar domain and resolution, for July we found 70% higher Isoprene emissions and 30% lower Terpenes emissions

  19. Luminosity and Color Dependence in Galaxy Cross-Correlations since z = 1 in PRIMUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron; Blanton, M. R.; Coil, A. L.; Cool, R. J.; Eisenstein, D.; Moustakas, J.; Skibba, R. A.; Zhu, G.

    2014-01-01

    I present small-scale galaxy cross-correlation measurements from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) as a function of color, luminosity, and redshift. We measure the real-space clustering of ~50,000 galaxies from PRIMUS, over a redshift range 0.2 < z < 1, by cross-correlating spectroscopic PRIMUS galaxies with a tracer population of galaxies selected from imaging catalogs. In agreement with previous work, we find strong clustering differences between blue and red galaxy populations. Our results indicate luminosity-dependent clustering, but this luminosity dependence further varies depending on color and physical scale. We interpret our results using a halo abundance model.

  20. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-22

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  1. Contribution of terms containing Z-boson exchange to the luminosity measurements at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, W.; Pietrzyk, B.

    1992-12-01

    We have investigated the contribution of terms containing Z-boson exchange to the luminosity measurements at LEP. Comparing the Monte Carlo program BABAMC and the semi-analytical program ALIBABA, we have determined the technical precision of the corresponding O( α) calculation in BABAMC to be 0.03%. Using the ALIBABA program we have assessed the higher-order corrections to these Z-boson exchange contributions to be of the order of 0.1% for the present luminosity measurements. The total theoretical error on the luminosity calculation for LEP experiments is at present not larger than 0.3%.

  2. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Chao, A.W.; Seryi, A.; Sramek, C.K.; /Rice U.

    2005-06-30

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ''banana effect''). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  3. Experimental demonstration of interaction region beam waist position knob for luminosity leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue; Bai, Mei; Duan, Zhe; Luo, Yun; Marusic, Aljosa; Robert-Demolaize, Guillaume; Shen, Xiaozhe

    2015-05-03

    In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of the model-dependent control of the interaction region beam waist position (s* knob) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The s* adjustment provides an alternative way of controlling the luminosity and is only known method to control the luminosity and reduce the pinch effect of the future eRHIC. In this paper, we will first demonstrate the effectiveness of the s* knob in luminosity controlling and its application in the future electron ion collider, eRHIC, followed by the detail experimental demonstration of such knob in RHIC.

  4. The line continuum luminosity ratio in AGN: Or on the Baldwin Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.; Ferland, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    The luminosity dependence of the equivalent width of CIV in active galaxies, the "Baldwin" effect, is shown to be a consequence of a luminosity dependent ionization parameter. This law also agrees with the lack of a "Baldwin" effect in Ly alpha or other hydrogen lines. A fit to the available data gives a weak indication that the mean covering factor decreases with increasing luminosity, consistent with the inference from X-ray observations. The effects of continuum shape and density on various line ratios of interest are discussed.

  5. The D-Zero luminosity monitor constant for {radical} {ital s} = 630 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, J.; Barnly, J.; Owen, D.

    1997-06-01

    D0 has calculated the luminosity monitor constant for {radical}s= 630 GeV. The inelastic p{anti p} cross section was interpolated between measurements performed at {radical}s = 546 and 1800 GeV. The geometric acceptance, hardware efficiency, and luminosity-dependent corrections are similar to those previously published for the full Tevatron energy. We find a luminosity-weighted value of {sigma}{sub L0} = 34.04 {+-} 1.05 mb, yielding a precision of {+-} 3.08%.

  6. Redshift Dependent Lag-Luminosity Relation in 565 BASTE Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Tanabe, Sachiko; Kodama, Yoshiki

    2008-05-01

    We compared redshifts zY measured from Yonetoku relation and zlag from the lag-luminosity relation for 565 BASTE GRBs and were surprised to find that the correlation between these two redshifts is very low. Assuming that the luminosity is a function of both zY and the intrinsic spectral lag τlag, we found a new redshift dependent lag-luminosity relation as L = 7.5×1050 erg/s(1+z)2.53τlag-0.282 with the correlation coefficient of 0.77.

  7. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  8. Energetic electron fluxes (E180 KeV) observed by the Giotto experiment EPA during encounter with Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, E.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Thompson, A.; Osullivan, D.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1986-12-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector system EPA/EPONA onboard Giotto detects ions and electrons with energies greater than 20 keV in various energy channels. In this paper, electron fluxes are presented together with data from the Giotto Magnetometer Experiment. Electrons >180 keV were recorded from the transit of the foreshock, inbound, until the last observation outbound at approximately 03:00 UT on 15 March 1986. Energy spectra for the inbound pass are shown. One flux enhancement in the >300 keV channel and several in the >180 keV channel were recorded outbound. Possible acceleration mechanisms for the energetic electrons are considered.

  9. Improvements of the standardization of (134)Cs by the critical window setting for 605keV photopeak.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Akira; Kawada, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio

    2016-03-01

    In the standardization of (134)Cs by the 4πβ-γ coincidence method with a γ-window at 605keV, the satellite components of 563keV and 569keV overlapping the 605keV peak cause a steep slope and non-linearity of the efficiency extrapolation function. By shifting the lower threshold of a γ-window higher, the satellite components are eliminated, and the slope tends to horizontal. Nearly flat efficiency curves were obtained by using a CeBr3 scintillator for detecting γ-photons, as well as a NaI(Tl) scintillator. PMID:26702547

  10. Spectral Analysis on Solar Flares with an Emission > 300 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, R.; Connaughton, V.

