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Sample records for 2-cm thick titanium

  1. An X-ray monitor for measurement of a titanium tritide target thickness.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    An X-ray device capable of measuring titanium tritide film thickness from 0.1 to 30 microns has been built and tested. The monitor was designed for use in a rotating target system which used thick targets and incorporated a sputtering electrode to remove depleted layers from the target surface. The thickness measurement can be done in the presence of an intense background of bremsstrahlung and characteristic titanium X-radiation. A measurement can be accomplished in situ in two hours with reasonable accuracy.

  2. An X-ray monitor for measurement of a titanium tritide target thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    An X-ray device capable of measuring titanium tritide film thickness from 0.1 to 30 micrometers has been built and tested. The monitor was designed for use in a rotating target system which used thick targets and incorporated a sputtering electrode to remove depleted layers from the target surface. The thickness measurement can be done in the presence of an intense background of bremsstrahlung and characteristic titanium X-radiation. A measurement can be accomplished in situ in two hours with reasonable accuracy.

  3. High-precision thickness setting models for titanium alloy plate cold rolling without tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Yang, Quan; He, Fei; Sun, Youzhao; Xiao, Huifang

    2015-03-01

    Due to its highly favorable physical and chemical properties, titanium and titanium alloy are widely used in a variety of industries. Because of the low output of a single batch, plate cold rolling without tension is the most common rolling production method for titanium alloy. This method is lack of on-line thickness closed-loop control, with carefully thickness setting models for precision. A set of high-precision thickness setting models are proposed to suit the production method. Because of frequent variations in rolling specification, a model structural for the combination of analytical models and statistical models is adopted to replace the traditional self-learning method. The deformation resistance and friction factor, the primary factors which affect model precision, are considered as the objectives of statistical modeling. Firstly, the coefficient fitting of deformation resistance analytical model based on over-determined equations set is adopted. Additionally, a support vector machine(SVM) is applied to the modeling of the deformation resistance and friction factor. The setting models are applied to a 1450 plate-coiling mill for titanium alloy plate rolling, and then thickness precision is found consistently to be within 3%, exceeding the precision of traditional setting models with a self-learning method based on a large number of stable rolling data. Excellent application performance is obtained. The proposed research provides a set of high-precision thickness setting models which are well adapted to the characteristics of titanium alloy plate cold rolling without tension.

  4. Fiber Lasers Application for Welding of Titanium Alloys With 16 mm Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtihiev, N. N.; Grezev, N. V.; Markushov, Y. V.; Murzakov, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    This article illustrates the use of fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy with 16 mm thickness. The basic advantages of the laser welding process over the traditional methods of arc welding of titanium are demonstrated. Destructive testing of welds was performed to confirm the quality of the welding. The results of the static tensile tests, static bending and toughness at room temperature are presented. All tests confirmed the high quality of the welded joint.

  5. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-02-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices.

  6. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices. PMID:26899567

  7. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  8. The influence of nickel layer thickness on microhardness and hydrogen sorption rate of commercially pure titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudiiarov, V. N.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Syrtanov, M. S.; Yugova, I. S.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of nickel coating thickness on microhardness and hydrogen sorption rate by commercially pure titanium alloy was established in this work. Coating deposition was carried out by magnetron sputtering method with prior ion cleaning of surface. It was shown that increase of sputtering time from 10 to 50 minutes leads to increase coating thickness from 56 to 3.78 μm. It was established that increase of nickel coating thickness leads to increase of microhardness at loads less than 0.5 kg. Microhardness values for all samples are not significantly different at loads 1 kg. Hydrogen content in titanium alloy with nickel layer deposited at 10 and 20 minutes exceeds concentration in initial samples on one order of magnitude. Further increasing of deposition time of nickel coating leads to decreasing of hydrogen concentration in samples due to coating delamination in process of hydrogenation.

  9. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth’s crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  10. Effect of Thickness on the Structure, Composition and Properties of Titanium Nitride Nano-Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Gustavo; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Chessa, J. F.; Ramana, C.V.

    2014-05-05

    Titanium nitride (TiNx) coatings were grown by magnetron sputtering onto Si(1 0 0) substrates by varying time of deposition to produce coatings with variable thickness (dTiN) in the range of 20-120 nm. TiNx coatings were characterized by studying their structure, composition, and mechanical properties. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) combined with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analyses indicate that the grown coatings were stoichiometric TiN. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) measurements indicate that the texturing of TiN coatings changes as a function of dTiN. The (1 1 1) and (0 0 2) peaks appear initially; (1 1 1) becomes intense while (0 0 2) disappears with increasing dTiN. Dense, columnar grain structure was evident for all the coatings in electron microscopy analyses. The residual stress for TiN coatings with dTiN~120 nm was 1.07 GPa in compression while thinner samples exhibit higher values of stress.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Residual Stress in Thick Titanium Alloy Plate Joined with Electron Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Jian Xun

    2010-10-01

    A finite-element (FE) simulation process integrating three dimensional (3D) with two-dimensional (2D) models is introduced to investigate the residual stress of a thick plate with 50-mm thickness welded by an electron beam. A combined heat source is developed by superimposing a conical volume heat source and a uniform surface heat source to simulate the temperature field of the 2D model with a fine mesh, and then the optimal heat source parameters are employed by the elongated heat source for the 3D simulation without trial simulations. The welding residual stress also is investigated with emphasis on the through-thickness stress for the thick plate. Results show that the agreement between simulation and experiment is good with a reasonable degree of accuracy in respect to the residual stress on the top surface and the weld profile. The through-thickness residual stress of the thick plate induced by electron beam welding is distinctly different from that of the arc welding presented in the references.

  12. Investigation of perovskite-sensitized nanoporous titanium dioxide photoanodes with different thicknesses in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yaoming; Han, Gaoyi; Chang, Yunzhen; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Miaoyu

    2015-07-01

    Perovskite-sensitized nanoporous TiO2 films with different thicknesses are prepared by an in situ method, which are employed as photoanodes in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The photoelectrochemical properties of different photoanodes are quantified by the ultraviolet to visible reflectance spectra, incident monochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Results demonstrate that the thin photoanode has high electron lifetime for recombination, which can enhance the separation and transmission of the electron and hole. However, the sunlight utilization will decrease with reducing the photoanode thickness due to the small quantity of CH3NH3PbI3 filled into the photoanode to absorb sunlight. After optimization, PSC with 0.80 μm of the photoanode thickness shows a superior cell efficiency of 12.22% without a hole transporting material.

  13. A young region on Enceladus revealed by 2 cm radiometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, P.; Janssen, M.

    2014-04-01

    On 5 November 2011, the Cassini spacecraft had a flyby of Enceladus dedicated to its synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument. In the course of that flyby, approximately 80% of Enceladus' surface was also observed serendipitously with the microwave radiometer operating concurrently at 2.2 cm. The radiometry data is analyzed and shown to drop sharply in the leading hemisphere's smooth terrain. This drop is also demonstrated in a series of unresolved distant radiometry measurements spread out over the ten years of the Cassini mission. However, the anomaly is absent from distant unresolved RADAR measurements and not visible in SAR imaging. The anomaly is most likely caused by a young surface (<100MYr in age) which has not yet been processed by micrometeoroid impacts below the electromagnetic skin depth (3 m).

  14. Thickness and structure change of titanium(IV) oxide thin films synthesized by the sol-gel spin coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Aneta; Synak, Anna; Grobelna, Beata; Bojarski, Piotr; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Karczewski, Jakub; Szczodrowski, Karol; Behrendt, Mirosław

    2014-08-01

    Titanium dioxide is a well-known material in nanotechnology, while it provides new opportunities due to its interesting properties, for example, as a semiconductor with a quite significant forbidden band gap energy of 3.2 eV. In this study, thin films of titanium dioxide (TiO2) were synthesized in amorphous and crystallographic systems using the sol-gel process. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were applied to obtain structural characteristics of the prepared films. We estimated that TiO2 thin films crystallize in anatase phase between temperatures 380 °C and 700 °C, and into anatase-rutile phase at 650 °C, while rutile phase exists alone above 800 °C. The changes in porosity of materials in relation to temperature were calculated as well. The refractive index of titanium dioxide thin films from ellipsometric measurements is also provided.

  15. Remote quantitative temperature and thickness measurements of plasma-deposited titanium nitride thin coatings on steel using a laser interferometric thermoreflectance optical thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yue; Mandelis, Andreas; Choy, Mervyn; Wang, Chinhua; Segal, Lee

    2005-08-15

    An optical thermometer based on the principle of laser thermoreflectance has been introduced to monitor the surface temperature of thin coatings on steel parts undergoing an industrial titanium nitride (TiN) alloy deposition process. To study the feasibility of the optical thermometer, various thermo-optical parameters of TiN affected by the deposition process have been investigated; namely, the reflectance-temperature relation, the thermoreflectance coefficient, and the coating thickness dependence of thermoreflectance and of total reflectance. A theory of interferometric thermoreflectance has been introduced to model the total reflectance variations during the coating process. An inverse reflectance-temperature relation for the TiN-D2 steel substrate system has been found and a first-order Taylor series expansion used to model thermoreflectance has been shown to yield a thermoreflectance coefficient which is independent of temperature. Both results are in quantitative agreement with the Drude-Zener theory of conductors and semi-conductors. An empirical formula has been derived to effectively model the experimental thermoreflectance coefficient dependence of the TiN-D2 steel system on TiN coating thickness, in qualitative agreement with scattering mechanisms of the Boltzmann transport theory in conductors and semiconductors. The good agreement of theoretical interferometric thermoreflectance simulations with in situ measurements during a specific industrial TiN sputter-coating growth process and the independence of the thermoreflectance and thin-coating-thickness reflectance coefficients from temperature show the potential of using this nonintrusive noncontacting technique as an optical thermometer to determine surface temperatures of physically inaccessible samples undergoing industrial coating deposition processes.

  16. Analysis of Experimental Production of Dense Titanium Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Frederick J.; Benage, John F.; Newton, Robert R.; Wood, Blake P.

    2001-10-01

    As part of the stockpile stewardship program, we are developing the capability to produce strongly coupled plasmas at very high density and modest temperature. In this experiment, we desire a cylindrical shell of titanium plasma with ion density ≈ 0.1 times solid density and ion temperature of a few eV. The shell has a radius of 1 cm, a length of 4 cm, and a shell thickness of 0.2 cm. The plasma is produced by using ≈ 1 MA of current (2.5 μs risetime) from the LANL Colt capacitor bank to ohmically heat a 100 μm thick titanium cylindrical foil to the desired conditions. Plasma pressure causes the titanium to expand to the desired thickness, with nylon tamps preventing further expansion. Magnetic force at the foil is reduced by splitting the return current between the axis and outside the foil. The primary diagnostic was two radial x-ray radiographic systems. Analysis of these data indicate the Titanium foil turns to plasma from the outside surfaces inward, rather than a bulk transition to plasma. The data indicate that after 4.8 μs, roughly one half of the foil mass has been turned into plasma, which has expanded to fill the gap between the nylon tamps.

  17. Photoluminescence of dense nanocrystalline titanium dioxide thin films: effect of doping and thickness and relation to gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Candy; Seeley, Zachary; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita; McHale, Jeanne L

    2011-07-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of dense nanocrystalline (anatase) TiO(2) thin films is reported as a function of calcination temperature, thickness, and tungsten and nickel doping. The dependence of the optical absorption, Raman spectra, and PL spectra on heat treatment and dopants reveals the role of oxygen vacancies, crystallinity, and phase transformation in the performance of TiO(2) films used as gas sensors. The broad visible PL from defect states of compact and undoped TiO(2) films is found to be much brighter and less sensitive to the presence of oxygen than that of mesoporous films. The dense nanocrystalline grains and the nanoparticles comprising the mesoporous film are comparable in size, demonstrating the importance of film morphology and carrier transport in determining the intensity of defect photoluminescence. At higher calcination temperatures, the transformation to rutile results in the appearance of a dominant near-infrared peak. This characteristic change in the shape of the PL spectra demonstrates efficient capture of conduction band electrons by the emerging rutile phase. The W-doped samples show diminished PL with quenching on the red side of the emission spectrum occurring at lower concentration and eventual disappearance of the PL at higher W concentration. The results are discussed within the context of the performance of the TiO(2) thin films as CO gas sensors and the chemical nature of luminescent defects. PMID:21702459

  18. Detection of Thermal 2 cm and 1 cm Formaldehyde Emission in NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Pihlstrom, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Formaldehyde is a tracer of high density gas in massive star forming regions. The K-doublet lines from the three lowest rotational energy levels of ortho-formaldehyde correspond to wavelengths of 6, 2 and 1 cm. Thermal emission of these transitions is rare, and maser emission has only been detected in the 6 cm line. NGC 7538 is an active site of massive star formation in the Galaxy, and one of only a few regions known to harbor 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers. Using the NRAO 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we detected 2 cm H2CO emission toward NGC 7538 IRS1. The velocity of the 2 cm H2CO line is very similar to the velocity of one of the 6 cm H2CO masers but the linewidth is greater. To investigate the nature of the 2 cm emission, we conducted observations of the 1 cm H2CO transition, and obtained a cross-scan map of the 2 cm line. We detected 1 cm emission and found that the 2 cm emission is extended (greater than 30"), which implies brightness temperatures of ˜0.2 K. Assuming optically thin emission, LTE, and that the 1 cm and 2 cm lines originate from the same volume of gas, both these detections are consistent with thermal emission of gas at ˜30 K. We conclude that the 1 cm and 2 cm H2CO lines detected with the GBT are thermal, which implies molecular densities above ˜105 cm-3. LY acknowledges support from WIU. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

  19. Examination of Organic Carryover from 2-cm Contactors to Support the Modular CSSX Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.; Norato, Michael A.; Walker; D. Douglas; Pierce, Robert A.; Eubanks, Ronnye A.; Clark, James D.; Smith, Wilson M. Jr.; Crump, Stephen L.; Nelson, D. Zane; Fink, Samuel D.; Peters, Thomas B.; May, Cecil G.; Herman, David T.; Bolton, Henry L.

