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Sample records for 2-16 khz sweep

  1. Effects of exposure to intermittent and continuous 6-7 kHz sonar sweeps on harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) hearing.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Schop, Jessica; Hoek, Lean

    2015-04-01

    Safety criteria for mid-frequency naval sonar sounds are needed to protect harbor porpoise hearing. A porpoise was exposed to sequences of one-second 6-7 kHz sonar down-sweeps, with 10-200 sweeps in a sequence, at an average received sound pressure level (SPLav.re.) of 166 dB re 1 μPa, with duty cycles of 10% (intermittent sounds) and 100% (continuous). Behavioral hearing thresholds at 9.2 kHz were determined before and after exposure to the fatiguing noise, to quantify temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTS1-4 min) and recovery. Significant TTS1-4 min occurred after 10-25 sweeps when the duty cycle was 10% (cumulative sound exposure level, SELcum: ∼178 dB re 1 μPa(2)s). For the same SELcum, the TTS1-4 min was greater for exposures with 100% duty cycle. The difference in TTS between the two duty cycle exposures increased as the number of sweeps in the exposure sequences increased. Therefore, to predict TTS and permanent threshold shift, not only SELcum needs to be known, but also the duty cycle or equivalent sound pressure level (Leq). It appears that the injury criterion for non-pulses proposed by Southall, Bowles, Ellison, Finneran, Gentry, Greene, Kastak, Ketten, Miller, Nachtigall, Richardson, Thomas, and Tyack [(2007). Aquat. Mamm. 33, 411-521] for cetaceans echolocating at high frequency (SEL 215 dB re 1 μPa(2)s) is too high for the harbor porpoise.

  2. Effect of broadband-noise masking on the behavioral response of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to 1-s duration 6-7 kHz sonar up-sweeps.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Steen, Nele; de Jong, Christ; Wensveen, Paul J; Verboom, Willem C

    2011-04-01

    Naval sonar systems produce signals which may affect the behavior of harbor porpoises, though their effect may be reduced by ambient noise. To show how natural ambient noise influences the effect of sonar sweeps on porpoises, a porpoise in a pool was exposed to 1-s duration up-sweeps, similar in frequency range (6-7 kHz) to those of existing naval sonar systems. The sweep signals had randomly generated sweep intervals of 3-7 s (duty cycle: 19%). Behavioral parameters during exposure to signals were compared to those during baseline periods. The sessions were conducted under five background noise conditions: the local normal ambient noise and four conditions mimicking the spectra for wind-generated noise at Sea States 2-8. In all conditions, the sweeps caused the porpoise to swim further away from the transducer, surface more often, swim faster, and breathe more forcefully than during the baseline periods. However, the higher the background noise level, the smaller the effects of the sweeps on the surfacing behavior of the porpoise. Therefore, the effects of naval sonar systems on harbor porpoises are determined not only by the received level of the signals and the hearing sensitivity of the animals but also by the background noise.

  3. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  4. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOEpatents

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  5. Operation Deep Sweep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Fifty scientists and a crew of 18 have embarked on a 64,000 km odyssey to explore the Pacific from pole to pole—the most ambitious program in the history of the marine geology branch of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Called Operation Deep Sweep, the 1-year cruise will search areas above the Arctic Circle, off of Alaska, to McMurdo Sound in Antarctica. The 63-m, 1,300-tonne research vessel Samuel P. Lee sailed from its home port of Redwood City, Calif., to San Francisco to begin the first leg of the lengthy journey.According to USGS officials and the cosponsoring Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, the cruise will ultimately involve 150 scientists, some of them representing Germany, France, Australia, and New Zealand. David Howell, branch chief of Pacific Marine Geology for the USGS, said the voyage of the Lee was “the most far reaching and of the longest duration” ever attempted by his unit. He said the cruise would string together a large number of scientific experiments spanning the Pacific. Howell likened the voyage to the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803-1806 (which explored Louisiana and the western United States) because “we're going into unknown territory and into regions not studied except in the most cursory manner.”

  6. A theory of satellite sweeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paonessa, M.; Cheng, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A theory of energetic charged particle absorption by insulating moons is presented that includes gyrophase dependence of the absorption probability when the gyroradius is not small compared to the satellite radius. This effect increases the average lifetime against absorption by factors of approximately 2 to 6 above previous estimates at Saturn. The sweeping lifetime then becomes significantly greater than the strong diffusion lifetime. A rigorous expression for the average lifetime against absorption, appropriate for a drift phase averaged radial diffusion equation, is derived assuming (1) a uniform distribution of gyrocenter equatorial plane crossing points in the sweeping corridor and (2) randomization of gyrophase. The pitch angle and energy dependences of the sweeping lifetime are found to be significantly different from the predictions of previous analytical estimates.

  7. A MHz speed wavelength sweeping for ultra-high speed FBG interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyeong Hun; Lee, Hwi Don; Eom, Tae Joong; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrated a MHz speed wavelength-swept fiber laser based on the active mode locking (AML) technique and applied to interrogation system of an array of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. MHz speed wavelength sweeping of wavelength-swept fiber laser can be obtained by programmable frequency modulation of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) without any wavelength tunable filter. Both static and dynamic strain measurement of FBG sensors were successfully characterized with high linearity of an R-square value of 0.9999 at sweeping speed of 50 kHz.

  8. Research related to variable sweep aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Toll, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Development in high speed, variable sweep aircraft research is reviewed. The 1946 Langley wind tunnel studies related to variable oblique and variable sweep wings and results from the X-5 and the XF1OF variable sweep aircraft are discussed. A joint program with the British, evaluation of the British "Swallow", development of the outboard pivot wing/aft tail configuration concept by Langley, and the applied research program that followed and which provided the technology for the current, variable sweep military aircraft is outlined. The relative state of variable sweep as a design option is also covered.

  9. Absolute distance measurement using frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer calibrated by an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuejian; Wei, Haoyun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ren, Libing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jitao

    2013-04-01

    We present a frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer to measure an absolute distance based on a frequency-tunable diode laser calibrated by an optical frequency comb (OFC) and an interferometric phase measurement system. The laser frequency-sweeping process is calibrated by the OFC within a range of 200 GHz and an accuracy of 1.3 kHz, which brings about a precise temporal synthetic wavelength of 1.499 mm. The interferometric phase measurement system consisting of the analog signal processing circuit and the digital phase meter achieves a phase difference resolution better than 0.1 deg. As the laser frequency is sweeping, the absolute distance can be determined by measuring the phase difference variation of the interference signals. In the laboratory condition, our experimental scheme realizes micrometer accuracy over meter distance.

  10. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  11. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  12. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  13. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  14. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  15. Megahertz FDML laser with up to 143nm sweep range for ultrahigh resolution OCT at 1050nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Jan Philip; Klein, Thomas; Eibl, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Tom; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We present a new design of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser (FDML laser), which provides a new record in sweep range at ~1μm center wavelength: At the fundamental sweep rate of 2x417 kHz we reach 143nm bandwidth and 120nm with 4x buffering at 1.67MHz sweep rate. The latter configuration of our system is characterized: The FWHM of the point spread function (PSF) of a mirror is 5.6μm (in tissue). Human in vivo retinal imaging is performed with the MHz laser showing more details in vascular structures. Here we could measure an axial resolution of 6.0μm by determining the FWHM of specular reflex in the image. Additionally, challenges related to such a high sweep bandwidth such as water absorption are investigated.

  16. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  17. You're a What? Chimney Sweep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a chimney sweep--also called a "sweep"--which inspects chimneys as well as cleans them. Some inspections are for a specific purpose, such as home appraisal, but most precede cleaning. Chimney cleaning requires a certain level of dexterity, because the job includes a lot of climbing, squatting, kneeling, and…

  18. Reverse spontaneous laser line sweeping in ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, P.; Peterka, P.; Honzatko, P.; Kubecek, V.

    2017-03-01

    Self-induced laser line sweeping of various regimes of sweep direction is reported for an experimental ytterbium fiber laser. The regimes involve sweeping from shorter to longer wavelengths (1076~\\text{nm}\\to 1083 nm)—so-called normal self-sweeping; from longer to shorter wavelengths (1079~\\text{nm}\\to 1073 nm)—so-called reverse self-sweeping; and a mixed regime in which a precarious balance of the normal and reverse sweeping exists and the sweep direction can change between consecutive sweeps. The regimes of sweeping were selected by changing the pump wavelength only. A detailed explanation of this sweep direction dynamics is presented based on a semi-empirical model. This model also provides a way to predict the sweep direction of fiber lasers based on other rare-earth-doped laser media.

  19. Network Models of Frequency Modulated Sweep Detection

    PubMed Central

    Skorheim, Steven; Razak, Khaleel; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Frequency modulated (FM) sweeps are common in species-specific vocalizations, including human speech. Auditory neurons selective for the direction and rate of frequency change in FM sweeps are present across species, but the synaptic mechanisms underlying such selectivity are only beginning to be understood. Even less is known about mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in FM sweep selectivity. We present three network models of synaptic mechanisms of FM sweep direction and rate selectivity that explains experimental data: (1) The ‘facilitation’ model contains frequency selective cells operating as coincidence detectors, summing up multiple excitatory inputs with different time delays. (2) The ‘duration tuned’ model depends on interactions between delayed excitation and early inhibition. The strength of delayed excitation determines the preferred duration. Inhibitory rebound can reinforce the delayed excitation. (3) The ‘inhibitory sideband’ model uses frequency selective inputs to a network of excitatory and inhibitory cells. The strength and asymmetry of these connections results in neurons responsive to sweeps in a single direction of sufficient sweep rate. Variations of these properties, can explain the diversity of rate-dependent direction selectivity seen across species. We show that the inhibitory sideband model can be trained using spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) to develop direction selectivity from a non-selective network. These models provide a means to compare the proposed synaptic and spectrotemporal mechanisms of FM sweep processing and can be utilized to explore cellular mechanisms underlying experience- or training-dependent changes in spectrotemporal processing across animal models. Given the analogy between FM sweeps and visual motion, these models can serve a broader function in studying stimulus movement across sensory epithelia. PMID:25514021

  20. A continuity method for sweeping processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recupero, Vincenzo

    We show that the existence and uniqueness of BV continuous sweeping processes can be easily reduced to the Lipschitz continuous case by means of a suitable reparametrization of the associated moving convex set. Moreover we put this approach in the wider framework of rate independent operators acting on curves in metric spaces and we prove an extension theorem for such operators. This abstract theorem is then applied in order to infer continuous dependence of the sweeping process on the data.

  1. Recent selective sweeps in North American Drosophila melanogaster show signatures of soft sweeps.

    PubMed

    Garud, Nandita R; Messer, Philipp W; Buzbas, Erkan O; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2015-02-01

    Adaptation from standing genetic variation or recurrent de novo mutation in large populations should commonly generate soft rather than hard selective sweeps. In contrast to a hard selective sweep, in which a single adaptive haplotype rises to high population frequency, in a soft selective sweep multiple adaptive haplotypes sweep through the population simultaneously, producing distinct patterns of genetic variation in the vicinity of the adaptive site. Current statistical methods were expressly designed to detect hard sweeps and most lack power to detect soft sweeps. This is particularly unfortunate for the study of adaptation in species such as Drosophila melanogaster, where all three confirmed cases of recent adaptation resulted in soft selective sweeps and where there is evidence that the effective population size relevant for recent and strong adaptation is large enough to generate soft sweeps even when adaptation requires mutation at a specific single site at a locus. Here, we develop a statistical test based on a measure of haplotype homozygosity (H12) that is capable of detecting both hard and soft sweeps with similar power. We use H12 to identify multiple genomic regions that have undergone recent and strong adaptation in a large population sample of fully sequenced Drosophila melanogaster strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). Visual inspection of the top 50 candidates reveals that in all cases multiple haplotypes are present at high frequencies, consistent with signatures of soft sweeps. We further develop a second haplotype homozygosity statistic (H2/H1) that, in combination with H12, is capable of differentiating hard from soft sweeps. Surprisingly, we find that the H12 and H2/H1 values for all top 50 peaks are much more easily generated by soft rather than hard sweeps. We discuss the implications of these results for the study of adaptation in Drosophila and in species with large census population sizes.

  2. Mikkelson sweep/spike chisel plow shovel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Profitability comparisons are reported between the Mikkelson Sweep/Spike Chisel Plow Shovel standard sweeps. This evaluation covers the first year of testing of the new Sweep/Spike design. The data are not averaged over treatments due to significant interaction between treatments and environmental factors. The cost of fuel, fall and spring, to perform the various treatments ranged from $1.27 to $3.36 per acre. Use of the sweep/spike shovel always reduced total fuel cost. Savings varied from $0.11 to $0.71 per acre depending on prior treatment. This means there will be money saved, to off-set expenses, when converting present chisel plows or for special options on new chisel plows, needed for use of the sweep/spike shovel. A summary of 1991--1992 energy measurements. They indicate that more power will be required to pull a chisel plow equipped with the sweep/spike shovel. A larger tractor, narrower chisel plow and/or slower speed will be required to avoid the wheel slippage problems encountered on soft or wet field surfaces.

  3. Beam pinging, sweeping, shaking, and electron/ion collecting, at the Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Wang, T.S.F.

    1993-06-01

    We have built, installed and tested a pinger for use as a general diagnostic at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Two 4-m-long parallel-plate electrodes with a plate spacing of 10.2 cm provide kicks of up to 1.1 mrad. A pair of solid-state pulsers may be operated in a single-pulse mode for beam pinging (tune measurements) or in a burst mode at up to 700 kHz pulse rates for beam sweeping. During our 1992 operating period we used the pinger for beam sweeping, for beam shaking, for measuring the tune shift, and we have used it as an ion chamber. Using the pinger as an ion chamber during production conditions has yielded some surprising results.

  4. Beam pinging, sweeping, shaking, and electron/ion collecting, at the Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Wang, T.S.F.

    1993-01-01

    We have built, installed and tested a pinger for use as a general diagnostic at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Two 4-m-long parallel-plate electrodes with a plate spacing of 10.2 cm provide kicks of up to 1.1 mrad. A pair of solid-state pulsers may be operated in a single-pulse mode for beam pinging (tune measurements) or in a burst mode at up to 700 kHz pulse rates for beam sweeping. During our 1992 operating period we used the pinger for beam sweeping, for beam shaking, for measuring the tune shift, and we have used it as an ion chamber. Using the pinger as an ion chamber during production conditions has yielded some surprising results.

  5. OCT based on multi-frequency sweeping Fizeau interferometer with phase modulating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Watanabe, T.; Sasaki, O.; Suzuki, T.

    2013-09-01

    The Multi-frequency sweeping Fizeau-type interferometer (MFS-FI) for optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated. The multi-frequency sweeping by a variable Fabry-Perot filter permits detection of high-order low-coherence interferometric signals in the Fizeau interferometer. The sinusoidal phase modulation technique was utilized to detect accurate interference amplitude and phase distributions of back scattered light from surfaces of a sample. OCT measurements by the MFS-FI were conducted for vibrating glass plates with a frequency of 1 kHz, and cellular tissues fixed with formalin and embedded in paraffin. The tomographic 3-dimensional volume and cross-sectional surface displacements were detected with an accuracy of nano-meters.

  6. Sweep-free brillouin optical time domain analysis using two individual laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kenichiro; Noda, Hitoshi; Onodera, Noriaki

    2012-11-01

    We propose a sweep-free measurement technique for distributed Brillouin frequency shift in optical fibers applicable to distributed strain/temperature monitoring systems, using two sets of pump-probe lights generated by two individual laser sources. This technique utilizes the Brillouin gain ratio measured at both the upper and lower side slopes of two different Brillouin spectra induced by two pump lights with different wavelengths. The proposed method offers high-speed measurement due to the combination of the frequency-sweep-free operation and the polarization-insensitive measurement scheme without polarization scramblers. A measurement accuracy of 17.3 μ ɛ with a spatial resolution of 5m over 2.6 km sensing length and a capability of kHz sampling rate are experimentally demonstrated.

  7. Investigation of Spiral and Sweeping Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Philip; Ameri, Ali; Culley, Dennis; Raghu, Surya; Shyam, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and Square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the non-diffusion type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross-sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data was taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing rations of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ration of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady RANS.

  8. Sinusoidal nonlinearity in wavelength-sweeping interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2007-11-20

    We report the influence of the nonlinearities in the wavelength-sweeping speed on the resulting interferometric signals in an absolute distance interferometer. The sweeping signal is launched in the reference and target interferometers from an external cavity laser source. The experimental results demonstrate a good resolution in spite of the presence of nonlinearities in the wavelength sweep. These nonlinearities can be modeled by a sum of sinusoids. A simulation is then implemented to analyze the influence of their parameters. It shows that a sinusoidal nonlinearity is robust enough to give a good final measurement uncertainty through a Fourier transform technique. It can be concluded that an optimal value of frequency and amplitude exists in the case of a sinusoidal nonlinearity.

  9. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written records. (a) Written records which are subject to these regulations must be maintained in a secure...

  10. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written records. (a) Written records which are subject to these regulations must be maintained in a secure...

  11. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written...

  12. 50 kHz PIV of a Swept-Ramp Shock-Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction at Mach 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanstone, Leon; Musta, Mustafa Nail; Seckin, Serdar; Saleem, Mohammad; Clemens, Noel

    2016-11-01

    The interaction from a 30° sweep, 22.5° compression ramp in a Mach 2 flow is examined using wide-field 5Hz and 50 kHz PIV. The high-speed PIV is fast enough to resolve the large-scale unsteady motions of the SWBLI and can be band-pass filtered to investigate the driving mechanisms of unsteadiness and the widefield PIV allows comparisons with mean flow-fields. Preliminary investigation looked at three distinct frequency bands: 10-50 kHz (0.025-0.25 U∞ /δ99), 1-10 kHz (0.025-0.25 U∞ /δ99), and 0-1 kHz (0-0.025 U∞ /δ99). The unsteadiness associated with 10-50 kHz shows no correlation with the upstream boundary layer and accounts for 40% of the amplitude. The unsteadiness associated with 1-10 kHz is correlated with the upstream boundary-layer and also accounts for 40% of unsteadiness. This frequency is similar to those of boundary-layer superstructures. The unsteadiness associated with 0-1 kHz shows the strongest correlation with the upstream boundary-layer but accounts for only 20% of the amplitude. Clearly a range of unsteadiness mechanisms are present, with significant amplitude associated with higher frequencies. Future work will focus on expanding these findings with surface pressure and additional PIV. This work is sponsored by the AFOSR under Grant FA9550-14-1-0167 with Ivett Leyva as the program manager. This source of support is gratefully acknowledged. Further, Mustafa Musta thanks the Scientific and Technological research Council of Turkey.

  13. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  14. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  15. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  16. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  17. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  18. Frequency sweep jitter and wander of a Vernier-Tuned Distributed Bragg Reflector (VT-DBR) laser at 1550 nm in OCT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens Biersach, R. C.; Derickson, Dennis; Ensher, Jason

    2015-07-01

    The short-term jitter and longer-term wander of the frequency sweep profile of a Vernier-Tuned Distributed Bragg Reflector (VT-DBR) laser at 1550 nm used in OCT applications is characterized in this work. The VT-DBR has demonstrated success in source-swept OCT (SSOCT), performing both intensity [1] and phase-sensitive [2] OCT. The purpose of this paper is to investigate one of the unique aspects of the VT-DBR laser that makes it successful in OCT: the stability of the linear optical frequency sweep of the source. Jitter measurements of the optical frequency sweep are recorded using a 3-cavity 100 GHz free spectral range (FSR) solid etalon. A gas absorption reference cell is used for wander characterization. We report that the VT-DBR jitters by no more than 82 MHz RMS in optical frequency while sweeping at an 8 kHz repetition rate. Longer-term wander provides insight into the accuracy of the VT-DBR selfcalibration routine which produces an intrinsically linear optical frequency sweep. Over an 8-hour data collection period, the system maintains a linear sweep with an optical frequency step of 105 MHz per 2.5 ns with +/- 3 kHz per 2.5 ns (+/- 0.03%) peak-to-peak deviation. We find that the absolute frequency drifts by 325 MHz (2.6pm) over the same 8- hour period with ambient temperature fluctuations of no more than 5 °C. Results show that using calibration with a gas reference cell, picometer absolute wavelength accuracy of the laser can be achieved at any time for a single sweep. Stability and accuracy limits are thought to be due to electronic drive circuitry in the current design.

  19. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Fast sweeping reflectometry upgrade on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Molina, D.; Ducobu, L.; Leroux, F.; Barbuti, A.; Heuraux, S.

    2010-10-15

    In order to study the temporal dynamics of turbulence, the sweep time of our reflectometry has been shortened from 20 to 2 {mu}s with 1 {mu}s dead time. Detailed technical aspects of the upgrade are given, namely, about the stability of the ramp generation, the detection setup, and the fast acquisition module. A review of studies (velocity measurement of the turbulence, modifications of the wavenumber spectrum, radial mapping of correlation time, etc.) offered by such improvements is presented.

  1. Operation Desert Sweep: The Restoration of Kuwait

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    of ordnance and other contaminations. A CMS proprietary software system called Minefield and Ordnance Recovery System (MORS) was used to collate...Operation Desert Sweep The Restoration of Kuwait Author: Fred Dibella VP Planning and Coordination CMS , Inc. 4904 Eisenhower Boulevard Tampa...NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) CMS , Inc,4904

  2. Experimental measurements on a single sweeping jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Damian; Graff, Emilio; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    ``Sweeping jets'' proved their effectiveness as Active Flow Control (AFC) actuators in improving the performance of vertical tails of generic and full-scale models. To gain further knowledge about the fundamental flow physics, the jets were investigated experimentally. The influence of a single jet on its surroundings was studied, especially the entrainment region. The results were compared to previous experiments to study the difference between a single isolated jet and multiple jets mounted on a vertical tail. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  3. Automatic detection of sweep-meshable volumes

    DOEpatents

    Tautges; Timothy J. , White; David R.

    2006-05-23

    A method of and software for automatically determining whether a mesh can be generated by sweeping for a representation of a geometric solid comprising: classifying surface mesh schemes for surfaces of the representation locally using surface vertex types; grouping mappable and submappable surfaces of the representation into chains; computing volume edge types for the representation; recursively traversing surfaces of the representation and grouping the surfaces into source, target, and linking surface lists; and checking traversal direction when traversing onto linking surfaces.

  4. Hausdorff metric BV discontinuity of sweeping processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Olaf; Recupero, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    Sweeping processes are a class of evolution differential inclusions arising in elastoplasticity and were introduced by J.J. Moreau in the early seventies. The solution operator of the sweeping processes represents a relevant example of rate independent operator. As a particular case we get the so called play operator, which is a typical example of a hysteresis operator. The continuity properties of these operators were studied in several works. In this note we address the continuity with respect to the strict metric in the space of functions of bounded variation with values in the metric space of closed convex subsets of a Hilbert space. We provide counterexamples showing that for all BV-formulations of the sweeping process the corresponding solution operator is not continuous when its domain is endowed with the strict topology of BV and its codomain is endowed with the L1-topology. This is at variance with the play operator which has a BV-extension that is continuous in this case.

  5. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  6. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  7. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  8. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  9. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  10. Application of variable-sweep wings to commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Lovell, W. A.; Price, J. E.; Turriiziani, R. V.; Washburn, F. F.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of using variable-sweep wings on the riding quality and mission-performance characteristics of commuter-type aircraft were studied. A fixed-wing baseline vehicle and a variable-sweep version of the baseline were designed and evaluated. Both vehicles were twin-turboprop, pressurized-cabin, 30-passenger commuter aircraft with identical mission requirements. Mission performance was calculated with and without various ride-quality constraints for several combinations of cruise altitude and stage lengths. The variable-sweep aircraft had a gross weight of almost four percent greater than the fixed-wing baseline in order to meet the design-mission requirements. In smooth air, the variable sweep configuration flying with low sweep had a two to three percent fuel-use penalty. However, the imposition of quality constraints in rough air can result in advantages in both fuel economy and flight time for the variable-sweep vehicle flying with high sweep.

  11. Frequency-domain analysis of dynamically applied strain using sweep-free Brillouin time-domain analyzer and sloped-assisted FBG sensing.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Asher; Rogawski, Dvora; Huang, Hao; Peled, Yair; Willner, Alan E; Tur, Moshe

    2012-12-10

    Fast reconstruction of the whole Brillouin gain spectrum is experimentally demonstrated using sweep-free Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (SF-BOTDA). Strain variations with the frequencies up to 400 Hz are spectrally analyzed, achieving strain sensitivity of 1 microstrain per root Hz at a sampling rate of 5.5 kHz and a spatial resolution of 4m. The results favorably compare with fiber Bragg grating sensing.

  12. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-28

    and highly charged ions of the solar wind. The main challenge in predicting the resultant photon flux in the X-ray energy bands is due to the...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0035 Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project 140200 Steven Sembay UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER Final Report 10/28/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...To) 01 Sep 2014 to 31 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP) 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1

  13. Morphological analysis on the coherence of kHz QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Chang, H. K.; Zhang, C. M.; Wang, D. H.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Song, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We take the recently published data of twin kHz quasi-period oscillations (QPOs) in neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) as the samples, and investigate the morphology of the samples, which focuses on the quality factor, peak frequency of kHz QPOs, and try to infer their physical mechanism. We notice that: (1) The quality factors of upper kHz QPOs are low (2˜20 in general) and increase with the kHz QPO peak frequencies for both Z and Atoll sources. (2) The distribution of quality factor versus frequency for the lower kHz QPOs are quite different between Z and Atoll sources. For most Z source samples, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are low (usually lower than 15) and rise steadily with the peak frequencies except for Sco X-1, which drop abruptly at the frequency of about 750 Hz. While for most Atoll sources, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are very high (from 2 to 200) and usually have a rising part, a maximum and an abrupt drop. (3) There are three Atoll sources (4U 1728-34, 4U 1636-53 and 4U 1608-52) of displaying very high quality factors for lower kHz QPOs. These three sources have been detected with the spin frequencies and sidebands, in which the source with higher spin frequency presents higher quality factor of lower kHz QPOs and lower difference between sideband frequency and lower kHz QPO frequency.

  14. Sweeping Jet Actuator in a Quiescent Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Melton, Latunia P.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of a sweeping jet (fluidic oscillator) actuator. The sweeping jet actuator promises to be a viable flow control actuator candidate due to its simple, no moving part structure and its high momentum, spatially oscillating flow output. Hot-wire anemometer and particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out with an emphasis on understanding the actuator flow field in a quiescent environment. The time averaged, fluctuating, and instantaneous velocity measurements are provided. A modified actuator concept that incorporates high-speed solenoid valves to control the frequency of oscillation enabled phase averaged measurements of the oscillating jet. These measurements reveal that in a given oscillation cycle, the oscillating jet spends more time on each of the Coanda surfaces. In addition, the modified actuator generates four different types of flow fields, namely: a non oscillating downward jet, a non oscillating upward jet, a non oscillating straight jet, and an oscillating jet. The switching from an upward jet to a downward jet is accomplished by providing a single pulse from the solenoid valve. Once the flow is switched, the flow stays there until another pulse is received. The oscillating jet is compared with a non oscillating straight jet, which is a typical planar turbulent jet. The results indicate that the oscillating jet has a higher (5 times) spreading rate, more flow entrainment, and higher velocity fluctuations (equal to the mean velocity).

  15. Selective sweeps in Cryptocercus woodroach antifungal proteins.

    PubMed

    Velenovsky, Joseph F; Kalisch, Jessica; Bulmer, Mark S

    2016-10-01

    We identified the antifungal gene termicin in three species of Cryptocercus woodroaches. Cryptocercus represents the closest living cockroach lineage of termites, which suggests that the antifungal role of termicin evolved prior to the divergence of termites from other cockroaches. An analysis of Cryptocercus termicin and two β-1,3-glucanase genes (GNBP1 and GNBP2), which appear to work synergistically with termicin in termites, revealed evidence of selection in these proteins. We identified the signature of past selective sweeps within GNBP2 from Cryptocercus punctulatus and Cryptocercus wrighti. The signature of past selective sweeps was also found within termicin from Cryptocercus punctulatus and Cryptocercus darwini. Our analysis further suggests a phenotypically identical variant of GNBP2 was maintained within Cryptocercus punctulatus, Cryptocercus wrighti, and Cryptocercus darwini while synonymous sites diverged. Cryptocercus termicin and GNBP2 appear to have experienced similar selective pressure to that of their termite orthologues in Reticulitermes. This selective pressure may be a result of ubiquitous entomopathogenic fungal pathogens such as Metarhizium. This study further reveals the similarities between Cryptocercus woodroaches and termites.

  16. Soft Selective Sweeps in Evolutionary Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin A.; Pennings, Pleuni S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population that is declining in size because of an environmental change is rescued from extinction by genetic adaptation. Evolutionary rescue is an important phenomenon at the intersection of ecology and population genetics, and the study of evolutionary rescue is critical to understanding processes ranging from species conservation to the evolution of drug and pesticide resistance. While most population-genetic models of evolutionary rescue focus on estimating the probability of rescue, we focus on whether one or more adaptive lineages contribute to evolutionary rescue. We find that when evolutionary rescue is likely, it is often driven by soft selective sweeps where multiple adaptive mutations spread through the population simultaneously. We give full analytic results for the probability of evolutionary rescue and the probability that evolutionary rescue occurs via soft selective sweeps. We expect that these results will find utility in understanding the genetic signatures associated with various evolutionary rescue scenarios in large populations, such as the evolution of drug resistance in viral, bacterial, or eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:28213477

  17. Improvement of Sweep Efficiency in Gasflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore Mohanty

    2008-12-31

    Miscible and near-miscible gasflooding has proven to be one of the few cost effective enhance oil recovery techniques in the past twenty years. As the scope of gas flooding is being expanded to medium viscosity oils in shallow sands in Alaska and shallower reservoirs in the lower 48, there are questions about sweep efficiency in near-miscible regions. The goal of this research is to evaluate sweep efficiency of various gas flooding processes in a laboratory model and develop numerical tools to estimate their effectiveness in the field-scale. Quarter 5-spot experiments were conducted at reservoir pressure to evaluate the sweep efficiency of gas, WAG and foam floods. The quarter 5-spot model was used to model vapor extraction (VAPEX) experiments at the lab scale. A streamline-based compositional simulator and a commercial simulator (GEM) were used to model laboratory scale miscible floods and field-scale pattern floods. An equimolar mixture of NGL and lean gas is multicontact miscible with oil A at 1500 psi; ethane is a multicontact miscible solvent for oil B at pressures higher than 607 psi. WAG improves the microscopic displacement efficiency over continuous gas injection followed by waterflood in corefloods. WAG improves the oil recovery in the quarter 5-spot over the continuous gas injection followed by waterflood. As the WAG ratio increases from 1:2 to 2:1, the sweep efficiency in the 5-spot increases, from 39.6% to 65.9%. A decrease in the solvent amount lowers the oil recovery in WAG floods, but significantly higher amount of oil can be recovered with just 0.1 PV solvent injection over just waterflood. Use of a horizontal production well lowers the oil recovery over the vertical production well during WAG injection phase in this homogeneous 5-spot model. Estimated sweep efficiency decreases from 61.5% to 50.5%. In foam floods, as surfactant to gas slug size ratio increases from 1:10 to 1:1, oil recovery increases. In continuous gasflood VAPEX processes, as the

  18. Comparing microbubble cavitation at 500 kHz and 70 kHz related to micellar drug delivery using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Diaz de la Rosa, Mario A; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that ultrasonic drug release at 70kHz was found to correlate with the presence of subharmonic emissions. No evidence of drug release or of the subharmonic emissions were detected in experiments at 500kHz. In an attempt to understand the difference in drug release behavior between low- and mid-frequency ultrasound, a mathematical model of a bubble oscillator was developed to explore the difference in the behavior of a single 10-μm bubble under 500- and 70-kHz ultrasound. The dynamics were found to be fundamentally different; the 500-kHz bubble follows a period-doubling route to chaos while a 70-kHz bubble follows an intermittent route to chaos. We propose that this type of "intermittent subharmonic" oscillation behavior is associated with the drug release observed experimentally.

  19. Optimization and control of the sweeping range in an Yb-doped self-sweeping fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, I. A.; Tkachenko, A. Yu; Kablukov, S. I.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of the laser cavity parameters (an active fiber length and output coupling losses) and the temperature of elements (active fiber and pump laser diode) on the sweeping range in an Yb-doped self-sweeping laser is investigated. The obtained results show that the sweeping spectral region is shifted to shorter wavelengths for shorter active fibers and with increasing absorbed power. This allows one to obtain self-sweeping operation in a broad range within a ytterbium gain bandwidth from 1028 to 1080 nm. At the same time, there are optimal cavity parameters at which the sweeping span is the broadest (>20 nm). Good agreement between the experimental sweeping range and the calculated maximum gain wavelength is demonstrated.

  20. Dissolution of FB-Line Cabinet Sweepings

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, Mark L.

    2005-06-14

    Three FB-Line samples were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and evaluation for suitability for HB-Line dissolution. These samples are part of a larger sampling/evaluation program in support of FB-Line deinventory efforts. The samples studied were identified as MC04-147- HBL, MC04-148-HBL, and FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N). The first sample, MC04-147-HBL, is a portion of FB-Line Packaging and Stabilization (P&S) materials. The second sample, MC04-148-HBL, is a sweeping from Cabinet 6-8, which is not representative of the mechanical line. The third sample, FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N), is an FB-Line North cabinet sweeping. The samples were described by FB-Line personnel as containing plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) which had not been high-fired. This description was generally confirmed by solids analysis and off gas measurements. All three samples were dissolved in 8 M HNO{sub 3}/0.1 M KF at 90-100 C leaving minor amounts of solid residue. During dissolution, sample MC04-147 did not generate hydrogen gas. Sample MC04-148 generated modest amounts of gas, which contained 4.0 to 4.7 volume percent (vol %) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at a ratio of up to 8.4 x 10{sup -5} mol H{sub 2}/g sample. Sample FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N) was nearly completely soluble in 8 M HNO{sub 3}and produced a very small amount of gas. Apparently, the CaF{sub 2} in that sample dissolves and provides sufficient fluoride to support the dissolution of other components.

  1. Control of energy sweep and transverse beam motion in induction linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, W. C.

    1991-05-01

    Recent interest in the electron induction accelerator has focussed on its application as a driver for high power radiation sources; free electron laser (FEL), relativistic klystron (RK) and cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM). In the microwave regime where many successful experiments have been carried out, typical beam parameters are: beam energy 1 to 10 MeV, current 1 to 3 kA and pulse width 50 nsec. Radiation source applications impose conditions on electron beam quality, as characterized by three parameters; energy sweep, transverse beam motion and brightness. These conditions must be maintained for the full pulse duration to assure high efficiency conversion of beam power to radiation. The microwave FEL that has been analyzed in the greatest detail requires energy sweep less than (+ or -) 1 pct., transverse beam motion less than (+ or -) 1 mm and brightness approx. 1 x 10(exp 8)A/sq m sq rad. In the visible region the requirements on these parameters become roughly an order of magnitude more strigent. With the ETAII accelerator at LLNL the requirements were achieved for energy sweep, transverse beam motion and brightness. The recent data and the advances that have made the improved beam quality possible are discussed. The most important advances are: understanding of focussing magnetic field errors and improvements in alignment of the magnetic axis, a redesign of the high voltage pulse distribution system between the magnetic compression modulators and the accelerator cells, and exploitation of a beam tuning algorithm for minimizing transverse beam motion. The prospects are briefly described for increasing the pulse repetition frequency to the range of 5 kHz and a delayed feedback method of regulating beam energy over very long pulse bursts, thus making average power megawatt level microwave sources at 140 GHz and above a possibility.

  2. Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations

    DOE PAGES

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Stevens, Sarah L.R.; Chan, Leong-Keat; ...

    2016-01-08

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Using a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005–2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of genemore » gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. Furthermore, these patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Finally, evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment.« less

  3. Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Bendall, Matthew L; Stevens, Sarah LR; Chan, Leong-Keat; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary A; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J; McMahon, Katherine D; Malmstrom, Rex R

    2016-01-01

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Here, from a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005–2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model' of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment. PMID:26744812

  4. Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations

    SciTech Connect

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Stevens, Sarah L.R.; Chan, Leong-Keat; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary A.; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2016-01-08

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Using a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005–2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. Furthermore, these patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Finally, evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment.

  5. Forward sweep, low noise rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A forward-swept, low-noise rotor blade includes an inboard section, an aft-swept section and a forward-swept outboard section. The rotor blade reduces the noise of rotorcraft, including both standard helicopters and advanced systems such as tiltrotors. The primary noise reduction feature is the forward sweep of the planform over a large portion of the outer blade radius. The rotor blade also includes an aft-swept section. The purpose of the aft-swept region is to provide a partial balance to pitching moments produced by the outboard forward-swept portion of the blade. The rotor blade has a constant chord width; or has a chord width which decreases linearly along the entire blade span; or combines constant and decreasing chord widths, wherein the blade is of constant chord width from the blade root to a certain location on the rotor blade, then decreases linearly to the blade tip thereafter. The noise source showing maximum noise reduction is blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also reduced are thickness, noise, high speed impulsive noise, cabin vibration and loading noise.

  6. Planetesimal formation by sweep-up coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmark, Fredrik; Birnstiel, Til; Ormel, Chris W.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2013-07-01

    The formation of planetesimals is often accredited to collisional sticking of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk. The exact process is however unknown, as collisions between larger aggregates tend to lead to fragmentation or bouncing rather than sticking. These growth barriers tend to halt the dust growth already at millimeters or centimeters in size, which is far below the kilometer-sizes that are needed for gravity to aid in the accretion. To study how far dust coagulation can proceed, we have developed a new collision model based on the latest laboratory experiments, and have used it together with a dust-size evolution code capable of resolving all grain interactions in the protoplanetary disk. We find that for the general dust population, bouncing and fragmenting collisions prevent the growth above millimeter-sizes. However, a small number of lucky particles can grow larger than the rest by only interacting at low, sticky velocities. As they grow, they become increasingly resilient to fragmentation caused by the small grains. In this way, two populations are formed: One which remains small due to the collisional barriers, and one that continues to grow by sweeping up the smaller grains around them.

  7. Influence of vane sweep on rotor-stator interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of vane sweep in rotor-stator interaction noise is investigated. In an analytical approach, the interaction of a convected gust representing the rotor viscous wake, with a cascade of cascade of finite span swept airfoils, representing the stator, is analyzed. The analysis is based on the solution of the exact linearized equations of motion. High frequency convected gusts for which noise generation is concentrated near the leading edge of airfoils is considered. In a preliminary study, the problem of an isolated finite span swept airfoil interacting with a convected gust is analyzed. Results indicate that sweep can substantially reduce the farfield noise levels for a single airfoil. Using the single airfoil model, an approximate solution to the problem of noise radiation from a cascade of finite span swept airfoils interacting with a convected gust is derived. A parametric study of noise generated by gust cascade interaction is carried out to assess the effectiveness of vane sweep in reducing rotor-stator interaction noise. The results show that sweep is beneficial in reducing noise levels. Rotor wake twist or circumferential lean substantially influences the effectiveness of vane sweep. The orientation of vane sweep must be chosen to enhance the natural phase lag caused by wake lean, in which case rather small sweep angles substantially reduce the noise levels.

  8. Influence of vane sweep on rotor-stator interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Envia, Edmane; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-12-01

    The influence of vane sweep in rotor-stator interaction noise is investigated. In an analytical approach, the interaction of a convected gust representing the rotor viscous wake, with a cascade of cascade of finite span swept airfoils, representing the stator, is analyzed. The analysis is based on the solution of the exact linearized equations of motion. High frequency convected gusts for which noise generation is concentrated near the leading edge of airfoils is considered. In a preliminary study, the problem of an isolated finite span swept airfoil interacting with a convected gust is analyzed. Results indicate that sweep can substantially reduce the farfield noise levels for a single airfoil. Using the single airfoil model, an approximate solution to the problem of noise radiation from a cascade of finite span swept airfoils interacting with a convected gust is derived. A parametric study of noise generated by gust cascade interaction is carried out to assess the effectiveness of vane sweep in reducing rotor-stator interaction noise. The results show that sweep is beneficial in reducing noise levels. Rotor wake twist or circumferential lean substantially influences the effectiveness of vane sweep. The orientation of vane sweep must be chosen to enhance the natural phase lag caused by wake lean, in which case rather small sweep angles substantially reduce the noise levels.

  9. ROM-Based Plan-Position-Indicator Sweep Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Leighty, B. D.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit produces PPI display on conventional X-Y oscilloscope. Circuit requires three inputs. First is once-per-scan pulse to synchronize display to north, relative heading, or another reference direction. Second is once-per-degree-of-rotation pulse to advance sweep rotation. Third input is normal sweep ramp. Duration of ramp corresponds to maximum displayed range. Changing ramp duration, while holding its peak amplitude constant, changes maximum displayed range. Conventional methods to accomplish this task use mechanically-driven deflection coils or mechanically-driven sine and cosine potentiometers, requiring mechanical preventive maintenance plus dedicated display indicator. New method displays radar sweep on any conventional storage oscilloscope.

  10. AN ALGORITHM FOR PARALLEL SN SWEEPS ON UNSTRUCTURED MESHES

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. PAUTZ

    2000-12-01

    We develop a new algorithm for performing parallel S{sub n} sweeps on unstructured meshes. The algorithm uses a low-complexity list ordering heuristic to determine a sweep ordering on any partitioned mesh. For typical problems and with ''normal'' mesh partitionings we have observed nearly linear speedups on up to 126 processors. This is an important and desirable result, since although analyses of structured meshes indicate that parallel sweeps will not scale with normal partitioning approaches, we do not observe any severe asymptotic degradation in the parallel efficiency with modest ({le}100) levels of parallelism. This work is a fundamental step in the development of parallel S{sub n} methods.

  11. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995: 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mele, Gary D.; Holley, Daniel C.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic applied sound (74 to 79 dB, SPL) with octave band center frequencies of either 8, 16 or 32 kHz for up to 60 days. Control cages had ambient sound levels of about 62 dB (SPL). Groups of rats (test vs. control; N=9 per group) were euthanized after 0. 5. 14, 30, and 60 days. On each euthanasia day, objective evaluation of their physiology and behavior was performed using a Stress Assessment Battery (SAB) of measures. In addition, rat hearing was assessed using the brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAER) method after 60 days of exposure. No statistically significant differences in mean daily food use could be attributed to the presence of the applied test sound. Test rats used 5% more water than control rats. In the 8 kHz and 32 kHz tests this amount was statistically significant(P less than .05). This is a minor difference of questionable physiological significance. However, it may be an indication of a small reaction to the constant applied sound. Across all test frequencies, day 5 test rats had 6% larger spleens than control rats. No other body or organ weight differences were found to be statistically significant with respect to the application of sound. This spleen effect may be a transient adaptive process related to adaptation to the constant applied noise. No significant test effect on differential white blood cell counts could be demonstrated. One group demonstrated a low eosinophil count (16 kHz experiment, day 14 test group). However this was highly suspect. Across all test frequencies studied, day 5 test rats had 17% fewer total leukocytes than day 5 control rats. Sound exposed test rats exhibited 44% lower plasma corticosterone concentrations than did control rats. Note that the plasma corticosterone concentration was lower in the sound exposed test animals than the control animals in every instance (frequency exposure and number of days exposed).

  12. Stoichiometry and Formation Constant Determination by Linear Sweep Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Franklin A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is described in which the equilibrium constants necessary for determining the composition and distribution of lead (II)-oxalate species may be measured by linear sweep voltammetry. (Author/BB)

  13. Theory of ring sweeping of energetic particles. [in Neptune environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paranicas, C. P.; Cheng, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    Because the effective 'area' of the Neptunian rings is larger than that of the inner moons, the sweeping of energetic particles by the rings is perhaps the dominant process for particle loss in the magnetosphere within 5 R(N). In this paper, a theory for calculating the absorption probability of energetic charged particles by the rings is described. The effects of a large tilt and an offset between the planet and dipole centers are included. It is found that the probability of absorption for protons is so high that the sweeping lifetime is only a few times the gradient-curvature drift period. For electrons, the sweeping lifetime is even less. The pitch angle dependence for sweeping manifests itself strongly only at large equatorial pitch angles. Lower-energy particles have higher absorption rates by the rings.

  14. View of the sweeping, curved stair made of stone and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the sweeping, curved stair made of stone and located to the southwest rear, northwest side of the wing, with scale - National Park Seminary, Main, Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  15. Revisiting The Effect Of Sine Sweep Rate On Modal Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nicolas; Girard, Alain

    2012-07-01

    Sine-sweep base excitation vibration tests are performed to qualify spacecraft structures in the low-frequency environment where the dynamic behavior can be characterized by a small number of modes. These modes can be extracted from the measured frequency response functions (FRF) by various modal identification methods, and then used for model validation purposes. If the sweep rate is too high, the steady-state response is not reached and the resulting FRF profile will be modified by the presence of transients. This has a direct effect on the modal parameters extracted from the FRF.Several authors have examined the effect of the sweep rate based on the response of a one-degree-of-freedom system. The goal of this paper is to adapt the approach to base-excitation vibration tests. Both increasing and decreasing exponential sweep rates are considered. The effect on the three principal modal parameters (natural frequency, damping and modal effective parameters) is examined.

  16. 13. VIEW OF SWEEP ARMDRIVE MECHANISM AND BELT CHAIN FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF SWEEP ARM-DRIVE MECHANISM AND BELT CHAIN FROM MOOR, LOOKING EAST - Mystic River Drawbridge No. 7, Spanning Mystic River at Boston & Maine Railroad Eastern Route, Somerville, Middlesex County, MA

  17. Yosida-Moreau Regularization of Sweeping Processes with Unbounded Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, M.; Monteiro Marques, M. D. P.

    1996-09-01

    Lett↦C(t) be a Hausdorff-continuous multifunction with closed convex values in a Hilbert spaceHsuch thatC(t) has nonempty interior for allt. We show that the Yosida-Moreau regularizations of the sweeping process with moving setC(t), i.e., the solutions of[formula]are strongly pointwisely convergent asλ→0+to the solution of the corresponding sweeping process, formally written as[formula

  18. A beam sweeping system for the Fermilab antiproton production target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    1993-08-01

    In the Main Injector era beam intensities high enough to damage the antiproton production target will be available. In order to continue to operate with a tightly-focused primary beam spot on the target, and thus maintain yield, it will be necessary to spread the hot spot on the target by use of a beam sweeping system. This report summarizes the requirements for such a system, and addresses the issues involved in the design of a sweeping system.

  19. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  20. Main optical system of China's 2.16-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ding-Qiang; Zhou, Bi-Fang; Yu, Xin-Mu

    1990-04-01

    This paper introduces configuration of the main optical system of China's 2.16-m telescope and the results of its optical design. There are three foci in this telescope: the Cassegrain, the coude, and the prime foci. Ritchey-Chretien (R-C) system is used as the Cassegrain system. The 2-lens and 3-lens correctors are prepared for the Cassegrain and the prime foci, respectively. The most significant characteristic of this optical system is that the coude and Cassegrain systems share one secondary mirror. A relay mirror is added to the coude system. Some other coude configurations and a special configuration for setting the focal reducer are also discussed.

  1. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping speed during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is considered a minimally invasive procedure to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). During the PVP, the prostate gland is irradiated by the 532-nm laser and the fiber is swept and dragged along the urethra. In this study the speed of sweeping fiber during the PVP is being investigated. In vitro porcine kidney model was used (N=100) throughout the experiment. A Q-switched 532-nm laser, equipped with sidefiring 750-Um fiber, was employed and set to power levels of 120 and 180 W. The speed of fiber sweeping was the only variable in this study and varied at 0 (i.e. no sweeping), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 sweep/s. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation thickness were quantified. Based on the current settings, ablation rate decreased as sweeping speed increased and was maximized between 0 to 1.0 sweep/s for 120-W power level and between 0 to 0.5 sweep/s for 180-W power level. Ablation rate at 180 W was higher than that at 120 W, regardless of sweeping speed. Ablation depth at both 120 and 180 W was maximized at 0 sweep/s and decreased 35% at 0.5 sweep/s. The overall coagulation thickness was less than 1.5 mm and comparable from 0 to 1.5 sweep/s (0.8~0.9 mm) and increased at 2.0 sweep/s (~1.1 mm). This study demonstrated that tissue ablation performance was contingent upon sweeping speed and maximized at slow sweeping speed due to longer laser-tissue interaction time and larger area coverage by the 532-nm light.

  2. Investigation of the Effect of Blade Sweep on Rotor Vibratory Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarzanin, F. J., Jr.; Vlaminck, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of helicopter rotor blade planform sweep on rotor vibratory hub, blade, and control system loads has been analytically investigated. The importance of sweep angle, sweep initiation radius, flap bending stiffness and torsion bending stiffness is discussed. The mechanism by which sweep influences the vibratory hub loads is investigated.

  3. Simple Phenotypic Sweeps Hide Complex Genetic Changes in Populations

    PubMed Central

    Maharjan, Ram P.; Liu, Bin; Feng, Lu; Ferenci, Thomas; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Changes in allele frequencies and the fixation of beneficial mutations are central to evolution. The precise relationship between mutational and phenotypic sweeps is poorly described however, especially when multiple alleles are involved. Here, we investigate these relationships in a bacterial population over 60 days in a glucose-limited chemostat in a large population. High coverage metagenomic analysis revealed a disconnection between smooth phenotypic sweeps and the complexity of genetic changes in the population. Phenotypic adaptation was due to convergent evolution and involved soft sweeps by 7–26 highly represented alleles of several genes in different combinations. Allele combinations spread from undetectably low baselines, indicating that minor subpopulations provide the basis of most innovations. A hard sweep was also observed, involving a single combination of rpoS, mglD, malE, sdhC, and malT mutations sweeping to greater than 95% of the population. Other mutant genes persisted but at lower abundance, including hfq, consistent with its demonstrated frequency-dependent fitness under glucose limitation. Other persistent, newly identified low-frequency mutations were in the aceF, galF, ribD and asm genes, in noncoding regulatory regions, three large indels and a tandem duplication; these were less affected by fluctuations involving more dominant mutations indicating separate evolutionary paths. Our results indicate a dynamic subpopulation structure with a minimum of 42 detectable mutations maintained over 60 days. We also conclude that the massive population-level mutation supply in combination with clonal interference leads to the soft sweeps observed, but not to the exclusion of an occasional hard sweep. PMID:25589261

  4. Comparison of ultrasonic degradation rates constants of methylene blue at 22.8 kHz, 127 kHz, and 490 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Techniques such as solvent extraction, incineration, chemical dehalogenation, and biodegradation have been investigated for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds. We found ultrasound to be an attractive technology for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in water. However, the effects of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate constants were not investigated quantitatively. In this study, the degradation process of a model for hazardous organic compound methylene blue was investigated using ultrasonic irradiation. The study focused on the effects of ultrasonic frequency and ultrasonic power on the degradation rate constant. The apparent degradation rate constants were estimated based on time dependence of methylene blue concentration assuming pseudo-first-order kinetics for the decomposition. A linear relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and ultrasonic power was identified. In addition, the apparent degradation rate constants at frequencies of 127 and 490 kHz were much larger than those at 22.8 kHz. A relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and the sonochemical efficiency value (SE value) was also found. Based on these results, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue based on the ultrasonic power and the SE value is proposed in this study.