    2013-12-01

    The continuum gamma-ray emission from solar flares is caused when a population of electrons is accelerated to relativistic speeds and interacts with the solar plasma. However, it has been theorized that the gamma-ray emission from some brighter flares comes from two populations of electrons. Using the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we studied the gamma-ray emission spectra of solar flares and paid special attention to the solar flares that showed emission above 300 keV. We found that the emission above 300 keV was better fit with a broken power-law than a single power-law, evidence that the gamma-ray emission from certain solar flares involved two populations of electrons. Specifically, our best model involved a broken power law that had a steeper slope before the break in energy than after. We studied the spectral parameters as a function of time during the period of the high-energy emission. We also found that solar flares with emission above 300 keV form a small subset (~4%) of flares that trigger GBM above 20 keV. One of the flares with an emission greater than 300 keV was fitted with a Broken Power Law model. Only data from the BGO detector was used in making the plots. Various parameters of the fit have been plotted vs. time with the top two graphs representing the light curves of the flare from different detectors (BGO-0 and NaI-4). A spectral fit for bn100612038 for the time interval of [45s-50s] using only the BGO (0) detector file. Data from this fit was used in creating the other plots.

  11. Neutron Total Cross Sections of {sup 235}U From Transmission Measurements in the Energy Range 2 keV to 300 keV and Statistical Model Analysis of the Data

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    2000-05-01

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample.1 The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al.4 in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code 2 was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained 3 from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  12. NEUTRON TOTAL CROSS SECTIONS OF 235U FROM TRANSMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN THE ENERGY RANGE 2 keV to 300 keV AND STATISTICAL MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2000-05-22

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample. The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al. in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and {alpha} data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  13. Unveiling the Physics of Low-luminosity AGNs through X-Ray Variability: LINER versus Seyfert 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, L.; Masegosa, J.; González-Martín, O.; Márquez, I.; Perea, J.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray variability is very common in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but these variations may not occur similarly in different families of AGNs. We aim to disentangle the structure of low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) compared to Seyfert 2s by the study of their spectral properties and X-ray variations. We assembled the X-ray spectral parameters and variability patterns, which were obtained from simultaneous spectral fittings. Major differences are observed in the X-ray luminosities and the Eddington ratios, which are higher in Seyfert 2s. Short-term X-ray variations were not detected, while long-term changes are common in LINERs and Seyfert 2s. Compton-thick sources generally do not show variations, most probably because the AGN is not accesible in the 0.5–10 keV energy band. The changes are mostly related to variations in the nuclear continuum, but other patterns of variability show that variations in the absorbers and at soft energies can be present in a few cases. We conclude that the X-ray variations may occur similarly in LINERs and Seyfert 2s, i.e., they are related to the nuclear continuum, although they might have different accretion mechanisms. Variations at UV frequencies are detected in LINER nuclei but not in Seyfert 2s. This is suggestive of at least some LINERs having an unobstructed view of the inner disk where the UV emission might take place, with UV variations being common in them. This result might be compatible with the disappeareance of the torus and/or the broad-line region in at least some LINERs.

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of RXTE Data from Cyg X-1. Spectral Index-Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency-Luminosity Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2006-01-01

    We present timing and spectral analysis of approx. 2.2 Ms of Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) archival data from Cyg X-1. Using the generic Comptonization model we reveal that the spectrum of Cyg X-1 consists of three components: a thermal seed photon spectrum, a Comptonized part of the seed photon spectrum and the iron line. We find a strong correlation between 0.1-20 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power-law index. Presence of two spectral phases (states) are clearly seen in the data when the spectral indices saturate at low and high values of QPO frequencies. This saturation effect was discovered earlier in a number of black hole candidate (BHC) sources and now we strongly confirm this phenomenon in Cyg X-1. In the soft state this index- QPO frequency correlation shows a saturation of the photon index Gamma approx. 2.1 at high values of the low frequency upsilon(sub L). The saturation level of Gamma approx. 2.1 is the lowest value found yet in BHCs. The bolometric luminosity does not show clear correlation with the index. We also show that Fe K(sub alpha) emission line strength (equivalent width, EW) correlates with the QPO frequency. EW increases from 200 eV in the low/hard state to 1.5 keV in the high/soft state. The revealed observational correlations allow us to propose a scenario for the spectral transition and iron line formation which occur in BHC sources. We also present the spectral state (the power-law index) evolution for eight years of Cyg X-1 observations by RXTE.

  15. Effect of 800 keV argon ions pre-damage on the helium blister formation of tungsten exposed to 60 keV helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Ar8+ ions pre-damage on the following He2+ irradiation behavior of polycrystalline tungsten. We compared the irradiation resistance performance against 60 keV He2+ ions of undamaged tungsten samples with that of pre-damaged samples which were preliminarily exposed to 800 keV Ar8+ ions at a fluence of 4 × 1019 ions m-2. The experimental results indicate that the helium blistering of tungsten could be effectively relieved by the Ar8+ ions pre-damage, while the retention of helium around low energy desorption sites in the pre-damaged tungsten was larger than that of the undamaged samples. A strong orientation dependence of blistering had been observed, with the blister occurred preferentially on the surface of grains with normal direction close to <111>. The Ar8+ ions irradiation-induced damage altered the morphology of helium bubbles in tungsten exposed to the following He2+ irradiation significantly. The intensity of helium release peaks at relatively low temperatures (<600 K) was enhanced due to Ar8+ ions pre-damage.

