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Sample records for 2-18 ghz frequency

  1. 164-GHz MMIC HEMT Frequency Doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi; Morgan, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) has been developed as a prototype of improved frequency doublers for generating signals at frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Signal sources that operate in this frequency range are needed for a variety of applications, notably including general radiometry and, more specifically, radiometric remote sensing of the atmosphere. Heretofore, it has been common practice to use passive (diode-based) frequency multipliers to obtain frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Unfortunately, diode-based frequency multipliers are plagued by high DC power consumption and low conversion efficiency. Moreover, multiplier diodes are not easily integrated with such other multiplier-circuit components as amplifiers and oscillators. The goals of developing the present MMIC HEMT frequency doubler were (1) to utilize the HEMT as an amplifier to increase conversion efficiency (more precisely, to reduce conversion loss), thereby increasing the output power for a given DC power consumption or, equivalently, reducing the DC power consumption for a given output power; and (2) to provide for the integration of amplifier and oscillator components on the same chip. The MMIC frequency doubler (see Figure 1) contains an AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMT biased at pinch-off to make it function as a class-B amplifier (meaning that it conducts in half-cycle pulses). Grounded coplanar waveguides (GCPWs) are used as impedance-matching transmission lines. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. Another combination of GCPWs also serves both as a low-pass filter to suppress undesired oscillations at frequencies below 60 GHz and as a DC blocker. Large decoupling capacitors and epitaxial resistors are added in the drain and gate lines to suppress bias oscillations. At the output terminal, the fundamental frequency is suppressed by a quarter-wave open stub, which presents

  2. Propagation handbook, frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress and accomplishments in the developmet of the Fourth Edition of the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design, for frequencies 10 to 100 GHz, NASA Reference Publication 1082(04), dated May 1988, prepared by Westighouse Electric Corporation for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed.

  3. Frequencies above 10 GHz. [for satellite communication services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcavoy, N.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the problems associated with extending the frequencies used by satellite communication services above 10 GHz. The principal propagation limitation above 10 GHz occurs when precipitation intercepts the earth-space propagation path and causes attenuation and depolarization of the transmitted signal. World attenuation statistics at 12 GHz for earth-space paths are discussed, revealing the effect of climate on attenuation properties. Space diversity is discussed as an effective means of overcoming precipitation-caused attenuation problems.

  4. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wilmart, Q.; Inhofer, A.; Boukhicha, M.; Yang, W.; Rosticher, M.; Morfin, P.; Garroum, N.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates. PMID:26879709

  5. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wilmart, Q; Inhofer, A; Boukhicha, M; Yang, W; Rosticher, M; Morfin, P; Garroum, N; Fève, G; Berroir, J-M; Plaçais, B

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates. PMID:26879709

  6. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmart, Q.; Inhofer, A.; Boukhicha, M.; Yang, W.; Rosticher, M.; Morfin, P.; Garroum, N.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-02-01

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates.

  7. Experimental Study of a Frequency Doubling, 70 GHz Gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Mark; Nusinovich, Gregory; Lawson, Wes; Granatstein, Victor; Miller, Thomas; Levush, Baruch; Danly, Bruce

    2000-10-01

    Interest is on the rise for frequency doubling designs for production of high power mm-waves in advanced radar applications. Initial experimental results will be presented for our frequency doubling, second harmonic, 70 GHz gyroklystron. The circuit has been designed based on the electron gun, input coupler, and input cavity used in previous experiments at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) performed at 35 GHz. The input cavity is driven by a 35 GHz driver and operates in the TE011 mode at the fundamental cyclotron resonance, while the buncher, penultimate, and output cavity operate in the TE021 mode at twice the signal frequency at the second cyclotron harmonic. The suite of codes developed at NRL - MAGYKL, CASCADE, and QPB were used to design the circuit. These codes predict an output power of 130 kW, with an efficiency of 23

  8. Phase locking and frequency locking of a 140 GHz klystron and a 280 GHz carcinotron

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.W.; Rettig, C.L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. )

    1992-10-01

    A phase and frequency-locked loop to synchronize two microwave tube oscillators for a high density plasma collective scattering diagnostic has been designed, assembled, and tested. A Varian (VRT2121A16) reflex klystron was down converted by mixing with the eighth harmonic of a 17.437 GHz phase-locked Gunn oscillator, and the resulting baseband was used to lock the klystron phase to a 200 MHz crystal. The down-converted 140 GHz klystron frequency spectrum shows a linewidth {lt}50 Hz and sideband power {lt}50 dB below the carrier (dBc). Frequency locking of a Thomson CSF TH4224S 280 GHz carcinotron was performed and the klystron was then down converted by the stabilized carcinotron and phase locked to the 200 MHz crystal. The klystron would track the frequency excursions of the carcinotron when the system was perturbed by direct modulation with frequencies of up to 10 MHz and remained locked as long as modulation sidebands were kept {lt}15 dBc. The locked states of both configurations show 3 to 4 orders of magnitude improvement in short and long term stability over the unlocked states.

  9. A 83 GHz InP DHBT static frequency divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youtao, Zhang; Xiaopeng, Li; Min, Zhang; Wei, Cheng; Xinyu, Chen

    2014-04-01

    A static frequency divider is presented using 0.7 μm InP DHBTs with 280 GHz ft/fmax. The divider is based on ECL master-slave D-flip-flop topology with 30 HBTs and 20 resistors with a chip size 0.62 × 0.65 mm2. The circuits use peaking inductance as a part of the loads to maximize the highest clock rate. Momentum simulation is used to accurately characterize the effect of the clock feedback lines at the W band. Test results show that the divider can operate from 1 GHz up to 83 GHz. Its phase noise is 139 dBc/Hz with 100 kHz offset. The power dissipation of divider core is 350 mW.

  10. HEMT Frequency Doubler with Output at 300 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Bruston, Jean

    2005-01-01

    An active frequency doubler in the form of an InP-based monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) containing a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) has been demonstrated in operation at output frequencies in the vicinity of 300 GHz. This is the highestfrequency HEMT doubler reported to date, the next-highest-frequency active HEMT doubler having been previously reported to operate at 180 GHz. While the output power of this frequency doubler is less than that of a typical Schottky diode, this frequency doubler is considered an intermediate product of a continuing effort to realize the potential of active HEMT frequency doublers to operate with conversion efficiencies greater than those of passive diode frequency doublers. An additional incentive for developing active HEMT frequency doublers lies in the fact that they can be integrated with amplifiers, oscillators, and other circuitry on MMIC chips. The circuitry of the doubler MMIC (see Figure 1) features grounded coplanar waveguides. Air bridges and vias are used to make contact with the ground plane. The HEMT is biased for Class-A operation (in which current is conducted throughout each cycle of oscillation), which would ordinarily be better suited to linear amplification than to frequency doubling. Ordinarily, class-B operation (in which current is conducted during about half of each cycle of oscillation) would be more suitable for frequency doubling because of the essential nonlinearity of partial-cycle conduction. The reason for the unusual choice of class A was that computational simulations had shown that in this case, the efficiency in class B would be less than in class A. The input matching circuit of this doubler includes transmission lines that afford a good impedance match at the fundamental frequency, plus an open stub to prevent leakage of the second harmonic through the input terminals. The output circuit was designed to suppress the fundamental while providing a good match for the second

  11. Design of tunable GHz-frequency optomechanical crystal resonators.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Hannes; Paraïso, Taofiq; Zang, Leyun; Painter, Oskar

    2016-05-30

    We present a silicon optomechanical nanobeam design with a dynamically tunable acoustic mode at 10.2 GHz. The resonance frequency can be shifted by 90 kHz/V2 with an on-chip capacitor that was optimized to exert forces up to 1 µN at 10 V operation voltage. Optical resonance frequencies around 190 THz with Q-factors up to 2.2 × 106 place the structure in the well-resolved sideband regime with vacuum optomechanical coupling rates up to g0/2π = 353 kHz. Tuning can be used, for instance, to overcome variation in the device-to-device acoustic resonance frequency due to fabrication errors, paving the way for optomechanical circuits consisting of arrays of optomechanical cavities. PMID:27410069

  12. Measurement of the dielectric properties of the epidermis and dermis at frequencies from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Wake, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have reported the measurements of the dielectric properties of the skin. Clarifying the manner in which the human body interacts with electromagnetic waves is essential for medical research and development, as well as for the safety assessment of electromagnetic wave exposure. The skin comprises several layers: the epidermis, the dermis, and the subcutaneous fat. Each of these skin layers has a different constitution; however, the previous measurements of their dielectric properties were typically conducted on tissue which included all three layers of the skin. This study presents novel dielectric property data for the epidermis and dermis with in vitro measurement at frequencies ranging from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz. Measured data was compared with literature values; in particular, the findings were compared with Gabriel’s widely used data on skin dielectric properties. The experimental results agreed with the data reported by Gabriel for the dermis of up to 20 GHz, which is the upper limit of the range of frequencies at which Gabriel reported measurements. For frequencies of 20-100 GHz, the experimental results indicated larger values than those extrapolated from Gabriel’s data using parametric expansion. For frequencies over 20 GHz, the dielectric properties provided by the parametric model tend toward the experimental results for the epidermis with increasing frequency.

  13. Measurement of the dielectric properties of the epidermis and dermis at frequencies from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Wake, K; Watanabe, S

    2014-08-21

    Numerous studies have reported the measurements of the dielectric properties of the skin. Clarifying the manner in which the human body interacts with electromagnetic waves is essential for medical research and development, as well as for the safety assessment of electromagnetic wave exposure. The skin comprises several layers: the epidermis, the dermis, and the subcutaneous fat. Each of these skin layers has a different constitution; however, the previous measurements of their dielectric properties were typically conducted on tissue which included all three layers of the skin. This study presents novel dielectric property data for the epidermis and dermis with in vitro measurement at frequencies ranging from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz. Measured data was compared with literature values; in particular, the findings were compared with Gabriel's widely used data on skin dielectric properties. The experimental results agreed with the data reported by Gabriel for the dermis of up to 20 GHz, which is the upper limit of the range of frequencies at which Gabriel reported measurements. For frequencies of 20-100 GHz, the experimental results indicated larger values than those extrapolated from Gabriel's data using parametric expansion. For frequencies over 20 GHz, the dielectric properties provided by the parametric model tend toward the experimental results for the epidermis with increasing frequency. PMID:25082800

  14. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: 24 and 43 GHz Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Ed B.; Gordon, David; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Ma, Chopo; Naudet, Charles J.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Zhang, Li-Wei D.

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-band) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  15. Molecular bremsstrahlung radiation at GHz frequencies in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Samarai, Imen; Bérat, Corinne; Deligny, Olivier; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Montanet, François; Settimo, Mariangela; Stassi, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    A detection technique for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy ionization electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed estimate of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from this radiation is presented. The spectral intensity expected from the passage of the high-energy electrons of the cascade is also estimated. The absorption of the photons in the plasma of electrons and neutral molecules is shown to be negligible. The obtained spectral intensity is shown to be 2 ×1 0-21 W cm-2 GHz-1 at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of 1 017.5 eV . In addition, a recent measurement of bremsstrahlung radiation in air at gigahertz frequencies from a beam of electrons produced at 95 keV by an electron gun is also discussed and reasonably reproduced by the model.

  16. A 260-340 GHz Dual Chip Frequency Tripler for THz Frequency Multiplier Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Tripon-Canseliet, Charlotte; Ward, John S.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran

    2006-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a fix-tuned balanced frequency tripler working in the 260-340 GHz band to be the first stage of a x3x3x3 multiplier chain to 2.7 THz. The design of a dual-chip version of this multiplier featuring an input splitter / output combiner as part of the input / output matching networks of both chips - with no degradation of the expected bandwidth and efficiency- will be presented.

  17. Measurement of carrier envelope offset frequency for a 10 GHz etalon-stabilized semiconductor optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, M.; Davila-Rodriguez, J.; Ozdur, I.; Quinlan, F.; Ozharar, S.; Hoghooghi, N.; Delfyett, P. J.

    2011-08-01

    We report Carrier Envelope Offset (CEO) frequency measurements of a 10 GHz harmonically mode-locked, Fabry-Perot etalon-stabilized, semiconductor optical frequency comb source. A modified multi-heterodyne mixing technique with a reference frequency comb was utilized for the measurement. Also, preliminary results from an attempt at f-2f self-referencing measurement are presented. The CEO frequency was found to be ~1.47 GHz for the particular etalon that was used.

  18. Spin noise spectroscopy from acoustic to GHz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Performing perturbation free measurements on semiconductor quantum systems has long been banished to textbooks on quantum mechanics. The emergent technique of spin noise spectroscopy is challenging this restriction. Empowered only by the ever present intrinsic spin fluctuation dynamics in thermal equilibrium, spin noise spectroscopy is capable to directly deduce several physical properties of carriers spins in semiconductors from these fluctuations. Originating from spin noise measurements on alkali metal vapors in quantum optics [1] the method has become a powerful technique to unravel the intrinsic spin dynamics in semiconductors [2]. In this talk I will present the recent progress of spin noise spectroscopy and how it is used to monitor the spin dynamic in semiconductor quantum wells at thermal equilibrium and as a consequence thereof directly detect the spatial dynamics of the carriers being marked with their own spin on a microscopic scale [3]. Further I will present measurements of how the non-perturbative nature of spin noise spectroscopy gives valuable insight into the delicate dependence of the spin relaxation time of electrons on doping density and temperature in semiconductors n-doped in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition where hyperfine and intra-band depolarization compete [4]. Also the measurement bandwidth can be extended to GHz frequencies by ultrafast optical probing [5] yielding in conjunction with depth resolved spin noise measurements insights into the origin of inhomogeneous spin dephasing effects at high magnetic fields [5]. Additionally I will present how spin noise spectroscopy can be employed to spatially depth resolve doping profiles with optical resolution [6] and give a summary on easy to implement techniques of spin noise spectroscopy at acoustic frequencies in alkali metal vapors. [4pt] [1] E. Aleksandrov and V. Zapassky, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 81, 132 (1981); S. A. Crooker, D. G. Rickel, A. V. Balatsky, and D. L. Smith

  19. New space research frequency band proposals in the 20- to 40.5-GHz range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Future space research communications systems may require spectra above 20 GHz. Frequency bands above 20 GHz are identified that are suitable for space research. The selection of the proper bands depends on consideration of interference with other radio services, adequate bandwidths, link performance, and technical requirements for practical implementation.

  20. Hysteresis effects in instantaneous frequency scaling of attenuation on 20 and 30 GHz satellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, D. G.; Pratt, T.; Bostian, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    It has been observed with 20/30 GHz satellite beacon measurements that the ratio of 30 GHz to 20 GHz attenuation changes during some fade events. This ratio displays a hysteresis effect. This effect can be explained by a change in the drop size distribution (DSD) during the event. However, it appears only above approximately 6-8 dB of attenuation at 20 GHz. Instantaneous frequency scaling of attenuation is being proposed as part of an algorithm for uplink power control (ULPC) and the dynamic range of such an algorithm must be appropriately limited to avoid the hysteresis.

  1. Design and Development of Thermistor based Power Meter at 140 GHz Frequency Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajesh; Kush, Abhimanyue Kumar; Dixit, Rajendra Prasad

    2011-12-01

    Design and development of thermistor based power meter at 140 gigahertz (GHz) frequency band have been presented. Power meter comprises power sensor, amplifier circuit and dialog based graphical user interface in visual C++ for the average power measurement. The output power level of a component or system is very critical design factor. Thus there was a need of a power meter for the development of millimeter wave components at 140 GHz frequency band. Power sensor has been designed and developed using NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient) thermistors. The design aims at developing a direct, simple and inexpensive power meter that can be used to measure absolute power at 140 GHz frequency band. Due to absorption of 140 GHz frequencies, resistance of thermistor changes to a new value. This change in resistance of thermistor can be converted to a dc voltage change and amplified voltage change can be fed to computer through data acquisition card. Dialog based graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed in visual C++ language for average power measurement in dBm. WR6 standard rectangular waveguide is the input port for the sensor of power meter. Temperature compensation has been achieved. Moderate sensor return loss greater than 20 dB has been found over the frequency range 110 to 170 GHz. The response time of the power sensor is 10 second. Average power accuracy is better than ±0.25 dB within the power range from -10 to 10 dBm at 140 GHz frequency band.

  2. Demonstration of An Image Rejection Mixer for High Frequency Applications (26-36 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, Cheryl D.; Carlstrom, John E.

    1999-01-01

    A new high frequency image-rejection mixer was successfully tested in a 26-36 GHz band receiver. This paper briefly describes the motivation for implementation of an image rejection mixer in a receiver system, the basic operation of an image rejection mixer, and the development and testing of an image rejection mixer for a high frequency, cryogenic receiver system.

  3. Development of compact and ultra-high-resolution spectrograph with multi-GHz optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Mamoru; Sukegawa, Takashi; Silva, Alissa; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, a calibration method for an astronomical spectrograph using an optical frequency comb (OFC) with a repetition rate of more than ten GHz has been developed successfully [1-5]. But controlling filtering cavities that are used for thinning out longitudinal modes precludes long term stability. The super-mode noise coming from the fundamental repetition rate is an additional problem. We developed a laser-diode pumped Yb:Y2O3 ceramic oscillator, which enabled the generation of 4-GHz (maximum repetition rate of 6.7 GHz) pulse trains directly with a spectrum width of 7 nm (full-width half-maximum, FWHM), and controlled its optical frequency within a MHz level of accuracy using a beat note between the 4-GHz laser and a 246-MHz Yb-fiber OFC. The optical frequency of the Yb-fiber OFC was phase locked to a Rb clock frequency standard. Furthermore we also built a table-top multi-pass spectrograph with a maximum frequency resolution of 600 MHz and a bandwidth of 1 nm using a large-size high-efficiency transmission grating. The resolution could be changed by selecting the number of passes through the grating. This spectrograph could resolve each longitudinal mode of our 4-GHz OFC clearly, and more than 10% throughput was obtained when the resolution was set to 600 MHz. We believe that small and middle scale astronomical observatories could easily implement such an OFC-calibrated spectrograph.

  4. Transit-time devices as local oscillators for frequencies above 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, H.; Kidner, C.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    Very promising preliminary experimental results have been obtained from GaAs IMPATT diodes at F-band frequencies (75 mW, 3.5 percent at 111.1 GHz and 20 mW, 1.4 percent at 120.6 GHz) and from GaAs TUNNETT diodes at W-band frequencies (26 mW, 1.6 percent at 87.2 GHz and 32 mW, 2.6 percent at 93.5 GHz). These results indicate that IMPATT, MITATT and TUNNETT diodes have the highest potential of delivering significant amounts of power at Terahertz frequencies. As shown recently, the noise performance of GaAs W-band IMPATT diodes can compete with that of Gunn devices. Since TUNNETT diodes take advantage of the quieter tunnel injection, they are expected to be especially suited for low-noise local oscillators. This paper will focus on the two different design principles for IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes, the material parameters involved in the design and some aspects of the present device technology. Single-drift flat-profile GaAs D-band IMPATT diodes had oscillations up to 129 GHz with 9 mW, 0.9 percent at 128.4 GHz. Single-drift GaAs TUNNETT diodes had oscillations up to 112.5 GHz with 16 mW and output power levels up to 33 mW and efficiencies up to 3.4 percent around 102 GHz. These results are the best reported so far from GaAs IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes.

  5. On-wafer vector network analyzer measurements in the 220-325 Ghz frequency band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man Andy; Dawson, D.; Samoska, L.; Lee, K.; Oleson, C.; Boll, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a full two-port on-wafer vector network analyzer test set for the 220-325 GHz (WR3) frequency band. The test set utilizes Oleson Microwave Labs frequency extenders with the Agilent 8510C network analyzer. Two port on-wafer measurements are made with GGB Industries coplanar waveguide (CPW) probes. With this test set we have measured the WR3 band S-parameters of amplifiers on-wafer, and the characteristics of the CPW wafer probes. Results for a three stage InP HEMT amplifier show 10 dB gain at 235 GHz [1], and that of a single stage amplifier, 2.9 dB gain at 231 GHz. The approximate upper limit of loss per CPW probe range from 3.0 to 4.8 dB across the WR3 frequency band.

  6. Radiometric measurements over bare and vegetated fields at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. [Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Engman, E. T.; Jackson, T. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Microwave emission from bare and vegetated fields was measured with dual polarized radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields are shown to compare favorably with those calculated from radiative transfer theory with two constant parameters characterizing surface roughness effect. The presence of vegetation cover is found to reduce the sensitivity to soil moisture variation. This sensitivity reduction is generally pronounced the denser, the vegetation cover and the higher the frequency of observation. The effect of vegetation cover is also examined with respect to the measured polarization factor at both frequencies. With the exception of dry corn fields, the measured polarization factor over vegetated fields is found appreciably reduced compared to that over bare fields. A much larger reduction in this factor is found at 5GHz than at 1.4GHz frequency.

  7. Radiometer at a frequency of 108-120 GHz for study of the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordonskiy, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Calculated and experimental design and operating characteristics of a 108-120 GHz superheterodyne radiometer with intermediate frequency modulation and a second harmonic frequency converter are presented and discussed. With a 1 sec time constant, the radiometer fluctuation sensitivity threshold is 1 K, without degradation in 2 hours of operation. Graphs of frequency variations, calibration, conversion loss, rectified current, fixed bias voltage, and contact needle impedance are included.

  8. Development of frequency step tunable 1 MW gyrotron at 131 to 146.5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Samartsev, A.; Gantenbein, G.; Dammertz, G.; Illy, S.; Kern, S.; Leonhardt, W.; Schlaich, A.; Schmid, M.; Thumm, M.

    2011-07-01

    Effective control of power absorption in tokamaks and stellarators could be achieved by the frequency tuning of ECH and CD power delivered by high-power gyrotrons. In this report some results of the development of a frequency tunable gyrotron with fused-silica Brewster window are presented. Excitation of several modes at 1 MW power level in the range of frequencies from 131 to 146.5 GHz is achieved. (author)

  9. Frequency stability of InP HBT over 0.2 to 220 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijiang, Zhou; Kun, Ren; Jun, Liu; Wei, Cheng; Haiyan, Lu; Lingling, Sun

    2015-02-01

    The frequency stabilities of InP DHBTs in a broadband over 1 to 220 GHz are investigated. A hybrid π-topology small-signal model is used to accurately capture the parasitics of devices. The model parameters are extracted from measurements analytically. The investigation results show that the excellent agreement between the measured and simulated data is obtained in the frequency range 200 MHz to 220 GHz. The dominant parameters of the π-topology model, bias conditions and emitter area have significant effects on the stability factor K. The HBT model can be unconditionally stable by reasonable selection of the proper bias condition and the physical layout of the device.

  10. Propagation effects on satellite systems at frequencies below 10 GHz: A handbook for satellite systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, Warren L.

    1987-01-01

    Frequencies below 10 GHz continue to be used for a large portion of satellite service, and new applications, including mobile satellite service and the global positioning system, use frequencies below 10 GHz. As frequency decreases below 10 GHz, attenuation due to precipitation and gases decreases and ionospheric effects increase. Thus the ionosphere, which can be largely neglected above 10 GHz, receives major attention. Although attenuation and depolarization due to rain are less severe below 10 GHz than above, they are nevertheless still important and constitute another major topic. The handbook emphasizes the propagation effects on satellite communications but material that is pertinent to radio navigation and positioning systems and deep-space telecommunications is included as well. Chapter 1 through 7 describe the various propagation impairments, and Chapter 9 is devoted to the estimation or calculation of the magnitudes of these effects for use in system design. Chapter 10 covers link power budget equations and the role of propagation effects in these equations. Chapter 8 deals with the complex subject of interference between space and terrestrial systems.

  11. Precise laboratory measurements of methanol rotational transition frequencies in the 5 to 13 GHz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenridge, S. M.; Kukolich, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Rotational transitions for CH3OH were measured in the 5-13 GHz range with a precision and accuracy of a few kilohertz or less using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The accurate center frequencies measured should be useful in determining accurate Doppler shifts and making positive molecule identification in radio astronomy.

  12. A fully-differential phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixue, Kuang; Baoyong, Chi; Lei, Chen; Wen, Jia; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-12-01

    A 40-GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication applications is presented. The electrical characteristics of the passive components in the VCO and LO buffers are accurately extracted with an electromagnetic simulator HFSS. A differential tuning technique is utilized in the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to achieve higher common-mode noise rejection and better phase noise performance. The VCO and the divider chain are powered by a 1.0 V supply while the phase-frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump (CP) are powered by a 2.5 V supply to improve the linearity. The measurement results show that the total frequency locking range of the frequency synthesizer is from 37 to 41 GHz, and the phase noise from a 40 GHz carrier is -97.2 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the synthesizer consumes a DC power of 62 mW, including all the buffers.

  13. A solid-mounted resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boudot, R; Li, M D; Giordano, V; Rolland, N; Rolland, P A; Vincent, P

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a 4.596 GHz frequency synthesis based on a 2.1 GHz solid mounted resonator (SMR) voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO). The SMR oscillator presents a chip size lower than 2 mm(2), a power consumption of 18.2 mW, and exhibits a phase noise of -89 dBc/Hz and -131 dBc/Hz at 2 kHz and 100 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The VCO temperature-frequency dependence is measured to be -14 ppm∕°C over a range of -20°C to 60°C. From this source, a low noise frequency synthesizer is developed to generate a 4.596 GHz signal (half of the Cs atom hyperfine transition frequency) with a phase noise of -81 dBc/Hz and -120 dBc/Hz at 2 kHz and 100 kHz from the carrier. The frequency synthesis output is used as a local oscillator in a Cs vapor microcell-based compact atomic clock. Preliminary results are reported and discussed. To the authors knowledge, this is the first development of a SMR-oscillator-based frequency synthesizer for miniature atomic clocks applications. PMID:21456775

  14. Spacecraft mass trade-offs versus radio-frequency power and antenna size at 8 GHz and 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchriest, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to help determine the relative merits of 32 GHz over 8 GHz for future deep space communications. This analysis is only a piece of the overall analysis and only considers the downlink communication mass, power, and size comparisons for 8 and 32 GHz. Both parabolic antennas and flat-plate arrays are considered. The Mars Sample Return mission is considered in some detail as an example of the tradeoffs involved; for this mission the mass, power, and size show a definite advantage of roughly 2:1 in using the 32 GHz over 8 GHz.

  15. Direct stress optic coefficients for YTZP ceramic and PTFE at GHz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Schemmel, Peter; Diederich, Gilles; Moore, Andrew J

    2016-04-18

    We report the first measurement of the direct stress optic coefficient for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (YTZP) ceramic, using illumination between 260 and 380 GHz with applied stresses up to 27 MPa. YTZP exhibited a linear change in refractive index as a function of stress across the entire applied stress domain. A direct stress optic coefficient was also measured for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). PTFE showed viscoelastic behavior at stress values above 4.5 MPa. These results open the way for quantitative sub-surface stress measurements in structural ceramics and ceramic coating systems at GHz and THz frequencies. PMID:27137250

  16. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-05-20

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ∼10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT's length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8-3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices. PMID:27070404

  17. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Zhe Liu, Jefferson

    2016-05-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ∼10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8–3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices.

  18. A digitally compensated 1.5 GHz CMOS/FBAR frequency reference.

    PubMed

    Rai, Shailesh; Su, Ying; Pang, Wei; Ruby, Richard; Otis, Brian

    2010-03-01

    A temperature-compensated 1.5 GHz film bulk acoustic wave resonator (FBAR)-based frequency reference implemented in a 0.35 microm CMOS process is presented. The ultra-small form factor (0.79 mm x 1.72 mm) and low power dissipation (515 microA with 2 V supply) of a compensated FBAR oscillator present a promising alternative for the replacement of quartz crystal frequency references. The measured post-compensation frequency drift over a 0-100 degrees C temperature range is < +/- 10 ppm. The measured oscillator phase noise is -133 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz offset from the 1.5 GHz carrier. PMID:20211770

  19. The 2.2 GHz Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) oscillator development Ku-band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Two 2.2 GHz SAW oscillators using aluminum nitride on sapphire (AlN/Al2O3) delay lines were fabricated. The oscillators were electronically temperature compensated and characterized. One of the oscillators was used as the frequency reference for the Ku band source; the second oscillator is available for continued evaluation. A 15 GHz frequency source was designed and fabricated. The 15 GHz source consists of a Ku band FET oscillator which is phase locked to the frequency multiplied (X7) output of the 2.2 GHz SAW reference source. The Ku band source was built using microstrip circuit designs, which are hybrid compatible. Two wafer runs of 2.2 GHz TED devices were fabricated and evaluated. The devices were mounted on microstrip test substrates and evaluated as 15 GHz divide by 7 circuits. The device evaluation indicated that in their present form the TED is not a practical circuit element.

  20. In-Phase Power-Combined Frequency Tripler at 300 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John; Lin, Robert; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Mehdi, Imran; Javadi, Hamid; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2009-01-01

    This design starts with commercial 85- to 115-GHz sources that are amplified to as much as 250 mW using power amplifiers developed for the Herschel Space Observatory. The frequency is then tripled using a novel waveguide GaAs Schottky diode frequency tripler. This planar diode produces 26 mW at 318 GHz. Peak conversion efficiency is over 15 percent, and the measured bandwidth of about 265 - 30 GHz is limited more by the driving source than by the tripler itself. This innovation is based on an integrated circuit designed originally for a single-chip 260- to 340-GHz balanced tripler. The power-combined version has two mirror-image tripler chips that are power-combined in-phase in a single waveguide block using a compact Y-junction divider at the input waveguide, and a Y-junction combiner at the output waveguide. The tripler uses a split-block waveguide design with two independent DC bias lines.

  1. The functional correlation between rainfall rate and extinction coefficient for frequencies from 3 to 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rainfall rate (R) obtained from radiometric brightness temperatures and the extinction coefficient (k sub e) is investigated by computing the values of k sub e over a wide range of rainfall rates, for frequencies from 3 to 25 GHz. The results show that the strength of the relation between the R and the k sub e values exhibits considerable variation for frequencies at this range. Practical suggestions are made concerning the selection of particular frequencies for rain measurements to minimize the error in R determinations.

  2. Three MMIC Amplifiers for the 120-to-200 GHz Frequency Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Schmitz, Adele

    2009-01-01

    Closely following the development reported in the immediately preceding article, three new monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers that would operate in the 120-to-200-GHz frequency band have been designed and are under construction at this writing. The active devices in these amplifiers are InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). These amplifiers (see figure) are denoted the LSLNA150, the LSA200, and the LSA185, respectively. Like the amplifiers reported in the immediately preceding article, the LSLNA150 (1) is intended to be a prototype of low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into spaceborne instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation and (2) has potential for terrestrial use in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter-wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The HEMTs in this amplifier were fabricated according to 0.08- m design rules of a commercial product line of InP HEMT MMICs at HRL Laboratories, LLC, with a gate geometry of 2 fingers, each 15 m wide. On the basis of computational simulations, this amplifier is designed to afford at least 15 dB of gain, with a noise figure of no more than about 6 dB, at frequencies from 120 to 160 GHz. The measured results of the amplifier are shown next to the chip photo, with a gain of 16 dB at 150 GHz. Noise figure work is ongoing. The LSA200 and the LSA185 are intended to be prototypes of transmitting power amplifiers for use at frequencies between about 180 and about 200 GHz. These amplifiers have also been fabricated according to rules of the aforesaid commercial product line of InP HEMT MMICs, except that the HEMTs in these amplifiers are characterized by a gate geometry of 4 fingers, each 37 m wide. The measured peak performance of the LSA200 is characterized by a gain of about 1.4 dB at a frequency of 190 GHz; the measured peak performance of the LSA185 is characterized by a gain of about 2

  3. A review of depolarization modeling for earth-space radio paths at frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Gaines, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented of models for the depolarization, caused by scattering from raindrops and ice crystals, that limits the performance of dual-polarized satellite communication systems at frequencies above 10 GHz. The physical mechanisms of depolarization as well as theoretical formulations and empirical data are examined. Three theoretical models, the transmission, attenuation-derived, and scaling models, are described and their relative merits are considered.

  4. The highest frequency detection of a radio relic: 16 GHz AMI observations of the `Sausage' cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Rumsey, Clare; Harwood, Jeremy J.; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Saunders, Richard D. E.; Sobral, David; Perrott, Yvette C.; Schammel, Michel P.

    2014-06-01

    We observed the cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at 16 GHz and present the first high radio-frequency detection of diffuse, non-thermal cluster emission. This cluster hosts a variety of bright, extended, steep-spectrum synchrotron-emitting radio sources, associated with the intracluster medium, called radio relics. Most notably, the northern, Mpc-wide, narrow relic provides strong evidence for diffusive shock acceleration in clusters. We detect a puzzling, flat-spectrum, diffuse extension of the southern relic, which is not visible in the lower radio-frequency maps. The northern radio relic is unequivocally detected and measures an integrated flux of 1.2 ± 0.3 mJy. While the low-frequency (<2 GHz) spectrum of the northern relic is well represented by a power law, it clearly steepens towards 16 GHz. This result is inconsistent with diffusive shock acceleration predictions of ageing plasma behind a uniform shock front. The steepening could be caused by an inhomogeneous medium with temperature/density gradients or by lower acceleration efficiencies of high energy electrons. Further modelling is necessary to explain the observed spectrum.

  5. Toward a low-jitter 10 GHz pulsed source with an optical frequency comb generator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shijun; Hollberg, Leo; Newbury, Nathan R; Diddams, Scott A

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate low residual timing jitter of 10 GHz pulses from a 1.55 ?m optical frequency comb generator based on a doubly-resonant electro-optic modulator. The comb spectral phase is shown to be linear but of different slopes for the two sides of the optical spectrum. The linear phase delay predicts well the measured timing delay of the two pulse trains from the comb generator. The pulse timing jitter is analyzed, and we illustrate that the pump laser's linewidth plays a dominant role in the timing jitter. For Fourier frequencies from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, integrated residual timing jitter at 10 GHz was reduced from approximately 94 fs to approximately 8 fs when the pump laser's linewidth was reduced from approximately 10 MHz to approximately 1 kHz. An electronic servo was then used to stabilize the Fabry-Pérot cavity in the comb generator. Integrated residual timing jitter was further reduced to approximately 6 fs, and the corresponding residual phase noise power density is -105 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz frequency offset from the 10 GHz pulse carrier. PMID:18545564

  6. Development of a dual frequency (110/138 GHz) gyrotron for JT-60SA and its extension to an oscillation at 82 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashia, Takayuki; Moriyama, Shinichi; Isayama, Akihiko; Sawahata, Masayuki; Terakado, Masayuki; Hiranai, Shinichi; Wada, Kenji; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Hinata, Jun; Yokokura, Kenji; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2015-03-01

    A dual-frequency gyrotron, which can generate 110 GHz and 138 GHz waves independently, is being developed in JAEA to enable electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) in a wider range of plasma discharge conditions of JT-60SA. Conditioning operation of the gyrotron toward 1 MW for 100 s, which is the target output power and pulse length for JT-60SA, is in progress without significant problems. Oscillations of 1 MW for 10 s and 0.5 MW for 198 s were obtained, so far, at both frequencies. Cooling water temperatures in the gyrotron and matching optics unit were saturated in the 198 s oscillation, and the observed maximum water temperature is sufficiently low. In addition to the above activity on the dual-frequency gyrotron development, an oscillation (0.3 MW for 20 ms) at 82 GHz was demonstrated as an additional frequency of the dual-frequency gyrotron. A possibility of the use of fundamental harmonic wave at 82 GHz in JT-60SA has been shown.

  7. The widest frequency radio relic spectra: observations from 150 MHz to 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Shimwell, Timothy; Rumsey, Clare; van Weeren, Reinout; Kierdorf, Maja; Donnert, Julius; Jones, Thomas W.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Hoeft, Matthias; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Carmen; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Saunders, Richard D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Radio relics are patches of diffuse synchrotron radio emission that trace shock waves. Relics are thought to form when intracluster medium electrons are accelerated by cluster merger-induced shock waves through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we present observations spanning 150 MHz to 30 GHz of the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' relics from the Giant Metrewave and Westerbork telescopes, the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Effelsberg telescope, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We detect both relics at 30 GHz, where the previous highest frequency detection was at 16 GHz. The integrated radio spectra of both sources clearly steepen above 2 GHz, at the ≳6σ significance level, supporting the spectral steepening previously found in the `Sausage' and the Abell 2256 relic. Our results challenge the widely adopted simple formation mechanism of radio relics and suggest more complicated models have to be developed that, for example, involve re-acceleration of aged seed electrons.

  8. High-Frequency Wireless Communications System: 2.45-GHz Front-End Circuit and System Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, M.-H.; Huang, M.-C.; Ting, Y.-C.; Chen, H.-H.; Li, T.-L.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a course on high-frequency wireless communications systems is presented. With the 145-MHz baseband subsystem available from a prerequisite course, the present course emphasizes the design and implementation of the 2.45-GHz front-end subsystem as well as system integration issues. In this curriculum, the 2.45-GHz front-end…

  9. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-08-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm(-2) and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics. PMID:27396243

  10. Underwater Wireless Sensor Communications in the 2.4 GHz ISM Frequency Band

    PubMed Central

    Lloret, Jaime; Sendra, Sandra; Ardid, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in underwater communications is the low data rate available due to the use of low frequencies. Moreover, there are many problems inherent to the medium such as reflections, refraction, energy dispersion, etc., that greatly degrade communication between devices. In some cases, wireless sensors must be placed quite close to each other in order to take more accurate measurements from the water while having high communication bandwidth. In these cases, while most researchers focus their efforts on increasing the data rate for low frequencies, we propose the use of the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band in these special cases. In this paper, we show our wireless sensor node deployment and its performance obtained from a real scenario and measures taken for different frequencies, modulations and data transfer rates. The performed tests show the maximum distance between sensors, the number of lost packets and the average round trip time. Based on our measurements, we provide some experimental models of underwater communication in fresh water using EM waves in the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band. Finally, we compare our communication system proposal with the existing systems. Although our proposal provides short communication distances, it provides high data transfer rates. It can be used for precision monitoring in applications such as contaminated ecosystems or for device communicate at high depth. PMID:22666029

  11. Underwater wireless sensor communications in the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Jaime; Sendra, Sandra; Ardid, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in underwater communications is the low data rate available due to the use of low frequencies. Moreover, there are many problems inherent to the medium such as reflections, refraction, energy dispersion, etc., that greatly degrade communication between devices. In some cases, wireless sensors must be placed quite close to each other in order to take more accurate measurements from the water while having high communication bandwidth. In these cases, while most researchers focus their efforts on increasing the data rate for low frequencies, we propose the use of the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band in these special cases. In this paper, we show our wireless sensor node deployment and its performance obtained from a real scenario and measures taken for different frequencies, modulations and data transfer rates. The performed tests show the maximum distance between sensors, the number of lost packets and the average round trip time. Based on our measurements, we provide some experimental models of underwater communication in fresh water using EM waves in the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band. Finally, we compare our communication system proposal with the existing systems. Although our proposal provides short communication distances, it provides high data transfer rates. It can be used for precision monitoring in applications such as contaminated ecosystems or for device communicate at high depth. PMID:22666029

  12. High-Power Ka-Band Transmission Line with a Frequency Bandwidth of 1 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdashov, A. A.; Denisov, G. G.; Samsonov, S. V.; Gachev, I. G.; Dominyuk, Ya. V.; Murzin, V. N.; Levitan, B. A.

    2016-03-01

    We present experimental results on a high-power transmission line from the broadband pulsed Ka-band gyro-TWT to the phased antenna array. The transmission line is designed to operate in a pulse-periodic regime with a pulse width of up to 250 μs, a duty factor of 8, and an average output power of up to 15 kW. Amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of the transmission line were measured at a low power level. It is shown that the nonlinearity of the phase-frequency characteristic does not exceed ±10° in the 34 ± 0.5 GHz frequency band.

  13. Observations of the frequency tuning effect in the 14 GHz CAPRICE ion source.

    PubMed

    Celona, L; Ciavola, G; Consoli, F; Gammino, S; Maimone, F; Mascali, D; Spädtke, P; Tinschert, K; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Robbach, J; Barbarino, S; Catalano, R S

    2008-02-01

    A set of measurements with the CAPRICE ion source at the GSI test bench has been carried out to investigate its behavior in terms of intensity and shape of the extracted beam when the microwaves generating the plasma sweep in a narrow range of frequency (+/-40 MHz) around the klystron center frequency (14.5 GHz). Remarkable variations have been observed depending on the source and the beamline operating parameters, confirming that a frequency dependent electromagnetic distribution is preserved even in the presence of plasma inside the source. Moreover, these observations confirm that the frequency tuning is a powerful method to optimize the electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances. A description of the experimental setup and of the obtained results is given in the following. PMID:18315291

  14. Generation of a 20 GHz train of subpicosecond pulses with a stabilized optical-frequency-comb generator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shijun; Hollberg, Leo; Diddams, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    With a modulator-based 10 GHz optical-frequency-comb generator at 1.55 microm, we report a 20 GHz repetitive train of optical pulses as short as 450 fs. The timing stability of the 20 GHz pulses, in addition to the phase for optical-comb modes, shows a strong dependence on the relative frequency detuning between the comb generator's cavity and the seed cw laser. With a new and simple scheme, the comb generator's cavity resonance was locked to a narrow-linewidth seed laser within an estimated optical-frequency range < or = 6 MHz, enabling high-fidelity 20 GHz subpicosecond pulses and stable optical-frequency-comb generation for indefinite periods. PMID:19109648

  15. Study of the dielectric properties of water in the frequency range 75-120 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furashov, N. I.; Dudin, V. E.; Sverdlov, B. A.

    2006-06-01

    We study experimentally the frequency dependences of the refractive index n and the absorption coefficient k of distilled, sea, and river water. The measurements were performed using a quasioptical device with a backward-wave oscillator as the radiation source and OAP-7 optical-acoustic receivers at a water temperature of 27°C in the cell. The quantities n and k were determined from the measured transmission and reflection coefficients of the cell with water by means of joint numerical solution of the equations for these quantities. For distilled water in the frequency range f = 75-120 GHz, we obtained n = 6.142-3.926 · 10-2f[GHz] + 1.307 · 10-4(f[GHz])2 and k = 3.607-2.101 · 10-2 f[GHz] + 5.252 · 10-5(f[GHz])2. On the whole, these data are in good agreement with the measurement results obtained by other authors at several frequencies of the indicated range and coincide with the calculation data based on the models by Meissner and Wentz and by Liebe et al. within the limits of the rms determination errors 0.05 and 0.02 for the parameters n and k, respectively. The values of n and k for different seawater samples and river water containing insoluble admixtures coincide with the values of these quantities for distilled water within the limits of the experimental measurement errors 3-5% and 1-2%, respectively. The dependences n(f) and k(f) obtained experimentally for seawater are compared with those calculated on the basis of the developed models. Measurements of the transmission spectrum of a cell with double distilled water were performed for low power density of radiation (less than µW/cm2) to reproduce the effect of water resonant transparency reported many times in the literature. Our measurements did not reveal any resonant features in the spectral behavior of the refractive index n and the absorption coefficient k of water and gave the same result as for a power density exceeding the threshold of appearance of this effect.