  5. AD-1 multiple exposure showing wing sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This photograph is a multiple exposure showing the AD-1 aircraft with its wing swept at different angles between zero and 60 degrees. The Ames-Dryden-1 (AD-1) aircraft was designed to investigate the concept of an oblique (pivoting) wing. The wing could be rotated on its center pivot, so that it could be set at its most efficient angle for the speed at which the aircraft was flying. NASA Ames Research Center Aeronautical Engineer Robert T. Jones conceived the idea of an oblique wing. His wind tunnel studies at Ames (Moffett Field, CA) indicated that an oblique wing design on a supersonic transport might achieve twice the fuel economy of an aircraft with conventional wings. The oblique wing on the AD-1 pivoted about the fuselage, remaining perpendicular to it during slow flight and rotating to angles of up to 60 degrees as aircraft speed increased. Analytical and wind tunnel studiesthat Jones conducted at Ames indicated that a transport-sized oblique-wing aircraft flying at speeds of up to Mach 1.4 (1.4 times the speed of sound) would have substantially better aerodynamic performance than aircraft with conventional wings. The AD-1 structure allowed the project to complete all of its technical objectives. The type of low-speed, low-cost vehicle - as expected - exhibited aeroelastic and pitch-roll-coupling effects that contributed to poor handling at sweep angles above 45 degrees. The fiberglass structure limited the wing stiffness that would have improved the handling qualities. Thus, after completion of the AD-1 project, there was still a need for a transonic oblique-wing research aircraft to assess the effects of compressibility, evaluate a more representative structure, and analyze flight performance at transonic speeds (those on either side of the speed of sound). The aircraft was delivered to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, in March 1979 and its first flight was on December 21, 1979. Piloting the aircraft on that flight, as well as on its last

  6. Ionosphere plasma electron parameters from radio frequency sweeping impedance probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E.; Patra, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we will describe the technique of using an RF sweeping impedance probe (SIP) to measure the AC impedance of an electrically short monopole immersed in a plasma. We analyze the SIP measurements which are taken from the payload of the Storms sounding rocket, launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in 2007. The scientific objective of the Storms mission was to concentrate on whether density irregularities observed in midlatitude spread F could arise from ionospheric coupling to terrestrial weather. As such, independent measurements of the electron density profile are crucial. Since the inherent nature of the SIP technique makes it relatively insensitive to errors introduced through spacecraft charging, probe contamination, and other DC effects, it is an ideal instrument to employ under disturbed plasma conditions. The instrument measures both the magnitude and phase of the AC impedance from 100 kHz to 20 MHz in 128 frequency steps, performing 45,776 sweeps over the entire flight. From these measurements we infer both the absolute electron density ne and the electron neutral collision frequencies νen throughout the flight trajectory. The SIP data can be approximately analyzed using a fluid formulation and thin sheath approximation particularly at altitudes below 200 km, which allows us to match the measurements to quasi-static analytical formulas. At about 265 km on the upleg, the magnitude data transitioned to a highly damped response with increasing altitude. The phase data, on the other hand, continued to indicate increased plasma density and reduced collisionality as expected. For a large portion of the flight, the payload of the Storms mission exhibited an uncontrolled coning motion, making the local magnetic field orientation with respect to the dipole difficult to decipher. Despite these difficulties, we were able to obtain robust estimates of the electron density profile, using the phase information from each sweep. In addition, the electron

  7. Basic mechanisms controlling the sweeping efficiency of propagating current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2006-02-01

    The basic mechanisms controlling the sweeping efficiency of propagating current sheets are investigated through experiments and analytical modelling. The sweeping efficiency of a current sheet in a parallel plate gas-fed pulsed plasma accelerator is defined as the ratio of the current sheet mass to the total available propellant mass. Permeability of neutrals through the sheet, and leakage of mass out of the sheet and into a cathode wake, decrease the sweeping efficiency. The sweeping efficiency of current sheets in argon, neon, helium and hydrogen propellants at different initial pressures was determined through measurements of sheet velocity with high speed photography and of sheet mass with laser interferometry. The mechanism that controls the sweeping efficiency of propagating current sheets was found to be an interplay of two processes: the flux of mass entering the sheet and the leakage of mass at the cathode, with the former dependent on the degree of permeability and the latter dependent on the level of ion current as determined by the ion Hall parameter.

  8. 1H-2H cross-polarization NMR in fast spinning solids by adiabatic sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Schurko, Robert; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-03-01

    Cross-polarization (CP) experiments employing frequency-swept radiofrequency (rf) pulses have been successfully used in static spin systems for obtaining broadband signal enhancements. These experiments have been recently extended to heteronuclear I, S = spin-1/2 nuclides under magic-angle spinning (MAS), by applying adiabatic inversion pulses along the S (low-γ) channel while simultaneously applying a conventional spin-locking pulse on the I-channel (1H). This study explores an extension of this adiabatic frequency sweep concept to quadrupolar nuclei, focusing on CP from 1H (I = 1/2) to 2H spins (S = 1) undergoing fast MAS (νr = 60 kHz). A number of new features emerge, including zero- and double-quantum polarization transfer phenomena that depend on the frequency offsets of the swept pulses, the rf pulse powers, and the MAS spinning rate. An additional mechanism found operational in the 1H-2H CP case that was absent in the spin-1/2 counterpart, concerns the onset of a pseudo-static zero-quantum CP mode, driven by a quadrupole-modulated rf/dipolar recoupling term arising under the action of MAS. The best CP conditions found at these fast spinning rates correspond to double-quantum transfers, involving weak 2H rf field strengths. At these easily attainable (ca. 10 kHz) rf field conditions, adiabatic level-crossings among the {|1 ⟩ ,|0 ⟩ ,|-1 ⟩ } mS energy levels, which are known to complicate the CP MAS of quadrupolar nuclei, are avoided. Moreover, the CP line shapes generated in this manner are very close to the ideal 2H MAS spectral line shapes, facilitating the extraction of quadrupolar coupling parameters. All these features were corroborated with experiments on model compounds and justified using numerical simulations and average Hamiltonian theory models. Potential applications of these new phenomena, as well as extensions to higher spins S, are briefly discussed.

  9. Modeling a 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A257 378 /7 Modeling A 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System by Kenneth Alan Malmquist B.S., Drexel University, Philadelphia (1985) Submitted in...Massachusetts Institute of Technology/ Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 92-28033 Vll1 Nlf • 92 BLANK PAR Modeling A 300 kIz Bathymetric Sonar System by...Deep Submergence Laboratory has developed a family of calibrated high frequency bathymetric sonar systems for underwater survey. It is useful to have a

  10. Commercial production of the oil absorbent Sea Sweep

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, T.B.; Mobeck, W.L.

    1993-12-31

    A new absorbent has been developed for oil spills. It attracts oil and chemicals and floats on water indefinitely. It is mpm-leaching and can save land and beaches from environmental disasters and can be disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner or recycled. The new absorbent is called {open_quotes}Sea Sweep{close_quotes}; extensive research has been done on it under an EPA Small Business Innovation Research grant, Phase I and Phase II. Sea Sweep has been tested for toxicity to the environment. Less than 2 mg/l total organic carbon was found in water in contact with oil saturated Sea Sweep after 30 minutes. No toxicity was measured to any of the marine or freshwater tested species at any test concentrations. Sea Sweep is made from {open_quotes}pin chips,{close_quotes} a waste wood product, using a patented thermolytic process in which the wood is heated to about 300{degrees}C. It is a coarse, free-flowing granular material absorbing from 2.6 to 6.6 g/g of oils and chemicals. While originally designed for marine oil spills, it is also very effective for oil and chemical spills on land or water. Sea Sweep has now reached the stage of limited commercialization. A small (5 tons/day) plant has been built in northern Colorado at a wood recycling plant and it has been operated since January 1993. The plant features an afterburner that destroys the blue haze resulting from pyrolysis of the sawdust so that production is environmentally acceptable. Sea Sweep is marketed in 5, 10 and 25 lb plastic bags and 500 lb drop bags. It is also sold in socks, booms pillows and bilge rats. The company will recycle non-toxic materials for the customer using methods developed under the SBIR grant. Sea Sweep has been features in a number of articles, on television, and in national and international trade shows. The international marketing of Sea Sweep is administered from the corporate offices in Denver. Domestic marketing is administered from the regional office in Chicago.

  11. Self-propelled sweeping removal of dropwise condensate

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Xiaopeng; Boreyko, Jonathan; Liu, Fangjie; ...

    2015-06-02

    Dropwise condensation can be enhanced by superhydrophobic surfaces, on which the condensate drops spontaneously jump upon coalescence. However, the self-propelled jumping in prior reports is mostly perpendicular to the substrate. Here, we propose a substrate design with regularly spaced micropillars. Coalescence on the sidewalls of the micropillars leads to self-propelled jumping in a direction nearly orthogonal to the pillars and therefore parallel to the substrate. This in- plane motion in turn produces sweeping removal of multiple neighboring drops. The spontaneous sweeping mechanism may greatly enhance dropwise condensation in a self-sustained manner.

  12. Spectroscopic determination of the internal amplitude of frequency sweeping TAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinches, S. D.; Berk, H. L.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Sharapov, S. E.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2004-07-01

    From an understanding of the processes that cause a marginally unstable eigenmode of the system to sweep in frequency, it is shown how the absolute peak amplitude of the mode can be determined from the spectroscopic measurements of the frequency sweeping rate, e.g. with Mirnov coils outside the plasma. In a first attempt to implement such a diagnostic calculation, the MISHKA code (Mikhailovskii A B et al 1997 Plasma Phys. Rep. 23 844) is used to determine the global mode structure of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) (Cheng C Z et al 1985 Ann. Phys. (NY) 161 21) observed in the MAST spherical tokamak (Sykes A et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 1423). Simulations using the HAGIS code (Pinches S D 1996 PhD Thesis The University of Nottingham, Pinches S D et al 1998 Comput. Phys. Commun. 111 131) are then made, replicating the experimentally observed sweeping phenomena. The fundamental theory is then used together with these simulation results to predict the internal field amplitude from the observed frequency sweeping. The calculated mode amplitude is shown to agree with that obtained from Mirnov coil measurements.

  13. Using temperature sweeps to investigate rheology of bioplastics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of research toward production of protein-based bioplastics, small amplitude oscillatory shear analyses were performed in the temperature sweep mode to examine protein blends in the presence of wheat flour and glycerol. The elastic modulus (G') of these samples was much higher than the visco...

  14. Triangular-wave generator with controlled sweep polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Generator, comprised largely of integrated circuits, has operational amplifier connected as integrator to provide linear voltage ramp, pair of logic gates and one-shot multivibrator function as sweep reverse circuit feeding the integrator. Solid state switch effects generator hold capability.

  15. Multiscale mapping of frequency sweep rate in mouse auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Issa, John B; Haeffele, Benjamin D; Young, Eric D; Yue, David T

    2017-02-01

    Functional organization is a key feature of the neocortex that often guides studies of sensory processing, development, and plasticity. Tonotopy, which arises from the transduction properties of the cochlea, is the most widely studied organizational feature in auditory cortex; however, in order to process complex sounds, cortical regions are likely specialized for higher order features. Here, motivated by the prevalence of frequency modulations in mouse ultrasonic vocalizations and aided by the use of a multiscale imaging approach, we uncover a functional organization across the extent of auditory cortex for the rate of frequency modulated (FM) sweeps. In particular, using two-photon Ca(2+) imaging of layer 2/3 neurons, we identify a tone-insensitive region at the border of AI and AAF. This central sweep region behaves fundamentally differently from nearby neurons in AI and AII, responding preferentially to fast FM sweeps but not to tones or bandlimited noise. Together these findings define a second dimension of organization in the mouse auditory cortex for sweep rate complementary to that of tone frequency.

  16. Optimal control of the sweeping process over polyhedral controlled sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, G.; Henrion, R.; Nguyen, D. Hoang; Mordukhovich, B. S.

    2016-02-01

    The paper addresses a new class of optimal control problems governed by the dissipative and discontinuous differential inclusion of the sweeping/Moreau process while using controls to determine the best shape of moving convex polyhedra in order to optimize the given Bolza-type functional, which depends on control and state variables as well as their velocities. Besides the highly non-Lipschitzian nature of the unbounded differential inclusion of the controlled sweeping process, the optimal control problems under consideration contain intrinsic state constraints of the inequality and equality types. All of this creates serious challenges for deriving necessary optimality conditions. We develop here the method of discrete approximations and combine it with advanced tools of first-order and second-order variational analysis and generalized differentiation. This approach allows us to establish constructive necessary optimality conditions for local minimizers of the controlled sweeping process expressed entirely in terms of the problem data under fairly unrestrictive assumptions. As a by-product of the developed approach, we prove the strong W 1 , 2-convergence of optimal solutions of discrete approximations to a given local minimizer of the continuous-time system and derive necessary optimality conditions for the discrete counterparts. The established necessary optimality conditions for the sweeping process are illustrated by several examples.

  17. Iowa's Clean Solid Waste Environmental Education Project (SWEEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eells, Jean Crim; And Others

    The Iowa Clean SWEEP program is designed to provide educators, K-12, with a series of activities focusing upon critical concepts related to Iowa's solid waste problem. This activity packet contains 19 activities for grades K-6, and 25 activities for grades 7-12. Key concepts addressed throughout the activity packet include: (1) an overview, the…

  18. An oscillating sweeping gap test for VMAT quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Mandar S; Han, Zhaohui; Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2010-09-07

    The objective of this study was to develop an oscillating sweeping gap test for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA). A novel test was designed and used to simultaneously determine uncertainties associated with linac performance, dose calculation and dosimetric MLC parameters during VMAT delivery. Delivered doses were measured with Matrixx, ionization chamber A12 and EDR2 films, and compared to calculations from the treatment planning system (TPS) Eclipse. A new gantry and MLC motion pattern, called here 'oscillating sweeping gap', is developed as an extension of the standard sweeping gap MLC pattern developed for IMRT QA. Specifically, in the oscillating sweeping gap test, a uniform MLC gap is moving repeatedly back and forth across the field at a constant speed during a full rotation of the gantry. The dose distribution generated by the combined gantry and MLC motion pattern is designed to be quasi-uniform within a cylindrical target volume with a sharp penumbra. The test design allows for an easy detection of dose errors as deviations from the uniform background. MLC gap sizes, gantry and MLC speeds and monitor units (MU) are selected according to a formula determining the magnitude of dose delivered to the target. Both measured and calculated dose distributions were analyzed as a function of the number of control points in the TPS, MLC gap size and magnitude of the gantry angle error. Dose calculation errors due to the insufficient number of control points in the gantry and MLC motion pattern appear as streak artifacts. The magnitude of these artifacts is increasing with the decreased number of control points, and with the decreased MLC gap size. The spatial distribution of dose errors due to the gantry angle errors (unsteady rocking motion) appears as high-frequency noise for higher wobble frequencies and as large hot/cold spots for lower wobble frequencies. The actual MLC leaf position as a function of time (or the gantry angle

  19. An oscillating sweeping gap test for VMAT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Mandar S.; Han, Zhaohui; Kien Ng, Sook; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an oscillating sweeping gap test for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA). A novel test was designed and used to simultaneously determine uncertainties associated with linac performance, dose calculation and dosimetric MLC parameters during VMAT delivery. Delivered doses were measured with Matrixx™, ionization chamber A12 and EDR2™ films, and compared to calculations from the treatment planning system (TPS) Eclipse™. A new gantry and MLC motion pattern, called here 'oscillating sweeping gap', is developed as an extension of the standard sweeping gap MLC pattern developed for IMRT QA. Specifically, in the oscillating sweeping gap test, a uniform MLC gap is moving repeatedly back and forth across the field at a constant speed during a full rotation of the gantry. The dose distribution generated by the combined gantry and MLC motion pattern is designed to be quasi-uniform within a cylindrical target volume with a sharp penumbra. The test design allows for an easy detection of dose errors as deviations from the uniform background. MLC gap sizes, gantry and MLC speeds and monitor units (MU) are selected according to a formula determining the magnitude of dose delivered to the target. Both measured and calculated dose distributions were analyzed as a function of the number of control points in the TPS, MLC gap size and magnitude of the gantry angle error. Dose calculation errors due to the insufficient number of control points in the gantry and MLC motion pattern appear as streak artifacts. The magnitude of these artifacts is increasing with the decreased number of control points, and with the decreased MLC gap size. The spatial distribution of dose errors due to the gantry angle errors (unsteady rocking motion) appears as high-frequency noise for higher wobble frequencies and as large hot/cold spots for lower wobble frequencies. The actual MLC leaf position as a function of time (or the gantry

  20. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... frequency 5167.5 kHz. The frequency 5167.5 kHz may be used by any station authorized under this part...

  1. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  2. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  3. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  4. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  5. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  6. 28 CFR 2.16 - Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. 2.16 Section 2.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE... Prisoners and Parolees § 2.16 Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. (a) Any...

  7. 28 CFR 2.16 - Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. 2.16 Section 2.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE... Prisoners and Parolees § 2.16 Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. (a) Any...

  8. 28 CFR 2.16 - Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. 2.16 Section 2.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE... Prisoners and Parolees § 2.16 Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. (a) Any...

  9. 28 CFR 2.16 - Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. 2.16 Section 2.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE... Prisoners and Parolees § 2.16 Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. (a) Any...

  10. Evaluation of the SWEEP model during high winds on the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A standalone version of the WEPS erosion submodel, the Single-event Wind Erosion Evaluation Program (SWEEP), was released in 2007. A limited number of studies have evaluated SWEEP in simulating soil loss under high winds. The objective of this study was to test SWEEP under conventional and undercut...

  11. Total body irradiation with a sweeping {sup 60}Cobalt beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, S.; El-Khatib, E.

    1995-09-30

    This article describes the physical, technical, and dosimetric aspects of total body irradiation (TBI). The continuous head swivel motion of a standard {sup 60}Cobalt unit has been used to obtain a sweeping beam that encompases the entire length of the patient in TBI. A perspex beam flattener designed to remove the inverse square fall-off in beam intensity along the sweep axis provides a 90% field length of 200 cm in air at a treatment source-to-skin distance of 160 cm. The anterior-posterior parallel pair setup permits accurate placement of customized lead compensators to limit the dose to lungs. Measured beam profiles, dose buildup curves, and percentage depth dose for the technique are presented. With compensators in place, the variation in lung dose is shown to be within {plus_minus}5% of the prescribed tumor dose. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-02-01

    Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

  13. An improved ELISA with linear sweep voltammetry detection.

    PubMed

    Tie, F; Pan, A; Ru, B; Wang, W; Hu, Y

    1992-04-27

    An improved ELISA combined with linear sweep voltammetry detection of p-nitrophenol generated by an enzyme has been investigated in this study. p-nitrophenol, produced from alkaline phosphatase catalysing p-nitrophenyl phosphate, yielded an oxidative peak at 1.06 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) with a wax-impregnated tubular graphite anode. Without separation, the small three-electrode system was directly inserted in the well of an ELISA plate for detection. The detection limit for p-nitrophenol was 1 x 10(-6) M, lower than that obtained by measuring the absorbance of p-nitrophenol. The feasibility of utilizing linear sweep voltammetry as a detection scheme was demonstrated by determining metallothionein, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and Xenopus laevis keratin using the above new system. The method was simple, reproducible and much more sensitive than traditional spectrophotometry.

  14. (Test and gather data on sweep spike combination tillage tool)

    SciTech Connect

    Lukach, J.

    1992-06-19

    This summary presents the data accumulated to date with only brief comment. It is prepared with the intent that the viewers will offer advice on terminology, data presentation, methods and other. The year end analysis will detail changes in the data due to the tillage treatments. The data is incomplete due to equipment problems and time limitations due to the wet fall and early freeze up. The trial was not completed due to our inability to get the Mikkelsen Chisel Plow Shovel (MCP), a 16 inch sweep with an anhydrous knife, to penetrate untilled land. The MCP shovel penetrated to deep on plowed ground and pulled so hard that the front wheels of our JD4440 tractor were jerked off the ground. The Standard Chisel Plow Shovels (SCP), a 16 inch sweep, worked well and the data is included.

  15. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Hakanen, Merja; Sorsa, Aki; Vippola, Minnamari; Leiviskä, Kauko; Lepistö, Toivo

    2014-02-01

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  16. Sweeping and Q Measurements at Elevated Temperatures in Quartz,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    unsuccessfully. Copper migration is of interest, since neither the metal nor the bipositive ion will migrate. However, the singly charged cuprous ion ...will migrate even though it is larger than the cupric inn. Thus, the charge on the ion seems to be more important than the ionic size. The role of...litn on.. rao ide It n.....wv and idengify by block nanbor) Sweeping Synthetic quartz Solid state electrolysis a-quartz B Elect rodiffus ion Alkali

  17. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo; Hakanen, Merja; Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko

    2014-02-18

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  18. Topographic mapping of single sweep evoked potentials in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liberati, D; DiCorrado, S; Mandelli, S

    1992-09-01

    Single trial analysis of brain-evoked potentials via stochastic parametric identification and filtering is here extended to multichannel recordings, leading to the topographic mapping of the brain activity elicited by a single stimulus, instead of the usual averaged mapping. The temporal dynamics of the subsequent sweeps in the protocol of a neurophysiologic experiment can thus be recovered and quantified also on its spatial characteristic.

  19. Performance Comparison of Sweeping/Steady Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Damian; Mercier, Justin; Noca, Flavio; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Flow control through the use of steady jet actuators has been used on various aircraft models since the late 1950's. However, the focus of recent studies has shifted towards the use of sweeping jets (fluidic oscillators) rather than steady jet actuators. In this work, experiments using various jet actuator designs were conducted at GALCIT's Lucas Wind Tunnel on a NACA 0012 vertical tail model similar to that of the Boeing 767 vertical stabilizer at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 million. The rudder angle was fixed at 20 degrees. A total of 32 jet actuators were installed along the wingspan perpendicular to the trailing edge and the rudder shoulder of the vertical stabilizer. It is known that these types of flow control prevent separation. However, the goal of this work is to compare different jet designs and evaluate their performance. Parameters such as the number of actuators, their volumetric flow, and the wind tunnel speed were varied. The lift generation capabilities of steady and sweeping jet actuators were then compared. Another set of experiments was conducted to compare a new sweeping jet actuator design with one of the standard versions. Supported by Boeing.

  20. Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing for controlling ambient TSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Min; Chou, Chih-Mei; Su, Kuo-Tung; Tseng, Chao-Heng

    Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing (S/W) for controlling ambient "total suspended particles (TSP)" was evaluated by TSP measurements and determining silt load from active traffic streets. A modified regenerative-air vacuum sweeper (RAVS) and a washer were used in this study. The sweeper made a pass followed by the washer. The S/W efficiencies (η,η) were obtained based on the experimental data of silt loading and TSP. It was found that the direct impact of sweeping on ambient TSP emissions was short-lived lasting no more than 3-4 h. When a vacuum sweeper and a washer, respectively, did a good job collecting or cleaning the visible fine particles on roads, the method of S/W tested in this work was effective at removing the sources of the road dust particles. This paper concludes that street sweeping followed by washing was found to offer a measurable reduction in TSP emission potentials. Typically, the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP is up to 30%. Finally, correlated with η (based on silt loading), a useful equation is proposed to estimate the S/W efficiency, η (based on TSP) with a standard error of ±20%. It seems feasible to predict the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP controlled by the regenerative-air vacuum sweeper and washer used in this work for engineering applications. Effects of traffic volume and wind velocity on the S/W efficiencies are also discussed in the paper.

  1. Fast sweeping method for the factored eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomel, Sergey; Luo, Songting; Zhao, Hongkai

    2009-09-01

    We develop a fast sweeping method for the factored eikonal equation. By decomposing the solution of a general eikonal equation as the product of two factors: the first factor is the solution to a simple eikonal equation (such as distance) or a previously computed solution to an approximate eikonal equation. The second factor is a necessary modification/correction. Appropriate discretization and a fast sweeping strategy are designed for the equation of the correction part. The key idea is to enforce the causality of the original eikonal equation during the Gauss-Seidel iterations. Using extensive numerical examples we demonstrate that (1) the convergence behavior of the fast sweeping method for the factored eikonal equation is the same as for the original eikonal equation, i.e., the number of iterations for the Gauss-Seidel iterations is independent of the mesh size, (2) the numerical solution from the factored eikonal equation is more accurate than the numerical solution directly computed from the original eikonal equation, especially for point sources.

  2. Analysis of sweeping heat loads on divertor plate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1991-12-31

    The heat flux on the divertor plate of a fusion reactor is probably one of the most limiting constraints on its lifetime. The current heat flux profile on the outer divertor plate of a device like ITER is highly peaked with narrow profile. The peak heat flux can be as high as 30--40 MW/m{sup 2} with full width at half maximum (FWHM) is in the order of a few centimeters. Sweeping the separatrix along the divertor plate is one of the options proposed to reduce the thermomechanical effects of this highly peaked narrow profile distribution. The effectiveness of the sweeping process is investigated parametrically for various design values. The optimum sweeping parameters of a particular heat load will depend on the design of the divertor plate as well as on the profile of such a heat load. In general, moving a highly peaked heat load results in substantial reduction of the thermomechanical effects on the divertor plate. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Analysis of sweeping heat loads on divertor plate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1991-01-01

    The heat flux on the divertor plate of a fusion reactor is probably one of the most limiting constraints on its lifetime. The current heat flux profile on the outer divertor plate of a device like ITER is highly peaked with narrow profile. The peak heat flux can be as high as 30--40 MW/m{sup 2} with full width at half maximum (FWHM) is in the order of a few centimeters. Sweeping the separatrix along the divertor plate is one of the options proposed to reduce the thermomechanical effects of this highly peaked narrow profile distribution. The effectiveness of the sweeping process is investigated parametrically for various design values. The optimum sweeping parameters of a particular heat load will depend on the design of the divertor plate as well as on the profile of such a heat load. In general, moving a highly peaked heat load results in substantial reduction of the thermomechanical effects on the divertor plate. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

    2002-01-01

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To

  5. Characterizing thermal sweeping: a rapid disc dispersal mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Hudoba de Badyn, Mathias; Clarke, Cathie J.; Robins, Luke

    2013-12-01

    We consider the properties of protoplanetary discs that are undergoing inside-out clearing by photoevaporation. In particular, we aim to characterize the conditions under which a protoplanetary disc may undergo `thermal sweeping', a rapid (≲104 years) disc destruction mechanism proposed to occur when a clearing disc reaches sufficiently low surface density at its inner edge and where the disc is unstable to runaway penetration by the X-rays. We use a large suite of 1D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to probe the observable parameter space, which is unfeasible in higher dimensions. These models allow us to determine the surface density at which thermal sweeping will take over the disc's evolution and to evaluate this critical surface density as a function of X-ray luminosity, stellar mass and inner hole radius. We find that this critical surface density scales linearly with X-ray luminosity, increases with inner hole radius and decreases with stellar mass, and we develop an analytic model that reproduces these results. This surface density criterion is then used to determine the evolutionary state of protoplanetary discs at the point that they become unstable to destruction by thermal sweeping. We find that transition discs created by photoevaporation will undergo thermal sweeping when their inner holes reach 20-40 au, implying that transition discs with large holes and no accretion (which were previously a predicted outcome of the later stages of all flavours of the photoevaporation model) will not form. Thermal sweeping thus avoids the production of large numbers of large, non-accreting holes (which are not observed) and implies that the majority of holes created by photoevaporation should still be accreting. We emphasize that the surface density criteria that we have developed apply to all situations where the disc develops an inner hole that is optically thin to X-rays. It thus applies not only to the case of holes originally created by photoevaporation but

  6. Changes in acoustic startle reflex in rats induced by playback of 22-kHz calls.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    In aversive or dangerous situations, adult rats emit long characteristic ultrasonic calls, often termed "22-kHz calls," which have been suggested to play a role of alarm calls. Although the playback experiment is one of the most effective ways to investigate the alarming properties of 22-kHz calls, clear behavioral evidence showing the anxiogenic effects of these playback stimuli has not been directly obtained to date. In this study, we investigated whether playback of 22-kHz calls or synthesized sine tones could change the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), enhancement of which is widely considered to be a reliable index of anxiety-related negative affective states in rats. Playback of 22-kHz calls significantly enhanced the ASR in rats. Enhancement effects caused by playback of 22-kHz calls from young rats were relatively weak compared to those after calls from adult rats. Playback of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones enhanced ASR in subjects, but not synthesized 60-kHz tones. Further, shortening the individual call duration of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones also enhanced the ASR. Accordingly, it is suggested that 22-kHz calls induce anxiety by socially communicated alarming signals in rats. The results also demonstrated that call frequency, i.e., of 22kHz, appears important for ultrasonic alarm-signal communication in rats.

  7. 20 kHz Space Station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.; Wolff, Fredrick J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station represents the next major U.S. commitment in space. The efficient delivery of power to multiple user loads is key to that success. In 1969, NASA Lewis Research Center began a series of studies with component and circuit developments that led to the high frequency bi-directional, four quadrant resonant driven converter. Additional studies and subsequent developments into the early 1980's have shown how the high frequency ac power system could provide overall advantages to many aerospace power systems. Because of its wide versatility, it also has outstanding advantages for the Space Station Program and its wide range of users. High frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources - photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines or nuclear Lewis distribution system testbed. The testbed demonstrates flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology as well as high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging at frequencies below 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Körber, Rainer; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Fedele, Tommaso; Albrecht, Hans-Helge; Mario Cassará, Antonino; Hartwig, Stefan; Trahms, Lutz; Haase, Jürgen; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Within the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) community the trend is going to higher and higher magnetic fields, ranging from 1.5 T to 7 T, corresponding to Larmor frequencies of 63.8-298 MHz. Since for high-field MRI the magnetization increases with the applied magnetic field, the signal-to-noise-ratio increases as well, thus enabling higher image resolutions. On the other hand, MRI is possible also at ultra-low magnetic fields, as was shown by different groups. The goal of our development was to reach a Larmor frequency range of the low-field MRI system corresponding to the frequency range of human brain activities ranging from near zero-frequency (near-DC) to over 1 kHz. Here, first 2D MRI images of phantoms taken at Larmor frequencies of 100 Hz and 731 Hz will be shown and discussed. These frequencies are examples of brain activity triggered by electrostimulation of the median nerve. The method will allow the magnetic fields of the brain currents to influence the magnetic resonance image, and thus lead to a direct functional imaging modality of neuronal currents.

  9. kHz Ion Acceleration Under Variable Background Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, John T.; Feister, S.; Frische, K.; Austin, D. R.; Ngirmang, G. K.; Peterson, A. C.; Smith, J.; Klim, A.; Orban, C.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    High-repetition rate, ultra-high intensity lasers are coming online, opening new possibilities for statistical approaches and applications to High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) research through relativistic laser-plasma interactions (RLPI). A new experimental framework including high-repetition rate solid-density targets, high-acquisition rate detectors, data acquisition, and analysis is needed to take advantage of these new possibilities. At the Extreme Light Laboratory at AFRL, development of a liquid target system has enabled us to perform 1kHz RLPI experiments in 0.03-20 mbar background pressures and intensities up to 5 1018 W/cm2. However, RLPI studied here transpires within a moderate vacuum, which may affect the strength of the electrostatic coupling between the energetic electrons and target ions, altering expected results for both the detected electrons and accelerated ions. Both the experimental methods and measurements of the ion acceleration from sub-micron solid density targets with variable background pressures will be presented. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the AFOSR, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra and from the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  10. Flow Separation Control Over a Ramp Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Owens, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Flow separation control on an adverse-pressure-gradient ramp model was investigated using various flow-control methods in the NASA Langley 15-Inch Wind Tunnel. The primary flow-control method studied used a sweeping jet actuator system to compare with more classic flow-control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady- and unsteady-vortex generating jets. Surface pressure measurements and a new oilflow visualization technique were used to characterize the effects of these flow-control actuators. The sweeping jet actuators were run in three different modes to produce steady-straight, steady-angled, and unsteady-oscillating jets. It was observed that all of these flow-control methods are effective in controlling the separated flows on the ramp model. The steady-straight jet energizes the boundary layer by momentum addition and was found to be the least effective method for a fixed momentum coefficient. The steady-angled jets achieved better performance than the steady-straight jets because they generate streamwise vortices that energize the boundary layer by mixing high-momentum fluid with near wall low-momentum fluid. The unsteady-oscillating jets achieved the best performance by increasing the pressure recovery and reducing the downstream flow separation. Surface flow visualizations indicated that two out-of-phase counter-rotating vortices are generated per sweeping jet actuator, while one vortex is generated per vortex-generating jets. The extra vortex resulted in increased coverage, more pressure recovery, and reduced flow separation.

  11. Atopic Dermatitis Susceptibility Variants in Filaggrin Hitchhike Hornerin Selective Sweep

    PubMed Central

    Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Xu, Duo; Flanagan, Colin; Rzhetskaya, Margarita; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Blekhman, Ran; Jablonski, Nina G.; Gokcumen, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Human skin has evolved rapidly, leaving evolutionary signatures in the genome. The filaggrin (FLG) gene is widely studied for its skin-barrier function in humans. The extensive genetic variation in this gene, especially common loss-of-function (LoF) mutations, has been established as primary risk factors for atopic dermatitis. To investigate the evolution of this gene, we analyzed 2,504 human genomes and genotyped the copy number variation of filaggrin repeats within FLG in 126 individuals from diverse ancestral backgrounds. We were unable to replicate a recent study claiming that LoF of FLG is adaptive in northern latitudes with lower ultraviolet light exposure. Instead, we present multiple lines of evidence suggesting that FLG genetic variation, including LoF variants, have little or no effect on fitness in modern humans. Haplotype-level scrutinization of the locus revealed signatures of a recent selective sweep in Asia, which increased the allele frequency of a haplotype group (Huxian haplogroup) in Asian populations. Functionally, we found that the Huxian haplogroup carries dozens of functional variants in FLG and hornerin (HRNR) genes, including those that are associated with atopic dermatitis susceptibility, HRNR expression levels and microbiome diversity on the skin. Our results suggest that the target of the adaptive sweep is HRNR gene function, and the functional FLG variants that involve susceptibility to atopic dermatitis, seem to hitchhike the selective sweep on HRNR. Our study presents a novel case of a locus that harbors clinically relevant common genetic variation with complex evolutionary trajectories. PMID:27678121

  12. Alarm pheromone does not modulate 22-kHz calls in male rats.

    PubMed

    Muyama, Hiromi; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Inagaki, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-03-15

    Rats are known to emit a series of ultrasonic vocalizations, termed 22-kHz calls, when exposed to distressing stimuli. Pharmacological studies have indicated that anxiety mediates 22-kHz calls in distressed rats. We previously found that exposure to the rat alarm pheromone increases anxiety in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the alarm pheromone would increase 22-kHz calls in pheromone-exposed rats. Accordingly, we tested whether exposure to the alarm pheromone induced 22-kHz calls, as well as whether the alarm pheromone increased 22-kHz calls in response to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS). Rats were first fear-conditioned to an auditory and contextual CS. On the following day, the rats were either exposed to the alarm pheromone or a control odor that was released from the neck region of odor-donor rats. Then, the rats were re-exposed to the aversive CS. The alarm pheromone neither induced 22-kHz calls nor increased 22-kHz calls in response to the aversive CS. In contrast, the control odor unexpectedly reduced the total number and duration of 22-kHz calls elicited by the aversive CS, as well as the duration of freezing. These results suggest that the alarm pheromone does not affect 22-kHz calls in rats. However, we may have found evidence for an appeasing olfactory signal, released from the neck region of odor-donor rats.

  13. Tycho 2: A Proxy Application for Kinetic Transport Sweeps

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Charles Kristopher; Warsa, James S.

    2016-09-14

    Tycho 2 is a proxy application that implements discrete ordinates (SN) kinetic transport sweeps on unstructured, 3D, tetrahedral meshes. It has been designed to be small and require minimal dependencies to make collaboration and experimentation as easy as possible. Tycho 2 has been released as open source software. The software is currently in a beta release with plans for a stable release (version 1.0) before the end of the year. The code is parallelized via MPI across spatial cells and OpenMP across angles. Currently, several parallelization algorithms are implemented.

  14. Existence of Solutions to the Nonconvex Sweeping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabdellah, Houcine

    2000-07-01

    In this note, we prove the existence of solutions for the sweeping process problem x‧(t)∈-NC(t)(x(t)) a.e., x(t)∈C(t), x(0)=x0∈C(0), where C(.) is an arbitrary Hausdorff-Lipschitzean multifunction, from I=[0, T] onto the set of nonempty closed subsets of Rd. This generalizes a well known result of J. J. Moreau, (1971, in “Sem. d'Analyse Convexe, Montpelier,” Exp. 15) in the convex case.

  15. Environmental and Pharmacological Modulation of Amphetamine-Induced 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rippberger, Henrike; van Gaalen, Marcel M.; Schwarting, Rainer K.W.; WÖhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats emit high-frequency 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in appetitive situations like social interactions. Drugs of abuse are probably the most potent non-social elicitors of 50-kHz USV, possibly reflecting their euphorigenic properties. Psychostimulants induce the strongest elevation in 50-kHz USV emission, particularly amphetamine (AMPH), either when applied systemically or locally into the nucleus accumbens (Nacc). Emission of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV depends on test context, such as the presence of conspecifics, and can be manipulated pharmacologically by targeting major neurotransmitter systems, including dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5-HT), but also protein kinase C (PKC) signaling. Several D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, as well as typical and atypical antipsychotics block the AMPH-induced elevation in 50-kHz USV. Inhibiting D1 and D2 receptors in the Nacc abolishes AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV, indicating a key role for this brain area. NA neurotransmission also regulates AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission given that α1 receptor antagonists and α2 receptor agonists exert attenuating effects. Supporting the involvement of the 5-HT system, AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV are attenuated by 5-HT2C receptor activation, whereas 5-HT2C receptor antagonism leads to the opposite effect. Finally, treatment with lithium, tamoxifen, and myricitrin was all found to result in a complete abolishment of the AMPH-induced increase in 50-kHz USV, suggesting the involvement of PKC signaling. Neurotransmitter systems involved in AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission only partially overlap with other AMPH-induced behaviors like hyperlocomotion. The validity of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV as a preclinical model for neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed, particularly with relevance to altered drive and mood seen in bipolar disorder. PMID:26411764

  16. 28 CFR 2.16 - Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parole of prisoner in state, local, or territorial institution. 2.16 Section 2.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States...

  17. A Miniature Sweeping Impedance Probe for Ionospheric Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Hidalgo, J.; Swenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The impedance of a probe immersed in ionospheric plasma at radio frequencies is an important technique for determining absolute electron density. Building on 50 years of history in developing and flying RF probes for plasma diagnostics at Utah State, a new SIP (Sweeping Impedance Probe) design has been completed which will obtain qualitative improvement over previous instruments in terms of accuracy and sweep rate. This instrument will provide a continuous measurement of the plasma impedance magnitude and phase with an expected accuracy of 1% and 1 degree respectively over the 1 to 20 MHz range. This new SIP will be launched in January 2014 onboard the Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) NASA sounding rocket mission using a short monopole probe. The rocket apogee of 600 km will allow the characterization of the plasma in the E and F layers at auroral latitudes and the study of short term and spatial variations along the high-altitude profile of the sounding rocket. Although this SIP design has been developed for a sounding rocket, it can be optimized and miniaturized for Cubesat's and included along other ionospheric diagnostic instruments such as double and Langmuir probes. This presentation is focused on the overall design of the instrument, the tests results for the ASSP instrument and conceptual designs for future CubeSat mission similar to the NSF DICE mission.

  18. Evaluation and Enhancement of Carbon Dioxide Flooding Through Sweep Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard

    2009-09-30

    Carbon dioxide displacement is a common improved recovery method applied to light oil reservoirs (30-45{degrees}API). The economic and technical success of CO{sub 2} floods is often limited by poor sweep efficiency or large CO{sub 2} utilization rates. Projected incremental recoveries for CO{sub 2} floods range from 7% to 20% of the original oil in place; however, actual incremental recoveries range from 9% to 15% of the original oil in place, indicating the potential for significant additional recoveries with improved sweep efficiency. This research program was designed to study the effectiveness of carbon dioxide flooding in a mature reservoir to identify and develop methods and strategies to improve oil recovery in carbon dioxide floods. Specifically, the project has focused on relating laboratory, theoretical and simulation studies to actual field performance in a CO{sub 2} flood in an attempt to understand and mitigate problems of areal and vertical sweep efficiency. In this work the focus has been on evaluating the status of existing swept regions of a mature CO{sub 2} flood and developing procedures to improve the design of proposed floods. The Little Creek Field, Mississippi has been studied through laboratory, theoretical, numerical and simulation studies in an attempt to relate performance predictions to historical reservoir performance to determine sweep efficiency, improve the understanding of the reservoir response to CO{sub 2} injection, and develop scaling methodologies to relate laboratory data and simulation results to predicted reservoir behavior. Existing laboratory information from Little Creek was analyzed and an extensive amount of field data was collected. This was merged with an understanding of previous work at Little Creek to generate a detailed simulation study of two portions of the field – the original pilot area and a currently active part of the field. This work was done to try to relate all of this information to an understanding

  19. Simulation and theory of spontaneous TAE frequency sweeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Berk, H. L.

    2012-09-01

    A simulation model, based on the linear tip model of Rosenbluth, Berk and Van Dam (RBV), is developed to study frequency sweeping of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs). The time response of the background wave in the RBV model is given by a Volterra integral equation. This model captures the properties of TAE waves both in the gap and in the continuum. The simulation shows that phase space structures form spontaneously at frequencies close to the linearly predicted frequency, due to resonant particle-wave interactions and background dissipation. The frequency sweeping signals are found to chirp towards the upper and lower continua. However, the chirping signals penetrate only the lower continuum, whereupon the frequency chirps and mode amplitude increases in synchronism to produce an explosive solution. An adiabatic theory describing the evolution of a chirping signal is developed which replicates the chirping dynamics of the simulation in the lower continuum. This theory predicts that a decaying chirping signal will terminate at the upper continuum though in the numerical simulation the hole disintegrates before the upper continuum is reached.

  20. Interactive patient-specific vascular modeling with sweep surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Jan; Godenschwager, Christian; Preim, Bernhard; Stamminger, Marc

    2013-12-01

    The precise modeling of vascular structures plays a key role in medical imaging applications, such as diagnosis, therapy planning and blood flow simulations. For the simulation of blood flow in particular, high-precision models are required to produce accurate results. It is thus common practice to perform extensive manual data polishing on vascular segmentations prior to simulation. This usually involves a complex tool chain which is highly impractical for clinical on-site application. To close this gap in current blood flow simulation pipelines, we present a novel technique for interactive vascular modeling which is based on implicit sweep surfaces. Our method is able to generate and correct smooth high-quality models based on geometric centerline descriptions on the fly. It supports complex vascular free-form contours and consequently allows for an accurate and fast modeling of pathological structures such as aneurysms or stenoses. We extend the concept of implicit sweep surfaces to achieve increased robustness and applicability as required in the medical field. We finally compare our method to existing techniques and provide case studies that confirm its contribution to current simulation pipelines.

  1. On-line sample preconcentration by sweeping with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide in capillary zone electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Maojun; Wehmeyer, Kenneth R.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Heineman, William R.

    2008-01-01

    On-line sample preconcentration of oligonucleotides with a new sweeping carrier was developed by using dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). The sweeping results with DTAB below and above the CMC were compared. The use of DTAB below the CMC benefits the preconcentration of the oligonucleotides, while the use of DTAB above the CMC is good for hydrophobic small molecules. The factors affecting the sweeping results were optimized and this method was evaluated by constructing calibration curves for thrombin aptamers. The sweeping scheme produced a 112-fold sensitivity enhancement for the oligonucleotides relative to that run in a running buffer without DTAB. The sweeping method developed here can be a good reinforcement of the preconcentration scheme by sweeping when less-hydrophobic analytes or large negatively-charged molecules need to be preconcentrated. PMID:16808920

  2. X-5 Multiple Exposure Photo Showing Wing Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1952-01-01

    This NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station photograph of the X-5 was taken at the South Base of Edwards Air Force Base. The photograph, a multiple exposure, illustrates the X-5's variably swept wing capability. The Bell, X-5 was flight tested at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station (now the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) from 1952 to 1955. The X-5 was the first aircraft capable of sweeping its wings in flight. It helped provide data about wing-sweep at angles of up to 60 degrees at subsonic and transonic speeds. There were two X-5 vehicles. Ship 1 was flown at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station (High-Speed Flight Station, as it was redesignated in 1954) from 1951 to 1955. Ship 2 was operated by Bell and the U.S. Air Force and was lost in a spin accident in 1953. Following the conclusion of the contractor's test program, the X-5 was grounded for installation of a NACA instrument package. The Air Force conducted a short, six-flight, evaluation program. Since the Air Force evaluation program included data collection, it was considered as part of the overall NACA effort and flights were logged as AF/NACA. In the NACA test program, the X-5 demonstrated severe stall-spin instability. The X-5 was also used as a chase plane for other research aircraft because it could vary its flying characteristics to suit the airplane it was chasing. Ship 1 flew a total of 133 flights during its three years of service. In spite of the problems with the aircraft, the X-5 provided a significant full-scale verification of NACA wind-tunnel predictions for reduced drag and improved performance that resulted from this configuration's increasing the wing sweep as the speed of the aircraft approached the speed of sound. The X-5 flight tests provided some of the design data for the Air Force F-111 and Navy F-14 tactical aircraft. Although the mechanism by which the X-5 changed its wing sweep made this particular design impractical, development of a

  3. 2 kHz high power smart transducer for acoustic sub-bottom profiling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathishkumar, R.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a 2 kHz Tonpilz projector was designed using a Terfenol-D and modeled in ATILA. For the purpose of modeling studies, it has been determined that a radiating head mass exhibits better transmitting current response (TCR) at 136 mm diameter, where the resonance occurs at 2.4 kHz and the peak value of 118 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1 m occurs at 12 kHz. Also bolt at a 46 mm distance from the center of the head mass offers resonance at 2.4 kHz, and the peak value of 115.3 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1m occurs at 11.5 kHz. This optimized design is fabricated and molded with polyurethane of 3 mm thickness. The prototype was tested at the Acoustic Test Facility (ATF) of National Institute of Ocean Technology (NIOT) for its underwater performances. Based on the result, the fundamental resonance was determined to be 2.18 kHz and the peak value of TCR of 182 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1m occurs at 14 kHz. The maximum value of the RS was found to be -190 dB re 1V/μPa at 1m at a frequency of 2.1 kHz.

  4. Mechanisms underlying intensity-dependent changes in cortical selectivity for frequency-modulated sweeps.

    PubMed

    Razak, K A

    2012-04-01

    Frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps are common components of species-specific vocalizations. The intensity of FM sweeps can cover a wide range in the natural environment, but whether intensity affects neural selectivity for FM sweeps is unclear. Bats, such as the pallid bat, which use FM sweeps for echolocation, are suited to address this issue, because the intensity of echoes will vary with target distance. In this study, FM sweep rate selectivity of pallid bat auditory cortex neurons was measured using downward sweeps at different intensities. Neurons became more selective for FM sweep rates present in the bat's echolocation calls as intensity increased. Increased selectivity resulted from stronger inhibition of responses to slower sweep rates. The timing and bandwidth of inhibition generated by frequencies on the high side of the excitatory tuning curve [sideband high-frequency inhibition (HFI)] shape rate selectivity in cortical neurons in the pallid bat. To determine whether intensity-dependent changes in FM rate selectivity were due to altered inhibition, the timing and bandwidth of HFI were quantified at multiple intensities using the two-tone inhibition paradigm. HFI arrived faster relative to excitation as sound intensity increased. The bandwidth of HFI also increased with intensity. The changes in HFI predicted intensity-dependent changes in FM rate selectivity. These data suggest that neural selectivity for a sweep parameter is not static but shifts with intensity due to changes in properties of sideband inhibition.

  5. Development and testing of a 20-kHz component test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.; Sundberg, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A history of the General Dynamics Space Systems Division 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including its current configuration and its role in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. Highlights and results are presented on a series of tests conducted on the 20 kHz Breadboard. The first test presented is the 20 kHz Breadboard Acceptance test. This test verified the operation of the delivered Breadboard and also characterized the main components of the system. Next, an indepth efficiency testing effort is presented. The tests attempted to apportion all the power losses in the 20 kHz Breadboard Main Invert Units. Distortion test data is presented showing the distortion characteristics of a Mapham inverter. Lastly, current work on the 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including Main Inverter Unit paralleling tests. Conclusions are summarized and references given.

  6. Jupiter's radiation belts and the sweeping effect of its satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.; Hess, W. N.

    1973-01-01

    Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are analyzed, with particular reference to the sweeping effect of its five inner satellites, located deep within its magnetosphere. The characteristics of trapped electrons and protons with a magnetic moment of 50 MeV/G, considered typical at Jupiter, are calculated. The assumption is then made that a particle would be removed from the radiation belt if, in its normal motion, it would happen to impact a satellite. The mean absorption time before impact is calculated for particles located at the radial distance of each of the satellites. This average lifetime is found to be of the order of a few days. A characteristic diffusion time near each satellite was calculated, assuming violation of the third invariant due to magnetic fluctuations associated with fluctuations in the solar wind.

  7. Sweeping the space of admissible quark mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Silke; Häußling, Rainer; Scheck, Florian

    2002-05-01

    We propose a new and efficient method of reconstructing quark mass matrices from their eigenvalues and a complete set of mixing observables. By a combination of the principle of NNI bases which are known to cover the general case, and of the polar decomposition theorem that allows us to convert arbitrary nonsingular matrices to triangular form, we achieve a parametrization where the remaining freedom is reduced to one complex parameter. While this parameter runs through the domain bounded by the circle with radius R=((m2t-m2u)/(m2t-m2c)) around the origin in the complex plane one sweeps the space of all mass matrices compatible with the given set of data.

  8. A double-sweeping preconditioner for the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslaminia, Mehran; Guddati, Murthy N.

    2016-06-01

    A new preconditioner is developed to increase the efficiency of iterative solution of the Helmholtz equation. The key idea of the proposed preconditioner is to split the domain of interest into smaller subdomains and sequentially approximate the forward and backward components of the solution. The sequential solution is facilitated by approximate interface conditions that ignore the effect of multiple reflections. The efficiency of the proposed method is tested using various 2-D heterogeneous media. We observe that the proposed preconditioner results in good convergence, with number of iterations growing very slowly with increasing frequency. We also note that the mesh size and number of subdomains do not affect the convergence rate. Finally, we find that the overall computational time is much smaller than that of the sweeping preconditioner.

  9. Effectiveness of oscillatory gutter brushes in removing street sweeping waste.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Parker, Graham A

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the novel concept of oscillatory gutter brushes of road sweepers is studied experimentally. Their effectiveness in removing different debris types is studied by means of a brushing test rig. The debris types dealt with are medium-size gravel, small and fine particles, wet thin debris, and compacted debris. The performance of two types of brushes, cutting and F128, under diverse operating conditions is investigated. The purpose of the tests is to ascertain whether brush oscillations superimposed onto brush rotation improve sweeping effectiveness. According to the results, brush oscillations seem to be useful for increasing brushing effectiveness in the case of bonded particles and wet thin debris, especially for bonded debris, but they seem to be of no value for other loosed debris. Also, appropriate values of brush penetration, sweeper speed, brush angle of attack, rotational speed, and frequency of brush speed oscillations, for the debris types studied are provided.

  10. Natural Laminar Flow Design for Wings with Moderate Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the aerodynamic design of wings with natural laminar flow is under development at the NASA Langley Research Center. The approach involves the addition of new flow constraints to an existing knowledge-based design module for use with advanced flow solvers. The uniqueness of the new approach lies in the tailoring of target pressure distributions to achieve laminar flow on transonic wings with leading-edge sweeps and Reynolds numbers typical of current transports. The method is demonstrated on the Common Research Model configuration at critical N-factor levels representative of both flight and high-Reynolds number wind tunnel turbulence levels. The design results for the flight conditions matched the target extent of laminar flow very well. The design at wind tunnel conditions raised some design issues that prompted further improvements in the method, but overall has given promising results.

  11. Performance of a prototype detector for use as the sweeping magnet photon-veto in the KOPIO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzikoutelis, A.; Graham, N.; Blecher, M.

    2006-06-01

    A detector system for use as a gamma (γ) veto in the volume of the high field of the sweeping magnet of the KOPIO experiment at BNL is presented here. A laminar design of alternating 5 mm plastic scintillator tiles and 2.54 mm Pb sheets was used. The scintillator signals were readout on both ends by embedded Kuraray Y11-200 multi-clad wave-shifting 1 mm × 19 fibers/tile (WSF). The calibration of the detectors through the single photo-electron (spe) peak of the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and the light attenuation measurements of the fibers were performed using a commercial light emitting diode (LED, blue 465 nm) pulsed with 30 ns pulses at 1kHz. Absolute light yield of a single tile averaged 60 pe per minimum ionizing particle (mip) from cosmic rays. An assembly of 10 scintillator layers combined with nine Pb layers yielded ~ 400 pe/mip. Light intensity attenuation of about 1 dB/m allows the embedded fibers to be extended to lengths of more than 6 m in order to carry the detector signal to PMTs outside the magnetic field, thus simplifying the readout.

  12. Gerbil middle-ear sound transmission from 100 Hz to 60 kHz1

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Cooper, Nigel P.; Rosowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Middle-ear sound transmission was evaluated as the middle-ear transfer admittance HMY (the ratio of stapes velocity to ear-canal sound pressure near the umbo) in gerbils during closed-field sound stimulation at frequencies from 0.1 to 60 kHz, a range that spans the gerbil’s audiometric range. Similar measurements were performed in two laboratories. The HMY magnitude (a) increased with frequency below 1 kHz, (b) remained approximately constant with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, and (c) decreased substantially from 35 to 50 kHz. The HMY phase increased linearly with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, consistent with a 20–29 μs delay, and flattened at higher frequencies. Measurements from different directions showed that stapes motion is predominantly pistonlike except in a narrow frequency band around 10 kHz. Cochlear input impedance was estimated from HMY and previously-measured cochlear sound pressure. Results do not support the idea that the middle ear is a lossless matched transmission line. Results support the ideas that (1) middle-ear transmission is consistent with a mechanical transmission line or multiresonant network between 5 and 35 kHz and decreases at higher frequencies, (2) stapes motion is pistonlike over most of the gerbil auditory range, and (3) middle-ear transmission properties are a determinant of the audiogram. PMID:18646983

  13. Gerbil middle-ear sound transmission from 100 Hz to 60 kHz.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Cooper, Nigel P; Rosowski, John J

    2008-07-01

    Middle-ear sound transmission was evaluated as the middle-ear transfer admittance H(MY) (the ratio of stapes velocity to ear-canal sound pressure near the umbo) in gerbils during closed-field sound stimulation at frequencies from 0.1 to 60 kHz, a range that spans the gerbil's audiometric range. Similar measurements were performed in two laboratories. The H(MY) magnitude (a) increased with frequency below 1 kHz, (b) remained approximately constant with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, and (c) decreased substantially from 35 to 50 kHz. The H(MY) phase increased linearly with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, consistent with a 20-29 micros delay, and flattened at higher frequencies. Measurements from different directions showed that stapes motion is predominantly pistonlike except in a narrow frequency band around 10 kHz. Cochlear input impedance was estimated from H(MY) and previously-measured cochlear sound pressure. Results do not support the idea that the middle ear is a lossless matched transmission line. Results support the ideas that (1) middle-ear transmission is consistent with a mechanical transmission line or multiresonant network between 5 and 35 kHz and decreases at higher frequencies, (2) stapes motion is pistonlike over most of the gerbil auditory range, and (3) middle-ear transmission properties are a determinant of the audiogram.