  16. Magnetic field structure around cores with very low luminosity objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soam, A.; Maheswar, G.; Lee, Chang Won; Dib, Sami; Bhatt, H. C.; Tamura, Motohide; Kim, Gwanjeong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We carried out optical polarimetry of five dense cores, (IRAM 04191, L1521F, L328, L673-7, and L1014) which are found to harbour very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; Lint ≲ 0.1 L⊙). This study was conducted mainly to understand the role played by the magnetic field in the formation of very low and substellar mass range objects. Methods: Light from the stars, while passing through the dust grains that are aligned with their short axis parallel to an external magnetic field, becomes linearly polarised. The polarisation position angles measured for the stars can provide the plane-of-the sky magnetic field orientation. Because the light in the optical wavelength range is most efficiently polarised by the dust grains typically found at the outer layers of the molecular clouds, optical polarimetry mostly traces the magnetic field orientation of the core envelope. Results: The polarisation observations of stars projected on IRAM 04191, L328, L673-7, and L1014 were obtained in the R-band and those of L1521F were obtained in the V-band. The angular offsets between the envelope magnetic field direction (inferred from optical polarisation measurements) and the outflow position angles from the VeLLOs in IRAM 04191, L1521F, L328, L673-7, and L1014 are found to be 84°, 53°, 24°, 08°, and 15°, respectively. The mean value of the offsets for all the five clouds is ~ 37°. If we exclude IRAM 04191, the mean value reduces to become ~ 25°. In IRAM 04191, the offset between the projected envelope and the inner magnetic field (inferred from the submillimetre data obtained using SCUBA-POL) is found to be ~ 68°. The inner magnetic field, however, is found to be nearly aligned with the projected position angles of the minor axis, the rotation axis of the cloud, and the outflow from the IRAM 04191-IRS. We discuss a possible explanation for the nearly perpendicular orientation between the envelope and core scale magnetic fields in IRAM 04191. The angular offset between the

  17. Luminosity-environment relation in the Lowz sample of the Sdss-Iii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xin-Fa; Qi, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Peng; Qian, Xiao-Xia; Song, Jun; Ding, Ying-Ping

    In this work, we examine the environmental dependence of the u-, g-, r-, i- and z-band luminosities in the LOWZ sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10). To decrease the radial selection effect, we divide the LOWZ sample into subsamples with a redshift bin size of Δ z = 0.01 and analyze the environmental dependence of luminosities for these subsamples in each redshift bin. It is found that all five band luminosities of the LOWZ galaxy sample in the redshift region z=0.16--0.23 show substantial correlation with the local environment, especially in the redshift bins 0.19--0.20 and 0.20--0.21. The environmental dependence of all five band luminosities in the LOWZ galaxy sample becomes weak with increasing redshift, like the one in the apparent-magnitude limited Main galaxy sample.

  18. The luminosity functions of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the 1969 Perseid and Orionid meteor showers are presented and used to derive luminosity functions for the 288 Perseids and 56 Orionids detected. Visual counts were performed under very good to excellent seeing conditions at the times of peak activities, and the brightnesses of the meteors were estimated to the nearest magnitude by comparison with the magnitudes of known objects. Maximum likelihood estimates of the power law index of the luminosity function of 1.56 + or - 0.06 for the Perseids and of 1.85 + or - 0.1 for the Orionids are obtained which are lower than the values found by other investigators. Under the assumption that the luminosity of visual meteors is proportional to their mass, the luminosity function power law may also be used to characterize the mass function.

  19. Tevatron Collider Run II status and novel technologies for luminosity upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2004-07-20

    Over the past 2 years the Tevatron peak luminosity steadily progressed and reached the level of 92e30 cm-2s-1 which exceeds the original Run IIa goal. Over 0.57fb-1 have being delivered to each CDF and D0 experiments since the beginning of the Run II. In parallel to the Collider operation, we have started a project of the luminosity upgrade which should lead to peak luminosities of about 270e30 and total integrated luminosity of 4.4-8.5 fb-1 through FY2009. In this paper we describe the status of the Tevatron Collider complex, essence of the upgrades and novel accelerator technologies to be employed.

  20. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James; Williams, Kurtis A.; von Hippel, Ted; Levine, Stephen E.; Monet, David G.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Nitta, Atsuko; Winget, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka; Knapp, G. R.; Lupton, Robert H.; Smith, J. Allyn; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of white dwarfs is selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 using their reduced proper motions, based on improved proper motions from combined SDSS and USNO-B data. Numerous SDSS and follow-up spectra (Kilic and coworkers) are used to quantify completeness and contamination of the sample; kinematics models are used to understand and correct for velocity-dependent selection biases. A luminosity function is constructed covering the range 7luminosity function based on 6000 stars is remarkably smooth and rises nearly monotonically to Mbol=15.3. It then drops abruptly, although the small number of low-luminosity stars in the sample and their unknown atmospheric composition prevent quantitative conclusions about this decline. Stars are identified that may have high tangential velocities, and a preliminary luminosity function is constructed for them.