  16. a New Broadband Cavity Enhanced Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique Using GHz Vernier Filtering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morville, Jérôme; Rutkowski, Lucile; Dobrev, Georgi; Crozet, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a new approach to Cavity Enhanced - Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy where the full emission bandwidth of a Titanium:Sapphire laser is exploited at GHz resolution. The technique is based on a low-resolution Vernier filtering obtained with an appreciable -actively stabilized- mismatch between the cavity Free Spectral Range and the laser repetition rate, using a diffraction grating and a split-photodiode. This particular approach provides an immunity to frequency-amplitude noise conversion, reaching an absorption baseline noise in the 10-9 cm-1 range with a cavity finesse of only 3000. Spectra covering 1800 cm-1 (˜ 55 THz) are acquired in recording times of about 1 second, providing an absorption figure of merit of a few 10-11 cm-1/√{Hz}. Initially tested with ambient air, we report progress in using the Vernier frequency comb method with a discharge source of small radicals. Rutkowski et al, Opt. Lett., 39(23)2014

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization by frequency modulation of a tunable gyrotron of 260 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Cuanillon, Philippe; Braunmueller, Falk; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) signal intensity is obtained with a tunable gyrotron producing frequency modulation around 260 GHz at power levels less than 1 W. The sweep rate of frequency modulation can reach 14 kHz, and its amplitude is fixed at 50 MHz. In water/glycerol glassy ice doped with 40 mM TEMPOL, the relative increase in the DNP enhancement was obtained as a function of frequency-sweep rate for several temperatures. A 68 % increase was obtained at 15 K, thus giving a DNP enhancement of about 80. By employing λ / 4 and λ / 8 polarizer mirrors, we transformed the polarization of the microwave beam from linear to circular, and achieved an increase in the enhancement by a factor of about 66% for a given power.

  18. LC nano composites based patch antenna @ 12 GHz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Afaque; Yadav, Harsh; Hasan, Shakebul; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of multiferroic Bismuth Ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles dispersed in nematic liquid crystal(NLC) i.e. 4-Cyano-4'-Pentylbiphenyl (5CB) on the orientational ordering at different biasing voltages (At 0V and 2V).The concentration of BFO nanoparticles doped was 0.5Mol% in NLC. Results shows that dielectric parameters are strong function of frequency and applied bias voltage. Moreover, Patch Antenna was designed based on Liquid Crystal (LC) Nanocomposites (LC+0.5 Mol%BFO nanoparticles) for earth and space applications. To fulfill the demand of modern antenna i.e. tunability, we have investigated a design of LC Nanocomposities based patch antenna with optimum frequency of 12 GHz. In this design, BFO nanoparticles dispersed in NLC is used as a dielectric substrate. Its dielectric permittivity is controlled by biasing voltage. Thus one gets tunability or shift in resonant frequency in the proposed geometry.

  19. Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (100 kHz-2 GHz) in Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rufo, M Montaña; Paniagua, Jesús M; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid increase in people's exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reports the measurements of radiofrequency (RF) total power densities and power density spectra in 35 towns of the region of Extremadura, Spain. The spectra were taken with three antennas covering frequencies from 100 kHz to 2.2 GHz. This frequency range includes AM/FM radio broadcasting, television, and cellular telephone signals. The power density data and transmitting antenna locations were stored in a geographic information system (GIS) as an aid in analyzing and interpreting the results. The results showed the power density levels to be below the reference level guidelines for human exposure and that the power densities are different for different frequency ranges and different size categories of towns. PMID:22048492

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization by frequency modulation of a tunable gyrotron of 260GHz.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Cuanillon, Philippe; Braunmueller, Falk; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) signal intensity is obtained with a tunable gyrotron producing frequency modulation around 260GHz at power levels less than 1W. The sweep rate of frequency modulation can reach 14kHz, and its amplitude is fixed at 50MHz. In water/glycerol glassy ice doped with 40mM TEMPOL, the relative increase in the DNP enhancement was obtained as a function of frequency-sweep rate for several temperatures. A 68 % increase was obtained at 15K, thus giving a DNP enhancement of about 80. By employing λ/4 and λ/8 polarizer mirrors, we transformed the polarization of the microwave beam from linear to circular, and achieved an increase in the enhancement by a factor of about 66% for a given power. PMID:26759116

  1. Signatures of Hydrometeor Species from Airborne Passive Microwave Data for Frequencies 10-183 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Leppert, Kenneth, II

    2014-01-01

    There are 2 basic precipitation retrieval methods using passive microwave measurements: (1) Emission-based: Based on the tendency of liquid precipitation to cause an increase in brightness temperature (BT) primarily at frequencies below 22 GHz over a radiometrically cold background, often an ocean background (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Adler et al. 1991; McGaughey et al. 1996); and (2) Scattering-based: Based on the tendency of precipitation-sized ice to scatter upwelling radiation, thereby reducing the measured BT over a relatively warmer (usually land) background at frequencies generally 37 GHz (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Smith et al. 1992; Ferraro and Marks 1995). Passive microwave measurements have also been used to detect intense convection (e.g., Spencer and Santek 1985) and for the detection of hail (e.g., Cecil 2009; Cecil and Blankenship 2012; Ferraro et al. 2014). The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission expands upon the successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission program to provide global rainfall and snowfall observations every 3 hours (Hou et al. 2014). One of the instruments on board the GPM Core Observatory is the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) which is a conically-scanning microwave radiometer with 13 channels ranging from 10-183 GHz. Goal of this study: Determine the signatures of various hydrometeor species in terms of BTs measured at frequencies used by GMI by using data collected on 3 case days (all having intense/severe convection) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment conducted over Oklahoma in 2011.

  2. 64 Gbit/s Transmission over 850 m Fixed Wireless Link at 240 GHz Carrier Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallfass, Ingmar; Boes, Florian; Messinger, Tobias; Antes, Jochen; Inam, Anns; Lewark, Ulrich; Tessmann, Axel; Henneberger, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    A directive fixed wireless link operating at a center frequency of 240 GHz achieves a data rate of 64 Gbit/s over a transmission distance of 850 m using QPSK and 8PSK modulation, in a single-channel approach without the use of spatial diversity concepts. The analog transmit and receive frontend consists of active monolithic integrated circuits including broadband RF amplification and quadrature subharmonic mixer channels. The analog frontend is addressed by 64 GSa/s ADC and DAC boards, which are amenable to real-time data transmission. A link budget calculation allows for the estimation of the performance under adverse weather conditions.

  3. Universal MOSFET gate impedance model for 200 MHz-20 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Sri Priya R.; Washburn, Clyde; Mukund, P. R.; Kolnik, Jan; Paradis, Ken; Howard, Steve; Burleson, Jeff

    2006-07-01

    The scaling of CMOS technology to 100 nm and below and the endless pursuit of higher operating frequencies drives the need to accurately model effects such as gate leakage and the deterioration of transport characteristics that dominate at those feature sizes and frequencies. Current modeling techniques are frequency limited and require different models for different frequency ranges in order to achieve accuracy goals. In the foundry world, high frequency models are typically empirical in nature and significantly lag their low frequency counterparts in terms of availability. This tends to slow the adoption of new foundry technologies for high performance applications such as extremely high data rate serializer/deserializer (SERDES) transceiver cores. However, design cycle time and time to market while transitioning between technology nodes can be reduced by incorporating a re-usable, industry-standard model. This work proposes such a model for device gate impedance that is simulator-friendly, compact, frequency-independent, and relatively portable across technology nodes. This semi-empirical gate impedance model is based on depletion in the poly-silicon gate electrode. The model performs accurately over 200 MHz-20 GHz at different bias conditions and widths and has been verified by measured data in three technology nodes. The model and model parameter behavior are consistent across technology nodes thereby enabling re-usability and portability.

  4. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi Ping; Cheng, De Ming; Ma, Wen Jing; Hu, Jing Wei; Yin, Yan Hong; Hu, Ying Yan; Li, Ye Sheng; Yang, Jian Gao; Xu, Qian Feng

    2015-06-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of carbon nanotube (CNT) macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ˜4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly different from that of traditional electromagnetic shielding materials that show a lower EMI SE with increasing frequency. For example, the EMI SE of Cu foils decrease from 75 dB to 35 dB as frequency increases from 25 GHz to 60 GHz. Considering their stable and outstanding EMI SE and easy manipulation, the composite CNT macro-films are expected to have potential applications in shielding against millimeter waves.

  5. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-07-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm-2 and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics.Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To

  6. Propagation effects on satellite systems at frequencies below 10 GHz, a handbook for satellite systems design, 1st edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite communications below about 6 GHz may need to contend with ionospheric effects, including Faraday rotation and ionospheric scintillation, which become increasingly significant with decreasing frequency. Scintillation is most serious in equatorial, auroral, and polar latitudes; even the 4 to 6 GHz frequency range turns out to be subject to scintillation to a significant degree of equatorial latitudes. Faraday rotation, excess range or time delay, phase advance, Doppler frequency fluctuations, and dispersion are proportional to total electron content (TEC) or its variation along the path. Tropospheric refraction and fading affects low angle satellite transmissions as well as terrestrial paths. Attenuation and depolarization due to rain become less important with decreasing frequency but need consideration for frequencies of about 4 GHz and higher. Empirically derived relations are useful for estimating the attenuation expected due to rain for particular percentages of time. Aeronautical, maritime, and land mobile satellite services are subject to fading due to multipath propagation.

  7. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of soft magnetic Nd2Co17 micron flakes fractured along c crystal plane with natural resonance frequency exceeding 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbo; Wang, Peng; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Planar anisotropy Nd2Co17 flakes fractured along c crystal plane were fabricated by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling technique. The magnetic flakes have a diameter range of 5-20 μm and a typical thickness of approximately 120 nm. The frequency dependence of complex permeability of Nd2Co17 epoxy resin composite has been investigated in the frequency range of 0.1-18 GHz. The measurement results show that the natural resonance frequency reaches 12.5 GHz while the initial permeability survives up to 2.26. The superior high frequency properties come from the large out-of-plane anisotropy field and the flake structure fractured along the c crystal plane of Nd2Co17. The planar anisotropic Nd2Co17 flakes have significant potential applications in the high-frequency devices working in the frequency beyond 10 GHz.

  8. Design of a 2.4-GHz CMOS monolithic fractional-N frequency synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Keliu

    The wireless communication technology and market have been growing rapidly since a decade ago. The high demand market is a driving need for higher integration in the wireless transceivers. The trend is to achieve low-cost, small form factor and low power consumption. With the ever-reducing feature size, it is becoming feasible to integrate the RF front-end together with the baseband in the low-cost CMOS technology. The frequency synthesizer is a key building block in the RF front-end of the transceivers. It is used as a local oscillator for frequency translation and channel selection. The design of a 2.4-GHz low-power frequency synthesizer in 0.35mum CMOS is a challenging task mainly due to the high-speed prescaler. In this dissertation, a brief review of conventional PLL and frequency synthesizers is provided. Design techniques of a 2.4-GHz monolithic SigmaDelta fractional-N frequency synthesizer are investigated. Novel techniques are proposed to tackle the speed and integration bottlenecks of high-frequency PLL. A low-power and inherently glitch-free phase-switching prescaler and an on-chip loop filter with capacitance multiplier are developed. Compared with the existing and popular dual-path topology, the proposed loop filter reduces circuit complexity and its power consumption and noise are negligible. Furthermore, a third-order three-level digital SigmaDelta modulator topology is employed to reduce the phase noise generated by the modulator. Suitable PFD and charge-pump designs are employed to reduce their nonlinearity effects and thus minimize the folding of the SigmaDelta modulator-shaped phase noise. A prototype of the fractional-N synthesizer together with some standalone building blocks is designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35mum CMOS through MOSIS. The prototype frequency synthesizer and standalone prescaler and loop filter are characterized. The feasibility and practicality of the proposed prescaler and loop filter are experimentally verified.

  9. Thermoregulatory responses of rats exposed to 9. 3-GHz radio-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, M.R.; Jauchem, J.R.; Heinmets, F.

    1987-10-15

    Ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in H orientation to far-field 9.3-GHz continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed (2 microseconds 500 pps) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at average power densities of 30 and 60 mW/sq. cm (whole-body average specific absorption rates of 9.3 and 18.6 W/kg, respectively). Irradiation was conducted to cyclicly increase colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5 C. Colonic, tympanic, and subcutaneous temperatures, ECG, blood pressure, and respiratory rate were continuously recorded during experimentation. At both power densities, the subcutaneous and tympanic temperature increases significantly exceeded the colonic temperature increase. At both exposure levels, heart rate increased significantly during irradiation and returned to baseline when exposure was discontinued. Blood pressure and respiratory rate did not significantly change during irradiation. There were no significant differences between the effects of CW and pulsed RFR exposure. The levels of subcutaneous heating and heart rate change were greater, and the times required to achieve and to recover from a 1 C colonic temperature increase were longer than in previous studies conducted at 2.8 GHz. Results of these studies indicate that the carrier frequency used during irradiation markedly affects the pattern of heat distribution and the physiological responses of RF-irradiated animals.

  10. Analysis of a 170-GHz frequency doubler with an array of planar diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuovinen, Jussi; Erickson, Neal R.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of a planar diode multiplier from 85-170 GHz is described. The doubler uses a waveguide mount with two series pairs of diodes in a balanced structure. Because of the difficulties in conventional scale model measurements, numerical electromagnetic simulation based on the finite element method was chosen for the analysis, using a commercial program. To optimize the diode design, the de-embedded diode terminal impedance was studied, as well as the power balance between the diodes. The analysis showed that the matching of the diode impedance to that of the waveguide is quite sensitive to the diode substrate thickness. Thicknesses from 25-100 micron in GaAs were studied as well as 100-micron-thick quartz. The accuracy of the theoretical analysis was verified by careful measurements using a slotted line to determine the diode terminal impedance under large signal pump, for frequencies between 80 and 90 GHz. Good agreement between the measured and simulated diode terminal impedance was observed, although full agreement requires the addition of an empirical loss term. Several options are considered for the source of this loss.

  11. A High Efficiency Multiple-Anode 260-340 GHz Frequency Tripler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Tripon-Canseliet, Charlotte; Ward, John S.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of a fixed-tuned split-block waveguide balanced frequency tripler working in the 260-340 GHz band. This tripler will be the first stage of a x3x3x3 multiplier chain to 2.7 THz (the last stages of which are being fabricated at JPL) and is therefore optimized for high power operation. The multiplier features six GaAs Schottky planar diodes in a balanced configuration integrated on a GaAs membrane. Special attention was put on splitting the input power as evenly as possible among the diodes in order to ensure that no diode is overdriven. Preliminary RF tests indicate that the multiplier covers the expected bandwidth and that the efficiency is in the range 1.5-7.5 % with 100 mW of input power.

  12. A 540-640-GHz High-efficiency Four-anode Frequency Tripler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John S.; Gill, John J.; Javadi, Hamid S.; Schlecht, Erich; Tripon-Canseliet, Charlotte; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, Imran

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design and performance of a broad-band, high-power 540-640-GHz fix-tuned balanced frequency tripler chip that utilizes four planar Schottky anodes. The suspended strip-line circuit is fabricated with a 12-micron-thick support frame and is mounted in a split waveguide block. The chip is supported by thick beam leads that are also used to provide precise RF grounding. At room temperature, the tripler delivers 0.9-1.8 mW across the band with an estimated efficiency of 4.5%-9%. When cooled to 120 K, the tripler provides 2.0-4.2 mW across the band with an estimated efficiency of 8%-12%.

  13. Microwave noise temperature and attenuation of clouds at frequencies below 50 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    The microwave attenuation and noise temperature effects of clouds can result in serious degradation of telecommunications link performance, especially for low-noise systems presently used in deep-space communications. Although cloud effects are generally less than rain effects, the frequent presence of clouds will cause some amount of link degradation a large portion of the time. Cloud types, water particle densities, radiative transfer, attenuation and noise temperature calculations are reviewed and examples of basic link signal to noise ratio calculations are given. Calculations for twelve different cloud models are presented for frequencies of from 1 to 50 GHz and elevation angles of 30 degrees and 90 degrees. These case results may be used as a handbook to predict noise temperature and attenuation values for known or forecast cloud conditions.

  14. 1/f frequency noise of 2-GHZ high-Q thin-film sapphire resonators.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Pikal, E S; Delgado Arámburo, M C; Walls, F L; Lakin, K M

    2001-03-01

    We present experimental results on intrinsic 1/f frequency modulation (FM) noise in high-overtone thin-film sapphire resonators that operate at 2 GHz. The resonators exhibit several high-Q resonant modes approximately 100 kHz apart, which repeat every 13 MHz. A loaded Q of approximately 20,000 was estimated from the phase response. The results show that the FM noise of the resonators varied between Sy (10 Hz) = -202 dB relative (rel) to 1/Hz and -210 dB rel to 1/Hz. The equivalent phase modulation (PM) noise of an oscillator using these resonators (assuming a noiseless amplifier) would range from [symbol: see text](10 Hz) = -39 to -47 dBc/Hz. PMID:11370364

  15. Time-Resolved SQUID Sensor with a Nyquist Frequency up to 25 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Wang, Y. H.; Kratz, P.; Rosenberg, A. J.; Watson, C. A.; Sochnikov, I.; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Gibson, G.; Kirtley, J. R.; Ketchen, M. B.; Moler, K. A.

    We demonstrate a time-resolved scanning Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensor with an expected maximum sampling rate of 50 GHz. The time-resolved SQUID sampler is operated by a pump-probe pulse sequence and will be particularly useful in studying high-frequency magnetic devices and the transient behavior of magnetic materials. The high sampling rate is achieved through a Josephson-interferometry technique developed at IBM. We tested our sampler with flux signals of order 10 mΦ0 (where Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum), which corresponds to 25 million Bohr magnetons located 1 micron directly below the pickup loop. Operating in this regime, our sampler will have much higher sensitivity than bulk sensors like conventional SQUIDs and much larger spatial scanning range than single-spin sensors like NV centers. The SQUID sampler will thus be well-suited to characterize individual mesoscopic samples as well as bulk samples with mesoscopic features.

  16. Low power low phase noise phase locked loop frequency synthesizer with fast locking mode for 2.4 GHz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Feng, Peng; Liu, Liyuan; Wu, Nanjian

    2014-01-01

    We designed a low power low phase noise phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 2.4 GHz wireless communication applications. Current reusing technique and triple-well NMOS transistors are applied to reduce power consumption and improve phase noise performance of the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), respectively. The synthesizer has a fast locking mode that uses frequency presetting technique to greatly shorten the locking time. The synthesizer was implemented in 0.18 µm CMOS process. The chip core area is 1.49 mm2. Measured results show that the output frequency tuning range is 2.16-2.55 GHz. The phase noise is -124.18 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz from a 2.4 GHz carrier. The power consumption is 4.98 mW and the locking time in fast locking mode is about 4 µs.

  17. All-optical generation of a 21 GHz microwave carrier by incorporating a double-Brillouin frequency shifter.

    PubMed

    Shee, Y G; Mahdi, M A; Al-Mansoori, M H; Yaakob, S; Mohamed, R; Zamzuri, A K; Man, A; Ismail, A; Hitam, S

    2010-05-01

    An all-optical generation of a microwave carrier at 21 GHz that incorporates a double-Brillouin frequency shifter is presented. The frequency shift of approximately 21 GHz is achieved by generating the second-order Brillouin Stokes signal from the Brillouin pump. This is accomplished through the circulation and isolation of its first-order Stokes signal in the optical fiber. The Brillouin pump signal is heterodyned with its second-order Brillouin Stokes signal at a high-speed photodetector, and the output beating frequency is equal to the offset between these two signals. The generated microwave carrier is measured at 21.3968 GHz, and the carrier phase noise as low as -58.67 dBc/Hz is achieved. PMID:20436603

  18. A 23.75-GHz frequency comb with two low-finesse filtering cavities in series for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hou; Hai-Nian, Han; Wei, Wang; Long, Zhang; Li-Hui, Pang; De-Hua, Li; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2015-02-01

    A laser frequency comb with several tens GHz level is demonstrated, based on a Yb-doped femtosecond fiber laser and two low-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavities (FPCs) in series. The original 250-MHz mode-line-spacing of the source comb is filtered to 4.75 GHz and 23.75 GHz, respectively. According to the multi-beam interferences theory of FPC, the side-mode suppression rate of FPC schemes is in good agreement with our own theoretical results from 27 dB of a single FPC to 43 dB of paired FPCs. To maintain long-term stable operation and determine the absolute frequency mode number in the 23.75-GHz comb, the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) locking technology is utilized. Such stable tens GHz frequency combs have important applications in calibrating astronomical spectrographs with high resolution. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11078022 and 61378040).

  19. A 0.8-4.2 GHz monolithic all-digital PLL based frequency synthesizer for wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanxin, Zhao; Yuanpei, Gao; Wei, Li; Ning, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2015-01-01

    A 0.8-4.2 GHz monolithic all-digital PLL based frequency synthesizer for wireless communications is successfully realized by the 130 nm CMOS process. A series of novel methods are proposed in this paper. Two band DCOs with high frequency resolution are utilized to cover the frequency band of interest, which is as wide as 2.5 to 5 GHz. An overflow counter is proposed to prevent the “pulse-swallowing” phenomenon so as to significantly reduce the locking time. A NTW-clamp digital module is also proposed to prevent the overflow of the loop control word. A modified programmable divider is presented to prevent the failure operation at the boundary. The measurement results show that the output frequency range of this frequency synthesizer is 0.8-4.2 GHz. The locking time achieves a reduction of 84% at 2.68 GHz. The best in-band and out-band phase noise performances have reached -100 dBc/Hz, and -125 dBc/Hz respectively. The lowest reference spur is -58 dBc.

  20. The possibilities for mobile and fixed services up to the 20/30 GHz frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Clifford D.; Feliciani, F.; Spiller, J.

    Satellite Communications and broadcasting is presently in a period of considerable change. In the fixed service there is strong competition from terrestrial fiber optic systems which have virtually arrested the growth of the traditional satellite market for long distance high capacity communications. The satellite has however made considerable progress in areas where it has unique advantages; for example, in point to multipoint (broadcasting), multipoint to point (data collection) and generally in small terminal system applications where flexibility of deployment coupled with ease of installation are of importance. In the mobile service, in addition to the already established geostationary systems, there are numerous proposals for HEO, MEO and LEO systems. There are also several new frequency allocations as a result of the WARC 92 to be taken into account. At one extreme there are researchers working on Ka band 20/30 GHz mobile systems and there are other groups who foresee no future above the L-band frequency allocations. Amongst all these inputs it is difficult to see the direction in which development activities both for satellites and for earth segment should be focused. However, as an aid to understanding, this paper seeks to find some underlying relationships and to clarify some of the variables.

  1. The possibilities for mobile and fixed services up to the 20/30 GHz frequency bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Clifford D.; Feliciani, F.; Spiller, J.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite Communications and broadcasting is presently in a period of considerable change. In the fixed service there is strong competition from terrestrial fiber optic systems which have virtually arrested the growth of the traditional satellite market for long distance high capacity communications. The satellite has however made considerable progress in areas where it has unique advantages; for example, in point to multipoint (broadcasting), multipoint to point (data collection) and generally in small terminal system applications where flexibility of deployment coupled with ease of installation are of importance. In the mobile service, in addition to the already established geostationary systems, there are numerous proposals for HEO, MEO and LEO systems. There are also several new frequency allocations as a result of the WARC 92 to be taken into account. At one extreme there are researchers working on Ka band 20/30 GHz mobile systems and there are other groups who foresee no future above the L-band frequency allocations. Amongst all these inputs it is difficult to see the direction in which development activities both for satellites and for earth segment should be focused. However, as an aid to understanding, this paper seeks to find some underlying relationships and to clarify some of the variables.

  2. Multifunction 35-GHz FMCW radar with frequency scanning antenna for synthetic vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tospann, Franz-Jose; Pirkl, Martin; Gruener, W.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental radar at 35 GHz in development at Daimler-Benz Aerospace, Ulm, Airborne Systems Division. This radar uses FMCW Frequency modulation waveforms with a frequency scanning antenna covering an azimuth sector of more than 30 degrees. Several signal processing algorithms, e.g. CFAR and contrast enhancement, have been developed for different applications. Due to the electronic scanning of the radar beam, an update rate of up to 15 pictures per second can be achieved as required for synthetic vision systems in aircraft. High resolution in both range and azimuth make this design suitable for a wide range of applications. The radar is suitable for use in helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft. Helicopter applications are obstacle warning (including wire detection), terrain avoidance, ground mapping and weather detection. Fixed wing aircraft applications are runway detection including detection of obstacles at the runway and taxiways. The demonstrator is used to verify the functionality of this radar design. Technical data and measurement results will be presented. Based on these measurements the radar performance will be evaluated.

  3. Two compact preamps cover 38-GHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbrink, N. K.; Fake, S. R.; Rosenberg, J. C.

    1985-09-01

    The design and performance characteristics of two compact preamplifiers that provide complete coverage of the 2-18 and 18-40 GHz frequency bands are examined. The 2-18-GHz prototype amplifier consists of four stages of thin-film hybrid microwave integrated circuit (MIC) amplification modules each of which incorporates a single GaAs distributed microwave integrated circuit (MMIC). The amplifier weights about 2 ounces and measures 1.75 x 1.15 x 0.67 inches. The 18-40-GHz amplifier consists of five thin-film MIC balanced gain stages and a MIC voltage regulator module with a throughline. The amplifier displays worst-case noise figures of 11.6 dB at the low frequency end of the band and less than 8 dB over much of the band.

  4. 47 CFR 101.17 - Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band. 101.17 Section 101.17 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses General...

  5. 47 CFR 101.17 - Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band. 101.17 Section 101.17 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses General...

  6. 47 CFR 101.17 - Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band. 101.17 Section 101.17 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses General...

  7. 47 CFR 101.17 - Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band. 101.17 Section 101.17 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses General...

  8. 47 CFR 101.17 - Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Performance requirements for the 38.6-40.0 GHz frequency band. 101.17 Section 101.17 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses General...

  9. Octave-spanning Ti:sapphire laser with a repetition rate >1 ghz for optical frequency measurements and comparisons.

    PubMed

    Fortier, T M; Bartels, A; Diddams, S A

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate a self-referenced, octave-spanning, mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser with a scalable repetition rate (550 MHz - 1.35 GHz). We use the frequency comb output of the laser, without additional broadening in optical fiber, for simultaneous measurements against atomic optical standards at 534, 578, 563, and 657 nm and to stabilize the laser offset frequency. PMID:16599240

  10. Fine resolution calculations of SAR in the human body for frequencies up to 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, P J

    2002-08-21

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed from 100 MHz to 3 GHz at the basic 2 mm resolution of the voxel (volume pixel) model NORMAN without any rescaling to larger cell sizes. The reduction in the voxel size from previous work allows SAR to be calculated at higher frequencies. Additionally, the calculations have been extended down to 10 MHz, covering the whole-body resonance regions at a resolution of 4 mm. As well as for the adult phantom, SAR values are calculated for scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children for both grounded and isolated conditions. External electric field levels are derived from limits of whole-body averaged SAR and localized SAR in the ankle, and compared with NRPB investigation levels and ICNIRP reference levels. The ICNIRP field reference levels alone would not provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR exposure in the leg for grounded conditions. It would be necessary to invoke the secondary reference level on limb current to provide compliance with basic restrictions on localized SAR averaged over 10 g. PMID:12222849

  11. Fine resolution calculations of SAR in the human body for frequencies up to 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, P. J.

    2002-08-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed from 100 MHz to 3 GHz at the basic 2 mm resolution of the voxel (volume pixel) model NORMAN without any rescaling to larger cell sizes. The reduction in the voxel size from previous work allows SAR to be calculated at higher frequencies. Additionally, the calculations have been extended down to 10 MHz, covering the whole-body resonance regions at a resolution of 4 mm. As well as for the adult phantom, SAR values are calculated for scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children for both grounded and isolated conditions. External electric field levels are derived from limits of whole-body averaged SAR and localized SAR in the ankle, and compared with NRPB investigation levels and ICNIRP reference levels. The ICNIRP field reference levels alone would not provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR exposure in the leg for grounded conditions. It would be necessary to invoke the secondary reference level on limb current to provide compliance with basic restrictions on localized SAR averaged over 10 g.

  12. A 4 GHz 32 bit direct digital frequency synthesizer based on a novel architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wu; Jianwu, Chen; Danyu, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Fan, Jiang; Zhi, Jin; Xinyu, Liu

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDFS) architecture based on nonlinear DAC coarse quantization and the ROM-based piecewise approximation method, which has the advantages of high speed, low power and low hardware resources. By subdividing the sinusoid into a collection of phase segments, the same initial value of each segment is realized by a nonlinear DAC. The ROM is decomposed with a coarse ROM and fine ROM using the piecewise approximation method. Then, the coarse ROM stores the offsets between the initial value of the common segment and the initial value of each line in the same segment. Meanwhile, the fine ROM stores the differences between the line values and the initial value of each line. A ROM compression ratio of 32 can be achieved in the case of 11 bit phase and 9 bit amplitude. Based on the above method, a prototype chip was fabricated using 1.4 μm GaAs HBT technology. The measurement shows an average spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of 45 dBc, with the worst SFDR only 40.07 dBc at a 4.0 GHz clock. The chip area is 4.6 × 3.7 mm2 and it consumes 7 W from a -4.9 V power supply.

  13. The 110-GHz Electron Cyclotron Range of Frequency System on JT-60U: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Seki, M.; Tsuneoka, M.; Takahashi, K.; Anno, K.; Hamamatsu, K.; Hiranai, S.; Ikeda, Yu.; Imai, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Shimono, M.; Shinozaki, S.; Terakado, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokokura, K.; Fujii, T.

    2002-09-15

    The electron cyclotron range of frequency (ECRF) system was designed and operated on the JT-60U to locally heat and control plasmas. The frequency of 110 GHz was adopted to inject the fundamental O-mode from the low field side with an oblique injection angle. The system is composed of four 1 MW-level gyrotrons, four transmission lines, and two antennae. The gyrotron is featured by a collector potential depression (CPD) and a gaussian beam output through a diamond window. The CPD enables JAERI to drive the gyrotron under the condition of the main DC voltage of 60 kV without a thyristor regulation. The gaussian mode from the gyrotron is effectively transformed to HE{sub 11} mode in the 31.75 mm diameter corrugated waveguide. About 75% of the output power of the gyrotrons can be injected into plasmas through the waveguides about 60 m in length. There are two antennae to control the deposition position of the EC wave during a plasma discharge. One is connected with three RF lines to steer the EC beams in the poloidal direction. The other is to control the EC beam in the toroidal and poloidal directions by two steerable mirrors.On the operation in 2000, the power of 1.5 to 1.6 MW for 3 s was successfully injected into plasmas using three gyrotrons. Local profile control was demonstrated by using the antennae. This capability was devoted to improve the plasma performance such as high T{sub e} production more than 15 keV and suppression of the MHD activities. In 2001, the fourth gyrotron, whose structure was improved for long pulse operation, has been installed for a total injection power of {approx}3 MW.

  14. Observations of deep convection from an airborne high-frequency (92 and 183 GHz) passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkarinen, I. M.; Adler, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Spencer et al. (1983) have reported that very low Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperatures at 37 GHz over land coincide with heavy thunderstorm rainfall, while Wilheit et al. (1982) used an aircraft-mounted radiometer operating at 92 and 183 GHz to observe convective precipitation associated with a tropical storm over the ocean. A scanning version of the instrument employed by Wilheit et al. is the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS). The present paper has the objective to summarize the preliminary results of AMMS observations of convective raining clouds and to determine whether empirical relationships between rain rate and microwave brightness temperature, such as those developed for 37 GHz satellite data by Spencer et al., can be extended to higher microwave frequencies.

  15. Coherent continuous-wave dual-frequency high-Q external-cavity semiconductor laser for GHz-THz applications.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Romain; Blin, Stéphane; Myara, Mikhaël; Gratiet, Luc Le; Sellahi, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-08-15

    We report a continuous-wave highly-coherent and tunable dual-frequency laser emitting at two frequencies separated by 30 GHz to 3 THz, based on compact III-V diode-pumped quantum-well surface-emitting semiconductor laser technology. The concept is based on the stable simultaneous operation of two Laguerre-Gauss transverse modes in a single-axis short cavity, using an integrated sub-wavelength-thick metallic mask. Simultaneous operation is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally by recording intensity noises and beat frequency, and time-resolved optical spectra. We demonstrated a >80  mW output power, diffraction-limited beam, narrow linewidth of <300  kHz, linear polarization state (>45  dB), and low intensity noise class-A dynamics of <0.3% rms, thus opening the path to a compact low-cost coherent GHz to THz source development. PMID:27519080

  16. A low-phase-noise 18 GHz Kerr frequency microcomb phase-locked over 65 THz.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-W; Yang, J; Lim, J; Zhou, H; Yu, M; Kwong, D-L; Wong, C W

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with -130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Allan deviations of 7 × 10(-11) in 1 s. The reported system is a promising compact platform for achieving self-referenced Kerr frequency combs and also for high-capacity coherent communication architectures. PMID:26311406

  17. A low-phase-noise 18 GHz Kerr frequency microcomb phase-locked over 65 THz

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S.-W.; Yang, J.; Lim, J.; Zhou, H.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with −130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Allan deviations of 7 × 10−11 in 1 s. The reported system is a promising compact platform for achieving self-referenced Kerr frequency combs and also for high-capacity coherent communication architectures. PMID:26311406

  18. A low-phase-noise 18 GHz Kerr frequency microcomb phase-locked over 65 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-W.; Yang, J.; Lim, J.; Zhou, H.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-08-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with -130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Allan deviations of 7 × 10-11 in 1 s. The reported system is a promising compact platform for achieving self-referenced Kerr frequency combs and also for high-capacity coherent communication architectures.

  19. Forward and inverse dielectric modeling of oven-dried cement paste specimens in the frequency range of 1.02 GHz to 4.50 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Yu, Tzuyang

    2015-04-01

    The use of radar non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for condition assessment of deteriorated civil infrastructure systems is an effective approach for preserving the sustainability of these systems. Radar NDE utilizes the interaction between radar signals (electromagnetic waves) and construction materials for surface and subsurface sensing based on dielectric properties and geometry. In the success of radar inspection, it is imperative to develop models capable of predicting the dielectric properties of the materials under investigation. The dielectric properties (dielectric constant and loss factor) of oven-dried cement paste specimens with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios (0.35, 0.40, 0.45, 0.50, 0.55) in the frequency range of 1.02 GHz to 4.50 GHz were studied and modeled using modified Debye's models. An open-ended coaxial probe and a network analyzer were used to measure dielectric properties. Forward models are proposed and inversed for predicting the w/c ratio of a given oven-dried cement paste specimen. Modeling results agreed with the experimental data. The proposed models can be used for predicting the dielectric properties of oven-dried cement paste specimens. Also, the modeling approach can be applied to other cementitious materials (e.g., concrete) with additional modification.

  20. Lewis Investigates Frequency Sharing Between Future NASA Space Systems and Local Multipoint Distribution Systems in the 27-GHz Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    At the request of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the NASA Lewis Research Center undertook an intensive study to examine the feasibility of frequency sharing between future NASA space services and proposed Local Multipoint Distribution Systems (LMDS) in the 25.25- to 27.5-GHz band. This follows NASA's earlier involvement in the FCC's 1994 Negotiated Rule Making Committee which studied frequency sharing between Ka-band Fixed Satellite Services and LMDS in the 27.5- to 29.5-GHz band. LMDS is a terrestrial, cellular, wireless communication service primarily intended to provide television distribution from hub stations located within relatively small cells to fixed subscriber receivers. Some proposed systems, however, also plan to offer interactive services via subscriber-to-hub transmissions. LMDS providers anticipate that their systems will be a cost-effective alternative to cable television systems, especially in urban areas. LMDS proponents have expressed an interest in using frequencies below 27.5 GHz. NASA, however, plans to operate three types of space systems below 27.5 GHz. The H, I, and J follow-on satellites for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which are planned for launch beginning in 1999, are designed to receive high-data-rate transmissions (up to 800 Mbps) from low-Earth orbiting "user" spacecraft in the 25.25- to 27.5-GHz band. In this case, the potential interference is the aggregate interference from LMDS transmitters (both hubs and subscribers) into the TDRSS tracking receive beams as they sweep over the Earth's surface while tracking lower altitude user spacecraft.

  1. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  2. Generation of 14 GHz radiation using a two frequency iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, J. W.; Rudolph, W.; Hager, G.

    1998-06-01

    A mode-locked and gain-switched photolytic iodine laser Zeeman tuned to operate simultaneously on the two strongest hyperfine transitions is shown to emit 1.315 μm radiation modulated at 13.9 GHz. The interaction of this laser radiation with suitable targets leads to the generation of microwave pulses that consist of only a few cycles at 13.9 GHz, making the system attractive for ultra-wide-band, short pulse radar applications.

  3. Electrorotation of single yeast cells at frequencies between 100 Hz and 1.6 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Hölzel, R

    1997-01-01

    The determination of complete electrorotation spectra of living cells has been made possible by the development of a quadrature generator and an electrode assembly that span the frequency range between 100 Hz and 1.6 GHz. Multiple spectra of single cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been measured at different medium conductivities ranging from 0.7 to 550 microS cm-1. A spherical four-shell model was applied that simulated the experimental data well and disclosed the four-layer structure of the cell envelope attributed to the plasma membrane, the periplasmic space, and a thick inner and a thin outer wall region. Below 10 kHz an additional rotation effect was found, which changed its direction depending on the ionic strength of the medium. This is supposed to be connected with properties of the cell surface and its close vicinity. From the four-shell simulation the following physical properties of cell compartments could be derived: specific capacitance of plasma membrane (0.76 microF cm-2), periplasmic space (0.5 microF cm-2), and outer wall region (0.1 microF cm-2). The conductivity of cytoplasm, plasma membrane, and inner wall region were found to vary with medium ionic strength from 9 to 12 mS cm-1, 5.8 nS cm-1 to approximately 50 nS cm-1, and 6 microS cm-1 to 240 microS cm-1, respectively. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9251826

  4. Surfatron Plasma Source Working at Frequency 2.45 GHz for Technological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, V.; Tichy, M.; Blazek, J.; Adamek, P.; Navratil, Z.; Slavicek, P.; Spatenka, P.

    2006-01-15

    Plasma as an active medium is widely exploited in technological applications. We have developed a microwave plasma source which might be suitable for future technological application. Plasma is generated by commercial (Sairem) surfatron working at frequency 2.45 GHz. The surfatron is fed by microwave power in the range from several watts up to 300 watts. Plasma is created from working gas mixture; typical flow rate is kept constant at 600 sccm. Technical Ar is used as carrier gas, O2 or N2 as reactive gases. We present complex diagnostics of the plasma created by this plasma source: by means of Langmuir probe measurements and by optical emission spectroscopy. Single probe method was used for determination of basic plasma parameters (plasma potential Vpl, mean electron energy Em, electron density ne, electron temperature) at low pressures. For determination of electron temperature at higher pressures when ion-neutral collision processes in the probe sheath had to be taken into account the double probe method was used. The discharge plasma was investigated and the results are discussed in cw as well as in computer-controlled impulse regime (time-resolved measurements). The pulse regime of plasma source is one of the ways how to increase an instantaneous input power and at the same time prevent treated materials (especially thermal sensitive materials, e.g. plastics) against thermal damage. Rotational and vibrational temperatures as well as consistence of discharge and axial intensity development of particular spectral lines were revealed on base of optical emission spectroscopy in cw regime.

  5. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaohua, Pan; Niansong, Mei; Hu, Chen; Yumei, Huang; Zhiliang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A low-phase-noise Σ—Δ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented. The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise. A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity. A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30 μs, which covers all five required frequency bands. The measured in-band phase noise are -89, -95.5 and -101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz, 2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers, respectively, and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are -121, -123 and -132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards.

  6. Calibrated complex impedance of CHO cells and E. coli bacteria at GHz frequencies using scanning microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuca, Silviu-Sorin; Badino, Giorgio; Gramse, Georg; Brinciotti, Enrico; Kasper, Manuel; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zhu, Rong; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-04-01

    The application of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) to extract calibrated electrical properties of cells and bacteria in air is presented. From the S 11 images, after calibration, complex impedance and admittance images of Chinese hamster ovary cells and E. coli bacteria deposited on a silicon substrate have been obtained. The broadband capabilities of SMM have been used to characterize the bio-samples between 2 GHz and 20 GHz. The resulting calibrated cell and bacteria admittance at 19 GHz were Y cell = 185 μS + j285 μS and Y bacteria = 3 μS + j20 μS, respectively. A combined circuitry-3D finite element method EMPro model has been developed and used to investigate the frequency response of the complex impedance and admittance of the SMM setup. Based on a proposed parallel resistance-capacitance model, the equivalent conductance and parallel capacitance of the cells and bacteria were obtained from the SMM images. The influence of humidity and frequency on the cell conductance was experimentally studied. To compare the cell conductance with bulk water properties, we measured the imaginary part of the bulk water loss with a dielectric probe kit in the same frequency range resulting in a high level of agreement.

  7. Design, development and verification of the 30 and 44 GHz front-end modules for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. J.; Wilkinson, A.; Davies, R. D.; Winder, W. F.; Roddis, N.; Blackhurst, E. J.; Lawson, D.; Lowe, S. R.; Baines, C.; Butlin, M.; Galtress, A.; Shepherd, D.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Castelli, C.; Cuttaia, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Gaier, T.; Hoyland, R.; Kettle, D.; Leonardi, R.; Mandolesi, N.; Mennella, A.; Meinhold, P.; Pospieszalski, M.; Stringhetti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valenziano, L.; Zonca, A.

    2009-12-01

    We give a description of the design, construction and testing of the 30 and 44 GHz Front End Modules (FEMs) for the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission to be launched in 2009. The scientific requirements of the mission determine the performance parameters to be met by the FEMs, including their linear polarization characteristics. The FEM design is that of a differential pseudo-correlation radiometer in which the signal from the sky is compared with a 4-K blackbody load. The Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) at the heart of the FEM is based on indium phosphide High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The radiometer incorporates a novel phase-switch design which gives excellent amplitude and phase match across the band. The noise temperature requirements are met within the measurement errors at the two frequencies. For the most sensitive LNAs, the noise temperature at the band centre is 3 and 5 times the quantum limit at 30 and 44 GHz respectively. For some of the FEMs, the noise temperature is still falling as the ambient temperature is reduced to 20 K. Stability tests of the FEMs, including a measurement of the 1/f knee frequency, also meet mission requirements. The 30 and 44 GHz FEMs have met or bettered the mission requirements in all critical aspects. The most sensitive LNAs have reached new limits of noise temperature for HEMTs at their band centres. The FEMs have well-defined linear polarization characteristcs.

  8. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano Chen, Zhao; Kukreja, Roopali; Spoddig, Detlef; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ollefs, Katharina; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-15

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  9. Calibrated complex impedance of CHO cells and E. coli bacteria at GHz frequencies using scanning microwave microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuca, Silviu-Sorin; Badino, Giorgio; Gramse, Georg; Brinciotti, Enrico; Kasper, Manuel; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zhu, Rong; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-04-01

    The application of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) to extract calibrated electrical properties of cells and bacteria in air is presented. From the S 11 images, after calibration, complex impedance and admittance images of Chinese hamster ovary cells and E. coli bacteria deposited on a silicon substrate have been obtained. The broadband capabilities of SMM have been used to characterize the bio-samples between 2 GHz and 20 GHz. The resulting calibrated cell and bacteria admittance at 19 GHz were Y cell = 185 μS + j285 μS and Y bacteria = 3 μS + j20 μS, respectively. A combined circuitry-3D finite element method EMPro model has been developed and used to investigate the frequency response of the complex impedance and admittance of the SMM setup. Based on a proposed parallel resistance-capacitance model, the equivalent conductance and parallel capacitance of the cells and bacteria were obtained from the SMM images. The influence of humidity and frequency on the cell conductance was experimentally studied. To compare the cell conductance with bulk water properties, we measured the imaginary part of the bulk water loss with a dielectric probe kit in the same frequency range resulting in a high level of agreement. PMID:26895571

  10. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  11. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip. PMID:26429444

  12. Radio Frequency Transistors Using Aligned Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes with Current-Gain Cutoff Frequency and Maximum Oscillation Frequency Simultaneously Greater than 70 GHz.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Brady, Gerald J; Gui, Hui; Rutherglen, Chris; Arnold, Michael S; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, we report record radio frequency (RF) performance of carbon nanotube transistors based on combined use of a self-aligned T-shape gate structure, and well-aligned, high-semiconducting-purity, high-density polyfluorene-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotubes, which were deposited using dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly method. These transistors show outstanding direct current (DC) performance with on-current density of 350 μA/μm, transconductance as high as 310 μS/μm, and superior current saturation with normalized output resistance greater than 100 kΩ·μm. These transistors create a record as carbon nanotube RF transistors that demonstrate both the current-gain cutoff frequency (ft) and the maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) greater than 70 GHz. Furthermore, these transistors exhibit good linearity performance with 1 dB gain compression point (P1dB) of 14 dBm and input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 22 dBm. Our study advances state-of-the-art of carbon nanotube RF electronics, which have the potential to be made flexible and may find broad applications for signal amplification, wireless communication, and wearable/flexible electronics. PMID:27327074

  13. Multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance in the millimeter-wave region up to 150 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmichi, E.; Tokuda, Y.; Tabuse, R.; Tsubokura, D.; Okamoto, T.; Ohta, H.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a novel technique is developed for multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance (ESR) in the millimeter-wave region. We constructed a compact ESR probehead, in which the cantilever bending is sensitively detected by a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer. With this setup, ESR absorption of diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl radical (<1 μg) was clearly observed at multiple frequencies of up to 150 GHz. We also observed the hyperfine splitting of low-concentration Mn2+ impurities(˜0.2%) in MgO.