    2005-04-29

    A bank of four 2-cm centrifugal contactors was operated in countercurrent fashion to help address questions about organic carryover for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The contactors, having weirs sized for strip operation, were used to examine carryover for both strip effluent (SE) and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). Since only one bank of contactors was available in the short time frame of this work, the organic phase and only one aqueous phase were present in the flow loops at a time. Personnel maintained flowsheet-typical organic phase to aqueous phase (O:A) flow ratios when varying flow rates. Solvent from two different batches were tested with strip solution. In addition, potential mitigations of pH adjustment and coalescing media were examined. The experiment found that organic carryover after decanting averaged 220 ppm by mass with a range of 74 to 417 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L for strip effluent (SE)/organic solvent contacts. These values are based on measured modifier. Values were bounded by a value of 95 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. The higher modifier-based numbers are considered more reliable at this time. Carryover of Isopar{reg_sign} L in DSS simulant averaged 77 ppm by mass with a range of 70 to 88 ppm of Isopar{reg_sign} L based on modifier content. The carryover was bounded by a value of 19 ppm based upon Isopar{reg_sign} L values as reported. More work is needed to resolve the discrepancy between modifier and Isopar{reg_sign} L values. The work did not detect organic droplets greater than 18 microns in SE. Strip output contained droplets down to 0.5 micron in size. Droplets in DSS were almost monodisperse by comparison, having a size range 4.7 +/- 1.6 micron in one test and 5.2 +/- 0.8 micron in the second demonstration. Optical microscopy provided qualitative results confirming the integrity of droplet size measurements in this work. Acidic or basic adjustments of aqueous strip solution

  20. A search for periodic structure in solar 2 cm microwave radiation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    A power spectral analysis of 285 hr of 2 cm microwave intensity data showed no statistically significant ( 96% confidence) periodicities in the frequency range 1 to 15 mHz. No correlation was found between 2 cm periodicities and solar activity in H alpha, X-ray, and several microwave frequencies. A small shift of power toward higher frequencies in the power spectrum of the 2 cm data was found to be correlated with solar H alpha and X-ray activity. Using the statistical properties of power spectra, an expression for the ratio of the minimum detectable peak-to-peak to ambient temperature at chromospheric heights may be derived. Applied to a model for oscillation bursts in quiescent supergranules, and using the most significant results of experiments to detect the microwave periodicities, this expression yields an upper limit of approximately .0015.

  1. The structure and temperature of Pluto's Sputnik Planum using 4.2 cm radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, Ivan; Protopapa, Silvia; Hinson, David P.; Bird, Mike; Tyler, G. Leonard; Grundy, William M.; McKinnon, William B.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Stern, S. Alan; Stansberry, John A.; Weaver, Harold A.; Pluto Composition Team, Pluto Geophysics and Geology Team, Pluto Atmospheres Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons measured the radiometric brightness temperature of Pluto at 4.2 cm, during the encounter with two scans of the spacecraft's high gain antenna shortly after closest approach. The Pluto mid-section scan included the region informally known as Sputnik Planum, now understood to be filled with nitrogen ice. The mean radiometric brightness temperature at 4.2 cm, obtained in this region is 25 K, for both Right Circular Polarization (RCP) and Left Circular Polarization (LCP), well below the sublimation temperature for nitrogen ice. Sputnik Planum was near the limb and the termination of the radiometric scan. Consequently, the thermal emission was measured obliquely over a wide range of emission angles. This geometry affords detailed modeling of the angular dependence of the thermal radiation, incorporating surface and subsurface electromagnetic scattering models as well as emissivity models of the nitrogen ice. In addition, a bistatic radar measurement detected the scattering of a 4.2 cm uplink transmitted from Earth. The bistatic specular point was within Sputnik Planum and the measurements are useful for constraining the dielectric constant as well as the surface and subsurface scattering functions of the nitrogen ice. The combination of the thermal emission's angular dependence, RCP and LCP polarization dependence, and the bistatic scattering, yields estimates of the radiometric thermal emissivity, nitrogen ice temperature and spatial correlation scales.This work is supported by the NASA New Horizons Mission.

  2. Efficacy of retrograde ureteropyeloscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi >2 cm.

    PubMed

    Bader, M J; Gratzke, C; Walther, S; Weidlich, P; Staehler, M; Seitz, M; Sroka, R; Reich, O; Stief, C G; Schlenker, B

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the efficacy and safety of retrograde ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi greater than 2 cm in diameter. A total of 24 patients with a stone burden >2 cm were treated with retrograde ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy. Primary study endpoints were number of treatments until the patient was stone free and perioperative complications with a follow-up of at least 3 months after intervention. In 24 patients (11 women and 13 men, 20-78 years of age), a total of 40 intrarenal calculi were treated with retrograde endoscopic procedures. At the time of the initial procedure, calculi had an average total linear diameter of 29.75 ± 1.57 mm and an average stone volume of 739.52 ± 82.12 mm(3). The mean number of procedures per patient was 1.7 ± 0.8 (range 1-3 procedures). The overall stone-free rate was 92%. After 1, 2 and 3 procedures 54, 79 and 92% of patients were stone free, respectively. There were no major complications. Minor postoperative complications included pyelonephritis in three cases (7.5%), of whom all responded immediately to parenteral antibiotics. In one patient the development of steinstrasse in the distal ureter required ureteroscopic fragment disruption and basketing. Ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy represents an efficient treatment option and allows the treatment of large intrarenal calculi of all compositions and throughout the whole collecting system even for patients with a stone burden of more than 2 cm size. PMID:20204341

  3. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  4. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  5. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  6. Titan's surface properties inferred from the seasonal brightness variation at 2-cm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, M.; Le Gall, A.; Lopes, R.; Lorenz, R.; Malaska, M.; Neish, C.; Solomonidou, A.

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive calibration and mapping of the thermal microwave emission from Titan's surface at 2.2-cm wavelength has been completed by the passive radiometer included in the Cassini RADAR instrument. A seasonal brightness temperature variation has been determined that is comparable to but slightly smaller than that obtained by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). This difference has implications for the composition and structure of Titan's surface; namely, that most of Titan's surface is covered by the deposition and possible redistribution of tholin-like atmospheric photochemical products to a depth of at least a meter.

  7. Analysis of Saturn's Thermal Emission at 2.2-cm Wavelength: Spatial Distribution of Ammonia Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laraia, A. L.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Janssen, Michael A.; Gulkis, Samuel; Oyafuso, Fabiano A.; Allison, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on determining the latitudinal structure of ammonia vapor in Saturn's cloud layer near 1.5 bars using the brightness temperature maps derived from the Cassini RADAR (Elachi et al., 2004) instrument, which works in a passive mode to measure thermal emission from Saturn at 2.2-cm wavelength. We perform an analysis of five brightness temperature maps that span epochs from 2005 to 2011, which are presented in a companion paper by Janssen et al. (2013a, this issue). The brightness temperature maps are representative of the spatial distribution of ammonia vapor, since ammonia gas is the only effective opacity source in Saturn's atmosphere at 2.2-cm wavelength. Relatively high brightness temperatures indicate relatively low ammonia relative humidity (RH), and vice versa. We compare the observed brightness temperatures to brightness temperatures computed using the Juno atmospheric microwave radiative transfer (JAMRT) program which includes both the means to calculate a tropospheric atmosphere model for Saturn and the means to carry out radiative transfer calculations at microwave frequencies. The reference atmosphere to which we compare has a 3x solar deep mixing ratio of ammonia (we use 1.352x10(exp -4) for the solar mixing ratio of ammonia vapor relative to H2; see Atreya, 2010) and is fully saturated above its cloud base. The maps are comprised of residual brightness temperatures-observed brightness temperature minus the model brightness temperature of the saturated atmosphere.

  8. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  9. Thick target D-T neutron yield measurements using metal occluders of scandium, titanium, yttrium, zirconium, gadolinium, erbium, hafnium, and tantalum at energies from 25 to 200 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Malbrough, D.J.; Molloy, J.T. Jr.; Becker, R.H.

    1990-11-19

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron yields from thick films of scandium, titanium, yttrium, zirconium, gadolinium, erbium, hafnium, and tantalum were measured by the associated particle technique using the 200-keV accelerator at the Pinellas Plant. The neutron yields were measured for all targets at energies from 25 to 200 keV in 5-keV steps with an average uncertainty of {plus_minus}6.8%. Tabulated results are presented with yield versus energy curves for each target. Yield curves for D-D neutrons from earlier measurements are also presented with the D-T neutron yield curves. Good fits to the data were found for both D-D and D-T with theoretical calculations that were adjusted by smooth functions of the form: A{sub 0} + A{sub 1}E + A{sub 2}E{sup 2}. The results of the fits strongly suggest that disagreement between measurement and theory is due mainly to inaccuracies in currently available stopping power data. Comparisons with earlier theoretical calculations for titanium and erbium are also presented. 27 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Saturns Thermal Emission at 2.2-cm Wavelength as Imaged by the Cassini RADAR Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Allison, M. D.; Gulkis, S.; Laraia, A. L.; Baines, K. H.; Edgington, S. G.; Anderson, Y. Z.; Kelleher, K.; Oyafuso, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present well-calibrated, high-resolution maps of Saturn's thermal emission at 2.2-cm wavelength obtained by the Cassini RADAR radiometer through the Prime and Equinox Cassini missions, a period covering approximately 6 years. The absolute brightness temperature calibration of 2% achieved is more than twice better than for all previous microwave observations reported for Saturn, and the spatial resolution and sensitivity achieved each represent nearly an order of magnitude improvement. The brightness temperature of Saturn in the microwave region depends on the distribution of ammonia, which our radiative transfer modeling shows is the only significant source of absorption in Saturn's atmosphere at 2.2-cm wavelength. At this wavelength the thermal emission comes from just below and within the ammonia cloud-forming region, and yields information about atmospheric circulations and ammonia cloud-forming processes. The maps are presented as residuals compared to a fully saturated model atmosphere in hydrostatic equilibrium. Bright regions in these maps are readily interpreted as due to depletion of ammonia vapor in, and, for very bright regions, below the ammonia saturation region. Features seen include the following: a narrow equatorial band near full saturation surrounded by bands out to about 10deg planetographic latitude that demonstrate highly variable ammonia depletion in longitude; narrow bands of depletion at -35deg latitude; occasional large oval features with depleted ammonia around -45deg latitude; and the 2010-2011 storm, with extensive saturated and depleted areas as it stretched halfway around the planet in the northern hemisphere. Comparison of the maps over time indicates a high degree of stability outside a few latitudes that contain active regions.