  1. HST Imaging of the Globular Clusters in the Formax Cluster: Color and Luminosity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillmair, C. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Brodie, J.; Elson, R.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the luminosity and B - I color distribution of globular clusters for three early-type galaxies in the Fornax cluster using imaging data from the Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  2. Testing Fundamental Particle Physics with the Galactic White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Melendez, B. E.; Althaus, L. G.; Isern, J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent determinations of the white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) from very large surveys have extended our knowledge of the WDLF to very high luminosities. It has been shown that the shape of the luminosity function of white dwarfs (WDLF) is a powerful tool to test the possible properties and existence of fundamental weakly interacting subelectronvolt particles. This, together with the availability of new full evolutionary white dwarf models that are reliable at high luminosities, have opened the possibility of testing particle emission in the core of very hot white dwarfs. We use the available WDLFs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey to constrain the values of the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μν) and the axion-electron coupling constant (gae) of DFSZ-axions.

  3. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-06-20

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  4. Hα as a Luminosity Class Diagnostic for K- and M-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Jeff; Levesque, Emily M.

    2016-04-01

    We have identified the Hα absorption feature as a new spectroscopic diagnostic of luminosity class in K- and M-type stars. From high-resolution spectra of 19 stars with well-determined physical properties (including effective temperatures and stellar radii), we measured equivalent widths for Hα and the Ca ii triplet and examined their dependence on both luminosity class and stellar radius. Hα shows a strong relation with both luminosity class and radius that extends down to late M spectral types. This behavior in Hα has been predicted as a result of the density-dependent overpopulation of the metastable 2s level in hydrogen, an effect that should become dominant for Balmer line formation in non-LTE conditions. We conclude that this new metallicity-insensitive diagnostic of luminosity class in cool stars could serve as an effective means of discerning between populations such as Milky Way giants and supergiant members of background galaxies.

  5. New structural and electronic properties of (TiO2)10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Granja, F.; Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    We present, based on state of the art density functional theoretic calculations, a new putative ground state (GS) for the cluster (TiO2)10, which results more than 1 eV lower in energy than all those previously reported in the literature. The geometric and electronic properties of this new cluster are discussed in detail and in comparison with the rest. We analyze the implications of the new GS in the context of recent experiments of reactivity regarding oxygen exchange with gaseous CO2 in TiO2 nanostructures, and also in connection with a recent interpretation of photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of the band gap of gas phase TiO 2- clusters.

  6. New structural and electronic properties of (TiO2)10.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Granja, F; Vega, A; Balbás, L C

    2016-06-21

    We present, based on state of the art density functional theoretic calculations, a new putative ground state (GS) for the cluster (TiO2)10, which results more than 1 eV lower in energy than all those previously reported in the literature. The geometric and electronic properties of this new cluster are discussed in detail and in comparison with the rest. We analyze the implications of the new GS in the context of recent experiments of reactivity regarding oxygen exchange with gaseous CO2 in TiO2 nanostructures, and also in connection with a recent interpretation of photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of the band gap of gas phase TiO2 (-) clusters. PMID:27334167

  7. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of AGN evolution stretching back to z˜5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function - all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is demonstrated at z ≈0 and 0.9, and clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z. The results support the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering: one, at high luminosity, that only occurs in high mass, highly biased haloes, and one that can occur over a wide range of halo masses and leads to luminosities that are correlated with halo mass. This latter mode dominates at z<0.9. The CLFs for Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs are also constrained at z ≈0, and we find evidence that unobscured quasars are more likely to be found in higher mass halos than obscured quasars. Thus, the AGN unification model seems to fail at quasar luminosities.

  8. Overview of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of a 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. The authors discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  9. RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS. I. STATISTICS OF SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zheng; Cen Renyue; Trac, Hy; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2010-06-10

    We combine a cosmological reionization simulation with box size of 100 h {sup -1} Mpc on a side and a Monte Carlo Ly{alpha} radiative transfer code to model Ly{alpha} Emitters (LAEs) at z {approx} 5.7. The model introduces Ly{alpha} radiative transfer as the single factor for transforming the intrinsic Ly{alpha} emission properties into the observed ones. Spatial diffusion of Ly{alpha} photons from radiative transfer results in extended Ly{alpha} emission and only the central part with high surface brightness can be observed. Because of radiative transfer, the appearance of LAEs depends on density and velocity structures in circumgalactic and intergalactic media as well as the viewing angle, which leads to a broad distribution of apparent (observed) Ly{alpha} luminosity for a given intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity. Radiative transfer also causes frequency diffusion of Ly{alpha} photons. The resultant Ly{alpha} line is asymmetric with a red tail. The peak of the Ly{alpha} line shifts toward longer wavelength and the shift is anti-correlated with the apparent-to-intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity ratio. The simple radiative transfer model provides a new framework for studying LAEs. It is able to explain an array of observed properties of z {approx} 5.7 LAEs in Ouchi et al., producing Ly{alpha} spectra, morphology, and apparent Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) similar to those seen in observation. The broad distribution of apparent Ly{alpha} luminosity at fixed UV luminosity provides a natural explanation for the observed UV LF, especially the turnover toward the low luminosity end. The model also reproduces the observed distribution of Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and explains the deficit of UV bright, high EW sources. Because of the broad distribution of the apparent-to-intrinsic Ly{alpha} luminosity ratio, the model predicts effective duty cycles and Ly{alpha} escape fractions for LAEs.