  14. Multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance in the millimeter-wave region up to 150 GHz.

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, E; Tokuda, Y; Tabuse, R; Tsubokura, D; Okamoto, T; Ohta, H

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a novel technique is developed for multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance (ESR) in the millimeter-wave region. We constructed a compact ESR probehead, in which the cantilever bending is sensitively detected by a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer. With this setup, ESR absorption of diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl radical (<1 μg) was clearly observed at multiple frequencies of up to 150 GHz. We also observed the hyperfine splitting of low-concentration Mn(2+) impurities(∼0.2%) in MgO. PMID:27475568

  15. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude δ f of frequency. The amplitude δ f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage Δ V a. At the Δ V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude δ f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  16. Lack of effect of 94 GHz radio frequency radiation exposure in an animal model of skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mason, P A; Walters, T J; DiGiovanni, J; Beason, C W; Jauchem, J R; Dick, E J; Mahajan, K; Dusch, S J; Shields, B A; Merritt, J H; Murphy, M R; Ryan, K L

    2001-10-01

    Although there is no evidence that electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency radiation (RFR) band is mutagenic, there have been suggestions that RFR energy might serve as either a promoter or co-promoter in some animal models of carcinogenesis. Recent developments in electromagnetic technology have resulted in the manufacture of RFR sources capable of generating frequencies in the millimeter wavelength (MMW) range (30-300 GHz). Because absorption of MMW energy occurs in the skin, it is to be expected that long-term detrimental health effects, if any, would most likely be manifest in the skin. In this study we investigated whether a single (1.0 W/cm(2) for 10 s) or repeated (2 exposures/week for 12 weeks, 333 mW/cm(2) for 10 s) exposure to 94 GHz RFR serves as a promoter or co-promoter in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced SENCAR mouse model of skin carcinogenesis. Neither paradigm of MMW exposure significantly affected papilloma development, as evidenced by a lack of effect on tumor incidence and multiplicity. There was also no evidence that MMW exposure served as a co-promoter in DMBA-induced animals repeatedly treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Therefore, we conclude that exposure to 94 GHz RFR under these conditions does not promote or co-promote papilloma development in this animal model of skin carcinogenesis. PMID:11577012

  17. 75 FR 9850 - Tank Level Probing Radars in the Frequency Band 77-81 GHz

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the Internet by... marketing equipment that complies with these conditions (e.g., Endress+Hauser GmbH+Co. KG (Endress+Hauser... TLPR operation in the 77-81 GHz band, subject to certain conditions. Endress+Hauser filed in support...

  18. Computational dosimetry in embryos exposed to electromagnetic plane waves over the frequency range of 10 MHz-1.5 GHz.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents calculated specific absorption rate (SAR) dosimetry in 4 and 8 week Japanese pregnant-woman models exposed to plane waves over the frequency range of 10 MHz-1.5 GHz. Two types of 2 mm spatial-resolution pregnant-woman models comprised a woman model, which is similar to the average-sized Japanese adult female in height and weight, with a cubic (4 week) embryo or spheroidal (8 week) one. The averaged SAR in the embryos exposed to vertically and horizontally polarized plane waves at four kinds of propagation directions are calculated from 10 MHz to 1.5 GHz. The results indicate that the maximum average SAR in the embryos exposed to plane waves is lower than 0.08 W kg(-1) when the incident power density is at the reference level of ICNIRP guideline for general public environment. PMID:20009180

  19. Effective conductivity and permittivity of unsaturated porous materials in the frequency range 1 mHz–1GHz

    PubMed Central

    Revil, A

    2013-01-01

    A model combining low-frequency complex conductivity and high-frequency permittivity is developed in the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 GHz. The low-frequency conductivity depends on pore water and surface conductivities. Surface conductivity is controlled by the electrical diffuse layer, the outer component of the electrical double layer coating the surface of the minerals. The frequency dependence of the effective quadrature conductivity shows three domains. Below a critical frequency fp, which depends on the dynamic pore throat size Λ, the quadrature conductivity is frequency dependent. Between fp and a second critical frequency fd, the quadrature conductivity is generally well described by a plateau when clay minerals are present in the material. Clay-free porous materials with a narrow grain size distribution are described by a Cole-Cole model. The characteristic frequency fd controls the transition between double layer polarization and the effect of the high-frequency permittivity of the material. The Maxwell-Wagner polarization is found to be relatively negligible. For a broad range of frequencies below 1 MHz, the effective permittivity exhibits a strong dependence with the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area. At high frequency, above the critical frequency fd, the effective permittivity reaches a high-frequency asymptotic limit that is controlled by the two Archie's exponents m and n like the low-frequency electrical conductivity. The unified model is compared with various data sets from the literature and is able to explain fairly well a broad number of observations with a very small number of textural and electrochemical parameters. It could be therefore used to interpret induced polarization, induction-based electromagnetic methods, and ground penetrating radar data to characterize the vadose zone. PMID:23576823

  20. A Monolithic Sub-sampling PLL based 6-18 GHz Frequency Synthesizer for C, X, Ku Band Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hanchao; Zhu, Ning; LI, Wei; Zhou, Zibo; Li, Ning; Ren, Junyan

    A monolithic frequency synthesizer with wide tuning range, low phase noise and spurs was realized in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. It consists of an analog PLL, a harmonic-rejection mixer and injection-locked frequency doublers to cover the whole 6-18 GHz frequency range. To achieve a low phase noise performance, a sub-sampling PLL with non-dividers was employed. The synthesizer can achieve phase noise -113.7 dBc/Hz@100 kHz in the best case and the reference spur is below -60 dBc. The core of the synthesizer consumes about 110 mA*1.2 V.

  1. Prediction of rain effects on earth-space communication links operating in the 10 to 35 GHz frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of precipitation on earth-space communication links operating the 10 to 35 GHz frequency range. Emphasis is on the quantitative prediction of rain attenuation and depolarization. Discussions center on the models developed at Virginia Tech. Comments on other models are included as well as literature references to key works. Also included is the system level modeling for dual polarized communication systems with techniques for calculating antenna and propagation medium effects. Simple models for the calculation of average annual attenuation and cross-polarization discrimination (XPD) are presented. Calculation of worst month statistics are also presented.

  2. Measurements of the Low Frequency Gain Fluctuations of a 30 GHz High-Electron-Mobility-Transistor Cryogenic Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarosik, Norman

    1994-01-01

    Low frequency gain fluctuations of a 30 GHz cryogenic HEMT amplifier have been measured with the input of the amplifier connected to a 15 K load. Effects of fluctuations of other components of the test set-up were eliminated by use of a power-power correlation technique. Strong correlation between output power fluctuations of the amplifier and drain current fluctuations of the transistors comprising the amplifier are observed. The existence of these correlations introduces the possibility of regressing some of the excess noise from the HEMT amplifier's output using the measured drain currents.

  3. Circumzenithal sky region survey at the frequency of 30 GHz with 32-element radiometer matrix of the RATAN-600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Semenova, T. A.; Khaikin, V. B.; Grechkin, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    We report the preliminary results of a deep sky survey in the field of 00h < RA < 24h, 40{./°}5 < 42{./°}5 with the RATAN-600 and its new focal 32-feed receiver matrix at the limiting radio frequency of 30 GHz, with the resolution up to 5″ in right ascension and 30″ in declination. The first results, including new estimates of the anisotropy of background radiation at the scales of ( l > 3000) and noise from discrete radio sources in the wavelength range between the NVSS and IRAS catalogs are listed.

  4. SCPC terminal and signal strength measuring apparatus for 30/20 GHz frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, M.; Nishiyama, I.; Saruwatari, T.; Takahashi, T.; Cho, T.

    1982-03-01

    In the Japanese Medium Capacity Communications Satellite (CS) for Experimental Purpose project, a delta-M-PSK-SCPC system operating in the 30/20 GHz band is planned in order to establish a small capacity communications system. A small-sized earth station and SCPC terminal equipment have been successfully developed. The earth station consists of an antenna with a diameter of 2 m, an IMPATT high power amplifier, and a GaAs FET low noise receiver. G/T and EIRP of the station are 22 dB/K and 58.5 dBW, respectively. The SCPC terminal consists of a delta-M-CODEC for voice transmission, a data interface, and a four-phase PSK modulator/demodulator operating at 64 kbps. A signal strength measuring apparatus has been developed for measuring the strength of the 20 GHz beacon signal from the CS. This apparatus is used to obtain data about propagation characteristics, such as rainfall attenuation.

  5. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, F.; Ycas, G.; Osterman, S.; Diddams, S. A.

    2010-06-01

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is ~350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by +/-30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of +/-5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR.

  6. A Measurement of the Temperature of the Cosmic MicrowaveBackground at a Frequency of 7.5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Levin, S.; Smoot,George F.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-06-01

    We have measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 7.5 GHz (wavelength 4.0 cm) using a ground-based, total power radiometer calibrated at the horn aperture by an external cryogenic reference target. The radiometer measured the difference in antenna temperature between the reference target and the zenith sky from a dry, high-altitude site. Subtraction of foreground signals (primarily atmospheric and galactic emission) measured with the same instrument leaves the CMB as the residual. The radiometer measured the atmospheric antenna temperature by correlating the signal change with the airmass in the beam during tip scans. The small galactic signal was subtracted based on extrapolation from lower frequencies, and was checked by differential drift scans. The limiting uncertainty in the CMB measurement was the effect of ground radiation in the antenna sidelobes during atmospheric measurements. The thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 7.5 GHz is 2.59 {+-} 0.07 K (68% confidence level).

  7. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, F.; Diddams, S. A.; Ycas, G.; Osterman, S.

    2010-06-15

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is {approx}350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by {+-}30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of {+-}5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR.

  8. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, F; Ycas, G; Osterman, S; Diddams, S A

    2010-06-01

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is approximately 350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by +/-30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of +/-5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR. PMID:20590223

  9. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE(11,2) and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE(11,2,q). The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  10. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G; Barnes, Alexander B

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  11. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  12. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  13. Dual frequency laser with two continuously and widely tunable frequencies for optical referencing of GHz to THz beatnotes.

    PubMed

    Danion, Gwennaël; Hamel, Cyril; Frein, Ludovic; Bondu, François; Loas, Goulchen; Alouini, Mehdi

    2014-07-28

    A dual-frequency 1.55 µm laser for CW low noise microwave, millimeter and sub millimeter wave synthesis is demonstrated, where frequency stabilization is possible on each wavelength independently. The solid state Er:Yb laser output power is 7 mW. The amplitude noise is -150 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset frequency. In free running regime, the frequency noise is 3.10(5)/f Hz/sqrt(Hz) (800 Hz on a 1µs timescale), better than commercial fibered or semi-conductor sources at this wavelength. PMID:25089387

  14. Numerical Design of Megawatt Gyrotron with 120 GHz Frequency and 50% Efficiency for Plasma Fusion Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Anil; Bhattacharya, Ranajoy; Singh, T. P.; Sinha, A. K.

    2013-02-01

    The design of 120 GHz, 1 MW gyrotron for plasma fusion application is presented in this paper. The mode selection is carried out considering the aim of minimum mode competition, minimum cavity wall heating, etc. On the basis of the selected operating mode, the interaction cavity design and beam-wave interaction computation are carried out by using the PIC code. The design of triode type Magnetron Injection Gun (MIG) is also presented. Trajectory code EGUN, synthesis code MIGSYN and data analysis code MIGANS are used in the MIG designing. Further, the design of MIG is also validated by using the another trajectory code TRAK. The design results of beam dumping system (collector) and RF window are also presented. Depressed collector is designed to enhance the overall tube efficiency. The design study confirms >1 MW output power with tube efficiency around 50% (with collector efficiency).

  15. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  16. Sensing glucose concentrations at GHz frequencies with a fully embedded Biomicro-electromechanical system (BioMEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Basmer, T.; Kulse, P.; Reich, C.; Drews, J.; Genschow, D.; Haak, U.; Marschmeyer, S.; Matthus, E.; Schulz, K.; Wolansky, D.; Winkler, W.; Guschauski, T.; Ehwald, R.

    2013-01-01

    The progressive scaling in semiconductor technology allows for advanced miniaturization of intelligent systems like implantable biosensors for low-molecular weight analytes. A most relevant application would be the monitoring of glucose in diabetic patients, since no commercial solution is available yet for the continuous and drift-free monitoring of blood sugar levels. We report on a biosensor chip that operates via the binding competition of glucose and dextran to concanavalin A. The sensor is prepared as a fully embedded micro-electromechanical system and operates at GHz frequencies. Glucose concentrations derive from the assay viscosity as determined by the deflection of a 50 nm TiN actuator beam excited by quasi-electrostatic attraction. The GHz detection scheme does not rely on the resonant oscillation of the actuator and safely operates in fluidic environments. This property favorably combines with additional characteristics—(i) measurement times of less than a second, (ii) usage of biocompatible TiN for bio-milieu exposed parts, and (iii) small volume of less than 1 mm3—to qualify the sensor chip as key component in a continuous glucose monitor for the interstitial tissue. PMID:25332510

  17. Sensing glucose concentrations at GHz frequencies with a fully embedded Biomicro-electromechanical system (BioMEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Basmer, T.; Kulse, P.; Reich, C.; Drews, J.; Genschow, D.; Haak, U.; Marschmeyer, S.; Matthus, E.; Schulz, K.; Wolansky, D.; Winkler, W.; Guschauski, T.; Ehwald, R.

    2013-06-01

    The progressive scaling in semiconductor technology allows for advanced miniaturization of intelligent systems like implantable biosensors for low-molecular weight analytes. A most relevant application would be the monitoring of glucose in diabetic patients, since no commercial solution is available yet for the continuous and drift-free monitoring of blood sugar levels. We report on a biosensor chip that operates via the binding competition of glucose and dextran to concanavalin A. The sensor is prepared as a fully embedded micro-electromechanical system and operates at GHz frequencies. Glucose concentrations derive from the assay viscosity as determined by the deflection of a 50 nm TiN actuator beam excited by quasi-electrostatic attraction. The GHz detection scheme does not rely on the resonant oscillation of the actuator and safely operates in fluidic environments. This property favorably combines with additional characteristics—(i) measurement times of less than a second, (ii) usage of biocompatible TiN for bio-milieu exposed parts, and (iii) small volume of less than 1 mm3—to qualify the sensor chip as key component in a continuous glucose monitor for the interstitial tissue.

  18. Study and development of a six port network analyzer in the 1-18 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeault, Eric

    A theoretical and experimental study for the realization of a six port analyzer to calibrate the components of the verification kit, used to evaluate the measurement accuracy of automated network analyzers, is presented. The detection is performed at the frequency of use, and the scattering parameters are determined in magnitude and phase by means of power measurements. The six port accuracy, realized in the 1 to 18 GHz frequency range, is limited by uncertainties in the power measurements. The detection law of the Schottky diodes used as power detectors, that relates the incident power level and the diode output voltage, is performed in situ. The characterization requires only two reference unknown test loads without any power measurement. The procedure is shown to be rather stable with frequency, so that a midband characterization is generally sufficient to provide enough accuracy in the whole frequency range. The measurement uncertainties due to the variation of the detector reflection coefficients with power, are estimated by determining the variations of the six port parameters. The principle of the six port compared to that of the heteordyne network analyzers is simpler, and it makes modeling and correcting systematic errors easier. Good agreement is found between the measurement results obtained with the dual six port and the other operating systems. Generally, the amplitude measurements are within a few thousands, while the phase measurement errors are below or around one degree for the parameters being measured.

  19. Frequency Dependence of Electron Spin Relaxation Times in Aqueous Solution for a Nitronyl Nitroxide Radical and Per-deuterated-Tempone between 250 MHz and 34 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Meyer, Virginia M.; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2012-01-01

    Electron spin relaxation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) 1 and of a nitronyl nitroxide 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl) 2 in aqueous solution at room temperature were measured by 2-pulse electron spin echo (T2) or 3-pulse inversion recovery (T1) in the frequency range of 250 MHz to 34 GHz. At 9 GHz values of T1 measured by long-pulse saturation recovery were in good agreement with values determined by inversion recovery. Below 9 GHz for 1 and below 1.5 GHz for 2, T1~ T2, as expected in the fast tumbling regime. At higher frequencies T2 was shorter than T1 due to incomplete motional averaging of g and A anisotropy. The frequency dependence of 1/T1 is modeled as the sum of spin rotation, modulation of g and A-anisotropy, and a thermally-activated process that has maximum contribution at about 1.5 GHz. The spin lattice relaxation times for the nitronyl nitroxide were longer than for PDT by a factor of about 2 at 34 GHz, decreasing to about a factor of 1.5 at 250 MHz. The rotational correlation times, τR are calculated to be 9 ps for 1 and about 25 ps for 2. The longer spin lattice relaxation times for 2 than for 1 at 9 and 34 GHz are due predominantly to smaller contributions from spin rotation that arise from slower tumbling. The smaller nitrogen hyperfine couplings for the nitronyl 2 than for 1 decrease the contribution to relaxation due to modulation of A anisotropy. However, at lower frequencies the slower tumbling of 2 results in a larger value of ωτR (ω is the resonance frequency) and larger values of the spectral density function, which enhances the contribution from modulation of anisotropic interactions for 2 to a greater extent than for 1. PMID:23123770

  20. Frequency dependence of electron spin relaxation times in aqueous solution for a nitronyl nitroxide radical and perdeuterated-tempone between 250 MHz and 34 GHz.

    PubMed

    Biller, Joshua R; Meyer, Virginia M; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2012-12-01

    Electron spin relaxation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) 1 and of a nitronyl nitroxide (2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl) 2 in aqueous solution at room temperature were measured by 2-pulse electron spin echo (T(2)) or 3-pulse inversion recovery (T(1)) in the frequency range of 250 MHz to 34 GHz. At 9 GHz values of T(1) measured by long-pulse saturation recovery were in good agreement with values determined by inversion recovery. Below 9 GHz for 1 and below 1.5 GHz for 2,T(1)~T(2), as expected in the fast tumbling regime. At higher frequencies T(2) was shorter than T(1) due to incomplete motional averaging of g and A anisotropy. The frequency dependence of 1/T(1) is modeled as the sum of spin rotation, modulation of g and A-anisotropy, and a thermally-activated process that has maximum contribution at about 1.5 GHz. The spin lattice relaxation times for the nitronyl nitroxide were longer than for PDT by a factor of about 2 at 34 GHz, decreasing to about a factor of 1.5 at 250 MHz. The rotational correlation times, τ(R) are calculated to be 9 ps for 1 and about 25 ps for 2. The longer spin lattice relaxation times for 2 than for 1 at 9 and 34 GHz are due predominantly to smaller contributions from spin rotation that arise from slower tumbling. The smaller nitrogen hyperfine couplings for the nitronyl 2 than for 1 decrease the contribution to relaxation due to modulation of A anisotropy. However, at lower frequencies the slower tumbling of 2 results in a larger value of ωτ(R) (ω is the resonance frequency) and larger values of the spectral density function, which enhances the contribution from modulation of anisotropic interactions for 2 to a greater extent than for 1. PMID:23123770

  1. Dual-frequency comb generation with differing GHz repetition rates by parallel Fabry–Perot cavity filtering of a single broadband frequency comb source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildner, Jutta; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Pollinger, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We present a dual-comb-generator based on a coupled Fabry–Perot filtering cavity doublet and a single seed laser source. By filtering a commercial erbium-doped fiber-based optical frequency comb with CEO-stabilisation and 250 MHz repetition rate, two broadband coherent combs of different repetition rates in the GHz range are generated. The filtering doublet consists of two Fabry–Perot cavities with a tunable spacing and Pound–Drever–Hall stabilisation scheme. As a prerequisite for the development of such a filtering unit, we present a method to determine the actual free spectral range and transmission bandwidth of a Fabry–Perot cavity in situ. The transmitted beat signal of two diode lasers is measured as a function of their tunable frequency difference. Finally, the filtering performance and resulting beat signals of the heterodyned combs are discussed as well as the optimisation measures of the whole system.

  2. Polarization-insensitive FSS-based perfect metamaterial absorbers for GHz and THz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabah, Cumali; Dincer, Furkan; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Unal, Emin; Akgol, Oguzhan

    2014-04-01

    New perfect frequency selective surface (FSS) metamaterial absorbers (MAs) based on resonator with dielectric configuration are numerically presented and investigated for both microwave and terahertz frequency ranges. Also, to verify the behaviors of the FSS MAs, one of the MAs is experimentally analyzed and tested in the microwave frequency range. Suggested FSS MAs have simple configuration which introduces flexibility to adjust their FSS metamaterial properties and to rescale the structure easily for any desired frequency range. There is no study which simultaneously includes microwave and terahertz absorbers in a single design in the literature. Besides, numerical simulations verify that the FSS MAs could achieve very high absorption levels at wide angles of incidence for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves. The proposed FSS MAs and their variations enable many potential application areas in radar systems, communication, stealth technologies, and so on.

  3. Precision waveguide system for measurement of complex permittivity of liquids at frequencies from 60 to 90Â GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, J.; Cerjak, I.; Schoenmaker, H.; Bonn, M.; Bakker, H. J.

    2011-10-01

    We describe a variable path length waveguide setup developed to accurately measure the complex dielectric permittivity of liquids. This is achieved by measuring the complex scattering parameter of the liquid in a waveguide section with a vector network analyzer in combination with an E-band frequency converter. The automated measurement procedure allows fast acquisition at closely spaced intervals over the entire measurement bandwidth: 60-90 GHz. The presented technique is an absolute method and as such is not prone to calibration errors. The technique is suited to investigate low-loss as well as high-loss liquids in contrast to similar setups described previously. We present measurements for a high-loss liquid (water), an intermediate-loss sample (ethanol), and for nearly loss-less n-octane. Due to the available phase information, the present data have an improved accuracy in comparison with literature data.

  4. Precision waveguide system for measurement of complex permittivity of liquids at frequencies from 60 to 90 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hunger, J; Cerjak, I; Schoenmaker, H; Bonn, M; Bakker, H J

    2011-10-01

    We describe a variable path length waveguide setup developed to accurately measure the complex dielectric permittivity of liquids. This is achieved by measuring the complex scattering parameter of the liquid in a waveguide section with a vector network analyzer in combination with an E-band frequency converter. The automated measurement procedure allows fast acquisition at closely spaced intervals over the entire measurement bandwidth: 60-90 GHz. The presented technique is an absolute method and as such is not prone to calibration errors. The technique is suited to investigate low-loss as well as high-loss liquids in contrast to similar setups described previously. We present measurements for a high-loss liquid (water), an intermediate-loss sample (ethanol), and for nearly loss-less n-octane. Due to the available phase information, the present data have an improved accuracy in comparison with literature data. PMID:22047313

  5. Optical properties of high-frequency radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Bannister, Keith W.; Chhetri, Rajan; Hancock, Paul J.; Johnston, Helen M.; Massardi, Marcella; Murphy, Tara

    2011-11-01

    Our current understanding of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) comes predominantly from studies at frequencies of 5 GHz and below. With the recent completion of the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey, we can now gain insight into the high-frequency radio properties of AGN. This paper presents supplementary information on the AT20G sources in the form of optical counterparts and redshifts. Optical counterparts were identified using the SuperCOSMOS data base and redshifts were found from either the 6dF Galaxy Survey or the literature. We also report 144 new redshifts. For AT20G sources outside the Galactic plane, 78.5 per cent have optical identifications and 30.9 per cent have redshift information. The optical identification rate also increases with increasing flux density. Targets which had optical spectra available were examined to obtain a spectral classification. There appear to be two distinct AT20G populations; the high luminosity quasars that are generally associated with point-source optical counterparts and exhibit strong emission lines in the optical spectrum, and the lower luminosity radio galaxies that are generally associated with passive galaxies in both the optical images and spectroscopic properties. It is suggested that these different populations can be associated with different accretion modes (cold-mode or hot-mode). We find that the cold-mode sources have a steeper spectral index and produce more luminous radio lobes, but generally reside in smaller host galaxies than their hot-mode counterparts. This can be attributed to the fact that they are accreting material more efficiently. Lastly, we compare the AT20G survey with the S-cubed semi-empirical (S3-SEX) models and conclude that the S3-SEX models need refining to correctly model the compact cores of AGN. The AT20G survey provides the ideal sample to do this.

  6. Observation of harmonically related solar radio zebra patterns in the 1-4 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Karlický, M.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    A unique case of two zebra patterns related harmonically with ratio of ~ 1:2 was observed by distant radio telescopes at São José dos Campos and Ondřejov Observatories. Accompanied zebras show that the ratio of frequencies of the neighboring zebra lines is in the range of 1.009-1.037. There is a tendency of a decrease of this ratio with decreasing frequency within the specific zebra pattern. Both facts speak in favour of plasma emission models for the zebra pattern fine structure in radio burst continua.

  7. Laser frequency locking with 46  GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I₂. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr. PMID:26906392

  8. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Kato, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Kawamura, H.; Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Ito, S.; Itoh, M.; Ando, S.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Shimizu, Y.; Sato, T.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  9. DUAL FREQUENCY RESONATOR FOR 1.2 GHZ EPR/16.2 MHZ NMR CO-IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Petryakov, Sergey; Samouilov, Alexandre; Kesselring, Eric; Caia, George L.; Sun, Ziqi; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a dual frequency resonator that enables both EPR and proton NMR imaging within the same resonator, magnet and gradient system is described. A novel design allows the same resonator to perform both EPR and proton NMR operation without moving resonator cables or switches. The resonator is capable of working at frequencies of 16.18 MHz for proton NMR and 1.2 GHz for EPR and is optimized for isolated rat heart experiments, measuring 22 mm in inner diameter and 19 mm in length. In EPR mode, the resonator functions as a one loop two gap resonator, electrically coupled through a half wavelength inverter. In NMR mode, it functions a single turn coil. Using the same loop for both modalities maximizes filling factor at both frequencies. Placing the tuning and switching controls away from the resonator prevents any inadvertent movement that would cause errors of EPR and NMR co-imaging registration. The resonator enabled good quality EPR and proton MRI of isolated rat hearts with precise registration. PMID:20434379

  10. Radio Frequency Mapping using an Autonomous Robot: Application to the 2.4 GHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J. M.; Murad, N. M.; Lorion, R.

    2016-03-01

    Radio signal strength measurement systems are essential to build a Radio Frequency (RF) mapping in indoor and outdoor environments for different application scenarios. This paper presents an autonomous robot making the construction of a radio signal mapping, by collecting and forwarding different useful information related to all access point devices and inherent to the robot towards the base station. A real case scenario is considered by measuring the RF field from our department network. The RF signal mapping consistency is shown by fitting the measurements with the radio signal strength model in two-dimensional area, and a path-loss exponent of 2.3 is estimated for the open corridor environment.

  11. Prospects and limitations for use of frequency spectrum from 40 to 300 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catoe, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The existing and future use of the electromagnetic spectrum from 40 to 300 gigahertz is discussed. The activities envisioned for this segment of the electromagnetic spectrum fall generically into two basic categories: communications and remote sensing. The communications services considered for this region are focused on the existing and future frequency allocations that are required for terrestrial radio services, space to ground radio services, space to space radio services, and space to deep space radio services. The remote sensing services considered for this region are divided into two groups of activities: earth viewing and space viewing.

  12. Synchronized signaling delivery for broadband 60 GHz in-building optical wireless network based on digital frequency division multiplexing and digital Nyquist shaping.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Li, F; Okonkwo, C M; van den Boom, H P A; Chen, M; Yang, B; Zou, S; Tangdiongga, E; Chen, L; Koonen, A M J

    2013-01-14

    A simple and low-cost synchronized signaling delivery scheme has been proposed for a 60 GHz in-building optical wireless network with 12.7Gbps throughput based on digital frequency division multiplexing and digital Nyquist shaping. PMID:23388920

  13. Effects of low intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies and antibiotics on energy-dependent proton and potassium ion transport by E. coli.

    PubMed

    Torgomyan, H

    2012-12-01

    The effects of low intensity (flux capacity 0.06 mW/cm2) coherent electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies and their combined effects with antibiotics--ceftriaxone or kanamycin (0.4 or 15 microM, correspondingly) on E. coli K12 growth and survival have been reported previously. To further study the effects of EMI and antibiotics and mechanisms, decrease in overall energy (glucose)-dependent H+ and K+ fluxes across the cell membrane was investigated in E. coli. The depression of H+ and K+ fluxes rate was maximally achieved with the 73 GHz frequency. The EMI strengthened the effect of N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide (DCCD, an inhibitor of the F0F1-ATPase). The 73 GHz EMI had more influence on H+ efflux inhibition, whereas 70.6 GHz on K+ influx. Also, EMI strengthened the depressive effects of ceftriaxone and kanamycin on the overall and DCCD-inhibited H+ and K+ fluxes. The 73 GHz EMI strengthened the effect of ceftriaxone on both ions fluxes. Kanamycin depressed H+ efflux more as compared to ceftriaxone, which was also strengthened with EMI. The results of E. coli H+ and K+ transport systems activities depression by irradiation and the irradiation effect on DCCD and antibiotics action indicated the EMI and antibiotics causing primary changes in the bacterial membrane. PMID:23350277

  14. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Yano, K.; Kato, Y.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  15. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Rácz, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-15

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1–18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1–18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  16. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode. PMID:24593510

  17. A 300 mV sub-threshold region 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator and frequency divider with transformer technique for ultralow power RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Keisuke; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    A new ultralow voltage 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a divide-by-2 frequency divider circuits operating in a CMOS sub-threshold region using a transformer technique have been developed. In the sub-threshold region, the CMOS transistor high frequency performances are decreased to the point where oscillation and frequency division are challenging to achieve. The new proposed VCO uses the transformer feedback complementary VCO technique to improves VCO negative feedback gain. The circuits have been fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process. The oscillation frequency is designed at 2.4 GHz under a 300 mV supply voltage. The total power consumption is 202 µW with noise performance of -96 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. The new proposed frequency divider circuit consists of two stages master-slave D-type flip-flop (DFF). The DFF differential input is coupled to a transformer circuit instead of transistors to reduce the number of stacks. The minimum operating supply voltage is 300 mV with power consumption of 34 µW with a free-run frequency of 1.085 GHz.

  18. Improved signal-to-noise ratio of 10 GHz microwave signals generated with a mode-filtered femtosecond laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Diddams, S A; Kirchner, M; Fortier, T; Braje, D; Weiner, A M; Hollberg, L

    2009-03-01

    We use a Fabry-Perot cavity to optically filter the output of a Ti:sapphire frequency comb to integer multiples of the original 1 GHz mode spacing. This effectively increases the pulse repetition rate, which is useful for several applications. In the case of low-noise microwave signal generation, such filtering leads to improved linearity of the high-speed photodiodes that detect the mode-locked laser pulse train. The result is significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio at the 10 GHz harmonic with the potential for a shot-noise limited single sideband phase noise floor near -168 dBc/Hz. PMID:19259170

  19. A More Precise Empirical Formula for Estimating Normalized Fog Attenuation in the Millimeter-Wave Frequency Range 30 ~ 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xia; Liu, Yun-Long; Chen, Li-Jiang; Xue, Yu-Li

    2013-04-01

    At millimeter wavelengths, normalized fog attenuation (NFA) in units of (dB/km)/ (g/m3) is generally calculated by the Rayleigh approximation when working wavelengths are much larger than the average diameter of fog droplets. The calculations of the Rayleigh approximation are much less than those of Mie scattering theory, but still complex and heavy. To solve the above problem and facilitate the engineering applications of the Rayleigh approximation, a new empirical formula is discussed to estimate NFA in the frequency range 30 ~ 100 GHz and the fog common temperature range -8 ~ 20 °C. The simulation results of the new formula are compared with those got by other three empirical formulae: the Altshuler empirical formula, the Liebe empirical formula and the Zhao empirical formula. Maximal absolute value of the relative errors (MAVRE) and Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) indicate the largest deviation of estimated results and the fitting performance of an empirical formula, respectively. Comparisons show that the MAVRE of the new formula is only 4.482 %, which is much smaller than those of the other three formulae. The mean value of the Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) of the proposed formula is 0.999943, larger than those of other methods. Additionally, relative error (RE) curves of the four empirical formulae are given at four certain temperatures -8 °C, 0 °C, 10 °C and 20 °C.

  20. High-frequency (95 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance study of the photoinduced charge transfer in conjugated polymer-fullerene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuster, J. De; Goovaerts, E.; Bouwen, A.; Hummelen, J. C.; Dyakonov, V.

    2001-11-01

    Light-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (LEPR) measurements are reported in composites of poly(2-methoxy-5-(3-,7-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MDMO-PPV) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), a soluble derivative of C60. Under illumination of the sample, two paramagnetic species are formed due to photoinduced charge transfer between conjugated polymer and fullerene. One is the positive polaron P+ on the polymer backbone and the other is the radical anion on the methanofullerene. Using high-frequency (95 GHz) LEPR it was possible to separate these two contributions to the spectrum on the basis of their g factors, and moreover to resolve the g anisotropy for both radicals. The positive polaron on the conjugated polymer chain possesses axial symmetry with g values g||=2.0034(1) and g⊥=2.0024(1). EPR on low doped polymer gave extra proof for the assignment to the positive polaron. The negatively charged methanofullerene has a lower, rhombic symmetry with gx=2.0003(1), gy=2.0001(1), and gz=1.9982(1). Different spin-lattice relaxation of both species gives rise to a rapid passage effect for the positive polaron spectrum.

  1. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Cavity design and linear analysis of 225 GHz frequency-quadrupling gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di-Wei; Yuan, Xue-Song; Yan, Yang; Liu, Sheng-Gang

    2009-07-01

    This paper considers the frequency-quadrupling three-cavity gyroklystrons with successive frequency-doubling in each cavity. The cavities of 225 GHz frequency-quadrupling gyroklystron are designed with the scattering matrices method and the possible operating mode are discussed. With the point-gap theory, the starting currents of the possible operating modes and the potential parasitic modes in the output cavity are calculated. The optimal operating mode is proposed under consideration of the mode competition and the power capacity of the cavity.

  2. Enhanced Microwave Absorption of SiO2-Coated Fe0.65Co0.35 Flakes at a Wide Frequency Band (1-18 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui; Gong, Rongzhou; Wang, Xian; Song, Kai; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-07-01

    Fe0.65Co0.35 (Fe-35Co) flakes were coated with SiO2 by the Stober process. The complex permittivity and permeability of both Fe-35Co and Fe-35Co/SiO2 composites were investigated over the frequency range of 1-18 GHz. Two dielectric resonance peaks were found in the Fe-35Co/SiO2 composite. Magnetic loss was verified to arise predominately from the natural resonance. Of particular importance is the natural resonance frequency increases with the SiO2 cladding. The experiments indicated that a reflection loss (RL) less than -20 dB for the Fe-35Co/SiO2 composites can be measured over the frequency range of 5.16-10.6 GHz with an absorbing thickness of 2-3.5 mm. Furthermore, an optimal RL of -60.23 dB was observed at 6.27 GHz with a thickness of 2.93 mm. The results provide a valuable path towards realizing microwave absorption over a wide frequency range.

  3. Enhanced Microwave Absorption of SiO2-Coated Fe0.65Co0.35 Flakes at a Wide Frequency Band (1-18 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui; Gong, Rongzhou; Wang, Xian; Song, Kai; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-05-01

    Fe0.65Co0.35 (Fe-35Co) flakes were coated with SiO2 by the Stober process. The complex permittivity and permeability of both Fe-35Co and Fe-35Co/SiO2 composites were investigated over the frequency range of 1-18 GHz. Two dielectric resonance peaks were found in the Fe-35Co/SiO2 composite. Magnetic loss was verified to arise predominately from the natural resonance. Of particular importance is the natural resonance frequency increases with the SiO2 cladding. The experiments indicated that a reflection loss (RL) less than -20 dB for the Fe-35Co/SiO2 composites can be measured over the frequency range of 5.16-10.6 GHz with an absorbing thickness of 2-3.5 mm. Furthermore, an optimal RL of -60.23 dB was observed at 6.27 GHz with a thickness of 2.93 mm. The results provide a valuable path towards realizing microwave absorption over a wide frequency range.

  4. Studying integrated silicon-lens antennas for radio communication systems operated in the 60 GHz frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, A. A.; Mal'tsev, A. A.; Maslennikov, R. O.; Sevastyanov, A. G.; Ssorin, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the development of an integrated lens antenna for LAN radio communication systems operated in the 60 GHz frequency band. The antenna is an extended hemispherical silicon lens. On its flat surface, a microstrip antenna element is located. The use of silicon, which has a dielectric permittivity ɛ = 11.7, as the lens material ensures the maximum range of scanning angles for the minimum axial size of the lens. The approximate analytical formulas, which are used for initial calculations of the lens parameters, allow one to evaluate the basic parameters of the lens antenna integrated with the microstrip antenna element. For further optimizing the parameters of the lens and the antenna element, 3D simulation of the electromagnetic-field distribution was performed. Based on its results, we have developed and manufactured extended hemispherical silicon lenses, which had radii of 6 and 12 mm. The planar microstrip antenna element was manufactured by the low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) technology. The results of simulation and experimental studies of the manufactured prototypes demonstrate that the developed lens antennas has directivities of 17.6 and 23.1 dBi for lenses with radii of 6 and 12 mm, respectively. In this case, the maximum beam deflection angle is achieved, which is equal to 55°, while the permissible decrease in the directivity is no more than 6 dBi compared with the case of a non-deflected beam. The obtained results show that the developed integrated lens antennas can find applications in high-speed radio communication systems operated in the millimeter-wave range.

  5. Electromagnetic interference shielding in 1-18 GHz frequency and electrical property correlations in poly(vinylidene fluoride)-multi-walled carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Sudheer; Vishnupriya, D; Joshi, Anupama; Datar, Suwarna; Patro, T Umasankar

    2015-08-21

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties in the 1-18 GHz frequency range for multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) composites are reported. A simple and gentle acid-treatment of MWNT showed a percolation threshold (PT) of 0.15 wt% in the PVDF matrix as against 0.35 wt% for unfunctionalized MWNT. Acid-treatment of MWNT significantly improves dispersion, interfacial adhesion with the matrix and the EMI shielding properties of PVDF composites. Further, the EMI shielding properties are correlated with the electrical properties. Using composite films of 0.3 mm thickness, the maximum shielding effectiveness (SET) values for 4 wt% unfunctionalized MWNT composites are found to be about 110, 45, 30, 26, and 58 dB for L (1-2 GHz), S (2-4 GHz), C (4-5.8 GHz), J (5.8-8 GHz), and X (8-12 GHz) bands, while the corresponding values for only 0.5 wt% acid functionalized MWNT composites are about 98, 45, 26, 19, and 47 dB, respectively. The electrical conductivity for both the cases is ∼10(-3) S cm(-1) and the weight contents of CNTs are higher than the PT for the respective composites. The comparable EMI SE and electrical conductivity values for both the composites at different weight fractions of CNTs suggest that there is a critical electrical conductivity above which the composites attain improved EMI shielding properties. Further, the shielding mechanism was found to be dominated by absorption loss. Therefore, the composites may also serve as a radar absorbing material. PMID:26194165

  6. UWB and 60-GHz RF generation and transmission over WDM-PON based on bidirectional asymmetric polarization modulation and frequency multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weilin; Yao, Jianping

    2013-10-01

    A novel scheme to simultaneously provide UWB, 60-GHz millimeter-wave (mmW), and baseband services over a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) passive optical network (PON) is proposed and demonstrated. In the proposed system, an OOK Gaussian pulse signal is modulated on the optical carrier and then converted to an OOK UWB impulse signal at an edge filter, a baseband signal and a 30-GHz signal are then modulated on the same optical carrier. By employing polarization multiplex technique, the UWB and baseband signal will have orthogonal polarization directions and the spectrum interference between the two signals is avoided. By suppressing the optical carrier, a frequencydoubled mmW signal at 60 GHz is generated by beating the two 1st order sidebands at a photodetector (PD). Error-free transmission of a UWB signal at 2.5 Gbps and a wired baseband signal at 2.5 and 5 Gbps over a 25-km single-mode fiber (SMF) is achieved. A frequency-doubled mmW signal at 60 GHz is also obtained.

  7. Effective conductivity and permittivity of unsaturated clayey materials in the frequency range 1 mHz to 1GHz: A unified model and its appications in hydrogeophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2012-12-01

    A model combining low frequency complex conductivity and high frequency permittivity is developed in the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 GHz. The low frequency conductivity depends on the pore water conductivity and a surface conductivity term that is mostly controlled by the electrical diffuse layer, the outer component of the electrical double layer coating the surface of the clay minerals. The frequency dependence of the effective quadrature conductivity shows three domains. Below a critical frequency fd that depends on the dynamic pore throat size, the quadrature conductivity is frequency dependent. Between fd and a second critical frequency fp, the quadrature conductivity is generally well described by a plateau (there are however few exception to this rule showing a well-characterized peak but still with a relatively weak frequency dependence). The characteristic frequency fd controls the transition between double layer polarization and the effect of the high frequency permittivity of the material. The Maxwell-Wagner polarization is found to be relatively negligible. For a broad range of frequencies below 1 MHz, the effective permittivity exhibits a strong dependence with the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area. At high frequency, above the critical frequency fd, the effective permittivity reaches a high-frequency asymptotic limit that is controlled by the two Archie's exponent m and n like the low-frequency electrical conductivity. The unified model is compared with various datasets from the literature and is able to explain fairly well a broad number of observations with a very small number of textural and electrochemical parameters. It canbe therefore used to interpret induced polarization, induction-based electromagnetic methods, GPR data, and seismoelectric measurements to characterize the vadose zone.

  8. 1 Gbps full-duplex links for ultra-dense-WDM 6.25 GHz frequency slots in optical metro-access networks.

    PubMed

    Altabas, Jose A; Izquierdo, David; Lazaro, Jose A; Lerin, Adolfo; Sotelo, Felix; Garces, Ignacio

    2016-01-11

    1 Gbps full-duplex optical links for 6.25 GHz ultra dense WDM frequency slots are demonstrated and optimized for cost-effective metro-access networks. The OLT-ONU downlinks are based on 1 Gbps Nyquist-DPSK using MZM and single-detector heterodyne reception obtaining a sensitivity of -52 dBm. The ONU-OLT uplinks are based on 1 Gbps NRZ-DPSK by directly phase modulated DFB and also single-detector heterodyne reception obtaining same sensitivity of -52 dBm. The power budget of full-duplex link is 43 dB. These proposed links can provide service to 16 (32) users at each 100 (200) GHz WDM channel. PMID:26832286

  9. Hybrid bidirectional radio-over-fiber-based orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network supporting 60/120 GHz using offset quadrate phase shift keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Chen, Chen; Qiu, Kun

    2015-09-01

    A hybrid bidirectional orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) based on offset quadrate phase shift keying (OQPSK) to support 60- and 120-GHz radio-over-fiber system is proposed. The system can support wired/wireless applications and enable the dynamic bandwidth allocation according to a subscriber's application. It is successfully achieved by using the millimeter waves (MMWs) generation and the carrier-reuse technique. In the proposed scheme, the MMW bands used for downlink (DL) and uplink transmissions are generated at the optical line terminal by the dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulators. Both 60- and 120-GHz MMWs are obtained for the transmission of the high bit-rate services in source-free optical network units (ONUs), only using a single 15-GHz sinusoidal wave source. The Rayleigh backscattering effect is considered in the proposed OQPSK-based OFDMA-PON. For DL transmission over a 30-km single-mode fiber, the power penalties are less than 0.8 and 1 dB for the OQPSK-OFDM wired data at 10 Gb/s and the OQPSK-OFDM wireless data at 5 Gb/s, respectively.