  14. Air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Sato, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Air puff-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in adult rats, termed "22-kHz calls," have been applied as a useful animal model to develop psychoneurological and psychopharmacological studies focusing on human aversive affective disorders. To date, all previous studies on air puff-induced 22-kHz calls have used outbred rats. Furthermore, newly developed gene targeting technologies, which are essential for further advancement of biomedical experiments using air puff-induced 22-kHz calls, have enabled the production of genetically modified rats using inbred rat strains. Therefore, we considered it necessary to assess air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred rats. In this study, we assessed differences in air puff-induced 22-kHz calls between inbred F344 rats and outbred Wistar rats. Male F344 rats displayed similar total (summed) duration of air puff-induced 22 kHz vocalizations to that of male Wistar rats, however, Wistar rats emitted fewer calls of longer duration, while F344 rats emitted higher number of vocalizations of shorter duration. Additionally, female F344 rats emitted fewer air puff-induced 22-kHz calls than did males, thus confirming the existence of a sex difference that was previously reported for outbred Wistar rats. The results of this study could confirm the reliability of air puff stimulus for induction of a similar amount of emissions of 22-kHz calls in different rat strains, enabling the use of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred F344 rats and derived genetically modified animals in future studies concerning human aversive affective disorders.

  15. Simulation of Sweep-Jet Flow Control, Single Jet and Full Vertical Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Robert E.; Stremel, Paul M.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Heineck, James T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Storms, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a simulation technology demonstrator, of sweep jet flow control used to suppress boundary layer separation and increase the maximum achievable load coefficients. A sweep jet is a discrete Coanda jet that oscillates in the plane parallel to an aerodynamic surface. It injects mass and momentum in the approximate streamwise direction. It also generates turbulent eddies at the oscillation frequency, which are typically large relative to the scales of boundary layer turbulence, and which augment mixing across the boundary layer to attack flow separation. Simulations of a fluidic oscillator, the sweep jet emerging from a nozzle downstream of the oscillator, and an array of sweep jets which suppresses boundary layer separation are performed. Simulation results are compared to data from a dedicated validation experiment of a single oscillator and its sweep jet, and from a wind tunnel test of a full-scale Boeing 757 vertical tail augmented with an array of sweep jets. A critical step in the work is the development of realistic time-dependent sweep jet inflow boundary conditions, derived from the results of the single-oscillator simulations, which create the sweep jets in the full-tail simulations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver Overow, with high-order spatial discretization and a range of turbulence modeling. Good results were obtained for all flows simulated, when suitable turbulence modeling was used.

  16. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 360 - Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure D.... Character (25). 12. SW_Sub_Acct_Identifier Sweep/Automated Credit Sub-Account IdentifierIf available, the.... • AI = Deposit Held in an affiliated depository institution. • FF = Federal Funds. • CP =...

  17. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 360 - Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure D.... Character (25). 12. SW_Sub_Acct_Identifier Sweep/Automated Credit Sub-Account IdentifierIf available, the.... • AI = Deposit Held in an affiliated depository institution. • FF = Federal Funds. • CP =...

  18. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 360 - Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure D.... Character (25). 12. SW_Sub_Acct_Identifier Sweep/Automated Credit Sub-Account IdentifierIf available, the.... • AI = Deposit Held in an affiliated depository institution. • FF = Federal Funds. • CP =...

  19. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 360 - Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure D.... Character (25). 12. SW_Sub_Acct_Identifier Sweep/Automated Credit Sub-Account IdentifierIf available, the.... • AI = Deposit Held in an affiliated depository institution. • FF = Federal Funds. • CP =...

  20. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 360 - Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweep/Automated Credit Account File Structure D.... Character (25). 12. SW_Sub_Acct_Identifier Sweep/Automated Credit Sub-Account IdentifierIf available, the.... • AI = Deposit Held in an affiliated depository institution. • FF = Federal Funds. • CP =...

  1. Benefits of 20 kHz PMAD in a nuclear space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1987-01-01

    Compared to existing systems, high frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety benefits. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources; photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines and nuclear. A 25 kW, 20 kHz ac power distribution system testbed was recently (1986) developed. The testbed possesses maximum flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology while maintaining high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume. Several aspects of the 20 kHz power management and distribution (PMAD) system that have particular benefits for a nuclear power Space Station are discussed.

  2. Analysis of Massively Parallel Discrete-Ordinates Transport Sweep Algorithms with Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Falgout, R D

    2008-10-14

    We present theoretical scaling models for a variety of discrete-ordinates sweep algorithms. In these models, we pay particular attention to the way each algorithm handles collisions. A collision is defined as a processor having multiple angles with ready to be swept during one stage of the sweep. The models also take into account how subdomains are assigned to processors and how angles are grouped during the sweep. We describe a data driven algorithm that resolves collisions efficiently during the sweep as well as other algorithms that have been designed to avoid collisions completely. Our models are validated using the ARGES and AMTRAN transport codes. We then use the models to study and predict scaling trends in all of the sweep algorithms.

  3. Aging and the 4-kHz Air-Bone Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed age- and sex-related patterns in the prevalence and 10-year incidence of 4-kHz air-bone gaps and associated factors. Method: Data were obtained as part of the longitudinal, population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study ( Cruickshanks et al., 1998). An air-bone gap at 4 kHz was defined as an…

  4. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Cara L.; Malavar, Jordan C.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Rats emit 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol’s stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50 kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50 kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50 kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50 kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50 kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning. PMID:24914463

  5. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Buck, Cara L; Malavar, Jordan C; George, Olivier; Koob, George F; Vendruscolo, Leandro F

    2014-09-01

    Rats emit 50kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol's stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning.

  6. 47 CFR 73.30 - Petition for authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the 1605-1705 kHz band. 73.30 Section 73.30 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band. (a) Any party interested in operating an AM broadcast station on one of the ten channels in the 1605-1705 kHz band must file a petition for the establishment...

  7. An Evaluation of the General Dynamics 20 Khz 5 Kw Breadboard for Space Station Electrical Power at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David K.; Kapustka, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    The results and observations are discussed of tests made on the General Dynamics 20 kHz Breadboard for Space Station Electrical Power. The General Dynamics 20 kHz system only is considered, and not the issue of the use of 20 kHz ac Power for Spacecraft Applications.

  8. High Speed Computational Ghost Imaging via Spatial Sweeping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwang; Liu, Yang; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Qiao, Chang; Dai, Qionghai

    2017-01-01

    Computational ghost imaging (CGI) achieves single-pixel imaging by using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) to generate structured illuminations for spatially resolved information encoding. The imaging speed of CGI is limited by the modulation frequency of available SLMs, and sets back its practical applications. This paper proposes to bypass this limitation by trading off SLM’s redundant spatial resolution for multiplication of the modulation frequency. Specifically, a pair of galvanic mirrors sweeping across the high resolution SLM multiply the modulation frequency within the spatial resolution gap between SLM and the final reconstruction. A proof-of-principle setup with two middle end galvanic mirrors achieves ghost imaging as fast as 42 Hz at 80 × 80-pixel resolution, 5 times faster than state-of-the-arts, and holds potential for one magnitude further multiplication by hardware upgrading. Our approach brings a significant improvement in the imaging speed of ghost imaging and pushes ghost imaging towards practical applications. PMID:28358010

  9. A Stepped Frequency Sweeping Method for Nonlinearity Measurement of Microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumiao; Dong, Yonggui; Huang, Xianxiang; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the nonlinear features of micromechanical resonators, a free damped oscillation method based on stair-stepped frequency sinusoidal pulse excitation is investigated. In the vicinity of the resonant frequency, a frequency stepping sinusoidal pulse sequence is employed as the excitation signal. A set of free vibration response signals, containing different degrees of nonlinear dynamical characteristics, are obtained. The amplitude-frequency curves of the resonator are acquired from the forced vibration signals. Together with a singular spectrum analysis algorithm, the instantaneous amplitudes and instantaneous frequencies are extracted by a Hilbert transform from the free vibration signals. The calculated Backbone curves, and frequency response function (FRF) curves are distinct and can be used to characterize the nonlinear dynamics of the resonator. Taking a Duffing system as an example, numerical simulations are carried out for free vibration response signals in cases of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The results show that this method displays better anti-noise performance than FREEVIB. A vibrating ring microgyroscope is experimentally tested. The obtained Backbone and FRF curves agree with those obtained by the traditional frequency sweeping method. As a test technique, the proposed method can also be used to for experimentally testing the dynamic characteristics of other types of micromechanical resonators. PMID:27754381

  10. 500 kHz OPCPA delivering tunable sub-20 fs pulses with 15 W average power based on an all-ytterbium laser.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Michele; Deng, Yunpei; Prochnow, Oliver; Ahrens, Jan; Binhammer, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe; Krenz, Marcel; Wolf, Martin; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    An optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier fully based on Yb lasers at 500 kHz is described. Passive optical-synchronization is achieved between a fiber laser-pumped white-light and a 515 nm pump produced with a 200 W picosecond Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier. An output power up to 19.7 W with long-term stability of 0.3% is demonstrated for wavelength tunable pulses between 680 nm and 900 nm and spectral stability of 0.2%; 16.5 W can be achieved with a bandwidth supporting 5.4 fs pulses. We demonstrate compression of 30 µJ pulses to sub-20 fs duration with a prism compressor, suitable for high harmonic generation.

  11. Experimental determination of optimum gutter brush parameters and road sweeping criteria for different types of waste.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Wang, Chong; Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Parker, Graham A

    2011-06-01

    The removal ability of gutter brushes for road sweeping for various debris types and different sweeping parameters is studied through experimental tests. The brushing test rig used comprises two commercial gutter brushes, a concrete test bed, and an asphalt test road with a gutter of 0.25 cm width and 10° slope. The brush-surface contact area is determined by sweeping sand on the concrete test bed. Sweeping problems are identified and discussed, and sweeping criteria for the different debris types are suggested. Also, optimum sweeping parameters are proposed for each debris type. In addition, debris removal mechanisms are discussed and analysed. The results indicate that for large heavy debris such as stones and gravel, it is not difficult to achieve large removal forces, because the steel bristles are relatively stiff. Conversely, high removal forces are not needed for particles of millimetre or micron sizes, but bristle curvature has to be appropriate to remove particles from road concavities. Finally, it is found that mud, especially dry mud on a rough surface, is the hardest debris to sweep, requiring a brush with a large tilt angle and a very large penetration to produce large removal forces.

  12. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping angle during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It is well regarded as a safe and minimally invasive procedure and an alternative to the gold standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Despite of its greatness, as well aware of, the operative procedure time during the PVP is still prolonged. Such attempts have been tried out in order to shorten the operative time and increase its efficacy. However, scientific study to investigate techniques used during the PVP is still lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate how sweeping angle might affect the PVP performance. Porcine kidneys acquired from a local grocery store were used (N=140). A Q-switched 532-nm GreenLight XPSTM (American Medical Systems, Inc., MN, USA), together with 750- μm core MoXyTM fiber, was set to have power levels of 120 W and 180 W. Treatment speed and sweeping speed were fixed at 2 mm/s and 0.5 sweep/s, respectively. Sweeping angles were varied from 0 (no sweeping motion) to 120 degree. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation zone were measured and quantified. Tissue ablation rate was peaked at 15 and 30 degree for both 120- and 180-W power levels and dramatically decreased beyond 60 degree. At 180 W, ablation rate increased 20% at 30 degree compared to 0 degree. This study demonstrated that ablation rate could be maximized and was contingent upon sweeping angle.

  13. Measurements of the eigenfunction of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes that sweep downward in frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Spong, D. A.; Tobias, B. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    Reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) usually sweep upward in frequency when the minimum value of the safety factor qmin decreases in time. On rare occasions, RSAEs sweep downward prior to the upward sweep. Electron cyclotron emission measurements show that the radial eigenfunction during the downsweeping phase is similar to the eigenfunction of normal, upsweeping RSAEs.

  14. Monitoring insects in sweetpotatoes with sweep net and sticky traps across the Mississippi Delta: a omparative study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect populations in sweetpotato fields in the Mississippi Delta were monitored in 2007 by comparing traditional sweep net sampling with purple and yellow sticky traps. Four sweep net samples each consisting of 25 sweeps were taken weekly from each of four different locations from 2 July to 3 Sept...

  15. Autonomous Planning and Replanning for Mine-Sweeping Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    This software generates high-quality plans for carrying out mine-sweeping activities under resource constraints. The autonomous planning and replanning system for unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) takes as input a set of prioritized mine-sweep regions, and a specification of available UUV resources including available battery energy, data storage, and time available for accomplishing the mission. Mine-sweep areas vary in location, size of area to be swept, and importance of the region. The planner also works with a model of the UUV, as well as a model of the power consumption of the vehicle when idle and when moving.

  16. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  17. THE SPECTRAL-TIMING PROPERTIES OF UPPER AND LOWER kHz QPOs

    SciTech Connect

    Peille, Philippe; Barret, Didier; Uttley, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Soft lags from the emission of the lower kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have been reported from 4U1608-522 and 4U1636-536. Those lags hold prospects for constraining the origin of the QPO emission. In this paper, we investigate the spectral-timing properties of both the lower and upper kHz QPOs from the neutron star binary 4U1728-34, using the entire Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer archive on this source. We show that the lag-energy spectra of the two QPOs are systematically different: while the lower kHz QPO shows soft lags, the upper kHz QPO shows either a flat lag-energy spectrum or hard variations lagging softer variations. This suggests two different QPO-generation mechanisms. We also performed the first spectral deconvolution of the covariance spectra of both kHz QPOs. The QPO spectra are consistent with Comptonized blackbody emission, similar to the one found in the time-averaged spectrum, but with a higher seed-photon temperature, suggesting that a more compact inner region of the Comptonization layer (boundary/spreading layer, corona) is responsible for the QPO emission. Considering our results together with other recent findings, this leads us to the hypothesis that the lower kHz QPO signal is generated by coherent oscillations of the compact boundary layer region itself. The upper kHz QPO signal may then be linked to less-coherent accretion-rate variations produced in the inner accretion disk, and is then detected when they reach the boundary layer.

  18. An investigation of airflow over the aft portions of a variable sweep fighter configuration. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, E. B.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of air flow over the aft portions of a variable sweep fighter aircraft configuration was made. Tests conducted in the unitary plan wind tunnel at Mach number 2.16 included measurements of forces, moments, and local static pressures as well as visual recordings of the air flow. An aerodynamic analytical prediction method was evaluated when used in data comparison at angles of attack of 0, 5, and 15 degrees. The results indicate that in supersonic flow the typical outboard located twin vertical tail arrangement tends to provide a more positive increment in normal-force on the afterbody fuselage and the horizontal tail than a single center-mounted vertical tail of similar planform shape. In addition, the results indicate that a method for aerodynamic analysis of wing-body-tail configurations currently available can provide reasonable estimates of pressure coefficient distributions on configurations in regions of complex supersonic flow. At this time, however, the available analytical method cannot adequately replace experimental wind tunnel tests for determining the supersonic flow environment of a given configuration.

  19. NGC 3312: A victim of ram pressure sweeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, P. M.; Richter, O.-G.; Vangorkom, Jacqueline H.; Ferguson, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers are undertaking a volume limited survey of the Hydra I cluster in neutral hydrogen using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (VLA). The main purpose is to study the effects of a dense environment on the gaseous component of the galaxies. Observational evidence has been accumulating recently that ram pressure sweeping does occur in the centers of clusters, but it is possible that tidal interactions play a role as well. Results of high resolution HI imaging of NGC 3312, the large peculiar spiral near the cluster center are presented. Hydra I (= A1060) is the nearest rich cluster beyond Virgo and, as such, presents a unique opportunity to do a complete survey of a cluster. It is similar to the Virgo cluster in many of its general physical characteristics, such as size, x ray luminosity, velocity dispersion, and galaxy content (high spiral fraction). However, Hydra I appears to be more regular and relaxed. This is evident in the x ray distribution in its central region, which is radially symmetric and centered on the dominant galaxy, NGC 3311, a cD-like elliptical. The observed x ray luminosity implies a central gas density of 4.5 x 10 to the 3rd power cm(-3). Gallagher (1978) argued from optical images of NGC 3312 that this galaxy might be an ideal candidate to directly study effects of the ram pressure process; it might currently be undergoing stripping of its interstellar medium. The researchers' data are consistent with this suggestion, but other origins of the peculiar appearance cannot yet be ruled out.

  20. Variable Field Analytical Ultracentrifugation: II. Gravitational Sweep Sedimentation Velocity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia; Zhao, Huaying; Sandmaier, Julia; Alexander Liddle, J; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-05

    Sedimentation velocity (SV) analytical ultracentrifugation is a classical biophysical technique for the determination of the size-distribution of macromolecules, macromolecular complexes, and nanoparticles. SV has traditionally been carried out at a constant rotor speed, which limits the range of sedimentation coefficients that can be detected in a single experiment. Recently we have introduced methods to implement experiments with variable rotor speeds, in combination with variable field solutions to the Lamm equation, with the application to expedite the approach to sedimentation equilibrium. Here, we describe the use of variable-field sedimentation analysis to increase the size-range covered in SV experiments by ∼100-fold with a quasi-continuous increase of rotor speed during the experiment. Such a gravitational-sweep sedimentation approach has previously been shown to be very effective in the study of nanoparticles with large size ranges. In the past, diffusion processes were not accounted for, thereby posing a lower limit of particle sizes and limiting the accuracy of the size distribution. In this work, we combine variable field solutions to the Lamm equation with diffusion-deconvoluted sedimentation coefficient distributions c(s), which further extend the macromolecular size range that can be observed in a single SV experiment while maintaining accuracy and resolution. In this way, approximately five orders of magnitude of sedimentation coefficients, or eight orders of magnitude of particle mass, can be probed in a single experiment. This can be useful, for example, in the study of proteins forming large assemblies, as in fibrillation process or capsid self-assembly, in studies of the interaction between very dissimilar-sized macromolecular species, or in the study of broadly distributed nanoparticles.

  1. Pollutant characteristics of road deposited sediments collected by road sweeping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Gun; Kim, Hyun-Seop; Kang, Hee-Man; Ko, Seok-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Road deposited sediments (RDS) swept from highways in South Korea were characterized to quantitatively evaluate the reduction in non-point source pollutants by sweeping. The swept RDS consisted primarily of sand (63 μm to 2 mm) particles (80.34 ± 8.33% of total weight) highly contaminated by organics, nutrients and heavy metals. The average concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), volatile solids (VS), total nitrogen (T-N), and total phosphorus (T-P) were 20.17 ± 9.13, 1.04 ± 0.62, 39.92 ± 16.55, 1.99 ± 0.96, and 0.54 ± 0.19 g kg(-1) (±one standard deviation), respectively, for 63 μm to 2 mm RDS. The concentrations of the pollutants were high for RDS smaller than 63 μm, but most of the mass was associated with the 63 μm to 2 mm RDS. The results suggest that the pollutants associated with RDS swept from highways originated mainly from engine wear, exhaust emissions, and tire wear. These results were different from the RDS on roads in residential and commercial areas, where natural particles and brake wear contribute significantly to RDS. In addition, the reductions in TOC, BOD, VS, T-N, T-P, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, and As based on the swept RDS measurements were calculated to be 3,355.3, 175.1, 6,621.4, 323.0, 88.3, 30.3, 13.7, 1.0, 303.4, 11,198.7, and 0.4 g km(-1), respectively.

  2. NGC 3312: A victim of Ram pressure sweeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, P. M.; Richter, O.-G.; van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Ferguson, H. C.

    1990-07-01

    Researchers are undertaking a volume limited survey of the Hydra I cluster in neutral hydrogen using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (VLA). The main purpose is to study the effects of a dense environment on the gaseous component of the galaxies. Observational evidence has been accumulating recently that ram pressure sweeping does occur in the centers of clusters, but it is possible that tidal interactions play a role as well. Results of high resolution HI imaging of NGC 3312, the large peculiar spiral near the cluster center are presented. Hydra I (= A1060) is the nearest rich cluster beyond Virgo and, as such, presents a unique opportunity to do a complete survey of a cluster. It is similar to the Virgo cluster in many of its general physical characteristics, such as size, x ray luminosity, velocity dispersion, and galaxy content (high spiral fraction). However, Hydra I appears to be more regular and relaxed. This is evident in the x ray distribution in its central region, which is radially symmetric and centered on the dominant galaxy, NGC 3311, a cD-like elliptical. The observed x ray luminosity implies a central gas density of 4.5 x 10 to the 3rd power cm(-3). Gallagher (1978) argued from optical images of NGC 3312 that this galaxy might be an ideal candidate to directly study effects of the ram pressure process; it might currently be undergoing stripping of its interstellar medium. The researchers' data are consistent with this suggestion, but other origins of the peculiar appearance cannot yet be ruled out.

  3. Mechanistic Understanding of Microbial Plugging for Improved Sweep Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Larry Britton

    2008-09-30

    Microbial plugging has been proposed as an effective low cost method of permeability reduction. Yet there is a dearth of information on the fundamental processes of microbial growth in porous media, and there are no suitable data to model the process of microbial plugging as it relates to sweep efficiency. To optimize the field implementation, better mechanistic and volumetric understanding of biofilm growth within a porous medium is needed. In particular, the engineering design hinges upon a quantitative relationship between amount of nutrient consumption, amount of growth, and degree of permeability reduction. In this project experiments were conducted to obtain new data to elucidate this relationship. Experiments in heterogeneous (layered) beadpacks showed that microbes could grow preferentially in the high permeability layer. Ultimately this caused flow to be equally divided between high and low permeability layers, precisely the behavior needed for MEOR. Remarkably, classical models of microbial nutrient uptake in batch experiments do not explain the nutrient consumption by the same microbes in flow experiments. We propose a simple extension of classical kinetics to account for the self-limiting consumption of nutrient observed in our experiments, and we outline a modeling approach based on architecture and behavior of biofilms. Such a model would account for the changing trend of nutrient consumption by bacteria with the increasing biomass and the onset of biofilm formation. However no existing model can explain the microbial preference for growth in high permeability regions, nor is there any obvious extension of the model for this observation. An attractive conjecture is that quorum sensing is involved in the heterogeneous bead packs.

  4. Performance analysis of half-sweep AOR method with nonlocal discretization scheme for nonlinear two-point boundary value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibubin, M. U.; Sunarto, A.; Sulaiman, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of Half-sweep Accelerated OverRelaxation (HSAOR) iterative method with a nonlocal discretization scheme for solving nonlinear two-point boundary value problems. Second order finite difference scheme has been used to derive the half-sweep finite difference (HSFD) approximations of the problems. Then, the nonlocal discretization scheme is applied in order to transform the system of nonlinear approximation equations into the corresponding system of linear equations. Numerical results showed that HSAOR method is superior compared to Full-sweep Gauss-seidel (FSGS), Full-sweep Successive OverRelaxation (FSSOR) and Full-sweep Accelerated Over Relaxation (FSAOR) methods.

  5. Spectroscopic Classification of Three Supernovae with the Xinglong 2.16-m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Li, Linyi; Zhang, Xinhan; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-02-01

    We report the classifications of the following three transients from the surveys of iPTF, ASASSN, and Master Robertic Net. The spectroscopic observations were performed with the Xinglong 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) on 2017 Feb. 17. Classifications were performed with the SNID code (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024).

  6. Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Airborne Radar Using SweepSAR Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavey, Brandon A.; Lin, Lung-Sheng S.; Quaddus, Momin

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes a frequency-scaled SweepSAR demonstration that operates at Ka-Band (35.6 GHz), and closely approximates the DESDynl mission antenna geometry, scaled by 28. The concept relies on the SweepSAR measurement technique. An array of digital receivers captures waveforms from a multiplicity of elements. These are combined using digital beamforming in elevation and SAR processing to produce imagery. Ka-band (35.6 GHz) airborne SweepSAR using array-fed reflector and digital beamforming features eight simultaneous receive beams generated by a 40-cm offset-fed reflector and eight-element active array feed, and eight digital receiver channels with all raw data recorded and later used for beamforming. Illumination of the swath is accomplished using a slotted-waveguide antenna radiating 250 W peak power. This experiment has been used to demonstrate digital beamforming SweepSAR systems.

  7. Dynamics of a many-particle Landau-Zener model: Inverse sweep

    SciTech Connect

    Itin, A. P.

    2009-05-15

    We consider dynamics of a slowly time-dependent Dicke model, which represents a many-body generalization of the Landau-Zener model. In particular, the model describes narrow Feshbach resonance passage in an ultracold gas of Fermi atoms. Adiabaticity is destroyed when a parameter crosses a critical value, even at very slow sweeping rates of a parameter. The dynamics crucially depends on direction of the sweep. We apply our recent analysis (A. P. Itin and P. Toermae, e-print arXiv:0901.4778) to the 'inverse' sweep through the resonance, corresponding (in a context of Feshbach resonance passage) to dissociation of molecules. On a level of the mean-field approximation, the dynamics is equivalent to a molecular condensate formation from Bose atoms within a two-mode model. Mapping the system to a Painleve equation allows us to calculate deviation from adiabaticity at very slow sweeps analytically.

  8. Transionospheric attenuation of 100 kHz radio waves inferred from satellite and ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Parrot, Michel; Ash, Matthew; Astin, Ivan; Williams, Paul; Talhi, R.

    2009-03-01

    Around fifty LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) transmitters in the northern hemisphere currently launch continuously pulsed 100 kHz radio waves into the Earth's atmosphere for marine navigation. It is discovered that the 100 kHz radio waves from the LORAN transmissions can be detected by the DEMETER satellite at an altitude of ~660 km above the transmitters. These novel electric field measurements in space enable the determination of the nocturnal transionospheric attenuation by comparison with ground based electric field measurements. The electric field measurements on the satellite indicate that the nocturnal transionospheric attenuation of 100 kHz radio waves from LORAN transmissions is equivalent to a nocturnal subionospheric attenuation of the 100 kHz radio waves at a distance of ~7-9 Mm. The radio waves exhibit an average subionospheric attenuation of ~5 dB/Mm and it is concluded that the nocturnal transionospheric attenuation of 100 kHz radio waves is ~35-45 dB. This result enables future space missions to quantify the intensity of lightning discharges associated with transient luminous events and terrestrial γ-ray flashes.

  9. Fast Sweeping Algorithms for a Class of Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-06

    the above type with variable coefficients. 1.1. Solving eikonal equations. In geometrical optics [10], the eikonal equa- tion √ φ2x + φ 2 y = r(x, y...of iterations for isotropic, homogeneous eikonal equations. This points out a future research direction of bounding the number of sweeping iterations...difficult cases. Key words. Hamilton–Jacobi equations, fast marching, fast sweeping, upwind finite differen- cing, eikonal equations AMS subject

  10. Sweep-free distributed Brillouin time-domain analyzer (SF-BOTDA).

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Asher; Yilmaz, Omer F; Willner, Alan W; Tur, Moshe

    2011-12-12

    A frequency-sweep-free method for distributed Brillouin sensing is proposed, having the potential for fast dynamic strain measurements. In this reported implementation of the method, multiple probe waves with carefully chosen optical frequencies simultaneously propagate in the fiber against an equal number of sequentially-launched, short pump pulses of matching frequencies, where each of pump-probe pair replaces one sweeping step in the classical BOTDA technique. Experimentally, distributed sensing is demonstrated with a spatial resolution of a few meters.

  11. A novel methodology for determining low-cost fine particulate matter street sweeping routes.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Carola A; Beghelli, Alejandra; Meneses, Veronica P

    2012-02-01

    This paper addresses the problem of low-cost PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 10 microm) street sweeping route. In order to do so, only a subset of the streets of the urban area to be swept is selected for sweeping, based on their PM10 emission factor values. Subsequently, a low-cost route that visits each street in the set is computed. Unlike related problems of waste collection where streets must be visited once (Chinese or Rural Postman Problem, respectively), in this case, the sweeping vehicle route must visit each selected street exactly as many times as its number of street sides, since the vehicle can sweep only one street side at a time. Additionally, the route must comply with traffic flow and turn constraints. A novel transformation of the original arc routing problem into a node routing problem is proposed in this paper. This is accomplished by building a graph that represents the area to sweep in such a way that the problem can be solved by applying any known solution to the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). As a way of illustration, the proposed method was applied to the northeast area of the Municipality of Santiago (Chile). Results show that the proposed methodology achieved up to 37% savings in kilometers traveled by the sweeping vehicle when compared to the solution obtained by solving the TSP problem with Geographic Information Systems (GIS)--aware tools.

  12. Mikkelson sweep/spike chisel plow shovel. Economic summary of the 1992 crop season

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Profitability comparisons are reported between the Mikkelson Sweep/Spike Chisel Plow Shovel standard sweeps. This evaluation covers the first year of testing of the new Sweep/Spike design. The data are not averaged over treatments due to significant interaction between treatments and environmental factors. The cost of fuel, fall and spring, to perform the various treatments ranged from $1.27 to $3.36 per acre. Use of the sweep/spike shovel always reduced total fuel cost. Savings varied from $0.11 to $0.71 per acre depending on prior treatment. This means there will be money saved, to off-set expenses, when converting present chisel plows or for special options on new chisel plows, needed for use of the sweep/spike shovel. A summary of 1991--1992 energy measurements. They indicate that more power will be required to pull a chisel plow equipped with the sweep/spike shovel. A larger tractor, narrower chisel plow and/or slower speed will be required to avoid the wheel slippage problems encountered on soft or wet field surfaces.

  13. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus pyogenes populations is induced by recombination-driven gene-specific sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Lee, Shaun W.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic recombination plays an important role in driving adaptive evolution and population differentiation in bacteria. However, controversy exists as to the effects of recombination on population diversity and differentiation, i.e., recombination is frequent enough to sweep through the population at selected gene loci (gene-specific sweeps), or the recombination rate is low without interfering genome-wide selective sweeps. Observations supporting either view are sparse. Pathogenic bacteria causing infectious diseases are promising candidates to provide observations of recombination. However, phenotype-associated differentiations are usually vague among them due to diverse disease manifestations. Here we report a population genomic study of the group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), a human pathogen with highly recombining genomes. By employing a genome-wide association study on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrate a phenotypic differentiation of GAS, represented by separate clustering of two sublineages associated with niche-specific infections, i.e., skin infection and pharyngitis-induced acute rheumatic fever. By quantifying SNPs associated with the differentiation in a statistical and phylogenetic context, we propose that the phenotype-associated differentiation arose through recombination-driven gene-specific sweeps, rather than genome-wide sweeps. Our work provides a novel paradigm of phenotype-associated differentiation induced by gene-specific sweeps in a human pathogen and has implications for understanding of driving forces of bacterial evolution. PMID:27821851

  14. Determination of the magnetocaloric entropy change by field sweep using a heat flux setup

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, J. C. B. Reis, R. D. dos; Mansanares, A. M.; Gandra, F. G.

    2014-08-18

    We report on a simple setup using a heat flux sensor adapted to a Quantum Design Physical Property Measurement System to determine the magnetocaloric entropy change (ΔS). The major differences for the existing setups are the simplicity of this assembly and the ease to obtain the isothermal entropy change either by a field sweep or a temperature sweep process. We discuss the use of these two processes applied to Gd and Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} samples. The results are compared to the temperature sweep measurements and they show the advantages of this setup and of the field sweep procedure. We found a significant reduction of ΔS and on the refrigerating cooling power (RCP) at low field changes in a field sweep process when the sample is not driven to the same initial state for each temperature. We show that the field sweep process without any measuring protocol is the only correct way to experimentally determine ΔS and RCP for a practical regenerative refrigerator.

  15. Modulation of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields Elicited by Successive Frequency-Modulated (FM) Sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2017-01-01

    In our daily life, we are successively exposed to frequency-modulated (FM) sounds that play an important role in speech and species-specific communication. Previous studies demonstrated that repetitive exposure to identical pure tones resulted in decreased neural activity. However, the effects of repetitively presented FM sounds on neural activity in the human auditory cortex remain unclear. In the present study, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked N1m responses elicited by four successive temporally repeated and superimposed FM sweeps in three sequences: (1) four FM sweeps were identical, (2) four FM sweeps had the same FM direction and rate, but different carrier frequencies, (3) four FM sweeps differed with respect to the FM rate and/or direction and their carrier frequencies. In contrast to our expectations, the results obtained demonstrated that N1m responses were maximal when the four FM sweeps were identical and minimal when they were distinct. These results suggest that the neural processing of repetitive FM sweeps in the human auditory cortex may differ from that of repetitive pure tones. PMID:28220066

  16. Using sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography to analyze Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Su, Hsiu-Li; Feng, Lan-Ing; Jen, Hsiu-Ping; Hsieh, You-Zung

    2009-04-17

    We have applied sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) to the simultaneous determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolites, 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH). We monitored the effects of several of the sweeping-MEKC parameters, including the proportion of organic modifier, the concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the pH, and the sample injection volume, to optimize the separation process. The optimal buffer for the analysis of the three analytes was 25 mM citric acid/disodium hydrogenphosphate (pH 2.6) containing 40% methanol and 75 mM SDS. Under the optimized separation parameters, the enrichment factors for THC, THC-COOH, and THC-OH when using sweeping-MEKC (relative to MEKC) were 77, 139, and 200, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for the three compounds in standard solutions ranged from 3.87 to 15.2 ng/mL. We combined the sweeping-MEKC method with solid-phase extraction to successfully detect THC, THC-COOH, and THC-OH in human urine with acceptable repeatability. The LODs of these analytes in urine samples ranged from 17.2 to 23.3 ng/mL. Therefore, this sweeping-MEKC method is useful for determining, with high sensitivity, the amounts of THC and its metabolites in the urine of suspected THC users.

  17. Influence of Finite Span and Sweep on Active Flow Control Efficacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    Active flow control efficacy was investigated by means of leading-edge and flap-shoulder zero mass-flux blowing slots on a semispan wing model that was tested in unswept (standard) and swept configurations. On the standard configuration, stall commenced inboard, but with sweep the wing stalled initially near the tip. On both configurations, leading-edge perturbations increased CL,max and post stall lift, both with and without deflected flaps. Without sweep, the effect of control was approximately uniform across the wing span but remained effective to high angles of attack near the tip; when sweep was introduced a significant effect was noted inboard, but this effect degraded along the span and produced virtually no meaningful lift enhancement near the tip, irrespective of the tip configuration. In the former case, control strengthened the wingtip vortex; in the latter case, a simple semi-empirical model, based on the trajectory or "streamline" of the evolving perturbation, served to explain the observations. In the absence of sweep, control on finite-span flaps did not differ significantly from their nominally twodimensional counterpart. Control from the flap produced expected lift enhancement and CL,max improvements in the absence of sweep, but these improvements degraded with the introduction of sweep.

  18. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments to Design Sweeping Jets for High Reynolds Number Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Fell, Jared S.; Webb, Sandy R.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The application of a sweeping jet actuator to a circulation control system was initiated by a risk reduction series of experiments to optimize the authority of a single sweeping jet actuator. The sweeping jet design was integrated into the existing Fundamental Aerodynamic Subsonic Transonic- Modular Active Control (FAST-MAC) model by replacing the steady blowing system with an array of thirty-nine sweeping jet cartridges. A constant slot height to wing chord ratio was similar to the steady blowing configuration resulting in each actuator having a unique in size for the sweeping jet configuration. While this paper will describe the scaling and optimization of the actuators for future high Reynolds number applications, the major focus of this effort was to target the transonic flight regime by increasing the amplitude authority of the actuator. This was accomplished by modifying the diffuser of the sweeping jet actuator, and this paper highlights twelve different diffuser designs. The experimental portion of this work was completed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility.

  19. Modulation of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields Elicited by Successive Frequency-Modulated (FM) Sweeps.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2017-01-01

    In our daily life, we are successively exposed to frequency-modulated (FM) sounds that play an important role in speech and species-specific communication. Previous studies demonstrated that repetitive exposure to identical pure tones resulted in decreased neural activity. However, the effects of repetitively presented FM sounds on neural activity in the human auditory cortex remain unclear. In the present study, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked N1m responses elicited by four successive temporally repeated and superimposed FM sweeps in three sequences: (1) four FM sweeps were identical, (2) four FM sweeps had the same FM direction and rate, but different carrier frequencies, (3) four FM sweeps differed with respect to the FM rate and/or direction and their carrier frequencies. In contrast to our expectations, the results obtained demonstrated that N1m responses were maximal when the four FM sweeps were identical and minimal when they were distinct. These results suggest that the neural processing of repetitive FM sweeps in the human auditory cortex may differ from that of repetitive pure tones.

  20. Plasma antennas driven by 5–20 kHz AC power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiansen Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-15

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5–20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  1. 2- to 3-kHz continuum emissions as possible indications of global heliospheric 'breathing'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzedzielski, S.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper analyzes the main features of 2- to 3-kHz heliospheric emissions in the context of a general heliospheric 'breathing' as inferred from the Voyager 2 solar wind average ram pressure data. Triggers for the three 3-kHz emission events seen to date are suggested, and good agreement is obtained in timing and expected postshock frequency for termination shock distances of about 90 AU. It is suggested that the visibility of the individual 3-kHz events and their observed upward frequency drift are enhanced when the postulated global heliospheric expansion results in the formation of a transient, compressed external plasma barrier around the heliopause that prevents radiation escape for several months. The average termination shock distance is estimated to be in the range 80-90 AU.

  2. Plasma antennas driven by 5-20 kHz AC power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiansen; Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-01

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5-20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  3. 20 kHz main inverter unit. [for space station power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, S.

    1989-01-01

    A proof-of-concept main inverter unit has demonstrated the operation of a pulse-width-modulated parallel resonant power stage topology as a 20-kHz ac power source driver, showing simple output regulation, parallel operation, power sharing and short-circuit operation. The use of a two-stage dc input filter controls the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) characteristics of the dc power bus, and the use of an ac harmonic trap controls the EMC characteristics of the 20-kHz ac power bus.

  4. MD-1324 and MD-1324A 5kHz Modem Overview, Issues and Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Contactor providing TSN support on DMR , MD-1324 1 Mar 2011 "Sustaining the Tactical Edge through reliable C4ISR UHF SATCOM Support" Distribution...UHF SATCOM Antenna and an External HPA / Up Converter (like a UHF SATCOM AN/WSC-3, ARC-210, or DMR RFS). ▼ Supports 5kHz and 25kHz DAMA and Non...Low cost light weight comms to manpac radio users and low data rate reliable comms to disadvantaged users. ▼ Simultaneously supports two

  5. Observation of 20-400 kHz fluctuations in the U-3M torsatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M. B.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.; Sorokovoy, E. L.; Slavnyj, A. S.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Kulaga, A. E.; Zamanov, N. V.; Hirose, A.

    2016-02-01

    First observations of quasi-coherent fluctuations in the frequency range of 20-400 kHz in Alfvén-wave-heated plasmas of the U-3M torsatron are presented. The excitation conditions of these modes depend on the radio frequency antenna type and the plasma density, the appearance of the modes correlating with the presence of both suprathermal electrons and high-energy ions in the plasma, which supports our opinion that the modes are excited by energetic particles. Complicated evolution of the mode frequencies with abrupt changes at the instants of plasma confinement transitions is observed at the initial stage of each discharge. The frequencies become stable at the stage of the plasma current flattop. Raw estimates show that toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes could be responsible for the 150-400 kHz fluctuations. Low-frequency 20-70 kHz bursts are observed during plasma confinement transitions. The poloidal mode number of one of these bursts with the frequency of 20 kHz burst was determined to be m = 2. This mode rotated in the electron diamagnetic rotation direction with a frequency lower than the geodesic acoustic mode frequency and can be identified as a drift-sound-type mode.

  6. An 18 bit 50 kHz ADC for low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    A fourth order incremental analog to digital converter (ADC) is proposed which performs 18 bit conversions at a 50 kHz rate on sampled and held data. A new self calibration scheme is presented which eases the matching requirements of capacitors, and the performance of the operational amplifiers in the ADC by changing coefficients in the digital postprocessing.

  7. Aspirin and clopidogrel: a sweeping combination in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S; Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Koulouris, Spyros; Melita, Helen

    2005-07-01

    important large-scale clinical trials currently ongoing. Newer data are being accumulated from studies where indications for the use of clopidogrel and aspirin continue to expand into other patient groups, rendering this dual antiplatelet drug therapy a sweeping combination in Cardiology. However, important issues remain to be further and more thoroughly explored about the benefit of this antiplatelet drug combination in these other patient groups, such as in patients with heart failure, where preliminary data indicate a favorable effect on thrombotic vascular events, in patients with atrial fibrillation, where there is hope that this combination may replace or be an alternative treatment modality to coumadin in certain subpopulations, in patients undergoing demanding catheter ablation procedures, where data point to a protective effect from thromboembolic events. Another pertaining issue to be further investigated is the occurrence of drug-resistance observed in some patients for both these antithrombotic agents. This article is a comprehensive review of all these data and the landmark trials on the two antiplatelet agents, the issues involved and the current recommendations for their use in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease and other cardiovascular disorders and procedures.

  8. Detection of selective sweeps in cattle using genome-wide SNP data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestication and subsequent selection by humans to create breeds and biological types of cattle undoubtedly altered the patterning of variation within their genomes. Strong selection to fix advantageous large-effect mutations underlying domesticability, breed characteristics or productivity created selective sweeps in which variation was lost in the chromosomal region flanking the selected allele. Selective sweeps have now been identified in the genomes of many animal species including humans, dogs, horses, and chickens. Here, we attempt to identify and characterise regions of the bovine genome that have been subjected to selective sweeps. Results Two datasets were used for the discovery and validation of selective sweeps via the fixation of alleles at a series of contiguous SNP loci. BovineSNP50 data were used to identify 28 putative sweep regions among 14 diverse cattle breeds. Affymetrix BOS 1 prescreening assay data for five breeds were used to identify 85 regions and validate 5 regions identified using the BovineSNP50 data. Many genes are located within these regions and the lack of sequence data for the analysed breeds precludes the nomination of selected genes or variants and limits the prediction of the selected phenotypes. However, phenotypes that we predict to have historically been under strong selection include horned-polled, coat colour, stature, ear morphology, and behaviour. Conclusions The bias towards common SNPs in the design of the BovineSNP50 assay led to the identification of recent selective sweeps associated with breed formation and common to only a small number of breeds rather than ancient events associated with domestication which could potentially be common to all European taurines. The limited SNP density, or marker resolution, of the BovineSNP50 assay significantly impacted the rate of false discovery of selective sweeps, however, we found sweeps in common between breeds which were confirmed using an ultra

  9. 41 CFR 302-2.16 - Must I sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agreement for a âlast move homeâ relocation? 302-2.16 Section 302-2.16 Public Contracts and Property... REQUIREMENTS General Rules Service Agreements § 302-2.16 Must I sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation? No, you do not need to sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation....

  10. Numerical Investigation of Blade Lean and Sweep affecting Secondary Flows in an Axial Expansion Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neipp, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on an axial expansion turbine used for energy recovery from working fluids an automated CFD-flow optimization was performed to increase the turbine efficiency without narrowing the operating range. The optimization results showed that even small changes in the optimization target had a significant influence on the lean and sweep of the new blade designs. The resulting blade shapes were extraordinary. The lean and sweep resembled more that of thermal turbomachinery than hydraulic machinery. It became clear that the special blade shapes were a result of the very low aspect ratio of the turbine and the resulting large influence of secondary flows. The blade lean and sweep induce secondary flow structures which are of decisive importance for the turbine performance. The simulation results showed that positive compound lean increases the efficiency and positive compound sweep improves the cavitation behavior of the investigated axial expansion turbine. However the complexity of the occurring secondary flows make an universally valid statement on the effect of blade lean and sweep on the flow behavior of an axial turbine impossible.

  11. Unlimited-volume Electrokinetic Stacking Injection in Sweeping Capillary Electrophoresis Using a Cationic Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Maojun; Wehmeyer, Kenneth R.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Heineman, William R.

    2008-01-01

    Sweeping is an effective and convenient way for online sample preconcentration in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). The usual procedure includes a hydrodynamic injection step carried out by applying pressure to the sample vial followed by the subsequent sweeping and separation processes. The injected sample volume is limited by the dimensions of the capillary because a part of the capillary has to be left free of sample solution for the subsequent sweeping and separation steps. In addition, when a short capillary, such as 4-10 cm, is used for sweeping, the injected sample volume is small even if the entire capillary is filled with sample solution. In order to solve this problem, an electrokinetic stacking injection (EKSI) scheme was developed by using a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, for sweeping in capillary electrophoresis. An experimental model was proposed, and the entire process was theoretically analyzed. According to the theoretical discussion, the optimal conditions for two model analytes, 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM) and sodium fluorescein (FL), were experimentally determined. The injected sample plug lengths for 5-FAM and FL under 20.1 kV for 60 min were experimentally estimated as 836 and 729 cm, corresponding to 28- and 24-fold the effective capillary length, respectively. The EKSI scheme resulted in increased detection factors for 5-FAM and FL of 4.5×103 and 4.0×103 using 60-minute injection relative to a traditional pressure injection. PMID:16944881

  12. All-fiber broad-range self-sweeping Yb-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Ivan A.; Kablukov, Sergey A.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.; Babin, Sergey A.

    2012-02-01

    The effect of broad-range self-sweeping in Yb-doped fiber laser has been demonstrated experimentally for the first time. The self-sweeping effect is observed in an all-fiber laser configuration with a double-clad Yb-doped fiber and a cavity formed by a broad-band fiber loop mirror and Fresnel reflection from one cleaved end. The sweep range is limited by the width of the broad-band reflector and reaches up to 16nm. It is found that the self-sweeping effect is related to selfpulsations. So the sweep rate is increased with an increase in pump power and is decreased with increasing cavity length. RF and optical spectra (linewidth is measured to be not more than 100 MHz) show that during the evolution of a single pulse a small number of longitudinal modes take a part in lasing. Based on these results we propose a model describing dynamics of the laser frequency. The model is based on the spatial hole burning effect and the gain saturation in Yb laser transition, and takes into account self-pulsations of the laser. Theoretical estimation for pulse to pulse change of lasing frequency is in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Validation of SWEEP for creep, saltation, and suspension in a desert-oasis ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, H.; Sharratt, B.; Feng, G.; Lei, J.; Li, X.; Zheng, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Wind erosion in the desert-oasis ecotone can accelerate desertification, but little is known about the susceptibility of the ecotone to wind erosion in the Tarim Basin despite being a major source of windblown dust in China. The objective of this study was to test the performance of the Single-event Wind Erosion Evaluation Program (SWEEP) in simulating soil loss as creep, saltation, and suspension in a desert-oasis ecotone. Creep, saltation, and suspension were measured and simulated in a desert-oasis ecotone of the Tarim Basin during discrete periods of high winds in spring 2012 and 2013. The model appeared to adequately simulate total soil loss (ranged from 23 to 2272 g m-2 across sample periods) according to the high index of agreement (d = 0.76). The adequate agreement of the SWEEP in simulating total soil loss was due to the good performance of the model (d = 0.71) in simulating creep plus saltation. The SWEEP model, however, inadequately simulated suspension based upon a low d (⩽0.43). The slope estimates of the regression between simulated and measured suspension and difference of mean suggested that the SWEEP underestimated suspension. The adequate simulation of creep plus saltation thus provides reasonable estimates of total soil loss using SWEEP in a desert-oasis environment.

  14. Influence of Finite Span and Sweep on Active Flow Control Efficacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control efficacy was investigated by means of leading-edge and flap-shoulder zero mass-flux blowing slots on a semispan wing model that was tested in unswept (standard) and swept configurations. On the standard configuration, stall commenced inboard, but with sweep the wing stalled initially near the tip. On both configurations, leading-edge perturbations increased C(sub L,max) and post stall lift, both with and without deflected flaps. Without sweep, the effect of control was approximately uniform across the wing span but remained effective to high angles of attack near the tip; when sweep was introduced a significant effect was noted inboard, but this effect degraded along the span and produced virtually no meaningful lift enhancement near the tip, irrespective of the tip configuration. In the former case, control strengthened the wingtip vortex; in the latter case, a simple semi-empirical model, based on the trajectory or streamline of the evolving perturbation, served to explain the observations. Control on finite-span flaps did not differ significantly from their two-dimensional counterpart, while control over a tip flap produced significant variations to all three moments in the presence of large deflection and these variations were linear with input slot momentum. Control from the flap produced expected lift enhancement and CL,max improvements in the absence of sweep, but these improvements degraded with the introduction of sweep.

  15. Hybrid massively parallel fast sweeping method for static Hamilton–Jacobi equations

    SciTech Connect

    Detrixhe, Miles; Gibou, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The fast sweeping method is a popular algorithm for solving a variety of static Hamilton–Jacobi equations. Fast sweeping algorithms for parallel computing have been developed, but are severely limited. In this work, we present a multilevel, hybrid parallel algorithm that combines the desirable traits of two distinct parallel methods. The fine and coarse grained components of the algorithm take advantage of heterogeneous computer architecture common in high performance computing facilities. We present the algorithm and demonstrate its effectiveness on a set of example problems including optimal control, dynamic games, and seismic wave propagation. We give results for convergence, parallel scaling, and show state-of-the-art speedup values for the fast sweeping method.

  16. Parallel deterministic transport sweeps of structured and unstructured meshes with overloaded mesh decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Pautz, Shawn D.; Bailey, Teresa S.

    2016-11-29

    Here, the efficiency of discrete ordinates transport sweeps depends on the scheduling algorithm, the domain decomposition, the problem to be solved, and the computational platform. Sweep scheduling algorithms may be categorized by their approach to several issues. In this paper we examine the strategy of domain overloading for mesh partitioning as one of the components of such algorithms. In particular, we extend the domain overloading strategy, previously defined and analyzed for structured meshes, to the general case of unstructured meshes. We also present computational results for both the structured and unstructured domain overloading cases. We find that an appropriate amount of domain overloading can greatly improve the efficiency of parallel sweeps for both structured and unstructured partitionings of the test problems examined on up to 105 processor cores.

  17. Parallel deterministic transport sweeps of structured and unstructured meshes with overloaded mesh decompositions

    DOE PAGES

    Pautz, Shawn D.; Bailey, Teresa S.

    2016-11-29

    Here, the efficiency of discrete ordinates transport sweeps depends on the scheduling algorithm, the domain decomposition, the problem to be solved, and the computational platform. Sweep scheduling algorithms may be categorized by their approach to several issues. In this paper we examine the strategy of domain overloading for mesh partitioning as one of the components of such algorithms. In particular, we extend the domain overloading strategy, previously defined and analyzed for structured meshes, to the general case of unstructured meshes. We also present computational results for both the structured and unstructured domain overloading cases. We find that an appropriate amountmore » of domain overloading can greatly improve the efficiency of parallel sweeps for both structured and unstructured partitionings of the test problems examined on up to 105 processor cores.« less

  18. Ka-Band Digital Beamforming and SweepSAR Demonstration for Ice and Solid Earth Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Heavy, Brandon; Perkovic, Dragana; Quddus, Momin; Zawadzki, Mark; Moller, Delwyn

    2010-01-01

    GLISTIN is an instrument concept for a single-pass interferometric SAR operating at 35.6 GHz. To achieve large swath widths using practical levels of transmitter power, a digitally-beamformed planar waveguide array is used. This paper describes results from a ground-based demonstration of a 16-receiver prototype. Furthermore, SweepSAR is emerging as promising technique for achieving very wide swaths for surface change detection. NASA and DLR are studying this approach for the DESDynI and Tandem-L missions. SweepSAR employs a reflector with a digitally-beamformed array feed. We will describe development of an airborne demonstration of SweepSAR using the GLISTIN receiver array and a reflector.

  19. Lax-Friedrichs fast sweeping methods for steady state problems for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weitao; Chou, Ching-Shan; Kao, Chiu-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Fast sweeping methods are efficient iterative numerical schemes originally designed for solving stationary Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Their efficiency relies on Gauss-Seidel type nonlinear iterations, and a finite number of sweeping directions. In this paper, we generalize the fast sweeping methods to hyperbolic conservation laws with source terms. The algorithm is obtained through finite difference discretization, with the numerical fluxes evaluated in WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-oscillatory) fashion, coupled with Gauss-Seidel iterations. In particular, we consider mainly the Lax-Friedrichs numerical fluxes. Extensive numerical examples in both scalar and system test problems in one and two dimensions demonstrate the efficiency, high order accuracy and the capability of resolving shocks of the proposed methods.

  20. Frictional Contact Problems for Thin Elastic Structures and Weak Solutions of Sweeping Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    The linearized equilibrium equations for straight elastic strings, beams, membranes or plates do not couple tangential and normal components. In the quasi-static evolution occurring above a fixed rigid obstacle with Coulomb dry friction, the normal displacement is governed by a variational inequality, whereas the tangential displacement is seen to obey a sweeping process, the theory of which was extensively developed by Moreau in the 1970s. In some cases, the underlying moving convex set has bounded retraction and, in these cases, the sweeping process can be solved by directly applying Moreau’s results. However, in many other cases, the bounded retraction condition is not fulfilled and this is seen to be connected to the possible event of moving velocity discontinuities. In such a case, there are no strong solutions and we have to cope with weak solutions of the underlying sweeping process.