  10. Hints on the Broad Line Region Structure of Quasars at High and Low Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Zamfir, Sebastian; Negrete, C. A.; Dultzin, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    Quasars show a considerable spectroscopic diversity. However, the variety of quasar spectra at low redshifts is non-random: a principal component analysis applied to large samples customarily identifies two main eigenvectors. In this contribution we show that the range of quasar optical spectral properties observed at low-z\\ and associated with the first eigenvector is preserved up to z ≈ 2 in a sample of high luminosity quasars. We also describe two major luminosity effects.

  11. Luminosities of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guandalini, R.; Cristallo, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Stars evolving along the asymptotic giant branch can become carbon-rich in the final part of their evolution. They replenish the inter-stellar medium with nuclear processed material via strong radiative stellar winds. The determination of the luminosity function of these stars, even if far from being conclusive, is extremely important for testing the reliability of theoretical models. In particular, strong constraints on the mixing treatment and the mass-loss rate can be derived. Aims: We present an updated luminosity function of Galactic carbon stars (LFGCS) obtained from a re-analysis of available data already published in previous papers. Methods: Starting from available near- and mid-infrared photometric data, we re-determined the selection criteria. Moreover, we took advantage of updated distance estimates and period-luminosity relations and we adopted a new formulation for the computation of bolometric corrections (BCs). This led us to collect an improved sample of carbon-rich sources from which we constructed an updated luminosity function. Results: The LFGCS peaks at magnitudes around -4.9, confirming the results obtained in a previous work. Nevertheless, the luminosity function presents two symmetrical tails instead of the larger high-luminosity tail characterizing the former luminosity function. Conclusions: The derived LFCGS matches the indications from recent theoretical evolutionary asymptotic giant branch models, thus confirming the validity of the choices of mixing treatment and mass-loss history. Moreover, we compare our new luminosity function with its counterpart in the Large Magellanic Cloud finding that the two distributions are very similar for dust-enshrouded sources, as expected from stellar evolutionary models. Finally, we derive a new fitting formula aimed to better determine BCs for C-stars. Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Sub-mm Emission Line Deep Fields: CO and [CII] Luminosity Functions out to z = 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; van Kampen, Eelco; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2016-06-01

    Now that ALMA is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J=1-0 out to CO J=6-5 and [CII] at redshifts z=0-6. We find that: 1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [CII] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z ≤ 2.75; 2) we find that the CO and [CII] luminosity functions of galaxies increase from z = 6 to z = 4, remain relatively constant till z = 1 and rapidly decrease towards z = 0. The galaxies that are brightest in CO and [CII] are found at z ˜ 2; 3) the CO J=3-2 emission line is most favourable to study the CO luminosity and global H2 mass content of galaxies, because of its brightness and observability with currently available sub-mm and radio instruments; 4) the luminosity functions of high-J CO lines show stronger evolution than the luminosity functions of low-J CO lines; 5) our model barely reproduces the available constraints on the CO and [CII] luminosity function of galaxies at z ≥ 1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  13. An experimental study of the luminosity of an MFC-MAES-based digital spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshev, A. I.; Savinov, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally investigated the dependence of luminosity of a digital spectrograph for the line spectrum on the input slit width in the range 5-100 μm for different ways of measuring the spectral line image intensity. Based on the results obtained, we showed that the spectrograph luminosity can be increased by more than an order of magnitude via a multiple increase in the input slit width over the normal one with a conserved minimum instrumental response function width.

  14. The dependence of protostellar luminosity on environment in the Cygnus-X star-forming complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Hora, J. L.; Smith, Howard A.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Kraemer, K.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.

    2014-07-01

    The Cygnus-X star-forming complex is one of the most active regions of low- and high-mass star formation within 2 kpc of the Sun. Using mid-infrared photometry from the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer Cygnus-X Legacy Survey, we have identified over 1800 protostar candidates. We compare the protostellar luminosity functions of two regions within Cygnus-X: CygX-South and CygX-North. These two clouds show distinctly different morphologies suggestive of dissimilar star-forming environments. We find the luminosity functions of these two regions are statistically different. Furthermore, we compare the luminosity functions of protostars found in regions of high and low stellar density within Cygnus-X and find that the luminosity function in regions of high stellar density is biased to higher luminosities. In total, these observations provide further evidence that the luminosities of protostars depend on their natal environment. We discuss the implications this dependence has for the star formation process.

  15. Luminosity function and cosmological evolution of X-ray selected quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of a complete sample of 55 X-ray sources is presented as part of the Medium Sensitivity Survey of the Einstein Observatory. A pure luminosity evolutionary law is derived in order to determine the uniform distribution of the sources and the rates of evolution for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) observed by X-ray and optical techniques are compared. A nonparametric representation of the luminosity function is fitted to the observational data. On the basis of the reduced data, it is determined that: (1) AGNs evolve cosmologically; (2) less evolution is required to explain the X-ray data than the optical data; (3) the high-luminosity portion of the X-ray luminosity can be described by a power-law with a slope of gamma = 3.6; and (4) the X-ray luminosity function flattens at low luminosities. Some of the implications of the results for conventional theoretical models of the evolution of quasars and Seyfert galaxies are discussed.