  10. Radar backscattering properties of corn and soybeans at frequencies of 1.6, 4.75, and 13.3. GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center made an observational study of the radar-backscattering properties of corn and soybeans in commercial fields in a test site in Webster County, IA. Aircraft-based radar scatterometers measured the backscattering coefficient of the crops at three frequencies, 1.6 GHz (L-band), 4.75 GHz (C-band), and 13.3 GHz (Ku-band), at 10 sensor look-angles (5 to 50 degrees from the nadir in steps of 5 degrees), and with several polarization combinations. Among other findings, it was determined that: (1) row direction differences among fields affected significantly the radar-backscattering coefficient of the fields when the radar system used like-polarization at look-angles from 5 to 25 degrees; (2) row-direction differences had no effect on radar backscattering when the system used either cross-polarization or look-angles greater than 25 degrees regardless of the polarization; (3) wet surface-soil moisture conditions resulted in significantly poorer spectral separability of the two crops as compared to dry-soil conditions; and (4) on the dry-soil date, the best channel for separating corn from soybeans was the C-band cross-polarized measurement at a look-angle of 50 degrees.

  11. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  12. Behavior of an inversion-based precipitation retrieval algorithm with high-resolution AMPR measurements including a low-frequency 10.7-GHz channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. A.; Xiang, X.; Mugnai, A.; Hood, R. E.; Spencer, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    A microwave-based, profile-type precipitation retrieval algorithm has been used to analyze high-resolution passsive microwave measurements over an ocean background, obtained by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on a NASA ER-2 aircraft. The analysis is designed to first determine the improvements that can be gained by adding brightness temperature information from the AMPR low-frequency channel (10.7 GHz) to a multispectral retrieval algorithm nominally run with satellite information at 19, 37, and 85 GHz. The impact of spatial resolution degradation of the high-resolution brightness temperature information on the retrieved rain/cloud liquid water contents and ice water contents is then quantified in order to assess the possible biases inherent to satellite-based retrieval. Careful inspection of the high-resolution aircraft dataset reveals five distinctive brightness temperature features associated with cloud structure and scattering effects that are not generally detectable in current passive microwave satellite measurements. Results suggest that the inclusion of 10.7-GHz information overcomes two basic problems associated with three-channel retrieval. Intercomparisons of retrievals carried out at high-resolution and then averaged to a characteristic satellite scale to the corresponding retrievals in which the brightness temperatures are first convolved down to the satellite scale suggest that with the addition of the 10.7-GHz channel, the rain liquid water contents will not be negatively impacted by special resolution degradation. That is not the case with the ice water contents as they appear ti be quite sensitive to the imposed scale, the implication being that as spatial resolution is reduced, ice water contents will become increasingly underestimated.

  13. Astrometrically registered simultaneous observations of the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O and 43 GHz SiO masers toward R Leonis Minoris using KVN and source/frequency phase referencing

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, Richard; Rioja, María J.; Jung, Tae-Hyun; Sohn, Bong-Won; Byun, Do-Young; Cho, Se-Hyung; Lee, Sang-Sung; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Kee-Tae; Oh, Chung-Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Chung, Moon-Hee; Wi, Seog-Oh; Kang, Jiman; Lee, Jung-Won; Chung, Hyunsoo; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; and others

    2014-11-01

    Oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can be intense emitters of SiO (v = 1 and 2, J = 1 → 0) and H{sub 2}O maser lines at 43 and 22 GHz, respectively. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the maser emission provide a unique tool to probe the innermost layers of the circumstellar envelopes in AGB stars. Nevertheless, the difficulties in achieving astrometrically aligned H{sub 2}O and v = 1 and v = 2 SiO maser maps have traditionally limited the physical constraints that can be placed on the SiO maser pumping mechanism. We present phase-referenced simultaneous spectral-line VLBI images for the SiO v = 1 and v = 2, J = 1 → 0, and H{sub 2}O maser emission around the AGB star R LMi, obtained from the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). The simultaneous multi-channel receivers of the KVN offer great possibilities for astrometry in the frequency domain. With this facility, we have produced images with bona fide absolute astrometric registration between high-frequency maser transitions of different species to provide the positions of the H{sub 2}O maser emission and the center of the SiO maser emission, hence reducing the uncertainty in the proper motions for R LMi by an order of magnitude over that from Hipparcos. This is the first successful demonstration of source frequency phase referencing for millimeter VLBI spectral-line observations and also where the ratio between the frequencies is not an integer.

  14. Flexible electromagnetic wave sensor operating at GHz frequencies for instantaneous concentration measurements of NaCl, KCl, MnCl2 and CuCl solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Ortoneda-Pedrola, M.; Mason, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    A novel electromagnetic wave sensor operating at GHz frequencies for real-time chlorides concentration analysis is reported. The sensor response to deionized water, NaCl, KCl, MnCl2 and CuCl solutions at various concentrations was tested. The sensing element, in the form of a silver pattern antenna that emits an electromagnetic field, was printed on a polyimide flexible laminate substrate to form a sensor to suit a broad range of applications, where a sensor could be placed in water reservoirs or fluid-carrying pipes for continuous analysis. The developed system confirmed the viability of using microwaves for real-time chloride solutions monitoring as the reflected signals represented by S11 parameters were unique with clearly observed shifts in the resonant frequencies and amplitude changes when placed in direct contact with 20 µl of each solution. This paper was an invited article at the Sensors and Applications XVII conference.

  15. Automated Microwave Complex on the Basis of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz and an Output Power of 1 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Morozkin, M. V.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Lubyako, L. V.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zapevalov, V. E.; V. Kholoptsev, V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Sedov, A. S.; Malygin, V. I.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Sokolov, E. V.; Denisov, G. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study experimentally the automated microwave complex for microwave spectroscopy and diagnostics of various media, which was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with GYCOM Ltd. on the basis of a gyrotron with a frequency of 263 GHz and operated at the first gyrofrequency harmonic. In the process of the experiments, a controllable output power of 0 .1 -1 kW was achieved with an efficiency of up to 17 % in the continuous-wave generation regime. The measured radiation spectrum with a relative width of about 10 -6 and the frequency values measured at various parameters of the device are presented. The results of measuring the parameters of the wave beam, which was formed by a built-in quasioptical converter, as well as the data obtained by measuring the heat loss in the cavity and the vacuum output window are analyzed.

  16. Frequency band justifications for passive sensors, 1 to 10 GHz. [for monitoring earth resources and the environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Remote sensor systems operating in the microwave region of the frequency spectrum provide information unobtainable with basic imaging techniques such as photography, television, or multispectral imaging. The frequency allocation requirements for passive microwave sensors used in the earth exploration satellite and space research services are presented for: (1) agriculture, forestry, and range resources; (2) land use survey and mapping: (3) water resources; (4) weather and climate; (5) environmental quality; and (6) marine resources, estuarine and oceans. Because measurements are required simultaneously in multiple frequency bands to adequately determine values of some phenomena, the relationships between frequency bands are discussed. The various measurement accuracies, dynamic range, resolutions and frequency needs are examined. A band-by-band summary of requirements, unique aspects, and sharing analyses of the required frequency bands is included.

  17. Patterned FeNi soft magnetic strips film with tunable resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yan; Ren, Jiankun; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Bo; Yan, Haiyang; Sun, Guangai; Peng, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Soft magnetic films with a wide-range tunable ferromagnetic resonance frequency are suitable for miniaturization and multifunctionalization of microwave integrated circuits. Fabrication of these films for high-frequency applications is usually complicated and difficult. We demonstrate a simple method to fabricate patterned FeNi soft magnetic strip films by magnetron sputtering and photolithography. Films prepared by this method exhibits a tunable in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (IPUMA) for different strip widths and gaps. As the strip widths changing from 500 to 2 μm, the IPUMA field increases monotonically from 2.2 to 576 Oe and resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz(which covers four microwave bands, including the L,S,C and X bands) respectively. This ultra-wide-range adjustability of resonance frequency can be attributed to shape anisotropy of strips. Considering that FeNi alloy has relatively low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, so a wider adjustable range of resonance frequency could be obtained using materials with stronger magnetocrystalline anisotropy. PMID:27561328

  18. Patterned FeNi soft magnetic strips film with tunable resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yan; Ren, Jiankun; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Bo; Yan, Haiyang; Sun, Guangai; Peng, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Soft magnetic films with a wide-range tunable ferromagnetic resonance frequency are suitable for miniaturization and multifunctionalization of microwave integrated circuits. Fabrication of these films for high-frequency applications is usually complicated and difficult. We demonstrate a simple method to fabricate patterned FeNi soft magnetic strip films by magnetron sputtering and photolithography. Films prepared by this method exhibits a tunable in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (IPUMA) for different strip widths and gaps. As the strip widths changing from 500 to 2 μm, the IPUMA field increases monotonically from 2.2 to 576 Oe and resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz(which covers four microwave bands, including the L,S,C and X bands) respectively. This ultra-wide-range adjustability of resonance frequency can be attributed to shape anisotropy of strips. Considering that FeNi alloy has relatively low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, so a wider adjustable range of resonance frequency could be obtained using materials with stronger magnetocrystalline anisotropy. PMID:27561328

  19. Chip design of a 5.8-GHz fractional-N frequency synthesizer with a tunable Gm-C loop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jhin-Fang; Liu, Ron-Yi; Lai, Wen-Cheng; Shin, Chun-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Ming

    2012-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel Gm-C loop filter instead of a conventional passive loop filter used in a phase-locked loop. The innovative advantage of the proposed architecture is tunable loop filter bandwidth and hence the process variations of passive elements of resistance R and capacitance C can be overcome and the chip area is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the MASH 1-1-1 sigma-delta (ΣΔ) modulator is adopted for performing the fractional division number and hence improves the phase noise as well. Measured results show that the locked phase noise is -114.1 dBc/Hz with lower Gm-C bandwidth and -111.7 dBm/C with higher Gm-C bandwidth at 1 MHz offset from carrier of 5.68 GHz. Including pads and built-in Gm-C filter, the chip area of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 1.06 mm2. The output power is -8.69 dBm at 5.68 GHz and consumes 56 mW with an off-chip buffer from 1.8-V supply voltage.

  20. Performance of FeCoB based thin-film microwave noise suppressor applied to the electromagnetic interference design in the GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jing; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Jin; Li, Wenli

    2014-05-01

    To develop high performance microwave noise suppressor, the microwave noise suppressors based on a microstrip line using FeCoB based magnetic thin film are presented, whose microwave noise suppression effects have been investigated. It was found that suitable low argon pressure is beneficial to the improvement of microwave noise suppression. In addition, the microwave noise suppression properties of microwave noise suppressor could be tuned by controlling the geometric dimension of FeCoB based magnetic thin film and SiO2 dielectric layer, resulted from the ferromagnetic resonance loss and eddy current loss. The maximum power loss ratio (Ploss/Pin) of thin-film microwave noise suppressor (the length, width, and thickness of FeCoNiB thin film are 25 mm, 10 mm, and 250 nm, respectively) achieves 0.75 at 3.4 GHz. These results show that the presented film noise suppressors have potential for the electromagnetic interference design in the GHz frequency range.

  1. Novel photoswitchable dielectric properties on nanomaterials of electronic core-shell γ-FeOx@Au@fullerosomes for GHz frequency applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Su, Chefu; Yu, Tzuyang; Tan, Loon-Seng; Hu, Bin; Urbas, Augustine; Chiang, Long Y

    2016-03-28

    We unexpectedly observed a large amplification of the dielectric properties associated with the photoswitching effect and the new unusual phenomenon of delayed photoinduced capacitor-like (i.e. electric polarization) behavior at the interface on samples of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP)@[C60(>DPAF-C9)](n)2 nanoparticles (NPs) in frequencies of 0.5-4.0 GHz. The detected relative dielectric constant amplification was initiated upon switching off the light followed by relaxation to give an excellent recyclability. These NPs having e(-)-polarizable fullerosomic structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell γ-FeOx@AuNPs. Surface-stabilized 2 in a core-shell structure was found to be capable of photoinducing the surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) effect by white LED light. The accumulated SPR energy was subsequently transferred to the partially bilayered C60(>DPAF-C9) fullerosomic membrane layer in a near-field (∼1.5 nm) region without producing radiation heat. Since the monostatic SAR signal is dielectric property-dependent, we used these measurements to provide evidence of derived reflectivity changes on a surface coated with 2 at 0.5-4.0 GHz upon illumination of LED white light. We found that a high, >99%, efficiency of response amplification in image amplitude can be achieved. PMID:26936772

  2. Direct generation of 12.5-GHz-spaced optical frequency comb with ultrabroad coverage in near-infrared region by cascaded fiber configuration.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Ken; Kurokawa, Takashi; Okuyama, Yasushi; Mori, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Hirano, Masaaki

    2016-04-18

    We generated a 12.5-GHz-spacing optical frequency comb that can be resolved over 100 THz, from 1040 to 1750 nm, without spectral mode filtering. To cover such a broad spectrum, we used electro-optic modulation of single frequency light and line-by-line pulse synthesis to produce a clear pulse train and subsequent spectral broadening in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs). We numerically and experimentally investigated a configuration of the HNLFs and find that a two-stage broadening through different HNLFs is required when using limited pulse energy at a high repetition rate. We designed and fabricated solid silica-based HNLFs with small zero-dispersion wavelengths to obtain strong spectral broadening, especially at the shorter wavelengths. The individual lines of the proposed frequency comb are resolvable with high contrast over the entire spectral range. The results described in this paper should lead to the development of multicarrier sources for wavelength-division-multiplexing communication and super-multi-point frequency calibration for spectrometers, especially in astrophysics. PMID:27137251

  3. An SIS Waveguide heterodyne Reciever for 600 GHz - 635 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salez, Morvan; Febvre, Pascal; McGrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    A waveguide SIS heterodyne receiver using a Nb/A10xNb junction has been built for astronomical observations of molecular tranitions in the frequency range 600GHz - 635GHZ, and has been successfully used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO).

  4. Spectrum allocations above 40 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzenstein, W. E.; Moore, R. P.; Kimball, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-79) revised the International Table of Frequency Allocations to reflect increased interest and activity in the region of the EM spectrum above 40 GHz. The total width of the spectrum allocated (235 GHz) in the region above 40 GHz indicates the extent of this new spectrum resource, made accessible by advances in the state-of-the-art of telecommunications equipment. There are some striking differences between the approach to allocation above and below 40 GHz. For example, there are not bands allocated exclusively. This reflects the characteristics of propagation and the small antenna beamwidths achievable at these frequencies. Attention is given to atmospheric window and absorption band limits, allocations to satellite services, allocations to scientific services, allocations to terrestrial services, the future refinement of the radio regulations above 40 GHz, and allocations of WARC-79 and frequency management.

  5. Dielectric behavior of wild-type yeast and vacuole-deficient mutant over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Asami, K; Yonezawa, T

    1996-01-01

    Dielectric behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuole-deficient mutant cells has been studied over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz. Both types of cells harvested at the early stationary growth phase showed dielectric dispersion that was phenomenologically formulated by a sum of three separate dispersion terms: beta 1-dispersion (main dispersion) and beta 2-dispersion (additional dispersion) and gamma-dispersion due to orientation of water molecules. The beta 1-dispersion centered at a few MHz, which has been extensively studied so far, is due to interfacial polarization (or the Maxwell-Wagner effect) related to the plasma membrane. The beta 2-dispersion for the vacuole-deficient mutant centered at approximately 50 MHz was explained by taking the cell wall into account, whereas, for the wild-type cells, the beta 2-dispersion around a few tens MHz involved the contributions from the vacuole and cell wall. PMID:8889195

  6. Behavior of microwave-heated silicon carbide particles at frequencies of 2.0–13.5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, H.; Hayashi, M.; Ishihara, S.; Kashimura, K.; Mitani, T.; Shinohara, N.

    2014-07-21

    Silicon carbide is a key material in microwave (MW) processing and is used widely as a thermal insulator and catalytic agent. In this study, we experimentally investigated the temperature dependence of the MW-absorption properties of SiC particles at frequencies of 2.0–13.5 GHz. We heated SiC particles of different sizes using MW radiation. The heating behaviors of the particles were then compared with their MW-absorption properties. The heating behavior of the particles was dependent on their radii; this result was in keeping with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the β-SiC particles exhibited anomalous behaviors when subjected to microwave heating at temperatures of 1100 °C and higher. These behaviors were attributable to the transformation of β-SiC into the α-phase. The underlying mechanism for this transformation is discussed on the basis of the results of X-ray diffraction analysis.

  7. Improving single slope ADC and an example implemented in FPGA with 16.7 GHz equivalent counter clook frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Odeghe, John; Stackley, Scott; Zha, Charles; /Rice U.

    2011-11-01

    Single slope ADC is a common building block in many ASCI or FPGA based front-end systems due to its simplicity, small silicon footprint, low noise interference and low power consumption. In single slope ADC, using a Gray code counter is a popular scheme for time digitization, in which the comparator output drives the clock (CK) port of a register to latch the bits from the Gray code counter. Unfortunately, feeding the comparator output into the CK-port causes unnecessary complexities and artificial challenges. In this case, the propagation delays of all bits from the counter to the register inputs must be matched and the counter must be a Gray code one. A simple improvement on the circuit topology, i.e., feeding the comparator output into the D-port of a register, will avoid these unnecessary challenges, eliminating the requirement of the propagation delay match of the counter bits and allowing the use of regular binary counters. This scheme not only simplifies current designs for low speeds and resolutions, but also opens possibilities for applications requiring higher speeds and resolutions. A multi-channel single slope ADC based on a low-cost FPGA device has been implemented and tested. The timing measurement bin width in this work is 60 ps, which would need a 16.7 GHz counter clock had it implemented with the conventional Gray code counter scheme. A 12-bit performance is achieved using a fully differential circuit making comparison between the input and the ramping reference, both in differential format.

  8. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation in the 20–200 GHz frequency range with arrays of carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Atdayev, Agylych; Danilyuk, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Summary The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a magnetic nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) is considered within the model of distributed random nanoparticles with a core–shell morphology. The approach is based on a system composed of a CNT conducting resistive matrix, ferromagnetic inductive nanoparticles and the capacitive interface between the CNT matrix and the nanoparticles, which form resonance resistive–inductive–capacitive circuits. It is shown that the influence of the resonant circuits leads to the emergence of specific resonances, namely peaks and valleys in the frequency dependence of the permeability of the nanocomposite, and in the frequency dependence of the reflection and transmission of electromagnetic radiation. PMID:25977874

  9. A 2-to-2.4-GHz differentially-tuned fractional-N frequency synthesizer for DVB tuner applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingbu, Meng; Lei, Lu; Wei, Zhao; Zhangwen, Tang

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the design of a fractional-N frequency synthesizer for digital video broadcasting-terrestrial (DVB-T) receivers. Transfer functions in differentially-tuned PLL are derived and loop parameters are designed. In addition, a fully-differential charge pump is presented. An 8/9 high speed prescaler is analyzed and the design considerations for the CML logic are also presented. Test results show that the RMS phase error is less than 0.7° in integer-N mode and less than 1° in fractional-N mode. The implemented frequency synthesizer draws 10 mA from a 1.8-V supply while occupying a die area of about 1-mm2 in a 0.18-μm CMOS process.

  10. Escherichia coli membrane-associated energy-dependent processes and sensitivity toward antibiotics changes as responses to low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-04-01

    Escherichia coli K-12(λ) was sensitive toward low-intensity (non-thermal, flux capacity 0.06 mW cm(-2)) electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of extremely high frequency-70.6 and 73 GHz. 1 h exposure to EMI markedly depressed growth and cell viability of bacteria. Membrane-associated processes-total H(+) efflux and H(2) evaluation by whole cells during glucose fermentation were shown to be lowered as well. At the same time, the F(0)F(1)-ATPase activity of membrane vesicles was little depressed with 70.6 GHz irradiation only. This finding was in conformity with non-changed N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-sensitive H(+) efflux. Furthermore, for understanding the different frequencies action mechanisms, the effects of antibiotics (chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, kanamycin, and tetracycline) on irradiated cells growth and survival were determined. EMI with the frequencies of 70.6 and 73 GHz as with 51.8 and 53.0 GHz enhanced the sensitivity of bacteria toward antibiotics, but comparison revealed that each frequency had a different portion. Probably, EMI of specific frequency triggered changes in biological processes and afterward in growth and viability of bacteria, creating conditions when the action of antibiotics became facilitated. PMID:22101511

  11. Novel photoswitchable dielectric properties on nanomaterials of electronic core-shell γ-FeOx@Au@fullerosomes for GHz frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Su, Chefu; Yu, Tzuyang; Tan, Loon-Seng; Hu, Bin; Urbas, Augustine; Chiang, Long Y.

    2016-03-01

    We unexpectedly observed a large amplification of the dielectric properties associated with the photoswitching effect and the new unusual phenomenon of delayed photoinduced capacitor-like (i.e. electric polarization) behavior at the interface on samples of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP)@[C60(>DPAF-C9)]n2 nanoparticles (NPs) in frequencies of 0.5-4.0 GHz. The detected relative dielectric constant amplification was initiated upon switching off the light followed by relaxation to give an excellent recyclability. These NPs having e--polarizable fullerosomic structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell γ-FeOx@AuNPs. Surface-stabilized 2 in a core-shell structure was found to be capable of photoinducing the surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) effect by white LED light. The accumulated SPR energy was subsequently transferred to the partially bilayered C60(>DPAF-C9) fullerosomic membrane layer in a near-field (~1.5 nm) region without producing radiation heat. Since the monostatic SAR signal is dielectric property-dependent, we used these measurements to provide evidence of derived reflectivity changes on a surface coated with 2 at 0.5-4.0 GHz upon illumination of LED white light. We found that a high, >99%, efficiency of response amplification in image amplitude can be achieved.We unexpectedly observed a large amplification of the dielectric properties associated with the photoswitching effect and the new unusual phenomenon of delayed photoinduced capacitor-like (i.e. electric polarization) behavior at the interface on samples of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP)@[C60(>DPAF-C9)]n2 nanoparticles (NPs) in frequencies of 0.5-4.0 GHz. The detected relative dielectric constant amplification was initiated upon switching off the light followed by relaxation to give an excellent recyclability. These NPs having e--polarizable fullerosomic structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell

  12. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S(1 ,1 ) varying from 0 to -30 db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  13. 10-25 GHz frequency reconfigurable MEMS 5-bit phase shifter using push-pull actuator based toggle mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a frequency tunable 5-bit true-time-delay digital phase shifter using radio frequency microelectromechanical system (RF MEMS) technology. The phase shifter is based on the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) concept utilizing a MEMS varactor. The main source of frequency tuning in this work is a bridge actuation mechanism followed by capacitance variation. Two stages of actuation mechanisms (push and pull) are used to achieve a 2:1 tuning ratio. Accurate control of the actuation voltage between the pull to push stages contributes differential phase shift over the band of interest. The functional behavior of the push-pull actuation over the phase shifter application is theoretically established, experimentally investigated and validated with simulation. The phase shifter is fabricated monolithically using a gold based surface micromachining process on an alumina substrate. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are the fundamental building blocks of the complete 5-bit phase shifter are designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized from 10-25 GHz for specific applications. Finally, the complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average phase error of 4.32°, 2.8°, 1° and 1.58°, an average insertion loss of 3.76, 4.1, 4.2 and 4.84 dB and an average return loss of 11.7, 12, 14 and 11.8 dB at 10, 12, 17.2 and 25 GHz, respectively. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported band tunable stand alone 5-bit phase shifter in the literature which can work over the large spectrum for different applications. The total area of the 5-bit phase shifter is 15.6 mm2. Furthermore, the cold-switched reliability of the unit cell and the complete 5-bit MEMS phase shifter are extensively investigated and presented.

  14. Optimization of transistor design including large signal device/circuit interactions at extremely high frequencies (20-100+GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Ralph; Grubin, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Transistor design for extremely high frequency applications requires consideration of the interaction between the device and the circuit to which it is connected. Traditional analytical transistor models are to approximate at some of these frequencies and may not account for variations of dopants and semiconductor materials (especially some of the newer materials) within the device. Physically based models of device performance are required. These are based on coupled systems of partial differential equations and typically require 20 minutes of Cray computer time for a single AC operating point. A technique is presented to extract parameters from a few partial differential equation solutions for the device to create a nonlinear equivalent circuit model which runs in approximately 1 second of personal computer time. This nonlinear equivalent circuit model accurately replicates the contact current properties of the device as computed by the partial differential solver on which it is based. Using the nonlinear equivalent circuit model of the device, optimization of systems design can be performed based on device/circuit interactions.

  15. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A 3.1-4.8 GHz transmitter with a high frequency divider in 0.18 μm CMOS for OFDM-UWB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renliang, Zheng; Junyan, Ren; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2009-12-01

    A fully integrated low power RF transmitter for a WiMedia 3.1-4.8 GHz multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing ultra-wideband system is presented. With a separate transconductance stage, the quadrature up-conversion modulator achieves high linearity with low supply voltage. The co-design of different resonant frequencies of the modulator and the differential to single (D2S) converter ensures in-band gain flatness. By means of a series inductor peaking technique, the D2S converter obtains 9 dB more gain without extra power consumption. A divided-by-2 divider is used for carrier signal generation. The measurement results show an output power between -10.7 and -3.1 dBm with 7.6 dB control range, an OIP3 up to 12 dBm, a sideband rejection of 35 dBc and a carrier rejection of 30 dBc. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in the Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process with an area of 1.74 mm2 and only consumes 32 mA current (at 1.8 V) including the test associated parts.

  16. Modelling changes in the dielectric and scattering properties of young snow-covered sea ice at GHz frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Crocker, G. B.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the physical properties of the snow cover and underlying young fast ice in Resolute Passage, Canada, were made during the winter of 1982. Detailed measurements of snow density and ice and snow temperatures, salinities, and brine volumes were made over a period of 46 d, beginning when the ice was 0.4 m thick and about 9 d old. The recorded values are used in a theoretical mixture model to predict the dielectric properties of the snow cover over the microwave frequency range. The results of this analysis are then used to investigate the effects of the snow properties on the radar backscatter signatures of young sea ice. The results show that backscatter is a function of the incidence angle and can change significantly over short periods of time during the early evolutionary phase of ice and snow-cover development. This has important consequences for the identification of young ice forms from SAR or SLAR images.

  17. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Klopf, J.; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-08-10

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed 'double spectra'. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  18. The Contribution of Microbunching Instability to Solar Flare Emission in the GHz to THz Range of Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopf, J. Michael; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-08-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed "double spectra." Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  19. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Klopf, J. Michael; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed "double spectra." Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  20. Statistical analysis of whole-body absorption depending on anatomical human characteristics at a frequency of 2.1 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Habachi, A.; Conil, E.; Hadjem, A.; Vazquez, E.; Wong, M. F.; Gati, A.; Fleury, G.; Wiart, J.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we propose identification of the morphological factors that may impact the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). This study is conducted for the case of exposure to a front plane wave at a 2100 MHz frequency carrier. This study is based on the development of different regression models for estimating the WBSAR as a function of morphological factors. For this purpose, a database of 12 anatomical human models (phantoms) has been considered. Also, 18 supplementary phantoms obtained using the morphing technique were generated to build the required relation. This paper presents three models based on external morphological factors such as the body surface area, the body mass index or the body mass. These models show good results in estimating the WBSAR (<10%) for families obtained by the morphing technique, but these are still less accurate (30%) when applied to different original phantoms. This study stresses the importance of the internal morphological factors such as muscle and fat proportions in characterization of the WBSAR. The regression models are then improved using internal morphological factors with an estimation error of approximately 10% on the WBSAR. Finally, this study is suitable for establishing the statistical distribution of the WBSAR for a given population characterized by its morphology.

  1. 41 CFR 60-2.18 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 60-2.18 Section 60-2.18 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts OFFICE OF FEDERAL CONTRACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of...

  2. 41 CFR 60-2.18 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true 60-2.18 Section 60-2.18 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts OFFICE OF FEDERAL CONTRACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 2-AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS Purpose and Contents of...

  3. Dielectric Relaxations of (Acetamide + Electrolyte) Deep Eutectic Solvents in the Frequency Window, 0.2 ≤ ν/GHz ≤ 50: Anion and Cation Dependence.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kallol; Das, Anuradha; Choudhury, Samiran; Barman, Anjan; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-06-25

    Dielectric relaxation (DR) measurements in the frequency range 0.2 ≤ ν/GHz ≤ 50 have been carried out for neat molten acetamide and six different (acetamide + electrolyte) deep eutectic solvents (DESs) for investigating ion effects on DR dynamics in these ionic DESs. Electrolytes used are lithium salts of bromide (LiBr), nitrate (LiNO3), and perchlorate (LiClO4); sodium salts of perchlorate (NaClO4) and thiocyante (NaSCN); and potassium thiocyanate (KSCN). With these electrolytes acetamide forms DESs approximately at an 80:20 mol ratio. Simultaneous fits to the measured permittivity (ε′) and loss (ε″) spectra of these DESs at ∼293 K require a sum of four Debye (4-D) processes with relaxation times spread over picosecond to nanosecond regime. In contrast, DR spectra for neat molten acetamide (∼354 K) depict 2-D relaxation with time constants ∼50 ps and ∼5 ps. For both the neat and ionic systems, the undetected dispersion, ε∞ – n(D)2, remains to be ∼3–4. Upon comparison, measured DR dynamics reveal pronounced anion and cation effects. Estimated static dielectric constants (ε0) from fits for these DESs cover the range 12 < ε0 < 30 and are remarkably lower than that (ε0 ∼ 64) measured for molten acetamide at ∼354 K. Hydrodynamic effective rotation volumes (Veff) estimated from the slowest DR relaxation time constants vary with ion identity and are much smaller than the molecular volume of acetamide. This decrease of ε0 and Veff is attributed respectively to the pinning of acetamide molecules by ions and orientation jumps and undetected portion to the limited frequency coverage employed in these measurements PMID:26012789

  4. 30 GHz Commercial Satellite Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's research and development work in satellite communications for the past 10 years has included a major technology thrust aimed at opening the Ka frequency band to commercial exploitation. This has included the development and testing of advanced system network architectures, on-board switching and processing, multibeam and phased array antennas, and satellite and ground terminal RF and digital hardware. Development work in system hardware has focused on critical components including power amplifiers, satellite IF switch matrices, low noise receivers, baseband processors, and high data rate bandwidth efficient modems. This paper describes NASA's work in developing and testing 30 GHz low noise satellite receivers for commercial space communications uplink applications. Frequencies allotted for fixed service commercial satellite communications in the Ka band are 27.5 - 30.0 GHz for uplink transmission and 17.7 - 20.2 GHz for downlink transmission. The relatively large 2.5 GHz bandwidth lends itself to wideband, high data rate digital transmission applications.

  5. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  6. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  7. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  8. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  9. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  10. Rain and cloud effects on a satellite dual-frequency radar altimeter system operating at 13.5 and 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Monaldo, F. M.; Goldhirsh, J.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of clouds and rain on the return waveform signatures from satellite borne radar altimeters operating at 13.5 and 35 GHz are examined. It is specifically demonstrated that spatial nonuniformity in the cloud liquid water content or variations of the rain rate may result in significant distortions of the altimeter signature. The distorted signal is produced as a result of nonuniform attenuation occurring at the different range bins associated with the reflected signal. Determination of the mean sea height by employing tracking algorithms on these distorted echoes may result in gross errors. Although the influence of clouds on the altimeter signature and hence tracking precision is minimal at 13.5 GHz (e.g., less than 4 cm for a 1-s average), it may produce unacceptable mean sea level uncertainties at 35 GHz (e.g., 20 cm for a 1-s average) assuming a significant waveheight of 4 m. On the other hand, the signatures at both 13.5 GHz and 35 GHz become grossly distorted for rain rates of 10 mm/h and higher resulting in mean sea height errors of 46 and 65 cm, respectively, for significant wave heights of 2 m.

  11. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  12. Frequency sharing between passive sensors and aeronautical radionavigation systems employing ground transponders in the band 4.2 - 4.4 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    The 4.2 to 4.4 GHz band is reserved for radio altimeters aboard aircraft and for associated transponders on the ground. A radar altimeter system which utilizes associated ground transponders is described and the feasibility of co-channel operation of such a system with a typical passive sensor is analyzed.

  13. A 20-GHz IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. L.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band. The development effort involved a variety of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, simple and multiple diode circuits designs, and amplifier integration and test.

  14. The use of radar at non-attenuating wavelengths as a tool for the estimation of rain attenuation at frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes radar techniques and modeling procedures for estimating slant path attenuation and site diversity performance. The estimation results of an ongoing experiment at Wallops Island, Virginia are examined. At this location a high resolution S-band radar (0.4 deg beamwidth) monitors the reflectivity at contiguous pulse volumes approximately colocated with an earth space-path along which the Comstar beacon signal at 28.56 GHz is received. Radar estimated levels of rain attenuation at 28.56 GHz are compared with directly measured values both on a case by case basis as well as statistically for summer and winter periods. Use is made of ground disdrometer measurements in the radar estimation scheme.

  15. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  16. Dielectric properties of porous silicon for use as a substrate for the on-chip integration of millimeter-wave devices in the frequency range 140 to 210 GHz

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the dielectric properties of porous Si for its use as a local substrate material for the integration on the Si wafer of millimeter-wave devices were investigated in the frequency range 140 to 210 GHz. Broadband electrical characterization of coplanar waveguide transmission lines (CPW TLines), formed on the porous Si layer, was used in this respect. It was shown that the dielectric parameters of porous Si (dielectric permittivity and loss tangent) in the above frequency range have values similar to those obtained at lower frequencies (1 to 40 GHz). More specifically, for the samples used, the obtained values were approximately 3.12 ± 0.05 and 0.023 ± 0.005, respectively. Finally, a comparison was made between the performance of the CPW TLines on a 150-μm-thick porous Si layer and on three other radiofrequency (RF) substrates, namely, on trap-rich high-resistivity Si (trap-rich HR Si), on a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) Si wafer (p-type, resistivity 1 to 10 Ω.cm) and on quartz. PACS 84.40.-x; 77.22.Ch; 81.05.Rm PMID:25206316

  17. Dielectric properties of porous silicon for use as a substrate for the on-chip integration of millimeter-wave devices in the frequency range 140 to 210 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafis, Panagiotis; Nassiopoulou, Androula Galiouna

    2014-08-01

    In this work, the dielectric properties of porous Si for its use as a local substrate material for the integration on the Si wafer of millimeter-wave devices were investigated in the frequency range 140 to 210 GHz. Broadband electrical characterization of coplanar waveguide transmission lines (CPW TLines), formed on the porous Si layer, was used in this respect. It was shown that the dielectric parameters of porous Si (dielectric permittivity and loss tangent) in the above frequency range have values similar to those obtained at lower frequencies (1 to 40 GHz). More specifically, for the samples used, the obtained values were approximately 3.12 ± 0.05 and 0.023 ± 0.005, respectively. Finally, a comparison was made between the performance of the CPW TLines on a 150-μm-thick porous Si layer and on three other radiofrequency (RF) substrates, namely, on trap-rich high-resistivity Si (trap-rich HR Si), on a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) Si wafer (p-type, resistivity 1 to 10 Ω.cm) and on quartz.

  18. Impact of high power interference sources in planning and deployment of wireless sensor networks and devices in the 2.4 GHz frequency band in heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology. PMID:23202228

  19. GaAs-based JFET and PHEMT technologies for ultra-low-power microwave circuits operating at frequencies up to 2.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Hietala, V.M.; Greenway, D.; Shul, R.J.; Hafich, M.J.; Zolper, J.C.; Sherwin, M.E.

    1998-05-01

    In this work the authors report results of narrowband amplifiers designed for milliwatt and submilliwatt power consumption using JFET and pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (PHEMT) GaAs-based technologies. Enhancement-mode JFETs were used to design both a hybrid amplifier with off-chip matching as well as a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) with on-chip matching. The hybrid amplifier achieved 8--10 dB of gain at 2.4 GHz and 1 mW. The MMIC achieved 10 dB of gain at 2.4 GHz and 2 mW. Submilliwatt circuits were also explored by using 0.25 {micro}m PHEMTs. 25 {micro}W power levels were achieved with 5 dB of gain for a 215 MHz hybrid amplifier. These results significantly reduce power consumption levels achievable with the JFETs or prior MESFET, heterostructure field effect transistor (HFET), or Si bipolar results from other laboratories.

  20. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven's power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology. PMID:23202228

  1. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CCEM key comparison CCEM.RF-K10.CL (GT-RF/99-2) 'Power in 50 Ω coaxial lines, frequency: 50 MHz to 26 GHz' measurement techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Dieter; Inoue, T.; Michaud, A.

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results and the measuring methods of an international key comparison between twelve national metrology institutes (NMIs) and is concerning the calibration factor of RF power sensors in the coaxial 3.5 mm line for frequencies up to 26 GHz. Two RF power travelling standards fitted with male PC 3.5 mm connectors were measured at seven frequencies. The following NMIs participated: NMIJ (Japan), NRC (Canada), NIST (USA), METAS (Switzerland), CSIR-NML (South Africa), NMIA (Australia), NPL (UK), SiQ (Slovenia), IEN (Italy), VNIIFTRI (Russian Federation), SPRING (Singapore) and PTB (Germany), as the pilot laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  2. Synchrotron Spectral Curvature from 22 MHZ to 23 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 GHz to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index beta = -2.64 +/-= 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount of Delta-beta = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic-ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.

  3. SYNCHROTRON SPECTRAL CURVATURE FROM 22 MHz TO 23 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.

    2012-07-10

    We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 GHz to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index {beta} = -2.64 {+-} 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount of {Delta}{beta} = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic-ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.

  4. Delivering Microwave Spectroscopy to the Masses: a Design of a Low-Cost Microwave Spectrometer Operating in the 18-26 GHZ Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steber, Amanda; Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Advances in chip-level microwave technology in the communications field have led to the possibilities of low cost alternatives for current Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers. Many of the large, expensive microwave components in a traditional design can now be replaced by robust, mass market monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). "Spectrometer on a board" designs are now feasible that offer dramatic cost reduction for microwave spectroscopy. These chip-level components can be paired with miniature computers to produce compact instruments that are operable through USB. A FTMW spectrometer design using the key MMIC components that drive cost reduction will be presented. Two dual channel synthesizers (Valon Technology Model 5008), a digital pattern generator (Byte Paradigm Wav Gen Xpress), and a high-speed digitizer/arbitrary waveform generator combination unit (Tie Pie HS-5 530 XM) form the key components of the spectrometer for operation in the 18-26.5 GHz range. The design performance is illustrated using a spectrometer that is being incorporated into a museum display for astrochemistry. For this instrument a user interface, developed in Python, has been developed and will be shown.

  5. Monolithic 20-GHz Transmitting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, T.; Kaelin, G.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    20-GHz monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) with amplification and phase-shift (time-delay) capabilities developed. Use of MMIC module technology promises to make feasible development of weight- and cost-effective phased-array antenna systems, identified as major factor in achieving minimum cost and efficient use of frequency and orbital resources of future generations of communication satellite systems. Use of MMIC transmitting modules provides for relatively simple method for phase-shift control of many separate radio-frequency (RF) signals required for phased-array antenna systems.

  6. 18 CFR 2.18 - Phased electric rate increase filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phased electric rate increase filings. 2.18 Section 2.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Policy and Interpretations Under the Federal Power Act § 2.18 Phased electric rate increase filings....

  7. Fractional-N PLL based FMCW sweep generator for an 80 GHz radar system with 24.5 GHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, T.; Bredendiek, C.; Vogt, M.; Pohl, N.

    2012-09-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency synthesizer capable of generating highly linear broadband frequency sweeps as signal source of a high resolution 80 GHz FMCW radar system is presented. The system achieves a wide output range of 24.5 GHz starting from 68 GHz up to 92.5 GHz. High frequencies allow the use of small antennas for small antenna beam angles. The wide bandwidth results in a radar system with a very high range resolution of below 1.5 cm. Furthermore, the presented synthesizer provides a very low phase noise performance of -80 dBc/Hz at 80 GHz carrier frequency and 10 kHz offset, which enables high precision distance measurements with low range errors. This is achieved by using two nested phase-looked loops with high order loop filters. The use of a fractional PLL divider and a high phase frequency discriminator (PFD) frequency assures an excellent ramp linearity.

  8. Frequency band justifications for passive sensors 10.0 to 385 GHz, chapter 2. [for monitoring earth resources and the environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Sensitivity requirements of the various measurements obtained by microwave sensors, and radiometry techniques are described. Analytical techniques applied to detailed sharing analyses are discussed. A bibliography of publications pertinent to the scientific justification of frequency requirements for passive microwave remote sensing is included.

  9. Atmospheric sounding near 118 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, A. D. S.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Staelin, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal emission spectrum of the atmosphere near the 118 GHz oxygen resonance has been measured from the NASA Convair-990 aircraft as it flew over clear air and storms. The instrument viewed the ground 45 deg from nadir with a 7.5 deg beamwidth. Brightness temperatures were measured in six bands 200 MHz wide centered at frequencies 821-1891 MHz from the line at 118.7505 GHz. The double-sideband super-heterodyne receiver had 1 K sensitivity for 1 s integration. Comparison of observed clear air brightness temperatures (from 238 mb) with those computed for a coincident dropsonde yielded agreement within 1.4 K; the retrieved temperature profile agreed with the dropsonde with an average magnitude error of 1.4 K.

  10. The Low Band Observatory (LOBO): Expanding the VLA Low Frequency Commensal System for Continuous, Broad-band, sub-GHz Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Peters, Wendy M.; Brisken, Walter; Hyman, Scott D.; Polisensky, Emil; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are currently commissioning the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) on a subset of JVLA antennas at modest bandwidth. Its bounded scientific goals are to leverage thousands of JVLA on-sky hours per year for ionospheric and transient studies, and to demonstrate the practicality of a prime-focus commensal system on the JVLA. Here we explore the natural expansion of VLITE to a full-antenna, full-bandwidth Low Band Observatory (LOBO) that would follow naturally from a successful VLITE experience. The new Low Band JVLA receivers, coupled with the existing primary focus feeds, can access two frequency bands: 4 band (54 - 86 MHz) and P band (236-492 MHz). The 4 band feeds are newly designed and now undergoing testing. If they prove successful then they can be permanently mounted at the primary focus, unlike their narrow band predecessors. The combination of Low Band receivers and fixed, primary-focus feeds could provide continuous, broad-band data over two complimentary low-frequency bands. The system would also leverage the relatively large fields-of-view of ~10 degrees at 4 band, and ~2.5 degrees at P band, coupling an excellent survey capability with a natural advantage for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss the compelling science case that flows from LOBO's robust imaging and time domain capabilities coupled with thousands of hours of wide-field, JVLA observing time each year. We also touch on the possibility to incorporate Long Wavelength Array (LWA) stations as additional 'dishes' through the LOBO backend, to improve calibration and sensitivity in LOBO's 4 band.

  11. 183-GHz Radiometer Handbook - November 2006

    SciTech Connect

    MP Cadeddu

    2006-11-30

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer (GVR) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from four double sideband channels centered at ± 1, ± 3, ± 7, and ± 14 GHz around the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. The 183.31 ± 14-GHz channel is particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from this nstrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm).