  1. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  2. Single sweep analysis of visual evoked potentials through a model of parametric identification.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, S; Baselli, G; Liberati, D; Pavesi, G

    1987-01-01

    An original method is presented for the single sweep analysis of visual evoked potentials (VEP's). The introduced algorithm bases upon an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) modeling. A Least Squares procedure estimates the coefficients of the model and allows to obtain a complete black-box description of the signal generation mechanism, besides providing a filtered version of the single sweep potential. The performance of the algorithm is verified on proper simulation tests and the experimental results put into evidence the noticeable improvement of signal-to-noise ratio with a consequent better recognition of the classical parameters of the peaks (latencies and amplitudes). The possibility of measuring these parameters on a single sweep basis enables to evaluate the dynamics of the Central Nervous System response during the entire course of the examination. A classification of the estimated evoked potentials in a small number of subsets, on the basis of their morphology, is also possible.

  3. Hybrid massively parallel fast sweeping method for static Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrixhe, Miles; Gibou, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The fast sweeping method is a popular algorithm for solving a variety of static Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Fast sweeping algorithms for parallel computing have been developed, but are severely limited. In this work, we present a multilevel, hybrid parallel algorithm that combines the desirable traits of two distinct parallel methods. The fine and coarse grained components of the algorithm take advantage of heterogeneous computer architecture common in high performance computing facilities. We present the algorithm and demonstrate its effectiveness on a set of example problems including optimal control, dynamic games, and seismic wave propagation. We give results for convergence, parallel scaling, and show state-of-the-art speedup values for the fast sweeping method.

  4. A simple frequency sweep linearization method for FM density profile reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Adi; Hu, Jianqiang; Doyle, Edward; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hong; Zhou, Chu; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Mingyuan; Lan, Tao; Xie, Jinglin; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan

    2015-11-01

    Frequency modulated, continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry is widely used to measure the electron density profile on fusion devices. To ensure the output intermediate frequency signal is proportional to the propagation delay time, the frequency sweep should be linearized, especially for reflectometry with sweeping periods of only a few microseconds. We introduce a simple dynamic calibration technique to linearize the frequency sweep based on digital complex demodulation methods, without using a Fourier transform, which would induce a trade-off between frequency and time resolution. The technique is convenient as it can be done in the same conditions as for plasma measurements. The method is in use on the EAST profile reflectometer, and results will be presented. Work was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under 11475173, National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Development Program of China under 2013GB106002 and 2014GB109002, and US DOE Grants DE- SC0010424 and DE-SC0010469.

  5. HUBBLE CLICKS IMAGES OF IO SWEEPING ACROSS JUPITER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    While hunting for volcanic plumes on Io, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured these images of the volatile moon sweeping across the giant face of Jupiter. Only a few weeks before these dramatic images were taken, the orbiting telescope snapped a portrait of one of Io's volcanoes spewing sulfur dioxide 'snow.' These stunning images of the planetary duo are being released to commemorate the ninth anniversary of the Hubble telescope's launch on April 24, 1990. All of these images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The three overlapping snapshots show in crisp detail Io passing above Jupiter's turbulent clouds. The close-up picture of Io (bottom right) reveal a 120-mile-high (200-kilometer) plume of sulfur dioxide 'snow' emanating from Pillan, one of the moon's active volcanoes. 'Other observations have inferred sulfur dioxide 'snow' in Io's plumes, but this image offers direct observational evidence for sulfur dioxide 'snow' in an Io plume,' explains John R. Spencer of Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz. A Trip Around Jupiter The three snapshots of the volcanic moon rounding Jupiter were taken over a 1.8-hour time span. Io is roughly the size of Earth's moon but 2,000 times farther away. In two of the images, Io appears to be skimming Jupiter's cloud tops, but it's actually 310,000 miles (500,000 kilometers) away. Io zips around Jupiter in 1.8 days, whereas the moon circles Earth every 28 days. The conspicuous black spot on Jupiter is Io's shadow and is about the size of the moon itself (2,262 miles or 3,640 kilometers across). This shadow sails across the face of Jupiter at 38,000 mph (17 kilometers per second). The smallest details visible on Io and Jupiter measure 93 miles (150 kilometers) across, or about the size of Connecticut. These images were further sharpened through image reconstruction techniques. The view is so crisp that one would have to stand on Io to see this much detail on Jupiter with the naked eye. The bright patches on Io

  6. Hubble Clicks Images of Io Sweeping Across Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    While hunting for volcanic plumes on Io, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured these images of the volatile moon sweeping across the giant face of Jupiter. Only a few weeks before these dramatic images were taken, the orbiting telescope snapped a portrait of one of Io's volcanoes spewing sulfur dioxide 'snow.'

    These stunning images of the planetary duo are being released to commemorate the ninth anniversary of the Hubble telescope's launch on April 24, 1990. All of these images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2.

    The three overlapping snapshots show in crisp detail Io passing above Jupiter's turbulent clouds. The close-up picture of Io (bottom right) reveal a 120-mile-high (200-kilometer) plume of sulfur dioxide 'snow' emanating from Pillan, one of the moon's active volcanoes.

    'Other observations have inferred sulfur dioxide 'snow' in Io's plumes, but this image offers direct observational evidence for sulfur dioxide 'snow' in an Io plume,' explains John R. Spencer of Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz.

    A Trip Around Jupiter

    The three snapshots of the volcanic moon rounding Jupiter were taken over a 1.8-hour time span. Io is roughly the size of Earth's moon but 2,000 times farther away. In two of the images, Io appears to be skimming Jupiter's cloud tops, but it's actually 310,000 miles (500,000 kilometers) away. Io zips around Jupiter in 1.8 days, whereas the moon circles Earth every 28 days.

    The conspicuous black spot on Jupiter is Io's shadow and is about the size of the moon itself (2,262 miles or 3,640 kilometers across). This shadow sails across the face of Jupiter at 38,000 mph (17 kilometers per second). The smallest details visible on Io and Jupiter measure 93 miles (150 kilometers) across, or about the size of Connecticut.

    These images were further sharpened through image reconstruction techniques. The view is so crisp that one would have to stand on Io to see this much detail on Jupiter with the naked eye

  7. HUBBLE CLICKS IMAGES OF IO SWEEPING ACROSS JUPITER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    While hunting for volcanic plumes on Io, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured these images of the volatile moon sweeping across the giant face of Jupiter. Only a few weeks before these dramatic images were taken, the orbiting telescope snapped a portrait of one of Io's volcanoes spewing sulfur dioxide 'snow.' These stunning images of the planetary duo are being released to commemorate the ninth anniversary of the Hubble telescope's launch on April 24, 1990. All of these images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The three overlapping snapshots show in crisp detail Io passing above Jupiter's turbulent clouds. The close-up picture of Io (bottom right) reveal a 120-mile-high (200-kilometer) plume of sulfur dioxide 'snow' emanating from Pillan, one of the moon's active volcanoes. 'Other observations have inferred sulfur dioxide 'snow' in Io's plumes, but this image offers direct observational evidence for sulfur dioxide 'snow' in an Io plume,' explains John R. Spencer of Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz. A Trip Around Jupiter The three snapshots of the volcanic moon rounding Jupiter were taken over a 1.8-hour time span. Io is roughly the size of Earth's moon but 2,000 times farther away. In two of the images, Io appears to be skimming Jupiter's cloud tops, but it's actually 310,000 miles (500,000 kilometers) away. Io zips around Jupiter in 1.8 days, whereas the moon circles Earth every 28 days. The conspicuous black spot on Jupiter is Io's shadow and is about the size of the moon itself (2,262 miles or 3,640 kilometers across). This shadow sails across the face of Jupiter at 38,000 mph (17 kilometers per second). The smallest details visible on Io and Jupiter measure 93 miles (150 kilometers) across, or about the size of Connecticut. These images were further sharpened through image reconstruction techniques. The view is so crisp that one would have to stand on Io to see this much detail on Jupiter with the naked eye. The bright patches on Io

  8. R2d2 Drives Selfish Sweeps in the House Mouse.

    PubMed

    Didion, John P; Morgan, Andrew P; Yadgary, Liran; Bell, Timothy A; McMullan, Rachel C; Ortiz de Solorzano, Lydia; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Bult, Carol J; Campbell, Karl J; Castiglia, Riccardo; Ching, Yung-Hao; Chunco, Amanda J; Crowley, James J; Chesler, Elissa J; Förster, Daniel W; French, John E; Gabriel, Sofia I; Gatti, Daniel M; Garland, Theodore; Giagia-Athanasopoulou, Eva B; Giménez, Mabel D; Grize, Sofia A; Gündüz, İslam; Holmes, Andrew; Hauffe, Heidi C; Herman, Jeremy S; Holt, James M; Hua, Kunjie; Jolley, Wesley J; Lindholm, Anna K; López-Fuster, María J; Mitsainas, George; da Luz Mathias, Maria; McMillan, Leonard; Ramalhinho, Maria da Graça Morgado; Rehermann, Barbara; Rosshart, Stephan P; Searle, Jeremy B; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Solano, Emanuela; Svenson, Karen L; Thomas-Laemont, Patricia; Threadgill, David W; Ventura, Jacint; Weinstock, George M; Pomp, Daniel; Churchill, Gary A; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    A selective sweep is the result of strong positive selection driving newly occurring or standing genetic variants to fixation, and can dramatically alter the pattern and distribution of allelic diversity in a population. Population-level sequencing data have enabled discoveries of selective sweeps associated with genes involved in recent adaptations in many species. In contrast, much debate but little evidence addresses whether "selfish" genes are capable of fixation-thereby leaving signatures identical to classical selective sweeps-despite being neutral or deleterious to organismal fitness. We previously described R2d2, a large copy-number variant that causes nonrandom segregation of mouse Chromosome 2 in females due to meiotic drive. Here we show population-genetic data consistent with a selfish sweep driven by alleles of R2d2 with high copy number (R2d2(HC)) in natural populations. We replicate this finding in multiple closed breeding populations from six outbred backgrounds segregating for R2d2 alleles. We find that R2d2(HC) rapidly increases in frequency, and in most cases becomes fixed in significantly fewer generations than can be explained by genetic drift. R2d2(HC) is also associated with significantly reduced litter sizes in heterozygous mothers, making it a true selfish allele. Our data provide direct evidence of populations actively undergoing selfish sweeps, and demonstrate that meiotic drive can rapidly alter the genomic landscape in favor of mutations with neutral or even negative effects on overall Darwinian fitness. Further study will reveal the incidence of selfish sweeps, and will elucidate the relative contributions of selfish genes, adaptation and genetic drift to evolution.

  9. Active Flow Control Using Sweeping Jet Actuators on a Semi-Span Wing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti

    2016-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed using active flow control on an unswept semispan wing model with a 30% chord trailing edge flap to aid in the selection of actuators for a planned high Reynolds number experiment. Two sweeping jet actuator sizes were investigated to determine the influence of actuator size on the active flow control system efficiency. Sweeping jet actuators with orifice sizes of 1 mm x 2 mm and 2 mm x 4 mm were selected because of the differences in actuator jet sweep angle. The parameters that were varied include actuator momentum, freestream velocity, and trailing edge flap deflection angle. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the two actuators. In addition to the wind tunnel experiments, benchtop studies of the actuators were performed to characterize the jets produced by each actuator. Benchtop investigations of the smaller actuator reveal that the jet exiting the actuator has a reduced sweep angle compared to published data for larger versions of this type of actuator. The larger actuator produces an oscillating jet that attaches to the external di?user walls at low supply pressures and produces the expected sweep angles. The AFC results using the smaller actuators show that while the actuators can control flow separation, the selected spacing of 3.3 cm may be too large due to the reduced sweep angle. In comparison, the spacing for the larger actuators, 6.6 cm, appears to be optimal for the Mach numbers investigated. Particle Image Velocimetry results are presented and show how the wall jets produced by the actuators cause the flow to attach to the flap surface.

  10. Sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers for low-mid frequencies vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardonio, P.; Zilletti, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation study concerning the low-mid frequencies control of flexural vibration in a lightly damped thin plate, which is equipped with three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers and is excited by a rain on the roof broad frequency band stationary disturbance. The sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are semi-active mass-spring-dashpot systems whose stiffness and damping properties can be varied uniformly within given ranges. They are operated in such a way as their characteristic natural frequencies are continuously varied to control the response of flexural modes that resonate within given frequency bands. More specifically, in this study the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are operated asynchronously, each within one of three sequential frequency bands comprised between 20 and 120, 120 and 220, 220 and 320 Hz. The flexural vibration control effects produced by the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are compared to those produced by three classical tuneable vibration absorbers, each set to control the response of a specific flexural mode of the plate resonating in one of these three frequency bands. The study shows that the proposed sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers outperform the classical tuneable vibration absorbers and produce about 6, 5, 4 dB reduction of the plate overall flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation. Also, the study indicates that the sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are robust to variations in the plate flexural response. For instance they still produce about 5.1, 5.3, 4.6 dB reductions of the flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation when the plate is tensioned such that the flexural natural frequencies are shifted up from about 40 percent, for the first resonance, to 7 percent, for the tenth resonance.

  11. Application of a performance modeling technique to an airplane with variable sweep wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redin, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    A performance modeling concept previously applied to an F-104F G and a YF-12C airplane was applied to an F-111A airplane. This application extended the concept to an airplane with variable sweep wings. The performance model adequately matched flight test data for maneuvers flown at different wing sweep angles at maximum afterburning and intermediate power settings. For maneuvers flown at less than intermediate power, including dynamic maneuvers, the performance model was not validated because the method used to correlate model and in-flight power setting was not adequate. Individual dynamic maneuvers were matched sucessfully by using adjustments unique to each maneuver.

  12. Techniques used in the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Chiles, Harry R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses and evaluates the test measurement techniques used to determine the laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition location in the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE). The main objective of the VSTFE was to determine the effects of wing sweep on the laminar-to-turbulent transition location at conditions representative of transport aircraft. Four methods were used to determine the transition location: (1) a hot-film anemometer system; (2) two boundary-layer rakes; (3) surface pitot tubes; and (4) liquid crystals for flow visualization. Of the four methods, the hot-film anemometer system was the most reliable indicator of transition.

  13. Application of quarter-sweep iteration for first order linear Fredholm integro-differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruchunan, Elayaraja; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram; Sulaiman, Jumat

    2013-04-01

    The main core of this paper is to analyze the application of the quarter-sweep iterative concept on finite difference and composite trapezoidal schemes with Gauss-Seidel iterative method to solve first order linear Fredholm integro-differential equations. The formulation and implementation of the Full-, Half- and Quarter-Sweep Gauss-Seidel methods namely FSGS, HSGS and QSGS respectively are also presented for performance comparison. Furthermore, computational complexity and percentage reduction analysis are also included and integrated with several numerical simulations. Based on numerical results, findings show the proposed QSGS method with the corresponding discretization schemes is superior compared to FSGS and HSGS iterative methods.

  14. Reinterpretation of reduction potential measurements done by linear sweep voltammetry in silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Haskin, L. A.; Keedy, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium concentrations of Ni between silicate melt and Pt were determined experimentally as a function of oxygen fugacity. The results demonstrate that metallic species derived in linear sweep voltammetry experiments in silicate melts are diffusing into Pt electrodes and not into the melt, as was concluded by previoius studies. This requires reinterpretation of previous linear sweep voltammetry results and recalculation and correction of reported reduction potentials. This paper reports these corrected reduction potentials. Also reported are the activity coefficients for Ni in synthetic basalt and diopsidic melts and for Co in diopsidic melt.

  15. Ohmsett Test of NOFI Vee-Sweep and NOFI 600S Oilboom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Hvidbak of DESMI, Inc. for operating the DESMI 250 skimmer. Byrge Skottvoll representing Bentech Subsea for interfacing the LM 200 oil thickness sensor to...Bentech LM200 Subsea Oil Level Meter and sensor technician services. 3 3.0 TEST SETUP In its standard configuration, the NOFI Vee-Sweep is too large to...the market in 1980. The oil trawl has been in regular use in Norway and in the former USSR. The Vee-Sweep is an ocean oil boom designed to contain

  16. Study of Effects of Sweep on the Flutter of Cantilever Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmby, J G; Cunningham, H J; Garrick, I E

    1951-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the flutter of sweptback cantilever wings is reported. The experiments employed groups of wings swept back by rotating and by shearing. The angle of sweep range from 0 degree to 60 degrees and Mach numbers extended to approximately 0.85. A theoretical analysis of the air forces on an oscillating swept wing of high length-chord ratio is developed, and the approximations inherent in the assumptions are discussed. Comparison with experiment indicates that the analysis developed in the present report is satisfactory for giving the main effects of sweep, at least for nearly uniform cantilever wings of high and moderate length-chord ratios.

  17. Probing the accretion disc structure by the twin kHz QPOs and spins of neutron stars in LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. H.; Zhang, C. M.; Lei, Y. J.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Zhi, Q. J.

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the relation between the emission radii of twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) and the co-rotation radii of the 12 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), which are simultaneously detected with the twin kHz QPOs and NS spins. We find that the average co-rotation radius of these sources is ∼ 32 km, and all the emission positions of twin kHz QPOs lie inside the co-rotation radii, indicating that the twin kHz QPOs are formed in the spin-up process. It is noticed that the upper frequency of twin kHz QPOs is higher than NS spin frequency by ≥10 per cent, which may account for a critical velocity difference between the Keplerian motion of accretion matter and NS spin that is corresponding to the production of twin kHz QPOs. In addition, we also find that ∼83 per cent of twin kHz QPOs cluster around the radius range of 15-20 km, which may be affected by the hard surface or the local strong magnetic field of the NS. As a special case, SAX J1808.4-3658 shows the larger emission radii of twin kHz QPOs of r ∼ 21-24 km, which may be due to its low accretion rate or small measured NS mass (<1.4 M⊙).

  18. 41 CFR 302-2.16 - Must I sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agreement for a âlast move homeâ relocation? 302-2.16 Section 302-2.16 Public Contracts and Property... agreement for a “last move home” relocation? No, you do not need to sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation....

  19. 41 CFR 302-2.16 - Must I sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agreement for a âlast move homeâ relocation? 302-2.16 Section 302-2.16 Public Contracts and Property... agreement for a “last move home” relocation? No, you do not need to sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation....

  20. 41 CFR 302-2.16 - Must I sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agreement for a âlast move homeâ relocation? 302-2.16 Section 302-2.16 Public Contracts and Property... agreement for a “last move home” relocation? No, you do not need to sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation....

  1. 41 CFR 302-2.16 - Must I sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... agreement for a âlast move homeâ relocation? 302-2.16 Section 302-2.16 Public Contracts and Property... agreement for a “last move home” relocation? No, you do not need to sign a service agreement for a “last move home” relocation....

  2. Preliminary use of nematic liquid crystal adaptive optics with a 2.16-meter reflecting telescope.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Hu, Lifa; Li, Dayu; Peng, Zenghui; Liu, Yonggang; Xuan, Li

    2009-02-16

    A nematic liquid crystal adaptive optics system (NLC AOS) was assembled for a 2.16-m telescope to correct for atmospheric turbulence. LC AOS was designed and optimized with Zemax optical software. Second, an adaptive correction experiment was performed in the laboratory to test the performance of the NLC AOS. After the correction, the peak to valley (PV) and root mean square (RMS) of the wavefront were down to 0.2 lambda (lambda=633 nm) and 0.05 lambda, respectively. Finally, the star of Pollux (beta Gem) was tracked using the 2.16-m Reflecting Telescope, and real time correction of the atmospheric turbulence was performed with the NLC AOS. After the adaptive correction, the average PV and RMS of the wavefront were reduced from 11 lambda and 2.5 lambda to 2.3 lambda and 0.6 lambda, respectively. Although the intensity distribution of the beta Gem was converged and its peak was sharp, a halo still existed around the peak. These results indicated that the NLC AOS only partially corrected the vertical atmospheric turbulence. The limitations of our NLC AOS are discussed and some proposals are made.

  3. The Xinglong 2.16-m Telescope: Current Instruments and Scientific Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhou; Wang, Huijuan; Jiang, Xiaojun; Wu, Hong; Li, Hongbin; Huang, Yang; Xu, Dawei; Hu, Zhongwen; Zhu, Yinan; Wang, Jianfeng; Komossa, Stefanie; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The Xinglong 2.16-m reflector is the first 2-m class astronomical telescope in China. It was jointly designed and built by the Nanjing Astronomical Instruments Factory (NAIF), Beijing Astronomical Observatory (now National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, NAOC), and Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1989. It is a Ritchey-Chrétien (R-C) reflector on an English equatorial mount and the effective aperture is 2.16 m. It had been the largest optical telescope in China for ˜18 years until the Guoshoujing Telescope (also called Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, LAMOST) and the Lijiang 2.4-m telescope were built. At present, there are three main instruments on the Cassegrain focus available: the Beijing Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (BFOSC) for direct imaging and low-resolution (R ˜ 500-2000) spectroscopy, the spectrograph made by Optomechanics Research Inc. (OMR) for low-resolution spectroscopy (the spectral resolutions are similar to those of BFOSC) and the fiber-fed High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS; R ˜ 30,000-65,000). The telescope is widely open to astronomers all over China as well as international astronomical observers. Each year there are more than 40 ongoing observing projects, including 6-8 key projects. Recently, some new techniques and instruments (e.g., astro-frequency comb calibration system, polarimeter, and adaptive optics) have been or will be tested on the telescope to extend its observing abilities.

  4. H2 16O line list for the study of atmospheres of Venus and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentieva, N. N.; Voronin, B. A.; Fedorova, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an important method of remote measurement of H2 16O content in planetary atmospheres with initial spectroscopic information from the HITRAN, GEISA, etc., databases adapted for studies in the Earth's atmosphere. Unlike the Earth, the atmospheres of Mars and Venus mainly consist of carbon dioxide with a CO2 content of about 95%. In this paper, the line list of H2 16O is obtained on the basis of the BT2 line list (R.J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G.J. Harris, et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 368, 1087 (2006)). The BT2 line list containing information on the centers, intensities, and quantum identification of lines is supplemented with the line contour parameters: the self-broadening and carbon dioxide broadening coefficients and the temperature dependence coefficient at 296 K in the range of 0.001-30000 cm-1. Transitions with intensity values 10-30, 10-32, and 10-35 cm/molecule, the total number of which is 323310, 753529, and 2011072, respectively, were chosen from the BT2 line list.

  5. Aberration-free three-dimensional multiphoton imaging of neuronal activity at kHz rates

    PubMed Central

    Botcherby, Edward J.; Smith, Christopher W.; Kohl, Michael M.; Débarre, Delphine; Booth, Martin J.; Juškaitis, Rimas; Paulsen, Ole; Wilson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience, promising to deliver important data on the spatiotemporal activity within individual neurons as well as in networks of neurons. A major limitation of current technologies is the relatively slow scan rates along the z direction compared to the kHz rates obtainable in the x and y directions. Here, we describe a custom-built microscope system based on an architecture that allows kHz scan rates over hundreds of microns in all three dimensions without introducing aberration. We further demonstrate how this high-speed 3D multiphoton imaging system can be used to study neuronal activity at millisecond resolution at the subcellular as well as the population level. PMID:22315405

  6. Zero-phonon-line pumped 100-kHz Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Nagisetty, Siva Sankar; Novák, Ondřej; Chyla, Michal; Severová, Patricie; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáś

    2014-02-01

    We are developing 100-kHz picosecond Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier with 500-W average power for medical and industrial applications. Especially in case of the next generation of semiconductor lithography, high average power solid-state laser with picosecond pulse duration as pre pulse source is a key element to realize 1-kW EUV lithography source. We compared the output characteristics of CW laser operation pumped at 940-nm and 969-nm, and measured the surface temperature of thin disk. We found that the surface temperature of thin disk pumped at 960-nm was much lower than that pumped at 940-nm. We obtained 83-W output from thin disk regenerative amplifier at the repetition rate of 100-kHz pumped at 969-nm. The measured pulse duration was 1.9-ps.

  7. Radio wave emitted by an extensive air showers in 10KHz to 1MHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichimura, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of radio waves in a frequency range of less than 1MHz in an EAS shower is discussed. Estimates of radio intensities at 10KHz, 100KHz and 1MHz in EAS showers made on the basis of the Kahn-Lerche theory. Negative charge excess in a shower is the main source of low frequency radio emission, in spite of the importance of the contribution of transverse current in the geomagnetic field in a higher frequency range. An estimate is also made for radio intensity produced when the shower hits the ground. The contribution of this process seems to be important at a large distance, i.e., beyond 1km from the shower axis.

  8. 100 kHz thousand-frame burst-mode planar imaging in turbulent flames.

    PubMed

    Michael, James B; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R

    2014-02-15

    High-repetition-rate, burst-mode lasers can achieve higher energies per pulse compared with continuously pulsed systems, but the relatively few number of laser pulses in each burst has limited the temporal dynamic range of measurements in unsteady flames. A fivefold increase in the range of timescales that can be resolved by burst-mode laser-based imaging systems is reported in this work by extending a hybrid diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG-based amplifier system to nearly 1000 pulses at 100 kHz during a 10 ms burst. This enables an unprecedented burst-mode temporal dynamic range to capture turbulent fluctuations from 0.1 to 50 kHz in flames of practical interest. High pulse intensity enables efficient conversion to the ultraviolet for planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nascent formaldehyde and other potential flame radicals.

  9. 115 kHz tuning repetition rate ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Oh, W Y; Yun, S H; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser using a polygon-based wavelength scanning filter. With a polygon rotational speed of 900 revolutions per second, a continuous wavelength tuning rate of 9200 nm/ms and a tuning repetition rate of 115 kHz were achieved. The wavelength tuning range of the laser was 80 nm centered at 1325 nm, and the average polarized output power was 23 mW.

  10. Status of 20 kHz space station power distribution technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1988-01-01

    Power Distribution on the NASA Space Station will be accomplished by a 20 kHz sinusoidal, 440 VRMS, single phase system. In order to minimize both system complexity and the total power coversion steps required, high frequency power will be distributed end-to-end in the system. To support the final design of flight power system hardware, advanced development and demonstrations have been made on key system technologies and components. The current status of this program is discussed.

  11. Swept source OCT imaging of human anterior segment at 200 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Karol; Gora, Michalina; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej; Huber, Robert; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2009-02-01

    We present applicability of the high speed swept-source optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging of the anterior segment of the human eye. Three dimensional imaging of the cornea with reduced motion artifacts is possible by using swept source with Fourier domain mode locking operating at 200kHz with 1300nm central wavelength. High imaging speeds allow for assessment of anterior and posterior corneal topography and generation of thickness and elevation maps.

  12. Determination of the dielectric constant of GaN in the kHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, M. J.; Uren, M. J.; Wallis, D. J.; Wright, P. J.; Soley, D. E. J.; Simons, A. J.; Martin, T.

    2011-08-01

    Capacitance techniques are used to show that the dielectric constant ɛ|| of GaN in the kHz frequency range is 10.6 ± 0.3. The data allow depth information to be accurately extracted using methods such as mercury probe capacitance profiling. The measurements complement the pre-existing data which are derived from infrared reflectivity and which give a value of 10.4 ± 0.3.

  13. Computer modeling and simulation of a 20kHz ac distribution system for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Fu-Sheng; Lee, Fred C.

    1987-01-01

    A computer model of a 20 kHz, ac distribution testbed for Space Station is presented. The system consists of six resonant inverters, a one-hundred-meter transmission line, and three load receivers: a dc receiver, a bidirectional receiver, and an ac receiver. A model library is generated characterizing all system components. The system's local and global behaviors are investigated using the EASY5 dynamic analysis program.

  14. Study on sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment at frequency ranges of 0.5-3 kHz and 90-170 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng-qi; Liu, Bao-hua; Yu, Kai-ben; Kan, Guang-ming; Yang, Zhi-guo

    2017-03-01

    In order to study the properties of sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment, the sound speed was measured both at high frequency (90-170 kHz) and low frequency (0.5-3 kHz) in laboratory environments. At high frequency, a sampling measurement was conducted with boiled and uncooked sand samples collected from the bottom of a large water tank. The sound speed was directly obtained through transmission measurement using single source and single hydrophone. At low frequency, an in situ measurement was conducted in the water tank, where the sandy sediment had been homogeneously paved at the bottom for a long time. The sound speed was indirectly inverted according to the traveling time of signals received by three buried hydrophones in the sandy sediment and the geometry in experiment. The results show that the mean sound speed is approximate 1710-1713 m/s with a weak positive gradient in the sand sample after being boiled (as a method to eliminate bubbles as much as possible) at high frequency, which agrees well with the predictions of Biot theory, the effective density fluid model (EDFM) and Buckingham's theory. However, the sound speed in the uncooked sandy sediment obviously decreases (about 80%) both at high frequency and low frequency due to plenty of bubbles in existence. And the sound-speed dispersion performs a weak negative gradient at high frequency. Finally, a water-unsaturated Biot model is presented for trying to explain the decrease of sound speed in the sandy sediment with plenty of bubbles.

  15. Dependence of kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies on accretion-related parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan; Çatmabacak, Önder

    2016-07-01

    To study the possible dependence of kHz QPO frequencies on the parameters such as the mass accretion rate, the surface magnetic field strength, mass, and radius of the neutron star, we consider the up-to-date distribution of neutron star LMXBs in the kHz QPO frequency versus X-ray luminosity plane. We confirm the absence of any correlation between QPO frequencies and luminosity in the ensemble of LMXBs. Searching for the dependence of QPO data on accretion-related parameters, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and the parameter combining mass accretion rate with magnetic field strength. The correlation cannot be adequately described by a simple power law due to observed scattering of individual source data in the ensemble of Z and atoll sources. Based on disk-magnetosphere boundary region, the model function for QPO frequency can delineate the correlation taking into account the scattering of individual sources. In addition to mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength, the model function also depends on the radial width of the boundary region near the magnetopause. Modelling the variation of the width with mass accretion rate, we also provide an explanation for the parallel tracks phenomenon observed in the case of individual sources.

  16. Rodent ultrasonic communication: Male prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations elicit social approach behavior in female rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Willadsen, Maria; Seffer, Dominik; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Rats emit distinct types of ultrasonic vocalizations (USV), which serve as situation-dependent affective signals with important communicative functions. Low-frequency 22-kHz USV typically occur in aversive situations, such as social defeat, whereas high-frequency 50-kHz USV can be observed in appetitive situations, like rough-and-tumble-play in juveniles or mating in adults. The 2 main USV types serve distinct communicative functions and induce call-specific behavioral responses in the receiver. While 22-kHz USV probably serve as alarm calls, 50-kHz USV appear to serve a prosocial communicative function in the sexual and the nonsexual context. In the sexual context, however, this view has recently been challenged by playback studies where only very limited behavioral changes were observed in response to prosocial 50-kHz USV. The aim of the present study was therefore to test whether female rats display social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV by means of our established playback paradigm. To this aim, we exposed female rats to playback of the following 2 acoustic stimuli: (a) natural male 50-kHz USV and (b) time- and amplitude-matched white noise, with the latter serving as acoustic control for novelty-induced changes in behavior not linked to the communicative function of male prosocial 50-kHz USV. Our present findings show that female rats display high levels of social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV, but not time- and amplitude-matched white noise, supporting the conclusion that male prosocial 50-kHz USV are likely to play an important role in establishing social proximity and possibly regulate mating behavior.

  17. Wind turbine rotor blade with in-plane sweep and devices using same, and methods for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wetzel, Kyle Kristopher

    2008-03-18

    A wind turbine includes a rotor having a hub and at least one blade having a torsionally rigid root, an inboard section, and an outboard section. The inboard section has a forward sweep relative to an elastic axis of the blade and the outboard section has an aft sweep.

  18. Wind turbine rotor blade with in-plane sweep and devices using the same, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Wetzel, Kyle Kristopher

    2014-06-24

    A wind turbine includes a rotor having a hub and at least one blade having a torsionally rigid root, an inboard section, and an outboard section. The inboard section has a forward sweep relative to an elastic axis of the blade and the outboard section has an aft sweep.

  19. Analog Techniques for Measuring the Frequency Response of Linear Physical Systems Excited by Frequency-Sweep Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H., III; Hall, Albert W.; Barker, Lawrence E., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Data-reduction methods using general-purpose analog computer equipment and compatible testing techniques for determining the frequency response of linear physical systems are examined. The techniques considered may be classed as steady state or transient depending on the method of excitation. The relative merits of periodic, slow sweep, and transient (rapid sweep) forcing functions are discussed and applications are given that relate to dynamic-response tests of aeroelastic systems. Two frequency-sweep-input methods are considered in detail. one case the sweep rate is sufficiently slow that the response is approximately the same as that for steady-state conditions. With this input the frequency response can be evaluated and displayed in real time while the test is in progress. Errors due to treating sweep data as steady state can be eliminated, when desired, by reanalyzing tape-recorded time histories of the input and output as transient rather than as periodic data. In the second method the frequency-response function is deter- mined from the system's transient response to a very rapid sweep input. The purpose of frequency sweep in this case is to provide sufficient harmonic content in the input to overcome noise while keeping the test time as short as possible. tests and limited flight-test data presented herein, it appears that a transient-type rapid-sweep forcing function offers a considerable saving in test time while preserving the accuracy possible with steady-state sinusoidal inputs.

  20. Evidence that the rate of strong selective sweeps increases with population size in the great apes

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Mailund, Thomas; Nater, Alexander; Greminger, Maja Patricia; Krützen, Michael; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the number of selective sweeps and their combined effects on genomic diversity in humans and other great apes is notoriously difficult. Here we address the question using a comparative approach to contrast diversity patterns according to the distance from genes in all great ape taxa. The extent of diversity reduction near genes compared with the rest of intergenic sequences is greater in a species with larger effective population size. Also, the maximum distance from genes at which the diversity reduction is observed is larger in species with large effective population size. In Sumatran orangutans, the overall genomic diversity is ∼30% smaller than diversity levels far from genes, whereas this reduction is only 9% in humans. We show by simulation that selection against deleterious mutations in the form of background selection is not expected to cause these differences in diversity among species. Instead, selective sweeps caused by positive selection can reduce diversity level more severely in a large population if there is a higher number of selective sweeps per unit time. We discuss what can cause such a correlation, including the possibility that more frequent sweeps in larger populations are due to a shorter waiting time for the right mutations to arise. PMID:28137852

  1. Effect of permeability heterogeneity on CO2 injectivity and sweep efficiency based on numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liang; Yang, Zhibing; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Niemi, Auli

    2015-04-01

    We study effect of geological heterogeneity on the injection of supercritical CO2 into a deep saline aquifer at the scale of a pilot test site, based on numerical modeling. The effect of heterogeneity on storage capacity is investigated by assessing the effect on sweep efficiency and on injectivity. Log-normally distributed random permeability fields characterized by their standard deviation (σ) and correlation length (λ) are generated and injection simulations conducted for each realization of the permeability fields with TOUGH2/ECO2N code. A range of injection pressures is tested as well. The results indicate that injectivity increases with the increased horizontal correlation length given that the vertical correlation length is fixed and significant inter-realization variation is seen when changing the standard deviation. Sweep efficiency is favored by smaller horizontal correlation length. For cases with increased standard deviation, the sweep efficiency shows significant inter-realization variability. Finally, it can be shown that both sweep efficiency and injectivity can be expressed as simple functions of medium heterogeneity characteristics, standard deviation (σ) and correlation length (λ).

  2. Wingbeat frequency-sweep and visual stimuli for trapping male Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Combinations of female wingbeat acoustic cues and visual cues were evaluated to determine their potential for use in male Aedes aegypti (L.) traps in peridomestic environments. A modified Centers for Disease control (CDC) light trap using a 350-500 Hz frequency-sweep broadcast from a speaker as an a...

  3. Evidence that the rate of strong selective sweeps increases with population size in the great apes.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Mailund, Thomas; Nater, Alexander; Greminger, Maja Patricia; Krützen, Michael; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2017-02-14

    Quantifying the number of selective sweeps and their combined effects on genomic diversity in humans and other great apes is notoriously difficult. Here we address the question using a comparative approach to contrast diversity patterns according to the distance from genes in all great ape taxa. The extent of diversity reduction near genes compared with the rest of intergenic sequences is greater in a species with larger effective population size. Also, the maximum distance from genes at which the diversity reduction is observed is larger in species with large effective population size. In Sumatran orangutans, the overall genomic diversity is ∼30% smaller than diversity levels far from genes, whereas this reduction is only 9% in humans. We show by simulation that selection against deleterious mutations in the form of background selection is not expected to cause these differences in diversity among species. Instead, selective sweeps caused by positive selection can reduce diversity level more severely in a large population if there is a higher number of selective sweeps per unit time. We discuss what can cause such a correlation, including the possibility that more frequent sweeps in larger populations are due to a shorter waiting time for the right mutations to arise.

  4. Oxide vapor distribution from a high-frequency sweep e-beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, R.; Tassano, P. L.; Tsujimoto, N.

    1995-03-01

    Oxide vapor distributions have been determined as a function of operating parameters of a high frequency sweep e-beam source combined with a programmable sweep controller. We will show which parameters are significant, the parameters that yield the broadest oxide deposition distribution, and the procedure used to arrive at these conclusions. A design-of-experimental strategy was used with five operating parameters: evaporation rate, sweep speed, sweep pattern (pre-programmed), phase speed (azimuthal rotation of the pattern), profile (dwell time as a function of radial position). A design was chosen that would show which of the parameters and parameter pairs have a statistically significant effect on the vapor distribution. Witness flats were placed symmetrically across a 25 inches diameter platen. The stationary platen was centered 24 inches above the e-gun crucible. An oxide material was evaporated under 27 different conditions. Thickness measurements were made with a stylus profilometer. The information will enable users of the high frequency e-gun systems to optimally locate the source in a vacuum system and understand which parameters have a major effect on the vapor distribution.

  5. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOEpatents

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  6. Performance of the SWEEP model affected by estimates of threshold friction velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) is a process-based model and needs to be verified under a broad range of climatic, soil, and management conditions. Occasional failure of the WEPS erosion submodel (Single-event Wind Erosion Evaluation Program or SWEEP) to simulate erosion in the Columbia Pl...

  7. Comparison of measured and simulated friction velocity and threshold friction velocity using SWEEP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) was developed by the USDA Agricultural Research Service as a tool to predict wind erosion and assess the influence of control practices on windblown soil loss. Occasional failure of the WEPS erosion submodel (SWEEP) to simulate erosion in the Columbia Platea...

  8. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of vane sweep effects on fan interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xiaodong; Liang, An; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    The lifting surface method is an efficient solution for fully three-dimensional aerodynamic response of an annular cascade to the unsteady disturbances. Based on this response function, a prediction model for fan tonal and broadband interaction noise has been established. Three dimensional effects, including primarily the annular geometry and the radial non-uniformity of the upwash, can be fully taken into account. In this paper, a thorough analysis of vanes sweep effects is carried out by particularly considering the great dependence of the annular cascade aerodynamic response and modal acoustic field upon the radial phase profiles of incident disturbances. For fan tonal noise, different control behaviors of the forward and backward swept vanes are observed when the radial non-uniformity in the incident gust is introduced. The argument suggests that sweep should be selected so as to increase the wake intersections per vane, until it is larger than the number of cut-on radial acoustic modes. For fan broadband noise, the backward sweep succeeds in reducing the sound power level for a wide range of frequencies. Due to the statistical average effect, the efficiency relies much on the shape of the turbulence spectrum. And the sweep angle should be large enough to guarantee a preferable reduction to the fan broadband noise.

  10. Influence of sample geometry on sweeping-detonation-wave spallation in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, G. T.; Hull, L. M.; Livescu, V.; Briggs, M. E.; Meyer, R. K.

    2017-01-01

    Widespread research since 1950 has provided a wealth of experimental data concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Sweeping-wave loading is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse or 1-D HE-driven plane-wave shock in terms of the evolving spherical and shear stresses applied. Sweeping-wave loading in a flat-plate geometry was previously observed to: a) yield a lower spall strength than previously documented for 1-D supported-shock-wave loading, b) exhibit increased shock hardening as a function of increasing obliquity, and c) lead to an increased incidence of deformation twin formation with increasing shock obliquity (1). The current sweeping-wave loading of a 10 cm radius curved Ta plate is observed to: a) lead to an increase in the shear stress as a function of increasing obliquity, and b) display a more developed level of damage evolution, extensive voids and coalescence, and lower spall strength with obliquity in the curved plate than in the flat-plate sweeping-detonation wave loading for an equivalent HE loading.

  11. Numerical solutions of two-point fuzzy boundary value problem using half-sweep alternating group explicit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahalan, A. A.; Muthuvalu, M. S.; Sulaiman, J.

    2013-09-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to examine the application of complexity reduction approach based on half-sweep iteration concept with Alternating Group Explicit (AGE) method namely Half-Sweep AGE (HSAGE) method for solving system of linear equations generated from the discretization of two-point fuzzy boundary value problems (FBVPs). To form the linear system, the corresponding second order finite difference scheme has been used to derive the half-sweep finite difference approximation equation of the problems. The formulation and implementation of the proposed iterative method are discussed. Furthermore, numerical results of two test problems are also included in order to verify performance of the method compared to Full-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (FSGS) and Full-Sweep AGE (FSAGE) methods. The findings show that the proposed HSAGE method is superior to other tested methods in the sense of number of iterations, execution time and Hausdorff distance.

  12. Genomic Signature of Selective Sweeps Illuminates Adaptation of Medicago truncatula to Root-Associated Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Maxime; Boitard, Simon; San Clemente, Hélène; Dumas, Bernard; Young, Nevin; Jacquet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume species used to investigate plant–microorganism interactions, notably root symbioses. Massive population genomic and transcriptomic data now available for this species open the way for a comprehensive investigation of genomic variations associated with adaptation of M. truncatula to its environment. Here we performed a fine-scale genome scan of selective sweep signatures in M. truncatula using more than 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms identified on 283 accessions from two populations (Circum and Far West), and exploited annotation and published transcriptomic data to identify biological processes associated with molecular adaptation. We identified 58 swept genomic regions with a 15 kb average length and comprising 3.3 gene models on average. The unimodal sweep state probability distribution in these regions enabled us to focus on the best single candidate gene per region. We detected two unambiguous species-wide selective sweeps, one of which appears to underlie morphological adaptation. Population genomic analyses of the remaining 56 sweep signatures indicate that sweeps identified in the Far West population are less population-specific and probably more ancient than those identified in the Circum population. Functional annotation revealed a predominance of immunity-related adaptations in the Circum population. Transcriptomic data from accessions of the Far West population allowed inference of four clusters of coregulated genes putatively involved in the adaptive control of symbiotic carbon flow and nodule senescence, as well as in other root adaptations upon infection with soil microorganisms. We demonstrate that molecular adaptations in M. truncatula were primarily triggered by selective pressures from root-associated microorganisms. PMID:25901015

  13. SECULAR RESONANCE SWEEPING OF THE MAIN ASTEROID BELT DURING PLANET MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Minton, David A.; Malhotra, Renu E-mail: renu@lpl.arizona.edu

    2011-05-01

    We calculate the eccentricity excitation of asteroids produced by the sweeping {nu}{sub 6} secular resonance during the epoch of planetesimal-driven giant planet migration in the early history of the solar system. We derive analytical expressions for the magnitude of the eccentricity change and its dependence on the sweep rate and on planetary parameters; the {nu}{sub 6} sweeping leads to either an increase or a decrease of eccentricity depending on an asteroid's initial orbit. Based on the slowest rate of {nu}{sub 6} sweeping that allows a remnant asteroid belt to survive, we derive a lower limit on Saturn's migration speed of {approx}0.15 AU Myr{sup -1} during the era that the {nu}{sub 6} resonance swept through the inner asteroid belt (semimajor axis range 2.1-2.8 AU). This rate limit is for Saturn's current eccentricity and scales with the square of its eccentricity; the limit on Saturn's migration rate could be lower if its eccentricity were lower during its migration. Applied to an ensemble of fictitious asteroids, our calculations show that a prior single-peaked distribution of asteroid eccentricities would be transformed into a double-peaked distribution due to the sweeping of the {nu}{sub 6} resonance. Examination of the orbital data of main belt asteroids reveals that the proper eccentricities of the known bright (H {<=} 10.8) asteroids may be consistent with a double-peaked distribution. If so, our theoretical analysis then yields two possible solutions for the migration rate of Saturn and for the dynamical states of the pre-migration asteroid belt: a dynamically cold state (single-peaked eccentricity distribution with mean of {approx}0.05) linked with Saturn's migration speed {approx}4 AU Myr{sup -1} or a dynamically hot state (single-peaked eccentricity distribution with mean of {approx}0.3) linked with Saturn's migration speed {approx}0.8 AU Myr{sup -1}.

  14. Are sweep net sampling and pitfall trapping compatible with molecular analysis of predation?

    PubMed

    Harwood, James D

    2008-08-01

    Molecular analysis of predation enables accurate and reliable elucidation of trophic linkages in complex food webs, but identifying the strength of such interactions can be subject to error. Currently two techniques dominate: monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although the optimization and characterization of these systems ensures their sensitivity and specificity, predator collection protocols such as sweep-netting and vacuum sampling could overestimate feeding rates because of surface-level contamination, yielding positive reactivity or predation within the sampling device. Therefore, two sampling techniques (sweep-net sampling and hand collection) were compared within an alfalfa agroecosystem using a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to test the hypothesis that cross-contamination is a source of error, i.e., significantly more predators (linyphiid spiders) would test positive for prey (Diptera) proteins. A concurrent study examining the viability of trapping predators into saline solution was also undertaken. No significant differences were found between the proportions of spiders screening positive for Diptera when collected by sweep-net versus hand collection, rejecting the hypothesis that sweep-netting predators for subsequent molecular gut content analysis overestimates predation frequency. ELISA was also capable of detecting prey proteins in predator guts from pitfall traps containing phosphate-buffered saline, indicating the suitability of this approach for the collection and analysis of epigeal predators. Although these results indicate that sweep netting and pitfall trapping into solution is appropriate in this predator-prey and ELISA analysis system, caution should be exercised with other interactions and PCR-based analysis. The likelihood for false-positive reactivity should therefore be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  15. Serotonin differentially modulates responses to tones and frequency-modulated sweeps in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, L M; Pollak, G D

    1999-09-15

    Although almost all auditory brainstem nuclei receive serotonergic innervation, little is known about its effects on auditory neurons. We address this question by evaluating the effects of serotonin on sound-evoked activity of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of Mexican free-tailed bats. Two types of auditory stimuli were used: tone bursts at the neuron's best frequency and frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps with a variety of spectral and temporal structures. There were two main findings. First, serotonin changed tone-evoked responses in 66% of the IC neurons sampled. Second, the influence of serotonin often depended on the type of signal presented. Although serotonin depressed tone-evoked responses in most neurons, its effects on responses to FM sweeps were evenly mixed between depression and facilitation. Thus in most cells serotonin had a different effect on tone-evoked responses than it did on FM-evoked responses. In some neurons serotonin depressed responses evoked by tone bursts but left the responses to FM sweeps unchanged, whereas in others serotonin had little or no effect on responses to tone bursts but substantially facilitated responses to FM sweeps. In addition, serotonin could differentially affect responses to various FM sweeps that differed in temporal or spectral structure. Previous studies have revealed that the efficacy of the serotonergic innervation is partially modulated by sensory stimuli and by behavioral states. Thus our results suggest that the population activity evoked by a particular sound is not simply a consequence of the hard wiring that connects the IC to lower and higher regions but rather is highly dynamic because of the functional reconfigurations induced by serotonin and almost certainly other neuromodulators as well.

  16. R2d2 Drives Selfish Sweeps in the House Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Didion, John P.; Morgan, Andrew P.; Yadgary, Liran; Bell, Timothy A.; McMullan, Rachel C.; Ortiz de Solorzano, Lydia; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Bult, Carol J.; Campbell, Karl J.; Castiglia, Riccardo; Ching, Yung-Hao; Chunco, Amanda J.; Crowley, James J.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Förster, Daniel W.; French, John E.; Gabriel, Sofia I.; Gatti, Daniel M.; Garland, Theodore; Giagia-Athanasopoulou, Eva B.; Giménez, Mabel D.; Grize, Sofia A.; Gündüz, İslam; Holmes, Andrew; Hauffe, Heidi C.; Herman, Jeremy S.; Holt, James M.; Hua, Kunjie; Jolley, Wesley J.; Lindholm, Anna K.; López-Fuster, María J.; Mitsainas, George; da Luz Mathias, Maria; McMillan, Leonard; Ramalhinho, Maria da Graça Morgado; Rehermann, Barbara; Rosshart, Stephan P.; Searle, Jeremy B.; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Solano, Emanuela; Svenson, Karen L.; Thomas-Laemont, Patricia; Threadgill, David W.; Ventura, Jacint; Weinstock, George M.; Pomp, Daniel; Churchill, Gary A.; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A selective sweep is the result of strong positive selection driving newly occurring or standing genetic variants to fixation, and can dramatically alter the pattern and distribution of allelic diversity in a population. Population-level sequencing data have enabled discoveries of selective sweeps associated with genes involved in recent adaptations in many species. In contrast, much debate but little evidence addresses whether “selfish” genes are capable of fixation—thereby leaving signatures identical to classical selective sweeps—despite being neutral or deleterious to organismal fitness. We previously described R2d2, a large copy-number variant that causes nonrandom segregation of mouse Chromosome 2 in females due to meiotic drive. Here we show population-genetic data consistent with a selfish sweep driven by alleles of R2d2 with high copy number (R2d2HC) in natural populations. We replicate this finding in multiple closed breeding populations from six outbred backgrounds segregating for R2d2 alleles. We find that R2d2HC rapidly increases in frequency, and in most cases becomes fixed in significantly fewer generations than can be explained by genetic drift. R2d2HC is also associated with significantly reduced litter sizes in heterozygous mothers, making it a true selfish allele. Our data provide direct evidence of populations actively undergoing selfish sweeps, and demonstrate that meiotic drive can rapidly alter the genomic landscape in favor of mutations with neutral or even negative effects on overall Darwinian fitness. Further study will reveal the incidence of selfish sweeps, and will elucidate the relative contributions of selfish genes, adaptation and genetic drift to evolution. PMID:26882987

  17. A Composite-Likelihood Method for Detecting Incomplete Selective Sweep from Population Genomic Data.

    PubMed

    Vy, Ha My T; Kim, Yuseob

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive evolution occurs as beneficial mutations arise and then increase in frequency by positive natural selection. How, when, and where in the genome such evolutionary events occur is a fundamental question in evolutionary biology. It is possible to detect ongoing positive selection or an incomplete selective sweep in species with sexual reproduction because, when a beneficial mutation is on the way to fixation, homologous chromosomes in the population are divided into two groups: one carrying the beneficial allele with very low polymorphism at nearby linked loci and the other carrying the ancestral allele with a normal pattern of sequence variation. Previous studies developed long-range haplotype tests to capture this difference between two groups as the signal of an incomplete selective sweep. In this study, we propose a composite-likelihood-ratio (CLR) test for detecting incomplete selective sweeps based on the joint sampling probabilities for allele frequencies of two groups as a function of strength of selection and recombination rate. Tested against simulated data, this method yielded statistical power and accuracy in parameter estimation that are higher than the iHS test and comparable to the more recently developed nSL test. This procedure was also applied to African Drosophila melanogaster population genomic data to detect candidate genes under ongoing positive selection. Upon visual inspection of sequence polymorphism, candidates detected by our CLR method exhibited clear haplotype structures predicted under incomplete selective sweeps. Our results suggest that different methods capture different aspects of genetic information regarding incomplete sweeps and thus are partially complementary to each other.

  18. A novel 24-kHz resonant scanner for high-resolution laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Steffen; Kaufmann, Christian; Hahn, Ramon; Mehner, Jan; Doetzel, Wolfram; Gessner, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This contribution deals with design, fabrication and test of a micromachined resonant scanner usable for horizontal deflection of the laser beam in a projection display. The electrostatically driven plate is separated from the mirror in order to reduce air damping and electrostatic non linearity. The device consists of a circularly shaped mirror which is suspended by torsion beams in the center of an elastically suspended driving plate. A resonator with two rotational degrees of freedom is arranged in this way. The rotation axes of mirror and driving plate are the same. A suitable design of the properties of the two degrees of freedom resonator leads to a significant amplification of the oscillation of the mirror compared to the oscillation of the driving plate. The first resonant mode is a rotation of both plates with nearly the same magnitude at a frequency of approx. 5 kHz. The second mode with paraphase deflection at 24 kHz shows a deflection amplification by a ratio of 53 and is used for scanning operation. A supporting part made of glass carries two electrodes in the region of the driving plate and has a micro sandblasted hole beneath the mirror. Bulk micromachining KOH wet etching of the electrode gap size on the back side of the driving plate, reactive ion etching for contour shaping of the mirror, of the driving plate and of the torsion beams and anodic bonding have been used for fabrication of the mechanical structure. The mirror is evaporated by an aluminum layer. Applying a voltage of 380V results in a mechanical deflection of +/- 5.5 degrees at 24 kHz at atmosphere pressure. The device shows very small dynamic warp (<100nm) of the mirror plate even though the relatively large size of 2.2 mm diameter because of the thickness of 280 μm. The measured mechanical Q-factor is 5100.