  11. Intrarenal Surgery vs Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in the Management of Lower Pole Stones Greater than 2 cm

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncu, Hakan; Yencilek, Faruk; Kalkan, Mehmet; Bastug, Yavuz; Yencilek, Esin; Ozdemir, Ahmet Tunc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of RIRS and PNL in lower pole stones ≥2 cm. Materials and and Methods: A total of 109 patients who underwent PNL or RIRS for solitary lower pole stone between April 2009 and December 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. Lower pole stone was diagnosed with CT scan. Stone size was assessed as the longest axis of the stone. All patients were informed about the advantages, disadvantages and probable complications of both PNL and RIRS before the selection of the procedure. Patients decided the surgery type by themselves without being under any influences and written informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to the surgery. Patients were divided into two groups according to the patients’ preference of surgery type. Group 1 consisted of 77 patients who underwent PNL and Group 2 consisted of 32 patients treated with RIRS. Stone free statuses, postoperative complications, operative time and hospitalization time were compared in both groups. Results There was no statistical significance between the two groups in mean age, stone size, stone laterality, mean follow-up periods and mean operative times. In PNL group, stone-free rate was 96.1% at first session and 100% after the additional procedure. In Group 2, stone-free rate was 90.6% at the first procedure and 100% after the additional procedure. The final stone-free rates and operative times were similar in both groups. Conclusions RIRS should be an effective treatment alternative to PNL in lower pole stones larger than 2 cm, especially in selected patients. PMID:26005965

  12. Design considerations and initial performance of a 1.2 cm{sup 2} beta imaging intra-operative probe

    SciTech Connect

    Tornai, M.P.; MacDonald, L.R.; Levin, C.S.; Siegel, S.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1996-08-01

    A novel small area beta ({beta}{sup {+-}}) detector is under development for nuclear emission imaging of surgically exposed, radiolabeled tumor beds. The imaging device front-end consists of a 0.5 mm thick by 1.25 cm diameter CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator disk coupled to a rapid bundle of 2 mm diameter double clad optical fibers through a polystyrene light diffuser. The detector area (1.2 cm{sup 2}) was determined by the requirement of introducing the probe into small cavities, e.g. during neuro-surgical lesion resection, but large enough to produce images of clinical significance. Flexible back-end optical fibers (1.9 m long) were coupled to the front-end components allowing {approximately} 75 photoelectrons to e detected for mean beta energies of 250 keV, indicating that sufficient signal can be obtained with clinical beta emitters (e.g. {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I). The long flexible fibers guide the scintillation light to a Philips XP1700 series, fiber optical faceplate, Multi-Channel PMT. The parallel MC-PMT outputs re fed into a variable gain, charge divider network and an i-V pre-amplifier/line driver network, whose resulting four outputs are digitized and histogrammed with standard Anger positioning logic. The various components in the imaging chain were evaluated and optimized by both simulations and measurements. Line spread functions measured in the 10.8 mm FOV were 0.50 mm {+-} 0.038 mm and 0.55 mm {+-} 0.065 mm FWHM in X and Y, respectively. A 20% variation in pulse height and minimal variation in spatial resolution was observed. The differential image uniformity was measured to be {+-}15.6% with {approximately} 150 cts/pixel. Preliminary images show excellent reproduction of phantom activity distributions.

  13. Titanium 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that the metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  14. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  15. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  16. Method for the production of strongly adhesive films on titanium and titanium alloys with a metallization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the spray-application of a strongly adhesive, thick antifriction layer on titanium and titanium alloys is proposed. The titanium/titanium alloy component to be coated is first subjected to cleaning in a pickling bath with reducing additives and sand-blasting, then coated with an intermediate layer of nickel, after which the final layer is applied. The formation of TiNi at the interface ensures strong bonding of the antifriction layer.

  17. Cell response of anodized nanotubes on titanium and titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher C; Ivanova, Elena P; Wen, Cuie

    2013-09-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy implants that have been demonstrated to be more biocompatible than other metallic implant materials, such as Co-Cr alloys and stainless steels, must also be accepted by bone cells, bonding with and growing on them to prevent loosening. Highly ordered nanoporous arrays of titanium dioxide that form on titanium surface by anodic oxidation are receiving increasing research interest due to their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. The response of bone cells to implant materials depends on the topography, physicochemistry, mechanics, and electronics of the implant surface and this influences cell behavior, such as adhesion, proliferation, shape, migration, survival, and differentiation; for example the existing anions on the surface of a titanium implant make it negative and this affects the interaction with negative fibronectin (FN). Although optimal nanosize of reproducible titania nanotubes has not been reported due to different protocols used in studies, cell response was more sensitive to titania nanotubes with nanometer diameter and interspace. By annealing, amorphous TiO2 nanotubes change to a crystalline form and become more hydrophilic, resulting in an encouraging effect on cell behavior. The crystalline size and thickness of the bone-like apatite that forms on the titania nanotubes after implantation are also affected by the diameter and shape. This review describes how changes in nanotube morphologies, such as the tube diameter, the thickness of the nanotube layer, and the crystalline structure, influence the response of cells.

  18. 2 cm spatial-resolution and 2 km range Brillouin optical fiber sensor using a transient differential pulse pair.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongkang; Zhang, Hongying; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-03-20

    We report a high-spatial-resolution and long-range distributed temperature sensor through optimizing differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA). In DPP-BOTDA, the differential signal suffers from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction with respect to the original signals, and for a fixed pulse-width difference the SNR reduction increases with the pulse width. Through reducing the pulse width to a transient regime (near to or less than the phonon lifetime) to decrease the SNR reduction after the differential process, the optimized 8/8.2 ns pulse pair is applied to realize a 2 cm spatial resolution, where a pulse generator with a 150 ps fall-time is used to ensure the effective resolution of DPP-BOTDA. In the experiment, a 2 cm spatial-resolution hot-spot detection with a 2 °C temperature accuracy is demonstrated over a 2 km sensing fiber. PMID:22441465

  19. Tissue response to implanted ceramic-coated titanium alloys in rats.

    PubMed

    Satomi, K; Akagawa, Y; Nikai, H; Tsuru, H

    1988-07-01

    In order to assess the tissue compatibility of the hybrid materials for the dental implant (hydroxyapatite, titanium oxide and titanium nitride coated titanium alloys), tissue response to these materials implanted in the rat subcutaneous tissue was histologically examined. Initial inflammatory response was less evident in titanium oxide coated and non-coated titanium alloys. All materials were encapsulated by thin fibrous connective tissues. The membrane thickness of hydroxyapatite coated titanium alloy was significantly higher than that of titanium nitride coated one. These results suggest that all materials possess favourable tissue compatibility and may encourage clinical use as the dental implant.

  20. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  1. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26727075

  3. Titan's surface at 2.2-cm wavelength imaged by the Cassini RADAR radiometer: Calibration and first results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, M.A.; Lorenz, R.D.; West, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.M.; Kirk, R.L.; Elachi, C.; Wall, S.D.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.A.; Callahan, P.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.A.; Kelleher, K.D.; Roth, L.; Stiles, B.; Le, Gall A.

    2009-01-01

    The first comprehensive calibration and mapping of the thermal microwave emission from Titan's surface is reported based on radiometric data obtained at 2.2-cm wavelength by the passive radiometer included in the Cassini Radar instrument. The data reported were accumulated from 69 separate observational segments in Titan passes from Ta (October 2004) through T30 (May 2007) and include emission from 94% of Titan's surface. They are diverse in the key observing parameters of emission angle, polarization, and spatial resolution, and their reduction into calibrated global mosaic maps involved several steps. Analysis of the polarimetry obtained at low to moderate resolution (50+ km) enabled integration of the radiometry into a single mosaic of the equivalent brightness temperature at normal incidence with a relative precision of about 1 K. The Huygens probe measurement of Titan's surface temperature and radiometry obtained on Titan's dune fields allowed us to infer an absolute calibration estimated to be accurate to a level approaching 1 K. The results provide evidence for a surface that is complex and varied on large scales. The radiometry primarily constrains physical properties of the surface, where we see strong evidence for subsurface (volume) scattering as a dominant mechanism that determines the emissivity, with the possibility of a fluffy or graded-density surface layer in many regions. The results are consistent with, but not necessarily definitive of a surface composition resulting from the slow deposition and processing of organic compounds from the atmosphere. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  4. How useful are the "other" semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs); the mini-unit (15.2 cm long)?

    PubMed

    Goodbred, Steven L; Bryant, Wade L; Rosen, Michael R; Alvarez, David; Spencer, Terri

    2009-06-15

    Mini (15.2 cm) semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used successfully in 169 streams from six metropolitan areas of the US to sequester hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) that are indicative of urbanization. A microscale assay the P450RGS, which responds to compounds that bind to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the Fluoroscan, a chemical screen for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were performed on each mini SPMD extract. Results show both tests were sensitive enough to respond in streams with low urbanization and responded exponentially in a predictable way to a gradient of urbanization. Mini SPMDs had sufficient sampling rates to detect HOCs using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS) in streams with low levels of urbanization. The total number of HOCs in streams had a linear response to a gradient of urbanization, where 73 of 140 targeted compounds were detected. A diverse group of compounds was found in urban streams including, PAHs, insecticides, herbicides, musk fragrances, waste water treatment compounds and flame retardants. Pentachloroanisole (PCA), a breakdown product of pentachlorophenol (wood preservative), was the most ubiquitous HOC, and was detected in 71% of streams. An evaluation of mini SPMD performance showed they can detect concentrations in water below toxicity benchmarks for many HOCs with the exception of 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. A comparison of mini SPMDs with full sized (91.4 cm) SPMDs showed they have several distinct advantages. The most notable advantages are their low cost, small size, and reduced chance of vandalism. The greatest limitation is the inability to detect compounds at low concentrations (pg/L). Mini SPMDs perform quite well in a wide array of environmental settings and applications and should be considered as an option in environmental studies. PMID:19328522

  5. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, D. S.; Engelbrecht, A. D.; Hadley, T. D.

    2005-10-01

    The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about 9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminum, which is produced in a similar way, is only about 1.7/kg. Electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide is therefore believed to have significant potential to reduce the cost of titanium products. The process is hampered by the high operating temperatures and sophisticated materials of construction required; the high affinity of titanium for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen; and physical and chemical properties of the different titanium oxide species when reducing titanium from Ti4+ to metallic titanium.

  6. Impact of Micropapillary Histologic Subtype in Selecting Limited Resection vs Lobectomy for Lung Adenocarcinoma of 2cm or Smaller

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to analyze the prognostic significance of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS) lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) classification for patients undergoing resection for small (≤2cm) lung ADC and to investigate whether histologic subtyping can predict recurrence after limited resection (LR) vs lobectomy (LO). Methods Comprehensive histologic subtyping was performed according to the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification on all consecutive patients who underwent LR or LO for small lung ADC between 1995 and 2009 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Clinical characteristics and pathologic data were retrospectively evaluated for 734 consecutive patients (LR: 258; LO: 476). Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was calculated using competing risks analysis and compared across groups using Grey’s test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Application of IASLC/ATS/ERS lung ADC histologic subtyping to predict recurrence demonstrates that, in the LR group but not in the LO group, micropapillary (MIP) component of 5% or greater was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, compared with MIP component of less than 5% (LR: 5-year CIR = 34.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 23.5% to 49.7% vs 5-year CIR = 12.4%, 95% CI = 6.9% to 22.1%, P < .001; LO: 5-year CIR = 19.1%, 95% CI = 12.0% to 30.5% vs 15-year CIR = 12.9%, 95% CI = 7.6% to 21.9%, P = .13). In the LR group, among patients with tumors with an MIP component of 5% or greater, most recurrences (63.4%) were locoregional; MIP component of 5% or greater was statistically significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence when the surgical margin was less than 1cm (5-year CIR = 32.0%, 95% CI = 18.6% to 46.0% for MIP ≥ 5% vs 5-year CIR = 7.6%, 95% CI = 2.3% to 15.6% for MIP < 5%; P = .007) but not when surgical margin was 1cm or greater (5-year CIR = 13.0%, 95% CI = 4.1% to 22

  7. Composition, seasonal change and bathymetry of Ligeia Mare, Titan, derived from its 2.2-cm thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, A. A.; Malaska, M.; Lorenz, R. D.; Janssen, M. A.; Tokano, T.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Veyssière, G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Karatekin, O.; Encrenaz, P.