  12. The effects of 2.45 GHz radio frequency energy on neurological tissue genes using an unrestrained murine model in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Brandon William

    The effects that radio frequency (RF) energy has on the body is currently an inconclusive and controversial topic. This is in part due to the differences and issues that can be found in previous studies. This thesis describes a study on the effect of continuous RF energy on the genome of in vivo mouse brain tissue for a duration of 31 days. To address the issues found in previous studies a new standardized procedure was followed. The genome of the brain tissue was quantified using RNA-seq and then analyzed using statistical combinations and empirical p-values. Transcripts with their respective p-values were uploaded into Integrity Pathway Analysis® to determine genes associated disease and function within the brain tissue. The results from this study provided evidence that supports RF energy induces changes in the genome. Additionally, the results provided evidence of the first reported case of a potential RF-controlled genetic transistor.

  13. Broadband Characterization of a 100 to 180 GHz Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Deal, W. R.; Mei, X. B.; Lai, R.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric science and weather forecasting require measurements of the temperature and humidity vs. altitude. These sounding measurements are obtained at frequencies close to the resonance frequencies of oxygen (118 GHz) and water (183 GHz) molecules. We have characterized a broadband amplifier that will increase the sensitivity of sounding and other instruments at these frequencies. This study demonstrated for the first t1me continuous low noise amplification from 100 to 180 GHz. The measured InP monolithic millimeter-wave Integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier had more than 18 dB of gain from 100 to 180 GHz and 15 dB of gain up to 220 GHz. This is the widest bandwidth low noise amplifier result at these frequencies to date. The circuit was fabricated in Northrop Grumman Corporation 35 nm InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT).

  14. Sixty GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. E.; Chen, J.; Benko, E.; Barger, M. J.; Nghiem, H.; Trinh, T. Q.; Kung, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT Diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goal of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10 year life time. During the course of the program, double drift (DD) GaAs IMPATT Diodes have been developed resulting in the state of the art performance at V band frequencies. A CW output power of 1.12 W was demonstrated at 51.9 GHz with 9.7 percent efficiency. The best conversion efficiency achieved was 15.3 percent. V band DD GaAs IMPATTs were developed using both small signal and large signal analyses. GaAs wafers of DD flat, DD hybrid, and DD Read profiles using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were developed with excellent doping profile control. Wafer evaluation was routinely made by the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurement. Ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis was also used for more detailed profile evaluation.

  15. High power pulsed magnicon at 34-GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Nezhevenko, O.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Ganguly, A.K.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    A high efficiency, high power magnicon amplifier at 34.272 GHz has been designed as a radiation source to drive multi-TeV electron-positron linear colliders. Simulations show peak output power of 45 MW in a 1.5 microsecond wide pulse with an efficiency of 45{percent} and gain of 55 dB. The repetition rate is 10 Hz. The amplifier is a frequency tripler, or third harmonic amplifier, in that the output frequency of 34.272 GHz is three times the input drive frequency of 11.424 GHz. Thus the rotating TM{sub 110} modes in the drive cavity, 3 gain cavities and double decoupled penultimate cavities are resonant near 11.424 GHz; and the rotating TM{sub 310} mode in the output cavity is resonant at 34.272 GHz. A 500 kV, 200 A high area compression electron gun will provide a low emittance electron beam with a diameter of about 0.8 mm. A superconducting solenoid magnet will provide a magnetic field of 13 kG in the deflection system and 22 kG in the output cavity. A collector for the spent beam has also been designed. Detailed simulation results for the operation of the entire magnicon amplifier (gun, magnetic system, rf system and collector) will be given. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Effects of Electromagnetic Field Over a Human Body, Sar Simulation with and Without Nanotextile in the Frequency Range 0.9-1.8GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomovski, Boyan; Gräbner, Frank; Hungsberg, Axel; Kallmeyer, Christian; Linsel, Mario

    2011-11-01

    Within only the last decade, usage of mobile phones and many other electronic devices with high speed wireless RF connection is rapidly increasing. Modern life requires reliable, quick and high-quality information connections, which explains the widely spreading craze for electronic mobile devices of various types. The vast technological advances we are witnessing in electronics, electro-optics, and computer science have profoundly affected our everyday lives. Meanwhile, safety concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic (EM) radiation have been raised, in particular at a low level of exposure which we everyday experience. A variety of waves and signals have to be considered such as different sine waves, digital signals used in radio, television, mobile phone systems and other information transfer systems. The field around us has become rather complicated and the "air space is getting more and more dense with RF. The establishing of safety recommendations, law norms and rules augmented by adequate measurements is very important and requires quite an expertise. But as many scientific researches suggest, what we are currently witnessing is very likely to generate a great public danger and a bad influence over the human body. There are many health organisations warning the public for possible development of cancer, mental and physical disorders etc [7, 8]. These suggestions are quite serious and should not be neglected by the official bodies and the test laboratories. In the following work, the effects of electromagnetic field over a virtual model of a human head have been simulated in the frequency range from 900 MHz to 1800 MHz (commonly created in the real life by mobile GSM system) with the help of the program MEFiSTo 2D Classic [1]. The created virtual models using the 2D simulation & computation software proved that the use of new high tech nanotextile materials for shielding layers around the human body can reduce the effects of EM fields

  17. 18 CFR 2.18 - Phased electric rate increase filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phased electric rate increase filings. 2.18 Section 2.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES GENERAL POLICY AND INTERPRETATIONS Statements of...

  18. 47 CFR 15.256 - Operation of level probing radars within the bands 5.925-7.250 GHz, 24.05-29.00 GHz, and 75-85 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of level probing radars within the bands 5.925-7.250 GHz, 24.05-29.00 GHz, and 75-85 GHz. 15.256 Section 15.256 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.256 Operation...

  19. A low-noise 492 GHz SIS waveguide receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, C. K.; Kooi, J. W.; Chant, M.; Leduc, H. G.; Schaffer, P. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Phillips, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance are described of an SIS waveguide receiver which provides low noise performance from 375 to 510 GHz. At its design frequency of 492 GHz the receiver has a double-sideband noise temperature of about 172 K. By using embedded magnetic-field concentrators Josephson pair tunneling is effectively suppressed. Techniques for improving receiver performance are discussed.

  20. A low-noise 492 GHz SIS waveguide receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, C. K.; Kooi, J. W.; Chan, M.; Leduc, Henry G.; Schaffer, P. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Phillips, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the design and performance of an SIS waveguide receiver which provides low noise performance from 375 to 510 GHz. At its design frequency of 492 GHz, the receiver has a double sideband noise temperature of approx. 172 K. By using embedded magnetic field concentrators, we are able to effectively suppress Josephson pair tunneling. Techniques for improving receiver performance are discussed.

  1. Influence of zinc concentration on structure, complex permittivity and permeability of Ni-Zn ferrites at high frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan-Nan; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Liu, Peng; Deng, Chao-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Polycrystalline soft magnetic nickel-zinc ferrites with chemical composition Ni1-xZnxFe2O4, where x=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.65, 0.7, 0.75, and 0.8, were prepared by solid state reaction method. We researched the effect of zinc concentration on the lattice parameter, crystal morphology and electromagnetic properties at high frequency. Results show that ε‧ and ε″ decline with increasing frequency until they reach almost constants over 3 MHz to 1 GHz. The dielectric constant achieves a maximum when the Zn concentration is 0.8. The value of ε‧ slightly declines with increasing frequency in the range of 2-18 GHz. The spectra of the permeability displays a relaxation resonance for the ferrites with x=0, 0.2, and 0.4 in 3 MHz to 1 GHz frequency range. The permeability is ruled by Snoek's law, which results in the values of μ‧ decreased fast below 2 GHz and smaller than 1 above 2 GHz. The value of μ‧ reaches maximum and μ″ shows minimum for the samples around x=0.75 in 2-18 GHz range. The magnetic permeability μ‧ decreases in an external magnetic field, and shows two resonance peaks corresponding to domain wall and spin rotation resonance. The resonance peaks shift to higher frequency with increasing the external magnetic field. But the permeability has no clear response for magnetic field when zinc concentration is much higher.

  2. Graphene based GHz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony K.; El Fatimy, Abdel; Barbara, Paola; Nath, Anindya; Campbell, Paul M.; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, D. Kurt

    Graphene demonstrates great promise as a detector over a wide spectral range especially in the GHz range. This is because absorption is enhanced due to the Drude contribution. In the GHz range there are viable detection mechanisms for graphene devices. With this in mind, two types of GHz detectors are fabricated on epitaxial graphene using a lift off resist-based clean lithography process to produce low contact resistance. Both device types use asymmetry for detection, consistent with recent thoughts of the photothermoelectric effect (PTE) mechanism. The first is an antenna coupled device. It utilizes two dissimilar contact metals and the work function difference produces the asymmetry. The other device is a field effect transistor constructed with an asymmetric top gate that creates a PN junction and facilitates tuning the photovoltaic response. The response of both device types, tested from 100GHz to 170GHz, are reported. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award Number N000141310865).

  3. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz

  4. 95 GHz gyrotron with ferroelectric cathode.

    PubMed

    Einat, M; Pilossof, M; Ben-Moshe, R; Hirshbein, H; Borodin, D

    2012-11-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ~0.5 μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable. PMID:23215293

  5. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard J.; Shapiro, Michael A.

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  6. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  7. Power-Amplifier Module for 145 to 165 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    A power-amplifier module that operates in the frequency range of 145 to 165 GHz has been designed and constructed as a combination of (1) a previously developed monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier and (2) a waveguide module. The amplifier chip was needed for driving a high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) frequency doubler. While it was feasible to connect the amplifier and frequency-doubler chips by use of wire bonds, it was found to be much more convenient to test the amplifier and doubler chips separately. To facilitate separate testing, it was decided to package the amplifier and doubler chips in separate waveguide modules. Figure 1 shows the resulting amplifier module. The amplifier chip was described in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11, (November 2003), page 49. To recapitulate: This is a three-stage MMIC power amplifier that utilizes HEMTs as gain elements. The amplifier was originally designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz. The waveguide module is based on a previously developed lower frequency module, redesigned to support operation in the frequency range of 140 to 220 GHz. Figure 2 presents results of one of several tests of the amplifier module - measurements of output power and gain as functions of input power at an output frequency of 150 GHz. Such an amplifier module has many applications to test equipment for power sources above 100 GHz.

  8. Experimental evaluation of a ruby maser at 43 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. R.; Neff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Inversion ratio measurements were conducted at several frequencies between 27 and 43 GHz for a pink ruby material (0.05% Cr/3+/ in Al2O3) at the push-pull pump angle of 54.7 degrees in order to determine the upper frequency limit where pink ruby could be expected to operate as a practical maser amplifier. Based on these measurements, a single-stage maser was developed which yielded 8 + or - 1 dB net gain and a 3 dB bandwidth of 180 MHz at a center frequency of 42.5 GHz. It is concluded that a multistage reflected wave maser could achieve bandwidths exceeding 1 GHz with 30 dB net gain at center frequencies near 40 GHz.

  9. The 18/30 GHz fixed communications system service demand assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriszeski, T.; Reiner, P.; Rogers, J.; Terbo, W.

    1979-01-01

    The total demand for voice, video, and data communications services, and satellite transmission services at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 18/30 GHz frequencies is discussed. Major study objectives, overall methodology, results, and general observations about a satellite systems market characteristics and trends are summarized.

  10. A 75-116-Ghz LNA with 23-K Noise Temperature at 108 Ghz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varonen, Mikko; Reeves, Rodrigo; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Cleary, Kieran; Gawande, Rohit; Fung, Andy; Gaier, Todd; Weinreb, Sander; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and measurement results, both on-wafer and in package, of an ultra-low-noise and wideband monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier in the frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. The three-stage amplifier packaged in a WR10 waveguide housing and fabricated using a 35-nm InP HEMT technology achieves a record noise temperature of 23 K at 108 GHz when cryogenically cooled to 27 K. The measured gain is 22 to 27 dB for frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. Furthermore, the amplifier utilizes four finger devices with total gate width of 60 um resulting for improved linearity.

  11. Oscillations up to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb resonant-tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Mahoney, L. J.; Molvar, K. M.; Soderstrom, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Oscillations have been obtained at frequencies from 100 to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes at room temperature. The measured power density at 360 GHz was 90 W/sq cm, which is 50 times that generated by GaAs/AlAs diodes at essentially the same frequency. The oscillation at 712 GHz represents the highest frequency reported to date from a solid-state electronic oscillator at room temperature.

  12. A 94/183 GHz multichannel radiometer for Convair flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel 94/183 GHz radiometer was designed, built, and installed on the NASA Convair 990 research aircraft to take data for hurricane penetration flights, SEASAT-A underflights for measuring rain and water vapor, and Nimbus-G underflights for new sea ice signatures and sea surface temperature data (94 GHz only). The radiometer utilized IF frequencies of 1, 5, and 8.75 GHz about the peak of the atmospheric water vapor absorption line, centered at 183.3 GHz, to gather data needed to determine the shape of the water molecule line. Another portion of the radiometer operated at 94 GHz and obtained data on the sea brightness temperature, sea ice signatures, and on areas of rain near the ocean surface. The radiometer used a multiple lens antenna/temperature calibration technique using 3 lenses and corrugated feed horns at 94 GHz and 183 GHz. Alignment of the feed beams at 94 GHz and 183 GHz was accomplished using a 45 deg oriented reflecting surface which permitted simultaneous viewing of the feeds on alternate cycles of the chopping intervals.

  13. 5-GHz fully differential multifunctional circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessas, F.; Tsitouras, A.; Kalivas, G.

    2012-09-01

    This letter presents a multifunctional circuit realising the functions of oscillation, frequency multiplication and frequency division at 5-GHz. A theoretical and experimental description of the circuit is given. The injection signal, which is used to stabilise the oscillation, is at a sub- or super-harmonic of the oscillation frequency having a power level as low as -30 dBm. Calculations and measurements of the phase noise are reported which indicate a phase noise improvement. The implementation of the circuit exhibits a phase noise of -110 dBc/Hz at 100 KHz offset whereas the improvement depends on the relative noise of the injected signal.

  14. Solar Patrol Polarization Telescopes at 45 and 90 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valio, A.; Kaufmann, P.; Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Raulin, J.-P.; Fernandes, L. O.; Marun, A.

    2012-12-01

    The spectra of solar flares provide important information about the physics involved in the flaring process. Presently, however, there is a large frequency gap at radio frequencies between 20 and 200 GHz. Unfortunately, this gap hinders the determination of important flare parameters such as: (i) the frequency of the peak of the spectra, or turnover frequency, which yields the magnetic field intensity in the flaring source and electron density; (ii) the optically thin frequency slope, that is related to the accelerated electrons with a power-law energy distribution, allowing information about the acceleration mechanism; (iii) and other physical parameters such as source size and inhomogeneities that may also be estimated from spectra with complete spectral coverage. Recently a new spectral component at high frequencies was discovered with fluxes increasing above 200 GHz, distinct from the traditional microwave component, with peak frequencies at about 10 GHz. To elucidate the nature of both components and fully characterize the spectra of solar flares, we analyze new observations at the intermediate frequencies obtained by two antennas with receivers at 45 and 90 GHz, capable of measuring circular polarization. The telescope, installed at CASLEO Observatory (Argentina), is described in detail. We also analyze the observations of the flares it has already detected, including their spectra especially when data at 212 and 405 GHz from the Solar Submillimeter Telescope (SST), located at the same site, is available.

  15. Lightweight Reflectarray Antenna for 7.115 and 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, Mark; Huang, John

    2007-01-01

    A lightweight reflectarray antenna that would enable simultaneous operation at frequencies near 7.115 GHz and frequencies near 32 GHz is undergoing development. More precisely, what is being developed is a combination of two reflectarray antennas -- one for each frequency band -- that share the same aperture. (A single reflectarray cannot work in both frequency bands.) The main advantage of the single dual-band reflectarray is that it would weigh less and occupy less space than do two single-band reflectarray antennas

  16. Design of 132 GHz gyrotron with 3 GHz tunability for 200 MHz DNP/NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A complete design of 132 GHz gyrotron for 200 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy application is presented in this article. The design is performed considering a frequency tunability range of 3 GHz and output power around 100 W. A smooth frequency tunability is achieved via the excitation of TE03p modes (p = 1-6) through the variation of cavity magnetic field. The start oscillation current calculation is performed to estimate the required magnetic field for each TE03p mode. Cold cavity analysis and beam-wave interaction computation are carried out for the estimation of quality factor, resonant frequency corresponding to each TE03p mode, axial electric field profile and output power. Other important components of gyrotron such as magnetron injection gun, non-linear taper and RF window are also designed considering the smooth frequency tunability a main design parameter.

  17. SEVENTH HARMONIC 20 GHz CO-GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2014-04-08

    To satisfy the need for multi-MW rf sources in frequency ranges where commercial sources do not exist, a study was undertaken on a class of devices based on gyro-harmonic frequency multiplication. This mechanism relies upon adding energy in gyrating motion to a linear electron beam that traverses a rotating-mode TE111-mode drive cavity in a dc magnetic field. The beam then drifts along the magnetic field into a second cavity, operating in the TEn11-mode tuned to the nth harmonic of the drive cavity. Studies of this configuration have been carried out for 2 < n < 7. Results are given for multi-MW, efficient operation of a 7th harmonic device operating at 20 GHz, and a 2nd harmonic device operating at 22.4 GHz.

  18. 7 CFR 2.18 - Under Secretary for Food Safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... authority, exercise the functions delegated to the Secretary by Executive Order 12580, 3 CFR, 1987 Comp., p... pollution control standards and section 1-601 of Executive Order 12088, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 243, to enter... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Under Secretary for Food Safety. 2.18 Section...

  19. 160-190 GHz Monolithic Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Y. L.; Wang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Lai, R.; Chen, Y. C.; Sholley, M.; Block, T.; Streit, D. C.; Liu, P. H.; Allen, B. R.; Samoska, L.; Gaier, T.; Barsky, Mike

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two 160-190 GHz monolithic low noise amplifiers (LNAs) fabricated with 0.07-microns pseudomorphic (PM) InAlAs/InGaAs/InP HEMT technology using a reactive ion etch (RIE) via hole process. A peak small signal gain of 9 dB was measured at 188 GHz for the first LNA with a 3-dB bandwidth from 164 to 192 GHz while the second LNA has achieved over 6-dB gain from 142 to 180 GHz. The same design (second LNA) was also fabricated with 0.08-micron gate and a wet etch process, showing a small signal gain of 6 dB with noise figure 6 dB. All the measurement results were obtained via on-wafer probing. The LNA noise measurement at 170 GHz is also the first attempt at this frequency.

  20. 177-207 GHz Radiometer Front End: Single Sideband Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, I.; Schnitzer, C. A.; Dengler, R. J.; Quintero, O.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty years of progress in 200 GHz receivers for spaceborne remote sensing has yielded a 180-220 GHz technology with maturing characteristics, as evident by increasing availability of relevant hardware, paralleled by further refinement in receiver performance requirements at this spectrum band. The 177-207 GHz superheterodyne receiver, for the Earth observing system (EOS) microwave limb sounder (MLS), effectively illustrates such technology developments. This MLS receiver simultaneously detects six different signals, located at sidebands below and above its 191.95 GHZ local-oscillator (LO). The paper describes the MLS 177-207 GHz receiver front-end (RFE), and provides measured data for its lower and upper sidebands. Sideband ratio data is provided as a function of IF frequency, at different LO power drive, and for variation in the ambient temperature.

  1. 30/20 GHz and 6/4 GHz band transponder development for communications satellite CS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Makoto; Okamoto, Teruki; Kumazawa, Hiroyuki

    The next phase communications satellite CS-3 will be launched in 1988 as a successor to CS-2. The CS-3 is composed of two 6/4 GHz band and ten 30/20 GHz band transponders and its mission life is seven years. This paper describes the newly developed CS-3 transponder, especially a 4 GHz band 7 watt GaAs FET amplifier, Ka-band frequency single-conversion, a 30 GHz band low noise amplifier, and a 20 GHz band 10 watt TWTA. The introduction of these new technologies contributes significantly to reducing the CS-3 transponder weight and size, and to improving performance characteristics and insuring a long life.

  2. Gyroharmonic Conversion at 11.4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, M. A.; Wang, Changbiao; Yoder, R. B.; Ganguly, A. K.; Wang, Mei; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    First results on the generation of 11.4 GHz microwaves by gyroharmonic conversion are presented. A helical rotating beam is prepared in a 2.857 GHz cyclotron autoresonant accelerator (CARA(M.A. LaPointe, R.B. Yoder, Changbiao Wang, A.K. Ganguly and J.L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 2718 (1996); J.L. Hirshfield, M.A. LaPointe, A.K. Ganguly, R.B. Yoder and Changbiao Wang, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2163 (1996).). The resulting 27A, 190 kV beam is injected into a cavity whose TE_411 mode is resonant at the 4th harmonic of the CARA drive frequency. With an appropriate magnetic field profile, power at 11.428 GHz has been observed. The spectrum at the 4th harmonic has a FWHM of 400 kHz, the Fourier limit for a 3 μsec pulse. Calorimeter measurements give an 11.4 GHz power level of about 300 kW, more than 20 dB above the nearest competing mode (TE_311). These results are compared with theory, especially regarding spreads in beam guiding center and axial velocity.

  3. The COMSAT 13 and 18 GHz Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. L.; Hyde, G.

    1975-01-01

    The ATS-6 COMSAT Propagation Experiment was designed to gather statistical data on attenuation caused by rain and snow at 13 and 18 GHz. These data will be used to determine system design parameters for future communications satellite systems operating at frequencies above 10 GHz. The experiment used 25, 18 GHz, and 15, 13 GHz unattended ground transmitters at 25 locations in the eastern U.S. to transmit to the ATS-6. The ATS-6 transponder converts these carriers to frequencies around 4150 MHz and transmits these signals to the COMSAT large horn antenna/data acquisition and receiving facility at Andover, Me. This facility calibrates and digitally records each carrier once per second. These data have been processed and analyzed for the period from July to Nov. 2, 1972. Plans are being made to conduct the experiment in Europe and India during the 35 deg E longitude site phase of ATS-6 operations.

  4. 600-GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-dynamic-range, electronically tunable vector measurement system that operates in the frequency range from approximately 560 to approximately 635 GHz has been developed as a prototype of vector measurement systems that would be suitable for use in nearly-real-time active submillimeter-wave imaging. As used here, 'vector measurement system" signifies an instrumentation system that applies a radio-frequency (RF) excitation to an object of interest and measures the resulting amplitude and phase response, relative to either the applied excitatory signal or another reference signal related in a known way to applied excitatory signal.

  5. Signal generator makes clean sweeps to 20 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, J.

    1986-02-01

    In the case of most swept frequency generators, approximately eight hours are required to calibrate the device, and a complex assortment of equipment is needed. The present article is concerned with a programmable sweep generator for which the calibration process is performed automatically in 15 minutes with the aid of an extra GPIB line dedicated to the control of a frequency counter and a power meter/power sensor combination. The signal generator has a frequency range from 2 to 20 GHz, a frequency resolution of 100 kHz, sweep times from 10 ms to 33 s, and a maximum levelled output power of 10 dBm at 18 GHz and 7 dBm at 20 GHz.

  6. 77 FR 45503 - 4.9 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...-4990 MHz (4.9 GHz) band applicants from certified frequency coordination. Next, the Commission corrects.... Finally, the Commission corrects minor errors in the Public Safety Pool Frequency Table and associated... print, audio cassette, and Braille) are available to persons with disabilities or by sending an email...

  7. 32 GHz VLBI Monitoring of SgrA*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Phillips, C.; Sotuela, I.; García-Mirí, C.

    2012-11-01

    The compact radio source Sagittarius A* is associated with the super massive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy and has been studied with VLBI observations at different frequencies such as 8, 22, 43, and 86 GHz, and more recently in the sub-millimeter regime. To understand the origin of SgrA*'s rapid variability, broad frequency coverage in such observations is crucial. NASA Deep Space Network has established a unique 32 GHz VLBI array to develop a celestial reference frame of radio loud quasars at 32 GHz using VLBI baselines from Canberra in Australia, Goldstone in California USA, and Madrid in Spain. We have detected 482 sources over the Declination range of 90 > Dec. > -45 and catalogued them with high positional accuracy. Using LBA stations in Australia that can also observe at 32 GHz (ATCA and Mopra) and using an ESA station in Argentina (Malargue) we are on the verge of exploring the sky coverage also toward the South Pole. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or considering adding 32 GHz VLBI capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide 32 GHz network for high resolution imaging and astrometry. This new frequency coverage with VLBI will be able to enhance the global campaign to monitor SgrA* in mid-2013 around the time when a cloud is making its closest approach to the central black hole where AGN activities are expected to be triggered.

  8. Frequency selective terahertz retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard James

    The use of novel optical structures operating at terahertz frequencies in industrial and military applications continues to grow. Some of these novel structures include gratings, frequency selective surfaces, metamaterials and metasurfaces, and retroreflectors. A retroreflector is a device that exhibits enhanced backscatter by concentrating the reflected wave in the direction of the source. Retroreflectors have applications in a variety of diverse fields such as aviation, radar systems, antenna technology, communications, navigation, passive identification, and metrology due to their large acceptance angles and frequency bandwidth. This thesis describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of a retroreflector designed for terahertz frequencies and the incorporation of a frequency selective surface in order to endow the retroreflector with narrow-band frequency performance. The radar cross section of several spherical lens reflectors operating at terahertz frequencies was investigated. Spherical lens reflectors with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 8 mm were fabricated from fused silica ball lenses and their radar cross section was measured at 100 GHz, 160 GHz, and 350 GHz. Crossed-dipole frequency selective surfaces exhibiting band-pass characteristics at 350 GHz fabricated from 12 um-thick Nickel screens were applied to the apertures of the spherical lens reflectors. The radar cross section of the frequency selective retroreflectors was measured at 160 GHz and 350 GHz to demonstrate proof-of-concept of narrow-band terahertz performance.

  9. 180-GHz Interferometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lim, Boon H.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Gaier, Todd C.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn, H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Ruf, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A 180-GHz interferometric imager uses compact receiver modules, combined high- and low-gain antennas, and ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) correlator technology, enabling continuous, all-weather observations of water vapor with 25-km resolution and 0.3-K noise in 15 minutes of observation for numerical weather forecasting and tropical storm prediction. The GeoSTAR-II prototype instrument is broken down into four major subsystems: the compact, low-noise receivers; sub-array modules; IF signal distribution; and the digitizer/correlator. Instead of the single row of antennas adopted in GeoSTAR, this version has four rows of antennas on a coarser grid. This dramatically improves the sensitivity in the desired field of view. The GeoSTAR-II instrument is a 48-element, synthetic, thinned aperture radiometer operating at 165-183 GHz. The instrument has compact receivers integrated into tiles of 16 elements in a 4x4 arrangement. These tiles become the building block of larger arrays. The tiles contain signal distribution for bias controls, IF signal, and local oscillator signals. The IF signals are digitized and correlated using an ASIC correlator to minimize power consumption. Previous synthetic aperture imagers have used comparatively large multichip modules, whereas this approach uses chip-scale modules mounted on circuit boards, which are in turn mounted on the distribution manifolds. This minimizes the number of connectors and reduces system mass. The use of ASIC technology in the digitizers and correlators leads to a power reduction close to an order of magnitude.

  10. 802GHz integrated horn antennas imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Dave, Hemant; Chin, Gordon

    1991-05-01

    Pattern measurements at 802GHz of a single element in 256-element integrated horn imaging array are presented. The integrated-horn antenna consists of a dipole-antenna suspended on a 1-micron dielectric membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The theoretical far-field patterns, calculated using reciprocity and Floquet-modes representation of the free-space field, agree well with the measured far-field patterns at 802GHz. The associated directivity for a 1.40 lambda horn aperture, calculated from the measured E and H-plane patterns is 12.3dB + or - 0.2dB. This work demonstrates that high-efficiency integrated-horn antennas are easily scalable to terahertz frequencies and could be used for radio-astronomical and plasma-diagnostic applications.

  11. 670 GHz Schottky Diode Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70 GHz IF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Sin, Seth (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) based subharmonic mixer working at 670 GHz using GaAs Schottky diodes. One example of the mixer has a LO input, an RF input and an IF output. Another possible mixer has a LO input, and IF input and an RF output. Each input or output is connected to a coplanar waveguide with a matching network. A pair of antiparallel diodes provides a signal at twice the LO frequency, which is then mixed with a second signal to provide signals having sum and difference frequencies. The output signal of interest is received after passing through a bandpass filter tuned to the frequency range of interest.

  12. Novel 140 GHz gyro-TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K.E.; Shapiro, M.; Temkin, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have designed and are currently building a novel gyro-TWT amplifier at powers up to 100 kW at a frequency of 140 GHz. The electron beam will be provided by an existing MIG electron gun which has been previously used in gyrotron oscillator research at the 100 kW power level at 140 GHz. The gun operates at 65 kV and up to 8A with {nu}{sub {perpendicular}}/{nu}{sub {parallel}} equal to 1.5. The novel wave circuit consists of two facing mirrors with confocal profiles in the transverse direction and flat profiles in the longitudinal direction. The mode is Gaussian-like in the transverse direction. This cavity design effectively reduces the mode competition problem in conventional amplifiers from two dimensions to one dimension. Another advantage of this circuit is the relatively large circuit size, which improves power capacity. Preliminary calculations indicate that the linear gain is about 2.7 dB/cm with an efficiency exceeding 20%. The driver of the Gyro-TWT amplifier is a 95 GHz Varian EIO generator with 100 W peak output power. The amplifier also employs a confocal mode converter which launches a gaussian beam along the axis. The slot size of the cavity is optimized to have minimal operating mode loss while maximizing losses of competing modes. A preliminary experiment using an oscillator configuration has also been designed. The device could easily be scaled to 95 GHz to meet D.O.D. needs at that frequency.

  13. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  14. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  15. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  16. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  17. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fundamental frequency following the provisions of § 15.31(m). (3) For systems operating in the 23.12-29.0 GHz... are used only for back-up assistance and that operate only when the vehicle is engaged in reverse. (1... emission appear shall be greater than 24.075 GHz. (4) These devices shall operate only when the vehicle...

  18. MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Ngo, Catherine; Janke, Paul; Hu, Ming; Micovic, Miro

    2003-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier that features high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) as gain elements is reviewed. This amplifier is designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz, which contains spectral lines of several atmospheric molecular species plus subharmonics of other such spectral lines. Hence, this amplifier could serve as a prototype of amplifiers to be incorporated into heterodyne radiometers used in atmospheric science. The original intended purpose served by this amplifier is to boost the signal generated by a previously developed 164-GHz MMIC HEMT doubler and drive a 164-to-328-GHz doubler to provide a few milliwatts of power at 328 GHz.

  19. Imaging, Doppler, and spectroscopic radars from 95 to 700 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Ken B.

    2016-05-01

    Imaging, Doppler, and spectroscopic radars from 95 to 700 GHz, all using the frequency-modulated continuous-wave technique, are in various stages of development for both defense and science applications at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For standoff security screening, a 340 GHz imaging radar now achieves an 8.3 Hz frame, and it has been tested using power-efficient MMIC-based active multiplier sources into its front end. That system evolved from a 680 GHz security radar platform, which has also been modified to operate in a Doppler mode for probing the dynamics of blowing sand and sensing small-amplitude target vibrations. Meanwhile, 95 and 183 GHz radars based on similar RF architectures are currently being developed to probe cometary jets in space and, using a differential absorption technique, humidity inside upper-tropospheric clouds.

  20. Waveguide Power-Amplifier Module for 80 to 150 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Weinreb, Sander; Peralta, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    A waveguide power-amplifier module capable of operating over the frequency range from 80 to 150 GHz has been constructed. The module comprises a previously reported power amplifier packaged in a waveguide housing that is compatible with WR-8 waveguides. (WR- 8 is a standard waveguide size for the nominal frequency range from 90 to 140 GHz.) The waveguide power-amplifier module is robust and can be bolted to test equipment and to other electronic circuits with which the amplifier must be connected for normal operation.

  1. A 32 GHz microstrip array antenna for microspacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1994-01-01

    JPL/NASA is currently developing microspacecraft systems for future deep space applications. One of the frequency bands being investigated for microspacecraft is the Ka-band (32 GHz), which can be used with smaller equipment and provides a larger bandwidth. This article describes the successful development of a circularly polarized microstrip array with 28 dBic of gain at 32 GHz. This antenna, which is thin, flat, and small, can be surface-mounted onto the microspacecraft and, hence, takes very little volume and mass of the spacecraft. The challenges in developing this antenna are minimizing the microstrip antenna's insertion loss and maintaining a reasonable frequency bandwidth.

  2. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.

    1983-01-01

    Key requirements for a 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne communication antenna feed array applications include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five-bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. The RF designs for each of the four submodules (low noise amplifier, some gain control, phase shifter, and RF to IF sub-module) are presented. Except for the phase shifter, high frequency, low noise FETs with sub-half micron gate lengths are employed in the submodules. For the gain control, a two stage dual gate FET amplifier is used. The phase shifter is of the passive switched line type and consists of 5-bits. It uses relatively large gate width FETs (with zero drain to source bias) as the switching elements. A 20 GHz local oscillator buffer amplifier, a FET compatible balanced mixer, and a 5-8 GHz IF amplifier constitute the RF/IF sub-module. Phase shifter fabrication using ion implantation and a self-aligned gate technique is described. Preliminary RF results obtained on such phase shifters are included.

  3. The 60 GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dat, Rovindra; Ayyagari, Murthy; Hoag, David; Sloat, David; Anand, Yogi; Whitely, Stan

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to develop 60 GHz IMPATT diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goals of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10-year lifetime. The final design of the 60 GHz IMPATT structure evolved from computer simulations performed at the University of Michigan. The initial doping profile, involving a hybrid double-drift (HDD) design, was derived from a drift-diffusion model that used the static velocity-field characteristics for GaAs. Unfortunately, the model did not consider the effects of velocity undershoot and delay of the avalanche process due to energy relaxation. Consequently, the initial devices were oscillating at a much lower frequency than anticipated. With a revised simulation program that included the two effects given above, a second HDD profile was generated and was used as a basis for fabrication efforts. In the area of device fabrication, significant progress was made in epitaxial growth and characterization, wafer processing, and die assembly. The organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) was used. Starting with a baseline X-Band IMPATT technology, appropriate processing steps were modified to satisfy the device requirements at V-Band. In terms of efficiency and reliability, the device requirements dictate a reduction in its series resistance and thermal resistance values. Qualitatively, researchers were able to reduce the diodes' series resistance by reducing the thickness of the N+ GaAs substrate used in its fabrication.

  4. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-01

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm. PMID:27505789

  5. Dielectric measurements at 30-40 GHz and 140 GHz performed on the specimen set of the NPL intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidinger, R.; Koeniger, F.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic samples (BeO, Macor and quartz) and polymeric samples (Rexolite, polyethylene) are measured for a near millimeter wavelength specimen intercomparison task. The data is used to relate the results of recently established dielectric measuring facilities to results from different techniques. The Ka band (30 to 40 GHz) and D band (140 GHz) are covered by two different Fabry-Perot resonator setups. Data evaluation is discussed in detail and various correction procedures to sample thickness are tested. The results of both frequency bands coincide for most specimens. The lowest dielectric loss is found in single crystal quartz. The dielectric loss increases strongly with frequency in Rexolite only and slightly in Macor.

  6. 80-GHz MMIC HEMT Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi

    2003-01-01

    A voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) that operates in the frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz has been constructed in the form of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). This circuit is a prototype of electronically tunable signal sources in the 75-to-110-GHz range, needed for communication, imaging, and automotive radar applications, among others. This oscillator (see Figure 1) includes two AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMTs. One HEMT serves mainly as an oscillator gain element. The other HEMT serves mainly as a varactor for controlling the frequency: the frequency-control element is its gate-to-source capacitance, which is varied by changing its gate supply voltage. The gain HEMT is biased for class-A operation (meaning that current is conducted throughout the oscillation cycle). Grounded coplanar waveguides are used as impedance-matching transmission lines, the input and output matching being chosen to sustain oscillation and maximize output power. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. A high density of vias is necessary for suppressing a parallel-plate electromagnetic mode that is undesired because it can propagate energy into the MMIC substrate. Previous attempts at constructing HEMT-based oscillators yielded circuits with relatively low levels of output power and narrow tuning ranges. For example, one HEMT VCO reported in the literature had an output power of 7 dBm (.5 mW) and a tuning range 2-GHz wide centered approximately at a nominal frequency of 77 GHz. In contrast, as shown in Figure 2, the present MMIC HEMT VCO puts out a power of 12.5 dBm (.18 mW) or more over the 6-GHz-wide frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz

  7. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-01-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  8. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-08-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  9. 90 GHz AND 150 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF THE ORION M42 REGION. A SUBMILLIMETER TO RADIO ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Mason, B. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Tucker, C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Irwin, K. D.; Maddalena, R. J.; McMullin, J. P.; Shepherd, D.S.; Sievers, A.

    2009-11-01

    We have used the new 90 GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9'' and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy beam{sup -1}. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMC1 molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15'' resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8, and 21 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T{sub e} = 11376 +- 1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80'' ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T{sub d} = 42 +- 3 K and beta {sub d} = 1.3 +- 0.1. We show that both T{sub d} and beta {sub d} decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMC1 interface to the denser UV shielded part of OMC1 (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 mum).

  10. 90 GHz and 150 GHz Observations of the Orion M42 Region. A Submillimeter to Radio Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicker, S. R.; Mason, B. S.; Korngut, P. M.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Devlin, M. J.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Benford, D. J.; Irwin, K. D.; Maddalena, R. J.; McMullin, J. P.; Shepherd, D. S.; Sievers, A.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the new 90GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Green Bank Telescope (GBT)to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9" and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy/beam. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMCI molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15" resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8. and 31 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T(sub e) = 11376+/-1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80" ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T(sub d) = 42+/-3 K and Beta(sub d) = 1.3+/-0.1. We show that both T(sub d) and Beta(sub d) decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMCI interface to the denser UV shielded part OMCI (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 micrometers).

  11. A 200 GHz tripler using single barrier varactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Debabani; Frerking, Margaret A.; Batelaan, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    The GaAs Schottky varactor diode is the nonlinear device most commonly used for submillimeter wave harmonic generation. Output power adequate to serve as a local oscillator source for SIS tunnel junctions has been demonstrated with whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky varactor multipliers in waveguide mounts up to about 800 GHz. In this paper, we present results for a tripler to 200 GHz using a new multiplier device, the single barrier varactor (SBV). This new varactor has a potential advantages such as stronger nonlinearities or special symmetry, which make it attractive for submillimeter wave frequency multiplication. The performance of a tripler using a SBV over a output frequency range from 186 to 207 GHz has been measured in a crossed waveguide mount. The theoretical performance of the device has been calculated using large signal analysis. A comparison of theoretical and measured results and a discussion of various losses in the mount and the varactor have also been presented.

  12. The 20 GHz spacecraft FET solid state transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band using GaAs field effect transistors (FETs) was detailed. The major efforts include GaAs FET device development, single-ended amplifier stage, balanced amplifier stage, cascaded stage and radial combiner designs, and amplifier integration and test. A multistage GaAs FET amplifier capable of 8.2 W CW output over the 17.9 to 19.1 GHz frequency band was developed. The GaAs FET devices developed represent state of the art FET power device technology. Further device improvements are necessary to increase the bandwidth to 2.5 GHz, improve dc-to-RF efficiency, and increase power capability at the device level. Higher power devices will simplify the amplifier combining scheme, reducing the size and weight of the overall amplifier.

  13. Broadband optical serrodyne frequency shifting.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M S; Hogan, J M; Chiow, S-w; Kasevich, M A

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate serrodyne frequency shifting of light from 200 MHz to 1.2 GHz with an efficiency of better than 60%. The frequency shift is imparted by an electro-optic phase modulator driven by a high-frequency high-fidelity sawtooth waveform that is passively generated by a commercially available nonlinear transmission line. We also implement a push-pull configuration using two serrodyne-driven phase modulators, allowing for continuous tuning between -1.6 GHz and +1.6 GHz. Compared with competing technologies, this technique is simple and robust, and it offers the largest available tuning range in this frequency band. PMID:20195339

  14. Towards an All-Sky 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Phillips, C.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Sotuela, I.; García-Miró, C.

    2012-07-01

    We have been developing a celestial reference frame catalogue at 32 GHz using 34m Beam Wave Guide antennas of NASA Deep Space Network to complement the current IAU standard S/X-band ICRF2. However, the DSN VLBI network alone can only cover limited part of the full sky, missing in the declination range from -45 to -90 degree. To extend the 32 GHz catalogue, we recently initiated a project to survey candidate catalogue sources in the southern sky using Canberra DSS-34 antenna in conjunction with two elements of LBA that can observe at 32 GHz, the Mopra telescope and ATCA. We formed a list of 144 new 32 GHz candidate catalogue sources at -90 < Dec. < -45 deg. as target sources of this pilot survey. We selected those sources as expected to be reasonably strong and compact for our purpose, considering estimated flux densities at 32 GHz based on the results of the ATCA 20 GHz (AT20G) survey with 8.6 GHz flux density measurements, as well as characteristics of the X-band unresolved components based on the RFC2011c version catalogue sources. The candidate list of 144 sources includes 46 ICRF2 sources with 29 "Defining" objects. This would allow cross-checking with the S/X results of ICRF2. The ultimate goal of our project is to establish a reference source catalogue at 32 GHz for the south polar cap region, which has never been covered in existing catalogues at that frequency. The catalogue can be used for future space navigation as well as astronomical and geodetic observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  15. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Nanni, Emilio A; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE(₅,₂,q) mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  16. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  17. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  18. Noise in waveguide between 18 GHz and 26.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allal, D.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarises the results of the Key Comparison CCEM.RF-K22.W on noise temperature, performed between October 2007 and February 2011. In this comparison, the available noise temperature of three noise sources was determined by six National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) in the frequency range from 18 GHz to 26.5 GHz. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. A quasioptical resonant-tunneling-diode oscillator operating above 200 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.R.; Parker, C.D.; Calawa, A.R.; Manfra, M.J.; Molvar, K.M. . Lincoln Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    A quasioptical resonant-tunneling-diode oscillator is demonstrated at frequencies above 200 GHz. The oscillator is stabilized by a semiconfocal open cavity. The maximum output power and the linewidth are approximately 50 [mu]W and 20 kHz, respectively, at a fundamental frequency of 210 GHz. By varying the cavity length, the oscillator frequency can be adjusted over a 0.4 GHz range in a repetitive manner. This behavior is explained by analogy with laser oscillators. The quasioptical RTD oscillator is well suited as a local oscillator for low-power radiometric mixers.

  20. The 20 GHz power GaAs FET development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandell, M.

    1986-01-01

    The development of power Field Effect Transistors (FET) operating in the 20 GHz frequency band is described. The major efforts include GaAs FET device development (both 1 W and 2 W devices), and the development of an amplifier module using these devices.

  1. Solid-State Power Amplifier For 61.5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Michael K.; Mcclymonds, James; Vye, David; Arthur, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Power amplifiers based on impact-avalanche-transit-time (IMPATT) diodes developed for operation in communication systems at frequencies near 60 GHz. Built in seven modular stages, power transferred through sections of waveguide and isolator/circulator assemblies. Intended as replacements for bulkier and heavier traveling-wave-tube amplifiers.

  2. Two-Stage, 90-GHz, Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Xenos, Stephanie; Soria, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Cleary, Kieran A.; Ferreira, Linda; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    A device has been developed for coherent detection of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A two-stage amplifier has been designed that covers 75-110 GHz. The device uses the emerging 35-nm InP HEMT technology recently developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation primarily for use at higher frequencies. The amplifier has more than 18 dB gain and less than 35 K noise figure across the band. These devices have noise less than 30 K at 100 GHz. The development started with design activities at JPL, as well as characterization of multichip modules using existing InP. Following processing, a test campaign was carried out using single-chip modules at 100 GHz. Successful development of the chips will lead to development of multichip modules, with simultaneous Q and U Stokes parameter detection. This MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) amplifier takes advantage of performance improvements intended for higher frequencies, but in this innovation are applied at 90 GHz. The large amount of available gain ultimately leads to lower possible noise performance at 90 GHz.