  19. Ground-truthing 6. 5-kHz side scan sonographs: What are we really imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; Field, M.E.; Lee, H.; Edwards, B.E. ); Masson, D.G.; Kenyon, N. ); Kidd, R.B. )

    1991-04-10

    A 1,000-km{sup 2} area on the distal lobe of Monterey Fan shows a digitate pattern of juxtaposed high and low backscatter on GLORIA side scan sonographs. This area was investigated using stereo photography, high-resolution seismic profiles, and measurements of physical properties of cores to quantitatively evaluate the causes of backscatter from the 6.5-kHz side scan sonar. Stereo photography and bottom video were used to determine that the sediment-water interface typically has a bed roughness less than 10 cm over the entire ground truth area; consequently, bed roughness is not a significant contributor to the sonar backscatter. Vertical-incidence 3.5-kHz profiles reveal that high-backscatter areas allow less penetration and have slightly more relief than low-backscatter areas. Closely spaced measurements of {rho} wave velocity, density, and grain size made on transponder-navigated cores are used to investigate the geoacoustic properties of the sediment with the aid of a numerical model. The model results demonstrate that the sediment-water interface is, in most cases, acoustically transparent to the sonar energy and that most or all of the energy is refracted into the sediment to depths of at least a few meters rather than scattered from the surface. In this area, thick (up to 50 cm) sand deposits with thin interbeds of silty clay correlate with lower backscatter than do silty clay deposits with thin interbeds of sand. This suggests that volume inhomogeneities and complex constructive and destructive interferences caused by the subsurface volume inhomogeneities within the top few meters of the sediment ultimately modulate the intensity of backscatter. Although 6.5-kHz sonographs appear easy to interpret in a conventional and simplistic manner, caution should be used when interpreting lithofacies from backscatter intensities.

  20. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  1. Lack of Teratological Effects in Rats Exposed to 20 or 60 kHz Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Izumi; Oshima, Atsushi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Negishi, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A risk assessment of magnetic field (MF) exposure conducted by the World Health Organization indicated the need for biological studies on primary hazard identification and quantitative risk evaluation of intermediate frequency (300 Hz–100 kHz) MFs. Because induction heating cookers generate such MFs for cooking, reproductive and developmental effects are a concern due to the close proximity of the fields' source to a cook's abdomen. METHODS: Pregnant Crl:CD(SD) rats (25/group) were exposed to a 20 kHz, 0.2 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.1 mT(rms) sinusoidal MF or sham-exposed for 22 hr/day during organogenesis, and their fetuses were examined for malformations on gestation day 20. All teratological evaluations were conducted in a blind fashion, and experiments were duplicated for each frequency to confirm consistency of experimental outcomes. RESULTS: No exposure-related changes were found in clinical signs, gross pathology, or number of implantation losses. The number of live fetuses and low-body-weight fetuses as well as the incidence of external, visceral, and skeletal malformations in the fetuses did not indicate significant differences between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups. Although some fetuses showed isolated changes in sex ratio and skeletal variation and ossification, such changes were neither reproduced in duplicate experiments nor were they common to specific field frequencies. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure of rats to MFs during organogenesis did not show significant reproducible teratogenicity under experimental conditions. Present findings do not support the hypothesis that intermediate frequency MF exposure after implantation carries a significant risk for developing mammalian fetuses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:469–477, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21770026

  2. Evaluation of potential health effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields: a rodent reproductive study.

    PubMed

    Dawson, B V; Robertson, I G; Wilson, W R; Zwi, L J; Boys, J T; Green, A W

    1998-01-01

    New technology involving the use of high-frequency inductive power distribution (HID) has recently been developed for use in materials handling and personnel transfer. Sinusoidal magnetic fields at a frequency of 10 kHz with field intensities of approximately 0.2 mT are generated directly between the current-carrying coils of this equipment. Effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields on cell division, migration, and differentiation have never been previously investigated. To evaluate potential effects on these parameters, a rodent reproductive study was undertaken using Wistar rats. Exposures were at 0.095, 0.24, and 0.95 mT with a background exposure of 5-10 microT. Three sets of parental rats were exposed continuously for 20-23.5 h/day to the fields: maternal rats during gestation, paternal rats for at least 45 days prior to mating and maternal rats 1 month prior to mating. Exposure phases thus covered spermatogenesis, maturation of the ovum and ovulation, fertilization, implantation, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and maturation of the fetus immediately prior to parturition. In all experiments pregnancy outcome was assessed. These studies failed to demonstrate any reproductive toxicity resulting from maternal or fetal exposure during gestation or following paternal or maternal exposure for several weeks prior to mating. No quantitative or qualitative effects on spermatogenesis occurred after exposure, and no effects on the estrous cycle or ovulation could be demonstrably linked to the 10 kHz magnetic field exposure at 0.095, 0.25, or 0.95 mT. Where possible, parental clinical chemistry and hematology were also examined. As in mouse toxicology studies previously reported, minor differences were observed between control and treated groups. These were regarded as statistically, but not biologically, significant and could not categorically be attributed to magnetic field exposure.

  3. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  4. A four kHz repetition rate compact TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yijun; Tan, Rongqing

    2013-09-01

    A compact transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition-rate was reported. The size of the laser is 380 mm×300 mm×200 mm, and the discharge volume is 12×103 mm3. The laser cavity has a length of 320mm and consists of a totally reflective concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 4 m (Cu metal substrate coated with Au) and a partially reflecting mirror. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable,the output energy can be as high as 28 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the width of the light pulse is 60ns.To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger is used in the system of the fast-gas flow cycle. When the wind speed is 100m/s, the repetition rate of the transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser is up to 2 kHz. On this basis, a dual modular structure with two sets of the gas discharge unit is adopted to obtain a higher pulse repetition frequency output. The dual discharge unit composed two sets of electrodes and two sets of turbo fan. Alternate trigger technology is used to make the two sets of discharge module work in turn with repetition frequency of 2 kHz, the discharge interval of two sets of the gas discharge unit can be adjusted continuously from 20 microseconds to 250 microseconds. Under the conditions of maintaining the other parameters constant, the repetition frequency of the laser pulse is up to 4 kHz. The total size of laser with dual modular structure is 380mm×520mm×200mm, and the discharge volume is 24×103 mm3 with the cavity length of 520mm.

  5. 2.5-kHz magnetostrictive Tonpilz sonar transducer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Stephen C.

    2002-07-01

    Naval Undersea Warfare Center has fabricated and tested a 2.5 kHz magnetostrictive sonar transducer to validate various modeling techniques. The transducer selected is a longitudinal vibrator Tonpilz type consisting of Terfenol-D driver, tail mass, radiating head mass, and stress rod bolt with 21 MPa (3000 psi) prestress. The Terfenol-D drive rod is interlaced with three samarium cobalt magnets, one in the center and one on either end magnetically biasing the Terfenol to 60 kA/m (750 Oe). Both the Terfenol-D rods and magnets were laminated to reduce eddy currents. The magnetic circuit is comprised of pole piece discs on each end of the Terfenol-D magnet assembly and an external magnetic cylinder (return path) made of a high-permeability, high-resistivity, high-saturation powdered metal 'T2'. The transducer has a 25 cm (9.8in) diameter radiating face (piston), is 28 cm (11 in.) long, and weighs 15 kg (32 lb.) without the housing. It is 41 cm (16 in.) long and 25 kg (56 lb.) with the underwater housing. The measured results are compared to a finite element model using 'ATILA' and distributed plane wave element equivalent circuit model. The coupling coefficient, permeability and mechanical loss effects for different prestress loads were measured on a resonant Terfenol 'dumbbell' device. The in-water measured results indicate a mechanical Q of 2.5, an effective coupling coefficient of 0.36, an electro-acoustic efficiency of 60 percent, beam pattern directivity index of 6 dB, a maximum Source Level of 214.6 dB re 1uPa/m at 15 Amps AC drive and bandwidth of 2 kHz to 5.4 kHz +/- 1.5 dB.

  6. In situ 24 kHz coherent imaging of morphology change in laser percussion drilling.

    PubMed

    Webster, Paul J L; Yu, Joe X Z; Leung, Ben Y C; Anderson, Mitchell D; Yang, Victor X D; Fraser, James M

    2010-03-01

    We observe sample morphology changes in real time (24 kHz) during and between percussion drilling pulses by integrating a low-coherence microscope into a laser micromachining platform. Nonuniform cut speed and sidewall evolution in stainless steel are observed to strongly depend on assist gas. Interpulse morphology relaxation such as hole refill is directly imaged, showing dramatic differences in the material removal process dependent on pulse duration/peak power (micros/0.1 kW, ps/20 MW) and material (steel, lead zirconate titanate PZT). Blind hole depth precision is improved by over 1 order of magnitude using in situ feedback from the imaging system.

  7. Upgrading a high-throughput spectrometer for high-frequency (<400 kHz) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Craig, D.

    2016-11-01

    The upgraded spectrometer used for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the Madison Symmetric Torus resolves emission fluctuations up to 400 kHz. The transimpedance amplifier's cutoff frequency was increased based upon simulations comparing the change in the measured photon counts for time-dynamic signals. We modeled each signal-processing stage of the diagnostic and scanned the filtering frequency to quantify the uncertainty in the photon counting rate. This modeling showed that uncertainties can be calculated based on assuming each amplification stage is a Poisson process and by calibrating the photon counting rate with a DC light source to address additional variation.

  8. Electrical conductivity of α-LiIO 3 acid type crystals at 1 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galez, C.; Rosso, C.; Teisseyre, Y.; Crettez, J. M.; Bourson, P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Righi, A.; Moreira, R. L.

    1995-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of α-LiIO 3 acid type crystals is studied. By applying a very low amplitude electric field at 1 kHz and performing a continuous sampling of measurements, differences, reproducible for all the investigated samples, appeared between the first and subsequent heatings The anomalies occurring during the first heating are attributed mainly to inclusions of mother liquor, HIO 3 and Li 1-xH xIO 3. The 'intrinsic' conductivity is measured after a first annealing at about 470 K; the activation energies are then calculated.

  9. 200 Deg C Demonstration Transformer Operates Efficiently at 50 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A compact, high temperature demonstration transformer was constructed, using a moly permalloy powder core and Teflon -insulated copper wire. At 50 kHz and 200 C, this 1:2 ratio transformer is capable of 98 percent efficiency when operating at a specific power of 6.1 kW/kg at 4 kW. This roughly 7 cm diameter transformer has a mass of 0.65 kg. Although Teflon is unstable above 200 C, about the same electrical performance was seen at 250 C. A plot of winding loss versus frequency illustrates the need to control these losses at high frequency.

  10. Bulk Current Injection Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques, 50 kHz to 400 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.; Singh, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated using bulk current injection (BCI) techniques with radiated fields from 50 kHz - 400 MHz. It is a follow up to the two-part paper series presented at the Asia Pacific EMC Conference that focused on TEM cell signal injection. This paper discusses the effects of cable types, shield connections, and chassis connections on cable noise. For each topic, well established theories are compared with data from a real-world physical system.

  11. Multifunctional 1050 nm Spectral Domain OCT System at 147 kHz for Posterior Eye Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anqi; Zhang, Qinqin; Huang, Yanping; Zhong, Zhiwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We report a newly developed multifunctional 1050 nm spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system working at 147 kHz A-scan rate for posterior eye imaging. It is demonstrated through in-vivo experiments that this system delivers not only superior performance of posterior eye structural imaging but also detailed visualization of microcirculation network in retina. The choroid of the eye with either myopic or normal conditions can clearly be visualized through the entire scanning volume. These results indicate great potential in applying this new system for clinical studies. PMID:26623142

  12. Ionospheric Absorption on 1539 Khz in Relation to Solar Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boska, J.

    1984-01-01

    Radio wave absorption data on 1539 kHz for the summer period of 1978 to 1980 are considered in relation to variations of solar X-ray and L-alpha radiation. It is shown that under non-flare conditions L-alpha dominates in controlling absorption and that X-rays contribute about 10% to the total absorption. Optimum regression equations show that absorption is proportional to the m-th power of ionizing flux where m 1. The role of correcting L-alpha values, measured by the AE-E satellite, is discussed.

  13. High-order harmonic generation at a repetition rate of 100 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Stremme, W.; Schaetzel, M. G.; Grasbon, F.; Paulus, G. G.; Walther, H.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2003-07-01

    We report high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases using a femtosecond laser system with a very high repetition rate (100 kHz) and low pulse energy (7 {mu}J). To our knowledge, this is the highest repetition rate reported to date for HHG. The tight focusing geometry required to reach sufficiently high intensities implies low efficiency of the process. Harmonics up to the 45th order are nevertheless generated and detected. We show evidence of clear separation and selection of quantum trajectories by moving the gas jet with respect to the focus, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of the semiclassical model of HHG.

  14. Simulating satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, M.; Hanuise, C.; Parrot, M.

    2010-10-01

    Relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds emit 100 kHz radio waves which illuminate the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. This contribution aims to clarify the physical processes which are relevant for the spatial spreading of the radio wave energy below and above the ionosphere and thereby enables simulating satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds. The simulation uses the DEMETER satellite which observes 100 kHz radio waves from fifty terrestrial Long Range Aid to Navigation (LORAN) transmitters. Their mean luminosity patch in the plasmasphere is a circular area with a radius of 300 km and a power density of 22 μW/Hz as observed at 660km height above the ground. The luminosity patches exhibit a southward displacement of 450 km with respect to the locations of the LORAN transmitters. The displacement is reduced to 150 km when an upward propagation of the radio waves along the geomagnetic field line is assumed. This residual displacement indicates that the radio waves undergo 150 km sub-ionospheric propagation prior to entering a magnetospheric duct and escaping into near-Earth space. The residual displacement at low (L<2.14) and high (L>2.14) geomagnetic latitudes ranges from 100 km to 200 km which suggests that the smaller inclination of the geomagnetic field lines at low latitudes helps to trap the radio waves and to keep them in the magnetospheric duct. Diffuse luminosity areas are observed northward of the magnetic conjugate locations of LORAN transmitters at extremely low geomagnetic latitudes (L<1.36) in Southeast Asia. This result suggests that the propagation along the geomagnetic field lines results in a spatial spreading of the radio wave energy over distances of 1 Mm. The summative assessment of the electric field intensities measured in space show that nadir observations of terrestrial 100 kHz radio waves, e.g., from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds, are attenuated

  15. The effects of nonlinear loading upon the Space Station Freedom 20 kHz power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leskovich, R. Thomas; Hansen, Irving G.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom power distribution system, which consists of dual redundant 20-kHz, 440-V RMS, single-phase power systems, is discussed. The effect of a typical space station nonlinear load on the measurement of RMS current and voltage at various points in the space station power system has been investigated using the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). The load current distortion at the user interface, its effect on the distribution system, and its relationship to power factor have been studied. Modeling results are compared to test data. The differences under nonlinear loading are evaluated and presented as a measure of distribution voltage distortion and current measurement accuracy.

  16. 3D Measurements of Ignition Processes at 20 kHz in a Supersonic Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-05

    measurements obtained via PIV [2], though quantitative com- parison is difficult due to the 2D nature of previous results and the 3D nature of the current...1 3 DOI 10.1007/s00340-015-6066-4 Appl. Phys. B (2015) 119:313–318 3D measurements of ignition processes at 20 kHz in a supersonic combustor Lin Ma...image velocimetry (PIV) [2]. Results from these past efforts all reveal highly transient and 3D flow and flame structures during the ignition processes

  17. Integrated optics magnetic sensor from 2 kHz to 9 GHz.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao; Chen, Fushen; Chen, Kaixin

    2011-04-10

    A new type of integrated optical magnetic field sensor is presented in this paper. The proposed sensor consists of a Mach-Zehnder waveguide interferometer and a doubly loaded loop antenna. Such a structure can successfully avoid detection of the undesired electric field signal. The size of the sensor is 35 mm×6 mm×1 mm. The measurements show that the frequency response is from 2 kHz to 9 GHz, the dynamic range is 98 dB, and the minimum detectable magnetic field is 51.8 μA/m at 1 GHz. Therefore, this sensing system can be used in electromagnetic compatibility measurements.

  18. Influence of Transducer Structure on Mechanical and Chemical Effects of 20 kHz Sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Khuyen Viet Bao; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we examined the influence of transducer structure on the mechanical and chemical effects of 20 kHz sonication, where the dissipated power measured by calorimetry was kept constant (5 W). The mechanical effects were evaluated from the degradation rate of poly(ethylene oxide) in aqueous solution, and the chemical effects were measured with potassium iodide solution. The mechanical effects for a bath-type apparatus with the transducers fixed at a node with a diameter of 50 mm are nearly equal to those for a horn-type apparatus. The former transducer showed the strongest chemical effects among the transducers investigated here.

  19. Medium, Long and Very Long Wave Propagation (at Frequencies Less than 3000 kHz)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Alectrique de 15 km environ accord6e A la fr~quence d𔄀mission. L’Universiti de Paris utilise un 6metteur de I KW qui alimente l’antenne avec un courant...maxi- mum de 8 amperes. L’Aerospace Corporation utilise l’metteur TVLF, le courant d’antenne est alors compris entre 20 et 45 ampbres. Les...cepteur VLF da SCATHA utilise 2 antennas pour d~tecter lea composantes magn~tique at Alactrique des Amissions. La sensibilitA du r~captaur ast A 1.3 KHz

  20. Risk factors associated with typhoid fever in children aged 2-16 years in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Ochiai, R L; Soofi, S B; Von-Seidlein, L; Khan, M J; Sahito, S M; Habib, M A; Puri, M K; Park, J K; You, Y A; Ali, M; Nizami, S Q; Acosta, C J; Bradley-Sack, R; Clemens, J D; Bhutta, Z A

    2012-04-01

    We analysed the data from the control group in a typhoid vaccine trial in Karachi to assess the differences in individual-, household- and cluster-level characteristics for developing typhoid fever. The annual incidence of typhoid in children aged 2-16 years in the control arm of the vaccine trial was 151/100 000 population. After adjustment, the risk of typhoid was lower with increasing age [risk ratio (RR) 0·89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·83-0·95], was higher with an increase in population density (RR 1·13, 95% CI 1·05-1·21) and was lower in the households using a safe drinking-water source (RR 0·63, 95% CI 0·41-0·99). Typhoid fever affects younger children living in areas of high population density and lack of access to safe water in Pakistan. A combination of environmental and biological interventions is required to prevent the continued epidemiological and economic impact of typhoid fever in high-risk areas of Pakistan.

  1. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  2. Reduction of dopamine synaptic activity: degradation of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Ahrens, Allison M; Ma, Sean T; Kane, Jacqueline R; Windham, E Blake; Woodlee, Martin T; Schallert, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    Vocal deficits are prevalent and debilitating in Parkinson's disease. These deficits may be related to the initial pathology of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and resulting dopamine depletion, which contributes to dysfunction of fine motor control in multiple functions. Although vocalization in animals and humans may differ in many respects, we evaluated complex (50-kHz) ultrasonic mate calls in 2 rat models of Parkinson's disease, including unilateral infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine to the medial forebrain bundle and peripheral administration of a nonakinesia dose of the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. We examined the effects of these treatments on multiple aspects of the acoustic signal. The number of trill-like (frequency modulated) 50-kHz calls was significantly reduced, and appeared to be replaced by simpler (flat) calls. The bandwidth and maximum intensity of simple and frequency-modulated calls were significantly decreased, but call duration was not. Our findings suggest that the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway is involved to some extent in fine sensorimotor function that includes USV production and complexity.

  3. Acoustic emission spectra and sonochemical activity in a 36 kHz sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-01-01

    During ultrasound-induced cavitation in liquids, acoustic emissions at fundamental and harmonic frequencies can be detected. The effect of acoustic emissions at harmonic frequencies on the sonochemical and sonophysical activities has not been explored, especially in large-scale sonoreactors. In this study, the acoustic emissions in the range, 0-250 kHz in a 36 kHz sonoreactor with varying liquid heights were studied and compared with the sonochemical activities. The acoustic pressures at both fundamental and harmonics decreased drastically as the liquid height was increased due to the attenuation of sound energy. It was observed that the increase in input power resulted in only an increase in the acoustic emissions at derivative frequencies such as, harmonics and subharmonics. The sonochemical activity, evaluated in terms of sonochemiluminescence and H2O2 yield, was not significantly enhanced at higher input power levels. This suggests that at higher power levels, the "extra" acoustic energy is not effectively used to generate primary cavitation activity; rather it is converted to generate acoustic emissions at harmonic and subharmonic frequencies. This is an important observation for the design of energy efficiency large-scale sonochemical reactors.

  4. Spin axis orientation of Ajisai determined from Graz 2 kHz SLR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, D.; Otsubo, T.; Kirchner, G.; Koidl, F.

    2010-08-01

    The Graz 2 kHz Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements allow determination of the spin axis orientation of the geodetic satellite Ajisai. The high repetition rate of the laser makes it possible to determine the epoch time when the laser is pointing directly between two corner cube reflector (CCR) rings of the satellite. Identification of many such events during a few (up to 3) consecutive passes allows to state the satellite orientation in the celestial coordinate system. Six years of 2 kHz SLR data (October 2003-October 2009) delivered 331 orientation values which clearly show precession of the axis along a cone centered at 14 h56 m2.8 s in right ascension and 88.512° in declination (J2000.0 celestial reference frame) and with an half-aperture angle θ of 1.405°. The spin axis precesses with a period of 117 days, which is equal to the period of the right ascension of the ascending node of Ajisai's orbit. We present a model of the axis precession which allows prediction of the satellite orientation - necessary for the envisaged laser time transfer via Ajisai mirrors.

  5. ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS <100 KHZ IN ELECTRIC AND GASOLINE-POWERED VEHICLES.

    PubMed

    Tell, Richard A; Kavet, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Measurements were conducted to investigate electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) from 120 Hz to 10 kHz and 1.2 to 100 kHz in 9 electric or hybrid vehicles and 4 gasoline vehicles, all while being driven. The range of fields in the electric vehicles enclosed the range observed in the gasoline vehicles. Mean magnetic fields ranged from nominally 0.6 to 3.5 µT for electric/hybrids depending on the measurement band compared with nominally 0.4 to 0.6 µT for gasoline vehicles. Mean values of electric fields ranged from nominally 2 to 3 V m(-1) for electric/hybrid vehicles depending on the band, compared with 0.9 to 3 V m(-1) for gasoline vehicles. In all cases, the fields were well within published exposure limits for the general population. The measurements were performed with Narda model EHP-50C/EHP-50D EMF analysers that revealed the presence of spurious signals in the EHP-50C unit, which were resolved with the EHP-50D model.

  6. Tri-linear color multi-linescan sensor with 200 kHz line rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrey, Olaf; Brockherde, Werner; Nitta, Christian; Bechen, Benjamin; Bodenstorfer, Ernst; Brodersen, Jörg; Mayer, Konrad J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a newly developed linear CMOS high-speed line-scanning sensor realized in a 0.35 μm CMOS OPTO process for line-scan with 200 kHz true RGB and 600 kHz monochrome line rate, respectively. In total, 60 lines are integrated in the sensor allowing for electronic position adjustment. The lines are read out in rolling shutter manner. The high readout speed is achieved by a column-wise organization of the readout chain. At full speed, the sensor provides RGB color images with a spatial resolution down to 50 μm. This feature enables a variety of applications like quality assurance in print inspection, real-time surveillance of railroad tracks, in-line monitoring in flat panel fabrication lines and many more. The sensor has a fill-factor close to 100%, preventing aliasing and color artefacts. Hence the tri-linear technology is robust against aliasing ensuring better inspection quality and thus less waste in production lines.

  7. Tickling increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hori, Miyo; Shimoju, Rie; Tokunaga, Ryota; Ohkubo, Masato; Miyabe, Shigeki; Ohnishi, Junji; Murakami, Kazuo; Kurosawa, Mieko

    2013-03-27

    Adolescent rats emit 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations, a marker of positive emotion, during rough-and-tumble play or on tickling stimulation. The emission of 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in response to tickling is suggested to be mediated by dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens; however, there is no direct evidence supporting this hypothesis. The present study aimed to elucidate whether play behavior (tickling) in adolescent rats can trigger dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens with hedonic 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations. The effect of tickling stimulation was compared with light-touch stimulation, as a discernible stimulus. We examined 35-40-day-old rats, which corresponds to the period of midadolescence. Tickling stimulation for 5 min significantly increased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (118±7% of the prestimulus control value). Conversely, light-touch stimulation for 5 min did not significantly change dopamine release. In addition, 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations were emitted during tickling stimulation but not during light-touch stimulation. Further, tickling-induced 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations were significantly blocked by the direct application of SCH23390 (D1 receptor antagonist) and raclopride (D2/D3 receptor antagonist) into the nucleus accumbens. Our study demonstrates that tickling stimulation in adolescent rats increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, leading to the generation of 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations.

  8. Theoretical interpretation of frequency sweeping observations in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vann, R. G. L.; Dendy, R. O.; Gryaznevich, M. P.

    2005-03-01

    Frequency sweeping (chirping) of high frequency magnetohydrodynamic modes is widely observed in tokamak plasmas. In this paper observations of chirping in neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [A. Sykes, R. J. Akers, L. C. Appel et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1423 (2001)] are considered, and it is shown that these may be interpreted using the Berk-Breizman augmentation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. This model includes an energetic particle source: it leads not only to a single chirp but also to a series of bursting events. This repetitious behavior is characteristic of the chirping seen in experiments such as MAST. The similarity between features in velocity space and features in frequency space reinforces the theory that hole-clump pair formation is responsible for the observed frequency sweeping.

  9. Toward a comprehensive theory for the sweeping of trapped radiation by inert orbiting matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, Walker

    1988-01-01

    There is a need to calculate loss rates when trapped Van Allen radiation encounters inert orbiting material such as planetary rings and satellites. An analytic expression for the probability of a hit in a bounce encounter is available for all cases where the absorber is spherical and the particles are gyrotropically distributed on a cylindrical flux tube. The hit probability is a function of the particle's pitch angle, the size of the absorber, and the distance between flux tube and absorber, when distances are scaled to the gyroradius of a particle moving perpendicular to the magnetic field. Using this expression, hit probabilities have been computed in drift encounters for all regimes of particle energies and absorber sizes. This technique generalizes the approach to sweeping lifetimes, and is particularly suitable for attacking the inverse problem, where one is given a sweeping signature and wants to deduce the properties of the absorber(s).

  10. Barkhausen noise-magnetizing voltage sweep measurement in evaluation of residual stress in hardened components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Sorsa, Aki; Hakanen, Merja; Leiviskä, Kauko; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, Barkhausen noise (BN) magnetizing voltage sweep (MVS) measurement is used to evaluate non-destructively the surface residual stress state of hardened components. A new computational feature, where the maximum slope of the sweep is divided by the corresponding magnetizing voltage, is introduced. The results show that this feature has a linear relationship with the residual stress state of the samples. The determination of residual stresses during online production of components is a highly recognized task because tensile stresses may be detrimental to the component. In this study, two sets of hardened samples are used in the analysis. A linear relationship is observed in each sample set indicating that the new feature is applicable in assessment of surface residual stresses of the components.

  11. Sweeping from the superfluid to the Mott phase in the Bose-Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Schützhold, Ralf; Uhlmann, Michael; Xu, Yan; Fischer, Uwe R

    2006-11-17

    We study the sweep through the quantum phase transition from the superfluid to the Mott state for the Bose-Hubbard model with a time-dependent tunneling rate J(t). In the experimentally relevant case of exponential decay J(t) proportional variant e -gamma t, an adapted mean-field expansion for large fillings n yields a scaling solution for the fluctuations. This enables us to analytically calculate the evolution of the number and phase variations (on-site) and correlations (off-site) for slow (gammamu) sweeps, where mu is the chemical potential. Finally, we derive the dynamical decay of the off-diagonal long-range order as well as the temporal shrinkage of the superfluid fraction in a persistent ring-current setup.

  12. Sweeping Jet Actuators - A New Design Tool for High Lift Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Emilio; Seele, Roman; Lin, John C.; Wygnanski, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) experiments performed at the Caltech Lucas Wind Tunnel on a generic airplane vertical tail model proved the effectiveness of sweeping jets in improving the control authority of a rudder. The results indicated that a momentum coefficient (C(sub u)) of approximately 2% increased the side force in excess of 50% at the maximum conventional rudder deflection angle in the absence of yaw. However, sparsely distributed actuators providing a collective C(sub u) approx. = 0.1% were able to increase the side force in excess of 20%. This result is achieved by reducing the spanwise flow along the swept back rudder and its success is attributed to the large sweep back angle of the vertical tail. This current effort was sponsored by the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project.

  13. Single-frequency Bismuth-doped fiber laser with quasi-continuous self-sweeping.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Ivan A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Melkumov, Mikhail A; Khopin, Vladimir F; Babin, Sergey A; Dianov, Evgeny M

    2015-09-21

    Generation of regular pulses of linearly polarized radiation with periodic self-induced laser line sweeping by ~10 nm near central wavelength of ~1460 nm has been demonstrated for the first time in an all-fiber Bismuth laser without any tuning element. It has been shown that the radiation of each pulse is single-frequency, and the pulse-to-pulse frequency shift is as low as 1 MHz corresponding to one intermode interval in 100-m long laser cavity. The measured intra-pulse frequency chirp is below 1 MHz while the pulses are long (~10 μs) and overlapping. Thus the sweeping is nearly continuous in frequency and time domains.

  14. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE): Unified Stability System (USS). Description and Users' Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.; Behbehani, Roxanna

    1990-01-01

    NASA initiated the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) to establish a boundary layer transition database for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper surface gloves were fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The development of an improved laminar boundary layer stability analysis system called the Unified Stability System (USS) is documented and results of its use on the VSTFE flight data are shown. The USS consists of eight computer codes. The theoretical background of the system is described, as is the input, output, and usage hints. The USS is capable of analyzing boundary layer stability over a wide range of disturbance frequencies and orientations, making it possible to use different philosophies in calculating the growth of disturbances on sweptwings.

  15. Stability and accuracy of the sweep rate measurements for LLNL optical streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.S.

    1989-08-04

    Precise pulse shaping is vital for present and future high-power lasers that will attempt to achieve low-entropy laser-fusion implosions. Multichannel, streak-camera-based systems are used to make such measurements. Such systems must be accurately calibrated in order to correct for time-base and flat-field variations. We use an on-line calibration system in order to measure the sweep rate, and in our recent work we have evaluated the accuracy of this measurement technique. By analyzing a large number of calibrations, and the effect of noise on our measurement technique, we have concluded that the sweep rate for our streak camera systems is reproducible to a least {plus minus}1.2% and that our measurement technique contributes an additional {plus minus}0.5% uncertainty in the measurement. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Exact transition probabilities for a linear sweep through a Kramers-Kronig resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Chen; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-11-19

    We consider a localized electronic spin controlled by a circularly polarized optical beam and an external magnetic field. When the frequency of the beam is tuned near an optical resonance with a continuum of higher energy states, effective magnetic fields are induced on the two-level system via the inverse Faraday effect. We explore the process in which the frequency of the beam is made linearly time-dependent so that it sweeps through the optical resonance, starting and ending at the values far away from it. In addition to changes of spin states, Kramers-Kronig relations guarantee that a localized electron can alsomore » escape into a continuum of states. We argue that probabilities of transitions between different possible electronic states after such a sweep of the optical frequency can be found exactly, regardless the shape of the resonance. In conclusion, we also discuss extension of our results to multistate systems.« less

  17. Exact transition probabilities for a linear sweep through a Kramers-Kronig resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chen; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-11-19

    We consider a localized electronic spin controlled by a circularly polarized optical beam and an external magnetic field. When the frequency of the beam is tuned near an optical resonance with a continuum of higher energy states, effective magnetic fields are induced on the two-level system via the inverse Faraday effect. We explore the process in which the frequency of the beam is made linearly time-dependent so that it sweeps through the optical resonance, starting and ending at the values far away from it. In addition to changes of spin states, Kramers-Kronig relations guarantee that a localized electron can also escape into a continuum of states. We argue that probabilities of transitions between different possible electronic states after such a sweep of the optical frequency can be found exactly, regardless the shape of the resonance. In conclusion, we also discuss extension of our results to multistate systems.

  18. Deficits in the Sensitivity to Pitch Sweeps by School-Aged Children Wearing Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Deroche, Mickael L. D.; Kulkarni, Aditya M.; Christensen, Julie A.; Limb, Charles J.; Chatterjee, Monita

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity to static changes in pitch has been shown to be poorer in school-aged children wearing cochlear implants (CIs) than children with normal hearing (NH), but it is unclear whether this is also the case for dynamic changes in pitch. Yet, dynamically changing pitch has considerable ecological relevance in terms of natural speech, particularly aspects such as intonation, emotion, or lexical tone information. Twenty one children with NH and 23 children wearing a CI participated in this study, along with 18 NH adults and 6 CI adults for comparison. Listeners with CIs used their clinically assigned settings with envelope-based coding strategies. Percent correct was measured in one- or three-interval two-alternative forced choice tasks, for the direction or discrimination of harmonic complexes based on a linearly rising or falling fundamental frequency. Sweep rates were adjusted per subject, in a logarithmic scale, so as to cover the full extent of the psychometric function. Data for up- and down-sweeps were fitted separately, using a maximum-likelihood technique. Fits were similar for up- and down-sweeps in the discrimination task, but diverged in the direction task because psychometric functions for down-sweeps were very shallow. Hits and false alarms were then converted into d′ and beta values, from which a threshold was extracted at a d′ of 0.77. Thresholds were very consistent between the two tasks and considerably higher (worse) for CI listeners than for their NH peers. Thresholds were also higher for children than adults. Factors such as age at implantation, age at profound hearing loss, and duration of CI experience did not play any major role in this sensitivity. Thresholds of dynamic pitch sensitivity (in either task) also correlated with thresholds for static pitch sensitivity and with performance in tasks related to speech prosody. PMID:26973451

  19. The Effects of Sweeping Jet Actuator Parameters on Flow Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti

    2015-01-01

    A parametric experimental study was performed with sweeping jet actuators (fluidic oscillators) to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation on an adverse pressure gradient ramp. Actuator parameters that were investigated include blowing coefficients, operation mode, pitch and spreading angles, streamwise location, aspect ratio, and scale. Surface pressure measurements and surface oil flow visualization were used to characterize the effects of these parameters on the actuator performance. 2D Particle Image Velocimetry measurements of the flow field over the ramp and hot-wire measurements of the actuator's jet flow were also obtained for selective cases. In addition, the sweeping jet actuators were compared to other well-known flow control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady vortex-generating jets. The results confirm that the sweeping jet actuators are more effective than steady blowing and steady vortex-generating jets. The results also suggest that an actuator with a larger spreading angle placed closer to the location where the flow separates provides better performance. For the cases tested, an actuator with an aspect ratio, which is the width/depth of the actuator throat, of 2 was found to be optimal. For a fixed momentum coefficient, decreasing the aspect ratio to 1 produced weaker vortices while increasing the aspect ratio to 4 reduced coverage area. Although scaling down the actuator (based on the throat dimensions) from 0.25 inch x 0.125 inch to 0.15 inch x 0.075 inch resulted in similar flow control performance, scaling down the actuator further to 0.075 inch x 0.0375 inch reduced the actuator efficiency by reducing the coverage area and the amount of mixing in the near-wall region. The results of this study provide insight that can be used to design and select the optimal sweeping jet actuator configuration for flow control applications.

  20. Study of Near-Stall Flow Behavior in a Modern Transonic Fan with Composite Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Shin, Hyoun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Detailed flow behavior in a modern transonic fan with a composite sweep is investigated in this paper. Both unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods are applied to investigate the flow field over a wide operating range. The calculated flow fields are compared with the data from an array of high-frequency response pressure transducers embedded in the fan casing. The current study shows that a relatively fine computational grid is required to resolve the flow field adequately and to calculate the pressure rise across the fan correctly. The calculated flow field shows detailed flow structure near the fan rotor tip region. Due to the introduction of composite sweep toward the rotor tip, the flow structure at the rotor tip is much more stable compared to that of the conventional blade design. The passage shock stays very close to the leading edge at the rotor tip even at the throttle limit. On the other hand, the passage shock becomes stronger and detaches earlier from the blade passage at the radius where the blade sweep is in the opposite direction. The interaction between the tip clearance vortex and the passage shock becomes intense as the fan operates toward the stall limit, and tip clearance vortex breakdown occurs at near-stall operation. URANS calculates the time-averaged flow field fairly well. Details of measured RMS static pressure are not calculated with sufficient accuracy with URANS. On the other hand, LES calculates details of the measured unsteady flow features in the current transonic fan with composite sweep fairly well and reveals the flow mechanism behind the measured unsteady flow field.

  1. Performance analysis of the sweep-free Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer (SF-BOTDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboinik, Asher; Willner, Alan E.; Tur, Moshe

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous multiple pumps and probes to estimate the Brillouin Frequency Shift along an optical fiber, as in the Sweep-free BOTDA (SF-BOTDA) technique, saves measurement time but involves quite a few tradeoffs. Through simulations this work studies the role of the number of tones, their granularity and the desired spatial resolution and dynamic range on the obtained BFS accuracy for different signal to noise ratios and number of averages.

  2. Observational Test for a Random Sweeping Model in Solar Wind Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Perschke, C; Narita, Y; Motschmann, U; Glassmeier, K H

    2016-03-25

    Evidence of frequency broadening at ion kinetic scales due to large-scale eddies and waves is found in solar wind turbulence by a test for a random sweeping model using the magnetic energy spectrum in the frequency vs wave number domain in the comoving frame of the flow obtained from multispacecraft observations. The statistical analysis of the frequency vs wave number spectra without using Taylor's hypothesis shows Gaussian frequency broadening around nearly zero frequencies that increases for larger wave numbers and non-Gaussian tails at higher frequencies. Comparison of the observed frequency broadening with a random sweeping model derived from hydrodynamic turbulence reveals similarities with respect to the Gaussian shape. The standard deviation of the broadening scales with ∼k^{1.6±0.2} and differs from the hydrodynamic turbulence model that predicts ∼k^{2/3}. We interpret this stronger increasing broadening as a consequence of the more diverse large scale structures (eddies and waves) in plasma turbulence and the accompanied more complex sweeping. Consequently, an identification and association of waves with normal modes based on their dispersion relation only, in particular at ion kinetic scales and below, is not possible in solar wind turbulence.

  3. Effect of Sweep on Cavity Flow Fields at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracy, Maureen B.; Plentovich, Elizabeth B.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Wilcox, Floyd J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 7 x 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) to study the effect of leading- and trailing-edge sweep on cavity flow fields for a range of cavity length-to-height (l/h) ratios. The free-stream Mach number was varied from 0.2 to 0.8. The cavity had a depth of 0.5 inches, a width of 2.5 inches, and a maximum length of 12.0 inches. The leading- and trailing-edge sweep was adjusted using block inserts to achieve leading edge sweep angles of 65 deg, 55 deg, 45 deg, 35 deg, and 0 deg. The fore and aft cavity walls were always parallel. The aft wall of the cavity was remotely positioned to achieve a range of length-to-depth ratios. Fluctuating- and static-pressure data were obtained on the floor of the cavity. The fluctuating pressure data were used to determine whether or not resonance occurred in the cavity rather than to provide a characterization of the fluctuating pressure field. Qualitative surface flow visualization was obtained using a technique in which colored water was introduced into the model through static-pressure orifices. A complete tabulation of the mean static-pressure data for the swept leading edge cavities is included.

  4. Extreme selective sweeps independently targeted the X chromosomes of the great apes.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien Yann; Veeramah, Krishna R; Woerner, August E; Hammer, Michael F; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2015-05-19

    The unique inheritance pattern of the X chromosome exposes it to natural selection in a way that is different from that of the autosomes, potentially resulting in accelerated evolution. We perform a comparative analysis of X chromosome polymorphism in 10 great ape species, including humans. In most species, we identify striking megabase-wide regions, where nucleotide diversity is less than 20% of the chromosomal average. Such regions are found exclusively on the X chromosome. The regions overlap partially among species, suggesting that the underlying targets are partly shared among species. The regions have higher proportions of singleton SNPs, higher levels of population differentiation, and a higher nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution ratio than the rest of the X chromosome. We show that the extent to which diversity is reduced is incompatible with direct selection or the action of background selection and soft selective sweeps alone, and therefore, we suggest that very strong selective sweeps have independently targeted these specific regions in several species. The only genomic feature that we can identify as strongly associated with loss of diversity is the location of testis-expressed ampliconic genes, which also have reduced diversity around them. We hypothesize that these genes may be responsible for selective sweeps in the form of meiotic drive caused by an intragenomic conflict in male meiosis.

  5. Advances in Digital Calibration Techniques Enabling Real-Time Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Perkovic, Dragana; Ghaemi, Hirad; Horst, Stephen; Shaffer, Scott; Veilleux, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Real-time digital beamforming, combined with lightweight, large aperture reflectors, enable SweepSAR architectures, which promise significant increases in instrument capability for solid earth and biomass remote sensing. These new instrument concepts require new methods for calibrating the multiple channels, which are combined on-board, in real-time. The benefit of this effort is that it enables a new class of lightweight radar architecture, Digital Beamforming with SweepSAR, providing significantly larger swath coverage than conventional SAR architectures for reduced mass and cost. This paper will review the on-going development of the digital calibration architecture for digital beamforming radar instrument, such as the proposed Earth Radar Mission's DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice) instrument. This proposed instrument's baseline design employs SweepSAR digital beamforming and requires digital calibration. We will review the overall concepts and status of the system architecture, algorithm development, and the digital calibration testbed currently being developed. We will present results from a preliminary hardware demonstration. We will also discuss the challenges and opportunities specific to this novel architecture.

  6. Soft sweeps: molecular population genetics of adaptation from standing genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Hermisson, Joachim; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2005-04-01

    A population can adapt to a rapid environmental change or habitat expansion in two ways. It may adapt either through new beneficial mutations that subsequently sweep through the population or by using alleles from the standing genetic variation. We use diffusion theory to calculate the probabilities for selective adaptations and find a large increase in the fixation probability for weak substitutions, if alleles originate from the standing genetic variation. We then determine the parameter regions where each scenario-standing variation vs. new mutations-is more likely. Adaptations from the standing genetic variation are favored if either the selective advantage is weak or the selection coefficient and the mutation rate are both high. Finally, we analyze the probability of "soft sweeps," where multiple copies of the selected allele contribute to a substitution, and discuss the consequences for the footprint of selection on linked neutral variation. We find that soft sweeps with weaker selective footprints are likely under both scenarios if the mutation rate and/or the selection coefficient is high.

  7. Low-lying quasibound rovibrational states of H2 16O**

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szidarovszky, Tamás; Császár, Attila G.

    2013-08-01

    A complex coordinate scaling (CCS) method is described allowing the quantum chemical computation of quasibound (also called resonance or metastable) rovibrational states of strongly bound triatomic molecules. The molecule chosen to test the method is H2 16O, for which an accurate global potential energy surface, a previous computation of a few resonance states via the complex absorbing potential (CAP) method, and some Feshbach (J = 0, where J is the quantum number characterising overall rotations of the molecule) and shape (J ≠ 0) resonances measured via a state-selective, triple-resonance technique are all available. Characterisation of the computed resonance states is performed via probability density plots based on CCS rovibrational wavefunctions. Such plots provide useful details about the physical nature of the resonance states. Based on the computations and the resonance plots, the following useful facts about the resonance states investigated are obtained: (a) Feshbach resonances are formed by accumulation of a large amount of energy in either the non-dissociative bending or symmetric streching modes, excitations by more than five quanta are not uncommon; (b) there are several resonance states with low and medium bending excitation, the latter are different from the states observed somewhat below dissociation by the same triple-resonance technique; (c) several types of dissociation bahavior can be identified, varying greatly among the states; (d) several pairs of J = 0 and J = 1 Feshbach resonance states can be identified which differ by rigid-rotor type energies; and (e) the lifetimes of the assigned J = 1 rovibrational Feshbach resonances are considerably longer than the lifetimes of their J = 0 vibrational counterparts.

  8. KHz combustion diagnostics by means of an onboard drop capsule laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paa, Wolfgang; Wagner, Volker; Klinkov, Konstantin; Eigenbrod, Christian

    kHz combustion diagnostics by means of an onboard drop capsule laser system We present an onboard drop capsule laser system, based on a combination of two diode-pumped solid-state Yb:YAG disk lasers. The laser system itself consists of oscillator (seed laser), power amplifier and frequency conversion units which are mounted on three platforms designed for high mechanical stability at minimal weight. The design of the cw seed laser -including frequency selective elements like intracavity etalon and two birefringent filters -yields a tuning range from 1005 nm to 1053 nm. A Pockels cell is used to generate short pulses (10 ns) at repetition rates of up to 4 kHz. Subsequently, the spectrally and temporally well defined pulses (∆λ << 1 pm, 10 ns, M2 = 1.3) are amplified in the Yb:YAG disk regenerative amplifier on the second platform. The amplification results in pulse energies of up to 25 mJ, depending both on the power pumping the Yb:YAG disk and the number of round trips within the resonator. The third platform accommodates crystals for second, third or fourth harmonic generation of the laser fundamental (SHG, THG, FHG) as well as beam shaping optics for experiments. Conversion efficiencies of 20% and 10% can be achieved for THG and FHG (UV spectral region around 343 nm and 257 nm), respectively. Thus, a number of combustion-relevant species like OH or formaldehyde can be investigated in this way. The laser provides excellent beam quality combined with a broad tuning range in single-frequency mode as well as high pulse energies at high repetition rates. These features enable the tracking of fast processes like turbulences or ignition. To demonstrate the capabilities of the drop capsule laser system at 1 kHz under µg-conditions, we investigated flame turbulences of a v-shaped H2 /O2 -burner recorded by means of a high speed intensified camera. The temporally and spatially resolved imaging of the flame turbulence is realized by planar laser induced fluo

  9. Optimization of the separation of lysergic acid diethylamide in urine by a sweeping technique using micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2002-07-25

    The separation and on-line concentrations of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), iso-lysergic acid diethylamide (iso-LSD) and lysergic acid N,N-methylpropylamide (LAMPA) in human urine were investigated by capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence spectroscopy using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as an anionic surfactant. A number of parameters such as buffer pH, SDS concentration, Brij-30 concentration and the content of organic solvent used in separation, were optimized. The techniques of sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) and cation-selective exhaustive injection-sweep-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweep-MEKC) were used for determining on-line concentrations. The advantages and disadvantages of this procedure with respect to sensitivity, precision and simplicity are discussed and compared.

  10. The Effects of Electrical and Optical Stimulation of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons on Rat 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Scardochio, Tina; Trujillo-Pisanty, Ivan; Conover, Kent; Shizgal, Peter; Clarke, Paul B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Adult rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) at around 50-kHz; these commonly occur in contexts that putatively engender positive affect. While several reports indicate that dopaminergic (DAergic) transmission plays a role in the emission of 50-kHz calls, the pharmacological evidence is mixed. Different modes of dopamine (DA) release (i.e., tonic and phasic) could potentially explain this discrepancy. Objective: To investigate the potential role of phasic DA release in 50-kHz call emission. Methods: In Experiment 1, USVs were recorded in adult male rats following unexpected electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In parallel, phasic DA release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) was recorded using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. In Experiment 2, USVs were recorded following response-contingent or non-contingent optogenetic stimulation of midbrain DAergic neurons. Four 20-s schedules of optogenetic stimulation were used: fixed-interval, fixed-time, variable-interval, and variable-time. Results: Brief electrical stimulation of the MFB increased both 50-kHz call rate and phasic DA release in the NAcc. During optogenetic stimulation sessions, rats initially called at a high rate comparable to that observed following reinforcers such as psychostimulants. Although optogenetic stimulation maintained reinforced responding throughout the 2-h session, the call rate declined to near zero within the first 30 min. The trill call subtype predominated following both electrical and optical stimulation. Conclusion: The occurrence of electrically-evoked 50-kHz calls, time-locked to phasic DA (Experiment 1), provides correlational evidence supporting a role for phasic DA in USV production. However, in Experiment 2, the temporal dissociation between calling and optogenetic stimulation of midbrain DAergic neurons suggests that phasic mesolimbic DA release is not sufficient to produce 50-kHz calls. The emission of the trill subtype of 50-kHz calls

  11. 20 kHz, 25 kVA node power transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, S.

    1989-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical design information and the electrical and thermal testing performed on the 440-208-V rms, 20-kHz, 25-kVa prototype node transformer are summarized. The calculated efficiency of the node transformer is 99.3 percent based on core loss and copper loss test data, and its maximum calculated load regulation is 0.7 percent. The node transformer has a weight of 19.7 lb and has a power density of 0.8 lb/kW. The hot-spot temperature rise is estimated to be 33 C above the cold plate mounting base. This proof-of-concept transformer design is a viable candidate for the space station Freedom application.

  12. 50 kHz bottom backscattering measurements from two types of artificially roughened sandy bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Su-Uk; Cho, Sungho; Choi, Jee Woong

    2016-07-01

    Laboratory measurements of 50 kHz bottom backscattering strengths as a function of grazing angle were performed on the sandy bottom of a water tank; two types of bottom roughnesses, a relatively smooth interface and a rough interface, were created on the bottom surface. The roughness profiles of the two interface types were measured directly using an ultrasound arrival time difference of 5 MHz and then were Fourier transformed to obtain the roughness power spectra. The measured backscattering strengths increased from -29 to 0 dB with increasing grazing angle from 35 to 86°, which were compared to theoretical backscattering model predictions. The comparison results implied that bottom roughness is a key factor in accurately predicting bottom scattering for a sandy bottom.

  13. Mechanism for generation of 2-3 kHz radiation in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macek, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    The question of how low-frequency non-thermal radio emissions at the boundary of the heliosphere might be generated is considered. The mechanism consists of two steps. First, the beam of energetic electrons generates a high level of electrostatic Langmuir plasma waves. Second, electromagnetic radiation results from the non-linear interaction between Langmuir waves. Intensity of radio emissions at 2 to 3 kHz detected by the Voyager plasma wave instrument in the outer heliosphere can be explained provided that the electron beams generating Langmuir waves exist also in the postshock plasma due to secondary shocks in the compressed solar wind beyond the termination shock. Modification of the heliospheric shocks by the cosmic ray pressure is also taken into account. The field strengths of Langmuir waves required to generate the second harmonic emissions are of 50 to 100 microvolts per meter. These waves may be observed in situ by Voyager 1 and 2 in the near future.

  14. Copper bromide vapor brightness amplifiers with 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, M. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a laser monitor with 10 μs time-resolution based on a high-frequency copper bromide vapor brightness amplifier. A sync circuit has been designed for single-pulse imaging. The analysis of amplifying characteristics of the active elements and active optical system (laser monitor) parameters allowed to determine the optimal concentration of HBr at which the images can be obtained with minimum distortions. For the active element operating at high frequencies (more than 50 kHz) as a brightness amplifier, the concentration of HBr must be lower than that needed for obtaining the maximum output power. The limiting brightness temperature of the background radiation which does not affect the image quality is determined. The potential feasibility of using a proposed brightness amplifier for visualizing processes blocked from viewing by the background radiation with the brightness temperature up to 8000 K is demonstrated.

  15. Transmission line design for a power distribution system at 20 kHz for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelby, L. W.; Mathes, J. B.; Shawver, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A low inductance, low characteristic impedance transmission line was designed for a 20 kHz power distribution system. Several different conductor configurations were considered: strip lines, interdigitated metal ribbons, and standard insulated wires in multiwire configurations (circular and rectangular cylindrical arrangements). The final design was a rectangular arrangement of multiple wires of the same gauge with alternating polarities from wire to wire. This offered the lowest inductance per unit length (on the order of several nanohenries/meter) and the lowest characteristic impedance (on the order of one Ohm). Standard multipin connectors with gold-plated elements were recommended with this transmission line, the junction boxes to be internally connected with flat metal ribbons for low inductance, and the line to be constructed in sections of suitable length. Computer programs for the calculation of inductance of multiwire lines and of capacitances of strip lines were developed.

  16. Performance of a 30-kV, 1-kHz, nanosecond source

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, K.; Goerz, D.

    1992-06-01

    An existing pulser at LLNL was modified to increase its repetition rate to 1000 Hz. Spark gap recovery measurements were made for both the Marx and the Blumlein output switches. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were necessary to over-voltage the switch. The output of the pulser was used to drive a log-periodic-dipole-array. Measurements were made on the transmitted pulses in an anechoic chamber and yielded a center frequency of 80 MHz. This paper describes the modifications made on the pulse generator, discusses the spark gap recovery data, and summarizes the performance of the pulser at 1 kHz. In addition, a brief description of the antenna is given along with the field measurements that were made in the EMPEROR facility.

  17. Quantitative NO{sub 2} molecular tagging velocimetry at 500 kHz frame rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Naibo; Nishihara, Munetake; Lempert, Walter R.