    2015-12-01

    For the last 10 years, the Cassini RADAR has been exploring Saturn's moon Titan, the only planetary body besides Earth whose surface presently exhibits significant accumulations of liquids in the forms of lakes and seas. In particular, the passive Radiometer that is incorporated in this instrument has been recording the 2.2 cm-wavelength thermal emission from Titan's three seas. Radiometry observations provide new information beyond the active radar reflection data. In this paper, we analyze the radiometry observations collected from Feb. 2007 to July 2013 over one of these seas, Ligeia Mare, with the goal of providing constrains on its liquid composition, seafloor nature, bathymetry, and dynamics. In light of the two-layer model we have developed for this analysis, we find that the dielectric constant of the sea liquid is most likely smaller than 1.8, suggesting that the composition of Ligeia Mare is dominated by liquid methane rather than liquid ethane (although a ternary methane-ethane-nitrogen mixture cannot be ruled out). This result is further supported by the value we infer for the liquid loss tangent of 3-5×10-5. This value is in agreement with the one first published by Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2014) based on active radar observation. A high methane concentration suggests that Ligeia Mare is either a sea from which ethane has been removed by crustal interaction, or a sea primarely fed by methane-rich precipitation, or both. For the seafloor, a dielectric constant of 2.6-2.9±0.9 is determined. Though this result is not very constraining, we favor a scenario where the floor of Ligeia Mare is covered by a sludge of compacted and possibly nitrile-rich organic material formed by the deposition of photochemical haze or by rain-washing of the nearby shores. These results are then used to convert the radiometry mosaic of Ligeia Mare into a qualitative low-resolution bathymetry map. Lastly, we establish limits on the physical temperature variation of the sea

  8. Producing Foils From Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; Gaspar, T. A.; Sukonnik, I. M.; Semiatan, S. L.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J. A.; Fraser, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of producing high-quality, thin-gage, titanium foil from direct cast titanium strip. Melt Overflow Rapid Solidification Technology (MORST) was used to cast several different titanium alloys into 500 microns thick strip, 10 cm wide and up to 3 m long. The strip was then either ground, hot pack rolled or cold rolled, as appropriate, into foil. Gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) was cast and ground to approximately 100 microns thick foil and alpha-2 titanium aluminide (Ti3AI) was cast and hot pack rolled to approximately 70 microns thick foil. CP Ti, Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo, and Ti22AI23Nb (Orthorhombic), were successfully cast and cold-rolled into good quality foil (less than 125 microns thick). The foils were generally fully dense with smooth surfaces, had fine, uniform microstructures, and demonstrated mechanical properties equivalent to conventionally produced titanium. By eliminating many manufacturing steps, this technology has the potential to produce thin gage, titanium foil with good engineering properties at significantly reduced cost relative to conventional ingot metallurgy processing.

  9. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-07-04

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  10. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  11. Cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wong, C; Xiong, J; Hodgson, P; Wen, C

    2010-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that titanium and the titanium alloying elements of tantalum, niobium, zirconium, molybdenum, tin, and silicon are biocompatible. However, our research in the development of new titanium alloys for biomedical applications indicated that some titanium alloys containing molybdenum, niobium, and silicon produced by powder metallurgy show a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cytotoxicity is linked to the ion release from the metals. To prove this hypothesis, we assessed the cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements in both forms of powder and bulk, using osteoblast-like SaOS(2) cells. Results indicated that the metal powders of titanium, niobium, molybdenum, and silicon are cytotoxic, and the bulk metals of silicon and molybdenum also showed cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, we established that the safe ion concentrations (below which the ion concentration is non-toxic) are 8.5, 15.5, 172.0, and 37,000.0 microg/L for molybdenum, titanium, niobium, and silicon, respectively.

  12. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  13. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  14. Osteogenic cell sheets reinforced with photofunctionalized micro-thin titanium.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Manabu; Hirota, Makoto; Park, Wonhee; Honda, Masaki J; Tsukimura, Naoki; Isokawa, Keitaro; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    Cell sheet technology has been used to deliver cells in single-sheet form with an intact extracellular matrix for soft tissue repair and regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that titanium-reinforced cell sheets could be constructed for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Fifty-µm-thick titanium plates containing apertures were prepared and roughened by acid etching, some of which were photofunctionalized with 12 min of UV light treatment. Cell sheets were prepared by culturing rat calvarial periosteum-derived cells on temperature-responsive culture dishes and attached to titanium plates. Titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheet construction was conditional on various technical and material factors: cell sheets needed to be double-sided and sandwich the titanium plate, and the titanium plates needed to be micro thin and contain apertures to allow close apposition of the two cell sheets. Critically, titanium plates needed to be UV-photofunctionalized to ensure adherence and retention of cell sheets. Single-sided cell sheets or double-sided cell sheets on as-made titanium contracted and deformed within 4 days of incubation. Titanium-reinforced cell sheets on photofunctionalized titanium were structurally stable at least up to 14 days, developed the expected osteogenic phenotypes (ALP production and mineralization), and maintained structural integrity without functional degradation. Successful construction of titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheets was associated with increased cell attachment, retention, and expression of vinculin, an adhesion protein by photofunctionalization. This study identified the technical and material requirements for constructing titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheets. Future in vivo studies are warranted to test these titanium-reinforced cell sheets as stably transplantable, mechanically durable, and shape controllable osteogenic devices.

  15. Titanium Process Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Gerdemann

    2001-07-01

    Titanium has a unique set of properties: low density, high specific strength, high temperature strength, and exceptional resistance to corrosion. Titanium is the fourth most common structural metal in the earth's crust. Only iron, aluminum, and magnesium are more abundant. More titanium is available than nickel, copper, chromium, lead, tin, and zinc put together. However, the current titanium production system is extremely labor and capital intensive. Titanium is expensive only because the current process for refining the ore to metal is a multi-step, high temperature batch process. This article will first describe current titanium technology, and will then discuss four of the most promising approaches to reduce the cost of titanium. These include the Kroll, Hunter, Cambridge, and Armstrong processes.

  16. The biomimetic apatite-cefalotin coatings on modified titanium.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Kyung; Lee, Sang-Bae; Moon, Seung-Kyun; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2012-02-01

    Dental implant failure often occurs due to oral bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that antibiotic efficacy could be enhanced with modified titanium. First, the titanium was modified by anodization and heat-treatment. Then, a biomimetic coating process was completed in two steps. Surface characterization was performed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Release of antibiotic was evaluated by UV/VIS spectrometry, and the antibacterial effect was evaluated on Streptococcus mutans. After the second coating step, we observed a thick homogeneous apatite layer that contained the antibiotic, cefalotin. The titanium formed a rutile phase after the heat treatment, and a carbonated apatite phase appeared after biomimetic coating. We found that the modified titanium increased the loading of cefalotin onto the hydroxyapatite coated surface. The results suggested that modified titanium coated with a cefalotin using biomimetic coating method might be useful for preventing local post-surgical implant infections.

  17. Discoloration of titanium alloy in acidic saline solutions with peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare corrosion behavior in several titanium alloys with immersion in acidulated saline solutions containing hydrogen peroxide. Seven types of titanium alloy were immersed in saline solutions with varying levels of pH and hydrogen peroxide content, and resulting differences in color and release of metallic elements determined in each alloy. Some alloys were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy. Ti-55Ni alloy showed a high level of dissolution and difference in color. With immersion in solution containing hydrogen peroxide at pH 4, the other alloys showed a marked difference in color but a low level of dissolution. The formation of a thick oxide film was observed in commercially pure titanium showing discoloration. The results suggest that discoloration in titanium alloys immersed in hydrogen peroxide-containing acidulated solutions is caused by an increase in the thickness of this oxide film, whereas discoloration of Ti-55Ni is caused by corrosion. PMID:23370866

  18. Titanium oxidation by rf inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; de la Piedad-Beneitez, A.; López-Callejas, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; de la Rosa-Vázquez, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    The development of titanium dioxide (TiO2) films in the rutile and anatase phases is reported. The films have been obtained from an implantation/diffusion and sputtering process of commercially pure titanium targets, carried out in up to 500 W plasmas. The experimental outcome is of particular interest, in the case of anatase, for atmospheric pollution degradation by photocatalysis and, as to the rutile phase, for the production of biomaterials required by prosthesis and implants. The reactor employed consists in a cylindrical pyrex-like glass vessel inductively coupled to a 13.56 MHz RF source. The process takes place at a 5×10-2 mbar pressure with the target samples being biased from 0 to -3000 V DC. The anatase phase films were obtained from sputtering the titanium targets over glass and silicon electrically floated substrates placed 2 cm away from the target. The rutile phase was obtained by implantation/diffusion on targets at about 700 °C. The plasma was developed from a 4:1 argon/oxygen mixture for ~5 hour processing periods. The target temperature was controlled by means of the bias voltage and the plasma source power. The obtained anatase phases did not require annealing after the plasma oxidation process. The characterization of the film samples was conducted by means of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  20. Method of measuring the thickness of radioactive thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.; Makinen, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Thickness monitor consists of proportional X-ray counter coupled to pulse counting system, copper filter over face of counter, rotatable collimator containing radioactive source, and rotatable shutter. Monitor can be used as integral part of neutron generator. It has been used to measure titanium tritide film thicknesses from 0.1 to 30 micrometers.

  1. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  2. Silk electrogel coatings for titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Elia, Roberto; Michelson, Courtney D; Perera, Austin L; Harsono, Masly; Leisk, Gray G; Kugel, Gerard; Kaplan, David L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop biocompatible, biodegradable dental implant coatings capable of withstanding the mechanical stresses imparted during implant placement. Two techniques were developed to deposit uniform silk fibroin protein coatings onto dental implants. Two novel coating techniques were implemented to coat titanium shims, studs, and implants. One technique involved electrodeposition of the silk directly onto the titanium substrates. The second technique consisted of melting electrogels and dispensing the melted gels onto the titanium to form the coatings. Both techniques were tested for coating reproducibility using a stylus profilometer and a dial thickness gauge. The mechanical strength of adhered titanium studs was assessed using a universal mechanical testing machine. Uniform, controllable coatings were obtained from both the electrodeposition and melted electrogel coating techniques, tunable from 35 to 1654 µm thick under the conditions studied, and able to withstand delamination during implantation into implant socket mimics. Mechanical testing revealed that the adhesive strength of electrogel coatings, 0.369 ± 0.09 MPa, rivaled other biologically derived coating systems such as collagen, hydroxyapatite, and chitosan (0.07-4.83 MPa). These novel silk-based techniques offer a unique approach to the deposition of safe, simple, mechanically robust, biocompatible, and degradable implant coatings.

  3. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  4. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-07-15

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

  5. Sprayable titanium composition

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, Chester E.; Kern, Werner; Vibronek, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to an organometallic titanium compound dissolved in a diluent and optionally containing a lower aliphatic alcohol spreading modifier, produces a solution that can be sprayed onto a substrate and cured to form an antireflection titanium oxide coating having a refractive index of from about 2.0 to 2.2.

  6. Titanium nitride thin films for minimizing multipactoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1979-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  7. Regulation of PP2Cm expression by miRNA-204/211 and miRNA-22 in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bang-fen; Gao, Chen; Ren, Shu-xun; Wang, Yi-bin; Sun, Hai-peng; Zhou, Mei-yi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The mitochondrial targeted 2C-type serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2Cm) is encoded by the gene PPM1K and is highly conserved among vertebrates. PP2Cm plays a critical role in branched-chain amino acid catabolism and regulates cell survival. Its expression is dynamically regulated by the nutrient environment and pathological stresses. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of PPM1K gene expression. In this study, we aimed to reveal how PPM1K expression is affected by miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. Methods: Computational analysis based on conserved miRNA binding motifs was applied to predict the candidate miRNAs that potentially affect PPM1K expression. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was performed to verify the miRNAs' binding sites in the PPM1K gene and their influence on PPM1K 3′UTR activity. We further over-expressed the mimics of these miRNAs in human and mouse cells to examine whether miRNAs affected the mRNA level of PPM1K. Results: Computational analysis identified numerous miRNAs potentially targeting PPM1K. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the 3′UTR of PPM1K gene contained the recognition sites of miR-204 and miR-211. Overexpression of these miRNAs in human and mouse cells diminished the 3′UTR activity and the endogenous mRNA level of PPM1K. However, the miR-22 binding site was found only in human and not mouse PPM1K 3′UTR. Accordingly, PPM1K 3′UTR activity was suppressed by miR-22 overexpression in human but not mouse cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that different miRNAs contribute to the regulation of PP2Cm expression in a species-specific manner. miR-204 and miR-211 are efficient in both mouse and human cells, while miR-22 regulates PP2Cm expression only in human cells. PMID:26592513

  8. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic composition composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to aobut 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  9. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  10. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  11. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  12. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  13. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  14. Titanium Allergy: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Goutam, Manish; Giriyapura, Chandu; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Siddharth

    2014-01-01

    Titanium has gained immense popularity and has successfully established itself as the material of choice for dental implants. In both medical and dental fields, titanium and its alloys have demonstrated success as biomedical devices. Owing to its high resistance to corrosion in a physiological environment and the excellent biocompatibility that gives it a passive, stable oxide film, titanium is considered the material of choice for intraosseous use. There are certain studies which show titanium as an allergen but the resources to diagnose titanium sensivity are very limited. Attention is needed towards the development of new and precise method for early diagnosis of titanium allergy and also to find out the alternative biomaterial which can be used in place of titanium. A review of available articles from the Medline and PubMed database was done to find literature available regarding titanium allergy, its diagnosis and new alternative material for titanium. PMID:25484409

  15. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy versus retrograde intrarenal surgery for treatment for renal stones 1-2 cm: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changjian; Yang, Hongmei; Luo, Jun; Xiong, Bo; Wang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) versus retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for the treatment for renal calculi 1-2 cm. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database were researched and hand-searched for relevant congress abstracts and journals about RIRS and ESWL for the treatment for 1- to 2-cm renal stones. The retrieval time ended in September 2014. The related trials met the inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of all included studies, and meta-analysis was performed with RevMan 5.2. Seven literatures were retrieved, including 983 patients. The meta-analysis results showed that, compared to RIRS group, the patients in ESWL group had the following features:(1) the stone-free rate [relative risk (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.95, P = 0.005] was significantly different between two groups; (2) The retreatment rate of RIRS group was lower (RR 8.12; 95% CI 4.77-13.83, P < 0.00); (3) The complications were not significantly different between two groups (Grade I RR 1.06; 95% CI 0.67-1.69, P = 0.80; Grade II RR 0.75; 95% CI 0.29-1.91, P = 0.54; Grade III RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.26-2.86, P = 0.80). Compared to ESWL, our results showed that RIRS provided significantly higher stone-free rate and lower retreatment rate and without increase in the incidence of complications. However, further randomized trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26211003

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

    2011-09-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic

  17. Characterization of titanium alloys for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reytier, M.; Kircher, F.; Levesy, B.