  16. The faint end of the 250 μm luminosity function at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Bethermin, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Cowley, W.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Viero, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the 250 μm luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods: We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 μm LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 μm luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results: We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (~ 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution L*250(z)∝(1+z)4.89±1.07 and moderate negative density evolution Φ*250(z)∝(1+z)-1.02±0.54 over the redshift range 0.02

  17. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V.; Supanitsky, A.D. E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10{sup 18} eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set.

  18. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  19. Keck Deep Fields. III. Luminosity-dependent Evolution of the Ultraviolet Luminosity and Star Formation Rate Densities at z~4, 3, and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Thompson, David

    2006-09-01

    We use our very deep UnGRI catalog of z~4, 3, and 2 UV-selected star-forming galaxies to study the cosmological evolution of the rest-frame 1700 Å luminosity density. The ability to reliably constrain the contribution of faint galaxies is critical here, and our data do so by reaching deep into the galaxy population, to M*LBG+2 at z~4 and deeper still at lower redshifts (M*LBG=-21.0 and L*LBG is the corresponding luminosity). We find that the luminosity density at z>~2 is dominated by the hitherto poorly studied galaxies fainter than L*LBG, and, indeed, the bulk of the UV light at these epochs comes from galaxies in the rather narrow luminosity range L=(0.1-1)L*LBG. Overall, there is a gradual rise in total luminosity density starting at >~4 (we find twice as much UV light at z~3 as at z~4), followed by a shallow peak or plateau within z~3-1, finally followed by the well-known plunge to z~0. Within this total picture, luminosity density in sub-L*LBG galaxies at z>~2 evolves more rapidly than that in more luminous objects; this trend is reversed at lower redshifts, z<~1-a reversal that is reminiscent of galaxy downsizing. We find that within the context of commonly used models there seemingly are not enough faint or bright LBGs to maintain ionization of intergalactic gas even as recently as z~4, and the problem becomes worse at higher redshifts: apparently the universe must be easier to reionize than some recent studies have assumed. Nevertheless, sub-L*LBG galaxies do dominate the total UV luminosity density at z>~2, and this dominance highlights the need for follow-up studies that will teach us more about these very numerous but thus far largely unexplored systems. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. 43 CFR 3162.2-10 - Will BLM notify me when it determines that drainage is occurring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Will BLM notify me when it determines that drainage is occurring? 3162.2-10 Section 3162.2-10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public... notify me when it determines that drainage is occurring? We will send you a demand letter by...

  1. 43 CFR 3162.2-10 - Will BLM notify me when it determines that drainage is occurring?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Will BLM notify me when it determines that drainage is occurring? 3162.2-10 Section 3162.2-10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public... notify me when it determines that drainage is occurring? We will send you a demand letter by...

  2. Tuning of wettability of PANI-GNP composites using keV energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2016-07-01

    Polyaniline nanofiber composites with various nanomaterials have several applications in electrochemical biosensors. The surface properties of these composites coated electrodes play crucial role in enzyme absorption and analyte detection process. In the present study, Polyaniline-Graphene nanopowder (PANI-GNP) composites were prepared by rapid-mixing polymerization method. The films were prepared on ITO coated glass substrates and irradiated with 42 keV He+ ions produced by indigenously fabricated accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi. The films were characterized before and after irradiation by SEM, Raman spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The as-prepared films show superhydrophilic nature and after irradiation the films show highly hydrophobic nature with water contact angle (135°). The surface morphology was studied by SEM and structural changes were studied by Raman spectra. The surface morphological modifications induced by keV energy ions helps in tuning the wettability at different ion fluences.

  3. Measurement of the 330-keV resonance in 18F(p,alpha)15O

    SciTech Connect

    Moazen, Brian; Blackmon, Jeff C; Bardayan, Daniel W; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-03-01

    While recent measurements have substantially improved our understanding of the {sup 18}F(p, {alpha}){sup 15}O reaction that is important in novae, the production of {sup 18}F is still uncertain by more than 2 orders of magnitude, due in large part to the contribution of a resonance located at E{sub cm} = 330 keV. We developed a new technique to study resonant (p, {alpha}) reactions and employed it to measure properties of the E{sub cm} = 183 keV resonance in {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N which had been previously reported to decrease {sup 18}F production in ONeMg novae by as much as a factor of 10. The previous results were confirmed using the new technique and we now propose to use this technique to study the {sup 18}F(p, {alpha}){sup 15}O reaction.

  4. Secondary ion emission from V and Al surfaces under keV light ion on bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blauner, Patricia G.; Weller, Martha R.; Kaurin, Michael G.; Weller, Robert A.

    1986-03-01

    Positive secondary ion mass spectra have been measured for oxidized polycrystalline V and Al targets bombarded by H +, H 2+, He + and Ar + ions with beam energies ranging from 25 keV to 275 keV. An enhancement in the relative yield of positive ions of electronegative surface constituents, in particular O + is observed under light ion bombardment. Metallic ion intensities were found to decrease with increasing primary beam energy in proportion to the estimated total sputtering yields for these targets and beams. In contrast, the O + secondary ion intensities were independent of primary beam energy. This behavior is similar to that observed previously with heavy ions of comparable velocities. In addition, for the projectiles and targets used in these measurements, no energy thresholds or collective effects were observed in the emission of any positive ion. Published data on secondary ion emission resulting from electron, photon, and heavy ion bombardment are compared with these results.