    2010-11-29

    NO{sub 2} molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) is demonstrated at repetition rates as high as 500 kHz in a laboratory scale Mach 5 wind tunnel. A pulse burst laser and a home built optical parametric oscillator system were used to simultaneously generate the required 355 and 226 nm wavelengths for NO{sub 2} photodissociation (tagging) and NO planar laser induced fluorescence imaging (interrogation), respectively. NO{sub 2} MTV images were obtained both in front and behind the characteristic bow shock from a 5 mm diameter cylinder. From Gaussian curve fitting, an average free stream flow velocity of 719 m/s was obtained. Absolute statistical precision in velocity of {approx}11.5 m/s was determined, corresponding to relative precision of 1.6%-5%, depending upon the region of the flow probed.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-11-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  19. Evaluating parallel architectures for two real-time applications with 100 kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Baldier, J.; Busson, Ph.; Charlot, C. ); Centro, S.; Pascoli, D ); Davis, E.E.; Ni, P. ); Denes, E.; Odor, G.; Vesztergombi ); Gheorghe, A.; Legrand, I. ); Klefenz, F.; Maenner, R.; Noffz, K.H.; Zoz, R. ); Lourens, W.; Taal, A. ); Malecki, P.; Sobala, A. ); Thielmann, A. ); Vermeulen, J. )

    1993-02-01

    In the context of Research and Development (R and D) activities for future hadron colliders, competitive implementations of real-time algorithms for feature extraction have been made on various forms of commercial pipelined and parallel architectures. The algorithms used for benchmarking serve for decision making and are of relative complexity; they are required to run with a repetition rate of 1,000 kHz in data sets of kilobyte size. Results are reported and discussed in detail. Among the commercially available architectures, pipelined image processing systems can compete with custom-designed architectures. General-purpose processors with systolic mesh connectivity can also be used. Massively parallel systems of the SIMD type (many processors executing the same program on different data) are less suitable in the presently marketed form.

  20. Analysis of 5 KHz combustion instabilities in 40K methane/LOX combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.; Priem, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    In 40K methane/LOX 5 KHz engine tests, (first transverse mode) combustion instabilities observed by Rocketdyne are analyzed using Heidmann and Wieber's vaporization model to include LOX flow oscillations. The LOX flow oscillations are determined by including acoustic waves in the feed system analysis. The major parameter controlling stability is the distance (or time delay) associated with atomizing the LOX stream in the coaxial injection system. Results of the analysis that show the influence of mixture ratio, oxidizer and fuel injection velocities, burning time and combustion chamber/injector dimensions on stability are used to explain the existing data. Calculated results to predict the influence of design changes being made for the next set of experiments are also presented.

  1. Testing energy quantization at the level of 100 kHz by neutron crystal diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summhammer, J.

    1996-10-01

    For the study of energy quantization in low-frequency potentials and the accompanying quantum effects we analyze a silicon double-crystal arrangement exploiting dynamical diffraction of neutrons to achieve the required extremely high energy resolution. The first crystal prepares a minimum-uncertainty beam that passes a potential region whose influence on the neutron energy is analyzed by the second crystal. With realistic parameters, changes of neutron energy below 0.5 neV can be resolved. This permits a test of quantized energy transfer in periodically time-dependent potentials of a frequency below 100 kHz. We also discuss three specific examples how to observe the quantum phenomena arising from the macroscopic wave packets thereby generated.

  2. Space station 20-kHz power management and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.; Sundberg, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the conceptual design phase a 20-kHz power distribution system was selected as the reference for the space station. The system is single-phase 400 VRMS, with a sinusoidal wave form. The initial user power level will be 75 kW with growth to 300 kW. The high-frequency system selection was based upon considerations of efficiency, weight, safety, ease of control, interface with computers, and ease of paralleling for growth. Each of these aspects will be discussed as well as the associated trade-offs involved. An advanced development program has been instituted to accelerate the maturation of the high-frequency system. Some technical aspects of the advanced development will be discussed.

  3. Probing insect backscatter cross-section and melanization using kHz optical remote detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Alem K.; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Rohwer, Erich; Neethling, Pieter

    2016-09-01

    kHz optical remote sensing system is implemented to determine melanization and backscatter cross-section in the near infrared (NIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) in situ. It is shown that backscatter cross-section in the SWIR is insensitive to melanization and absolute melanization can be derived from the ratio of backscatter cross-section in two bands (SWIR/NIR). We have shown that insects reflect more strongly in the SWIR as compared to NIR and Visible (VIS) in accordance with previous findings. This is illustrated using three different insects (Snow white moth (spilosoma genus), Fox moth (Macrothylacia) and Leather beetle (Odontotaenius genus)) and it is shown that the reflectance of the Leather beetle in the VIS and NIR is more affected by melanization as compared with snow white moth.

  4. Influence of Liquid Height on Mechanical and Chemical Effects in 20 kHz Sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Khuyen Viet Bao; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2013-07-01

    We examined the influence of liquid height on mechanical and chemical effects in 20 kHz sonication with a new Langevin-type transducer. Mechanical effects were evaluated from the degradation of polyethylene oxide in aqueous solution and chemical effects were measured with potassium iodide solution. Standing waves or reactive zones were observed using sonochemical luminescence and aluminum foil erosion. The observed wavelength was reduced by coupled vibration, compared with the wavelength calculated by dividing velocity by irradiation frequency. As liquid height increased, mechanical effects were suppressed. In the case of chemical effects, the stable sonochemical efficiency gained at a height of over 120 mm, and the sonochemical efficiency were also markedly higher than those of a conventional horn-type one.

  5. Theory for broadband Noise of Rotor and Stator Cascades with Inhomogeneous Inflow Turbulence Including Effects of Lean and Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of broadband noise generated by turbulence impinging on a downstream blade row is examined from a theoretical viewpoint. Equations are derived for sound power spectra in terms of 3 dimensional wavenumber spectra of the turbulence. Particular attention is given to issues of turbulence inhomogeneity associated with the near field of the rotor and variations through boundary layers. Lean and sweep of the rotor or stator cascade are also handled rigorously with a full derivation of the relevant geometry and definitions of lean and sweep angles. Use of the general theory is illustrated by 2 simple theoretical spectra for homogeneous turbulence. Limited comparisons are made with data from model fans designed by Pratt & Whitney, Allison, and Boeing. Parametric studies for stator noise are presented showing trends with Mach number, vane count, turbulence scale and intensity, lean, and sweep. Two conventions are presented to define lean and sweep. In the "cascade system" lean is a rotation out of its plane and sweep is a rotation of the airfoil in its plane. In the "duct system" lean is the leading edge angle viewing the fan from the front (along the fan axis) and sweep is the angle viewing the fan from the side (,perpendicular to the axis). It is shown that the governing parameter is sweep in the plane of the airfoil (which reduces the chordwise component of Mach number). Lean (out of the plane of the airfoil) has little effect. Rotor noise predictions are compared with duct turbulence/rotor interaction noise data from Boeing and variations, including blade tip sweep and turbulence axial and transverse scales are explored.

  6. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  7. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G [Menlo Park, CA; Merkel, Timothy C [Menlo Park, CA; Baker, Richard W [Palo Alto, CA

    2012-05-15

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  8. A 400 KHz line rate 2048-pixel stitched SWIR linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Gielen, Daphne; Wouters, Kristof; Vervenne, Vincent; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; De Gaspari, Danny; Das, Jo; Merken, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Xenics has developed a family of stitched SWIR long linear arrays that operate up to 400 KHz of line rate. These arrays serve medical and industrial applications that require high line rates as well as space applications that require long linear arrays. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long array to run at a high line rates irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The ROIC is flip-chipped with InGaAs detector arrays. The FPA has a pixel pitch of 12.5μm and has two pixel flavors: square (12.5μm) and rectangular (250μm). The frontend circuit is based on Capacitive Trans-impedance Amplifier (CTIA) to attain stable detector bias, and good linearity and signal integrity, especially at high speeds. The CTIA has an input auto-zero mechanism that allows to have low detector bias (<20mV). An on-chip Correlated Double Sample (CDS) facilitates removal of CTIA KTC and 1/f noise, and other offsets, achieving low noise performance. There are five gain modes in the FPA giving the full well range from 85Ke- to 40Me-. The measured input referred noise is 35e-rms in the highest gain mode. The FPA operates in Integrate While Read mode and, at a master clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4μs, achieves the highest line rate of 400 KHz. In this paper, design details and measurements results are presented in order to demonstrate the array performance.

  9. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  10. Development of 5-kHz ultra-line-narrowed F2 laser for dioptric projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Nohdomi, Ryoichi; Ariga, Tatsuya; Hotta, Kazuaki; Nakao, Kiyoharu; Kasuya, Koichi

    2003-11-01

    The roadmap of semiconductor fabrication predicts that the semiconductor market will demand 65 nm node devices from 2004/2005. Therefore, an Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 laser for dioptric projection systems has been developed under the ASET project of "The F2 Laser Lithography Development Project". The target of this project is to achieve a F2 laser spectral bandwidth below 0.2 pm (FWHM) and an average power of 25 W at a repetition rate of 5 kHz. The energy stability (3-sigma) target is less than 10%. Simultaneously, it is also required to establish the technology of evaluating the optical performance. An Oscillator-Amplifier arrangement at 2 kHz was developed as a first step of an Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 laser system. With this laser system, we achieved the basic study of the synchronization technology for line narrowing operation using two system arrangements: MOPA (Master Oscillator/Power Amplifier) and Injection Locking. Based on this experience we have developed the 5 kHz system. With the 5 kHz Line-Narrowed Injection Locking system, we have achieved a spectral bandwidth of <0.2 pm with an output energy of >5 mJ and a pulse to pulse energy stability of <10%. The feasibility of a 5 kHz Ultra-Line-Narrowed F2 Laser for Dioptric Projection Systems has been demonstrated.

  11. PULSE AMPLITUDE DEPENDS ON kHz QPO FREQUENCY IN THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND PULSAR SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2015-01-10

    We study the relation between the 300-700 Hz upper kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and the 401 Hz coherent pulsations across all outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the pulse amplitude systematically changes by a factor of ∼2 when the upper kHz QPO frequency passes through 401 Hz: it halves when the QPO moves to above the spin frequency and doubles again on the way back. This establishes for the first time the existence of a direct effect of kHz QPOs on the millisecond pulsations and provides a new clue to the origin of the upper kHz QPO. We discuss several scenarios and conclude that while more complex explanations can not formally be excluded, our result strongly suggests that the QPO is produced by azimuthal motion at the inner edge of the accretion disk, most likely orbital motion. Depending on whether this azimuthal motion is faster or slower than the spin, the plasma then interacts differently with the neutron-star magnetic field. The most straightforward interpretation involves magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow that sets in when the upper kHz QPO becomes slower than the spin.

  12. Summary of NACA/NASA Variable-Sweep Research and Development Leading to the F-111 (TFX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    On November 24, 1962, the United States ushered in a new era of aircraft development when the Department of Defense placed an initial development contract for the world's first supersonic variable-sweep aircraft - the F-111 or so-called TFX (tactical fighter-experimental). The multimission performance potential of this concept is made possible by virtue of the variable-sweep wing - a research development of the NASA and its predecessor, the NACA. With the wing swept forward into the maximum span position, the aircraft configuration is ideal for efficient subsonic flight. This provides long-range combat and ferry mission capability, short-field landing and take-off characteristics, and compatibility with naval aircraft carrier operation. With the wing swept back to about 650 of sweep, the aircraft has optimum supersonic performance to accomplish high-altitude supersonic bombing or interceptor missions. With the wing folded still further back, the aircraft provides low drag and low gust loads during supersonic flight "on the deck" (altitudes under 1000 feet). The concept of wing variable sweep, of course, is not new. Initial studies were conducted at Langley as early as 1945, and two subsonic variable-sweep prototypes (Bell X-5 and Grumman XF-IOF) were flown as early as 1951/52. These were subsonic aircraft, however, and the great advantage of variable sweep in improving supersonic flight efficiency could not be realized. Further the structures of these early aircraft were complicated by the necessity for translating the ing fore and aft to achieve satisfactory longitUdinal stability as the wing sweep was varied. Late in 1958 a research breakthrough at Langley provided the technology for designing a variable-sweep wing having satisfactory stability through a wide sweep angle range without the necessity for fore and aft translation of the wing. In this same period there evolved within the military services an urgent requirement for a versatile fighter-bomber that

  13. Underwater detection of tonal signals between 0.125 and 100 kHz by harbor seals (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Wensveen, Paul J; Hoek, Lean; Verboom, Willem C; Terhune, John M

    2009-02-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivities of two 1-year-old female harbor seals were quantified in a pool built for acoustic research, using a behavioral psychoacoustic technique. The animals were trained to respond when they detected an acoustic signal and not to respond when they did not (go/no-go response). Pure tones (0.125-0.25 kHz) and narrowband frequency modulated (tonal) signals (center frequencies 0.5-100 kHz) of 900 ms duration were tested. Thresholds at each frequency were measured using the up-down staircase method and defined as the stimulus level resulting in a 50% detection rate. The audiograms of the two seals did not differ statistically: both plots showed the typical mammalian U-shape, but with a wide and flat bottom. Maximum sensitivity (54 dB re 1 microPa, rms) occurred at 1 kHz. The frequency range of best hearing (within 10 dB of maximum sensitivity) was from 0.5 to 40 kHz (6(1/3) octaves). Higher hearing thresholds (indicating poorer sensitivity) were observed below 1 and above 40 kHz. Thresholds below 4 kHz were lower than those previously described for harbor seals, which demonstrates the importance of using quiet facilities, built specifically for acoustic research, for hearing studies in marine mammals. The results suggest that under unmasked conditions many anthropogenic noise sources and sounds from conspecifics are audible to harbor seals at greater ranges than formerly believed.

  14. Using bedding in a test environment critically affects 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Natusch, C; Schwarting, R K W

    2010-09-01

    Rats utter distinct classes of ultrasonic vocalizations depending on their developmental stage, current state, and situational factors. One class, comprising the so-called 50-kHz calls, is typical for situations where rats are anticipating or actually experiencing rewarding stimuli, like being tickled by an experimenter, or when treated with drugs of abuse, such as the psychostimulant amphetamine. Furthermore, rats emit 50-kHz calls when exposed to a clean housing cage. Here, we show that such vocalization effects can depend on subtle details of the testing situation, namely the presence of fresh rodent bedding. Actually, we found that adult males vocalize more in bedded cages than in bare ones. Also, two experiments showed that adult rats emitted more 50-kHz calls when tickled on fresh bedding. Furthermore, ip amphetamine led to more 50-kHz vocalization in activity boxes containing such bedding as compared to bare ones. The analysis of psychomotor activation did not yield such group differences in case of locomotion and centre time, except for rearing duration in rats tested on bedding. Also, the temporal profile of vocalization did not parallel that of behavioural activation, since the effects on vocalization peaked and started to decline again before those of psychomotor activation. Therefore, 50-kHz calls are not a simple correlate of psychomotor activation. A final experiment with a choice procedure showed that rats prefer bedded conditions. Overall, we assume that bedded environments induce a positive affective state, which increases the likelihood of 50-kHz calling. Based on these findings, we recommend that contextual factors, like bedding, should receive more research attention, since they can apparently decrease the aversiveness of a testing situation. Also, we recommend to more routinely measure rat ultrasonic vocalization, especially when studying emotion and motivation, since this analysis can provide information about the subject's status, which may

  15. Widespread selective sweeps throughout the genome of model plant pathogenic fungi and identification of effector candidates.

    PubMed

    Badouin, H; Gladieux, P; Gouzy, J; Siguenza, S; Aguileta, G; Snirc, A; Le Prieur, S; Jeziorski, C; Branca, A; Giraud, T

    2017-04-01

    Identifying the genes underlying adaptation, their distribution in genomes and the evolutionary forces shaping genomic diversity are key challenges in evolutionary biology. Very few studies have investigated the abundance and distribution of selective sweeps in species with high-quality reference genomes, outside a handful of model species. Pathogenic fungi are tractable eukaryote models for investigating the genomics of adaptation. By sequencing 53 genomes of two species of anther-smut fungi and mapping them against a high-quality reference genome, we showed that selective sweeps were abundant and scattered throughout the genome in one species, affecting near 17% of the genome, but much less numerous and in different genomic regions in its sister species, where they left footprints in only 1% of the genome. Polymorphism was negatively correlated with linkage disequilibrium levels in the genomes, consistent with recurrent positive and/or background selection. Differential expression in planta and in vitro, and functional annotation, suggested that many of the selective sweeps were probably involved in adaptation to the host plant. Examples include glycoside hydrolases, pectin lyases and an extracellular membrane protein with CFEM domain. This study thus provides candidate genes for being involved in plant-pathogen interaction (effectors), which have remained elusive for long in this otherwise well-studied system. Their identification will foster future functional and evolutionary studies, in the plant and in the anther-smut pathogens, being model species of natural plant-pathogen associations. In addition, our results suggest that positive selection can have a pervasive impact in shaping genomic variability in pathogens and selfing species, broadening our knowledge of the occurrence and frequency of selective events in natural populations.

  16. A design of three-stage addressing sweep frequency signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihui; Fan, Muwen; Zhou, Luchun

    2015-10-01

    In order to test the working state of adaptive optics system, it is necessary to design an online sweep-frequency circuit module to test the frequency response of the adaptive system. Sweep-frequency signal generator based on Direct Digital frequency Synthesis (DDS) is one of the core components. But the classic DDS technology also has some drawbacks: the truncation error of phase, the truncation error of magnitude (caused by memory FWL) and high occupancy of ROM. These are also the optimization directions in this paper. This paper presents a FPGA-based DDS sweep-frequency signal generator suitable in adaptive optics. It has a low occupancy rate with ROM. And in the case of low-ROM, the paper reduces the noise generated by the truncation error of phase and the truncation error of magnitude of DDS sweepfrequency signal generator by method of linear interpolation. The results show that, when the reference frequency is 100 MHz, the frequency resolution can be as low as 0.025 Hz. It only takes up 0.5 KB ROM with the ROM compression ratio of 64:1 in the optimized scheme in the paper and has higher precision due to the method of linear interpolation than the unoptimized scheme, which can meet the engineering needs. Compared with other schemes, the scheme in the paper improves signal accuracy in the case of reducing the truncation error of phase, the truncation error of magnitude and the occupancy rate with ROM, but only adds a multiplication and division circuit, which is a practical solution.

  17. Steady-state sweep visual evoked potential processing denoised by wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiderpass, Heinar A.; Yamamoto, Jorge F.; Salomão, Solange R.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Pereira, Josenilson M.; Sacai, Paula Y.; de Oliveira, José P.; Costa, Marcio A.; Burattini, Marcelo N.

    2008-03-01

    Visually evoked potential (VEP) is a very small electrical signal originated in the visual cortex in response to periodic visual stimulation. Sweep-VEP is a modified VEP procedure used to measure grating visual acuity in non-verbal and preverbal patients. This biopotential is buried in a large amount of electroencephalographic (EEG) noise and movement related artifact. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) plays a dominant role in determining both systematic and statistic errors. The purpose of this study is to present a method based on wavelet transform technique for filtering and extracting steady-state sweep-VEP. Counter-phase sine-wave luminance gratings modulated at 6 Hz were used as stimuli to determine sweep-VEP grating acuity thresholds. The amplitude and phase of the second-harmonic (12 Hz) pattern reversal response were analyzed using the fast Fourier transform after the wavelet filtering. The wavelet transform method was used to decompose the VEP signal into wavelet coefficients by a discrete wavelet analysis to determine which coefficients yield significant activity at the corresponding frequency. In a subsequent step only significant coefficients were considered and the remaining was set to zero allowing a reconstruction of the VEP signal. This procedure resulted in filtering out other frequencies that were considered noise. Numerical simulations and analyses of human VEP data showed that this method has provided higher SNR when compared with the classical recursive least squares (RLS) method. An additional advantage was a more appropriate phase analysis showing more realistic second-harmonic amplitude value during phase brake.

  18. Frequency-sweeping: A new technique for energy-selective transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-02-01

    A new method is described for inducing energy-selective transport by `sweeping` the frequency of applied low-n magnetic perturbations. The mechanism, formally analogous to the `rising buckets` concept in accelerator physics, can move particles with a selected velocity in a nondiffusive fashion from one specified radius to another. The technique is considered principally as a means for removal of Helium ash. Other likely applications are as a method for burn control, profile control, as a diagnostic, and perhaps as a nonstochastic means of effecting the direct coupling of alpha power recently discussed by Fisch and Rax.

  19. Local hardening evaluation of carbon steels by using frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Yuji; Kudo, Yuki; Enokizono, Masato

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents our proposed frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method (FSES method) by a magnetic sensor for non-destructive testing of hardened low carbon steels. This method can evaluate the magnetic properties of low carbon steels which were changed after induction heating treatment. It was examined by our proposed method that the degrees of yield strength of low carbon steels were varied depending on hardened conditions. Moreover, it was made clear that the maximum magnetic field strength, Hmax, derived from the measured B-H loops was very sensitive to the hardening if the surface of the samples were flat.

  20. Linear-sweep voltammetry of a soluble redox couple in a cylindrical electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An approach is described for using the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) technique to study the kinetics of flooded porous electrodes by assuming a porous electrode as a collection of identical noninterconnected cylindrical pores that are filled with electrolyte. This assumption makes possible to study the behavior of this ideal electrode as that of a single pore. Alternatively, for an electrode of a given pore-size distribution, it is possible to predict the performance of different pore sizes and then combine the performance values.

  1. The Grid[Way] Job Template Manager, a tool for parameter sweeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorca, Alejandro; Huedo, Eduardo; Llorente, Ignacio M.

    2011-04-01

    Parameter sweeping is a widely used algorithmic technique in computational science. It is specially suited for high-throughput computing since the jobs evaluating the parameter space are loosely coupled or independent. A tool that integrates the modeling of a parameter study with the control of jobs in a distributed architecture is presented. The main task is to facilitate the creation and deletion of job templates, which are the elements describing the jobs to be run. Extra functionality relies upon the GridWay Metascheduler, acting as the middleware layer for job submission and control. It supports interesting features like multi-dimensional sweeping space, wildcarding of parameters, functional evaluation of ranges, value-skipping and job template automatic indexation. The use of this tool increases the reliability of the parameter sweep study thanks to the systematic bookkeeping of job templates and respective job statuses. Furthermore, it simplifies the porting of the target application to the grid reducing the required amount of time and effort. Program summaryProgram title: Grid[Way] Job Template Manager (version 1.0) Catalogue identifier: AEIE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Apache license 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3545 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126 879 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Perl 5.8.5 and above Computer: Any (tested on PC x86 and x86_64) Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux (tested on Ubuntu 9.04, Scientific Linux 4.7, centOS 5.4), Mac OS X (tested on Snow Leopard 10.6) RAM: 10 MB Classification: 6.5 External routines: The GridWay Metascheduler [1]. Nature of problem: To parameterize and manage an application running on a grid or cluster. Solution method: Generation of job templates as a cross product of

  2. A fluctuating surface pressure test technique utilizing Mach number sweeps at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanly, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A multichannel on-line RMS data acquisition and reduction system has been developed using commercial RMS computing modules and a programmable calculator. Details of this system, which has the capability of acquiring 96 channels of RMS data and computing and printing desired parameters in near real-time, are presented. In addition, raw data can be recorded at a much higher rate for computation and printing later. Results are presented showing the benefits of this system in 'sweep' tests where one parameter such as Mach number or angle of attack is slowly varied with time.

  3. Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of two 72 deg-sweep delta-wing models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Robert V., Jr.; Soistmann, David L.; Spain, Charles V.; Parker, Ellen C.; Silva, Walter A.

    1989-01-01

    Transonic flutter boundaries are presented for two simple, 72 deg. sweep, low-aspect-ratio wing models. One model was an aspect-ratio 0.65 delta wing; the other model was an aspect-ratio 0.54 clipped-delta wing. Flutter boundaries for the delta wing are presented for the Mach number range of 0.56 to 1.22. Flutter boundaries for the clipped-delta wing are presented for the Mach number range of 0.72 to 0.95. Selected vibration characteristics of the models are also presented.

  4. Effects of Mach Number, Leading-Edge Bluntness, and Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jillie, Don W.; Hopkins, Edward J.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of leading-edge bluntness and sweep on boundary-layer transition on flat plate models were investigated at Mach numbers of 2.00, 2.50, 3.00, and 4.00. The effect of sweep on transition was also determined on a flat plate model equipped with an elliptical nose at a Mach number of 0.27. Models used for the supersonic investigation had leading-edge radii varying from 0.0005 to 0.040 inch. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was held constant at 15 million per foot for the supersonic tests and the angle of attack was 0 deg. Surface flow conditions were determined by visual observation and recorded photographically. The sublimation technique was used to indicate transition, and the fluorescent-oil technique was used to indicate flow separation. Measured Mach number and sweep effects on transition are compared with those predicted from shock-loss considerations as described in NACA Rep. 1312. For the models with the blunter leading edges, the transition Reynolds number (based on free-stream flow conditions) was approximately doubled by an increase in Mach number from 2.50 to 4.00; and nearly the same result was predicted from shock-loss considerations. At all super- sonic Mach numbers, increases in sweep reduced the transition Reynolds number and the amount of reduction increased with increases in bluntness. The shock-loss method considerably underestimated- the sweep effects, possibly because of the existence of crossflow instability associated with swept wings. At a Mach number of 0.27, no reduction in the transition Reynolds number with sweep was measured (as would be expected with no shock loss) until the sweep angle was attained where crossflow instability appeared.

  5. A 400 KHz line rate 2048 pixel modular SWIR linear array for earth observation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Wouters, Kristof; Gielen, Daphne; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; van der Zanden, Koen; Vermeiren, Jan; Merken, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report about a family of linear imaging FPAs sensitive in the [0.9 - 1.7um] band, developed for high speed applications such as LIDAR, wavelength references and OCT analyzers and also for earth observation applications. Fast linear FPAs can also be used in a wide variety of terrestrial applications, including high speed sorting, electro- and photo-luminesce and medical applications. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. In principle, this concept can be extended to any multiple of 512 pixels, the limiting factor being the pixel yield of long InGaAs arrays and the CTE differences in the hybrid setup. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long-linear array to run at a high line rate of 400 KHz irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The pixel has a pitch of 12.5um. The detector frontend is based on CTIA (Capacitor Trans-impedance Amplifier), having 5 selectable integration capacitors giving full well from 62x103e- (gain0) to 40x106e- (gain4). An auto-zero circuit limits the detector bias non-uniformity to 5-10mV across broad intensity levels, limiting the input referred dark signal noise to 20e-rms for Tint=3ms at room temperature. An on-chip CDS that follows the CTIA facilitates removal of Reset/KTC noise, CTIA offsets and most of the 1/f noise. The measured noise of the ROIC is 35e-rms in gain0. At a master clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4us, the FPAs reach the highest line rate of 400 KHz.

  6. Ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer using a continuous wave 650 kHz Gaussian shaded transmitter.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron; Singer, Sigmond; Wang, Chua-Chin

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer (UTET) based on a kerfless transmitter with Gaussian radial distribution of its radiating surface velocity. UTET presents an attractive alternative to electromagnetic TET, where a low power transfer density of less than 94 mW/cm(2) is sufficient. The UTET is operated with a continuous wave at 650 kHz and is intended to power devices implanted up to 50mm deep. The transmitter was fabricated using a 15 mm diameter disc shape PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) element (C-2 grade, Fujiceramics Corporation Tokyo Japan), in which one surface electrode was partitioned into six equal area electrodes ( approximately 23 mm(2) each) in the shape of six concentric elements. The UTET was experimented using pig muscle tissue, and showed a peak power transfer efficiency of 39.1% at a power level of 100 mW. An efficient (91.8%) power driver for the excitation of the transmitter array, and an efficient rectifier (89%) for the implanted transducer are suggested. To obtain the pressure field shape, the Rayleigh integral has been solved numerically and the results were compared to finite element simulation results. Pressure and power transfer measurements within a test tank further confirm the effectiveness of the proposed UTET.

  7. 10-kHz High-Frequency SCS Therapy: A Clinical Summary

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Marc; Van Buyten, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain remains a serious public health problem worldwide. A spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy called HF10 SCS uses 10-kHz high-frequency stimulation to provide pain relief without paresthesia. In this article, we describe the therapy, device, and the methods of implant and then review the safety and effectiveness data for this therapy. Results HF10 SCS uses a charge-balanced stimulation waveform that has been shown to be safe in both animal and human studies. Data from a multicenter, prospective clinical trial shows that the therapy provides substantial back and leg pain relief. Numerous additional reports suggest improved pain relief in other body areas and for complex pain patterns, even for patients who have previously failed other neuromodulation therapies. Conclusions The clinical experience reported in this article supports the efficacy and pain relief provided by HF10 SCS therapy. Clinical studies have also concluded that HF10 SCS does not generate paresthesia nor was it necessary to provide adequate coverage for pain relief. As clinical evidence accumulates and technological innovation improves patient outcomes, neuromodulatory techniques will be sought earlier in the treatment continuum to reduce the suffering for the many with otherwise intractable chronic pain. PMID:25377278

  8. Noiseless imaging detector for adaptive optics with kHz frame rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John V.; McPhate, Jason; Mikulec, Bettina; Tremsin, Anton; Clark, Allan; Siegmund, Oswald

    2004-10-01

    A new hybrid optical detector is described that has many of the attributes desired for the next generation AO wavefront sensors. The detector consists of a proximity focused MCP read out by four multi-pixel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chips developed at CERN ("Medipix2") with individual pixels that amplify, discriminate and count input events. The detector has 512 x 512 pixels, zero readout noise (photon counting) and can be read out at 1kHz frame rates. The Medipix2 readout chips can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few microseconds with an accuracy of 10 nanoseconds. When used in a Shack-Hartman style wavefront sensor, it should be able to centroid approximately 5000 spots using 7 x 7 pixel sub-apertures resulting in very linear, off-null error correction terms. The quantum efficiency depends on the optical photocathode chosen for the bandpass of interest. A three year development effort for this detector technology has just been funded as part of the first Adaptive Optics Development Program managed by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

  9. Backscatter from a limestone seafloor at 2-3.5 kHz: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Raymond J; Gragg, Robert F

    2003-05-01

    Physics-based interface scattering models for the seafloor [H.-H. Essen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 1299-1310 (1994); Gragg et al., ibid. 110, 2878-2901 (2001)] exhibit features in their predicted grazing angle dependence. These features have a strong dependence on the assumed composition and roughness of the bottom. Verifying such predictions requires data that cover a wide range of grazing angles and involve minimal sub-bottom penetration. Such measurements were performed in the frequency band 2-3.5 kHz over an exposed limestone bottom off the Carolina coast during the second Littoral Warfare Advanced Development Focused Technology Experiment of 1996 (LWAD FTE 96-2). Direct-path bottom scattering strengths were obtained in shallow water (198-310 m deep) for grazing angles from 8 degrees to 75 degrees using data fusion from multiple experimental geometries coupled with careful signal processing. The processing included corrections for the surface-reflected path, other multipaths, and characteristics of the reverberation decay observed over the pulse duration at higher grazing angles. The resulting frequency and grazing-angle dependences exhibit trends consistent with theoretical predictions, and geoacoustic parameters obtained by inversion are consistent with values expected for limestone.

  10. Experimental investigation of photoresist etching by kHz AC atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Zheng, Yashuang; Wu, Chen; Jia, Shenli

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the mechanism of the photoresist (PR) etching by means of a kHz AC atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is investigated. The scanning electron (SEM) and the polarizing microscope are used to perform the surface analysis, and the mechanical profilometry is applied to diagnose the etch rate. The results show that granulated structure with numerous microparticles appears at the substrate surface after APPJ treatment, and the etch rate in the etch center is the fastest and gradually slows down to the edge of etch region. In addition, the pin-ring electrode APPJ has the highest etch rate at but easy to damage the Si wafer, the double-ring APPJ is the most stable but requires long time to achieve the ideal etch result, and the etch rate and the etch result of the multi-electrode APPJ fall in between. Ar APPJ had much higher PR etch rate and more irregular etch trace than He APPJ. It is speculated that Ar APPJ is more energetic and effective in transferring reactive species to the PR surface. It is also observed that the effective etch area initially increases and then decreases as plasma jet outlet to the PR surface distance increases.

  11. Impact of sonication at 20 kHz on Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena circinalis and Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, Pradeep; Fan, Linhua; Nguyen, Thang; Roddick, Felicity A

    2012-04-01

    Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria such as Microcystis aeruginosa periodically occur within wastewater treatment lagoons in the warmer months, and may consequently cause contamination of downstream water and outages of the supply of recycled wastewater. Lab-scale sonication (20 kHz) was conducted on suspensions of M. aeruginosa isolated from a wastewater treatment lagoon, and two other algal strains, Anabaena circinalis and Chlorella sp., to investigate cell reduction, growth inhibition, release of microcystin and sonication efficiency in controlling the growth of the M. aeruginosa. For M. aeruginosa, for all sonication intensities and exposure times trialled, sonication led to an immediate reduction in the population, the highest reduction rate occurring within the initial 5 min. Sonication for 5 min at 0.32 W/mL, or for a longer exposure time (>10 min) at a lower power intensity (0.043 W/mL), led to an immediate increase in microcystin level in the treated suspensions. However, prolonged exposure (>10 min) to sonication at higher power intensities reduced the microcystin concentration significantly. Under the same sonication conditions, the order of decreasing growth inhibition of the three algal species was: A. circinalis > M. aeruginosa > Chlorella sp., demonstrating sonication has the potential to selectively remove/deactivate harmful cyanobacteria from the algal communities in wastewater treatment lagoons.

  12. Streamer properties in a repetitively pulsed plasma jet from 1 to 100 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian; Ganguly, Biswa; Scofield, James

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the properties of guided streamers in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed dielectric barrier plasma jet at repetition rates up to 100 kHz. In this regime, remnant ionization and neutral metastable concentrations are significant in the channel through which the streamer propagates. Both helium and a Penning mixture of helium and argon are investigated as feed gases for a plasma jet in a controlled pressure chamber with a flowing nitrogen background. The applied voltage pulse was set at 8 kV, with a risetime of 15 ns and falltime of 8.5 μs. Streamer dynamics were monitored using spatiotemporally-resolved emission spectroscopy with a PMT filtered at 706.5 nm He (33S - 23P) and 587.6 nm He (33D - 23P) to track the streamer head. Temporally-resolved ICCD imaging was also used to characterize discharge development. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was used to measure He (23S1) and Ar (3P2) metastable densities in the streamer channel, and streamer current was measured using an inductive current monitor. As the pulse rate is increased, the streamer dynamics are significantly altered, while production of He (23S1) and Ar (3P2) is enhanced with alternate production channels becoming important in the case of He (23S1). Work funded by Air Force Office of Scientific Research under program manager Jason Marshall.

  13. THz generation from elliptically-focused two-color laser pulses at 1 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yungjun; Kuk, Donghoon; Zhong, Zheqiang; Kim, Ki-Yong

    2017-01-01

    We have generated high-power terahertz (THz) radiation by elliptical focusing of two-color femtosecond laser pulses in air at a 1-kHz repetition rate. Elliptical focusing produces a 2-dimensional plasma sheet, emitting two diverging THz radiation lobes in the far field. Such radiation is collimated and refocused by a combination of cylindrical and off-axis parabolic mirrors. Here the distances between the 2-D plasma sheet, cylindrical mirror, and off-axis parabolic mirror are carefully adjusted to minimize the THz spot size at the refocus. The refocused THz field strength is estimated by measuring the THz energy, beam spot size, and waveform. Here an uncooled microbolometer camera with real-time lock-in imaging is used to monitor and measure the focused THz beam profiles with a high signal-to-noise ratio at a broad range of THz (1 40 THz) frequencies. High-pressure gas (N2 and Ar) jets puffed in air are also tested as laser targets to boost the output THz energy even further. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-16-1-0163.

  14. Laser-induced incandescence measurements in a fired diesel engine at 3 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, I. G.; Heinold, O.; Geigle, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) was performed at 3 kHz in an optically accessible cylinder of a fired diesel engine using a commercially available diode-pumped solid-state laser and an intensified CMOS camera. The resulting images, acquired every 3° of crank angle, enabled the spatiotemporal tracking of soot structures during the expansion/exhaust stroke of the engine cycle. The image sequences demonstrate that soot tends to form in thin sheets that propagate and interact with the in-cylinder flow. These sheets tend to align parallel to the central axis of the cylinder and are frequently wrapped into conical spirals by aerodynamic swirl. Most of the soot is observed well away from the cylinder walls. Quantitative soot measurements were beyond the scope of this study but the results demonstrate the practical utility of using kHz-rate LII to acquire ensemble-averaged statistical data with high crank angle resolution over a complete engine cycle. Based on semi-quantitative measures of soot distribution, it was possible to identify soot dynamics related to incomplete charge exchange. This study shows that long-duration, multi-kHz acquisition rate LII measurements are viable in a fired diesel engine with currently available laser and camera technology, albeit only in the expansion and exhaust phase of the cycle at present. Furthermore, such measurements yield useful insight into soot dynamics and therefore constitute an important new tool for the development and optimization of diesel engine technology.

  15. Time-dependent seafloor acoustic backscatter (10-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Daniel D; de Moustier, Christian P

    2003-11-01

    A time-dependent model of the acoustic intensity backscattered by the seafloor is described and compared with data from a calibrated, vertically oriented, echo-sounder operating at 33 and 93 kHz. The model incorporates the characteristics of the echo-sounder and transmitted pulse, and the water column spreading and absorption losses. Scattering from the water-sediment interface is predicted using Helmholtz-Kirchhoff theory, parametrized by the mean grain size, the coherent reflection coefficient, and the strength and exponent of a power-law roughness spectrum. The composite roughness approach of Jackson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 1410-1422 (1986)], modified for the finite duration of the transmitted signal, is used to predict backscatter from subbottom inhomogeneities. It depends on the sediment's volume scattering and attenuation coefficients, as well as the interface characteristics governing sound transmission into the sediment. Estimation of model parameters (mean grain size, roughness spectrum strength and exponent, volume scattering coefficient) reveals ambiguous ranges for the two spectral components. Analyses of model outputs and of physical measurements reported in the literature yield practical constraints on roughness spectrum parameter settings appropriate for echo-envelope-based sediment classification procedures.

  16. Application of longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis at 50 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nescolarde, L.; Doñate, T.; Casañas, R.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    More relevant information of the fluid changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be obtained with segmental bioimpedance measurements rather than whole-body measurement, who hidden information of body composition. Whole-body and segmental bioimpedance measurements were obtained using 5 configurations (whole-body or right-side (RS), longitudinal-leg (L-LEG), longitudinal-abdomen (L-AB), transversal-abdomen (T-AB), and transversal-leg (T-LEG)) in 20 patients: 15 males (56.5 ± 9.4 yr, 24.2 ± 4.2 kg/m2) and 5 females (58.4 ± 7.1 yr, 28.2 ± 5.9 kg/m2) in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between whole-body, longitudinal-segmental (L-LEG and L-AB) and transversal-segmental (TAB and TLEG) bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, with clinical parameters of cardiovascular risk, dyslipidemia, nutrition and hydration. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. Longitudinal bioimpedance parameters were normalized by the height of the patients. The Spearman correlation was used to analyze the correlation between bioimpedance and clinical parameters. The statistical significance was considered with P < 0.05. Transversal bioimpedance measurements have higher correlation with clinical parameters than longitudinal measurements.

  17. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Gas Phase Thermometry at 5 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineman, Claresta; Lucht, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the thermal instabilities occurring in turbulent combustion, such as in modern gas turbine combustors, is critical for more reliable and fuel-efficient operation. Non-intrusive laser based spectroscopy methods have been documented as the techniques of choice for turbulent combustion diagnostics. Specifically, femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) thermometry has been established for temporal resolution of turbulent fluctuations in flame structure and provides accurate measurements across a wide range of temperatures. Experiments performed to date include 5 kHz pure vibrational N2 chirped probe-pulse fs-CARS thermometry on non-premixed hydrogen jet diffusion flames, methane jet diffusion flames, and the DLR gas turbine model combustor (GTMC). The fs-CARS signal generation process requires precise spatial and temporal overlap of tightly focused pulsed laser beams of less than 100 fs pulse duration. Here, signal loss due to beam steering, pressure fluctuations, or shear layer density gradients can become a problem. The effect of such interferences has been investigated using high velocity flow of compressed nitrogen gas from a converging-diverging nozzle. Resulting changes in fs-CARS spectra have been studied. Funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  18. Measurement of the acoustic reflectivity of sirenia (Florida manatees) at 171 kHz.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Jules S; Simonet, Fernando; Roberts, Paul L D; Bowles, Ann E

    2007-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is an endangered sirenian. At present, its adult population (approximately 2200) seems stable, but tenuous. Manatee-boat collisions are a significant proportion (approximately 25%) of mortalities. Here, the potential use of active sonar for detecting manatees by quantifying sonic reflectivity is explored. In order to estimate reflectivity two methods were used. One method measured live reflections from captive animals using a carefully calibrated acoustic and co-registered optical system. The other method consisted of the analysis of animal tissue in order to obtain estimates of the sound speed and density and to predict reflectivity. The impedance measurement predicts that for a lateral view, the tissue reflectivity is close to 0.13, with a critical grazing angle of 28 degrees. Data measured from live animals indicate that substantial reflections can be recorded, however in many instances observed "empirical target strengths" were less than an experimentally dependent -48-dB threshold. Conclusions favor the hypothesis that the animals reflect substantial amounts of sound; however, the reflections can often be specular, and therefore impractical for observation by a manatee detection sonar operating at 171 kHz.

  19. Femtosecond Laser Tagging Characterization of a Sweeping Jet Actuator Operating in the Compressible Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Christopher J.; Miles, Richard B.; Burns, Ross A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Gregory S.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    A sweeping jet (SWJ) actuator operating over a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) was characterized with femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET), single hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and high-speed/phase-averaged schlieren. FLEET velocimetry was successfully demonstrated in a highly unsteady, oscillatory flow containing subsonic through supersonic velocities. Qualitative comparisons between FLEET and HWA (which measured mass flux since the flow was compressible) showed relatively good agreement in the external flow profiles. The spreading rate was found to vary from 0.5 to 1.2 depending on the pressure ratio. The precision of FLEET velocity measurements in the external flow field was poorer (is approximately equal to 25 m/s) than reported in a previous study due to the use of relatively low laser fluences, impacting the velocity fluctuation measurements. FLEET enabled velocity measurements inside the device and showed that choking likely occurred for NPR = 2.0, and no internal shockwaves were present. Qualitative oxygen concentration measurements using FLEET were explored in an effort to gauge the jet's mixing with the ambient. The jet was shown to mix well within roughly four throat diameters and mix fully within roughly eight throat diameters. Schlieren provided visualization of the internal and external flow fields and showed that the qualitative structure of the internal flow does not vary with pressure ratio and the sweeping mechanism observed for incompressible NPRs also probably holds for compressible NPRs.

  20. Effects of Fin Leading Edge Sweep on Shock-Shock Interaction at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of fin leading edge sweep on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interaction have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The shock interaction was produced by the intersection of a planar incident shock (16.8 deg shock angle relative to the freestream, generated by a 9 deg wedge) with the bow shock formed around a O.5-inch diameter cylindrical leading edge fin. Heating distributions along the leading edge stagnation line have been obtained using densely spaced thin film resistive-type sensors. Schlieren images were obtained to illustrate the very complex shock-shock interactions. The fin leading edge sweep angle was varied from 15-degrees swept back to 45-degrees swept forward for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Two models were utilized during the study, one with 0.025-inch spacing between gage centers, and the other 0.015-inch spacing. Gage spatial resolution on the order of 0.015-in appeared to accurately capture the narrow spike in heating. Peak heating due to shock interaction was maximized when the fin was swept forward 15 deg and 25 deg, both promoting augmentations about 7 times the baseline value. The schlieren images for these cases revealed Type 4 and Type 3 interactions, respectively.

  1. Evidence for selective sweeps by Wolbachia infections: phylogeny of Altica leaf beetles and their reproductive parasites.

    PubMed

    Jäckel, Regina; Mora, Diana; Dobler, Susanne

    2013-08-01

    Infections with maternally inherited Wolbachia bacteria may have dramatic influences on reproductive traits and speciation patterns of their hosts. We here show that in the beetle genus Altica, infection has influenced phylogenetic patterns of the host's mtDNA and different strains led to repeated selective sweeps. By comparing a COI/II-based phylogeny of the hosts with a phylogeny of the bacteria based on ftsZ, we show that cospeciation is rare and restricted to few recently diverged species. While in general each species apparently harbours a single Wolbachia strain, Altica lythri presents a strikingly different pattern: in the polyphyletic species, three highly divergent mtDNA haplotypes (2.1-4.6% p-distance) are coupled with three different Wolbachia strains (wLytA1, wLytA2 and wLytB). These haplotypes and Wolbachia strains are widely distributed and mostly found in sympatry. A phylogeny based on microsatellite data supports the monophyly of A. lythri. The discrepancy between mtDNA and nuclear phylogeny may best be explained by interspecific hybridization that led to introgression of mtDNA coupled with a different Wolbachia strain. Selective sweeps apparently drove the introgressed haplotypes to widespread distribution. As for effects of Wolbachia on reproduction, infection with wLytA1 appears to be correlated with a substantial sex ratio distortion, which was most prominent in A. lythri.

  2. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  3. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  4. Efficient Stochastic Rendering of Static and Animated Volumes using Visibility Sweeps.

    PubMed

    von Radziewsky, Philipp; Kroes, Thomas; Eisemann, Martin; Eisemann, Elmar

    2016-09-07

    Stochastically solving the rendering integral (particularly visibility) is the de-facto standard for physically-based light transport but it is computationally expensive, especially when displaying heterogeneous volumetric data. In this work, we present efficient techniques to speed-up the rendering process via a novel visibility-estimation method in concert with an unbiased importance sampling (involving environmental lighting and visibility inside the volume), filtering, and update techniques for both static and animated scenes. Our major contributions include a progressive estimate of partial occlusions based on a fast sweeping-plane algorithm. These occlusions are stored in an octahedral representation, which can be conveniently transformed into a quadtree-based hierarchy suited for a joint importance sampling. Further, we propose sweep-space filtering, which suppresses the occurrence of fireflies and investigate different update schemes for animated scenes. Our technique is unbiased, requires little precomputation, is highly parallelizable, and is applicable to a various volume data sets, dynamic transfer functions, animated volumes and changing environmental lighting.

  5. A Practical Genome Scan for Population-Specific Strong Selective Sweeps That Have Reached Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ohashi, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypic divergences between modern human populations have developed as a result of genetic adaptation to local environments over the past 100,000 years. To identify genes involved in population-specific phenotypes, it is necessary to detect signatures of recent positive selection in the human genome. Although detection of elongated linkage disequilibrium (LD) has been a powerful tool in the field of evolutionary genetics, current LD-based approaches are not applicable to already fixed loci. Here, we report a method of scanning for population-specific strong selective sweeps that have reached fixation. In this method, genome-wide SNP data is used to analyze differences in the haplotype frequency, nucleotide diversity, and LD between populations, using the ratio of haplotype homozygosity between populations. To estimate the detection power of the statistics used in this study, we performed computer simulations and found that these tests are relatively robust against the density of typed SNPs and demographic parameters if the advantageous allele has reached fixation. Therefore, we could determine the threshold for maintaining high detection power, regardless of SNP density and demographic history. When this method was applied to the HapMap data, it was able to identify the candidates of population-specific strong selective sweeps more efficiently than the outlier approach that depends on the empirical distribution. This study, confirming strong positive selection on genes previously reported to be associated with specific phenotypes, also identifies other candidates that are likely to contribute to phenotypic differences between human populations. PMID:17356696

  6. Flow Separation Control on A Full-Scale Vertical Tail Model Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andino, Marlyn Y.; Lin, John C.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Whalen, Edward A.; Graff, Emilio C.; Wygnanski, Israel J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes test results of a joint NASA/Boeing research effort to advance Active Flow Control (AFC) technology to enhance aerodynamic efficiency. A full-scale Boeing 757 vertical tail model equipped with sweeping jets AFC was tested at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The flow separation control optimization was performed at 100 knots, a maximum rudder deflection of 30deg, and sideslip angles of 0deg and -7.5deg. Greater than 20% increments in side force were achieved at the two sideslip angles with a 31-actuator AFC configuration. Flow physics and flow separation control associated with the AFC are presented in detail. AFC caused significant increases in suction pressure on the actuator side and associated side force enhancement. The momentum coefficient (C sub mu) is shown to be a useful parameter to use for scaling-up sweeping jet AFC from sub-scale tests to full-scale applications. Reducing the number of actuators at a constant total C(sub mu) of approximately 0.5% and tripling the actuator spacing did not significantly affect the flow separation control effectiveness.

  7. The relative importance of ejections and sweeps to momentum transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, Gabriel; Poggi, Davide; Cava, Daniela; Finnigan, John

    2006-09-01

    Using an incomplete third-order cumulant expansion method (ICEM) and standard second-order closure principles, we show that the imbalance in the stress contribution of sweeps and ejections to momentum transfer (Δ S o ) can be predicted from measured profiles of the Reynolds stress and the longitudinal velocity standard deviation for different boundary-layer regions. The ICEM approximation is independently verified using flume data, atmospheric surface layer measurements above grass and ice-sheet surfaces, and within the canopy sublayer of maturing Loblolly pine and alpine hardwood forests. The model skill for discriminating whether sweeps or ejections dominate momentum transfer (e.g. the sign of Δ S o ) agrees well with wind-tunnel measurements in the outer and surface layers, and flume measurements within the canopy sublayer for both sparse and dense vegetation. The broader impact of this work is that the “genesis” of the imbalance in Δ S o is primarily governed by how boundary conditions impact first and second moments.

  8. Selection Under Domestication: Evidence for a Sweep in the Rice Waxy Genomic Region

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M.; Caicedo, Ana L.; Polato, Nicholas; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated by Asian Neolithic farmers >11,000 years ago, and different cultures have selected for divergent starch qualities in the rice grain during and after the domestication process. An intron 1 splice donor site mutation of the Waxy gene is responsible for the absence of amylose in glutinous rice varieties. This mutation appears to have also played an important role in the origin of low amylose, nonglutinous temperate japonica rice varieties, which form a primary component of Northeast Asian cuisines. Waxy DNA sequence analyses indicate that the splice donor mutation is prevalent in temperate japonica rice varieties, but rare or absent in tropical japonica, indica, aus, and aromatic varieties. Sequence analysis across a 500-kb genomic region centered on Waxy reveals patterns consistent with a selective sweep in the temperate japonicas associated with the mutation. The size of the selective sweep (>250 kb) indicates very strong selection in this region, with an inferred selection coefficient that is higher than similar estimates from maize domestication genes or wild species. These findings demonstrate that selection pressures associated with crop domestication regimes can exceed by one to two orders of magnitude those observed for genes under even strong selection in natural systems. PMID:16547098

  9. Mutagenic activity of sweepings and pigments from a household-wax factory assayed with Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Varella, S D; Pozetti, G L; Vilegas, W; Varanda, E A

    2004-12-01

    The mutagenic activity of garbage originating from a household wax industry was determined by the Salmonella/microsome assay, using the bacterial strains TA100, TA98 and YG1024. The garbage was obtained by sweeping the floor of the factory at the end of the work shift. Organic compounds were extracted by ultrasound for 30 min in dichloromethane or 70% ethanol. After evaporation of solvent, these extracts (HFS: household-wax factory sweepings) were dissolved in DMSO, and were tested for the mutagenic activity at varying concentrations (HFS-ET: 0.08-0.68 mg/plate, HFS-DCM: 0.60-7.31 mg/plate). The colouring agents (pigments) used in the production of the wax were also dissolved in DMSO and tested with the assay. The concentrations tested for each pigment were: Amaranth: 0.46-3.65 mg/plate, Auramine: 0.15-1.2 mg/plate and Rhodamine B: 0.22-1.82 mg/plate. Both ET and DCM organic extracts had mutagenic activity, especially in the YG1024 strain. The pigments behaved in a similar way, demonstrating that YG1024 was the most sensitive strain for the detection of mutagenicity, and that metabolization increased the activity. Human exposure (occupational and non-occupational) to industrial residues generated during the household-wax manufacturing and packaging process should be monitored, since this type of garbage is normally deposited in the environment without any control.

  10. Theory of linear sweep voltammetry with diffuse charge: Unsupported electrolytes, thin films, and leaky membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, David; Bazant, Martin Z.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Pugh, Mary C.; Dawson, Francis P.

    2017-03-01

    Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry techniques are important tools for electrochemists and have a variety of applications in engineering. Voltammetry has classically been treated with the Randles-Sevcik equation, which assumes an electroneutral supported electrolyte. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive mathematical theory of voltammetry in electrochemical cells with unsupported electrolytes and for other situations where diffuse charge effects play a role, and present analytical and simulated solutions of the time-dependent Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations with generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer boundary conditions for a 1:1 electrolyte and a simple reaction. Using these solutions, we construct theoretical and simulated current-voltage curves for liquid and solid thin films, membranes with fixed background charge, and cells with blocking electrodes. The full range of dimensionless parameters is considered, including the dimensionless Debye screening length (scaled to the electrode separation), Damkohler number (ratio of characteristic diffusion and reaction times), and dimensionless sweep rate (scaled to the thermal voltage per diffusion time). The analysis focuses on the coupling of Faradaic reactions and diffuse charge dynamics, although capacitive charging of the electrical double layers is also studied, for early time transients at reactive electrodes and for nonreactive blocking electrodes. Our work highlights cases where diffuse charge effects are important in the context of voltammetry, and illustrates which regimes can be approximated using simple analytical expressions and which require more careful consideration.