    2002-05-01

    Titanium alloys are employed in the design of superconducting magnet support systems for their high mechanical strength associated with their low thermal conductivity. But their use requires a careful attention to their crack tolerance at cryogenic temperature. Measurements have been performed on two extra low interstitial materials (Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Ti-6Al-4V ELI) with different thickness and manufacturing process. The investigation includes the tensile properties at room and liquid helium temperatures using smooth and notched samples. Moreover, the fracture toughness has been determined at 4.2 K using Compact Tension specimens. The microstructure of the different alloys and the various fracture surfaces have also been studied. After a detailed description of the experimental procedures, practical engineering characteristics are given and a comparison of the different titanium alloys is proposed for cryogenic applications.

  18. Analysis of Square Cup Deep-Drawing Test of Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Takaki; Ma, Ninshu; Ueyama, Minoru; Harada, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of formability of titunium is more difficult than steels since its strong anisotropy. If computer simulation can estimate the formability of titanium, we can select the optimal forming conditions. The purpose of this study was to acquire knowledge for the formability prediction by the computer simulation of the square cup deep-drawing of pure titanium. In this paper, the results of FEM analsis of pure titanium were compared with the experimental results to examine the analysis validity. We analyzed the formability of deepdrawing square cup of titanium by the FEM using solid elements. Compared the analysis results with the experimental results such as the forming shape, the punch load, and the thickness, the validity was confirmed. Further, through analyzing the change of the thickness around the forming corner, it was confirmed that the thickness increased to its maximum value during forming process at the stroke of 35mm more than the maximum stroke.

  19. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect

    Gambogi, Joseph; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  20. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  1. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation.

  2. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  3. Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

  4. Effects of neurosurgical titanium mesh on radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Patone, Hassisen . E-mail: hash.patone@mail.mcgill.ca; Barker, Jennifer; Roberge, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric impact of a neurosurgical titanium mesh in patients treated with 6- and 18-MV photon beams. The effects of a 0.4-mm-thick titanium mesh on the dose profile at 3 regions within a solid water phantom were measured using extended dose range-2 (EDR2) film for 6- and 18-MV photon beams. All measurements were performed with the titanium mesh placed at a depth of 1.5 cm in the phantom. Films were exposed immediately above the mesh, immediately below the mesh, and at a depth of 5 cm from the surface of the phantom. The films were scanned using a scanning densitometer. In the region directly above the titanium mesh, there was an increase in dose of 7.1% for 6-MV photons and 4.9% for 18-MV photons. Directly below the titanium mesh, there was an average decrease in dose of 1.5% for 6-MV photons and an increase of 1.0% for 18-MV photons. At 5-cm depth, for 6- and 18-MV photons, there was a decrease in dose of 2.2% and 0.6%, respectively. We concluded that for cranial irradiation with high-energy photons, the dosimetric impact of a 0.4-mm titanium mesh is small and does not require modification in treatment parameters.

  5. Performance of a 64-channel, 3.2×3.2 cm2 SiPM tile for TOF-PET application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Alessandro; Acerbi, Fabio; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio; Paternoster, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a new 3.2×3.2 cm2 detector tile, composed of 8×8 single SiPMs, having a regular 4 mm pitch in both the X and Y directions. The tile fill factor is 85%. We produced two versions of the tile with different SiPM technologies: RGB-HD and NUV. The first one features square micro-cells with 25 μm pitch, a PDE peaked at 550 nm and a DCR of 300 kHz/mm2, at 20 °C and at maximum detection efficiency. The second one features micro-cells with 40 μm pitch and a PDE peaked in the blue part of the spectrum. The dark count rate at 20 °C and at maximum PDE is 100 kHz/mm2. In this work, we show the energy and timing resolution measurements at 511 keV obtained coupling the two tiles to an 8×8 LYSO array with a pixel size of 4×4×22 mm3, perfectly matching the photo-detector array.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

    2011-11-29

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

  7. Electrical characteristic of the titanium mesh electrode for transcutaneous intrabody communication to monitor implantable artificial organs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a tissue-inducing electrode using titanium mesh to obtain mechanically and electrically stable contact with the tissue for a new transcutaneous communication system using the human body as a conductive medium. In this study, we investigated the electrical properties of the titanium mesh electrode by measuring electrode-tissue interface resistance in vivo. The titanium mesh electrode (Hi-Lex Co., Zellez, Hyogo, Japan) consisted of titanium fibers (diameter of 50 μm), and it has an average pore size of 200 μm and 87 % porosity. The titanium mesh electrode has a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm. Three titanium mesh electrodes were implanted separately into the dorsal region of the rat. We measured the electrode-electrode impedance using an LCR meter for 12 weeks, and we calculated the tissue resistivity and electrode-tissue interface resistance. The electrode-tissue interface resistance of the titanium mesh electrode decreased slightly until the third POD and then continuously increased to 75 Ω. The electrode-tissue interface resistance of the titanium mesh electrode is stable and it has lower electrode-tissue interface resistance than that of a titanium disk electrode. The extracted titanium mesh electrode after 12 weeks implantation was fixed in 10 % buffered formalin solution and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Light microscopic observation showed that the titanium mesh electrode was filled with connective tissue, inflammatory cells and fibroblasts with some capillaries in the pores of the titanium mesh. The results indicate that the titanium mesh electrode is a promising electrode for the new transcutaneous communication system. PMID:26920581

  8. Electrical characteristic of the titanium mesh electrode for transcutaneous intrabody communication to monitor implantable artificial organs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a tissue-inducing electrode using titanium mesh to obtain mechanically and electrically stable contact with the tissue for a new transcutaneous communication system using the human body as a conductive medium. In this study, we investigated the electrical properties of the titanium mesh electrode by measuring electrode-tissue interface resistance in vivo. The titanium mesh electrode (Hi-Lex Co., Zellez, Hyogo, Japan) consisted of titanium fibers (diameter of 50 μm), and it has an average pore size of 200 μm and 87 % porosity. The titanium mesh electrode has a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm. Three titanium mesh electrodes were implanted separately into the dorsal region of the rat. We measured the electrode-electrode impedance using an LCR meter for 12 weeks, and we calculated the tissue resistivity and electrode-tissue interface resistance. The electrode-tissue interface resistance of the titanium mesh electrode decreased slightly until the third POD and then continuously increased to 75 Ω. The electrode-tissue interface resistance of the titanium mesh electrode is stable and it has lower electrode-tissue interface resistance than that of a titanium disk electrode. The extracted titanium mesh electrode after 12 weeks implantation was fixed in 10 % buffered formalin solution and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Light microscopic observation showed that the titanium mesh electrode was filled with connective tissue, inflammatory cells and fibroblasts with some capillaries in the pores of the titanium mesh. The results indicate that the titanium mesh electrode is a promising electrode for the new transcutaneous communication system.

  9. Titanium alkoxide compound

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  10. Hydroxyapatite-titanium interface reaction induced by keV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Foti, G.

    1992-03-01

    Thin films of hydroxyapatite bioceramic, 5-50 Å in thickness, have been deposited on ion cleaned titanium surfaces to study the chemical-physical adhesion of metal-ceramic interfaces of biomedical devices (orthopaedic and dentistry prosthesis). Film deposition was performed in ultrahigh vacuum condition (10 -10 mbar) using 5 keV argon sputtering of hydroxyapatite matrix; the film thickness was measured in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-titanium interface was irradiated with an electron beam of 0.5-5 keV energy and 0.2-2 A/cm 2 current density. During electron irradiation, Auger spectra show chemical shifts of phosphorus, titanium and oxygen peaks. The released electron energy induces modifications in the tetraedric phosphorus-oxygen groups with production of new chemical bonds between phosphorus, oxygen and titanium. Oxygen, for example, diffuses into the titanium interface forming titanium oxide. Chemical reactions induced by electron irradiation are driven by the metal-ceramic interface. Near the interface a strong and fast effect is observed while far from the interface a weak and slow effect occurs. Chemical reactions depend on the electron irradiation dose showing an inhibition threshold at about 10 19 e/cm 2 and, near the interface, a saturation condition at about 5 × 10 20 e/cm 2. Titanium-ceramic chemical reactions are inhibited if the substrate titanium surface is rich in oxide.

  11. Characterization of hydrogen barrier coatings for titanium-base alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguey, T.; Baluc, N.; Jansen, F.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the barrier efficiency of a thick thermal spray deposit on the α-titanium alloy, Ti-5Al-2.4Sn against hydrogen penetration. Therefore, a duplex coating has been applied by plasma spraying using a Sulzer Metco F4 gun. The selected duplex coating system consisted of a 0.1-0.2 mm thick tantalum bond layer and a chromium oxide top layer doped with 3 wt% titanium oxide. The achieved thickness of the top layer was about 0.6 mm. The coated specimens have been characterized with regard to bond strength, hardness and microstructure. Hydrogen charging experiments were performed in a Sievert's apparatus.

  12. Design of 3D-Printed Titanium Compliant Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Howell, Larry L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes 3D-printed titanium compliant mechanisms for aerospace applications. It is meant as a primer to help engineers design compliant, multi-axis, printed parts that exhibit high performance. Topics covered include brief introductions to both compliant mechanism design and 3D printing in titanium, material and geometry considerations for 3D printing, modeling techniques, and case studies of both successful and unsuccessful part geometries. Key findings include recommended flexure geometries, minimum thicknesses, and general design guidelines for compliant printed parts that may not be obvious to the first time designer.

  13. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  14. [SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) study of titanium implant surfaces coated with anodic titanium-oxide layer].

    PubMed

    Suba, Csongor; Velich, Norbert; Vida, György; Kovács, Lajos; Kiss, Gábor; Szabó, György

    2003-10-01

    The demands that must be satisfied by titanium implants applied in medical practice include chemical and physical durability. An anodic oxide protective layer formed on the surface of titanium implants serves for the better attainment of this aim. The composition of the passivizing layer and the changes in its thickness and binding state can be studied by method of material science, e.g. by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this way a possibility arises for the material technological classification of the Ti-TiO2 layer structure and for the observation of the physical and chemical reactions that occur between the implants and the tissues in the organism. The present XPS examinations revealed that the binding state of the titanium forming the surface of the plates involve neither significant quantities of titanium oxide nor impurities. In the SIMS investigation the thickness of the titanium oxide layer was found to be 120-150 nm. Determination of the thickness of the surface, the binding state of the titanium and the exact proportions of the impurities and additives furnishes a possibility for a subsequent comparison with the surface structure of plates removed from the organism. It is important for the assessment of the practical value of the protective layer.

  15. The field evaporation of deuterated titanium as a neutron generator ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, B.; Johnson, B. Bargsten; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2010-11-01

    The field evaporation of deuterated titanium films is being investigated as a deuterium ion source for deuterium-tritium neutron generators. It has been found that titanium and deuterated titanium films having thicknesses of up to at least 70 layers assume a body-centered-cubic crystal structure when grown on ⟨110⟩ oriented tungsten substrates. Deuterated titanium films having thicknesses exceeding 50 atomic layers have been controllably field evaporated from the surface of tungsten tips in less than 20 ns. At ion current densities exceeding ˜106 A/cm2 and film thicknesses greater than ˜20 layers, space charge effects decrease the ratio of D to TiDx ions to less than 1. Decreasing the evaporation rate such that ion current densities are of the order of 105 A/cm2 increases the D to TiDx ratio for the evaporation of a film thickness of greater than ˜20 layers by the reduction in space charge effects that can inhibit the dissociation of titanium-deuterium complexes. Atomic deuterium ion yields of ˜10-7 μC of D+/tip have been observed and yields of >10-6 μC of D+/tip should be possible using larger tip radii. The field evaporation of titanium from an array of microfabricated tips has been demonstrated for the first time.