  5. One-ampere, 80-keV, long pulse H - source and accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, J. W.; Ackerman, G. D.; Anderson, O. A.; Chan, C. F.; Cooper, W. S.; deVries, G. J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Soroka, L.; Steele, W. F.

    1986-05-01

    The design and operation of the surface-conversion H- ion source and the 80-keV preaccelerator are discussed. Both the source and the preaccelerator, together with the transverse field focusing (TFF) matching and pumping beam transport section (presently being tested), will be parts of a negative-ion-based neutral beam line. Results from testing the source and preaccelerator have shown that the system can accelerate more than 1 A of H- ions at 80 keV continuously; the preaccelerator operates at an optimum perveance which matches the one predicted by WOLF code computer simulation. Deconditioning of the preaccelerator due to cesium contamination is a critical problem. A method has been developed to cope with this problem.

  6. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, H.; Courcelle, A.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-01

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  7. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  8. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  9. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  10. Design and modeling of 40 keV X-ray optics for Titan experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S

    2006-06-22

    In 2004 we designed and fabricated a 40 keV W/SiC multilayer coated mirrors with 2.0 nm period thickness that were tested at RAL (UK) in winter 2004/2005. The mirrors reflected from 35 to 70 keV (different grazing incidence angles) and showed high reflectivity. However, there was not enough beamtime at RAL to obtain quantitative results. Similar experiment will now be performed in Titan facility (LLNL). In this report we design and model multilayers with even shorter period than the ones used in 2004/2005 experiments. Our goal is to fabricate 1 nm period W/SiC multilayers with high reflectivity. This will enable operation at higher angle of grazing incidence and simplified the mounting fixture.

  11. Energetic (>100 keV) 0/sup +/ ions in the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ipavich, F.M.; Galvin, A.B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.

    1984-05-01

    We present the first measurements of very energetic (112-157 keV) 0/sup +/ ions in the earth's magnetosphere. The observations were made with the UMd/MPE ULECA sensor on ISEE-1 on 5 March 1981 at geocentric distances approx.20 R/sub E/ in the earth's magnetotail. During this time period an Energetic Storm Particle event was observed by our nearly identical sensor on the ISEE-3 space-craft, located approx.250 R/sub E/ upstream of the earth's magnetosphere. The ISEE-1 sensor observed a similar temporal profile except for several sharp intensity enhancements, corresponding to substorm recoveries during which the plasma sheet engulfed the spacecraft. During these plasma sheet encounters we observe 0/sup +//H/sup +/ abundance ratios, at approx.130 keV, as large as 0.35. In between plasma sheet encounters with 0/sup +//H/sup +/ ratio at this energy is consistent with zero.

  12. Experimental results of a dual-beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. H. Cui, B. Q.; Ma, R. G.; Ma, Y. J.; Tang, B.; Huang, Q. H.; Jiang, W. S.; Zheng, Y. N.

    2014-02-15

    A dual beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter aimed to produce 200 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} beams simultaneously has been developed. Not suitable to use the analyzing magnet, the purity of beam extracted from the source becomes important to the performance of implanter. The performance of ion source was measured. The results of experiments show that the materials of inlet tube of ion source, the time of arc ionization in ion source, and the amount of gas flow have significant influence on the purity of beam. The measures by using copper as inlet tube material, long time of arc ionization, and increasing the inlet of gas flow could effectively reduce the impurity of beam. And the method using the gas mass flow controller to adjust the proportion of H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} is feasible.

  13. Dense high aspect ratio hydrogen silsesquioxane nanostructures by 100 keV electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Gorelick, Sergey; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; David, Christian

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the fabrication of dense, high aspect ratio hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) nanostructures by 100 keV electron beam lithography. The samples were developed using a high contrast developer and supercritically dried in carbon dioxide. Dense gratings with line widths down to 25 nm were patterned in 500 nm-thick resist layers and semi-dense gratings with line widths down to 10 nm (40 nm pitch) were patterned in 250 nm-thick resist layers. The dense HSQ nanostructures were used as molds for gold electrodeposition, and the semi-dense HSQ gratings were iridium-coated by atomic layer deposition. We used these methods to produce Fresnel zone plates with extreme aspect ratio for scanning transmission x-ray microscopy that showed excellent performance at 1.0 keV photon energy.

  14. Dense high aspect ratio hydrogen silsesquioxane nanostructures by 100 keV electron beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Gorelick, Sergey; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; David, Christian

    2010-07-16

    We investigated the fabrication of dense, high aspect ratio hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) nanostructures by 100 keV electron beam lithography. The samples were developed using a high contrast developer and supercritically dried in carbon dioxide. Dense gratings with line widths down to 25 nm were patterned in 500 nm-thick resist layers and semi-dense gratings with line widths down to 10 nm (40 nm pitch) were patterned in 250 nm-thick resist layers. The dense HSQ nanostructures were used as molds for gold electrodeposition, and the semi-dense HSQ gratings were iridium-coated by atomic layer deposition. We used these methods to produce Fresnel zone plates with extreme aspect ratio for scanning transmission x-ray microscopy that showed excellent performance at 1.0 keV photon energy. PMID:20562479