  11. Digital Calibration of TR Modules for Real-time Digital Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Perkovic, Dragana; Shaffer, Scott; Veilleux, Louise; Peral, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Real-time digital beamforming, combined with lightweight, large aperture reflectors, enable SweepSAR architectures such as that of the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI). These new instrument concepts require new methods for calibrating the multiple channels, which must be combined on-board, in real-time. The calibration of current state-of-the-art Electronically Steered Arrays typically involves pre-flight TR (Transmit/Receive) module characterization over temperature, and in-flight correction based on temperature, which ignores the effects of element aging and drifts unrelated to temperature. We are developing new methods for digitally calibrating digital beamforming arrays to reduce development time, risk and cost of precision calibrated TR modules for array architectures by accurately tracking modules' characteristics through closed-loop Digital Calibration, thus tracking systematic changes regardless of temperature. The benefit of this effort is that it would enable a new class of lightweight radar architecture, Digital Beamforming with SweepSAR, providing significantly larger swath coverage than conventional SAR architectures for solid earth and biomass remote sensing, while reducing mission mass and cost. This new instrument concept requires new methods for calibrating the multiple channels, which must be combined on-board, in real-time.

  12. Experimental implementation of switching and sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers for broadband vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilletti, Michele; Gardonio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the laboratory implementation of two semi-active tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs): a switching TVA and a sweeping TVA. The two absorbers are designed to control the low frequency total flexural response of a cylindrical duct excited by a stationary broadband random force. The two TVAs are composed by a seismic mass mounted on a axial spring. Both TVAs are equipped with a relative displacement and relative velocity feedback control system, which is used to vary the characteristic stiffness and damping, that is the characteristic natural frequency and damping ratio, of the TVA. The switching TVA cyclically tunes its characteristic natural frequency and damping ratio to iteratively control the resonant responses due to three targeted flexural natural modes of the duct. Alternatively the sweeping TVA continuously varies its characteristic natural frequency and damping ratio within given ranges to blindly control the resonant responses due to the same three flexural natural modes of the duct. The paper presents both simulation and experimental results regarding the feedback loop used to iteratively or continuously tune the TVAs and about the reduction of vibration produced by the two semi-active TVAs. The simulation and the experimental results show that both TVAs effectively control the flexural response of the duct in the low frequency band, which is characterised by the resonances of the three targeted flexural natural modes of the duct.

  13. Demonstration of frequency-sweep testing technique using a Bell 214-ST helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Fletcher, Jay W.; Diekmann, Vernon L.; Williams, Robert A.; Cason, Randall W.

    1987-01-01

    A demonstration of frequency-sweep testing using a Bell-214ST single-rotor helicopter was completed in support of the Army's development of an updated MIL-H-8501A, and an LHX (ADS-33) handling-qualities specification. Hover and level-flight (V sub a = 0 knots and V sub a = 90 knots) tests were conducted in 3 flight hours by Army test pilots at the Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity (AEFA) at Edwards AFB, Calif. Bandwidth and phase-delay parameters were determined from the flight-extracted frequency responses as required by the proposed specifications. Transfer function modeling and verification demonstrates the validity of the frequency-response concept for characterizing closed-loop flight dynamics of single-rotor helicopters -- even in hover. This report documents the frequency-sweep flight-testing technique and data-analysis procedures. Special emphasis is given to piloting and analysis considerations which are important for demonstrating frequency-domain specification compliance.

  14. Compact hadron driver for cancer therapies using continuous energy sweep scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wah, Leo Kwee; Monma, Takumi; Adachi, Toshikazu; Kawakubo, Tadamichi; Dixit, Tanuja; Takayama, Ken

    2016-04-01

    A design of a compact hadron driver for future cancer therapies based on the induction synchrotron concept is presented. To realize a slow extraction technique in a fast-cycling synchrotron, which allows energy sweep beam scanning, a zero momentum-dispersion D (s ) region and a high flat D (s ) region are necessary. The proposed design meets both requirements. The lattice has two-fold symmetry with a circumference of 52.8 m, a 2-m dispersion-free straight section, and a 3-m-long large flat dispersion straight section. Assuming a 1.5-T bending magnet, the ring can deliver heavy ions (200 MeV /u ) at 10 Hz. A beam fraction is dropped from the barrier bucket at the desired timing, and the increasing negative momentum deviation of this beam fraction becomes large enough for the fraction to fall in the electrostatic septum extraction gap, which is placed at the large D (s ) region. The programmed energy sweep extraction enables scanning beam irradiation on a cancer site in depth without an energy degrader, avoiding the production of secondary particles and the degradation of emittance. Details of the lattice parameters and computer simulations for slow extraction are discussed. An example extraction scenario is presented. Qualities of the spilled beam such as emittance and momentum spread are discussed, as well as necessary functions and parameters required for the extraction system.

  15. Experiments and error analysis of laser ranging based on frequency-sweep polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuyuan; Ji, Rongyi; Li, Yao; Cheng, Zhi; Zhou, Weihu

    2016-11-01

    Frequency-sweep polarization modulation ranging uses a polarization-modulated laser beam to determine the distance to the target, the modulation frequency is swept and frequency values are measured when transmitted and received signals are in phase, thus the distance can be calculated through these values. This method gets much higher theoretical measuring accuracy than phase difference method because of the prevention of phase measurement. However, actual accuracy of the system is limited since additional phase retardation occurs in the measuring optical path when optical elements are imperfectly processed and installed. In this paper, working principle of frequency sweep polarization modulation ranging method is analyzed, transmission model of polarization state in light path is built based on the theory of Jones Matrix, additional phase retardation of λ/4 wave plate and PBS, their impact on measuring performance is analyzed. Theoretical results show that wave plate's azimuth error dominates the limitation of ranging accuracy. According to the system design index, element tolerance and error correcting method of system is proposed, ranging system is built and ranging experiment is performed. Experiential results show that with proposed tolerance, the system can satisfy the accuracy requirement. The present work has a guide value for further research about system design and error distribution.

  16. [Locally weighted least squares estimation of DPOAE evoked by continuously sweeping primaries].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoli; Fu, Xinxing; Cui, Jie; Xiao, Ling

    2013-12-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) signal can be used for diagnosis of hearing loss so that it has an important clinical value. Continuously using sweeping primaries to measure DPOAE provides an efficient tool to record DPOAE data rapidly when DPOAE is measured in a large frequency range. In this paper, locally weighted least squares estimation (LWLSE) of 2f1-f2 DPOAE is presented based on least-squares-fit (LSF) algorithm, in which DPOAE is evoked by continuously sweeping tones. In our study, we used a weighted error function as the loss function and the weighting matrixes in the local sense to obtain a smaller estimated variance. Firstly, ordinary least squares estimation of the DPOAE parameters was obtained. Then the error vectors were grouped and the different local weighting matrixes were calculated in each group. And finally, the parameters of the DPOAE signal were estimated based on least squares estimation principle using the local weighting matrixes. The simulation results showed that the estimate variance and fluctuation errors were reduced, so the method estimates DPOAE and stimuli more accurately and stably, which facilitates extraction of clearer DPOAE fine structure.

  17. Cancer Incidence in a Cohort of Swedish Chimney Sweeps, 1958–2006

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Catarina; Hugosson, Marcus; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Gustavsson, Per

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined cancer incidence in an expanded cohort of Swedish chimney sweeps. Methods. We added male chimney sweep trade union members (1981–2006) to an earlier cohort (employed 1918–1980) and linked them to nationwide registers of cancer, causes of deaths, and total population. The total cohort (n = 6320) was followed from 1958 through 2006. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) using the male Swedish population as reference. We estimated exposure as years of employment and analyzed for exposure–response associations by Poisson regression. Results. A total of 813 primary cancers were observed versus 626 expected (SIR = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.21, 1.39). As in a previous follow-up, SIRs were significantly increased for cancer of the esophagus, liver, lung, bladder, and all hematopoietic cancer. New findings included significantly elevated SIRs for cancer of the colon, pleura, adenocarcinoma of the lung, and at unspecified sites. Total cancer and bladder cancer demonstrated positive exposure–response associations. Conclusions. Exposure to soot and asbestos are likely causes of the observed cancer excesses, with contributions from adverse lifestyle factors. Preventive actions to control work exposures and promote healthier lifestyles are an important priority. PMID:23327283

  18. Combined multivariate matching pursuit and support vector machine: a way forward to classify single-sweep evoked potentials?

    PubMed

    Graversen, Carina; Brock, Christina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Farina, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Evoked brain potentials averaged over multiple sweeps provide a valuable objective measure of abnormal pain processing due to sensitization of the central nervous system. However, the average procedure cancel out important information regarding phase resetting and non-phase locked oscillations. Hence, assessment of the pain processing could be optimized by analyzing single-sweeps. To develop improved methods to assess single-sweeps, we applied a new approach in one healthy volunteer participating in a placebo controlled study of widespread hyperalgesia induced by perfusion of acid and capsaicin in the esophagus. The evoked potentials were recorded during electrical stimulations in the rectosigmoid colon. Features from the single-sweeps were extracted by a multivariate matching pursuit algorithm with Gabor atoms, and features were discriminated by a support vector machine with a linear kernel. The classification performance for the optimal number of atoms was 95% when discriminating the sensitization response from the placebo response, which was above change level compared to the performance when discriminating the two baseline responses (P < 0.001). The discriminative capacity was increased power in the delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands. This result corresponds to previous characteristics seen in chronic pain patients who exhibit central sensitization. The new approach to classify single-sweeps on a single subject basis might in the future prove to be a useful tool in assessing mechanisms in central sensitization, and could be applied to improve enriched enrollment of study subjects in clinical trial units.

  19. The Effect of Leading-Edge Sweep and Surface Inclination on the Hypersonic Flow Field Over a Blunt Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creager, Marcus O.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of variation of leading-edge sweep and surface inclination on the flow over blunt flat plates was conducted at Mach numbers of 4 and 5.7 at free-stream Reynolds numbers per inch of 6,600 and 20,000, respectively. Surface pressures were measured on a flat plate blunted by a semicylindrical leading edge over a range of sweep angles from 0 deg to 60 deg and a range of surface inclinations from -10 deg to +10 deg. The surface pressures were predicted within an average error of +/- 8 percent by a combination of blast-wave and boundary-layer theory extended herein to include effects of sweep and surface inclination. This combination applied equally well to similar data of other investigations. The local Reynolds number per inch was found to be lower than the free-stream Reynolds number per inch. The reduction in local Reynolds number was mitigated by increasing the sweep of the leading edge. Boundary-layer thickness and shock-wave shape were changed little by the sweep of the leading edge.

  20. More effective drugs lead to harder selective sweeps in the evolution of drug resistance in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Alison F; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Holmes, Susan P; Shafer, Robert W; Petrov, Dmitri A; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2016-01-01

    In the early days of HIV treatment, drug resistance occurred rapidly and predictably in all patients, but under modern treatments, resistance arises slowly, if at all. The probability of resistance should be controlled by the rate of generation of resistance mutations. If many adaptive mutations arise simultaneously, then adaptation proceeds by soft selective sweeps in which multiple adaptive mutations spread concomitantly, but if adaptive mutations occur rarely in the population, then a single adaptive mutation should spread alone in a hard selective sweep. Here, we use 6717 HIV-1 consensus sequences from patients treated with first-line therapies between 1989 and 2013 to confirm that the transition from fast to slow evolution of drug resistance was indeed accompanied with the expected transition from soft to hard selective sweeps. This suggests more generally that evolution proceeds via hard sweeps if resistance is unlikely and via soft sweeps if it is likely. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10670.001 PMID:26882502

  1. Effects of 35 kHz, low-frequency ultrasound application in vitro on human fibroblast morphology and migration patterns.

    PubMed

    Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Malpass, Gloria; Steele, Arhalia; Howlett, Allyn

    2015-03-01

    Low-frequency ultrasound (LFU) in the frequency range 30-40 kHz administered using different delivery methods (waterbath and noncontact spray) has shown positive effects on chronic wound healing rates in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are only beginning to be explored. To examine the effects of LFU delivered at 35 kHz on the morphology and migration of human fibroblasts, real-time videography was used to record the rate and character of cultured human fibroblast migration at 8-hour increments for 48 hours in a wound assay model. Cells were treated with 35 kHz LFU or saline only (control). Cellular morphology (cell shape, packing, and apparent length) and migration patterns including orientation were analyzed using time-lapse videography. LFU delivered at a frequency of 35 kHz produced a different pattern of fibroblast migration in vitro (varied orientation versus vertical orientation for untreated cells) and altered cell morphology compared to controls. The observed pattern of migration was more varied and widely distributed across multiple angles versus the predominant parallel orientation of the migrating untreated cells. The potential implications of these findings on collagen placement in the extracellular matrix, which may affect degree of soft tissue scarring, should be further investigated.

  2. Are the kHz QPO Lags in Neutron Star 4U 1608-52 due to Reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGNs for neutron star LMXBs. Assuming that relativistic reflection forms the broad iron line and associated reflection continuum, we use reflection fits to the energy spectrum along with the impulse response functions to calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star LMXBs, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  3. Are the kHz QPO lags in neutron star 4U 1608-52 due to reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward

    2016-04-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGN for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz QPO frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  4. 47 CFR 73.30 - Petition for authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... licensed Class D station. If more than one Class D station applies for this migration opportunity, the... station on one of the ten channels in the 1605-1705 kHz band must file a petition for the establishment of... these petitions is limited to licensees of existing AM stations (excluding Class C stations)...

  5. Strained multiquantum-well corrugation-pitch-modulated distributed feedback laser with ultranarrow (3.6kHz) spectral linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, M.; Suzuki, M.; Taniwatari, T.

    1993-09-01

    Introducing a 1% compressive strained multiquantum-well (MQW) active layer into a corrugation-pitch-modulated distributed feedback (CPM-DFB) laser reduces the linewidth floor (residual linewidth for extrapolated infinite output power) to 2 kHz and results in a linewidth-power product of 140 kHz mW. Strained MQW CPM-DFB lasers produced a 55 mW output with a spectral linewidth of only 3.6 kHz.

  6. Enhanced production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using rice bran extracts by Lactobacillus sakei B2-16.

    PubMed

    Kook, Moo-Chang; Seo, Myung-Ji; Cheigh, Chan-Ick; Pyun, Yu-Ryang; Cho, Seok-Cheol; Park, Hoon

    2010-04-01

    An efficient and simple fermentation process was developed for the production of gamma-amminobutyric acid (GABA) by Lactobacillus sakei B2-16. When the L. sakei B2-16 was cultivated in the rice bran extracts medium containing 4% sucrose, 1% yeast extract and 12% monosodium glutamate, the maximum GABA concentration reached 660.0 mM with 100% conversion yield, showing the 2.4-fold higher GABA concentration compared to the modified MRS medium without the rice bran extracts. The GABA production was scaled-up from a laboratory scale (5 L) to a pilot (300 L) and a plant scales (5,000 L) to investigate the application possibility of GABA production to industrial fields. The GABA production at the pilot and plant scales was similar to the laboratory scale using rice bran extracts medium which could be effective for the low-cost production of GABA.

  7. Demonstration of correlations between the 8 and 10 kHz atmospherics and the inflammatory reaction of rats after carrageenan injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhenstroth-Bauer, Gerhard; Rösing, Olga; Baumer, Hans; Sönning, Walter; Lehmacher, Walter

    1988-09-01

    Between the mean daily density of 28 kHz atmospherics and the onset of epileptic fits there is a highly significant correlation coefficient ( r) of 0.30; there is a negative coefficient of -0.20 between the fits and the mean daily density of 10 kHz atmospherics. The onset of heart infarction is correlated with 28 kHz atmospherics ( r=0.15). Furthermore, we have discovered that sudden deafness is also correlated with certain configurations of atmospherics. In this paper we report the following correlation coefficients between the inflammatory reaction of rats to a carrageenan injection (rci) into a hind paw and the mean daily pulse rate of atmospherics of the same day: r=0.49 for the 8 kHz atmospherics ( P<0.02) and r=0.44 for the 10 kHz atmospherics ( P<0.04). The correlations between rci reaction and other atmospherics (12 and 28 kHz) are smaller and not significant. By the method of multiple linear regression we found a multiple R=0.54 between rci reaction and the 8 and 10 kHz atmospherics (the regression function for the rci reaction is 0.15+0.004×8 kHz+0.002×10 kHz, P<0.05).

  8. Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure

    DOEpatents

    Doehler, Joachim

    1994-12-20

    Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

  9. Effect of sweep angle on the pressure distributions and effectiveness of the ogee tip in diffusing a line vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcerak, J. C.; Feller, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Low-speed wind tunnel tests were conducted to study the influence of sweep angle on the pressure distributions of an ogee-tip configuration with relation to the effectiveness of the ogee tip in diffusing a line vortex. In addition to the pressure data, performance and flow-visualization data were obtained in the wind tunnel tests to evaluate the application of the ogee tip to aircraft configurations. The effect of sweep angle on the performance characteristics of a conventional-tip model, having equivalent planform area, was also investigated for comparison with the ogee-tip configuration. Results of the investigation generally indicate that sweep angle has little effect on the characteristics of the ogee in diffusing a line vortex.

  10. 20 kHz ultrasound assisted treatment of chronic wounds with concurrent optic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawiec, Christopher R.; Sunny, Youhan; Diaz, David; Nadkarni, Sumati; Weingarten, Michael S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Margolis, David J.; Zubkov, Leonid; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a novel, wearable, battery powered ultrasound applicator that was evaluated as a therapeutic tool for healing of chronic wounds, such as venous ulcers. The low frequency and low intensity (~100mW/cm2) applicator works by generating ultrasound waves with peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes of 55 kPa at 20 kHz. The device was used in a pilot human study (n=25) concurrently with remote optical (diffuse correlation spectroscopy - DCS) monitoring to assess the healing outcome. More specifically, the ulcers' healing status was determined by measuring tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the capillary network. This procedure facilitated an early prognosis of the treatment outcome and - once verified - may eventually enable customization of wound management. The outcome of the study shows that the healing patients of the ultrasound treated group had a statistically improved (p<0.05) average rate of wound healing (20.6%/week) compared to the control group (5.3%/week). In addition, the calculated blood flow index (BFI) decreased more rapidly in wounds that decreased in size, indicating a correlation between BFI and wound healing prediction. Overall, the results presented support the notion that active low frequency ultrasound treatment of chronic venous ulcers accelerates healing when combined with the current standard clinical care. The ultrasound applicator described here provides a user-friendly, fully wearable system that has the potential for becoming the first device suitable for treatment of chronic wounds in patient's homes, which - in turn - would increase patients' compliance and improve quality of life.

  11. Energy dependent time delays of kHz oscillations due to thermal Comptonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Misra, Ranjeev

    2014-12-01

    We study the energy dependent photon variability from a thermal Comptonizing plasma that is oscillating at kHz frequencies. In particular, we solve the linearized time-dependent Kompaneets equation and consider the oscillatory perturbation to be either in the soft photon source or in the heating rate of the plasma. For each case, we self consistently consider the energy balance of the plasma and the soft photon source. The model incorporates the possibility of a fraction of the Comptonized photons impinging back into the soft photon source. We find that when the oscillation is due to the soft photon source, the variation of the fractional root mean sqaure (rms) is nearly constant with energy and the time-lags are hard. However, for the case when the oscillation is due to variation in the heating rate of the corona, and when a significant fraction of the photons impinge back into the soft photon source, the rms increases with energy and the time-lags are soft. As an example, we compare the results with the ˜850 Hz oscillation observed on 1996 March 3 for 4U 1608-52 and show that both the observed soft time-lags as well as the rms versus energy can be well described by such a model where the size of the Comptonizing plasma is ˜1 km. Thus, modelling of the time-lags as due to Comptonization delays, can provide tight constraints on the size and geometry of the system. Detailed analysis would require well-constrained spectral parameters.

  12. Cationic gemini pyrrolidinium surfactants based sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography for simultaneous detection of nine organic pollutants in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Wei, Ran; Cai, Bo; Dong, Jinfeng; Deng, Bin; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2016-12-02

    A series of novel cationic gemini surfactants with pyrrolidinium head groups, 1,1'-(butane-1,s-alkyl) bis (1-alkylpyrrolidinium) (Cn-4-CnPB, n=12, 14, 16), were employed as carriers in sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) for simultaneous detection of nine organic water pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sulfonamides and steroids. The sweeping and separation conditions were optimized. Cn-4-CnPB (n=12, 14, 16) were compared with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in terms of their abilities to preconcentrate and separate the nine analytes. Under the optimized conditions, the sensitivity enhancement factors based on the peak height (SEFsHeight) were ca. 310-580 of C16-4-C16PB, which were higher than those of C14-4-C14PB (120-290) and C12-4-C12PB (110-160). Meanwhile, the SEFsHeight of C16-4-C16PB were higher than those of 30% (v/v) methanol-modified CTAB (140-320). The C16-4-C16PB based sweeping-MEKC, coupled with offline solid phase extraction and UV detection (228nm), was used to analyze spiked environmental water samples. The nine analytes were successfully separated and detected. The limit of detection (S/N=3) was in range of 2.79-3.76ng/mL, and the recovery ranged from 70.8% to 95.5% with the RSDs less than 9.89%. This study confirms that the C16-4-C16PB based sweeping-MEKC has significant advantages over the CTAB based sweeping-MEKC and it is a promising method for sensitive and simultaneous detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sulfonamides and steroids in environmental water samples.

  13. Broad-range self-sweeping of a narrow-line self-pulsing Yb-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Ivan A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.; Babin, Sergey A.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of broad-range (16 nm) self-sweeping of a narrow-line (less than 1 pm) Yb-doped fiber laser has been demonstrated experimentally. It is found that the effect arises from the self-sustained relaxation oscillations. As a result, the sweeping rate increases as square root of the laser power and decreases with increasing cavity length. Based on these results we propose a model describing dynamics of the laser frequency. The model takes into account the effects of gain saturation at the laser transition and spatial hole burning in the self-pulsing regime.

  14. Broad-range self-sweeping of a narrow-line self-pulsing Yb-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Ivan A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Podivilov, Evgeniy V; Babin, Sergey A

    2011-08-29

    The effect of broad-range (16 nm) self-sweeping of a narrow-line (less than 1 pm) Yb-doped fiber laser has been demonstrated experimentally. It is found that the effect arises from the self-sustained relaxation oscillations. As a result, the sweeping rate increases as square root of the laser power and decreases with increasing cavity length. Based on these results we propose a model describing dynamics of the laser frequency. The model takes into account the effects of gain saturation at the laser transition and spatial hole burning in the self-pulsing regime.

  15. Laryngeal flow due to longitudinal sweeping motion of the vocal folds and its contribution to auto-oscillation.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Henri; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of published depth-kymography data [George, de Mul, Qiu, Rakhorst, and Schutte (2008). Phys. Med. Biol. 53, 2667-2675] shows that, for the subject studied, the flow due to the longitudinal sweeping motion of the vocal folds contributes several percent of a typical acoustic flow at the larynx. This sweeping flow is a maximum when the glottis is closed. This observation suggests that assumption of zero laryngeal flow during the closed phase as a criterion when determining parameters in inverse filtering should be used with caution. Further, these data suggest that the swinging motion contributes work to overcome mechanical losses and thus to assist auto-oscillation.

  16. Unsteady Flow Simulation of a Sweeping Jet Actuator Using a Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, B.; Wessels, M.; Fares, E.; Vatsa, V.

    2016-01-01

    Active flow control technology is increasingly used in aerospace applications to control flow separation and to improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper, PowerFLOW is used to simulate the flow through a sweeping jet actuator at two different pressure ratios. The lower pressure ratio leads to a high subsonic flow, whereas the high pressure ratio produces a choked flow condition. Comparison of numerical results with experimental data is shown, which includes qualitatively good agreement of pressure histories and spectra. PIV measurements are also available but the simulation overestimates mean and fluctuation quantities outside the actuator. If supply pressure is matched at one point inside the mixing chamber a good qualitative agreement is achieved at all other monitor points.

  17. Phase lock acquisition for sampled data PLLs using the sweep technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre, S.; Brown, D. H.; Hurd, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Simulation results of the swept-acquisition performance of residual carrier phase-locked loops (PLLs) are reported. The loops investigated are sampled data counterparts of the continuous time type II and III loops currently in use in Deep Space Network receivers. It was found that sweep rates of 0.2 B(sub L)(2) to 0.4 B(sub L)(2) Hz/s can be used, depending on the loop parameters and loop signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), where B(sub L) is the one-sided loop noise bandwidth. Type III loops are shown to be not as reliable as type II loops for acquisition using this technique, especially at low SNRs.

  18. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Blowers, J.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-29

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s ramping rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0{sup 0} to 10{sup 0}, in steps of 1{sup 0}. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  19. A Genome-wide Scan for Selective Sweeps in Racing Horses

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sunjin; Lee, Jin Woo; Shin, Donghyun; Shin, Kwang-Yun; Kim, Jun; Choi, Ik-Young; Kim, Jaemin; Kim, Heebal

    2015-01-01

    Using next-generation sequencing, we conducted a genome-wide scan of selective sweeps associated with selection toward genetic improvement in Thoroughbreds. We investigated potential phenotypic consequence of putative candidate loci by candidate gene association mapping for the finishing time in 240 Thoroughbred horses. We found a significant association with the trait for Ral GApase alpha 2 (RALGAP2) that regulates a variety of cellular processes of signal trafficking. Neighboring genes around RALGAP2 included insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1), pallid (PLDN), and Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2) genes have similar roles in signal trafficking, suggesting that a co-evolving gene cluster located on the chromosome 22 is under strong artificial selection in racehorses. PMID:26333666

  20. Heat Sweep Analysis of Thermal Breakthrough at Los Humeros and La Primavera Fields, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, P.; Lam, S.; Molinar, R.; Aragon, A.

    1987-01-20

    Early evaluation of the potential for geothermal breakthrough of reinjected fluids in newly developed geothermal fields can be obtained with the SGP one-dimensional heat sweep model. The model was used to estimate fluid cooldown from wells selected for the first wellhead generating units to be installed at the Los Humeros and La Primavera geothermal fields in Mexico, based on staff-compiled geometric and geologic data, thermal properties of the reservoir rock, and expected production conditions. Geometric considerations were evaluated with respect to known and postulated fault zones and return flow angle of the reinjected fluid. The results show the range of parameter values that affect the rate of thermal breakthrough to an abandonment temperature of 170 ºC corresponding to the minimum inlet pressure to the CFE 5-MW wellhead generator units. 9 figs., 4 tabs., 11 refs.

  1. The uranium-Xylidyl Blue I complex and its application in linear sweep polarography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Cai, X; Li, P

    1987-09-01

    The linear sweep polarographic wave of the uranium-Xylidyl Blue I complex in ethylenediamine-1,10-phenanthroline-hydrochloric acid medium has been studied. The complex, corresponding to UO(2)(XBI)(2-)(2) with log beta' = 9.09 (by polarography), 8.81 (by spectrophotometry), is strongly adsorbed on the surface of the mercury electrode. The polarographic wave is attributed to the reduction of Xylidyl Blue I in the complex. The method is very sensitive with a detection limit of 3 x 10(-8)M. The wave height is proportional to the concentration of uranium over the range 8 x 10(-8)-7 x 10(-6)M. Solvent extraction is used to separate possible interferences. The recommended procedure has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of uranium in ores.

  2. Selective sweep on human amylase genes postdates the split with Neanderthals

    PubMed Central

    Inchley, Charlotte E.; Larbey, Cynthia D. A.; Shwan, Nzar A. A.; Pagani, Luca; Saag, Lauri; Antão, Tiago; Jacobs, Guy; Hudjashov, Georgi; Metspalu, Ene; Mitt, Mario; Eichstaedt, Christina A.; Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Wee, Joseph; Abdullah, Syafiq; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Mormina, Maru; Mägi, Reedik; Villems, Richard; Metspalu, Mait; Jones, Martin K.; Armour, John A. L.; Kivisild, Toomas

    2016-01-01

    Humans have more copies of amylase genes than other primates. It is still poorly understood, however, when the copy number expansion occurred and whether its spread was enhanced by selection. Here we assess amylase copy numbers in a global sample of 480 high coverage genomes and find that regions flanking the amylase locus show notable depression of genetic diversity both in African and non-African populations. Analysis of genetic variation in these regions supports the model of an early selective sweep in the human lineage after the split of humans from Neanderthals which led to the fixation of multiple copies of AMY1 in place of a single copy. We find evidence of multiple secondary losses of copy number with the highest frequency (52%) of a deletion of AMY2A and associated low copy number of AMY1 in Northeast Siberian populations whose diet has been low in starch content. PMID:27853181

  3. Surfaces Relief Profilometry of Solid Objects by Sweeping of a Laser Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Peimbert, Didia P.; Trujillo-Schiaffino, Gerardo; Mendoza-Villegas, Paloma G.; Ojeda-González, Daniel; Almazán-Cuellar, Saúl; Corral-Martínez, Luis F.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a laser system for the digitalization and three-dimensional reconstruction of solid objects. The first step consists of applying on the object a linear sweeping of a thin laser line using a laser diode with 635 nm and 5 mW, a motorized stage for linear displacement of 138 mm, and a controller with RS232 interface. The next step consists of capturing and transmitting the image of the deformed line on the object to a computer. For this step was used a monochrome camera CCD, and an image acquisition board. The last step consists of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the solid object. All the corresponding algorithms were implemented using the programming language LabVIEW.

  4. Fluid Diversion and Sweep Improvement with Chemical Gels in Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.; Martin, F.D.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes progress made during the second year of the three-year project, Fluid diversion and Sweep Improvement with Chemical Gels in Oil Recovery Processes.'' The objectives of this project are to identify the mechanisms by which gel treatments divert fluids in reservoirs and to establish where and how gel treatments are best applied. Several different types of gelants are being examined. This research is directed at gel applications in water injection wells, in production wells, and in high-pressure gasfloods. The work examines how the flow properties of gels and gelling agents are influenced by permeability, lithology, and wettability. Other goals include determining the proper placement of gelants, the stability of in-place gels, and the types of gels required for the various oil recovery processes and for different scales of reservoir heterogeneity. 93 refs., 39 figs., 43 tabs.

  5. Digitally Calibrated TR Modules Enabling Real-Time Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Veilleux, Louse A.; Peral, Eva; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Shaffer, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    SweepSAR, a novel radar architecture that depends on a DBF (digital beamforming) array, requires calibration accuracies that are order(s) of magnitude greater than is possible with traditional techniques, such as a priori characterization of TR (transmit/receive) modules in thermal vacuum chambers, or simple loop-back of the calibration signal. The advantages of a SweepSAR architecture are so great that it is worth applying significant resources to calibration efforts. Due to the nature of the DBF, each channel contains a digitizer and very powerful digital processor. Each channel can independently digitize (with the digitizer) and analyze (with the processor) its channel's unique calibration signal, and extract the relevant calibration parameters, namely channel gain and channel phase delay commonly referred to as the gain (or amplitude) and phase of the channel. Using the processor, each channel's gain and phase can theoretically be estimated with arbitrary precision through averaging a sufficiently large number of samples. Systematic errors and the changing gain and phase of the channels, typically due to temperature drifts, limits how long the averaging can occur, which limits the precision of the calibration estimate. However, results indicate that calibration knowledge of both the transmit and receive chains of each TR module can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude. Due to the digital nature of the receiver data, the channel's gain and phase may be corrected by a similar amount, while the transmit chain can only be corrected in a traditional manner. To implement Sweep SAR, the order of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the channel's gain and phase is needed, and the control of the receiver to a similar level is required. Inherent to the DBF array is the individual digitization of each of the array's receiver channels. Current systems typically combine all of the analog signals in the array into one or two analog channels, which are then

  6. Fast sweep-rate plastic Faraday force magnetometer with simultaneous sample temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Slobinsky, D; Borzi, R A; Mackenzie, A P; Grigera, S A

    2012-12-01

    We present a design for a magnetometer capable of operating at temperatures down to 50 mK and magnetic fields up to 15 T with integrated sample temperature measurement. Our design is based on the concept of a Faraday force magnetometer with a load-sensing variable capacitor. A plastic body allows for fast sweep rates and sample temperature measurement, and the possibility of regulating the initial capacitance simplifies the initial bridge balancing. Under moderate gradient fields of ~1 T/m our prototype performed with a resolution better than 1 × 10(-5) emu. The magnetometer can be operated either in a dc mode, or in an oscillatory mode which allows the determination of the magnetic susceptibility. We present measurements on Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7) and Sr(3)Ru(2)O(7) as an example of its performance.

  7. A Generalized Fast Frequency Sweep Algorithm for Coupled Circuit-EM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rockway, J D; Champagne, N J; Sharpe, R M; Fasenfest, B

    2004-01-14

    Frequency domain techniques are popular for analyzing electromagnetics (EM) and coupled circuit-EM problems. These techniques, such as the method of moments (MoM) and the finite element method (FEM), are used to determine the response of the EM portion of the problem at a single frequency. Since only one frequency is solved at a time, it may take a long time to calculate the parameters for wideband devices. In this paper, a fast frequency sweep based on the Asymptotic Wave Expansion (AWE) method is developed and applied to generalized mixed circuit-EM problems. The AWE method, which was originally developed for lumped-load circuit simulations, has recently been shown to be effective at quasi-static and low frequency full-wave simulations. Here it is applied to a full-wave MoM solver, capable of solving for metals, dielectrics, and coupled circuit-EM problems.

  8. Dynamics and morphology development in electrospun fibers driven by concentration sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratyush; Kyu, Thein

    2007-10-01

    The present article describes the modeling and simulation of the dynamics of the electrospinning process coupled with the spatio-temporal evolution of fiber morphology driven by concentration sweeps. The electrospinning process has been modeled based on an array of beads connected by Maxwell's elements in a cylindrical shell to describe the force balance between Coulombic and viscoelastic forces at the surface of the jet. The phase separation dynamics has been calculated in the framework of the Cahn-Hilliard time-evolution equation by incorporating Flory-Huggins free energy for liquid-liquid demixing in conjunction with solvent evaporation through the fiber surface. The simulations based on the coupling of these two processes have revealed in situ morphology development registering all structural forming processes such as polymer droplets, interconnected spinodal structure, and the porous structure along the spinline. The simulated porous fiber shows a striking resemblance to the experimental finding.

  9. A single-sweep, nanosecond time resolution laser temperature-jump apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballew, R. M.; Sabelko, J.; Reiner, C.; Gruebele, M.

    1996-10-01

    We describe a fast temperature-jump (T-jump) apparatus capable of acquiring kinetic relaxation transients via real-time fluorescence detection over a time interval from nanoseconds to milliseconds in a single sweep. The method is suitable for aqueous solutions, relying upon the direct absorption of laser light by the bulk water. This obviates the need for additives (serving as optical or conductive heaters) that may interact with the sample under investigation. The longitudinal temperature profile is made uniform by counterpropagating heating pulses. Dead time is limited to one period of the probe laser (16 ns). The apparatus response is tested with aqueous tryptophan and the diffusion-controlled dimerization of proflavine.

  10. The simulative calculation and optimum design for FOA, the purge gas sweeping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liquan; Jing, Yukun; Feng, Bing; Li, Fuquan; Xiang, Yong; Han, Wei; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    This paper first studies the structure effect law in order to design a reasonable option in theory for the Final Optics Assembly(FOA)' harmonic converter module, involved in the design of the fluid theory, including the basic equations of fluid motion, the form of fluid motion and fluid movement in the small hole. Optimizing the structure need to be applied to the simulation software, which requires the Fluent simulation principle. Then, combined with theoretical knowledge to design the overall structure of the multiplier module, It will apply the simulation software to optimize structural parameters of the board and use control system to realize it for verifying the law obtained by simulation under various conditions whether consistent with the law in actual work of the sweeping system.

  11. Landau-Zener sweeps and sudden quenches in coupled Bose-Hubbard chains.

    PubMed

    Kasztelan, C; Trotzky, S; Chen, Y-A; Bloch, I; McCulloch, I P; Schollwöck, U; Orso, G

    2011-04-15

    We simulate numerically the dynamics of strongly correlated bosons in a two-leg ladder subject to a time-dependent energy bias between the two chains. When all atoms are initially in the leg with higher energy, we find a drastic reduction of the interchain particle transfer for slow linear sweeps, in quantitative agreement with recent experiments. This effect is preceded by a rapid broadening of the quasimomentum distribution of atoms, signaling the presence of a bath of low-energy excitations in the chains. We further investigate the scenario of quantum quenches to fixed values of the energy bias. We find that for a large enough density the momentum distribution relaxes to that of an equilibrium thermal state with the same energy.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Paul Willhite; Don W. Green; Stan McCool; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2004-02-01

    The objectives of the research are to improve the effectiveness of polymer gels to increase volumetric sweep efficiency of fluid displacement processes and to reduce water production in production wells. The research is based on experimental data and conceptual and mathematical models developed from interpretation of experimental data. This report describes two types of mathematical models that were developed. One model type simulates the chemical reactions where polymer molecules are crosslinked to form a 3-dimensional network or gel. The model is based on statistical probabilities of reactions and yields molecular weights averages and distributions as functions of conversion. The second model type simulates the transport of chromium acetate, a common polymer crosslinker, through porous dolomite rock and includes the mechanisms of dolomite dissolution and chromium precipitation. The chromium transport model reasonably agreed with experimental data.

  13. Planetesimal formation via sweep-up growth at the inner edge of dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drążkowska, J.; Windmark, F.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The early stages of planet formation are still not well understood. Coagulation models have revealed numerous obstacles to the dust growth, such as the bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift barriers. Gas drag causes rapid loss, and turbulence leads to generally destructive collisions between the dust aggregates. Aims: We study the interplay between dust coagulation and drift to determine the conditions in protoplanetary disk that support the formation of planetesimals. We focus on planetesimal formation via sweep-up and investigate whether it can take place in a realistic protoplanetary disk. Methods: We have developed a new numerical model that resolves the spatial distribution of dust in the radial and vertical dimensions. The model uses representative particles approach to follow the dust evolution in a protoplanetary disk. The coagulation and fragmentation of solids is taken into account in the Monte Carlo method. A collision model adopting the mass transfer effect, which can occur for different-sized dust aggregate collisions, is implemented. We focus on a protoplanetary disk that includes a pressure bump caused by a steep decline of turbulent viscosity around the snow line. Results: Our results show that high enough resolution of the vertical disk structure in dust coagulation codes is needed to obtain adequately short growth timescales, especially in the case of a low turbulence region. We find that a sharp radial variation in the turbulence strength at the inner edge of dead zone promotes planetesimal formation in several ways. It provides a pressure bump that efficiently prevents the dust from drifting inwards. It also causes a radial variation in the size of aggregates at which growth barriers occur, favoring the growth of large aggregates by sweeping up of small particles. In our model, by employing an ad hoc α viscosity change near the snow line, it is possible to grow planetesimals by incremental growth on timescales of approximately 105

  14. Sweep-up growth at the inner edge of dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazkowska, Joanna; Windmark, Fredrik; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2013-07-01

    Planetesimal formation is still not understood. Coagulation models have revealed numerous obstacles to the dust growth. One of them is the bouncing barrier. The growth of small dust grains was shown to be completely halted already for cm-sized silicate particles. This barrier can be actually beneficial to the growth. When a limited number of grains is inserted into a population halted by the bouncing, growth to planetesimal sizes is possible. This is because as long as a collision between two big particles generally leads to fragmentation, a collision involving non-equal sized aggregates can lead to growth via so-called fragmentation with mass transfer. The origin of the first seeds is a problem for this scenario. We propose a new method of providing the seeds. We find that a steep radial variation in the turbulence efficiency that takes place at the inner edge of a dead zone, promotes planetesimal formation via sweep-up in several ways. It provides a pressure trap that saves the dust from the radial drift barrier. It also causes a change in the maximum size of aggregates at which growth barriers occur. The seeds can grow in the dead zone, where the bouncing barrier occurs for larger grains, and then be delivered by radial mixing to the MRI active region, where the growth via sweep-up occurs. In the presented model, which is employing an ad hoc turbulent viscosity change near the snow line, it is possible to grow planetesimals by incremental growth on timescales relevant for planet formation.

  15. Dealloying NiCo and NiCoCu Alloy Thin Films Using Linear Sweep Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peecher, Benjamin; Hampton, Jennifer

    When electrodeposited into thin films, metals have well-known electrochemical potentials at which they will be removed from the film. These potential differences can be utilized to re-oxidize only certain metals in an alloy, altering the film's structure and composition. Here we discuss NiCo and NiCoCu thin films' response to linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) as a means of electrochemical dealloying. For each of four different metal ratios, films were dealloyed to various potentials in order to gain insight into the evolution of the film over the course of the LSV. Capacitance, topography, and composition were examined for each sample before and after linear sweep voltammetry was performed. For NiCo films with high percentages of Ni, dealloying resulted in almost no change in composition, but did result in an increased capacitance, with greater increases occurring at higher LSV potentials. Dealloying also resulted in the appearance of large (100-1000 nm) pores on the surface of the film. For NiCoCu films with high percentages of Ni, Cu was almost completely removed from the film at LSV potentials greater than 500 mV. The LSV first removed larger copper-rich dendrites from the film's surface before creating numerous nano-pores, resulting in a net increase in area. This work is supported by an Award to Hope College from the HHMI Undergraduate Science Education Program, the Hope College Department of Physics Frissel Research Fund, and the National Science Foundation under Grants RUI-DMR-1104725 and MRI-CHE-0959282.

  16. Acceleration of groundwater remediation by deep sweeps and vortex ejections induced by rapidly pulsed pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, David M.; Kabala, Zbigniew J.

    2016-05-01

    One key limiting factor to groundwater remediation is contaminant sequestered in pores whose contents do not mix well with the bulk flow. Mixing between well-connected (pores whose volume is flushed as water flows through the aquifer) and poorly connected pores (pores whose volume does not exchange readily when water flows through the aquifer) is of primary concern. Under steady flow, contaminants are effectively trapped in the poorly connected pores and are transferred only by molecular diffusion. This slow mixing process between pore types is a bottleneck to remediation. We present a novel rapidly pulsed pumping method that increases the mixing between these pore types. We do it in the context of pump-and-treat remediation because it is the most common remediation practice. In rapidly pulsed pumping, the increase in flow causes a deep sweep, which pushes the flow into poorly connected pores and sweeps out sequestered contaminants. The decrease in flow causes a vortex ejection, which causes the vortex within the poorly connected pore to emerge with contaminant. These actions are modeled with computational fluid mechanics to elucidate the individual mechanisms and determine how they function and interact. Cleanup of single and multiple poorly connected pore systems were simulated and show the acceleration possible. This technique can decrease the time and cost needed to remediate contaminated aquifers, which in the United States has been estimated to exceed $1 trillion. Since our rapidly pulsed pumping method enhances mixing between well-connected and poorly connected pores, it can be applied to other remediation schemes such as in situ methods.

  17. Population Parameters Underlying an Ongoing Soft Sweep in Southeast Asian Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Timothy J.C.; Nair, Shalini; McDew-White, Marina; Cheeseman, Ian H.; Nkhoma, Standwell; Bilgic, Fatma; McGready, Rose; Ashley, Elizabeth; Pyae Phyo, Aung; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, François

    2017-01-01

    Multiple kelch13 alleles conferring artemisinin resistance (ART-R) are currently spreading through Southeast Asian malaria parasite populations, providing a unique opportunity to observe an ongoing soft selective sweep, investigate why resistance alleles have evolved multiple times and determine fundamental population genetic parameters for Plasmodium. We sequenced kelch13 (n = 1,876), genotyped 75 flanking SNPs, and measured clearance rate (n = 3,552) in parasite infections from Western Thailand (2001–2014). We describe 32 independent coding mutations including common mutations outside the kelch13 propeller associated with significant reductions in clearance rate. Mutations were first observed in 2003 and rose to 90% by 2014, consistent with a selection coefficient of ∼0.079. ART-R allele diversity rose until 2012 and then dropped as one allele (C580Y) spread to high frequency. The frequency with which adaptive alleles arise is determined by the rate of mutation and the population size. Two factors drive this soft sweep: (1) multiple kelch13 amino-acid mutations confer resistance providing a large mutational target—we estimate the target is 87–163 bp. (2) The population mutation parameter (Θ = 2Neμ) can be estimated from the frequency distribution of ART-R alleles and is ∼5.69, suggesting that short term effective population size is 88 thousand to 1.2 million. This is 52–705 times greater than Ne estimated from fluctuation in allele frequencies, suggesting that we have previously underestimated the capacity for adaptive evolution in Plasmodium. Our central conclusions are that retrospective studies may underestimate the complexity of selective events and the Ne relevant for adaptation for malaria is considerably higher than previously estimated. PMID:28025270

  18. Electrophoretic concentration and sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography analysis of cationic drugs in water samples.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-07-03

    Sample preparation by electrophoretic concentration, followed by analysis using sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography, was studied as a green and simple analytical strategy for the trace analysis of cationic drugs in water samples. Electrophoretic concentration was conducted using 50 mmol/L ammonium acetate at pH 5 as acceptor electrolyte. Electrophoretic concentration was performed at 1.0 kV for 50 min and 0.5 kV and 15 min for purified and 10-fold diluted waste water samples, respectively. Sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography was with 100 mmol/L sodium phosphate at pH 2, 100 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate and 27.5%-v/v acetonitrile as separation electrolyte. The separation voltage was -20 kV, UV-detection was at 200 nm, and the acidified concentrate was injected for 36 s at 1 bar (or 72% of the total capillary length, 60 cm). Both purified water and 10-fold diluted waste water exhibited a linear range of two orders of concentration magnitude. The coefficient of determination, and intra- and interday repeatability were 0.991-0.997, 2.5-6.2, and 4.4-9.7%RSD (n=6), respectively, for purified water. The values were 0.991-0.997, 3.4-7.1, and 8.7-9.8%RSD (n=6), correspondingly, for 10-fold diluted waste water. The method detection limit was in the range from 0.04-0.09 to 1.20-6.97 ng/mL for purified and undiluted waste water, respectively.

  19. Copy number variants and selective sweeps in natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Bryk, Jarosław; Tautz, Diethard

    2014-01-01

    Copy–number variants (CNVs) may play an important role in early adaptations, potentially facilitating rapid divergence of populations. We describe an approach to study this question by investigating CNVs present in natural populations of mice in the early stages of divergence and their involvement in selective sweeps. We have analyzed individuals from two recently diverged natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) from Germany and France using custom, high–density, comparative genome hybridization arrays (CGH) that covered almost 164 Mb and 2444 genes. One thousand eight hundred and sixty one of those genes we previously identified as differentially expressed between these populations, while the expression of the remaining genes was invariant. In total, we identified 1868 CNVs across all 10 samples, 200 bp to 600 kb in size and affecting 424 genic regions. Roughly two thirds of all CNVs found were deletions. We found no enrichment of CNVs among the differentially expressed genes between the populations compared to the invariant ones, nor any meaningful correlation between CNVs and gene expression changes. Among the CNV genes, we found cellular component gene ontology categories of the synapse overrepresented among all the 2444 genes tested. To investigate potential adaptive significance of the CNV regions, we selected six that showed large differences in frequency of CNVs between the two populations and analyzed variation in at least two microsatellites surrounding the loci in a sample of 46 unrelated animals from the same populations collected in field trappings. We identified two loci with large differences in microsatellite heterozygosity (Sfi1 and Glo1/Dnahc8 regions) and one locus with low variation across the populations (Cmah), thus suggesting that these genomic regions might have recently undergone selective sweeps. Interestingly, the Glo1 CNV has previously been implicated in anxiety–like behavior in mice, suggesting a

  20. Mine detection performance comparison between manual sweeping and tele-operated robotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herman; Higgins, Todd; Falmier, Olga; Valois, Jean-Sebastien; McMahill, Jeff

    2010-04-01

    Mine detection is a dangerous and physically demanding task that is very well-suited for robotic applications. In the experiment described in this paper, we try to determine whether a remotely-operated robotic mine detection system equipped with a hand-held mine detector can match the performance of a human equipped with a hand-held mine detector. To achieve this objective, we developed the Robotic Mine Sweeper (RMS). The RMS platform is capable of accurately sweeping and mapping mine lanes using common detectors, such as the Minelab F3 Mine Detector or the AN/PSS-14. The RMS is fully remote controlled from a safe distance by a laptop via a redundant wireless connection link. Data collected from the mine detector and various sensors mounted on the robot are transmitted and logged in real-time to the remote user interface and simultaneously graphically displayed. In addition, a stereo color camera mounted on top of the robot sends a live picture of the terrain. The system plays audio feedback from the detector to further enhance the user's situational awareness. The user is trained to drag and drop various icons onto the user interface map to locate mines and non-mine clutter objects. We ran experiments with the RMS to compare its detection and false alarm rates with those obtained when the user physically sweeps the detectors in the field. The results of two trials: one with the Minelab F3, the other with the Cyterra AN/PSS-14 are presented here.

  1. An angularly refineable phase space finite element method with approximate sweeping procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kophazi, J.; Lathouwers, D.

    2013-07-01

    An angularly refineable phase space finite element method is proposed to solve the neutron transport equation. The method combines the advantages of two recently published schemes. The angular domain is discretized into small patches and patch-wise discontinuous angular basis functions are restricted to these patches, i.e. there is no overlap between basis functions corresponding to different patches. This approach yields block diagonal Jacobians with small block size and retains the possibility for S{sub n}-like approximate sweeping of the spatially discontinuous elements in order to provide efficient preconditioners for the solution procedure. On the other hand, the preservation of the full FEM framework (as opposed to collocation into a high-order S{sub n} scheme) retains the possibility of the Galerkin interpolated connection between phase space elements at arbitrary levels of discretization. Since the basis vectors are not orthonormal, a generalization of the Riemann procedure is introduced to separate the incoming and outgoing contributions in case of unstructured meshes. However, due to the properties of the angular discretization, the Riemann procedure can be avoided at a large fraction of the faces and this fraction rapidly increases as the level of refinement increases, contributing to the computational efficiency. In this paper the properties of the discretization scheme are studied with uniform refinement using an iterative solver based on the S{sub 2} sweep order of the spatial elements. The fourth order convergence of the scalar flux is shown as anticipated from earlier schemes and the rapidly decreasing fraction of required Riemann faces is illustrated. (authors)

  2. Study of pre-seismic kHz EM emissions by means of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    The field of study of complex systems holds that the dynamics of complex systems are founded on universal principles that may used to describe disparate problems ranging from particle physics to economies of societies. A corollary is that transferring ideas and results from investigators in hitherto disparate areas will cross-fertilize and lead to important new results. It is well-known that the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics works best in dealing with systems composed of either independent subsystems or interacting via short-range forces, and whose subsystems can access all the available phase space. For systems exhibiting long-range correlations, memory, or fractal properties, non-extensive Tsallis statistical mechanics becomes the most appropriate mathematical framework. As it was mentioned a central property of the magnetic storm, solar flare, and earthquake preparation process is the possible occurrence of coherent large-scale collective with a very rich structure, resulting from the repeated nonlinear interactions among collective with a very rich structure, resulting from the repeated nonlinear interactions among its constituents. Consequently, the non-extensive statistical mechanics is an appropriate regime to investigate universality, if any, in magnetic storm, solar flare, earthquake and pre-failure EM emission occurrence. A model for earthquake dynamics coming from a non-extensive Tsallis formulation, starting from first principles, has been recently introduced. This approach leads to a Gutenberg-Richter type law for the magnitude distribution of earthquakes which provides an excellent fit to seismicities generated in various large geographic areas usually identified as "seismic regions". We examine whether the Gutenberg-Richter law corresponding to a non-extensive Tsallis statistics is able to describe the distribution of amplitude of earthquakes, pre-seismic kHz EM emissions (electromagnetic earthquakes), solar flares, and magnetic storms. The

  3. Operation and beam profiling of an up to 200 kHz pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C. Den Hartog, D. J.

    2014-11-15

    A new, high-repetition rate laser is in development for use on the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The laser has been tested at a rate of 200 kHz in a pulse-burst operation, producing bursts of 5 pulses above 1.5 J each, while capable of bursts of 17 pulses at 100 kHz. A master oscillator-power amplifier architecture is used with a Nd:YVO{sub 4} oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifiers, and a Nd:glass amplifier. A radial profile over the pulse sequence is measured by using a set of graphite apertures and an energy meter, showing a change in beam quality over a pulsing sequence.

  4. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz.

  5. A 1.6-kW, 110-kHz dc-dc converter optimized for IGBT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Keming; Stuart, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    A full bridge dc-dc converter using a zero-current and zero-voltage switching technique is described. This circuit utilizes the characteristics of the IGBT to achieve power and frequency combinations that are much higher than previously reported for this device. Experimental results are included for a 1.6-kW, 110-kHz converter with 95 percent efficiency.

  6. Combinations of corn glutel meal, clove oil, and sweep cultivation are ineffective for weed control in organic peanut production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic peanut is difficult and lack of residual weed control complicates weed management efforts. Weed management systems using corn gluten meal in combination with clove oil and sweep cultivation were evaluated in a series of irrigated field trials. Corn gluten meal applied in a ...