  16. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, H C; Kumar, A; Wang, J; Bi, X F; Tomé, C N; Zhang, Z; Mao, S X

    2016-01-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: 〈0001〉hcp||〈001〉fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning. PMID:27067515

  17. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-04-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: <0001>hcp||<001>fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning.

  18. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-01-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: 〈0001〉hcp||〈001〉fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning. PMID:27067515

  19. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, R.; Sieber, M.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their outstanding specific mechanical and high-temperature properties, titanium aluminides exhibit a high potential for lightweight components exposed to high temperatures. However, their application is limited through their low wear resistance and the increasing high-temperature oxidation starting from about 750 °C. By the use of oxide ceramic coatings, these constraints can be set aside and the possible applications of titanium aluminides can be extended. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) represents a process for the generation of oxide ceramic conversion coatings with high thickness. The current work aims at the clarification of different electrolyte components’ influences on the oxide layer evolution on alloy TNM-B1 (Ti43.5Al4Nb1Mo0.1B) and the creation of compact and wear resistant coatings. Model experiments were applied using a ramp-wise increase of the anodic potential in order to show the influence of electrolyte components on the discharge initiation and the early stage of the oxide layer growth. The production of PEO layers with technically relevant thicknesses close to 100 μm was conducted in alkaline electrolytes with varying amounts of Na2SiO3·5H2O and K4P2O7 under symmetrically pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The addition of phosphates and silicates leads to an increasing substrate passivation and the growth of compact oxide layers with higher thicknesses. Optimal electrolyte compositions for maximum coating hardness and thickness were identified by statistical analysis. Under these conditions, a homogeneous inner layer with low porosity can be achieved. The frictional wear behavior of the compact coating layer is superior to a hard anodized layer on aluminum.

  20. Machining of Aircraft Titanium with Abrasive-Waterjets for Fatigue Critical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. T.; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.

    2012-02-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the fatigue performance of abrasive-waterjet- (AWJ-) machined aircraft titanium. Dog-bone specimens machined with AWJs were prepared and tested with and without sanding and dry-grit blasting with Al2O3 as secondary processes. The secondary processes were applied to remove the visual appearance of AWJ-generated striations and to clean up the garnet embedment. The fatigue performance of AWJ-machined specimens was compared with baseline specimens machined with CNC milling. Fatigue test results of the titanium specimens not only confirmed our previous findings in aluminum dog-bone specimens but in comparison also further enhanced the fatigue performance of the titanium. In addition, titanium is known to be difficult to cut, particularly for thick parts, however AWJs cut the material 34% faster han stainless steel. AWJ cutting and dry-grit blasting are shown to be a preferred ombination for processing aircraft titanium that is fatigue critical.

  1. Interaction Between Titanium Implant Surfaces and Hydrogen Peroxide in Biologically Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Muyco, J; Ratto, T

    2004-04-21

    Titanium was exposed to dilute solutions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to better characterize the interaction at the interface between the solution and metal. The intensity of light passing through films of known thickness of titanium on quartz was measured as a function of time in contact with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in concentrations of 0.3% and 1.0%. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to record deflection-distance (force) curves as a probe approached the interface of titanium in contact with solution containing 0.3% of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The interaction layer measured using AFM techniques was much greater than the thickness of the titanium films used in this study. Raman spectroscopy taken during interaction shows the emergence of a Ti-peroxy gel and titania after 2 hours in contact with 0.3% H2O2 solution.

  2. Corrosion of stainless steel, nickel-titanium, coated nickel-titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Johnson, J W

    1999-02-01

    Orthodontic wires containing nickel have been implicated in allergic reactions. The potential for orthodontic wires to cause allergic reactions is related to the pattern and mode of corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions, such as nickel, into the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in the corrosive potential of stainless steel, nickel titanium, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires. At least two specimens of each wire were subjected to potentiostatic anodic dissolution in 0.9% NaCl solution with neutral pH at room temperature. Using a Wenking MP 95 potentiostat and an electrochemical corrosion cell, the breakdown potential of each wire was determined. Photographs were taken of the wire speci mens using a scanning electron microscope, and surface changes were qualitatively evaluated. The breakdown potentials of stainless steel, two nickel titanium wires, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium were 400 mV, 300 mV, 750 mV, 300 mV, 1800 mV, and >2000 mV, respectively. SEM photographs revealed that some nickel titanium and stainless steel wires were susceptible to pitting and localized corrosion. The results indicate that corrosion occurred readily in stainless steel. Variability in breakdown potential of nickel titanium alloy wires differed across vendors' wires. The nitride coating did not affect the corrosion of the alloy, but epoxy coating decreased corrosion. Titanium wires and epoxy-coated nickel titanium wires exhibited the least corrosive potential. For patients allergic to nickel, the use of titanium or epoxy-coated wires during orthodontic treatment is recommended.

  3. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  4. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  5. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of titanium in a simulated oral environment.

    PubMed

    Harada, Rino; Takemoto, Shinji; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the corrosion behavior of titanium in response to sulfide by determining the effects of sulfide concentration and pH over immersion period. Corrosion was evaluated through changes in color, glossiness, surface characterization, and titanium release. Sulfide solutions were prepared in 3 different concentrations with Na2S, each in pH unadjusted (sulfide-alkaline) and pH adjusted to 7.5 (sulfide-neutral). Titanium discoloration increased and glossiness decreased as sulfide concentration and immersion period increased in sulfide-alkaline solutions. Coral-like complexes were observed on the surface of these specimens, which became more pronounced as concentration increased. Small amounts of titanium release were detected in sulfide-alkaline solutions; however, this was not affected by immersion periods. Corrosion was indicated through considerable surface oxidation suggesting the formation of a thick oxide layer. No significant changes in color and glossiness, or titanium release were indicated for titanium specimens immersed in sulfide-neutral solutions indicating that pH had a significant effect on corrosion. Our findings suggest that a thick oxide layer on the titanium surface was formed in sulfide-alkaline solutions due to excessive oxidation.

  6. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of titanium in a simulated oral environment.

    PubMed

    Harada, Rino; Takemoto, Shinji; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the corrosion behavior of titanium in response to sulfide by determining the effects of sulfide concentration and pH over immersion period. Corrosion was evaluated through changes in color, glossiness, surface characterization, and titanium release. Sulfide solutions were prepared in 3 different concentrations with Na2S, each in pH unadjusted (sulfide-alkaline) and pH adjusted to 7.5 (sulfide-neutral). Titanium discoloration increased and glossiness decreased as sulfide concentration and immersion period increased in sulfide-alkaline solutions. Coral-like complexes were observed on the surface of these specimens, which became more pronounced as concentration increased. Small amounts of titanium release were detected in sulfide-alkaline solutions; however, this was not affected by immersion periods. Corrosion was indicated through considerable surface oxidation suggesting the formation of a thick oxide layer. No significant changes in color and glossiness, or titanium release were indicated for titanium specimens immersed in sulfide-neutral solutions indicating that pH had a significant effect on corrosion. Our findings suggest that a thick oxide layer on the titanium surface was formed in sulfide-alkaline solutions due to excessive oxidation. PMID:26952423

  7. Photoelectrochemical and physical properties of titanium dioxide films obtained by aerosol pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belaidi, A.; Chaqour, S.M.; Gorochov, O.; Neumann-Spallart, M

    2004-04-02

    Aerosol pyrolysis (AP) was used to prepare thin films of titanium dioxide on various substrates. The films were characterized by SEM, SIMS, XRD, and thickness measurements, and by photoelectrochemical response before and after annealing in various ambients. Pinhole-free anatase films of thickness up to 1000 nm were prepared. Incident photon to current efficiencies (IPCEs) of up to 20% at 365 nm were obtained for thick films under depletion conditions, in aqueous electrolytes.

  8. Shadow-casted ultrathin surface coatings of titanium and titanium/silicon oxide sol particles via ultrasound-assisted deposition.

    PubMed

    Karahan, H Enis; Birer, Özgür; Karakuş, Kerem; Yıldırım, Cansu

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted deposition (USAD) of sol nanoparticles enables the formation of uniform and inherently stable thin films. However, the technique still suffers in coating hard substrates and the use of fast-reacting sol-gel precursors still remains challenging. Here, we report on the deposition of ultrathin titanium and titanium/silicon hybrid oxide coatings using hydroxylated silicon wafers as a model hard substrate. We use acetic acid as the catalyst which also suppresses the reactivity of titanium tetraisopropoxide while increasing the reactivity of tetraethyl orthosilicate through chemical modifications. Taking the advantage of this peculiar behavior, we successfully prepared titanium and titanium/silicon hybrid oxide coatings by USAD. Varying the amount of acetic acid in the reaction media, we managed to modulate thickness and surface roughness of the coatings in nanoscale. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies showed the formation of conformal coatings having nanoroughness. Quantitative chemical state maps obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggested the formation of ultrathin (<10nm) coatings and thickness measurements by rotating analyzer ellipsometry supported this observation. For the first time, XPS chemical maps revealed the transport effect of ultrasonic waves since coatings were directly cast on rectangular substrates as circular shadows of the horn with clear thickness gradient from the center to the edges. In addition to the progress made in coating hard substrates, employing fast-reacting precursors and achieving hybrid coatings; this report provides the first visual evidence on previously suggested "acceleration and smashing" mechanism as the main driving force of USAD.

  9. Shadow-casted ultrathin surface coatings of titanium and titanium/silicon oxide sol particles via ultrasound-assisted deposition.

    PubMed

    Karahan, H Enis; Birer, Özgür; Karakuş, Kerem; Yıldırım, Cansu

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted deposition (USAD) of sol nanoparticles enables the formation of uniform and inherently stable thin films. However, the technique still suffers in coating hard substrates and the use of fast-reacting sol-gel precursors still remains challenging. Here, we report on the deposition of ultrathin titanium and titanium/silicon hybrid oxide coatings using hydroxylated silicon wafers as a model hard substrate. We use acetic acid as the catalyst which also suppresses the reactivity of titanium tetraisopropoxide while increasing the reactivity of tetraethyl orthosilicate through chemical modifications. Taking the advantage of this peculiar behavior, we successfully prepared titanium and titanium/silicon hybrid oxide coatings by USAD. Varying the amount of acetic acid in the reaction media, we managed to modulate thickness and surface roughness of the coatings in nanoscale. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies showed the formation of conformal coatings having nanoroughness. Quantitative chemical state maps obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggested the formation of ultrathin (<10nm) coatings and thickness measurements by rotating analyzer ellipsometry supported this observation. For the first time, XPS chemical maps revealed the transport effect of ultrasonic waves since coatings were directly cast on rectangular substrates as circular shadows of the horn with clear thickness gradient from the center to the edges. In addition to the progress made in coating hard substrates, employing fast-reacting precursors and achieving hybrid coatings; this report provides the first visual evidence on previously suggested "acceleration and smashing" mechanism as the main driving force of USAD. PMID:26964975

  10. Titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition and a process for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  11. Biomimetic whisker-shaped apatite coating of titanium powder.

    PubMed

    Sim, Young Uk; Kim, Jong Hee; Yang, Tae Young; Yoon, Seog Young; Park, Hong Chae

    2010-05-01

    Biomimetic apatite coatings on chemically modified titanium powder have been processed and the resulting coating layers evaluated in terms of morphology, composition and structure, using TF-XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM and FTIR analysis. After 7 days immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF), nanometer-sized fine precipitates with an amorphous whisker-like phase and a Ca/P atomic ratio of 1.94 were obtained on the external surface of the titanium particles. When the immersion time in SBF was extended to 16 days, the coating layer consisted of the whisker-like nanostructured crystals of carbonated hydroxyapatite with a atomic ratio of 3; in such a case, a double coating layer was developed. The double layer could be divided into two regions and could be clearly distinguished: an inner dense region (approximately 200 nm in thickness) which may include hard agglomerated crystals and an outer less dense region (> 500 nm in thickness) in which crystals are loosely distributed.

  12. Titanium Optics for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1999-01-01

    Ion thruster total impulse capability is limited, in part, by accelerator grid sputter erosion. A development effort was initiated to identify a material with a lower accelerator grid volumetric sputter erosion rate than molybdenum, but that could utilize the present NSTAR thruster grid design and fabrication techniques to keep development costs low, and perform as well as molybdenum optics. After comparing the sputter erosion rates of several atomic materials to that of molybdenum at accelerator voltages, titanium was found to offer a 45% reduction in volumetric erosion rates. To ensure that screen grid sputter erosion rates are not higher at discharge chamber potentials, titanium and molybdenum sputter erosion rates were measured at these potentials. Preliminary results showed only a slightly higher volumetric erosion rate for titanium, so that screen grid erosion is insignificant. A number of material, thermal, and mechanical properties were also examined to identify any fabrication, launch environment, and thruster operation issues. Several titanium grid sets were successfully fabricated. A titanium grid set was mounted onto an NSTAR 30 cm engineering model ion thruster and tested to determine optics performance. The titanium optics operated successfully over the entire NSTAR power range of 0.5 to 2.3 kW. Differences in impingement-limited perveances and electron backstreaming limits were found to be due to a larger cold gap for the titanium optics. Discharge losses for titanium grids were lower than those for molybdenum, likely due to a slightly larger titanium screen grid open area fraction. Radial distributions of beam current density with titanium optics were very similar to those with molybdenum optics at all power levels. Temporal electron backstreaming limit measurements showed that titanium optics achieved thermal equilibrium faster than molybdenum optics.