  3. Quantum limited quasiparticle mixers at 100 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A; Hu, Qing; Richards, P.L. ); Worsham, A.H.; Prober, D.E. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Raeisaenen, A.V. . Radio Lab.)

    1990-09-01

    We have made accurate measurements of the noise and gain of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers employing small area (1{mu}m{sup 2}) Ta/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1} tunnel junctions. We have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 +/{minus} 0.31 quanta at 95.0 GHz, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit of 0.5 quanta. We have carried out a detailed comparison between theoretical predictions of the quantum theory of mixing and experimentally measured noise and gain. We used the shapes of I-V curves pumped at the upper and lower sideband frequencies to deduce values of the embedding admittances at these frequencies. Using these admittances, the mixer noise and gain predicted by quantum theory are in excellent agreement with experiment. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  4. 47 CFR 15.257 - Operation within the band 92-95 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 92-95 GHz. 15.257 Section 15.257 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.257 Operation within the band 92-95 GHz. (a) Operation of devices under...

  5. 47 CFR 15.255 - Operation within the band 57-64 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. 15.255 Section 15.255 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.255 Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. (a) Operation under the provisions...

  6. Investigations Into Accumulator 4-8 GHz Pickup Loop / Combiner Board Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Meuler, D.; /Fermilab

    2000-04-17

    A set of pickup measurements performed in August of 1999 (see Pbar note 618) indicated problems with the pickup sensitivity for frequencies above {approx}4.8 GHz. This note describes the effort made to determine if the problems with system performance were due to the design of the 4-8 GHz circuit board.

  7. High sensitivity broadband 360GHz passive receiver for TeraSCREEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Oldfield, Matthew; Maestrojuán, Itziar; Platt, Duncan; Brewster, Nick; Viegas, Colin; Alderman, Byron; Ellison, Brian N.

    2016-05-01

    TeraSCREEN is an EU FP7 Security project aimed at developing a combined active, with frequency channel centered at 360 GHz, and passive, with frequency channels centered at 94, 220 and 360 GHz, imaging system for border controls in airport and commercial ferry ports. The system will include automatic threat detection and classification and has been designed with a strong focus on the ethical, legal and practical aspects of operating in these environments and with the potential threats in mind. Furthermore, both the passive and active systems are based on array receivers with the active system consisting of a 16 element MIMO FMCW radar centered at 360 GHz with a bandwidth of 30 GHz utilizing a custom made direct digital synthesizer. The 16 element passive receiver system at 360 GHz uses commercial Gunn diode oscillators at 90 GHz followed by custom made 90 to 180 GHz frequency doublers supplying the local oscillator for 360 GHz sub-harmonic mixers. This paper describes the development of the passive antenna module, local oscillator chain, frequency mixers and detectors used in the passive receiver array of this system. The complete passive receiver chain is characterized in this paper.

  8. Dielectric properties of brain tissue between 0.01 and 10 GHz.

    PubMed

    Foster, K R; Schepps, J L; Stoy, R D; Schwan, H P

    1979-11-01

    Dielectric permittivity and conductivity are reported for grey and white matter from dog brain tissue between 0.01 and 10 GHz. Between 0.01 and approximately 1 GHz, the permittivity decreases and conductivity increases as a power law of frequency. Above 1 GHz, the conductivity increases quadratically with frequency due to dipolar reorientation of free water molecules in tissue; the apparent rotational relaxation frequency at 37 degrees C is 21--25 GHz, slightly below the 25 GHz characteristic frequency of pure water at that temperature. The microwave data are analysed using the Maxwell mixture theory applicable for a suspension of nonconducting, low permittivity spheres in bulk water. From the increase in conductivity above 1 GHz, and the tissue permittivity at 2--4 GHz, the apparent volume fraction of water is approximately 0.70 and 0.55 for grey and white matter, respectively, about 10--15% lower than respective values from the literature. This discrepancy is apparently due to a small fraction of water which does not contribute to the tissue permittivity above 1 GHz. Empirical equations are given to summarise the dielectric properties of 'average' brain tissue at 37 degrees C for future theoretical studies of microwave absorption in the head. PMID:531093

  9. Test results for 20-GHz GaAs FET spacecraft power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Test were conducted to measure the performance of the 20-GHz solid state, proof-of-concept amplifier. The amplifier operates over the 17.7 to 20.2-GHz frequency range and uses high power gallium arsenide field effect transistors. The amplifier design and test methods are briefly described. NASA and contractor performance data are compared.

  10. Microwave ablation at 10.0 GHz achieves comparable ablation zones to 1.9 GHz in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Luyen, Hung; Gao, Fuqiang; Hagness, Susan C; Behdad, Nader

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using high-frequency microwaves for tissue ablation by comparing the performance of a 10 GHz microwave ablation system with that of a 1.9 GHz system. Two sets of floating sleeve dipole antennas operating at these frequencies were designed and fabricated for use in ex vivo experiments with bovine livers. Combined electromagnetic and transient thermal simulations were conducted to analyze the performance of these antennas. Subsequently, a total of 16 ablation experiments (eight at 1.9 GHz and eight at 10.0 GHz) were conducted at a power level of 42 W for either 5 or 10 min. In all cases, the 1.9 and 10 GHz experiments resulted in comparable ablation zone dimensions. Temperature monitoring probes revealed faster heating rates in the immediate vicinity of the 10.0 GHz antenna compared to the 1.9 GHz antenna, along with a slightly delayed onset of heating farther from the 10 GHz antenna, suggesting that heat conduction plays a greater role at higher microwave frequencies in achieving a comparably sized ablation zone. The results obtained from these experiments agree very well with the combined electromagnetic/thermal simulation results. These simulations and experiments show that using lower frequency microwaves does not offer any significant advantages, in terms of the achievable ablation zones, over using higher frequency microwaves. Indeed, it is demonstrated that high-frequency microwave antennas may be used to create reasonably large ablation zones. Higher frequencies offer the advantage of smaller antenna size, which is expected to lead to less invasive interstitial devices and may possibly lead to the development of more compact multielement arrays with heating properties not available from single-element antennas. PMID:24845280

  11. Searching for inflationary B modes: can dust emission properties be extrapolated from 350 GHz to 150 GHz?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Pavlidou, Vasiliki

    2015-07-01

    Recent Planck results have shown that radiation from the cosmic microwave background passes through foregrounds in which aligned dust grains produce polarized dust emission, even in regions of the sky with the lowest level of dust emission. One of the most commonly used ways to remove the dust foreground is to extrapolate the polarized dust emission signal from frequencies where it dominates (e.g. ˜350 GHz) to frequencies commonly targeted by cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g. ˜150 GHz). In this Letter, we describe an interstellar medium effect that can lead to decorrelation of the dust emission polarization pattern between different frequencies due to multiple contributions along the line of sight. Using a simple 2-cloud model we show that there are two conditions under which this decorrelation can be large: (a) the ratio of polarized intensities between the two clouds changes between the two frequencies; (b) the magnetic fields between the two clouds contributing along a line of sight are significantly misaligned. In such cases, the 350 GHz polarized sky map is not predictive of that at 150 GHz. We propose a possible correction for this effect, using information from optopolarimetric surveys of dichroicly absorbed starlight.

  12. Observations of nine supernova remnants at 10.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Kundu, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity contour and polarization observation maps of nine supernova remnants at a microwave frequency are presented and discussed. The data provided are the highest-frequency (10.6 GHz) measurements to date for several of these sources and should therefore be useful in determining their spectra. Polarization ranges from 2 or 3% to as high as 40-50%. Integrated fluxes for the sources vary from about 3 to more than 25.

  13. Design of a 60 GHz beam waveguide antenna positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerick, Kenneth S.

    1989-01-01

    A development model antenna positioner mechanism with an integral 60 GHz radio frequency beam waveguide is discussed. The system features a 2-ft diameter carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy antenna reflector and support structure, and a 2-degree-of-freedom elevation over azimuth mechanism providing hemispherical field of view. Emphasis is placed on the constraints imposed on the mechanism by the radio frequency subsystems and how they impacted the mechanical configuration.

  14. Using a 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier with seeding light by 64-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency division multiplexing modulation to achieve a 10-gbits/s upstream rate in long-reach passive optical network access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We use a commercially available 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)--based optical network unit (ONU) to achieve 10-gbits/s upstream traffic for an optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) long-reach passive optical network (LR-PON). This is the first time the 64--quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) OFDM format has been applied to RSOA-ONU to achieve a 75 km fiber transmission length. In the proposed LR-PON, the upstream power penalty of 5.2 dB at the bit error rate of 3.8×10-3 is measured by using a 64-QAM OFDM modulation after the 75 km fiber transmission without dispersion compensation.

  15. AMI 15 GHz upper limits for the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2016coj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, K. P.; Fender, R. P.; Cantwell, T.; Titterington, D.; Saunders, R.; Carey, S.; Hickish, J.; Perrott, Y. C.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Scott, P.; Grainge, K.; Scaife, A.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the type Ia supernova SN 2016coj in NGC 4125 (Zheng et al., ATel #9095; d=19Mpc; discovery date 2016 May 28.18) with the AMI Large Array at 15 GHz. We detected a fading source (later found to be a chance coincidence; see below) at the location of the supernova on 2016 Jun 03.86, Jun 05.89 and Jun 09.76 UT, following which we triggered the Jansky VLA. The VLA observations, carried out between 2-18 GHz on Jun 11.07 UT, gave 3sigma upper limits of ~60 uJy at S, C, X and Ku bands.

  16. 42 CFR 2.18 - Restrictions on the use of identification cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on the use of identification cards. 2.18 Section 2.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.18 Restrictions on the use of identification cards....

  17. Effect of precipitation on choice of frequency for SEASAT scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dome, G.

    1975-01-01

    Precipitation backscatter limits the effectiveness of a remote sensing radar in a satellite. Scatterometer operation on SEASAT is considered in one of the following frequency ranges: 12.5 GHz; 13.4-14.0 GHz; and 14.4-15.35 GHz. The effect of backscatter from precipitation in these frequency ranges is compared.

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  19. Rectenna Technology Program: Ultra light 2.45 GHz rectenna 20 GHz rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1987-01-01

    The program had two general objectives. The first objective was to develop the two plane rectenna format for space application at 2.45 GHz. The resultant foreplane was a thin-film, etched-circuit format fabricated from a laminate composed of 2 mil Kapton F sandwiched between sheets of 1 oz copper. The thin-film foreplane contains half wave dipoles, filter circuits, rectifying Schottky diode, and dc bussing lead. It weighs 160 grams per square meter. Efficiency and dc power output density were measured at 85% and 1 kw/sq m, respectively. Special testing techniques to measure temperature of circuit and diode without perturbing microwave operation using the fluoroptic thermometer were developed. A second objective was to investigate rectenna technology for use at 20 GHz and higher frequencies. Several fabrication formats including the thin-film scaled from 2.45 GHz, ceramic substrate and silk-screening, and monolithic were investigated, with the conclusion that the monolithic approach was the best. A preliminary design of the monolithic rectenna structure and the integrated Schottky diode were made.

  20. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Asaji, T; Nakamura, T; Furuse, M; Hitobo, T; Uchida, T; Muramatsu, M; Kato, Y

    2016-02-01

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5-6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating. PMID:26931948

  1. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.

    2016-02-01

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5-6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating.

  2. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec < -45 deg.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Phillips, Chris; Stevens, Jamie; Jacobs, Christopher; Sotuela, Ioana; Garcia miro, Cristina

    2014-04-01

    (We resubmit this proposal to extend from the previous semester. The 24 hour blocks for ATCA and Mopra were granted in May 2012 but canceled because fringe test before the scheduled experiment failed although fringes were detected between Mopra and Tidbinbilla. During the last scheduled LBA session for this project we discovered ATCA/Mopra had an issue with frequency standard, which has now been resolved.) We propose to conduct a LBA survey of compact radio sources at 32 GHz near the south pole region. This is the first attempt to fill the gap in the existing 32 GHz catalogue establish by NASA Deep Space Network toward completing the full sky celestial reference frame at 32 GHz. The catalogue will be used for future spacecraft navigation by NASA and other space agencies as well as for radio astronomical observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  3. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec < -45 deg.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Phillips, Chris; Stevens, Jamie; Jacobs, Christopher; Sotuela, Ioana; Garcia miro, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    (We resubmit this proposal to extend from the previous semester. The 24 hour blocks for ATCA and Mopra were granted in May 2012 but canceled because fringe test before the scheduled experiment failed although fringes were detected between Mopra and Tidbinbilla. As it turned out ATCA had an issue with frequency standard, which has now been resolved.) We propose to conduct a LBA survey of compact radio sources at 32 GHz near the south pole region. This is the first attempt to fill the gap in the existing 32 GHz catalogue establish by NASA Deep Space Network toward completing the full sky celestial reference frame at 32 GHz. The catalogue will be used for future spacecraft navigation by NASA and other space agencies as well as for radio astronomical observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  4. Millimetre-wave measurement radars for 140 and 280 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. G.; Plaster, M. W.; Woolcock, S. C.

    Radio modelling is used to carry out scaled radar trials under repeatable, controlled conditions. Such trials can provide a thorough knowledge of the radar scattering characteristics of a particular target by the use of precision metalized models which are made to a scale of typically 1/16 full size. The model is viewed by a measurement radar radiating at a frequency 16 times that of the comparable full-scale radar. Much of the modelling work is aimed at the development of mathematical models for which the individual echo sources must be determined first by measurements. The 'specification' for coherent measurement radars is discussed, and the block schematic of the 'coherent' radar is presented. The 140 GHz radar considered comprises a modulator trolley and an aerial trolley which houses the microwave head and receiver. The most of the 280 GHz radar is mounted in a large cabinet with the transmitter source, a 280 GHz carcinotron, in the lower half.

  5. Severe storm detection with passive 37 GHz observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.; Howland, M. R.; Martin, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The research objective was to determine the information content of satellite passive 37 GHz brightness temperatures on the severity of thunderstorms through the measurement of the attenuation (scattering) signature of precipitation. The severe storm detection potential of satellite-observed passive 37 GHz radiances was evaluated by comparing Nimbus-7 Scanning Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data to reports of severe weather contained in the NSSFC severe weather log for calendar years 1979 and 1980 over the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Heavy thunderstorms have a characteristic signature in the form of localized very low 37 GHz T sub B from scattering by precipitation-size ice particles (thick cirrus being transparent at this frequency). The local noon and midnight snapshots taken by the SMMR on alternating days (with incomplete areal coverage of the U.S. on any given day) were scanned to find cases of strong scattering by precipitation, revealed by large differences between the 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperatures, the 37 GHz T sub B being at least 20 C lower than the 18 GHz T sub B. The value of the 37 GHz T sub b was then compared to severe weather reports within one hour of the SMMR observation time, in the vicinity of the SMMR-observed storm. It was found that the degree to which the T sub B were lowered was a fairly good indicator of the probability that the storm was severe. Of 263 storms observed by the SMMR during 1979 and 1980, 54 percent had severe weather associated with them for a T sub b below 203 K, while 8 percent of those above this threshold were severe.

  6. 28 GHz Gyrotron ECRH Upgrade for LDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. C.; Woskov, P. P.; Ellsworth, J. L.; Kesner, J.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2009-11-01

    A 10 kW, CW, 28 GHz gyrotron is being implemented on LDX to increase the plasma density and to more fully explore the potential of high beta plasma stability in a dipole magnetic configuration. Higher density increases the heating of ions by thermal equilibration and allows for improved wave propagation in planned ICRF experiments. This represents over a 50% increase in the 17 kW ECRH from sources at 2.45, 6.4, and 10.5 GHz. The higher frequency will also make possible access to plasma densities of up to 10^13 cm-3. The 1 Tesla resonances are located above and below the floating coil near the dipole axial region. The gyrotron beam will be transmitted in TE01 mode in 32.5 mm diameter guide using one 90 bend and a short < 5 m straight waveguide run. A Vlasov launch antenna in LDX will direct the beam to the upper 1 Tesla resonance region. A layout of the planned system will be presented.

  7. Snow backscatter in the 1-8 GHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    The 1-8 GHz microwave active spectrometer system was used to measure the backscatter response of snow covered ground. The scattering coefficient was measured for all linear polarization combinations at angles of incidence between nadir and 70 deg. Ground truth data consisted of soil moisture, soil temperature profile, snow depth, snow temperature profile, and snow water equivalent. The radar sensitivity to snow water equivalent increased in magnitude with increasing frequency and was almost angle independent for angles of incidence higher than 30 deg, particularly at the higher frequencies. In the 50 deg to 70 deg angular range and in the 6 to 8 GHz frequency range, the sensitivity was typically between -0.4 dB/.1 g/sq cm and -0.5 dB/,1 g/sq cm, and the associated linear correlation coefficient had a magnitude of about 0.8.

  8. Frequency response enhancement in integrated coupled-cavity DBR lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred; Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G.; Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L.; Yang, Zhenshan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-11-01

    We present a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) composed of two strongly coupled lasers. This PIC utilizes the dynamics of mutual injection locking to increase the relaxation resonance frequency from 3 GHz to beyond 30 GHz.

  9. A 150 GHz Receiver Module for Astronomical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voll, Patricia; Lau, J.; Sieth, M.; Church, S.; Samoska, L. A.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Soria, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Van Winkle, D.; Tantawi, S.

    2011-01-01

    A compact, wide-band, heterodyne amplifier module has been designed to operate in the 150 GHz atmospheric window using High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifier technology. This frequency range is important for many astrophysical science applications, including spectral line studies, separating the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation from foregrounds, and detecting the hot gas around galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already being manufactured around 100 GHz, but recent advances have made it possible to extend this technology to even higher frequencies. The prototype 150 GHz module housing utilizes Monolithic Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) InP Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs). These amplifiers, along with a second harmonic mixer, bias circuitry, and connectors, are contained in a single, split-block housing approximately one inch cubed in size. Preliminary cryogenic tests have measured a system noise temperature of 150 K over a bandwidth of 25 GHz with a minimum noise temperature of less than 100 K at 168 GHz. The minimum noise temperature is less than 100 K at 168 GHz. Module improvements for the second phase are expected to reduce the noise temperature to the minimum allowed by the device limit. Development of a 4-element array to demonstrate the scalability of these receivers is currently underway, and will serve as a prototype for much larger, 100-element arrays for astrophysical applications. In the future, a space mission incorporating an array of these modules could be used to detect the curl modes (B-modes) of the CMB polarization, which is important for the search for the signature of inflation.

  10. The design and evaluation of a 5.8 ghz laptop-based radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Kevin Chi-Ming

    This project involves design and analysis of a 5.8 GHz laptop-based radar system. The radar system measures Doppler, ranging and forming Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images utilizing Matlab software provided from MIT Open Courseware and performs data acquisition and signal processing. The main purpose of this work is to bring new perspective to the existing radar project by increasing the ISM band frequency from 2.4 GHz to 5.8 GHz and to carry out a series of experiments on the implementation of the radar kit. Demonstrating the radar at higher operating frequency is capable of providing accurate data results in Doppler, ranging and SAR images.

  11. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  12. Characteristics of ocular temperature elevations after exposure to quasi- and millimeter waves (18-40 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Masami; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Sasaki, Kensuke; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Hirata, Akimasa; Sasaki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate changes in ocular temperature in rabbit eyes exposed to different frequencies (18 to 40 GHz) of quasi-millimeter waves, and millimeter waves (MMW). Pigmented rabbits were anesthetized with both general and topical anesthesia, and thermometer probes (0.5 mm in diameter) were inserted into their cornea (stroma), lens (nucleus) and vitreous (center of vitreous). The eyes were exposed unilaterally to 200 mW/cm2 by horn antenna for 3 min at 18, 22 and 26.5 GHz using a K band exposure system or 26.5, 35 and 40 GHz using a Ka band exposure system. Changes in temperature of the cornea, lens and vitreous were measured with a fluoroptic thermometer. Since the ocular temperatures after exposure to 26.5 GHz generated by the K band and Ka band systems were similar, we assumed that experimental data from these 2 exposure systems were comparable. The highest ocular temperature was induced by 40 GHz MMW, followed by 35 GHz. The 26.5 and 22 GHz corneal temperatures were almost the same. The lowest temperature was recorded at 18 GHz. The elevation in ocular temperature in response to exposure to 200 mW/cm2 MMW is dependent on MMW frequency. MMW exposure induced heat is conveyed not only to the cornea but also the crystalline lens.

  13. THE CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME AT 24 AND 43 GHz. I. ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, G. E.; Jacobs, C. S.; Naudet, C. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Zhang, L. D.; Boboltz, D. A.; Fey, A. L.; Charlot, P.; Fomalont, E. B.; Geldzahler, B. J.; Gordon, D.; Romney, J. D.

    2010-05-15

    We present astrometric results for compact extragalactic objects observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at radio frequencies of 24 and 43 GHz. Data were obtained from ten 24 hr observing sessions made over a five-year period. These observations were motivated by the need to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies to enable improved deep space navigation after 2016 and to improve state-of-the-art astrometry. Source coordinates for 268 sources were estimated at 24 GHz and for 131 sources at 43 GHz. The median formal uncertainties of right ascension and declination at 24 GHz are 0.08 and 0.15 mas, respectively. Median formal uncertainties at 43 GHz are 0.20 and 0.35 mas, respectively. Weighted root-mean-square differences between the 24 and 43 GHz positions and astrometric positions based on simultaneous 2.3 and 8.4 GHz Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations, such as the ICRF, are less than about 0.3 mas in both coordinates. With observations over five years we have achieved a precision at 24 GHz approaching that of the ICRF but unaccounted systematic errors limit the overall accuracy of the catalogs.

  14. Radar response to vegetation. II - 8-18 GHz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bush, T. F.; Batlivala, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on the backscattering properties of corn, milo, soybeans, and alfalfa are presented. The measurements were made during the summer of 1973 over the 8-18 GHz frequency band. The data indicate that soil moisture estimation is best accomplished at incidence angles near nadir with lower frequencies while crop discrimination is best accomplished using two frequencies at incidence angles ranging from 30 deg to 65 deg. It is also shown that temporal plant morphology variations can cause extreme variations in the values of the scattering coefficients. These morphological changes can be caused by growth, heavy rain, and in the case of alfalfa, harvesting.

  15. Biasable Subharmonic Membrane Mixer for 520 to 600 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich; Siegel, Peter; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Peralta, Alejandro; Tsang, Raymond; Oswald, John; Dengler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure shows a biasable subharmonic mixer designed to operate in the frequency range from 520 to 600 GHz. This mixer is a prototype of low-power mixers needed for development of wideband, high-resolution spectrometers for measuring spectra of molecules in the atmospheres of Earth, other planets, and comets in the frequency range of 400 to 700 GHz. Three considerations dictated the main features of the design: It is highly desirable to operate the spectrometers at or slightly below room temperature. This consideration is addressed by choosing Schottky diodes as the frequency-mixing circuit elements because of all mixer diodes, Schottky diodes are the best candidates for affording sufficient sensitivity at or slightly below room-temperature range. The short wavelengths in the intended operating-frequency range translate to stringent requirements for precision of fabrication and assembly of the circuits; these requirements are even more stringent for wide-bandwidth circuits. This consideration is addressed in two ways: (1) As much as possible of the mixer circuitry is fabricated in the form of a monolithic integrated circuit on a GaAs membrane, employing a modified version of a process used previously to fabricate a non-subharmonic mixer for a frequency of 2.5 THz and frequency multipliers for frequencies up to 2 THz. (2) The remainder of the circuitry is precision machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs integrated circuit.

  16. Miniature microwave plasma antenna at 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachkov, Vasil; Kiss'ovski, Zhivko

    2015-12-01

    New unique miniature plasma antenna driven by a one microwave signal at frequency of 2.45 GHz is constructed and tested. The length of the antenna (l = 16 mm) is much shorter than the free space wavelength of the signal. The parameters of the plasma column (n = 2.6±0.4×1018 m-3, Te = 3.1±0.2 eV) are obtained from argon emission spectrum by applying the line ratio method. The simulations of this monopole antenna reveal that in the standing wave regime the plasma antenna is effective transmitter at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. The results we obtained show that the shape of the radiation pattern of the plasma antenna depends on the plasma density, the exciter and the distance above the grounded plane.

  17. Development of a 20 GHz scanned beam microstrip antenna array with a proximity coupled YBCO feed network

    SciTech Connect

    Mittleman, S.D.; Herd, J.S.; Kenny, J.P.; Poles, L.D.; Champion, M.H.; Rainville, P.J.; Silva, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    A superconducting antenna array with a proximity coupled feed network operating at 20 GHz has been developed. The antenna is a 4x4 array and its performance was measured from 18 GHz to 22 GHz. At temperatures below 80 K, there was a 15 dBi gain measured at several frequencies in this range. The design of a low loss superconducting phase shifter monolithically incorporated into the YBCO feed network is indicated.

  18. Infrared heterodyne receivers with IF responses approaching 5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolczok, J. M.; Peyton, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Specialized coherent 10.6 micrometer infrared receivers were developed with infrared frequency responses approaching 5 GHz. Carbon dioxide lasers were employed for these applications because of their availability, stability, and high average power levels. Heterodyne receivers which employ extrinsic photoconductive Ge:Cu(Sb) mixers were developed for measurements of carbon dioxide laser scattering to determine: (1) the drive lower hybrid wave density fluctuations; and (2) the plasma ion temperature of the dense Tokamak plasmas.

  19. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  20. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kasa, J.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Kotera, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ~ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment.

  1. A 20 GHz bright sample for δ > 72° - II. Multifrequency follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, R.; Righini, S.; Verma, R.; Prandoni, I.; Carretti, E.; Mack, K.-H.; Massardi, M.; Procopio, P.; Zanichelli, A.; Gregorini, L.; Mantovani, F.; Gawroński, M. P.; Peel, M. W.

    2013-11-01

    We present follow-up observations at 5, 8 and 30 GHz of the K-band Northern Wide Survey (KNoWS) 20 GHz Bright Sample, performed with the 32-m Medicina radio telescope and the 32-m Toruń radio telescope. The KNoWS sources were selected in the Northern Polar Cap (δ > 72°) and have a flux density limit S20 GHz = 115 mJy. We include NRAO-VLA Sky Survey 1.4 GHz measurements to derive the source radio spectra between 1.4 and 30 GHz. Based on optical identifications, 68 per cent of the sources are quasars and 27 per cent are radio galaxies. A redshift measurement is available for 58 per cent of the sources. The radio spectral properties of the different source populations are found to be in agreement with those of other high-frequency-selected samples.

  2. A 20-GHz low-noise HEMT amplifier for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumitsu, Y.; Niori, M.; Saito, T.

    1984-03-01

    A description is given of a 20-Ghz low-noise amplifier that uses a new device, a low-noise high electron mobiity transistor (HEMT), developed for the receiver front-end in earth stations for 30/20-GHz satellite communications systems. The minimum noise figure of the HEMT is 3.1 dB, and the associated gain is 7.5 dB at 20 GHz. It is believed that before too long the HEMT will surpass the GaAs FET as a low-noise device. In the test amplifier at an operating frequency range from 17.6 GHz to 19.2 Ghz, the noise figure is 4.2 dB and the gain is 28.6 dB. The minimum noise figure is 3.9 dB. It is expected that cooling the amplifier will give a significant improvement in the noise figure.

  3. Cross-impact study of foreign satellite communications on NASA's 30/20 GHz program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive traffic demand forecast and a scenario for the transition process from current satellite systems to more advanced systems of the 1990's are presented. Systems configurations with and without the use of 30/20 GHz are described and these two alternatives are compared. It is concluded that: (1) the use of 30/20 GHz will result in increased satellite capacity, which will be needed to satisfy demand; (2) the use of 30/20 GHz will decrease the transmission cost, especially for broadband communications; (3) in some areas, particularly Europe and Japan but also the U.S., 30/20 GHz is the only available frequency band for customer premise Earth stations because of the dense terrestrial microwave networks; and (4) the development of 30/20 GHz technology will improve U.S. markets for equipment and satellites in many world regions.

  4. Low-Noise Amplifier for 100 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Pukala, David; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard; Deal, William

    2009-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier designed to exhibit low noise in operation at frequencies from about 100 to somewhat above 180 GHz has been built and tested. This is a prototype of broadband amplifiers that have potential utility in diverse applications, including measurement of atmospheric temperature and humidity and millimeter-wave imaging for inspecting contents of opaque containers. Figure 1 depicts the amplifier as it appears before packaging. Figure 2 presents data from measurements of the performance of the amplifier as packaged in a WR-05 waveguide and tested in the frequency range from about 150 to about 190 GHz. The amplifier exhibited substantial gain throughout this frequency range. Especially notable is the fact that at 165 GHz, the noise figure was found to be 3.7 dB, and the noise temperature was found to be 370 K: This is less than half the noise temperature of the prior state of the art.

  5. Observing-responses of rats exposed to 1. 28- and 5. 62-GHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    de Lorge, J.O.; Ezell, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of microwave irradiation at two different frequencies (1.28 and 5.62 GHz) on observing-behavior of rodents were investigated. During daily irradiation, eight male hooded rats performed on a two-lever task; depression of one lever produced one of two different tones and the other lever produced food when depressed in the presence of the appropriate tone. At 5.62 GHz, the observing-response rate was not consistently affected until the power density approximated 26 mW/cm2 at 1.28 GHz, the observing-response rate of all rats was consistently affected at a power density of 15 mW/cm2. The respective whole-body specific absorption rates (SARs) were 4.94 and 3.75 W/kg. Measurements of localized SAR in a rat-shaped model of simulated muscle tissue revealed marked differences in the absorption pattern between the two frequencies. The localized SAR in the model's head at 1.28 GHz was higher on the side distal to the source of radiation. At 5.62 GHz the localized SAR in the head was higher on the proximal side. It is concluded that the rat's observing behavior is disrupted at a lower power density at 1.28 than at 5.62 GHz because of deeper penetration of energy at the lower frequency, and because of frequency-dependent differences in anatomic distribution of the absorbed microwave energy.

  6. Development of gyrotrons for fusion with power exceeding 1 MW over a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kato, T.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Mutoh, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Ono, M.; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotrons covering a wide frequency range (14 GHz-300 GHz) are in increasing demand for nuclear fusion. Recent electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments highlight a requirement of megawatt-scale gyrotrons at a relatively lower frequency (14-35 GHz) range of some plasma devices, like GAMMA 10/PDX of the University of Tsukuba, QUEST of Kyushu University, NSTX-U of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Heliotron J of Kyoto University. Collaborative studies for designing a new 28 GHz/35 GHz dual-frequency gyrotron and a 14 GHz gyrotron have commenced. Operation above 1 MW of 28 GHz/35 GHz dual oscillation was demonstrated experimentally. Further in the design of dual-frequency gyrotron, operations with 2 MW 3 s and 0.4 MW CW (continuous wave) at 28 GHz, and power exceeding 1 MW for 3 s at 34.8 GHz have been shown to be feasible. The 14 GHz gyrotron is expected to operate above 1 MW. We are also developing higher frequency gyrotrons (77-300 GHz). The joint program of National Institute for Fusion Science and the University of Tsukuba developed two new 154 GHz gyrotrons for the large helical device after the demonstration of three 77 GHz gyrotrons. The 154 GHz gyrotrons achieved a maximum output power of 1.25 MW and quasi-CW operation of 0.35 MW for 30 min.

  7. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma.

    PubMed

    Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi

    2016-02-01

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF. PMID:26931932

  8. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi

    2016-02-01

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  9. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS..., 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. In addition to the technical...

  10. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  11. 47 CFR 5.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.303 Section 5.303... Licenses § 5.303 Frequencies. Licensees may operate in any frequency band, except for frequency bands... licensees are permitted to operate in frequency bands above 38.6 GHz, unless these bands are listed...

  12. Large-Area Monolayer MoS2 for Flexible Low-Power RF Nanoelectronics in the GHz Regime.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Yu; Yogeesh, Maruthi Nagavalli; Ghosh, Rudresh; Rai, Amritesh; Sanne, Atresh; Yang, Shixuan; Lu, Nanshu; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-03-01

    Flexible synthesized MoS2 transistors are advanced to perform at GHz speeds. An intrinsic cutoff frequency of 5.6 GHz is achieved and analog circuits are realized. Devices are mechanically robust for 10 000 bending cycles. PMID:26707841

  13. The 4.8 GHz LHC Schottky pick-up system

    SciTech Connect

    Caspers, Fritz; Jimenez, Jose Miguel; Jones, Rhodri Owain; Kroyer, Tom; Vuitton, Christophe; Hamerla, Timothy W.; Jansson, Andreas; Misek, Joel; Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Seifrid, Peter; Sun, Ding; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The LHC Schottky observation system is based on traveling wave type high sensitivity pickup structures operating at 4.8 GHz. The choice of the structure and operating frequency is driven by the demanding LHC impedance requirements, where very low impedance is required below 2 GHz, and good sensitivity at the selected band at 4.8 GHz. A sophisticated filtering and triple down -mixing signal processing chain has been designed and implemented in order to achieve the specified 100 dB instantaneous dynamic range without range switching. Detailed design aspects for the complete systems and test results without beam are presented and discussed.

  14. 80 GHz waveform generated by the optical Fourier synthesis of four spectral sidebands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatome, Julien; Hammani, Kamal; Kibler, Bertrand; Finot, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Using the linear phase shaping of a simple four-line optical frequency comb, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of various optical waveforms such as parabolic, triangular or flat-top pulse trains at a repetition rate of 80 GHz. The initial 80 GHz comb is obtained through the nonlinear spectral broadening of a 40 GHz carrier-suppressed sinusoidal beating in a highly nonlinear fiber. Proof-of-principle experiments are reported for two distinct configurations of the waveform generated: continuous trains and bunches of shaped pulses.

  15. A 3 to 6 GHz microwave/photonic transceiver for phased-array interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Edward; Wanuga, Stephen; Candela, Karen; Scotti, Ronald E.; MacDonald, V. W.; Gates, John V.

    1992-04-01

    The general design and operation of a microwave/photonic transceiver operating in the range 3-6 GHz are presented. The transceiver consists of drop-in submodules with optical fiber pigtails mounted on a brass carrier measuring less than 1 x 1 x 0.1 inch along with MMIC amplifiers and an alumina motherboard. Minimum 3 to 6 GHz return losses of 6 dB have been measured for both the microwave input and the microwave output of the module; the insertion loss is between 19 and 20 dB at most frequencies in the 3-6 GHz band.

  16. Design of a 26 GHZ wakefield power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Gao, F.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Kazakov, S.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC; KEK

    2008-01-01

    High frequency, high output power, and high efficiency RF sources have compelling applications in accelerators for high energy physics. The 26 GHz RF power extractor proposed in this paper provides a practical approach for generating high power RF in this particular frequency range. The extractor is designed to couple out RF power generated from the high charge electron bunch train at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Designs are presented including parameter optimization, electromagnetic modeling of structures and RF couplers, and analysis of beam dynamics.

  17. Few-hundred GHz carbon nanotube nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

    PubMed

    Island, J O; Tayari, V; McRae, A C; Champagne, A R

    2012-09-12

    We study 23-30 nm long suspended single-wall carbon nanotube quantum dots and observe both their stretching and bending vibrational modes. We use low-temperature DC electron transport to excite and measure the tubes' bending mode by making use of a positive feedback mechanism between their vibrations and the tunneling electrons. In these nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), we measure fundamental bending frequencies f(bend) ≈ 75-280 GHz and extract quality factors Q ∼ 10(6). The NEMS's frequencies can be tuned by a factor of 2 with tension induced by mechanical breakjunctions actuated by an electrostatic force or tension from bent suspended electrodes. PMID:22888989

  18. Microwave Radiometric Observations Near 19.35, 92 and 183 GHz of Precipitation in Tropical Storm Cora.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, A. T. C.; King, J. L.; Rodgers, E. B.; Nieman, R. A.; Krupp, B. M.; Milman, A. S.; Stratigos, J. S.; Siddalingaiah, H.

    1982-08-01

    Observations of rain cells in the remains of a decaying tropical storm were made by Airborne Microwave Radiometers at 19.35 and 92 GHz and three frequencies near 183 GHz. Extremely low brightness temperatures, as low as 140 K, were noted in the 92 and 183 GHz observations. These can be accounted for by the ice often associated with raindrop formation. Further, the 183 GHz observations can be interpreted in terms of the height of the ice. The brightness temperatures observed suggest the presence of precipitationsized ice as high as 9 km or more.

  19. Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Lau, Judy M.; Sieth, Matthew M.; VanWinkle, Daniel; Tantawi, Sami

    2011-01-01

    HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already starting to be manufactured at 100 GHz, but the advances in technology should make it possible to develop receiver modules with even greater operation frequency up to 200 GHz. A prototype heterodyne amplifier module has been developed for operation from 140 to 170 GHz using monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) low-noise InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. The compact, scalable module is centered on the 150-GHz atmospheric window using components known to operate well at these frequencies. Arrays equipped with hundreds of these modules can be optimized for many different astrophysical measurement techniques, including spectroscopy and interferometry. This module is a heterodyne receiver module that is extremely compact, and makes use of 35-nm InP HEMT technology, and which has been shown to have excellent noise temperatures when cooled cryogenically to 30 K. This reduction in system noise over prior art has been demonstrated in commercial mixers (uncooled) at frequencies of 160-180 GHz. The module is expected to achieve a system noise temperature of 60 K when cooled. An MMIC amplifier module has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of expanding heterodyne amplifier technology to the 140 to 170-GHz frequency range for astronomical observations. The miniaturization of many standard components and the refinement of RF interconnect technology have cleared the way to mass-production of heterodyne amplifier receivers, making it a feasible technology for many large-population arrays. This work furthers the recent research efforts in compact coherent receiver modules, including the development of the Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) modules centered at 40 and 90 GHz, and the production of heterodyne module prototypes at 90 GHz.

  20. Generation of 20 GHz, sub-40 fs pulses at 960 nm via repetition-rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, M S; Braje, D A; Fortier, T M; Weiner, A M; Hollberg, L; Diddams, S A

    2009-04-01

    Optical filtering of a stabilized 1 GHz optical frequency comb produces a 20 GHz comb with approximately 40 nm bandwidth (FWHM) at 960 nm. Use of a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity in a double-pass configuration provides a broad cavity coupling bandwidth (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 10%) and large suppression (50 dB) of unwanted modes. Pulse durations shorter than 40 fs with less than 2% residual amplitude modulation are achieved. PMID:19340155

  1. Distributing Frequency And Time Signals On Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, George F.

    1993-01-01

    Paper reports progress in distribution of frequency and time reference signals over optical fibers. Describes current performance at frequencies of 100 MHz, 1 GHz, and 8.4 GHz. Also describes transmitting and receiving equipment and discusses tradeoff between cost and performance. Concludes with discussion of likely future development and effects of developments on systems using distributed frequency reference signals.

  2. 140-GHz gyrotron experiments based on a confocal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Shapiro, M.A.; Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.

    1998-06-01

    The authors have designed and experimentally demonstrated the operation of a novel quasioptical gyrotron oscillator based on an overmoded confocal waveguide cavity. This cavity effectively suppresses undesired modes, and therefore has extremely low mode density. Stable single-mode, single-frequency operation was achieved in the TE06 mode at 136 GHz. A peak RF output power of 66 kW, corresponding to an efficiency of 18%, was measured. By varying the cavity magnetic field, high-power generation was observed at 136 GHz in the TE{sub 06} mode and at 114 GHz in the TE{sub 05} mode. These frequencies correspond to the high Q modes of the confocal resonator. The low Q modes were either weak or not observed. In this paper, the authors will review the design procedure for this cavity and present experimental data verifying its effectiveness in reducing the number of modes that can be excited. The confocal waveguide could also be used in high-power, gyro-TWT amplifiers to provide greater operating stability and bandwidth, especially in an overmoded waveguide structure.

  3. LFI 30 and 44 GHz receivers Back-End Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artal, E.; Aja, B.; de la Fuente, M. L.; Pascual, J. P.; Mediavilla, A.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Pradell, L.; de Paco, P.; Bara, M.; Blanco, E.; García, E.; Davis, R.; Kettle, D.; Roddis, N.; Wilkinson, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Mennella, A.; Tomasi, M.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; Mandolesi, N.; Stringhetti, L.

    2009-12-01

    The 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules (BEM) for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument are broadband receivers (20% relative bandwidth) working at room temperature. The signals coming from the Front End Module are amplified, band pass filtered and finally converted to DC by a detector diode. Each receiver has two identical branches following the differential scheme of the Planck radiometers. The BEM design is based on MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers using GaAs P-HEMT devices, microstrip filters and Schottky diode detectors. Their manufacturing development has included elegant breadboard prototypes and finally qualification and flight model units. Electrical, mechanical and environmental tests were carried out for the characterization and verification of the manufactured BEMs. A description of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules of Planck-LFI radiometers is given, with details of the tests done to determine their electrical and environmental performances. The electrical performances of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules: frequency response, effective bandwidth, equivalent noise temperature, 1/f noise and linearity are presented.

  4. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirm, Karl; Curt, Stephane; Dobert, Steffen; McMonagle, Gerard; Rossat, Ghislain; Syratchev, Igor; Timeo, Luca; Haase, Andrew Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Sprehn, Daryl; Vlieks, Arnold; Hamdi, Abdallah; Peauger, Franck; Kuzikov, Sergey; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  5. The 20 GHz spacecraft IMPATT solid state transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, T.; Ngan, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid-state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20-GHz frequency range is described. This effort involved a multitude of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, multiple-diode circuit design, and amplifier integration and test. The objective was to develop a transmitter amplifier demonstrating the feasibility of providing an efficient, reliable, lightweight solid-state transmitter to be flown on a 30 to 20 GHz communication demonstration satellite. The work was done under contract from NASA/Lewis Research Center for a period of three years. The result was the development of a GaAs IMPACT diode amplifier capable of an 11-W CW output power and a 2-dB bandwidth of 300 MHz. GaAs IMPATT diodes incorporating diamond heatsink and double-Read doping profile capable of 5.3-W CW oscillator output power and 15.5% efficiency were developed. Up to 19% efficiency was also observed for an output power level of 4.4 W. High performance circulators with a 0.2 dB inserting loss and bandwidth of 5 GHz have also been developed. These represent a significant advance in both device and power combiner circuit technologies in K-band frequencies.

  6. Offset-frequency locking of extended-cavity diode lasers for precision spectroscopy of water at 1.38 μm.

    PubMed

    Gianfrani, Livio; Castrillo, Antonio; Fasci, Eugenio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Casa, Giovanni; Laporta, Paolo

    2010-10-11

    We describe a continuous-wave diode laser spectrometer for water-vapour precision spectroscopy at 1.38 μm. The spectrometer is based upon the use of a simple scheme for offset-frequency locking of a pair of extended-cavity diode lasers that allows to achieve unprecedented accuracy and reproducibility levels in measuring molecular absorption. When locked to the master laser with an offset frequency of 1.5 GHz, the slave laser exhibits residual frequency fluctuations of 1 kHz over a time interval of 25 minutes, for a 1-s integration time. The slave laser could be continuously tuned up to 3 GHz, the scan showing relative deviations from linearity below the 10{-6} level. Simultaneously, a capture range of the order of 1 GHz was obtained. Quantitative spectroscopy was also demonstrated by accurately determining relevant spectroscopic parameters for the 22,1→22,0line of the H2(18)O v1+v3 band at 1384.6008 nm. PMID:20941085

  7. a 33GHZ and 95GHZ Cloud Profiling Radar System (cprs): Preliminary Estimates of Particle Size in Precipitation and Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekelsky, Stephen Michael

    1995-11-01

    The Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) st the University of Massachusetts has developed a unique single antenna, dual-frequency polarimetric Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS). This project was funded by the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, and was intended to help fill the void of ground-based remote sensors capable of characterizing cloud microphysical properties. CPRS is unique in that it can simultaneously measure the complex power backscattered from clouds at 33 GHz and 95 GHz through the same aperture. Both the 33 GHz and 95 GHz channels can transmit pulse-to-pulse selectable vertical or horizontal polarization, and simultaneously record both the copolarized and crosspolarized backscatter. CPRS Doppler, polarimetric and dual-wavelength reflectivity measurements combined with in situ cloud measurements should lead to the development of empirical models that can more accurately classify cloud-particle phase and habit, and make better quantitative estimates of particle size distribution parameters. This dissertation describes the CPRS hardware, and presents colocated 33 GHz and 95 GHz measurements that illustrate the use of dual-frequency measurements to estimate particle size when Mie scattering, is observed in backscatter from rain and ice-phase clouds. Polarimetric measurements are presented as a means of discriminating cloud phase (ice-water) and estimating crystal shape in cirrus clouds. Polarimetric and dual-wavelength observations of insects are also presented with a brief discussion of their impact on the interpretation of precipitation and liquid cloud measurements. In precipitation, Diermendjian's equations for Mie backscatter (1) and the Marshal-Palmer drop-size distribution are used to develop models relating differences in the reflectivity and mean velocity at 33 GHz and 95 GHz to the microphysical parameters of rain. These models are then used to estimate mean droplet size from CPRS measurements of

  8. Specifics of processing SRS lidar signals in GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkanich, A. S.; Elizarov, V. V.; Kascheev, S. V.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Sidorov, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the highly effective methods of operative remote environmental monitoring on land and water surfaces is laser sensing. It knew that the Raman scattering cross section is very small (10-25-10-27), so in some cases radiation back into captivity to the target could be a few tens of photons. For high-speed sensing, speed of processing and ease of use lidar units required for the use of appropriate hardware and software systems used for the decision of tasks of collecting, processing, storing, organizing large amounts of data.