  7. On the single sweep processing of auditory brainstem responses: click vs. chirp stimulations and active vs. passive electrodes.

    PubMed

    Corona-Strauss, Farah I; Delb, Wolfgang; Bloching, Marc; Strauss, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    We have recently shown that click evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) single sweeps can efficiently be processed by a hybrid novelty detection system. This approach allowed for the objective detection of hearing thresholds in a fraction of time of conventional schemes, making it appropriate for the efficient implementation of newborn hearing screening procedures. It is the objective of this study to evaluate whether this approach might further be improved by different stimulation paradigms and electrode settings. In particular, we evaluate chirp stimulations which compensate the basilar-membrane dispersion and active electrodes which are less sensitive to movements. This is the first study which is directed to a single sweep processing of chirp evoked ABRs. By concentrating on transparent features and a minimum number of adjustable parameters, we present an objective comparison of click vs.chirp stimulations and active vs. passive electrodes in the ultrafast ABR detection. We show that chirp evoked brainstem responses and active electrodes might improve the single sweeps analysis of ABRs.Consequently, we conclude that a single sweep processing of ABRs for the objective determination of hearing thresholds can further be improved by the use of optimized chirp stimulations and active electrodes.

  8. From Sweeping to the Caress: Similarities and Discrepancies between Human and Non-Human Primates’ Pleasant Touch

    PubMed Central

    Grandi, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Affective touch plays a key role in affiliative behavior, offering a mechanism for the formation and maintenance of social bonds among conspecifics, both in humans and non-human primates. Furthermore, it has been speculated that the CT fiber system is a specific coding channel for affiliative touch that occurs during skin-to-skin interactions with conspecifics. In humans, this touch is commonly referred to as the caress, and its correlation with the CT fiber system has been widely demonstrated. It has been hypothesized that the sweeping touch that occurs during grooming in non-human primates may modulate the CT fibers, with recent preliminary studies on rhesus monkeys supporting this hypothesis. The present mini-review proposes a comparison between the pleasant touch, caress and sweeping of humans and non-human primates, respectively. The currently available data was therefore reviewed regarding (i) the correlation between pleasant touch and CT fibers both in humans and non-human primates, (ii) the autonomic effects, (iii) the encoding at the central nervous system, (iv) the development from early life to adulthood, and (v) the potential applications of pleasant touch in the daily lives of both humans and non-human primates. Moreover, by considering both the similarities and discrepancies between the human caress and non-human primate sweeping, a possible evolutionary mechanism can be proposed that has developed from sweeping as a utilitarian action with affiliative meaning among monkeys, to the caress as a purely affective gesture associated with humans. PMID:27660620

  9. From Sweeping to the Caress: Similarities and Discrepancies between Human and Non-Human Primates' Pleasant Touch.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Affective touch plays a key role in affiliative behavior, offering a mechanism for the formation and maintenance of social bonds among conspecifics, both in humans and non-human primates. Furthermore, it has been speculated that the CT fiber system is a specific coding channel for affiliative touch that occurs during skin-to-skin interactions with conspecifics. In humans, this touch is commonly referred to as the caress, and its correlation with the CT fiber system has been widely demonstrated. It has been hypothesized that the sweeping touch that occurs during grooming in non-human primates may modulate the CT fibers, with recent preliminary studies on rhesus monkeys supporting this hypothesis. The present mini-review proposes a comparison between the pleasant touch, caress and sweeping of humans and non-human primates, respectively. The currently available data was therefore reviewed regarding (i) the correlation between pleasant touch and CT fibers both in humans and non-human primates, (ii) the autonomic effects, (iii) the encoding at the central nervous system, (iv) the development from early life to adulthood, and (v) the potential applications of pleasant touch in the daily lives of both humans and non-human primates. Moreover, by considering both the similarities and discrepancies between the human caress and non-human primate sweeping, a possible evolutionary mechanism can be proposed that has developed from sweeping as a utilitarian action with affiliative meaning among monkeys, to the caress as a purely affective gesture associated with humans.

  10. The influence of sweep on the aerodynamic loading of an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.hilaire, A. O.; Carta, F. O.; Fink, M. R.; Jepson, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    Aerodynamic experiments were performed on an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil utilizing a tunnel-spanning wing in both unswept and 30 degree swept configurations. The airfoil was tested in steady state and in oscillatory pitch about the quarter chord. The unsteady aerodynamic loading was measured using pressure transducers along the chord. Numerical integrations of the unsteady pressure transducer responses were used to compute the normal force, chord force, and moment components of the induced loading. The effects of sweep on the induced aerodynamic load response was examined. For the range of parameters tested, it was found that sweeping the airfoil tends to delay the onset of dynamic stall. Sweeping was also found to reduce the magnitude of the unsteady load variation about the mean response. It was determined that at mean incidence angles greater than 9 degrees, sweep tends to reduce the stability margin of the NACA 0012 airfoil; however, for all cases tested, the airfoil was found to be stable in pure pitch. Turbulent eddies were found to convect downstream above the upper surface and generate forward-moving acoustic waves at the trailing edge which move upstream along the lower surface.

  11. Steady-state and dynamic characteristics of a 20-kHz spacecraft power system - Control of harmonic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasynczuk, O.; Krause, P. C.; Biess, J. J.; Kapustka, R.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed computer simulation was used to illustrate the steady-state and dynamic operating characteristics of a 20-kHz resonant spacecraft power system. The simulated system consists of a parallel-connected set of DC-inductor resonant inverters (drivers), a 440-V cable, a node transformer, a 220-V cable, and a transformer-rectifier-filter (TRF) AC-to-DC receiver load. Also included in the system are a 1-kW 0.8-pf RL load and a double-LC filter connected at the receiving end of the 20-kHz AC system. The detailed computer simulation was used to illustrate the normal steady-state operating characteristics and the dynamic system performance following, for example, TRF startup. It is shown that without any filtering the given system exhibits harmonic resonances due to an interaction between the switching of the source and/or load converters and the AC system. However, the double-LC filter at the receiving-end of the AC system and harmonic traps connected in series with each of the drivers significantly reduce the harmonic distortion of the 20-kHz bus voltage. Significant additional improvement in the waveform quality can be achieved by including a double-LC filter with each driver.

  12. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimension without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.

  13. High-anxiety rats are less sensitive to the rewarding affects of amphetamine on 50kHz USV.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Małgorzata H; Taracha, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Jacek; Sobolewska, Alicja; Turzyńska, Danuta; Skórzewska, Anna; Płaźnik, Adam

    2014-12-15

    This study assessed behaviour, as measured by 50kHz calls related to positive affect, in rats with different fear conditioned response strengths: low-anxiety rats (LR) and high-anxiety rats (HR), after amphetamine injection in a two-injection protocol (TIPS). The results showed that the first dose of amphetamine evoked similar behavioural effects in frequency-modulated (FM) 50kHz calls in the LR and HR groups. The second injection of amphetamine resulted in stronger FM 50kHz calls in LR compared with HR rats. The biochemical data ('ex vivo' analysis) showed that the LR rats had increased basal levels of dopamine in the amygdala, and increased homovanilic acid (HVA), dopamine's main metabolite, in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex compared with HR rats. The 'in vivo' analysis (microdialysis study) showed that the LR rats had increased HVA concentrations in the basolateral amygdala in response to an aversively conditioned context. Research has suggested that differences in dopaminergic system activity in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex may be one of the biological factors that underlie individual differences in response to fear stimuli, which may also affect the rewarding effects of amphetamine.

  14. Conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (kHz) non-symmetric biphasic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Frankenhaeuser–Huxley axonal model to analyze the effects of non-symmetric waveforms on conduction block of myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (10–300 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. The results predict a monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency for symmetric waveform and a non-monotonic relationship for non-symmetric waveforms. The symmetric waveform causes conduction block by constantly activating both sodium and potassium channels at frequencies of 20–300 kHz, while the non-symmetric waveforms share the same blocking mechanism from 20 kHz up to the peak threshold frequency. At the frequencies above the peak threshold frequency the non-symmetric waveforms block axonal conduction by either hyperpolarizing the membrane (if the positive pulse is longer) or depolarizing the membrane (if the negative pulse is longer). This simulation study further increases our understanding of conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical stimulation, and can guide future animal experiments as well as optimize stimulation parameters that might be used for electrically induced nerve block in clinical applications. PMID:26217217

  15. 20 kHz toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of a jet in nearly sonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. A.; Troutman, V. A.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript describes continuous, high-repetition-rate (20 kHz) toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in an expansion tube impulse flow facility. Cinematographic image sequences are acquired that visualize an underexpanded jet of hydrogen in Mach 0.9 crossflow, a practical flow configuration relevant to aerospace propulsion systems. The freestream gas is nitrogen seeded with toluene; toluene broadly absorbs and fluoresces in the ultraviolet, and the relatively high quantum yield of toluene produces large signals and high signal-to-noise ratios. Toluene is excited using a commercially available, frequency-quadrupled (266 nm), high-repetition-rate (20 kHz), pulsed (0.8-0.9 mJ per pulse), diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YAG laser, and fluorescence is imaged with a high-repetition-rate intensifier and CMOS camera. The resulting PLIF movie and image sequences are presented, visualizing the jet start-up process and the dynamics of the jet in crossflow; the freestream duration and a measure of freestream momentum flux steadiness are also inferred. This work demonstrates progress toward continuous PLIF imaging of practical flow systems in impulse facilities at kHz acquisition rates using practical, turn-key, high-speed laser and imaging systems.

  16. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    DOE PAGES

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; ...

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimensionmore » without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.« less

  17. Processes involved in sweeping as sample enrichment method in cyclodextrin-modified micellar electrokinetic chromatography of hydrophobic basic analytes.

    PubMed

    El-Awady, Mohamed; Pyell, Ute

    2014-03-01

    Sweeping is an enrichment method in MEKC, which includes following steps: stacking/destacking of the micelles, sweeping of analyte by the stacked/destacked micelles, destacking/stacking of the swept analyte zone and additional focusing/defocusing due to the retention factor gradient effect (RFGE). In this study, we investigate additional processes, regarding online focusing in cyclodextrin-modified MEKC (CD-MEKC) of hydrophobic basic analytes: dynamic pH junction (sample with pH different from that of BGE) and adsorption of analyte onto the capillary wall within the sample zone. It is demonstrated that the developed method for the assessment of the sweeping efficiency is also applicable to CD-MEKC taking ethylparaben as an example of acidic analytes and desloratadine as an example of basic analytes using different types of β-cyclodextrin. Our previous results regarding RFGE as an additional focusing/defocusing effect in sweeping-MEKC are confirmed for the case that the apparent distribution coefficient differs for the sample and the BGE due to a different content of the complex-forming agent cyclodextrin and due to a pH difference between the sample and the BGE. Despite being significantly more hydrophobic than ethylparaben, desloratadine shows an unexpectedly low enrichment factor. This enrichment factor is nearly unaffected by the addition of CD to the BGE. This unexpected behavior is attributed to wall adsorption of the protonated hydrophobic basic analyte within the sample zone, which significantly counteracts the sweeping process. This assumption is corroborated by an improvement in the enrichment factor achieved via addition of a dynamic coating agent (triethylamine) to the sample solution.

  18. Parameter Sweep and Optimization of Loosely Coupled Simulations Using the DAKOTA Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Elwasif, Wael R; Bernholdt, David E; Pannala, Sreekanth; Allu, Srikanth; Foley, Samantha S

    2012-01-01

    The increasing availability of large scale computing capabilities has accelerated the development of high-fidelity coupled simulations. Such simulations typically involve the integration of models that implement various aspects of the complex phenomena under investigation. Coupled simulations are playing an integral role in fields such as climate modeling, earth systems modeling, rocket simulations, computational chemistry, fusion research, and many other computational fields. Model coupling provides scientists with systematic ways to virtually explore the physical, mathematical, and computational aspects of the problem. Such exploration is rarely done using a single execution of a simulation, but rather by aggregating the results from many simulation runs that, together, serve to bring to light novel knowledge about the system under investigation. Furthermore, it is often the case (particularly in engineering disciplines) that the study of the underlying system takes the form of an optimization regime, where the control parameter space is explored to optimize an objective functions that captures system realizability, cost, performance, or a combination thereof. Novel and flexible frameworks that facilitate the integration of the disparate models into a holistic simulation are used to perform this research, while making efficient use of the available computational resources. In this paper, we describe the integration of the DAKOTA optimization and parameter sweep toolkit with the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS), a component-based framework for loosely coupled simulations. The integration allows DAKOTA to exploit the internal task and resource management of the IPS to dynamically instantiate simulation instances within a single IPS instance, allowing for greater control over the trade-off between efficiency of resource utilization and time to completion. We present a case study showing the use of the combined DAKOTA-IPS system to aid in the design of a lithium ion

  19. Repeated amphetamine administration and long-term effects on 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations: possible relevance to the motivational and dopamine-stimulating properties of the drug.

    PubMed

    Simola, Nicola; Morelli, Micaela

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of 50kHz are thought to indicate positive affective states in rats, and are increasingly being used to investigate the motivational properties of drugs of abuse. However, previous studies have observed that only dopaminergic psychostimulants of abuse, but not other addictive drugs, stimulate 50-kHz USVs immediately after their administration. This would suggest that 50-kHz USVs induced by addictive dopaminergic psychostimulants might reflect rewarding dopaminergic effect, rather than motivational effect. To elucidate this issue, our study compared the effects of the psychostimulant of abuse amphetamine and the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine on 50-kHz USVs. Rats that received five drug administrations on alternate days in a novel test-cage were first re-exposed to the test-cage 7 days after treatment discontinuation to assess drug-conditioning, and then received a drug challenge. USVs were recorded throughout the experiments together with locomotor activity. To further clarify how amphetamine and apomorphine influenced 50-kHz USVs, rats were subdivided into "low" and "high" vocalizers, and time-dependence of drug effects was assessed. Amphetamine and apomorphine stimulated both 50-kHz USVs and locomotor activity, though they elicited dissimilar changes in these behaviors, depending on drug dose, rats׳ individual predisposition to vocalize, and time. Moreover, only amphetamine-treated rats displayed both sensitized 50-kHz USVs emission and conditioned vocalizations on test-cage re-exposure. These results indicate that the effects of amphetamine on 50-kHz USVs are not mimicked by a dopaminergic agonist with a low abuse potential, and may further support the usefulness of 50-kHz USVs in the study of the motivational properties of psychoactive drugs.

  20. The fiber noise suppression of astro-comb fiber link system for Chinese 2.16m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Huiqi; Han, Jian; Wu, Yuanjie; Xiao, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We built a fiber link system to connect the astronomical laser frequency combs (astro-comb) and the HRS spectrograph for Chinese 2.16m telescope in Xinglong. Fiber noise deteriorates the precision and stability of high spectral resolution fiber-fed spectrograph, especially when the astro-comb is used as calibrators. In order to optimize the performance of the astro-comb fiber link system, it is essential to suppress the fiber noise. The polygonal fiber is used to improve the scrambling and a vibrator attached to fiber is used to eliminate the speckle. The experiment results show good suppression of fiber noise with polygonal fiber, especially for the octagonal fiber, together with dynamic agitation by a vibrator.

  1. Dynamic-stability tests on an aircraft escape module at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, E. E.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-tunnel measurements of the aerodynamic damping and oscillatory stability of a model of a proposed escape module for a military aircraft have been made using a small-amplitude forced-oscillation technique in pitch and yaw at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.16 and in roll at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.20. The results in pitch indicate regions in the angle-of-attack range where the model exhibits large and rapid changes in both damping and stability with angle of attack, probably caused by vortex flow over the fins. There was no pronounced effect of change in angle of attack on damping in yaw. Except for the highest Mach number, negative damping in roll was produced at high negative angles of attack.

  2. Male-killing Wolbachia and mitochondrial DNA: selective sweeps, hybrid introgression and parasite population dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Jiggins, Francis M

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences are widely used as neutral genetic markers in insects. However, patterns of mtDNA variability are confounded by the spread of maternally transmitted parasites, which are genetically linked to the mitochondria. We have investigated these effects in the butterflies Acraea encedon (which is host to two strains of male-killing Wolbachia bacteria) and A. encedana (which is host to one strain). Within a population, the mitochondria are in linkage disequilibrium with the different male-killers. Furthermore, there has been a recent selective sweep of the mtDNA, which has led to the loss of mitochondrial variation within populations and erased any geographical structure. We also found that one of the male-killers, together with the associated mtDNA, has introgressed from A. encedana into A. encedon within the last 16,000 years. Interestingly, because butterflies are female heterogametic, this will presumably have also led to the introgression of genes on the W sex chromosome. Finally, in A. encedon the mitochondria in uninfected females are unaltered by the spread of the male-killer and have diverse, geographically structured mtDNA. This means we can reject the hypothesis that the male-killer is at a stable equilibrium maintained by imperfect transmission of the bacterium. Instead, some other form of balancing selection may be maintaining uninfected females in the population and preventing the species from going extinct due to a shortage of males. PMID:12750316

  3. Sweeping and redevelopment of longitudinal vortices in a turbulent boundary layer by injecting bubble swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Tasaka, Yuji; Murai, Yuichi

    2015-11-01

    We performed injection of bubble swarms, which consist of leading air films and following smaller bubbles, into a turbulent channel flow to investigate interaction between turbulent vortices and small air films. Advection of the air films flowing along the channel wall is faster than the streamwise vortices in a turbulent boundary layer, and thus the vortices in the boundary layer are swept by the air films. Our question is what happening on the vortices after sweeping? We visualized the vortices, and it elucidated that the swept vortices survive beneath the air films without dissipating and bursting. This was also confirmed on the corresponding measurement of Reynolds shear stress. Then the vortices return to the wall after escaping from beneath the air films. After that the redevelopment of the vortices occurs and original condition of the boundary layer is restored. Reduction of Reynolds shear stress is still continued even beneath smaller bubbles in middle part of the bubble swarms and it suggests that redevelopment of Reynolds shear stress event, bursting of streamwise vortices mainly, cannot occur quickly even with survival of the vortices. As a result, the bubble swarms reduce frictional drag more than continuously injected bubbles at the same volume fraction of bubbles.

  4. A Sweeping based Kinematic Simulation for the Stably Stratified Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Aditya; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    A Kinematic Simulation (KS) for a statistically stationary and stably stratified surface layer is proposed. The Fourier coefficients are obtained by numerically solving the linearized NS equations with Boussinesq approximation in spectral space, under the assumption of ``rapid'' deformation (RDT) due to combined shear and stratification. The linearization of RDT, which is unrealistic for the surface layer, is rectified using Mann's (JFM, 1994) idea of wavenumber dependent eddy lifetime. The input parameters required by the KS are estimated using either Monin-Obukhov theory, or an appropriate Second Moment Closure. In order to overcome the frozen turbulence hypothesis made in the Mann model, we incorporate inter-scale ``sweeping'' of eddies following the ideas of Fung et al. (JFM, 1992), along with temporal decorrelation associated with the natural eddy time scale. The solenoidal velocity field generated by the KS allows inclusion of a wide range of scales with correct space-time correlations, making it ideal to investigate particle dispersion in a stably stratified environment, and can also serve as inflow for the study of Wind Farm-PBL interactions. The effect of varying Obukhov length will be discussed by analyzing the frozen Eulerian spectra and Lagrangian particle dispersion.

  5. Fast frequency-sweep spectroscopic imaging with an ultra-low flip angle

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junyu; Patay, Zoltan; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging has become an important tool in clinical settings for noninvasively obtaining spatial and metabolic information on a molecular scale. Conventional spectroscopic imaging is acquired in the time domain, and its clinical application is limited by the long acquisition time, restricted spatial coverage, and complex suppression and reconstruction procedures. We introduce a fast MR spectroscopic imaging technique in the frequency domain, termed phase-cycled spectroscopic imaging (PCSI). PCSI uses a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence with an ultra-low flip angle to achieve very high acquisition efficiency with a short repetition time. This approach enables faster frequency sweeping by changing the cycled RF phase and using flexible non-uniform sampling, and it greatly reduces the RF energy deposition in tissue. With its intrinsic water and fat suppression, PCSI more closely resembles routine clinical scans because it eliminates the suppression steps. We demonstrate that it is feasible to acquire PCSI spectra in a phantom and in humans and that PCSI provides an efficient spectroscopic imaging method, even for J-coupled metabolites. PCSI may enable spectroscopic imaging to play a larger role in the clinical assessment of the spatial tissue distribution of metabolites. PMID:27440077

  6. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-05

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep.

  7. Evaluating the performance of selection scans to detect selective sweeps in domestic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Schlamp, Florencia; van der Made, Julian; Stambler, Rebecca; Chesebrough, Lewis; Boyko, Adam R.; Messer, Philipp W.

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding of dogs has resulted in repeated artificial selection on breed-specific morphological phenotypes. A number of quantitative trait loci associated with these phenotypes have been identified in genetic mapping studies. We analyzed the population genomic signatures observed around the causal mutations for 12 of these loci in 25 dog breeds, for which we genotyped 25 individuals in each breed. By measuring the population frequencies of the causal mutations in each breed, we identified those breeds in which specific mutations most likely experienced positive selection. These instances were then used as positive controls for assessing the performance of popular statistics to detect selection from population genomic data. We found that artificial selection during dog domestication has left characteristic signatures in the haplotype and nucleotide polymorphism patterns around selected loci that can be detected in the genotype data from a single population sample. However, the sensitivity and accuracy at which such signatures were detected varied widely between loci, the particular statistic used, and the choice of analysis parameters. We observed examples of both hard and soft selective sweeps and detected strong selective events that removed genetic diversity almost entirely over regions >10 Mbp. Our study demonstrates the power and limitations of selection scans in populations with high levels of linkage disequilibrium due to severe founder effects and recent population bottlenecks. PMID:26589239

  8. Determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations by linear sweep, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry methods.

    PubMed

    Atila, Alptug; Yilmaz, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, simple, fast and reliable cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) methods were developed and validated for determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods were based on electrochemical oxidation of bosentan at platinum electrode in acetonitrile solution containing 0.1 M TBACIO4. The well-defined oxidation peak was observed at 1.21 V. The calibration curves were linear for bosentan at the concentration range of 5-40 µg/mL for LSV and 5-35 µg/mL for SWV and DPV methods, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precision values for bosentan were less than 4.92, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 6.29%. The mean recovery of bosentan was 100.7% for pharmaceutical preparations. No interference was found from two tablet excipients at the selected assay conditions. Developed methods in this study are accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Tracleer and Diamond tablets as pharmaceutical preparation.

  9. Dissolved oxygen transfer to sediments by sweep and eject motions in aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, B.L.; Hondzo, Miki

    2008-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were quantified near the sediment-water interface to evaluate DO transfer to sediments in a laboratory recirculating flume and open channel under varying fluid-flow conditions. DO concentration fluctuations were observed within the diffusive sublayer, as defined by the time-averaged DO concentration gradient near the sediment-water interface. Evaluation of the DO concentration fluctuations along with detailed fluid-flow characterizations were used to quantify quasi-periodic sweep and eject motions (bursting events) near the sediments. Bursting events dominated the Reynolds shear stresses responsible for momentum and mass fluctuations near the sediment bed. Two independent methods for detecting bursting events using DO concentration and velocity data produced consistent results. The average time between bursting events was scaled with wall variables and was incorporated into a similarity model to describe the dimensionless mass transfer coefficient (Sherwood number, Sh) in terms of the Reynolds number, Re, and Schmidt number, Sc, which described transport in the flow. The scaling of bursting events was employed with the similarity model to quantify DO transfer to sediments and results showed a high degree of agreement with experimental data. ?? 2008, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  10. A support vector machine approach for truncated fingerprint image detection from sweeping fingerprint sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Jim; Pai, Tun-Wen; Cheng, Mox

    2015-03-31

    A sweeping fingerprint sensor converts fingerprints on a row by row basis through image reconstruction techniques. However, a built fingerprint image might appear to be truncated and distorted when the finger was swept across a fingerprint sensor at a non-linear speed. If the truncated fingerprint images were enrolled as reference targets and collected by any automated fingerprint identification system (AFIS), successful prediction rates for fingerprint matching applications would be decreased significantly. In this paper, a novel and effective methodology with low time computational complexity was developed for detecting truncated fingerprints in a real time manner. Several filtering rules were implemented to validate existences of truncated fingerprints. In addition, a machine learning method of supported vector machine (SVM), based on the principle of structural risk minimization, was applied to reject pseudo truncated fingerprints containing similar characteristics of truncated ones. The experimental result has shown that an accuracy rate of 90.7% was achieved by successfully identifying truncated fingerprint images from testing images before AFIS enrollment procedures. The proposed effective and efficient methodology can be extensively applied to all existing fingerprint matching systems as a preliminary quality control prior to construction of fingerprint templates.

  11. The effect of contrast polarity reversal on face detection: evidence of perceptual asymmetry from sweep VEP.

    PubMed

    Liu-Shuang, Joan; Ales, Justin M; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-03-01

    Contrast polarity inversion (i.e., turning dark regions light and vice versa) impairs face perception. We investigated the perceptual asymmetry between positive and negative polarity faces (matched for overall luminance) using a sweep VEP approach in the context of face detection (Journal of Vision 12 (2012) 1-18). Phase-scrambled face stimuli alternated at a rate of 3 Hz (6 images/s). The phase coherence of every other stimulus was parametrically increased so that a face gradually emerged over a 20-s stimulation sequence, leading to a 3 Hz response reflecting face detection. Contrary to the 6 Hz response, reflecting low-level visual processing, this 3 Hz response was larger and emerged earlier over right occipito-temporal channels for positive than negative polarity faces. Moreover, the 3 Hz response emerged abruptly to positive polarity faces, whereas it increased linearly for negative polarity faces. In another condition, alternating between a positive and a negative polarity face also elicited a strong 3 Hz response, indicating an asymmetrical representation of positive and negative polarity faces even at supra-threshold levels (i.e., when both stimuli were perceived as faces). Overall, these findings demonstrate distinct perceptual representations of positive and negative polarity faces, independently of low-level cues, and suggest qualitatively different detection processes (template-based matching for positive polarity faces vs. linear accumulation of evidence for negative polarity faces).

  12. The East African decapod crab Neosarmatium meinerti (de Man) sweeps mangrove floors clean of leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, Emil; Buchmayer, Susanne; Skov, Martin W

    2002-12-01

    Leaf litter removal by the abundant mangrove decapod crab Neosarmatium meinerti was studied in series of field and laboratory experiments in East Africa. In the high intertidal Avicennia marina zone crabs buried all leaves placed on the forest floor and consumed on average 67% of them within 2 hrs. High shore crabs in Kenya buried 4 g m(-2) leaf-litter in 1 hr, i.e. approx. twice the daily litter fall. In contrast, in the low shore Sonneratia alba zone, where typical leaf-eating crabs were absent, none of the offered leaves showed signs of herbivory. Leaf choice experiments in the laboratory showed that N. meinerti preferred some species to others. Leaf consumption per gram crab was higher in females than males. The laboratory studies also indicated that crabs could consume substantially more than the average daily litter fall. Video recordings documented frequent fights to gain or retain fallen leaves, suggesting strong competition for leaf litter. Earlier studies indicating that N. meinerti may sweep mangrove forest floors clean of leaf litter are confirmed. In high shore mangroves of East and South Africa where N. meinerti is common, energy flow appears unique: virtually all litter production is retained.

  13. Computational wing design in support of an NLF variable sweep transition flight experiment. [Natural Laminar Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Campbell, R. L.; Phillips, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    A natural laminar flow outer panel wing glove has been designed for a variable sweep fighter aircraft using state-of-the-art computational techniques. Testing of the design will yield wing pressure and boundary-layer data under actual flight conditions and environment. These data will be used to enhance the understanding of the interaction between crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances on boundary-layer transition. The outer wing panel was contoured such that a wide range of favorable pressure gradients could be obtained on the wing upper surface. Extensive computations were performed to support the design effort which relied on two- and three-dimensional transonic design and analysis techniques. A detailed description of the design procedure that evolved during this study is presented. Results on intermediate designs at various stages in the design process demonstrate how the various physical and aerodynamic constraints were integrated into the design. Final results of the glove design analyzed as part of the complete aircraft configuration with a full-potential wing/body analysis code indicate that the aerodynamic design objectives were met.

  14. A Support Vector Machine Approach for Truncated Fingerprint Image Detection from Sweeping Fingerprint Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Jim; Pai, Tun-Wen; Cheng, Mox

    2015-01-01

    A sweeping fingerprint sensor converts fingerprints on a row by row basis through image reconstruction techniques. However, a built fingerprint image might appear to be truncated and distorted when the finger was swept across a fingerprint sensor at a non-linear speed. If the truncated fingerprint images were enrolled as reference targets and collected by any automated fingerprint identification system (AFIS), successful prediction rates for fingerprint matching applications would be decreased significantly. In this paper, a novel and effective methodology with low time computational complexity was developed for detecting truncated fingerprints in a real time manner. Several filtering rules were implemented to validate existences of truncated fingerprints. In addition, a machine learning method of supported vector machine (SVM), based on the principle of structural risk minimization, was applied to reject pseudo truncated fingerprints containing similar characteristics of truncated ones. The experimental result has shown that an accuracy rate of 90.7% was achieved by successfully identifying truncated fingerprint images from testing images before AFIS enrollment procedures. The proposed effective and efficient methodology can be extensively applied to all existing fingerprint matching systems as a preliminary quality control prior to construction of fingerprint templates. PMID:25835186

  15. Identification of local selective sweeps in human populations since the exodus from Africa.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Asa; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2008-06-01

    Selection on the human genome has been studied using comparative genomics and SNP architecture in the lineage leading to modern humans. In connection with the African exodus and colonization of other continents, human populations have adapted to a range of different environmental conditions. Using a new method that jointly analyses haplotype block length and allele frequency variation (F(ST)) within and between populations, we have identified chromosomal regions that are candidates for having been affected by local selection. Based on 1.6 million SNPs typed in 71 individuals of African American, European American and Han Chinese descent, we have identified a number of genes and non-coding regions that are candidates for having been subjected to local positive selection during the last 100 000 years. Among these genes are those involved in skin pigmentation (SLC24A5) and diet adaptation (LCT). The list of genes implicated in these local selective sweeps overlap partly with those implicated in other studies of human populations using other methods, but show little overlap with those postulated to have been under selection in the 5-7 myr since the divergence of the ancestors of human and chimpanzee. Our analysis provides focal points in the genome for detailed studies of evolutionary events that have shaped human populations as they explored different regions of the world.

  16. Performance Enhancement of a Vertical Tail Model with Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seele, Roman; Graff, Emilio; Lin, John; Wygnanski, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) experiments performed at the Caltech Lucas Adaptive Wall Wind Tunnel on a 12%-thick, generic vertical tail model indicated that sweeping jets emanating from the trailing edge (TE) of the vertical stabilizer significantly increased the side force coefficient for a wide range of rudder deflection angles and yaw angles at free-stream velocities approaching takeoff rotation speed. The results indicated that 2% blowing momentum coefficient (C(sub mu) increased the side force in excess of 50% at the maximum conventional rudder deflection angle in the absence of yaw. Even C(sub mu) = 0.5% increased the side force in excess of 20% under these conditions. This effort was sponsored by the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the successful demonstration of this flow-control application could have far reaching implications. It could lead to effective applications of AFC technologies on key aircraft control surfaces and lift enhancing devices (flaps) that would aid in reduction of fuel consumption through a decrease in size and weight of wings and control surfaces or a reduction of the noise footprint due to steeper climb and descent.

  17. Genomic sweep and potential genetic rescue during limiting environmental conditions in an isolated wolf population.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer R; Vucetich, Leah M; Hedrick, Philip W; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2011-11-22

    Genetic rescue, in which the introduction of one or more unrelated individuals into an inbred population results in the reduction of detrimental genetic effects and an increase in one or more vital rates, is a potentially important management tool for mitigating adverse effects of inbreeding. We used molecular techniques to document the consequences of a male wolf (Canis lupus) that immigrated, on its own, across Lake Superior ice to the small, inbred wolf population in Isle Royale National Park. The immigrant's fitness so exceeded that of native wolves that within 2.5 generations, he was related to every individual in the population and his ancestry constituted 56 per cent of the population, resulting in a selective sweep of the total genome. In other words, all the male ancestry (50% of the total ancestry) descended from this immigrant, plus 6 per cent owing to the success of some of his inbred offspring. The immigration event occurred in an environment where space was limiting (i.e. packs occupied all available territories) and during a time when environmental conditions had deteriorated (i.e. wolves' prey declined). These conditions probably explain why the immigration event did not obviously improve the population's demography (e.g. increased population numbers or growth rate). Our results show that the beneficial effects of gene flow may be substantial and quickly manifest, short-lived under some circumstances, and how the demographic benefits of genetic rescue might be masked by environmental conditions.

  18. How far are rheological parameters from amplitude sweep tests predictable using common physicochemical soil properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppe, N.; Horn, R.

    2017-01-01

    A basic understanding of soil behavior on the mesoscale resp. macroscale (i.e. soil aggregates resp. bulk soil) requires knowledge of the processes at the microscale (i.e. particle scale), therefore rheological investigations of natural soils receive growing attention. In the present research homogenized and sieved (< 2 mm) samples from Marshland soils of the riparian zone of the River Elbe (North Germany) were analyzed with a modular compact rheometer MCR 300 (Anton Paar, Ostfildern, Germany) with a profiled parallel-plate measuring system. Amplitude sweep tests (AST) with controlled shear deformation were conducted to investigate the viscoelastic properties of the studied soils under oszillatory stress. The gradual depletion of microstructural stiffness during AST cannot only be characterized by the well-known rheological parameters G, G″ and tan δ but also by the dimensionless area parameter integral z, which quantifies the elasticity of microstructure. To discover the physicochemical parameters, which influences the microstructural stiffness, statistical tests were used taking the combined effects of these parameters into account. Although the influence of the individual factors varies depending on soil texture, the physicochemical features significantly affecting soil micro structure were identified. Based on the determined statistical relationships between rheological and physicochemical parameters, pedotransfer functions (PTF) have been developed, which allow a mathematical estimation of the rheological target value integral z. Thus, stabilizing factors are: soil organic matter, concentration of Ca2+, content of CaCO3 and pedogenic iron oxides; whereas the concentration of Na+ and water content represent structurally unfavorable factors.

  19. Validation of Flow Sheet for Dissolution and Downstream Processing of Mark 42 Compacts and Sweepings

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2000-12-06

    Unirradiated Mark 42 compact material was successfully dissolved in various laboratory tests. Assuming a dissolver charge of 10,000 grams of plutonium added to 8000 liters, the dissolver solution optimized with the lowest fluoride concentration was 0.25 molar fluoride-2.0 g/L boron-8 molar nitric acid. This 0.25 molar fluoride achieved a successful codissolution of plutonium oxide and aluminum in less than 15 hours. Based on a 30 minute dissolution of aluminum and measured corrosion rates using this dissolver solution, MTS assessed that the impact on the dissolver integrity due to corrosion from this campaign should be small. All dissolution tests in this work were achieved in the absence of a mercury catalyst, and therefore, to minimize waste and reduce chemical exposure to workers, the use of mercury for the dissolution of Mark 42 compact material is not recommended. The purpose of this report is determine an appropriate dissolver solution composition that will dissolve unirradiated Mark 42 compacts and sweepings in an F-Canyon dissolver within a 24 hour heating period

  20. Evaluating the performance of selection scans to detect selective sweeps in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Schlamp, Florencia; van der Made, Julian; Stambler, Rebecca; Chesebrough, Lewis; Boyko, Adam R; Messer, Philipp W

    2016-01-01

    Selective breeding of dogs has resulted in repeated artificial selection on breed-specific morphological phenotypes. A number of quantitative trait loci associated with these phenotypes have been identified in genetic mapping studies. We analysed the population genomic signatures observed around the causal mutations for 12 of these loci in 25 dog breeds, for which we genotyped 25 individuals in each breed. By measuring the population frequencies of the causal mutations in each breed, we identified those breeds in which specific mutations most likely experienced positive selection. These instances were then used as positive controls for assessing the performance of popular statistics to detect selection from population genomic data. We found that artificial selection during dog domestication has left characteristic signatures in the haplotype and nucleotide polymorphism patterns around selected loci that can be detected in the genotype data from a single population sample. However, the sensitivity and accuracy at which such signatures were detected varied widely between loci, the particular statistic used and the choice of analysis parameters. We observed examples of both hard and soft selective sweeps and detected strong selective events that removed genetic diversity almost entirely over regions >10 Mbp. Our study demonstrates the power and limitations of selection scans in populations with high levels of linkage disequilibrium due to severe founder effects and recent population bottlenecks.

  1. Effects of Wing Sweep on In-flight Boundary-layer Transition for a Laminar Flow Wing at Mach Numbers from 0.60 to 0.79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The variable sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE) was conducted on an F-14A variable sweep wing fighter to examine the effect of wing sweep on natural boundary layer transition. Nearly full span upper surface gloves, extending to 60 percent chord, were attached to the F-14 aircraft's wings. The results are presented of the glove 2 flight tests. Glove 2 had an airfoil shape designed for natural laminar flow at a wing sweep of 20 deg. Sample pressure distributions and transition locations are presented with the complete results tabulated in a database. Data were obtained at wing sweeps of 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg, at Mach numbers ranging from 0.60 to 0.79, and at altitudes ranging from 10,000 to 35,000 ft. Results show that a substantial amount of laminar flow was maintained at all the wing sweeps evaluated. The maximum transition Reynolds number obtained was 18.6 x 10(exp 6) at 15 deg of wing sweep, Mach 0.75, and at an altitude of 10,000 ft.

  2. Spatiotemporal analysis of turbulent jets enabled by 100-kHz, 100-ms burst-mode particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joseph D.; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Mance, Jason G.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2016-12-01

    100-kHz particle image velocimetry (PIV) is demonstrated using a double-pulsed, burst-mode laser with a burst duration up to 100 ms. This enables up to 10,000 time-sequential vector fields for capturing a temporal dynamic range spanning over three orders of magnitude in high-speed turbulent flows. Pulse doublets with inter-pulse spacing of 2 µs and repetition rate of 100 kHz are generated using a fiber-based oscillator and amplified through an all-diode-pumped, burst-mode amplifier. A physics-based model of pulse doublet amplification in the burst-mode amplifier is developed and used to accurately predict oscillator pulse width and pulse intensity inputs required to generate equal-energy pulse doublets at 532 nm for velocity measurements. The effect of PIV particle response and high-speed-detector limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution are estimated in subsonic turbulent jets. An effective spatial resolution of 266-275 µm and temporal resolution of 10 µs are estimated from the 8 × 8 pixel correlation window and inter-doublet time spacing, respectively. This spatiotemporal resolution is sufficient for quantitative assessment of integral time and length scales in highly turbulent jets with Reynolds numbers in the range 15,000-50,000. The temporal dynamic range of the burst-mode PIV measurement is 1200, limited by the 85-ms high-energy portion of the burst and 30-kHz high-frequency noise limit.

  3. Optimization of un-tethered, low voltage, 20-100kHz flexural transducers for biomedical ultrasonics applications.

    PubMed

    Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Nguyen, An T; Samuels, Joshua A; Weingarten, Michael S; Zubkov, Leonid A; Lewin, Peter A

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes optimization of un-tethered, low voltage, 20-100kHz flexural transducers for biomedical ultrasonics applications. The goal of this work was to design a fully wearable, low weight (<100g), battery operated, piezoelectric ultrasound applicator providing maximum output pressure amplitude at the minimum excitation voltage. Such implementation of ultrasound applicators that can operate at the excitation voltages on the order of only 10-25V is needed in view of the emerging evidence that spatial-peak temporal-peak ultrasound intensity (I(SPTP)) on the order of 100mW/cm(2) delivered at frequencies below 100kHz can have beneficial therapeutic effects. The beneficial therapeutic applications include wound management of chronic ulcers and non-invasive transdermal delivery of insulin and liposome encapsulated drugs. The early prototypes of the 20 and 100kHz applicators were optimized using the maximum electrical power transfer theorem, which required a punctilious analysis of the complex impedance of the piezoelectric disks mounted in appropriately shaped metal housings. In the implementation tested, the optimized ultrasound transducer applicators were driven by portable, customized electronics, which controlled the excitation voltage amplitude and facilitated operation in continuous wave (CW) or pulsed mode with adjustable (10-90%) duty cycle. The driver unit was powered by remotely located rechargeable lithium (Li) polymer batteries. This was done to further minimize the weight of the applicator unit making it wearable. With DC voltage of approximately 15V the prototypes were capable of delivering pressure amplitudes of about 55kPa or 100mW/cm(2) (I(SPTP)). This level of acoustic output was chosen as it is considered safe and side effects free, even at prolonged exposure.

  4. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  5. Experimental simulation of satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, M.; Hanuise, C.; Parrot, M.

    2011-01-01

    Relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds emit 100 kHz radio waves which illuminate the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. This contribution aims to clarify the physical processes which are relevant for the spatial spreading of the radio wave energy below and above the ionosphere and thereby enables an experimental simulation of satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds. The simulation uses the DEMETER satellite which observes 100 kHz radio waves from fifty terrestrial Long Range Aid to Navigation (LORAN) transmitters. Their mean luminosity patch in the plasmasphere is a circular area with a radius of 300 km and a power density of 22 μW/Hz as observed at 660 km height above the ground. The luminosity patches exhibit a southward displacement of 450 km with respect to the locations of the LORAN transmitters. The displacement is reduced to 150 km when an upward propagation of the radio waves along the geomagnetic field line is assumed. This residual displacement indicates that the radio waves undergo 150 km sub-ionospheric propagation prior to entering a magnetospheric duct and escaping into near-Earth space. The residual displacement at low (L < 2.14) and high (L > 2.14) geomagnetic latitudes ranges from 100 km to 200 km which suggests that the smaller inclination of the geomagnetic field lines at low latitudes helps to trap the radio waves and to keep them in the magnetospheric duct. Diffuse luminosity areas are observed northward of the magnetic conjugate locations of LORAN transmitters at extremely low geomagnetic latitudes (L < 1.36) in Southeast Asia. This result suggests that the propagation along the geomagnetic field lines results in a spatial spreading of the radio wave energy over distances of 1 Mm. The summative assessment of the electric field intensities measured in space show that nadir observations of terrestrial 100 kHz radio waves, e.g., from relativistic electron beams above

  6. Efficient 1 kHz femtosecond optical parametric amplification in BiB(3)O(6) pumped at 800 nm.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Masood; Ebrahim-Zadeh, Majid; Petrov, Valentin; Tzankov, Pancho; Noack, Frank

    2006-10-30

    We demonstrate efficient operation of a tunable femtosecond optical parametric amplifier based on BiB(3)O(6) pumped at 800 nm by a 1 kHz Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. The idler wavelength coverage extends to beyond 3 mum and the pulse duration at this wavelength is of the order of 110 fs. This new nonlinear borate crystal offers exceptionally high nonlinearity, making it a very promising candidate for power scaling of such frequency converters in the near-IR.

  7. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-01-01

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [ Opt. Express22, 10221 ( 2014)24921725]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system’s FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging. PMID:25321778

  8. The influence of subsonic mission segments on the use of variable-sweep wings for high speed civil transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Glenn L.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.; Domack, Christopher S.; Shields, E. William

    1988-01-01

    A Mach-3.0, 250-passenger, 6500-n. mi. range SST configuration's alternative use of fixed-planform or variable-sweep wings is presently evaluated, with a view to effects on aerodynamics, mission performance, and sizing. After preliminary design, the fixed and variable-wing configurations were resized to perform missions incorporating subsonic cruise segments of as much as 4000 n. mi.; the effect of subsonic segment length on design gross weight and block time was then ascertained. Due to the reduced supersonic efficiency of the variable-sweep aircraft, over one-half of the 6500-n. mi. mission would have to be flown subsonically for its sizing to reach a lower ramp weight than that of its fixed-geometry counterpart.

  9. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging.

  10. [Test and gather data on sweep spike combination tillage tool]. Quarterly technical report, August 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lukach, J.

    1992-06-19

    This summary presents the data accumulated to date with only brief comment. It is prepared with the intent that the viewers will offer advice on terminology, data presentation, methods and other. The year end analysis will detail changes in the data due to the tillage treatments. The data is incomplete due to equipment problems and time limitations due to the wet fall and early freeze up. The trial was not completed due to our inability to get the Mikkelsen Chisel Plow Shovel (MCP), a 16 inch sweep with an anhydrous knife, to penetrate untilled land. The MCP shovel penetrated to deep on plowed ground and pulled so hard that the front wheels of our JD4440 tractor were jerked off the ground. The Standard Chisel Plow Shovels (SCP), a 16 inch sweep, worked well and the data is included.

  11. Potential effects of structural controls and street sweeping on stormwater loads to the lower Charles River, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Breault, Robert F.; Weiskel, Peter K.

    2002-01-01

    The water quality of the lower Charles River is periodically impaired by combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and non-CSO stormwater runoff. This study examined the potential non-CSO load reductions of suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, total phosphorus, and total lead that could reasonably be achieved by implementation of stormwater best management practices, including both structural controls and systematic street sweeping. Structural controls were grouped by major physical or chemical process; these included infiltration-filtration (physical separation), biofiltration-bioretention (biological mechanisms), or detention-retention (physical settling). For each of these categories, upper and lower quartiles, median, and average removal efficiencies were compiled from three national databases of structural control performance. Removal efficiencies obtained indicated a wide range of performance. Removal was generally greatest for infiltration-filtration controls and suspended solids, and least for biofiltration-bioretention controls and fecal coliform bacteria. Street sweeping has received renewed interest as a water-quality control practice because of reported improvements in sweeper technology and the recognition that opportunities for implementing structural controls are limited in highly urbanized areas. The Stormwater Management Model that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the lower Charles River Watershed was modified to simulate the effects of street sweeping in a single-family land-use basin. Constituent buildup and washoff variable values were calibrated to observed annual and storm-event loads. Once calibrated, the street sweeping model was applied to various permutations of four sweeper efficiencies and six sweeping frequencies that ranged from every day to once every 30 days. Reduction of constituent loads to the lower Charles River by the combined hypothetical practices of structural controls and street sweeping was estimated for a range

  12. Digitally Calibrated TR Modules Enabling Real-Time Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures for DESDynI-Class Radar Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Peral, Eva; Veilluex, Louise; Perkovic, Dragana; Shaffer, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Real-time digital beamforming, combined with lightweight, large aperture reflectors, enable SweepSAR architectures such as that of the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI). SweepSAR promises significant increases in instrument capability for solid earth and biomass remote sensing, while reducing mission mass and cost. This new instrument concept requires new methods for calibrating the multiple channels, which must be combined on-board, in real-time. We are developing new methods for digitally calibrating digital beamforming arrays to reduce development time, risk and cost of precision calibrated TR modules for array architectures by accurately tracking modules' characteristics through closed-loop Digital Calibration, thus tracking systematic changes regardless of temperature

  13. ARX filtering of single-sweep movement-related brain macropotentials in mono- and multi-channel recordings.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, L; Filligoi, G C; Liberati, D; Cerutti, S; Babiloni, F; Fattorini, L; Urbano, A

    1994-03-01

    A technique of stochastic parametric identification and filtering is applied to the analysis of single-sweep event-related potentials. This procedure, called AutoRegressive with n eXogenous inputs (ARXn), models the recorded signal as the sum of n+1 signals: the background EEG activity, modeled as an autoregressive process driven by white noise, and n signals, one of which represents a filtered version of a reference signal carrying the average information contained in each sweep. The other (n-1) signals could represent various sources of noise (i.e., artifacts, EOG, etc.). An evaluation of the effects of both artifact suppression and accurate selection of the average signal on mono- or multi-channel scalp recordings is presented.

  14. Sweep Rate and Concentration Effects on Metastable Structures Formed in the Underpotential Deposition of Silver on Pt(111)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Sweep Rate and Concentration Effects on Metastable Structures 0) Formed in the Underpotential Deposition of Silver on Pt(111) _Vm D. L. Taylor and H...process of underpotential deposition (UPD) of metals on foreign metal substrates continues to be the subject of intense investigation [1] through the...1" 0•- There are several parameters involved in the underpotential deposition of metals which 1 1 S•. may affect the growth mechanism of the metal

  15. Development of inhibitory mechanisms underlying selectivity for the rate and direction of frequency-modulated sweeps in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Razak, Khaleel A; Fuzessery, Zoltan M

    2007-02-14

    Although it is known that neural selectivity for species-specific vocalizations changes during development, the mechanisms underlying such changes are not known. This study followed the development of mechanisms underlying selectivity for the direction and rate of frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps in the auditory cortex of the pallid bat, a species that uses downward FM sweeps to echolocate. In the adult cortex, direction and rate selectivity arise as a result of different spectral and temporal properties of low-frequency inhibition (LFI) and high-frequency inhibition (HFI). A narrow band of delayed HFI shapes rate selectivity for downward FM sweeps. A broader band of early LFI shapes direction selectivity. Here we asked whether these differences in LFI and HFI are present at the onset of hearing in the echolocation range or whether the differences develop slowly. We also studied how the development of properties of inhibitory frequencies influences FM rate and direction selectivity. We found that adult-like FM rate selectivity is present at 2 weeks after birth, whereas direction selectivity matures 12 weeks after birth. The different developmental time course for direction and rate selectivity is attributable to the differences in the development of LFI and HFI. Arrival time and bandwidth of HFI are adult-like at 2 weeks. Average arrival time of LFI gradually becomes faster and bandwidth becomes broader between 2 and 12 weeks. Thus, two properties of FM sweeps that are important for vocalization selectivity follow different developmental time courses attributable to the differences in the development of underlying inhibitory mechanisms.

  16. Design and Testing of a 30-Degree Sweep Laminar Flow Wing for a High-Altitude Long-Endurance Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Center Room 342 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Box 87-6106 Tempe, Arizona 85287-6106 USA Email: william.solomon@ngc.com /aaron.drake@ngc.com...wing laminar flow, which is the focus of this paper. 1.2 General Relationships Between Instability Mechanisms and Wing Sweep Angles Boundary-layer...transition in 3-D flows is a complicated process involving complex flow structures, multiple instability mechanisms , and nonlinear interactions. Four

  17. Influence of high-conductivity buffer composition on field-enhanced sample injection coupled to sweeping in CE.

    PubMed

    Anres, Philippe; Delaunay, Nathalie; Vial, Jérôme; Thormann, Wolfgang; Gareil, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the mechanism taking place in field-enhanced sample injection coupled to sweeping and micellar EKC (FESI-Sweep-MEKC), with the utilization of two acidic high-conductivity buffers (HCBs), phosphoric acid or sodium phosphate buffer, in view of maximizing sensitivity enhancements. Using cationic model compounds in acidic media, a chemometric approach and simulations with SIMUL5 were implemented. Experimental design first enabled to identify the significant factors and their potential interactions. Simulation demonstrates the formation of moving boundaries during sample injection, which originate at the initial sample/HCB and HCB/buffer discontinuities and gradually change the compositions of HCB and BGE. With sodium phosphate buffer, the HCB conductivity increased during the injection, leading to a more efficient preconcentration by staking (about 1.6 times) than with phosphoric acid alone, for which conductivity decreased during injection. For the same injection time at constant voltage, however, a lower amount of analytes was injected with sodium phosphate buffer than with phosphoric acid. Consequently sensitivity enhancements were lower for the whole FESI-Sweep-MEKC process. This is why, in order to maximize sensitivity enhancements, it is proposed to work with sodium phosphate buffer as HCB and to use constant current during sample injection.

  18. Effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammetry in a cylindrical-pore electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; Fedkiw, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    A means is presented to account for the effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammograms by modeling a pore in a porous matrix as a cylindrical-pore electrode, and solving the mass and charge conservation equations in the context of this geometry for the simply redox reaction O + ne(-) yield R where both O and R are soluble species. Both analytical and numerical techniques are used to solve the governing equations. The calculated peak currents and potentials are correlated by empirical formulas to the measurable parameters: sweep rate, concentration of the redox species, diffusion coefficient, conductivity of the electrolyte, and pore dimensions. Using the correlations, a methodology is established for determining if the redox reaction kinetics are irreversible or reversible (Nernstian). If the reaction is irreversible, it is shown how the standard rate constant and the transfer coefficient may be extracted from linear-sweep voltammetry data, or, if the reaction is reversible, how the number of electrons transferred may be deduced.

  19. An elementary analysis of the effect of sweep, Mach number, and lift coefficient on wing-structure weight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyser, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented from an elementary analysis of the effect of sweep angle on the idealized structural weight of swept wings, with cruise Mach number M and lift coefficient C sub L as parameters. The analysis indicates that sweep is unnecessary for cruise Mach numbers below about 0.80, whereas for the higher subsonic speeds, a well defined minimum-weight condition exists at a sweep angle in the neighborhood of 35 deg or 40 deg, depending on M and C sub L. The results further indicate that wing-structure weight increases sharply with Mach number in the high subsonic range, with Mach 0.85 wings weighing half again as much as Mach 0.75 wings. Weight is also shown to increase with cruise lift coefficient, but the effect is not strong for the usual range of design lift coefficients. Minimum wing-structure weight is found to occur at a ratio of thickness to normal chord of about 18 percent, but it is concluded that the thickness ratio for optimum wing design would probably lie in the range of 12 to 15 percent.

  20. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.