  13. Refractory plasmonics with titanium nitride: broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Guler, Urcan; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guan, Jianguo; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2014-12-17

    A high-temperature stable broadband plasmonic absorber is designed, fabricated, and optically characterized. A broadband absorber with an average high absorption of 95% and a total thickness of 240 nm is fabricated, using a refractory plasmonic material, titanium nitride. This absorber integrates both the plasmonic resonances and the dielectric-like loss. It opens a path for the interesting applications such as solar thermophotovoltaics and optical circuits.

  14. The thickness of glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Vokey, Marshall W.

    2015-09-01

    Basic formulae and results of glacier physics appearing in glaciology textbooks can be derived from first principles introduced in algebra-based first year physics courses. We discuss the maximum thickness of alpine glaciers and ice sheets and the relation between maximum thickness and length of an ice sheet. Knowledge of ordinary differential equations allows one to derive also the local ice thickness.

  15. Polyisocyanides of titanium.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Valdés, Haydee; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2009-02-26

    Neutral Ti[CN](n) complexes have been investigated with quantum chemistry techniques. According to our theoretical predictions, these complexes are shown to prefer isocyanide arrangements. Therefore, these compounds are good candidates to be the first polyisocyanides to be characterized. The theoretical calculations predict Ti(NC)(4), a methane-like tetrahedral structure with four isocyanide ligands, as the most stable neutral complex. The fact that the isocyanide ligand is a better pi-donor than the cyanide one seems to be the key factor for the preference for isocyanides in neutral titanium complexes.

  16. Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Gilad; Baio, Joe E; Weidner, Tobias; Migonney, Veronique; Castner, David G

    2011-11-01

    Biointegration of titanium implants in the body is controlled by their surface properties. Improving surface properties by coating with a bioactive polymer is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of titanium implants. To optimize the grafting processes, it is important to fully understand the composition and structure of the modified surfaces. The main focus of this study is to provide a detailed, multitechnique characterization of a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film grafted from titanium surfaces via a two-step procedure. Thin titanium films (∼50 nm thick with an average surface roughness of 0.9 ± 0.2 nm) prepared by evaporation onto silicon wafers were used as smooth model substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) showed that the titanium film was covered with a TiO(2) layer that was at least 10 nm thick and contained hydroxyl groups present at the outermost surface. These hydroxyl groups were first modified with a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) cross-linker. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed that a monolayer of the MPS molecules was successfully attached onto the titanium surfaces. The pNaSS film was grafted from the MPS-modified titanium through atom transfer radical polymerization. Again, XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to verify that the pNaSS molecules were successfully grafted onto the modified surfaces. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the film was smooth and uniformly covered the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that an ordered array of grafted NaSS molecules were present on the titanium surfaces. Sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy illustrated that the NaSS molecules were grafted onto the titanium surface with a substantial degree of orientational order in the styrene rings.

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  18. Surface characteristics of thermally treated titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Cui, De-Zhe; Jeon, Ha-Ra; Chung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Yeong-Joon; Kim, Ok-Su

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The characteristics of oxidized titanium (Ti) surfaces varied according to treatment conditions such as duration time and temperature. Thermal oxidation can change Ti surface characteristics, which affect many cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the surface characteristics and cell response of thermally treated Ti surfaces. Methods The samples were divided into 4 groups. Control: machined smooth titanium (Ti-S) was untreated. Group I: Ti-S was treated in a furnace at 300℃ for 30 minutes. Group II: Ti-S was treated at 500℃ for 30 minutes. Group III: Ti-S was treated at 750℃ for 30 minutes. A scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and X-ray diffraction were used to assess surface characteristics and chemical composition. The water contact angle and surface energy were measured to assess physical properties. Results The titanium dioxide (TiO2) thickness increased as the treatment temperature increased. Additional peaks belonging to rutile TiO2 were only found in group III. The contact angle in group III was significantly lower than any of the other groups. The surface energy significantly increased as the treatment temperature increased, especially in group III. In the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, after 24 hours of incubation, the assessment of cell viability showed that the optical density of the control had a higher tendency than any other group, but there was no significant difference. However, the alkaline phosphatase activity increased as the temperature increased, especially in group III. Conclusions Consequently, the surface characteristics and biocompatibility increased as the temperature increased. This indicates that surface modification by thermal treatment could be another useful method for medical and dental implants. PMID:22803009

  19. Ballistic Experiments with Titanium and Aluminum Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gogolewski, R.; Morgan, B.R.

    1999-11-23

    During the course of the project we conducted two sets of fundamental experiments in penetration mechanics in the LLNL Terminal Ballistics Laboratory of the Physics Directorate. The first set of full-scale experiments was conducted with a 14.5mm air propelled launcher. The object of the experiments was to determine the ballistic limit speed of 6Al-4V-alloy titanium, low fineness ratio projectiles centrally impacting 2024-T3 alloy aluminum flat plates and the failure modes of the projectiles and the targets. The second set of one-third scale experiments was conducted with a 14.5mm powder launcher. The object of these experiments was to determine the ballistic limit speed of 6Al-4V alloy titanium high fineness ratio projectiles centrally impacting 6Al-4V alloy titanium flat plates and the failure modes of the projectiles and the target. We employed radiography to observe a projectile just before and after interaction with a target plate. Early on, we employed a non-damaging ''soft-catch'' technique to capture projectiles after they perforated targets. Once we realized that a projectile was not damaged during interaction with a target, we used a 4-inch thick 6061-T6-alloy aluminum witness block with a 6.0-inch x 6.0-inch cross-section to measure projectile residual penetration. We have recorded and tabulated below projectile impact speed, projectile residual (post-impact) speed, projectile failure mode, target failure mode, and pertinent comments for the experiments. The ballistic techniques employed for the experiments are similar to those employed in an earlier study.

  20. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  1. Electrorotation of titanium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; Ramos, Antonio; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel

    2013-04-01

    Electrorotation (ROT) data for solid titanium micrometer-sized spheres in an electrolyte are presented for three different ionic conductivities, over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The direction of rotation was found to be opposite to the direction of rotation of the electric field vector (counterfield electrorotation), with a single rotation peak. The maximum rotation rate occurs at a frequency of the order of the reciprocal RC time constant for charging the particle double layer capacitance through the resistor of the electrolyte bulk. A model for the electrical torque acting on a metallic sphere is presented, using a constant phase element impedance to describe the metal/electrolyte interface. The titanium spheres are much denser than the electrolyte and rest on the bottom substrate. Therefore, the electrical and viscous torques near a wall are considered in the analysis. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured rotational speed as a function of frequency. Theory shows that there is no effect of induced charge electroosmotic flow on the ROT, as observed experimentally.

  2. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  3. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G

    2014-09-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm(2).

  4. Strength of inserts in titanium alloy machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Huang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a stressed state of a non-worn cutting wedge in a machined titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr) is analyzed. The distribution of contact loads on the face of a cutting tool was obtained experimentally with the use of a ‘split cutting tool’. Calculation of internal stresses in the indexable insert made from cemented carbide (WC8Co) was carried out with the help of ANSYS 14.0 software. Investigations showed that a small thickness of the cutting insert leads to extremely high compressive stresses near the cutting edge, stresses that exceed the ultimate compressive strength of cemented carbide. The face and the base of the insert experience high tensile stresses, which approach the ultimate tensile strength of cemented carbide and increase a probability of cutting insert destruction. If the thickness of the cutting insert is bigger than 5 mm, compressive stresses near the cutting edge decrease, and tensile stresses on the face and base decrease to zero. The dependences of the greatest normal and tangential stresses on thickness of the cutting insert were found. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (dimension of specific contact loads and stresses); γ - rake angle of the cutting tool [°] α - clearance angle of the sharp cutting tool [°].

  5. Corneal thickness in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    De Cevallos, E; Dohlman, C H; Reinhart, W J

    1976-02-01

    The central corneal stromal thickness of patients with open angle glaucoma, secondary glaucoma (the majority aphakic), or a history of unilateral acute angle closure glaucoma were measured and compared with the stromal thickness of a group of normal patients. In open angle glaucoma, there was a small but significant increase in the average stromal thickness. This thickness increase was, in all likelihood, due to an abnormal function of the endothelium in this disease since the level of the intraocular pressure did not seem to be a factor. There was no correlation between stromal thickness and duration of the glaucoma or type of anti-glaucomatous medication. Most cases of secondary glaucome, controlled medically or not, had markedly increased corneal thickness, again, most likely, due to endothelial damage rather than to level of intraocular pressure. After an angle closure attack, permanent damage to the cornea was found to be rare. PMID:1247273

  6. [Development and evaluation of a new surface treatment method for titanium alloy implants].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Akira

    2004-06-01

    We developed and evaluated a new method of titanium surface treatment for direct bone fixation of implants. This method consists of hydroxyapatite (HA) flame coating onto a porous titanium surface which is arc-sprayed with pure titanium material in argon gas at atmospheric pressure. The surface roughness of the porous layer was 360 microm, Rmax, and showed higher resistance to blast erosion in comparison with the conventional low-pressure plasma-sprayed porous layers of titanium. The thickness of the HA layer was between 20 and 40 microm considering the balance of bone conduction effect of HA and the possibility of mechanical detachment of the layers from the porous titanium. Short-term animal tests showed excellent results. This new surface treatment method was applied to cementless total hip joints which were used clinically. The results obtained from observations of the retrieved specimens show that the thickness of the HA coating layer is sufficient for the new bone formation after implantation. It was concluded that the new surface treatment method for titanium alloy implants is effective and successful for direct bone fixation. PMID:15301280

  7. Corrosion resistance of a magnetic stainless steel ion-plated with titanium nitride.

    PubMed

    Hai, K; Sawase, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Baba, K; Hatada, R

    2000-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the corrosion resistance of a titanium nitride (TiN) ion-plated magnetic stainless steel (447J1) for the purpose of applying a magnetic attachment system to implant-supported prostheses made of titanium. The surface hardness of the TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy with varying TiN thickness was determined prior to the corrosion testing, and 2 micrometers thickness was confirmed to be appropriate. Ions released from the 447J1 alloy, TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy, and titanium into a 2% lactic acid aqueous solution and 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were determined by means of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Long-term corrosion behaviour was evaluated using a multisweep cyclic voltammetry. The ICP-AES results revealed that the 447J1 alloy released ferric ions into both media, and that the amount of released ions increased when the alloy was coupled with titanium. Although both titanium and the TiN-plated 447J1 alloy released titanium ions into lactic acid solution, ferric and chromium ions were not released from the alloy specimen for all conditions. Cyclic voltamograms indicated that the long-term corrosion resistance of the 447J1 alloy was considerably improved by ion-plating with TiN.

  8. Beta titanium alloys and their role in the titanium industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, Paul J.

    1994-07-01

    The class of titanium alloys generically referred to as the beta alloys is arguably the most versatile in the titanium family. Since these alloys offer the highest strength-to-weight ratios and deepest hardenability of all titanium alloys, one might expect them to compete favorably for a variety of aerospace applications. To the contrary, however, except for one very successful application (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al on the SR-71), the beta alloys have remained a very small segment of the industry. As a perspective on this situation, this article reviews some past and present applications of titanium alloys. It also descibes some unique new alloys and applications that promise to reverse historical trends.

  9. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C.; Biederman, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  10. Fibrous capsule formation around titanium and copper.