  9. Development of 26GHz dielectric-based wakefield power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs; KEK; Dynamics Software

    2009-01-01

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  10. Development of 26 GHz Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.

    2009-01-22

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  11. Antennas for 20/30 GHz and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. Harry; Wong, William C.; Hamada, S. Jim

    1989-01-01

    Antennas of 20/30 GHz and higher frequency, due to the small wavelength, offer capabilities for many space applications. With the government-sponsored space programs (such as ACTS) in recent years, the industry has gone through the learning curve of designing and developing high-performance, multi-function antennas in this frequency range. Design and analysis tools (such as the computer modelling used in feedhorn design and reflector surface and thermal distortion analysis) are available. The components/devices (such as BFN's, weight modules, feedhorns and etc.) are space-qualified. The manufacturing procedures (such as reflector surface control) are refined to meet the stringent tolerance accompanying high frequencies. The integration and testing facilities (such as Near-Field range) also advance to facilitate precision assembling and performance verification. These capabilities, essential to the successful design and development of high-frequency spaceborne antennas, shall find more space applications (such as ESGP) than just communications.

  12. Design of a 50 MW, 34 GHz second harmonic coaxial gyroklystron for advanced accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Arjona, M.R.; Lawson, W.

    1999-07-01

    At the University of Maryland, the authors have been investigating the feasibility of using gyroklystrons and gyroklystrons as drivers for linear colliders and advanced accelerators for a number of years. The most recent experimental tube achieved a peak power of about 80 MW at 8.57 GHz with 32% efficiency and over 30 dB gain with a three-cavity first harmonic circuit. The current experimental effort is devoted to producing about 100 MW of peak power at 17.14 GHz with a second-harmonic three-cavity tube. Some schemes for advanced linear colliders with center-of-mass energies of 5 TeV or more expect to require higher frequency sources, perhaps near 35 GHz or 91 GHz. A design study at 95 GHz indicated that peak powers near 7 MW were possible. In this design study, they present the simulated operating characteristics of a four cavity 34 GHz second-harmonic gyroklystron tube which is capable of producing about 60 MW of peak power with an efficiency of about 40% and a gain above 50 dB. The electron gun is a single-anode magnetron injection gun. The input cavity is a TE{sub 011} cavity which is driven at 17 GHz. The remainder of the cavities are TE{sub 021} cavities which interact near the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The gain cavity and the output cavities are at twice the drive frequency, but the penultimate cavity is detuned to enhance efficiency. All cavities are abrupt-transition cavities. Both systems are derived from scaled versions of the 17 GHz tube. In this paper, they present detailed designs and performance predictions for both the electron gun and the microwave circuit.

  13. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  14. A 30-GHz Hexagonal Ferrite Phase Shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. S.; Slavin, A. N.; Mantese, J. V.

    2005-03-01

    Highly-anisotropic hexaferrites, such as barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BFO), are ideal for millimeter wave phase shifters due to a large ferromagnetic resonance frequency at low magnetic bias field H. It enables one to make millimeter-wave devices with compact magnetic systems. Here we discuss the design, fabrication and characterization of a BFO phase shifter. A microstrip line deposited on a ferrite substrate supports the propagation of electromagnetic wave, leading to a phase shift kb, where k is the wave number and b is the length of the microstrip line. As k is a function of the bias H, we obtain a differential phase shift with a change of H. A phase shifter consisting of a single crystal (7 x 7 x 0.5 mm^3) BFO and a 500 μm wide stripline was evaluated at 30 GHz. A differential phase shift of 30 deg. was measured for H=1.2 kOe. The measured value of the insertion loss was about 10 dB. -Work supported by a grant from the Delphi Automotive Corporation.

  15. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Addendum A: Mixed baseband and IF signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    As part of a definition study for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS), baseline design concepts for a channelized crosslink were identified. The crosslink would allow communications between geostationary satellites of the planned Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS) and would accommodate a mixture of frequency translation coherent links (bent pipe links) and baseband-in/baseband-out links (mod/demod links). A 60 GHz communication system was developed for sizing and analyzing the crosslink. For the coherent links this system translates incoming signals directly up to the 60 GHz band; trunks the signals across from one satellite to a second satellite at 60 GHz then down converts to the proper frequency for re-transmission from the second satellite without converting to any intermediate frequencies. For the baseband-in/baseband-out links the baseband data is modulated on to the 60 GHz carrier at the transmitting satellite and demodulated at the receiving satellite. The frequency plan, equipment diagrams, and link calculations are presented along with results from sizing and reliability analyses.

  16. High precision 6.8GHz phase locking of coherent laser beams for optical lattice experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xun; Sang, Linlin; Zhang, Chen; Jin, Ge; Jiang, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    With the optical phase lock loop (OPLL) we made, we can achieve phase locking at frequency differences ranging from 0.5GHz to 7.5 GHz. This OPLL is fully applicable in atomic physics experiments, mostly in coherent lasers frequency locking. Two kinds of modulation modes were brought to ensure the frequency range and precision: the fast feedback current as the injection current and the slow feedback current to adjust the piezo-electric transducer. This device has been put into an optical lattice platform to lock a laser used for cooling and trapping atoms. The beat signal has a -3dB band width of 1Hz at 6.834GHz, corresponding to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state 87Rb atom.

  17. 47 CFR 5.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.303 Section 5.303... Licenses § 5.303 Frequencies. Licensees may operate in any frequency band, except for the following: (a) Frequency bands at or below 38.6 GHz that are designated as restricted in § 15.205(a) of this chapter;...

  18. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  19. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  20. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  1. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  2. 47 CFR 5.403 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.403 Section 5.403... Radio Licenses § 5.403 Frequencies. (a) Licensees may operate in any frequency band, including those above 38.6 GHz, except for frequency bands exclusively allocated to the passive services (including...

  3. 47 CFR 5.403 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.403 Section 5.403... Radio Licenses § 5.403 Frequencies. (a) Licensees may operate in any frequency band, including those above 38.6 GHz, except for frequency bands exclusively allocated to the passive services (including...

  4. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  5. The Rare 23.1 GHz Methanol Masers in NGC 7538 IRS 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Montes, Gabriela; Ramírez, Edgar A.; Kurtz, Stan; Araya, Esteban; Hofner, Peter

    2010-04-01

    We present high angular resolution (θ_syn ≲ 0.2") observations of the 23.1 GHz methanol (CH3OH) transition toward the massive star-forming region NGC 7538 IRS 1. The two velocity components previously reported by Wilson et al. are resolved into distinct spatial features with brightness temperatures (TB ) greater than 104 K, proving their maser nature. Thus, NGC 7538 IRS 1 is the third region confirmed to show methanol maser emission at this frequency. The brighter 23.1 GHz spot coincides in position with a rare formaldehyde (H2CO) maser, and marginally with a 22.2 GHz water (H2O) maser, for which we report archival observations. The weaker CH3OH spot coincides with an H2O maser. The ratio of TB for the 23.1 GHz masers to that of the well-known 12.2 GHz CH3OH masers in this region roughly agrees with model predictions. However, the 23.1 GHz spots are offset in position from the CH3OH masers at other frequencies. This is difficult to interpret in terms of models that assume that all the masers arise from the same clumps, but it may result from turbulent conditions within the gas or rapid variations in the background radiation field.

  6. The 18/30 GHz fixed communications system service demand assessment. Volume 2: Main text

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriszeski, T.; Reiner, P.; Rogers, J.; Terbo, W.

    1979-01-01

    The total demand for communications services, and satellite transmission services at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 18/30 GHz frequencies is assessed. The services are voice, video, and data services. Traffic demand, by service, is distributed by geographical regions, population density, and distance between serving points. Further distribution of traffic is made among four major end user groups: business, government, institutions and private individuals. A traffic demand analysis is performed on a typical metropolitan city to examine service distribution trends. The projected cost of C and Ku band satellite systems are compared on an individual service basis to projected terrestrial rates. Separation of traffic between transmission systems, including 18/30 GHz systems, is based on cost, user, and technical considerations.

  7. Electrooptic modulation up to 40 GHz in a barium titanate thin film waveguide modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Pingsheng; Towner, D. J.; Hamano, T.; Meier, A. L.; Wessels, B. W.

    2004-11-01

    The high frequency operation of a low-voltage electrooptic modulator based on a strip-loaded BaTiO3 thin film waveguide structure has been demonstrated. The epitaxial BaTiO3 thin film on an MgO substrate forms a composite structure with a low effective dielectric constant of 20.8 at 40 GHz. A 3.9 V half-wave voltage with a 3.7 GHz 3-dB bandwidth and a 150 pm/V effective electrooptic coefficient is obtained for the 3.2mm-long modulator at 1.55 μm. Broadband modulation up to 40 GHz is measured with a calibrated detection system. Numerical simulations indicate that the BaTiO3 thin film modulator has the potential for a 3-dB operational bandwidth in excess of 40 GHz through optimized design.

  8. A packaged Schottky diode as detector, harmonic mixer, and harmonic generator in the 25 500 GHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goy, P.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes experimental results obtained with a packaged GaAs Schottky barrier diode in contact with a coaxial connector and placed across waveguides for bands Ka, V, E, W or F. Among the microwave sources used for calibration were 9 carcinotrons in the frequency interval 51 490 GHz. As soon as the frequency F is above the waveguide cut-off frequency, the different characteristics do not depend critically on the waveguide size for V, E, W and F bands. The video detection sensitivity, of several 100 mV/mW at 50 GHz and below, decreases as F-4 in the range 51 500 GHz. Coupling an X-band centimeter frequency via the coaxial connector and a millimeter frequency via the waveguide permits harmonic mixing in the diode. Between 36 and 490 GHz, the harmonic mixing number varies from 3 up to the very large value 40 with conversion losses from 18 to 88 dB. The minimum detectable signal in the 100 kHz band can be as low as -90 dBm at 80 GHz. A noticeable millimeter power is available at the waveguide output from injected centimeter power by harmonic generation. Starting for instance with 100 mW around 11.5 GHz, we have measured 0.1 mW at 80 GHz and 0.1 μW at 230 GHz. To illustrate the possibility of creating usable millimeter and submillimeter wave without heavy equipment (such as carcinotrons or millimeter klystron) we report spectroscopic experiments in Rydberg atoms. Resonances have been observed up to 340 GHz by harmonic generation (28th harmonic) from an X-band klystron).

  9. MMIC Power Amplifier Puts Out 40 mW From 75 to 110 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2006-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) W-band amplifier has been constructed and tested in a continuing effort to develop amplifiers as well as oscillators, frequency multipliers, and mixers capable of operating over wide frequency bands that extend above 100 GHz. There are numerous potential uses for MMICs like these in scientific instruments, radar systems, communication systems, and test equipment operating in this frequency range.

  10. Dispersion studies of the 22 GHz water vapor line shape. II - Instrumental correction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, T. A.; Liebe, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    Anomalies in the resonance dispersion of the pressure-broadened water vapor line at a frequency of 22.235 GHz are resolved. The pressure-scanning differential-refraction spectrometer gives rise to a signal enhancement as the line center moves within the width of the dispersion discriminator. Resonance absorption prevents the frequency of peak transmitted power from coinciding with the resonance condition of zero phase. The results reported for the 23.6 GHz rotational line of ethylene oxide show a Lorentzian molecular line shape.

  11. 32-GHz cryogenically cooled HEMT low-noise amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duh, K. H. George; Kopp, William F.; Ho, Pin; Chao, Pane-Chane; Ko, Ming-Yih; Smith, Phillip M.; Ballingall, James M.; Bautista, J. Javier; Ortiz, Gerardo G.

    1989-01-01

    The cryogenic noise temperature performance of a two-stage and a three-stage 32 GHz high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier was evaluated. The amplifiers employ 0.25 micrometer conventional AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT devices, hybrid matching input and output microstrip circuits, and a cryogenically stable dc biasing network. The noise temperature measurements were performed in the frequency range of 31 to 33 GHz over a physical temperature range of 300 K down to 12 K. Across the measurement band, the amplifiers displayed a broadband response, and the noise temperature was observed to decrease by a factor of 10 in cooling from 300 to 15 K. The lowest noise temperature measured for the two-stage amplifier at 32 GHz was 35 K with an associated gain of 16.5 dB, while the three-stage amplifier measured 39 K with an associated gain of 26 dB. It was further observed that both amplifiers were insensitive to light.

  12. On 32-GHz cryogenically cooled HEMT low-noise amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.; Ortiz, G. G.; Duh, K. H. G.; Kopp, W. F.; Ho, P.; Chao, P. C.; Kao, M. Y.; Smith, P. M.; Ballingall, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The cryogenic noise temperature performance of a two-stage and a three-stage 32 GHz High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifier was evaluated. The amplifiers employ 0.25 micrometer conventional AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT devices, hybrid matching input and output microstrip circuits, and a cryogenically stable dc biasing network. The noise temperature measurements were performed in the frequency range of 31 to 33 GHz over a physical temperature range of 300 K down to 12 K. Across the measurement band, the amplifiers displayed a broadband response, and the noise temperature was observed to decrease by a factor of 10 in cooling from 300 K to 15 K. The lowest noise temperature measured for the two-stage amplifier at 32 GHz was 35 K with an associated gain of 16.5 dB, while the three-stage amplifier measured 39 K with an associated gain of 26 dB. It was further observed that both amplifiers were insensitive to light.

  13. 650 GHz bistatic scattering measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Richard A.; Mujica-Schwahn, Natalie; Grossman, Erich N.

    2014-06-01

    Many groups are developing submillimeter cameras that will be used to screen human subjects for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other threat items hidden beneath their clothing. To interpret submillimeter camera images the scattering properties, specifically the bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF) must be known. This problem is not trivial because surfaces of man-made objects and human skin have topographic features comparable to the wavelength of submillimeter radiation—thus simple, theoretical scattering approximations do not apply. To address this problem we built a goniometer instrument to measure the BSDF from skin surfaces of live human subjects illuminated with a beam from a 650 GHz synthesized source. To obtain some multi-spectral information, the instrument was reconfigured with a 160 GHz source. Skin areas sampled are from the hand, interior of the forearm, abdomen, and back. The 650 GHz beam has an approximately Gaussian profile with a FWHM of approximately 1 cm. Instrument characteristics: angular resolution 2.9⍛; noise floor -45 dB/sr; dynamic range ˃ 70 dB; either s or p-polarization; 25⍛ bidirectional-scattering-angle ≤ 180⍛ ; The human scattering target skin area was placed exactly on the goniometer center of rotation with normal angle of incidence to the source beam. Scattering power increased at the higher frequency. This new work enables radiometrically correct models of humans.

  14. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Baseline document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The overall system and component concepts for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS) are described. The ICLS was designed to augment the capabilities of the current Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), providing a data rate capacity large enough to accommodate the expected rates for user satellites (USAT's) in the post-1995 timeframe. The use of 60 GHz for the anticipated successor to TDRSS, the Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS), was selected because of current technology development that will enable multigigibit data rates. Additionally, the attenuation of the earth's atmosphere at 60 GHz means that there is virtually no possibility of terrestrially generated interference (intentional or accidental) or terrestrially based intercept. The ICLS includes the following functional areas: (1) the ICLS payload package on the GEO TDAS satellite that communicates simultaneously with up to five LEO USAT's; (2) the payload package on the USAT that communicates with the TDAS satellite; and (3) the crosslink payload package on the TDAS satellite that communicates with another TDAS satellite. Two methods of data relay on-board the TDAS spacecraft were addressed. One is a complete baseband system (demod and remod) with a bi-directional 2 Gbps data stream; the other is a channelized system wherein some of the channels are baseband and others are merely frequency translated before re-transmission. Descriptions of the TDAS antenna, transmitter, receiver, and mechanical designs are presented.

  15. 60 GHz low noise wideband receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knust-Graichen, R. A.; Bui, L.

    1985-01-01

    The printed circuit and GaAs beam lead technology-based, low noise integrated receiver presented was developed for low cost space communications and operates in the 59-64 GHz range, using a phase-locked Gunn oscillator at 51.5 GHz. An IF output of 7.5-12.5 GHz is obtained. With the exception of the IF amplifier, and of the E-plane technology-based RF preselect filter, all circuits of the device employ suspended stripline construction.

  16. Design of 4x1 microstrip patch antenna array for 5.8 GHz ISM band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valjibhai, Gohil Jayesh; Bhatia, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the new design of four element antenna array using corporate feed technique. The proposed antenna array is developed on the Rogers 5880 dielectric material. The antenna array works on 5.8 GHz ISM band. The industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) radio bands are radio bands (portions of the radio spectrum) reserved internationally for the use of radio frequency (RF) energy for industrial, scientific and medical purposes other than communications. The array antennas have VSWR < 1.6 from 5.725 - 5.875 GHz. The simulated return loss characteristic of the antenna array is - 39.3 dB at 5.8 GHz. The gain of the antenna array is 12.3 dB achieved. The directivity of the broadside radiation pattern is 12.7 dBi at the 5.8 GHz operating frequency. The antenna array is simulated using High frequency structure simulation software.

  17. Low Frequency Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We propose to survey the sky from 10-100 GHz covering greater than 50% of the sky in intensity and polarizatiton. This will allow us to mep out the synchrotron and free - free background as well as the spinning dust component to sufficient sensitivity to allow detailed modeling and removal of the galactic foregrounds allowing for deeper polarization surveys searching for signatures of inflation. While most measurements have concentrated on the region above 100 GHz this reggion is more complex in dust contmination that originally thought. Dust is best measured at high frequencies but the atmosphere greatly hinders extremely deep dust surveys due to water vapor. Surveys ar low frequency will be complimentary to the higher frequency measurements.

  18. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  19. High efficiency coupling of radio frequency beams from the dual frequency gyrotron with a corrugated waveguide transmission system.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Mitsunaka, Yoshika; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    High efficiency coupling of the millimeter-wave output of the dual-frequency gyrotron with the transmission line was demonstrated. The dual-frequency gyrotron was design to produce similar beam profiles for two operation frequencies (170 GHz and 137 GHz). Using two RF beam reflecting mirrors in a matching optics unit (MOU), which are designed to transform the beam profile of the gyrotron output to the fundamental waveguide mode (HE(11) mode) at 170 GHz, high efficiency coupling was demonstrated for two frequencies. The measured mode purity of HE(11) mode was 96% at 170 GHz and 94% at 137 GHz operations with the identical mirrors at the fixed mirror position and angle. The results indicate that the significantly simple dual frequency system is realized by the gyrotron designed to output the similar beam profiles at different frequency operation. PMID:23387644

  20. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  1. 17 GHz low noise GaAs FET amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharj, J. S.

    1984-10-01

    The considered amplifier is suitable for use as the first stage in a direct broadcast TV satellite receiver, and it was specifically designed for the Unisat spacecraft. Attention is given to RF device characterization, the design of the low-noise FET amplifier, the very significant dispersion effects at 17 GHz, the noise figure, and questions of DC bias. Balanced stages are used for low-noise and high-gain amplifiers to enhance the reliability. The noise figure of the amplifier is approximately 3.75 dB in the frequency band of interest. A low-noise microstrip GaAs FET amplifier circuit is shown.

  2. 15.6 GHz Ceramic RF Power Extractor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.V.; Luo, Y.; Yu, D.

    2004-12-07

    A 15.6GHz, slow-wave dielectric structure with matched RF power outcoupler is described. The extractor is to be driven at the 12th harmonic of a bunched electron beam at the upgraded AWA facility at ANL. The design includes a single-port output with two stubs, an upstream absorber, and a ceramic tube matched for the fundamental mode at the downstream end and for the dipole mode at the upstream end. Two codes (Microwave Studio registered and Gd1) were used to optimize and analyze the design in frequency and time domains including wakefields.

  3. The 30/20 GHz experimental communications satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    NASA is continuing to pursue an agressive satellite communications technology development program focused on the 30/20 GHz frequency band. A review of the program progress to date is presented. Included is a discussion of the technology program status as well as a description of the experimental system concept under study. Expected system performance characteristics together with spacecraft and payload configuration details including weight and power budget is presented. Overall program schedules of both the technology development and the flight system development are included.

  4. Development of 12 GHz 100 W TWT for satellite broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Morishita, Y.

    A traveling wave tube for broadcasting satellites is presented. The tube incorporates an impregnated cathode, gold plated and tapered helix, spent beam refocusing section and four-stage depressed collector. Operating in the frequency range of 11.7 to 12.2 GHz, the tube delivers a saturated output power of 140 W with overall efficiency of 47 percent. The collector envelope is alumina-coated, and radiates heat directly into space. With an overall length of 440 mm, it weighs 2.8 kg. Design and measurements are presented together with calculated data. Results of preliminary environmental tests, and of life test, are also given.

  5. A model of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Tegmark, Max; Gaensler, B. M.; Jonas, Justin; Landecker, T. L.; Reich, Patricia

    2008-07-01

    Understanding diffuse Galactic radio emission is interesting both in its own right and for minimizing foreground contamination of cosmological measurements. cosmic microwave background experiments have focused on frequencies >~10GHz, whereas 21-cm tomography of the high-redshift universe will mainly focus on <~0.2GHz, for which less is currently known about Galactic emission. Motivated by this, we present a global sky model derived from all publicly available total power large-area radio surveys, digitized with optical character recognition when necessary and compiled into a uniform format, as well as the new Villa Elisa data extending the 1.42-GHz map to the entire sky. We quantify statistical and systematic uncertainties in these surveys by comparing them with various global multifrequency model fits. We find that a principal component based model with only three components can fit the 11 most accurate data sets (at 10, 22, 45 and 408 MHz and 1.42, 2.326, 23, 33, 41, 61, 94 GHz) to an accuracy around 1-10 per cent depending on frequency and sky region. Both our data compilation and our software returning a predicted all-sky map at any frequency from 10 MHz to 100 GHz are publicly available at http://space.mit.edu/home/angelica/gsm.

  6. Active wideband 350GHz imaging system for concealed-weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick L. J.

    2009-05-01

    A prototype active wideband 350 GHz imaging system has been developed to address the urgent need for standoff concealed-weapon detection. This system is based on a wideband, heterodyne, frequency-multiplier-based transceiver system coupled to a quasi-optical focusing system and high-speed conical scanner. This system is able to quickly scan personnel for concealed weapons. Additionally, due to the wideband operation, this system provides accurate ranging information, and the images obtained are fully three-dimensional. Waves in the microwave, millimeter-wave, and terahertz (3 GHz to 1 THz) frequency bands are able to penetrate many optical obscurants, and can be used to form the basis of high-resolution imaging systems. Waves in the sub-millimeter-wave band (300 GHz to 1 THz) are particularly interesting for standoff concealed-weapon detection at ranges of 5 - 20+ meters, due to their unique combination of high resolution and clothing penetration. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has previously developed portal screening systems that operate at the lower end of the millimeter-wave frequency range around 30 GHz. These systems are well suited for screening within portals; however, increasing the range of these systems would dramatically reduce the resolution due to diffraction at their relatively long wavelength. In this paper, the standoff 350 GHz imaging system is described in detail and numerous imaging results are presented.

  7. 60 GHz wireless data transfer for tracker readout systems—first studies and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmeier, S.; Berger, N.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2014-11-01

    To allow highly granular trackers to contribute to first level trigger decisions or event filtering, a fast readout system with very high bandwidth is required. Space, power and material constraints, however, pose severe limitations on the maximum available bandwidth of electrical or optical data transfers. A new approach for the implementation of a fast readout system is the application of a wireless data transfer at a carrier frequency of 60 GHz. The available bandwidth of several GHz allows for data rates of multiple Gbps per link. 60 GHz transceiver chips can be produced with a small form factor and a high integration level. A prototype transceiver currently under development at the University of Heidelberg is briefly described in this paper. To allow easy and fast future testing of the chip's functionality, a bit error rate test has been developed with a commercially available transceiver. Crosstalk might be a big issue for a wireless readout system with many links in a tracking detector. Direct crosstalk can be avoided by using directive antennas, linearly polarized waves and frequency channeling. Reflections from tracking modules can be reduced by applying an absorbing material like graphite foam. Properties of different materials typically used in tracking detectors and graphite foam in the 60 GHz frequency range are presented. For data transmission tests, links using commercially available 60 GHz transmitters and receivers are used. Studies regarding crosstalk and the applicability of graphite foam, Kapton horn antennas and polarized waves are shown.

  8. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 15.33 Frequency range of radiated measurements. (a) For an intentional radiator, the spectrum shall... kHz, up to at least the frequency shown in this paragraph: (1) If the intentional radiator operates... lower. (2) If the intentional radiator operates at or above 10 GHz and below 30 GHz: to the...

  9. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... § 15.33 Frequency range of radiated measurements. (a) For an intentional radiator, the spectrum shall... kHz, up to at least the frequency shown in this paragraph: (1) If the intentional radiator operates... lower. (2) If the intentional radiator operates at or above 10 GHz and below 30 GHz: to the...

  10. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... § 15.33 Frequency range of radiated measurements. (a) For an intentional radiator, the spectrum shall... kHz, up to at least the frequency shown in this paragraph: (1) If the intentional radiator operates... lower. (2) If the intentional radiator operates at or above 10 GHz and below 30 GHz: to the...

  11. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 15.33 Frequency range of radiated measurements. (a) For an intentional radiator, the spectrum shall... kHz, up to at least the frequency shown in this paragraph: (1) If the intentional radiator operates... lower. (2) If the intentional radiator operates at or above 10 GHz and below 30 GHz: to the...

  12. The Power of Simultaneous Multifrequency Observations for mm-VLBI: Astrometry up to 130 GHz with the KVN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioja, María J.; Dodson, Richard; Jung, Taehyun; Sohn, Bong Won

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous observations at multiple frequency bands have the potential to overcome the fundamental limitation imposed by the atmospheric propagation in (sub)millimeter very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) observations. The propagation effects place a severe limit on the sensitivity achievable in mm-VLBI, reducing the time over which the signals can be coherently combined, and preventing the use of phase referencing and astrometric measurements. We carried out simultaneous observations at 22, 43, 87, and 130 GHz of a group of five active galactic nuclei, the weakest of which is ∼200 mJy at 130 GHz, with angular separations ranging from 3.°6 to 11°, using the Korean VLBI Network. We analyzed these data using the frequency phase transfer (FPT) and the source frequency phase referencing (SFPR) techniques, which use the observations at a lower frequency to correct those at a higher frequency. The results of the analysis provide an empirical demonstration of the increase in the coherence times at 130 GHz from a few tens of seconds to about 20 minutes, with FPT, and up to many hours with SFPR. Moreover, the astrometric analysis provides high-precision relative position measurements between two frequencies, including, for the first time, astrometry at 130 GHz. Finally, we demonstrate a method for the generalized decomposition of the relative position measurements into absolute position shifts for bona fide astrometric registration of the maps of the individual sources at multiple frequencies, up to 130 GHz.

  13. Microwave regenerative frequency dividers with low phase noise.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Pikal, E S; Walls, F L

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate regenerative divide-by-two (halver) circuits with very low phase modulation (PM) noise at input frequencies of 18.4 GHz and 39.8 GHz. The PM noise of the 18.4 to 9.2 GHz divider pair was L(10 Hz)=-134 dB below the carrier in a 1 Hz bandwidth (dBc/Hz) and L(10 MHz)=-166 dBc/Hz, and the PM noise of the 39.8 GHz to 19.9 GHz divider pair was L(10 Hz)=-122 dBc/Hz and L(10 MHz)=-167 dBc/Hz. PMID:18238416

  14. First demonstration of a vehicle mounted 250GHz real time passive imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Chris

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a ruggedized passive Terahertz imager, the frequency of operation is a 40GHz band centred around 250GHz. This system has been specifically targeted at vehicle mounted operation, outdoors in extreme environments. The unit incorporates temperature stabilization along with an anti-vibration chassis and is sealed to allow it to be used in a dusty environment. Within the system, a 250GHz heterodyne detector array is mated with optics and scanner to allow real time imaging out to 100 meters. First applications are envisaged to be stand-off, person borne IED detection to 30 meters but the unique properties in this frequency band present other potential uses such as seeing through smoke and fog. The possibility for use as a landing aid is discussed. A detailed description of the system design and video examples of typical imaging output will be presented.

  15. A 1.3-GHz LTS/HTS NMR Magnet–A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Juan; Hahn, Seungyong; Park, Dong Keun; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present details of a 600 MHz HTS insert (H600) double pancake (DP) windings. It will first be operated in the bore of a 500 MHz LTS magnet, achieving a frequency of 1.1 GHz. Upon completion of H600, we will embark on the final phase (Phase 3B) of a 3-Phase program began in 2000: completion of a high resolution 1.3 GHz LTS/HTS magnet. In Phase 3B, the H600 will be coupled to a 700 MHz LTS magnet to achieve the ultimate frequency of 1.3 GHz. The HTS insert is composed of two concentric stacks of double pancakes, one wound with high strength BSCCO-2223 tape, the other with YBCO coated conductor. Details include conductor and coil parameters, winding procedure, DPs mechanical support and integration to the background 500 MHz LTS magnet. Test results of individual DPs in LN2 are also presented. PMID:22081752

  16. A 23 GHz low power VCO in SiGe BiCMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yinkun, Huang; Danyu, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Fan, Jiang; Jin, Wu; Zhi, Jin

    2013-04-01

    A 23 GHz voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) with very low power consumption is presented. This paper presents the design and measurement of an integrated millimeter wave VCO. This VCO employs an on-chip inductor and MOS varactor to form a high Q resonator. The VCO RFIC was implemented in a 0.18 μm 120 GHz ft SiGe hetero-junction bipolar transistor (HBT) BiCMOS technology. The VCO oscillation frequency is around 23 GHz, targeting at the ultra wideband (UWB) and short range radar applications. The core of the VCO circuit consumes 1 mA current from a 2.5 V power supply and the VCO phase noise was measured at around -94 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz frequency offset. The FOM of the VCO is -177 dBc/Hz.

  17. A vacuum window for a 1 MW CW 110 GHz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.; Doane, J.L.; DiMartino, M.

    1994-07-01

    Development of high power microwave sources for fusion applications is limited by the availability of suitable vacuum windows in the 100 to 200 GHz frequency range. A novel vacuum window is described which uses water cooled sapphire as the dielectric. Heat removal is achieved by using thin slats of sapphire interleaved and brazed to niobium hexagonal tubes in which the cooling water flows. Analysis indicates a window 100 cm{sup 2} in area can readily pass 1 MW in the HE{sub 11} mode at 110 GHz for current experimental applications and 1 MW with a HE{sub 11}{sup 0}-HE{sub 12}{sup 0} mixture at 170 GHz, the projected ITER frequency.

  18. Superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver for 800-GHz operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Blundell, R.; Tong, C.-Y. E.; Papa, D. C.; Hunter, T. R.; Paine, S. N.; Patt, F.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Cherednichenko, S.; Voronov, B.; Gershenzon, E.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver designed to operate in the partially transmissive 350-μm atmospheric window. The receiver employs an NbN thin-film microbridge as the mixer element, in which the main cooling mechanism of the hot electrons is through electron-phonon interaction. At a local-oscillator frequency of 808 GHz, the measured double-sideband receiver noise temperature is Trx=970 K, across a 1-GHz intermediate-frequency bandwidth centered at 1.8 GHz. We have measured the linearity of the receiver and the amount of local-oscillator power incident on the mixer for optimal operation, which is PLO ≈ 1 microwatt. This receiver was used in making observations as a facility instrument at the Heinrich Hertz Telescope, Mt. Graham, AZ, during the 1998-1999 winter observing season.

  19. A 1.3-GHz LTS/HTS NMR Magnet-A Progress Report.

    PubMed

    Bascuñán, Juan; Hahn, Seungyong; Park, Dong Keun; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present details of a 600 MHz HTS insert (H600) double pancake (DP) windings. It will first be operated in the bore of a 500 MHz LTS magnet, achieving a frequency of 1.1 GHz. Upon completion of H600, we will embark on the final phase (Phase 3B) of a 3-Phase program began in 2000: completion of a high resolution 1.3 GHz LTS/HTS magnet. In Phase 3B, the H600 will be coupled to a 700 MHz LTS magnet to achieve the ultimate frequency of 1.3 GHz. The HTS insert is composed of two concentric stacks of double pancakes, one wound with high strength BSCCO-2223 tape, the other with YBCO coated conductor. Details include conductor and coil parameters, winding procedure, DPs mechanical support and integration to the background 500 MHz LTS magnet. Test results of individual DPs in LN2 are also presented. PMID:22081752

  20. ATS-6 - Preliminary results from the 13/18-GHz COMSAT Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, G.

    1975-01-01

    The 13/18-GHz COMSAT Propagation Experiment (CPE) is reviewed, the data acquisition and processing are discussed, and samples of preliminary results are presented. The need for measurements of both hydrometeor-induced attenuation statistics and diversity effectiveness is brought out. The facilitation of the experiment - CPE dual frequency and diversity site location, the CPE ground transmit terminals, the CPE transponder on Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6), and the CPE receive and data acquisition system - is briefly examined. The on-line preprocessing of the received signal is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the off-line processing of this database to remove signal fluctuations not due to hydrometeors. Finally, samples of the results of first-level analysis of the resultant data for the 18-GHz diversity site near Boston, Mass., and for the dual frequency 13/18-GHz site near Detroit, Mich., are presented and discussed.

  1. Recent operating experience with Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Ives, L.; Jory, H.; Lopez, N.; Shively, J.; Spang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The design features and initial test results of Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz CW gyrotrons are presented. The first experimental 140 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 102 kW at 24% efficiency under pulsed conditions in the desired TE031 cavity mode. Further tests aimed at achieving the design goal of 100 kW CW are currently underway. The 70 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 200 kW under pulsed conditions and possesses a wide dynamic range for output power variations. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Optical frequency comb based multi-band microwave frequency conversion for satellite applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwu; Xu, Kun; Yin, Jie; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Li, Jianqiang; Lu, Hua; Liu, Tao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-01-13

    Based on optical frequency combs (OFC), we propose an efficient and flexible multi-band frequency conversion scheme for satellite repeater applications. The underlying principle is to mix dual coherent OFCs with one of which carrying the input signal. By optically channelizing the mixed OFCs, the converted signal in different bands can be obtained in different channels. Alternatively, the scheme can be configured to generate multi-band local oscillators (LO) for widely distribution. Moreover, the scheme realizes simultaneous inter- and intra-band frequency conversion just in a single structure and needs only three frequency-fixed microwave sources. We carry out a proof of concept experiment in which multiple LOs with 2 GHz, 10 GHz, 18 GHz, and 26 GHz are generated. A C-band signal of 6.1 GHz input to the proposed scheme is successfully converted to 4.1 GHz (C band), 3.9 GHz (C band) and 11.9 GHz (X band), etc. Compared with the back-to-back (B2B) case measured at 0 dBm input power, the proposed scheme shows a 9.3% error vector magnitude (EVM) degradation at each output channel. Furthermore, all channels satisfy the EVM limit in a very wide input power range. PMID:24515046

  3. Radio-frequency electromagnetic emissions from materials under high-frequency mechanical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Christian; Moore, David

    2015-06-01

    Direct contact piezoelectric transducers were used to excite compacted polycrystalline dielectric material samples with high amplitude but short duration ultrasound through a frequency range of 50 kHz to 10 MHz, while near field RF emissions were measured in 12 frequency bands from 18 to 750 GHz using a suite of detectors. Emissions were observed only in three detectors, covering the 40-75 GHz, 110-170 GHz, and 170-260 GHz frequency ranges. Emission amplitudes appear to rise nonlinearly with applied ultrasound amplitude, and the emission amplitudes versus ultrasound frequency are different than the thermal responses of these samples. Data comparing thermal responses and electromagnetic emissions versus ultrasound frequency and amplitude for several sample types (oxidizers and energetic materials) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20605.

  4. Quasi-Optical Transmission Line for 94-GHz Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.; Veruttipong, Watt

    2008-01-01

    A quasi-optical transmission line (QOTL) has been developed as a low-loss transmission line for a spaceborne cloudobserving radar instrument that operates at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz. This QOTL could also readily be redesigned for use in terrestrial millimeter-wave radar systems and millimeter-wave imaging systems. In the absence of this or another lowloss transmission line, it would be necessary to use a waveguide transmission line in the original radar application. Unfortunately, transmission losses increase and power-handling capacities of waveguides generally decrease with frequency, such that at 94 GHz, the limitation on transmitting power and the combined transmission and reception losses (greater than 5 dB) in a waveguide transmission line previously considered for the original application would be unacceptable. The QOTL functions as a very-lowloss, three-port circulator. The QOTL includes a shaped input mirror that can be rotated to accept 94-GHz transmitter power from either of two high-power amplifiers. Inside the QOTL, the transmitter power takes the form of a linearly polarized beam radiated from a feed horn. This beam propagates through a system of mirrors, each of which refocuses the beam to minimize diffraction losses. A magnetically biased ferrite disc is placed at one of the foci to utilize the Faraday effect to rotate the polarization of the beam by 45 degrees. The beam is then transmitted via an antenna system. The radar return (scatter from clouds, and/or reflections from other objects) is collected by the same antenna and propagates through the Faraday rotator in the reverse of the direction of propagation of the transmitted beam. In the Faraday rotator, the polarization of the received signal is rotated a further 45 degrees, so that upon emerging from the Faraday rotator, the received beam is polarized at 90 with respect to the transmitted beam. The transmitted and received signals are then separated by a wire-grid polarizer.

  5. A low noise 665 GHz SIS quasi-particle waveguide receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, J. W.; Walker, C. K.; Leduc, H. G.; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Phillips, T. G.

    1993-01-01

    Recent results on a 565-690 GHz SIS heterodyne receiver employing a 0.36 micron(sup 2) Nb/AlOx/Nb SIS tunnel junction with high quality circular non-contacting back short and E-plane tuners in a full height wave guide mount are reported. No resonant tuning structures were incorporated in the junction design at this time, even though such structures are expected to help the performance of the receiver. The receiver operates to at least the gap frequency of Niobium, approximately 680 GHz. Typical receiver noise temperatures from 565-690 GHz range from 160K to 230K with a best value of 185K DSB at 648 GHz. With the mixer cooled from 4.3K to 2K the measured receiver noise temperatures decreased by approximately 15 percent, giving roughly 180K DSB from 660 to 680 GHz. The receiver has a full 1 GHz IF pass band and was successfully installed at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory in Hawaii.

  6. Spectral Characteristics of a 140-GHz Long-Pulsed Gyrotron.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Torrezan, Antonio C; Woskov, Paul P

    2007-06-01

    Gyrotrons operating in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges are the promising sources for applications that are requiring good spectral characteristics and a wide range of output power. We report the precise measurement results of gyrotron spectra. Experiments were conducted using a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron that is developed for the dynamic nuclear polarization/nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Transient downshift of the frequency by 12 MHz with a time constant of 3 s was observed. After reaching equilibrium, the frequency was maintained within 1 ppm for over 20 s. The coefficient of the frequency change with cavity temperature was -2.0 MHz/K, which shows that fine tuning of the gyrotron frequency is plausible by cavity-temperature control. Frequency pulling by the beam current was observed, but it was shown to be masked by the downward shift of the gyrotron frequency with temperature. The linewidth was measured to be much less than 1 MHz at 60 dB relative to the carrier power [in decibels relative to carrier (dBc)] and 4.3 MHz at 75 dBc, which is the largest dynamic range to date for the measurement of gyrotron linewidth to our knowledge. PMID:19081779

  7. Spectral Characteristics of a 140-GHz Long-Pulsed Gyrotron

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Gyrotrons operating in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges are the promising sources for applications that are requiring good spectral characteristics and a wide range of output power. We report the precise measurement results of gyrotron spectra. Experiments were conducted using a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron that is developed for the dynamic nuclear polarization/nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Transient downshift of the frequency by 12 MHz with a time constant of 3 s was observed. After reaching equilibrium, the frequency was maintained within 1 ppm for over 20 s. The coefficient of the frequency change with cavity temperature was −2.0 MHz/K, which shows that fine tuning of the gyrotron frequency is plausible by cavity-temperature control. Frequency pulling by the beam current was observed, but it was shown to be masked by the downward shift of the gyrotron frequency with temperature. The linewidth was measured to be much less than 1 MHz at 60 dB relative to the carrier power [in decibels relative to carrier (dBc)] and 4.3 MHz at 75 dBc, which is the largest dynamic range to date for the measurement of gyrotron linewidth to our knowledge. PMID:19081779

  8. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101... FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz system operations. (a) A licensee using the 24 GHz band may construct and operate any number of fixed...

  9. A compact 500GHz SIS receiver developed for space observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Yao, Q. J.; Li, J.; Shi, S. C.

    2011-08-01

    The submillimeter (submm) regime, ranging from 100 to 1000um, is an important frequency band for radio astronomy. A large number of astronomical spectral lines are located in this frequency region. Compared with ground-based observation, which is limited by the atmospheric absorption of signal, space borne platform provides perfect condition for submm observation. Here we introduce some preliminary results for a compact 500GHz SIS (Superconductor- Insulator-Superconductor) heterodyne receiver system developed for future space borne observation. Considering low power consumption requirement for space applications, we adopt a high critical temperature (Tc) NbN/AlN/NbN SIS tunnel junction for the mixer, a key component of the receiver system, which may work at relatively high temperature around 10 K. All the components, including the SIS mixer, HEMT low noise amplifier and optical lens, are assembled into a compact system. The whole system is cooled by a close-cycled 4K cryo-cooler in laboratory and test result shows a good noise performance, less than 250K at the 500GHz band. Detailed simulation and experimental results will be presented in this paper.

  10. Low-Noise MMIC Amplifiers for 120 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro; Bayuk, Brian; Grundbacher, Ron; Oliver, Patricia; Cavus, Abdullah; Liu, Po-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers capable of providing useful amounts of gain over the frequency range from 120 to 180 GHz have been developed as prototype low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation. There are also potential uses for such LNAs in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter- wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The main advantage afforded by these MMIC LNAs, relative to prior MMIC LNAs, is that their coverage of the 120-to-180-GHz frequency band makes them suitable for reuse in a wider variety of applications without need to redesign them. Each of these MMIC amplifiers includes InP transistors and coplanar waveguide circuitry on a 50- mthick chip (see Figure 1). Coplanar waveguide transmission lines are used for both applying DC bias and matching of input and output impedances of each transistor stage. Via holes are incorporated between top and bottom ground planes to suppress propagation of electromagnetic modes in the substrate. On the basis of computational simulations, each of these amplifiers was expected to operate with a small-signal gain of 14 dB and a noise figure of 4.3 dB. At the time of writing this article, measurements of noise figures had not been reported, but on-chip measurements had shown gains approaching their simulated values (see Figure 2).