  15. Dust-driven winds of AGB stars: The critical interplay of atmospheric shocks and luminosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Nowotny, W.; Eriksson, K.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Winds of AGB stars are thought to be driven by a combination of pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. In dynamic atmosphere and wind models, the stellar pulsation is often simulated by prescribing a simple sinusoidal variation in velocity and luminosity at the inner boundary of the model atmosphere. Aims: We experiment with different forms of the luminosity variation in order to assess the effects on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate, when progressing from the simple sinusoidal recipe towards more realistic descriptions. This will also give an indication of how robust the wind properties derived from the dynamic atmosphere models are. Methods: Using state-of-the-art dynamical models of C-rich AGB stars, a range of different asymmetric shapes of the luminosity variation and a range of phase shifts of the luminosity variation relative to the radial variation are tested. These tests are performed on two stellar atmosphere models. The first model has dust condensation and, as a consequence, a stellar wind is triggered, while the second model lacks both dust and wind. Results: The first model with dust and stellar wind is very sensitive to moderate changes in the luminosity variation. There is a complex relationship between the luminosity minimum, and dust condensation: changing the phase corresponding to minimum luminosity can either increase or decrease mass-loss rate and wind velocity. The luminosity maximum dominates the radiative pressure on the dust, which in turn, is important for driving the wind. An earlier occurrence of the maximum, with respect to the propagation of the pulsation-induced shock wave, then increases the wind velocity, while a later occurrence leads to a decrease. These effects of changed luminosity variation are coupled with the dust formation. In contrast there is very little change to the structure of the model without dust. Conclusions: Changing the luminosity variation, both by introducing a phase shift

  16. An Investigation of X-ray Luminosity versus Crystalline Powder Granularity

    SciTech Connect

    Borade, Ramesh; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; ,

    2012-03-07

    At the High-throughput Discovery of Scintillator Materials Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scintillators are synthesized by solid-state reaction or melt mixing, forming crystalline powders. These powders are formed in various granularity and the crystal grain size affects the apparent luminosity of the scintillator. To accurately predict a "full-size" scintillator's crystal luminosity, the crystal luminosity as a function of crystal granularity size has to be known. In this study, we examine Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO), YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP:Ce), and CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} (CBI) luminosities as a function of crystalline grain size. The highest luminosities were measured for 600- to 1000-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for BGO and LSO, for 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for CBI, and for crystal grains larger than 165{micro}m for YAP:Ce. Crystal grains that were larger than 1 mm had a lower packing fraction, and smaller grains were affected by internal scattering. We measured a 34% decrease in luminosity for BGO when decreasing from the 600- to 1000- {micro}m crystal grain size range down to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range. The corresponding luminosity decrease for LSO was 44% for the same grain size decrease. YAP:Ce exhibited a luminosity decrease of 47% when the grain size decreased from the 165- to 310-{micro}m crystal grains to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range, and CBI exhibited a luminosity decrease of 98% when the grain size decreased from the 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain range to the 36- to 50-{micro}m range. We were able to very accurately estimate full-size crystal luminosities from crystalline grains that are larger than 90 {micro}m.

  17. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  18. Dust-driven winds of AGB stars: The critical interplay of atmospheric shocks and luminosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Nowotny, W.; Eriksson, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Winds of AGB stars are thought to be driven by a combination of pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. In dynamic atmosphere and wind models, the stellar pulsation is often simulated by prescribing a simple sinusoidal variation in velocity and luminosity at the inner boundary of the model atmosphere. Aims: We experiment with different forms of the luminosity variation in order to assess the effects on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate, when progressing from the simple sinusoidal recipe towards more realistic descriptions. This will also give an indication of how robust the wind properties derived from the dynamic atmosphere models are. Methods: Using state-of-the-art dynamical models of C-rich AGB stars, a range of different asymmetric shapes of the luminosity variation and a range of phase shifts of the luminosity variation relative to the radial variation are tested. These tests are performed on two stellar atmosphere models. The first model has dust condensation and, as a consequence, a stellar wind is triggered, while the second model lacks both dust and wind. Results: The first model with dust and stellar wind is very sensitive to moderate changes in the luminosity variation. There is a complex relationship between the luminosity minimum, and dust condensation: changing the phase corresponding to minimum luminosity can either increase or decrease mass-loss rate and wind velocity. The luminosity maximum dominates the radiative pressure on the dust, which in turn, is important for driving the wind. An earlier occurrence of the maximum, with respect to the propagation of the pulsation-induced shock wave, then increases the wind velocity, while a later occurrence leads to a decrease. These effects of changed luminosity variation are coupled with the dust formation. In contrast there is very little change to the structure of the model without dust. Conclusions: Changing the luminosity variation, both by introducing a phase shift

  19. Study of photon attenuation coefficients of some multielement materials. [123-1250 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandal, G.S. ); Singh, K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-03-01

    Total photon mass attenuation of six multielement shielding materials (concrete, plaster of paris, quick lime, black cement, white cement, and silica) is measured in the 123- to 1,250-keV energy range. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Considerable sensitivity of the total mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers to variations in oxygen content are found in these multielement materials.

  20. Picosecond x-ray measurements from 100 eV to 30 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.; Kauffman, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.

    1980-10-15

    Picosecond x-ray measurements relevant to the Livermore Laser Fusion Program are reviewed. Resolved to 15 picoseconds, streak camera detection capabilities extend from 100 eV to higher than 30 keV, with synchronous capabilities in the visible, near infrared, and ultraviolet. Capabilities include automated data retrieval using charge coupled devices (CCD's), absolute x-ray intensity levels, novel cathodes, x-ray mirror/reflector combinations, and a variety of x-ray imaging devices.