  11. Multilayer nanogranular magnetic thin films for GHz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Masayuki

    2002-11-01

    (CoFe)-Si-O/Si-O multilayer nanogranular magnetic thin films for GHz rf circuits were designed and fabricated on SiO2/Si substrates using inductively coupled rf sputtering. A multilayer structure consisting of a CoFe ferromagnetic mononanogranular layer covered with an atomic-order SiO2 amorphous phase and a nanometer-order insulative SiO2 amorphous layer was fabricated by repeatedly cosputtering CoFe alloy and SiO2 glass targets and the subsequent single sputtering SiO2 target. The optimized multilayer structured film (appropriate grain size of CoFe and Si-O layer thickness, i.e., CoFe mononanogranular layer: Si-O layer=6 nm: 1 nm) shows superb soft magnetism performance in high-frequency regions, such as a constant 200 of real permeability with 2.2 mOmega cm resistivity and 2.86 GHz self-resonant frequency.

  12. An Assessment of the Use of AMSR E 10 GHz Data for Soil Moisture Estimation in SMEX02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, A. Y.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P. E.

    2003-12-01

    The launch of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the NASA EOS Aqua Satellite has drawn much interest from the scientific community that has been waiting for a low frequency spaceborne microwave radiometer (< 10 GHz) capable of measuring soil moisture. The AMSR-E instrument was developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and makes dual-polarized microwave measurements at six frequencies: 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89 GHz. Early examinations of AMSR-E measurements have shown evidence of extensive Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) in the 6.9 GHz channels, especially over the continental U.S. Due to the contamination of 6.9 GHz data by RFI, it may be necessary to use the next lowest frequency, 10.7 GHz, for soil moisture retrieval. This frequency has been available on the TRMM Microwave Imager for several years; however, the TRMM sensor only provides data between 38 N to 38 S in latitude whereas AMSR-E provides global coverage. We examined the impact of alternative frequencies on soil moisture retrieval using data from the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2002 (SMEX02). SMEX02 took place in Walnut Creek Watershed and surrounding region of Iowa from June 24 to July 12. The experiment focused on microwave remote sensing of soil moisture in an agricultural setting. Land cover in the Walnut Creek Watershed consists of a patchwork of corn and soybean fields, with some isolated forested zones. This presents a challenge to soil moisture retrieval using AMSR-E 10 GHz data. Extensive vegetation sampling was conducted during SMEX02 to provide information to estimate vegetation parameters required by retrieval algorithm. The maps of AMSR-E 10 GHz data over the SMEX02 area from July 2 to 13 show the decrease of brightness temperature (TB) due to precipitation, although the range is not as profound as expected at L band. The Normalized Difference Polarization Index (NDPI), defined as (TBv-TBh)/(TBv+TBh), computed for various

  13. The 20 GHz GaAs monolithic power amplifier module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of a 20 GHz GaAs FET monlithic power amplifier module for advanced communication applications is described. Four-way power combing of four 0.6 W amplifier modules is used as the baseline approach. For this purpose, a monolithic four-way traveling-wave power divider/combiner was developed. Over a 20 GHz bandwidth (10 to 30 GHz), an insertion loss of no more than 1.2 dB was measured for a pair of back-to-back connected divider/combiners. Isolation between output ports is better than 20 dB, and VSWRs are better than 21:1. A distributed amplifier with six 300 micron gate width FETs and gate and drain transmission line tapers has been designed, fabricated, and evaluated for use as an 0.6 W module. This amplifier has achieved state-of-the-art results of 0.5 W output power with at least 4 dB gain across the entire 2 to 21 GHz frequency range. An output power of 2 W was achieved at a measurement frequency of 18 GHz when four distributed amplifiers were power-combined using a pair of traveling-wave divider/combiners. Another approach is the direct common-source cascading of three power FET stages. An output power of up to 2W with 12 dB gain and 20% power-added efficiency has been achieved with this approach (at 17 GHz). The linear gain was 14 dB at 1 W output. The first two stages of the three-stage amplifier have achieved an output power of 1.6 W with 9 dB gain and 26% power-added efficiency at 16 GHz.

  14. INDEX OF PUBLICATIONS ON BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION (0-100 GHZ)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable research effort has been made into the biological effects of electro-magnetic radiation over the frequency range of 0-100 GHz. This work intensified since 1966 when occupational exposure guidelines were made by American Standards Institute - C95.9. During this period...

  15. MMIC Amplifier Produces Gain of 10 dB at 235 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Douglas; Fung, King Man; Lee, Karen; Samoska, Lorene; Wells, Mary; Gaier, Todd; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Grundbacher, Ronald; Lai, Richard; Raja, Rohit; Liu, Po-Hsin

    2007-01-01

    The first solid-state amplifier capable of producing gain at a frequency >215 GHz has been demonstrated. This amplifier was fabricated as a monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) chip containing InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) of 0.07 micron gate length on a 50- m-thick InP substrate.

  16. Phillips SA8016BW 2.5 GHz Synthesizer SEE Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carts, Marty; Ladbury, Ray; Marshall, Paul W.; Mackey, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Single Event Effects (SEE) testing of the Phillips SA8016BW 2.5 GHz Synthesizer that was chose by the GLAST Program for Frequency Generation. Included in this are diagrams of the phased-locked loop (PLL), the synthesizer, and heater.

  17. A 1- to 10-GHz downconverter for high-resolution microwave survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwatters, D.

    1994-01-01

    A downconverter was designed, built, and tested for the High Resolution Microwave Survey project. The input frequency range is 1 to 10 GHz with instantaneous bandwidth of 350 MHz and dynamic range of 125 dB/Hz. Requirements were derived for the local oscillators and special design techniques were implemented to achieve the high degree of spectral purity required.

  18. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  19. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  20. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  1. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  2. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  3. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  4. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  5. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  6. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  7. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  8. 330 GHz FMCW Image Sensor for Homeland Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilevich, Boris; Pinhasi, Yosef; Arusi, Ruth; Anisimov, Michael; Hardon, Danny; Litvak, Boris; Wool, Yan

    2010-11-01

    A single-pixel imaging remote sensor operating at 330 GHz is described. It is based on a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) and aimed at detection of concealed objects for ranges up to 40 m. The system consists of 2 horn-lens antennas integrated with a homodyne transceiver. The synthesized linear FMCW signal at X-band is multiplied by a factor of 32 to generate the transmitted signal. An intermediate frequency (IF) signal obtained in the output port of the 2-nd harmonic mixer is employed for image processing. Distance measurements were made by performing data acquisition unit based on LabView interface and resulting in a range resolution about 1 cm. Examples of 2D and 3D images reconstructed with this sensor are presented.

  9. Progress of high power 170 GHz gyrotron in JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Keishi; Kasugai, Atsushi; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Oda, Yasuhisa; Hayashi, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Noriyuki

    2009-09-01

    Recent progress on the high power gyrotron development in JAEA is presented. The gyrotron is featured to have a triode-type magnetron injection gun, a cylindrical resonator working at 170 GHz with TE31,8 mode, a water-cooled diamond window and a depressed collector. After the demonstration of the ITER basic performance, the gyrotron has been operated for 3 years, and recorded ~200 GJ of total output energy. Next, a gyrotron which oscillates in higher order resonator mode, TE31,12, is designed and fabricated to study the long pulse oscillation at greater than 1 MW. In parallel, feasibility studies of a CW-power modulation for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization, a dual frequency gyrotron and a rapid frequency control are carried out. It is shown that these gyrotrons will be available with current technology.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Prebiotic Propenal up to 660 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, A. M.; Bermúdez, C.; Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    Since interstellar detection of propenal is only based on two rotational transitions in the centimeter wave region, its high resolution rotational spectrum has been measured up to 660 GHz and fully characterized by assignment of more than 12,000 transitions to provide direct laboratory data to the astronomical community. Spectral assignments and analysis include transitions from the ground state of the trans and cis isomers, three trans-13C isotopologues, and ten excited vibrational states of the trans form. Combining new millimeter and submillimeter data with those from the far-infrared region has yielded the most precise set of spectroscopic constants of trans-propenal obtained to date. Newly determined rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, vibrational energies, and Coriolis and Fermi interaction constants are given with high accuracy and were used to predict transition frequencies and intensities over a wide frequency range. Results of this work should facilitate astronomers further observation of propenal in the interstellar medium.

  11. 1.4GHz Survey of Fossil Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Wilcots, E.; Hess, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    Fossil groups, luminous, isolated elliptical galaxies with extended x-ray halos, represent the remnants of galactic cannibalism within galaxy groups. Current research has concentrated primarily on visible and x-ray observations. Here, we report the results of a preliminary survey of 34 fossil groups observed at 1.4Ghz using the VLA. We detect radio sources in many of the groups. Using radio emission as a tracer for nuclear activity, we estimate the frequency of past and current AGN activity in fossil groups and extract information about the age and evolutionary history of the fossil groups. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies may then provide information about the role of minor mergers and AGN as sources of heat in the IGM and as remedies to the cooling flow problem.

  12. Improved Speed and Functionality of a 580-GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Cooper, Ken; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Skalare, Anders; Gill, John

    2010-01-01

    With this high-resolution imaging radar system, coherent illumination in the 576-to-589-GHz range and phase-sensitive detection are implemented in an all-solid-state design based on Schottky diode sensors and sources. By employing the frequency-modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) radar technique, centimeter-scale range resolution has been achieved while using fractional bandwidths of less than 3 percent. The high operating frequencies also permit centimeter-scale cross-range resolution at several-meter standoff distances without large apertures. Scanning of a single-pixel transceiver enables targets to be rapidly mapped in three dimensions, so that the technology can be applied to the detection of concealed objects on persons.

  13. Wideband fixed-tuned SIS receiver for 200-GHz operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blundell, Raymond; Tong, Cheuk-Yu E.; Papa, D. Cosmo; Leombruno, R. Louie; Zhang, Xiaolei; Paine, Scott; Stern, Jeffrey A.; Leduc, Henry G.; Bumble, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design and development of a heterodyne receiver, designed to cover the frequency range 176-256 GHz. This receiver incorporates a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction mixer, which, chiefly for reasons of reliability and ease of operation, is a fixed-tuned waveguide design. On-chip tuning is provided to resonate out the junction's geometric capacitance and produce a good match to the waveguide circuit. Laboratory measurements on the first test receiver indicate that the required input bandwidth (about 40%) is achieved with an average receiver noise temperature of below 50 K. Mixer conversion gain is observed at some frequencies, and the lowest measured receiver noise is less than 30 K. Furthermore, the SIS mixer used in this receiver is of simple construction, is easy to assemble and is therefore a good candidate for duplication.

  14. Asteroid Sizing by Radiogalaxy Occultation at 5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Bach, U.; Muinonen, K.; Poutanen, M.; Petrov, L.

    2016-05-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids observed at visual wavelengths have been an important tool for studying the size and shape of asteroids and for revising the orbital parameters of asteroids. At radio frequencies, a shadow of an asteroid on the Earth is dominated by diffraction effects. Here, we show, for the first time, that a single observation of an occultation of a compact radio source at a frequency of 5 GHz can be used to derive the effective size of the occulting object and to derive the distance between the observer and the center of the occultation path on the Earth. The derived diameter of the occulting object, asteroid (115) Thyra, is 75 ± 6 km. The observed occultation profile shows features that cannot be explained by diffraction of a single asteroid.

  15. Statistical results from the Virginia Tech propagation experiment using the Olympus 12, 20, and 30 GHz satellite beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.; Safaai-Jazi, A.; Pratt, Timothy; Nelson, B.; Laster, J.; Ajaz, H.

    1993-01-01

    Virginia Tech has performed a comprehensive propagation experiment using the Olympus satellite beacons at 12.5, 19.77, and 29.66 GHz (which we refer to as 12, 20, and 30 GHz). Four receive terminals were designed and constructed, one terminal at each frequency plus a portable one with 20 and 30 GHz receivers for microscale and scintillation studies. Total power radiometers were included in each terminal in order to set the clear air reference level for each beacon and also to predict path attenuation. More details on the equipment and the experiment design are found elsewhere. Statistical results for one year of data collection were analyzed. In addition, the following studies were performed: a microdiversity experiment in which two closely spaced 20 GHz receivers were used; a comparison of total power and Dicke switched radiometer measurements, frequency scaling of scintillations, and adaptive power control algorithm development. Statistical results are reported.

  16. Microwave radiometric observations near 19.35, 92 and 183 GHz of precipitation in tropical storm Cora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, A. T.; King, J. L.; Rodgers, E. B.; Nieman, R. A.; Krupp, B. M.; Milman, A. S.; Stratigos, J. S.; Siddalingaih, H.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of rain cells in the remains of a decaying tropical storm were made by Airborne Microwave Radiometers at 19.35,92 and three frequencies near 183 GHz. Extremely low brightness temperatures, as low as 140 K were noted in the 92 and 183 GHz observations. These can be accounted for by the ice often associated with raindrop formation. Further, 183 GHz observations can be interpreted in terms of the height of the ice. The brightness temperatures observed suggest the presence of precipitation sized ice as high as 9 km or more.

  17. Frequency tuning of THz quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xifeng; Danylov, Andriy A.; Light, Alexander R.; Waldman, Jerry; Erickson, Neal

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces the continuously tunable THz radiation through sideband generation of a free running and solidnitrogen- cooled THz quantum cascade laser. The 2.324 THz QCL operating in a single longitudinal mode (SLM) in continuous-wave (cw) was mixed with a swept synthesized microwave signal by a THz Schottky-diode-balanced mixer. Through sideband generation, two frequency branches were observed at low and high frequency, characterized with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. At low frequency, the sideband generates frequencies from -50 GHz to +50 GHz. At high frequency, it generates sideband frequencies from 70 GHz to 115 GHz. The total +/-100 GHz tuning range can be further expanded with higher frequency millimeter wave amplifier/multiplier source. The sideband generates total 1 μW of output power at both upper and lower frequency with 200 μW of driven power from the THz QCL, showing a power conversion efficiency of 5 × 10-3. The demonstration of this SM, continuously tunable THz source enables its applications where SM, spatially coherent beam is required.

  18. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmeier, S.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m2) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  19. Amplifier Module for 260-GHz Band Using Quartz Waveguide Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Fung, King Man; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary M.; Pukala, David M.; Sin, Seth; Samoska, Lorene A.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of MMIC LNA (monolithic microwave integrated circuit low-noise amplifier) chips at frequencies over 200 GHz has always been problematic due to the high loss in the transition between the MMIC chip and the waveguide medium in which the chip will typically be used. In addition, above 200 GHz, wire-bond inductance between the LNA and the waveguide can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. This work resulted in the development of a low-loss quartz waveguide transition that includes a capacitive transmission line between the MMIC and the waveguide probe element. This capacitive transmission line tunes out the wirebond inductance (where the wire-bond is required to bond between the MMIC and the probe element). This inductance can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. The amplifier module consists of a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, a short capacitive tuning element, a short wire-bond to the MMIC, and the MMIC LNA. The output structure is similar, with a short wire-bond at the output of the MMIC, a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, and the output waveguide. The quartz probe element is made of 3-mil quartz, which is the thinnest commercially available material. The waveguide band used is WR4, from 170 to 260 GHz. This new transition and block design is an improvement over prior art because it provides for better RF matching, and will likely yield lower loss and better noise figure. The development of high-performance, low-noise amplifiers in the 180-to- 700-GHz range has applications for future earth science and planetary instruments with low power and volume, and astrophysics array instruments for molecular spectroscopy. This frequency band, while suitable for homeland security and commercial applications (such as millimeter-wave imaging, hidden weapons detection, crowd scanning, airport security, and communications), also has applications to

  20. A compact high-gradient 25 MeV 17 GHz RF linac for free-electron laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Chen, S.C.; Kreischer, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    A new compact high-gradient (60 MeV/m) high-frequency (17.136 GHz) RF linac is presently under construction by Haimson Research Corp. (HRC) for installation at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center in the High-Gradient Accelerator and High Power Microwave Laboratory. This accelerator will utilize an existing traveling-wave relativistic klystron (TWRK) which is now operation at MIT with 25 MW power, 67 dB gain, and 52% efficiency at 17.136 GHz.

  1. Small-Signal Performance and Modeling of sub-50nm nMOSFETs with fT above 460-GHz

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, V.; Heng, J.; Timp, K.; Dimauro, O.; Chan, R.; Hafez, M.; Feng, J.; Sorsch, T.; Mansfield, W.; Miner, J.; Kornblit, A.; Klemens, F.; Bower, J.; Cirelli, R.; Ferry, E. J.; Taylor, A.; Feng, M.; Timp, G.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated and tested the performance of sub-50nm gate nMOSFETs to assess their suitability for mixed signal applications in the super high frequency (SHF) band, i.e. 3–30GHz. For a 30nm×40 μm×2 device, we found fT =465GHz at Vds=2V, Vg=0.67V, which is the highest cut-off frequency reported for a MOSFET produced on bulk silicon substrate so far. However, our measurements of fmax and noise figure indicate that parasitics impose limitations on SHF operation. We also present a high-frequency ac model appropriate to sub-50nm gate length nanotransistors, which incorporates the effects of the parasitics. The model accurately accounts for measurements of the S and Y parameters in the frequency range from 1 to 50GHz. PMID:20706596

  2. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .../2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service or 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service may not be operated on civil... rules and regulations in this Part and the applicable engineering standards. Prior to engaging in...

  3. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .../2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service or 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service may not be operated on civil... rules and regulations in this Part and the applicable engineering standards. Prior to engaging in...

  4. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  5. Optimal GHZ Paradox for Three Qubits.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changliang; Su, Hong-Yi; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Wu, Chunfeng; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Quatum nonlocality as a valuable resource is of vital importance in quantum information processing. The characterization of the resource has been extensively investigated mainly for pure states, while relatively less is know for mixed states. Here we prove the existence of the optimal GHZ paradox by using a novel and simple method to extract an optimal state that can saturate the tradeoff relation between quantum nonlocality and the state purity. In this paradox, the logical inequality which is formulated by the GHZ-typed event probabilities can be violated maximally by the optimal state for any fixed amount of purity (or mixedness). Moreover, the optimal state can be described as a standard GHZ state suffering flipped color noise. The maximal amount of noise that the optimal state can resist is 50%. We suggest our result to be a step toward deeper understanding of the role played by the AVN proof of quantum nonlocality as a useful physical resource. PMID:26272658

  6. Optimal GHZ Paradox for Three Qubits

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changliang; Su, Hong-Yi; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Wu, Chunfeng; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Quatum nonlocality as a valuable resource is of vital importance in quantum information processing. The characterization of the resource has been extensively investigated mainly for pure states, while relatively less is know for mixed states. Here we prove the existence of the optimal GHZ paradox by using a novel and simple method to extract an optimal state that can saturate the tradeoff relation between quantum nonlocality and the state purity. In this paradox, the logical inequality which is formulated by the GHZ-typed event probabilities can be violated maximally by the optimal state for any fixed amount of purity (or mixedness). Moreover, the optimal state can be described as a standard GHZ state suffering flipped color noise. The maximal amount of noise that the optimal state can resist is 50%. We suggest our result to be a step toward deeper understanding of the role played by the AVN proof of quantum nonlocality as a useful physical resource. PMID:26272658

  7. Optimal GHZ Paradox for Three Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Changliang; Su, Hong-Yi; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Wu, Chunfeng; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2015-08-01

    Quatum nonlocality as a valuable resource is of vital importance in quantum information processing. The characterization of the resource has been extensively investigated mainly for pure states, while relatively less is know for mixed states. Here we prove the existence of the optimal GHZ paradox by using a novel and simple method to extract an optimal state that can saturate the tradeoff relation between quantum nonlocality and the state purity. In this paradox, the logical inequality which is formulated by the GHZ-typed event probabilities can be violated maximally by the optimal state for any fixed amount of purity (or mixedness). Moreover, the optimal state can be described as a standard GHZ state suffering flipped color noise. The maximal amount of noise that the optimal state can resist is 50%. We suggest our result to be a step toward deeper understanding of the role played by the AVN proof of quantum nonlocality as a useful physical resource.

  8. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondal, J.; Contolatis, T.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.; Sokolov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The technical achievements and deliveries made during the duration of the program to develop a 30 GHz monolithic receive module for communication feed array applications and to deliver submodules and 30 GHz monolithic receive modules for experimental evaluation are discussed. Key requirements include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF-to-RF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. In addition, the monolithic receive module design addresses a cost goal of less than one thousand dollars (1980 dollars) per module in unit buys of 5,000 or more, and a mechanical configuration that is applicable to a spaceborne phase array system. An additional task for the development and delivery of 32 GHz phase shifter integrated circuit (IC) for deep space communication is also described.

  9. Multi-Anode Frequency Triplers at Sub-Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Tripon-Canseliet, Charlotte; Ward, John S.; Javadi, Hamid; Gill, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design methodology of fix-tuned split-block waveguide balanced frequency triplers working at 300,600 and 900 GHz. They feature four to six GaAs Schottky planar diodes in a balanced configuration. A 6-anode 300 GHz tripler, a 6-anode 560 GHz tripler and a 4-anode 900 GHz tripler will be fabricated with JPL membrane technology in order to minimize dielectric loading and ensure accurate thickness of the substrate. A 4-anode 600 GHz tripler was fabricated with JPL substrateless technology that delivers 0.8-1.6mW in the 540-640 GHz band at room temperature. When cooled to l2OK this tripler delivers 2-4mW from 540 to 640 GHz.

  10. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  11. Performance of 3.9 GHz SRF Cavities at Fermilab's ILCTA_MDB Horizontal Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is building a cryomodule containing four 3.9 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at the Deutsches Elektronen-SYnchrotron (DESY) laboratory. Before assembling the cavities into the cryomodule, each individual cavity is tested at Fermilab's Horizontal Test Stand (HTS). The HTS provides the capability to test fully-dressed SRF cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF in order to verify that the cavities achieve performance requirements under these conditions. The performance at the HTS of the 3.9 GHz cavities built for FLASH is presented here.

  12. An 8.4-GHz cryogenically cooled HEMT amplifier for DSS 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanida, L.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype 8.4 GHz (X-band) high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier/closed cycle refrigerator system was installed in the Deep Space Station 13 feedcone in August 1987. The amplifier is cryogenically cooled to a physical temperature of 12 K and provides 31 K antenna noise temperature (zenith) and 35 dB of gain at a frequency of 8.2 to 8.6 GHz. Antenna system noise temperature is less than 50 K from 7.2 to 9.4 MHz. The low noise HEMT amplifier system is intended for use as a radio astronomy or space communications receiver front end.

  13. Clean Beam Patterns with Low Crosstalk Using 850 GHz Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.; Doyle, S.; Endo, A.; Ferrari, L.; Hochgürtel, S.; Klein, B.

    2014-09-01

    We present modeling of distributed /4 microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) showing how electromagnetic cross coupling between the MKID resonators can occur at frequencies corresponding to the microwave readout signal (4-8 GHz). We then show system beam pattern measurements in the reimaged focal plane of a 72 detector array of lens-antenna coupled MKIDs at 850 GHz, which enables a direct measure of any residual optical crosstalk. With use of transmission line bridges we see no residual cross coupling between MKIDs and hence low crosstalk down to the 30 dB level, with near Gaussian shape (limited by reimaging optics) to 10 dB level.

  14. 5. 8 GHz ophthalmic microwave applicator for treatment of choroidal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Packer, S.; Svitra, P.; Paglione, R.W.; Albert, D.M.; Chess, J.

    1983-01-01

    We report on the use of a 5.8 GHz microwave applicator to treat choroidal melanoma (Greene) in rabbits. The physical requirements needed to treat these intraocular tumors are quite different from those encountered elsewhere in the body. From a trans-scleral approach the penetration needed is minimal (5 to 10 mm.). The fibrous sclera is the only structure between the heat source and the tumor. The sclera has a relatively low water content when compared to tumor. This fact in addition to the frequency dependent interactions of tissue and electromagnetic radiation, results in an advantage to the use of the 5.8 GHz microwave device in treating intraocular malignancies.

  15. Performance of 3.9 GHz SRF cavities at Fermilab's ILCTA_MDB nhorizontal test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Elvin; Hocker, Andy; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermilab is building a cryomodule containing four 3.9 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at the Deutsches Elektronen-SYnchrotron (DESY) laboratory. Before assembling the cavities into the cryomodule, each individual cavity is tested at Fermilab's Horizontal Test Stand (HTS). The HTS provides the capability to test fully-dressed SRF cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF in order to verify that the cavities achieve performance requirements under these conditions. The performance at the HTS of the 3.9 GHz cavities built for FLASH is presented here.

  16. Radio properties of Compact Steep Spectrum and GHz-Peaked Spectrum radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.

    2016-02-01

    Compact steep spectrum (CSS) and GHz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio sources represent a large fraction of the extragalactic objects in flux density-limited samples. They are compact, powerful radio sources whose synchrotron peak frequency ranges between a few hundred MHz to several GHz. CSS and GPS radio sources are currently interpreted as objects in which the radio emission is in an early evolutionary stage. In this contribution I review the radio properties and the physical characteristics of this class of radio sources, and the interplay between their radio emission and the ambient medium of the host galaxy.

  17. Effect of an applied magnetic field on the performance of a SIS receiver near 300 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallison, W. H.; De Zafra, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) receiver has been successfully constructed and tested for operation at 265 - 280 GHz using 1 micron/sq area Nb-AlO(x)-Nb tunnel junctions fabricated at Stony Brook. The best performance to date is a double sideband (DSB) receiver noise temperature of 129 K at 278 GHz. It is found that suppression of the Josephson pair currents with a magnetic field is essential for good performance and a stable dc bias point. Fields as high as 280 gauss have been used with no degradation of mixing performance. The improvement in the intermediate frequency output stability with progressively increasing magnetic fields is illustrated.

  18. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Footnote 5.353A in 47 CFR 2.106 and the priority and real-time preemption requirements imposed by Footnote... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE...

  19. Note: Efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, J. C.; Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; O’Connor, T. P.; Jiang, W.

    2014-04-15

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8–2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments.

  20. Note: efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zappala, J C; Bailey, K; Lu, Z-T; O'Connor, T P; Jiang, W

    2014-04-01

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8-2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments. PMID:24784682

  1. Note: Efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, J. C.; Bailey, K.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Jiang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8-2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments.

  2. 94 GHz doppler wind radar satellite mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Rommen, Björn; Buck, Christopher; Schüttemeyer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Extreme weather such as storms, hurricanes and typhoons, also called `high impact weather', is a high priority area of research for the atmospheric dynamics and meteorological science communities. 94 GHz Doppler wind radar satellite mission concepts have been elaborated, which use cloud and precipitation droplets/particles as tracers to measure 3-D wind fields. The so-called polarisation-diversity pulse-pair (PDPP) technique enables to derive line-of-sight wind speed with good accuracy (< 2-3 m/s) and large unambiguous dynamic range (e.g. 75 m/s). Two distinct system concepts have been elaborated: (1) a conically scanning radar concept with large coverage (> 800 km) and ˜50 km along-track sampling, and; (2) a stereo viewing concept with high sampling resolution (< 4 km) within an inclined cut through the atmosphere. The former concept is adequate for studying large-scale severe/extreme weather systems, whereas the latter would be more suitable for understanding of small-scale convective phenomena. For demonstrating the potential of the FDPP technique for deriving accurate Doppler observations, ground-based and airborne Doppler radar campaigns are in preparation. The Galileo 94 GHz radar, upgraded recently to include a FDPP capability, at Chilbolton in the UK, will be used for an extended ground-based campaign (6 months). For the airborne campaign, the dual-frequency (9.4 + 94 GHz) NAWX radar on board a Convair-580 aircraft of the National Science Council of Canada will be upgraded and flown. This paper describes the observation requirements, preliminary satellite mission concepts, associated wind retrieval aspects and the planned demonstration campaigns.

  3. TWT design requirements for 30/20 GHz digital communications' satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankiewicz, N.; Anzic, G.

    1979-01-01

    The rapid growth of communication traffic (voice, data, and video) requires the development of additional frequency bands before the 1990's. The frequencies currently in use for satellite communications at 6/4 GHz are crowded and demands for 14/12 GHz systems are increasing. Projections are that these bands will be filled to capacity by the late 1980's. The next higher frequency band allocated for satellite communications is at 30/20 GHz. For interrelated reasons of efficiency, power level, and system reliability criteria, a candidate for the downlink amplifier in a 30/20 GHz communications' satellite is a dual mode traveling wave tube (TWT) equipped with a highly efficient depressed collector. A summary is given of the analyses which determine the TWT design requirements. The overall efficiency of such a tube is then inferred from a parametric study and from experimental data on multistaged depressed collectors. The expected TWT efficiency at 4 dB below output saturation is 24 percent in the high mode and 22 percent in the low mode.

  4. A 140 GHz pulsed EPR/212 MHz NMR spectrometer for DNP studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Bryant, Jeffrey A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-10-01

    We described a versatile spectrometer designed for the study of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperatures and high fields. The instrument functions both as an NMR spectrometer operating at 212 MHz (1H frequency) with DNP capabilities, and as a pulsed-EPR operating at 140 GHz. A coiled TE011 resonator acts as both an NMR coil and microwave resonator, and a double balanced (1H, 13C) radio frequency circuit greatly stabilizes the NMR performance. A new 140 GHz microwave bridge has also been developed, which utilizes a four-phase network and ELDOR channel at 8.75 GHz, that is then multiplied and mixed to obtain 140 GHz microwave pulses with an output power of 120 mW. Nutation frequencies obtained are as follows: 6 MHz on S = 1/2 electron spins, 100 kHz on 1H, and 50 kHz on 13C. We demonstrate basic EPR, ELDOR, ENDOR, and DNP experiments here. Our solid effect DNP results demonstrate an enhancement of 144 and sensitivity gain of 310 using OX063 trityl at 80 K and an enhancement of 157 and maximum sensitivity gain of 234 using Gd-DOTA at 20 K, which is significantly better performance than previously reported at high fields (⩾3 T).

  5. A 12 GHZ 50 MW Klystron for Support of Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl; Haase, Andrew; Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    A 12 GHz 50MW X-band klystron is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department. The klystron will be fabricated to support programs currently underway at three European Labs; CERN, PSI, and INFN Trieste. The choice of frequency selection was due to the CLIC RF frequency changing from 30 GHz to the European X-band frequency of 11.99 GHz in 2008. Since the Klystron Department currently builds 50MW klystrons at 11.424 GHz known collectively as the XL4 klystrons, it was deemed cost-effective to utilize many XL4 components by leaving the gun, electron beam transport, solenoid magnet and collector unchanged. To realize the rf parameters required, the rf cavities and rf output hardware were necessarily altered. Some improvements to the rf design have been made to reduce operating gradients and increase reliability. Changes in the multi-cell output structure, waveguide components, and the window will be discussed along with testing of the devices. Five klystrons known as XL5 klystrons are scheduled for production over the next two years.

  6. Absorption by H2O and H2O-N2 mixtures at 153 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A.; Godon, M.; Carlier, J.; Ma, Q.; Tippings, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    New experimental data on and a theoretical analysis of the absorption coefficient at 153 GHz are presented for pure water vapor and water vapor-nitrogen mixtures. This frequency is 30 GHz lower than the resonant frequency of the nearest strong water line (183 GHz) and complements our previous measurements at 213 GHz. The pressure dependence is observed to be quadratic in the case of pure water vapor, while in the case of mixtures there are both linear and quadratic density components. By fitting our experimental data taken at several temperatures we have obtained the temperature dependence of the absorption. Our experimental data are compared to several theoretical models with and without a continuum contribution, and we find that none of the models is in very good agreement with the data; in the case of pure water vapor, the continuum contribution calculated using the recent theoretical absorption gives the best results. In general, the agreement between the data and the various models is less satisfactory than found previously in the high-frequency wing. The anisotropy in the observed absorption differs from that currently used in atmospheric models.

  7. A 140 GHz Pulsed EPR/212 MHz NMR Spectrometer for DNP Studies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Bryant, Jeffrey A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    We described a versatile spectrometer designed for the study of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperatures and high fields. The instrument functions both as an NMR spectrometer operating at 212 MHz (1H frequency) with DNP capabilities, and as a pulsed-EPR operating at 140 GHz. A coiled TE011 resonator acts as both an NMR coil and microwave resonator, and a double balanced (1H, 13C) radio frequency circuit greatly stabilizes the NMR performance. A new 140 GHz microwave bridge has also been developed, which utilizes a four-phase network and ELDOR channel at 8.75 GHz, that is then multiplied and mixed to obtain 140 GHz microwave pulses with an output power of 120 mW. Nutation frequencies obtained are as follows: 6 MHz on S = ½ electron spins, 100 kHz on 1H, and 50 kHz on 13C. We demonstrate basic EPR, ELDOR, ENDOR, and DNP experiments here. Our solid effect DNP results demonstrate an enhancement of 144 and sensitivity gain of 310 using OX063 trityl at 80 K and an enhancement of 157 and maximum sensitivity gain of 234 using Gd-DOTA at 20 K, which is significantly better performance than previously reported at high fields (>3 T). PMID:22975246

  8. 9C continued: results from a deeper radio-source survey at 15 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldram, E. M.; Pooley, G. G.; Davies, M. L.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Scott, P. F.

    2010-05-01

    The 9C survey of radio sources with the Ryle Telescope at 15.2 GHz was set up to survey the fields observed with the cosmic microwave background telescope, the Very Small Array. In our first paper, we described three regions of the survey, constituting a total area of 520 deg2 to a completeness limit of ~25mJy. Here we report on a series of deeper regions, amounting to an area of 115 deg2 complete to ~10mJy and of 29 deg2 complete to ~5.5mJy. We have investigated the source counts and the distributions of the 1.4 to 15.2 GHz spectral indices (α15.21.4) for these deeper samples. The whole catalogue of 643 sources is available online. Down to our lower limit of 5.5mJy, we detect no evidence for any change in the differential source count from the earlier fitted count above 25mJy, n(S) = 51(S/Jy)-2.15Jy-1 sr-1. We have matched both our new and earlier catalogues with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalogue at 1.4 GHz and selected flux-limited samples at both 15 and 1.4 GHz. As expected, we find that the proportions of sources with flat and rising spectra in the samples selected at 15 GHz are significantly higher than those in the samples selected at 1.4 GHz. In addition, for 15-GHz samples selected in three flux density ranges, we detect a significant shift in the median value of α15.21.4: the higher the flux densities the higher the proportions of sources with flat and rising spectra. In our area complete to ~10mJy, we find five sources between 10 and 15mJy at 15 GHz, amounting to 4.3 per cent of sources in this range, with no counterpart in the NVSS catalogue. This implies that, had we relied on NVSS for locating our sources, we could have missed a significant proportion of them at low flux densities. Our results illustrate the problems inherent in using a low-frequency catalogue to characterize the source population at a much higher frequency and emphasize the value of our blind 15.2-GHz survey.

  9. Structured surface reflector design for oblique incidence beam splitter at 610 GHz.

    PubMed

    Defrance, F; Casaletti, M; Sarrazin, J; Wiedner, M C; Gibson, H; Gay, G; Lefèvre, R; Delorme, Y

    2016-09-01

    An iterative alternate projection-based algorithm is developed to design structured surface reflectors to operate as beam splitters at GHz and THz frequencies. To validate the method, a surface profile is determined to achieve a reflector at 610 GHz that generates four equal-intensity beams towards desired directions of ±12.6° with respect to the specular reflection axis. A prototype is fabricated and the beam splitter behavior is experimentally demonstrated. Measurements confirm a good agreement (within 1%) with computer simulations using Feko, validating the method. The beam splitter at 610 GHz has a measured efficiency of 78% under oblique incidence illumination that ensures a similar intensity between the four reflected beams (variation of about 1%). PMID:27607640

  10. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2010-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Kaband (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fiftyone 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec ( mu as) in alpha cos delta and 290 mu as in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 mu as level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  11. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2011-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fifty-one 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec in a cos delta and 290 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  12. A 330-500 GHz Zero-Biased Broadband Tripler Based on Terahertz Monolithic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tian-Hao; Zhang, Yong; Yan, Bo; Xu, Rui-Min; Yang, Cheng-Yue; Zhou, Jing-Tao; Jin, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    A 330-500 GHz zero-biased broadband monolithic integrated tripler is reported. The measured results show that the maximum efficiency and the maximum output power are 2% and 194 μW at 348 GHz. The saturation characteristic test shows that the output 1 dB compression point is about -8.5 dBm at 334 GHz and the maximum efficiency is obtained at the point, which is slightly below the 1 dB compression point. Compared with the conventional hybrid integrated circuit, a major advantage of the monolithic integrated circuit is the significant improvement of reliability and consistency. In this work, a terahertz monolithic frequency multiplier at this band is designed and fabricated.

  13. On the origin of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yuriy T.; Smirnova, Victoria V.; Morgachev, Alexander S.; Motorina, Galina G.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Nagnibeda, Valery G.; Strekalova, Polina V.

    2016-04-01

    The sub-THz event observed on the 4 July 2012 with the Bauman Moscow State Technical University Radio Telescope RT-7.5 at 93 and 140 GHz as well as Kislovodsk and Metsähovi radio telescopes, Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), GOES, RHESSI, and SDO orbital stations is analyzed. The spectral flux between 93 and 140 GHz has been observed increasing with frequency. On the basis of the SDO/AIA data the differential emission measure has been calculated. It is shown that the thermal coronal plasma with the temperature above 0.5 MK cannot be responsible for the observed sub-THz flare emission. The non-thermal gyrosynchrotron mechanism can be responsible for the microwave emission near 10 GHz but the observed millimeter spectral characteristics are likely to be produced by the thermal bremsstrahlung emission from plasma with a temperature of about 0.1 MK.

  14. On the use of passive microwaves at 37 GHz in remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; Njoku, E. G.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a number of studies have investigated the use of the 37 GHz channels of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) for vegetation monitoring and for studying synergisms between the SMMR and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The approaches are promising but raise a number of issues concerning interpretation of the results, specifically on the relative effects of vegetation and other surface and atmospheric characteristics on the observed signal. This article analyzes the 37 GHz Microwave Polarization Difference Temperature (MPDT) in terms of its sensitivity to surface and atmospheric parameters. For this, a radiative transfer model is used which indicates some limitations of the MPDT index and suggests the importance of accounting for atmospheric effects in the data analysis. An alternative approach to the MPDT, including lower SMMR frequencies than 37 GHz, is discussed.

  15. On board low noise 30 GHz receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambrosio, A.; Castelli, G.; Mazzini, C.

    An advanced receiver for onboard application in a 30/20 GHz SS-TDMA satellite communication system is described. The basic requirements of the receiver are a total noise temperature of 1000 K and a bandwidth of 250 MHz. Attention is given to system requirements, the receiver configuration, the parametric preamplifier, and the down converter and IF preamplifier.

  16. Graphene-channel FETs for photonic frequency double-mixing conversion over the sub-THz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Tetsuya; Sugawara, Kenta; Dobroiu, Adrian; Eto, Takanori; Kurita, Yuki; Kojima, Kazuki; Yabe, Yuhei; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Takayuki; Suemitsu, Tetsuya; Ryzhii, Victor; Iwatsuki, Katsumi; Fukada, Youichi; Kani, Jun-ichi; Terada, Jun; Yoshimoto, Naoto; Kawahara, Kenji; Ago, Hiroki; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2015-01-01

    We report on photonic frequency double-mixing conversion utilizing a graphene-channel FET (G-FET). Optoelectronic properties of graphene are exploited to perform single-chip photonic double-mixing functionality, which is greatly advantageous in future broadband technological conversion between optical fiber and sub-terahertz wireless communications. A 1 GHz modulation signal on a 125 GHz carrier is electrically input to the gate, whereas a 1.58 μm dual wavelength CW laser beam having a frequency difference of 112.5 GHz impinges on the G-FET. The G-FET works as a photomixer generating a 112.5 GHz local signal which is then electrically mixed to the 1 GHz modulated 125 GHz carrier signal, resulting in the down-conversion of the 1 GHz signal to a 12.5 GHz intermediate frequency (IF) signal.

  17. Instantaneous high-resolution multiple-frequency measurement system based on frequency-to-time mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan A; Chan, Erwin H W; Minasian, Robert A

    2014-04-15

    A new microwave photonic instantaneous frequency measurement system that can simultaneously measure multiple-frequency signals while achieving very high resolution and wide frequency measurement range is presented. It is based on the frequency-to-time mapping technique implemented using a frequency shifting recirculating delay line loop and a narrowband optical filter realized by the in-fiber stimulated Brillouin scattering effect. Experimental results demonstrate the realization of a multiple-frequency measurement capability over a frequency range of 0.1-20 GHz that can be extended to 90 GHz, and with a measurement resolution of 250 MHz. PMID:24979008

  18. A 30/20 GHz FSS feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The near term feasibility of direct-to-subscriber services were determined using the 30/20 GHz Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) frequency bands. Those technologies which need to be further developed before such a system can be implemented, were identified. To determine this feasibility, dozens of potential applications were examined for their near-term viability, and the subscriber base of three promising applications were estimated. The system requirements, terminal design, and satellite architecture were all investigated to determine whether a 30/20 GHz FSS system is technically and economically feasible by mid-1990s. It was concluded that such a system is feasible, although maturation of some technologies is needed. This system would likely consist of one or two multibeam satellites serving hub/spoke networks of simple user terminals and more complex, mutli-channel terminals of the service providers. Rain compensation would be accomplished non-adaptively through the use of coding, nonuniform satellite TWT power that is a function of a beam's anticipated downlink fading, and signal regeneration of traffic to the wettest climate regions. It was estimated that a potential market of almost two million users could exist in in the mid-1990s time frame for home banking and financial services via Ka-band satellites.

  19. Investigation of a 94 GHz Pseudospark-Sourced Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, David; Yin, Huabi; Cross, Adrian; He, Wenlong; Phelps, Alan; Ronald, Kevin; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Daohui

    2010-11-01

    Work is ongoing at the University of Strathclyde to design, construct and test a klystron amplifier with an operating frequency of 94 GHz using a pseudospark discharge beam source. A pseudospark is a form of low-pressure, high-current discharge which produces an electron beam possessing high brightness and self-focusing properties during the final stages of the discharge. Single-gap pseudospark experiments were performed in order to assess the feasibility of scaling down in size previous work carried out at the University of Strathclyde. Using 1mm cathode and anode apertures with 3mm separation, a 10kV voltage applied at a pressure of 100mTorr resulted in a 4 A beam current, which compares favourably with previous discharges. A 3-cavity 94 GHz klystron has been simulated with the particle-in-cell code MAGIC-2D with pulsed voltage and current inputs in keeping with possible pseudospark discharge traces. Efficiency and gain were simulated at 7.38% and 16.5 dB respectively.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 700 MHz/460 GHz.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Markhasin, Evgeny; Daviso, Eugenio; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Nanni, Emilio A; Jawla, Sudheer K; Mena, Elijah L; DeRocher, Ronald; Thakkar, Ajay; Woskov, Paul P; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of the instrumentation required to perform DNP-NMR at higher field strengths than previously demonstrated, and report the first magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP-NMR experiments performed at (1)H/e(-) frequencies of 700 MHz/460 GHz. The extension of DNP-NMR to 16.4 T has required the development of probe technology, cryogenics, gyrotrons, and microwave transmission lines. The probe contains a 460 GHz microwave channel, with corrugated waveguide, tapers, and miter-bends that couple microwave power to the sample. Experimental efficiency is increased by a cryogenic exchange system for 3.2 mm rotors within the 89 mm bore. Sample temperatures ≤85 K, resulting in improved DNP enhancements, are achieved by a novel heat exchanger design, stainless steel and brass vacuum jacketed transfer lines, and a bronze probe dewar. In addition, the heat exchanger is preceded with a nitrogen drying and generation system in series with a pre-cooling refrigerator. This reduces liquid nitrogen usage from >700 l per day to <200 l per day and allows for continuous (>7 days) cryogenic spinning without detrimental frost or ice formation. Initial enhancements, ε=-40, and a strong microwave power dependence suggests the possibility for considerable improvement. Finally, two-dimensional spectra of a model system demonstrate that the higher field provides excellent resolution, even in a glassy, cryoprotecting matrix. PMID:23000974