    PubMed

    Suska, Felicia; Emanuelsson, Lena; Johansson, Anna; Tengvall, Pentti; Thomsen, Peter

    2008-06-15

    Previous studies suggest that implant material properties influence the quality and quantity of fibrous capsule around the implant. However, the precise relation between material surface chemistry, early inflammatory response, and fibrous subsequent repair outcome is still unknown. Titanium (Ti) and copper (Cu), surfaces with different inflammatory potential, were implanted subcutaneously in rats and retrieved fibrous capsules were analyzed after 28 and 56 days. Histological examinations show pronounced differences in capsule morphology. The fibrous capsule around Ti was thinner than that around Cu, with less number of the inflammatory cells in the layer close to the implant surface, and less and smaller blood vessels. The capsule around Cu was thick, with a large number of the inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages and giant cells, and increased number of blood vessels. Our study suggests that material surface properties, which initiate early, multiple cellular inflammatory events, are also associated with increased fibrosis and angiogenesis during repair phase. PMID:17896778

  11. Lead Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-02-16

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in{sup 3}, an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  12. Bacterial adherence to anodized titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jorge Peremarch, C.; Pérez Tanoira, R.; Arenas, M. A.; Matykina, E.; Conde, A.; De Damborenea, J. J.; Gómez Barrena, E.; Esteban, J.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Staphylococcus sp adhesion to modified surfaces of anodized titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Surface modification involved generation of fluoride-containing titanium oxide nanotube films. Specimens of Ti-6Al-4V alloy 6-4 ELI-grade 23- meets the requirements of ASTM F136 2002A (AMS 2631B class A1) were anodized in a mixture of sulphuric/hydrofluoric acid at 20 V for 5 and 60 min to form a 100 nm-thick porous film of 20 nm pore diameter and 230 nm-thick nanotube films of 100 nm in diameter. The amount of fluorine in the oxide films was of 6% and of 4%, respectively. Collection strains and six clinical strains each of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were studied. The adherence study was performed using a previously published protocol by Kinnari et al. The experiments were performed in triplicates. As a result, lower adherence was detected for collection strains in modified materials than in unmodified controls. Differences between clinical strains were detected for both species (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test), although global data showed similar results to that of collection strains (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Adherence of bacteria to modified surfaces was decreased for both species. The results also reflect a difference in the adherence between S. aureus and S. epidermidis to the modified material. As a conclusion, not only we were able to confirm the decrease of adherence in the modified surface, but also the need to test multiple clinical strains to obtain more realistic microbiological results due to intraspecies differences.

  13. Advanced titanium processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Alan D.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Schrems, Karol K.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating a means to form useful wrought products by direct and continuous casting of titanium bars using cold-wall induction melting rather than current batch practices such as vacuum arc remelting. Continuous ingots produced by cold-wall induction melting, utilizing a bottomless water-cooled copper crucible, without slag (CaF2) additions had minor defects in the surface such as ''hot tears''. Slag additions as low as 0.5 weight percent were used to improve the surface finish. Therefore, a slag melted experimental Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot was compared to a commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot in the areas of physical, chemical, mechanical, and corrosion attributes to address the question, ''Are any detrimental effects caused by slag addition''?

  14. Development of technologies for welding interconnects to fifty-micron thick silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop technologies for welding interconnects to 50 microns thick, 2 by 2 cm solar cells. The cells were characterized with respect to electrical performance, cell thickness, silver contact thickness, contact waviness, bowing, and fracture strength. Weld schedules were independently developed for each of the three cell types and were coincidentally identical. Thermal shock tests (100 cycles from 100 C to -180 C) were performed on 16 cell coupons for each cell type without any weld joint failures or electrical degradation. Three 48 cell modules (one for each cell type) were assembled with 50 microns thick cells, frosted fused silica covers, silver clad Invar interconnectors, and Kapton substrates.

  15. Dense and porous titanium substrates with a biomimetic calcium phosphate coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. A.; Balestra, R. M.; Rocha, M. N.; Peripolli, S. B.; Andrade, M. C.; Pereira, L. C.; Oliveira, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The present work studied a biomimetic method using a simplified solution (SS) with calcium and phosphorus ions for coating titanium substrates, in order to improve their bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium dense sheet, microporous and macroporous titanium samples, both produced by powder metallurgy, were treated in NaOH solution followed by heat-treating and immersed in SS for 7, 14 or 21 days. The samples characterization was performed by quantitative metallographic analysis, confocal scanning optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and low angle X-ray diffraction. The results showed coatings with calcium phosphate precipitation in all samples, with globular or plate-like morphology, typical of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate, respectively, indicating that the solution (SS) has potential for coating titanium substrates. In addition, the different surfaces of substrates had an effect on the formed calcium phosphate phase and thickness of coatings, depending on the substrate type and imersion time in the simplified solution.

  16. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  17. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  18. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  19. Education and "Thick" Epistemology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzee, Ben

    2011-01-01

    In this essay Ben Kotzee addresses the implications of Bernard Williams's distinction between "thick" and "thin" concepts in ethics for epistemology and for education. Kotzee holds that, as in the case of ethics, one may distinguish between "thick" and "thin" concepts of epistemology and, further, that this distinction points to the importance of…

  20. Low cost titanium--myth or reality

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Paul C.; Hartman, Alan D.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium, and titanium cost has prevented its use in non-aerospace applications including the automotive and heavy vehicle industries.

  1. Removing biofilms from microstructured titanium ex vivo: a novel approach using atmospheric plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each). Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates). Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h) to 91 µm (72 h) covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease.

  2. Removing Biofilms from Microstructured Titanium Ex Vivo: A Novel Approach Using Atmospheric Plasma Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 5 each). Plasma treatment of biofilms was carried out ex vivo using a microwave-driven pulsed plasma source working at temperatures from 39 to 43°C. Following plasma treatment, one group was air/water spray treated before re-treatment by second plasma pulses. Vital microorganisms on the titanium surfaces were identified by contact culture (Rodac agar plates). Biofilm presence and bacterial viability were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Morphology of titanium surfaces and attached biofilms was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total protein amounts of biofilms were colorimetrically quantified. Untreated and air/water treated biofilms served as controls. Cold plasma treatment of native biofilms with a mean thickness of 19 µm (24 h) to 91 µm (72 h) covering the microstructure of the titanium surface caused inactivation of biofilm bacteria and significant reduction of protein amounts. Total removal of biofilms, however, required additional application of air/water spray, and a second series of plasma treatment. Importantly, the microstructure of the titanium discs was not altered by plasma treatment. The combination of atmospheric plasma and non-abrasive air/water spray is applicable for complete elimination of oral biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants and may enable new routes for the therapy of periimplant disease. PMID:22016784

  3. Induction Bonding of Prepreg Tape and Titanium Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messier, Bernadette C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid structural laminates made of titanium foil and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite offer a potential for improved performance in aircraft structural applications. To obtain information needed for the automated fabrication of hybrid laminates, a series of bench scale tests were conducted of the magnetic induction bonding of titanium foil and thermoplastic prepreg tape. Foil and prepreg specimens were placed in the gap of a toroid magnet mounted in a bench press. Several magnet power supplies were used to study power at levels from 0.5 to 1.75 kW and frequencies from 50 to 120 kHz. Sol-gel surface-treated titanium foil, 0.0125 cm thick, and PIXA/IM7 prepreg tape were used in several lay-up configurations. Data were obtained on wedge peel bond strength, heating rate, and temperature ramp over a range of magnet power levels and frequencies at different "power-on" times for several magnet gap dimensions. These data will be utilized in assessing the potential for automated processing. Peel strengths of foil-tape bonds depended on the maximum temperature reached during heating and on the applied pressure. Maximum peel strengths were achieved at 1.25kW and 8OkHz. Induction heating of the foil appears to be capable of good bonding up to 10 plies of tape. Heat transfer calculations indicate that a 20-40 C temperature difference exists across the tape thickness during heat-up.

  4. Omega phase formation in titanium and titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Morris, C.E.; Lawson, A.C.

    1992-05-01

    Although the response of titanium alloys to dynamic loading is receiving increased attention in the literature (particularly in the area of shear-band formation), a more limited experimental database exists concerning the detailed structure/property relationships of titanium alloys subjected to shock loading. In this study, preliminary results concerning the influence of alloy chemistry on the property of omega-phase formation and its structure in three titanium alloys are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium, A-70 (3700 ppm oxygen) titanium, and Ti-6Al-4V were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and ``soft`` shock-recovery techniques. VISAR wave profiles of shock-loaded high-purity titanium revealed the omega-phase pressure-induced transition to occur at approximately 10.4 GPa. Wave profile measurements on A-70 Ti shocked to pressures up to 35 GPa and Ti-6Al-4V shocked to pressures up to 25 GPa exhibited no evidence of a three-wave structure indicative of a pressure-induced phase transition. Neutron and X-ray diffractometry and TEM analysis confirmed the presence of retained {omega}-phase in the electrolytic-Ti and the absence of {omega}-phase in the shock-recovered A-70 Ti and Ti-6Al-4V. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correlate with suppression of deformation twinning. Neutron diffraction was used to measure the in-situ bulk lattice constants and volume fraction of the {alpha} and {omega} phases in the recovered high-purity titanium samples that were shock loaded. The influence of alloy content on the kinetics of formation/retention of {omega}-phase and substructure evolution is discussed and contrasted in light of previous literature studies.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of titanium carbide, titanium boron carbonitride, titanium boride/titanium carbide and titanium carbide/chromium carbide multilayer coatings by reactive and ion beam assisted, electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Douglas Edward

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the synthesis of titanium carbide, TiBCN, TiB2/TiC and TiC/Cr23C6 multilayer coatings by several methods of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and examine the affects of various processing parameters on the properties and microstructures of the coatings. TiC was successfully deposited by reactive ion beam assisted (RIBA), EB-PVD and the results were compared to various titanium carbide coatings deposited by a variety of techniques. The affects of substrate temperature and ion beam current density were correlated with composition, hardness, changes in the lattice parameter, degree of crystallographic texture, residual stress, surface morphology, and microstructure. The average Vicker's hardness number was found to increase with increasing ion beam current density and increase over the substrate temperature range of 250°C to 650°C. The average Vicker's hardness number decreased at a substrate temperature of 750°C as a result of texturing and microstructure. The present investigation shows that the average Vicker's hardness number is not only a function of the composition, but also the microstructure including the degree of crystallographic texture. TiB2/TiC multilayer coatings were deposited by argon ion beam assisted, EB-PVD with varying number of total layers to two different film thicknesses under slightly different deposition conditions. In both cases, the hardness of the coatings increased with increasing number of total layers. The adhesion of the coatings ranged from 30 N to 50 N, with the better adhesion values obtained with the thinner coatings. The crystallographic texture coefficients of both the TiC and TiB2 layers were found to change with increasing number of total layers. The multilayer design was found to significantly affect the microstructure and grain size of the deposited coatings. The fracture toughness was found to decrease with increasing number of total layers and was

  6. Evaluation of outer flaws in titanium alloys using eddy current measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Psuj, G.; Kowalczyk, J.

    2011-06-23

    In this paper results of shallow outer flaw detection in thick titanium alloy specimens is presented. In order to increase efficiency of inspections of minor defects an eddy current measuring system with a lock-in amplifier was used. The measurements were carried out for flat and cylindrical specimens with artificial flaws.

  7. Comparison of the properties of titanium dioxide films prepared by various techniques.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J M; Pelletier, E; Albrand, G; Borgogno, J P; Lazarides, B; Carniglia, C K; Schmell, R A; Allen, T H; Tuttle-Hart, T; Guenther, K H; Saxer, A

    1989-08-15

    Fourteen university, government, and industrial laboratories prepared a total of twenty pairs of single-layer titanium dioxide films. Several laboratories analyzed the coatings to determine their optical properties, thickness, surface roughness, absorption, wetting contact angle, and crystalline structure. Wide variations were found in the optical and physical properties of the films, even among films produced by nominally the same deposition techniques.

  8. CO2 laser welding of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nanri, Kenzo; Ootani, Masanori; Seto, Sachio; Arai, Mikiya; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-02-01

    Titanium aluminide intermetallic compound is studied to find out good welding conditions using CO2 laser irradiation. In the experiment, we used the casting titanium aluminide containing iron, vanadium and boron with a thickness of 2 mm. We carried out bead-on-plate laser welding at various initial temperatures of specimens varied from room temperature to 873 [K] in inert gas environment filled with argon. We measured fused depth, bead width and Vickers hardness. As a result of experiments, welding speeds that allow full bead-on- plate welding to be possible were strongly by dependent on the initial temperature, 3000 [mm/min], initial temperature 873 [K], 2600 [mm/mm], initial temperature 673 [K], and 2000 [mm/min] with 300 [K]. Transverse crack-free welding was achieved, when initial temperature was at 873 [K].

  9. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  10. Interfacial oxidations of pure titanium and titanium alloys with investments.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Watanabe, T; Mizutani, N; Fukui, H; Hasegawa, J; Nakamura, H

    2000-12-01

    External oxides of a commercially pure titanium (cpTi), Ti6Al4V alloy, and an experimental beta-type titanium alloy (Ti 53.4 wt%, Nb 29 wt%, Ta 13 wt%, and Zr 4.6 wt%) were characterized after heating to 600, 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C in contact with three types of investments (alumina cement, magnesia cement, and phosphate-bonded) in air. XRD studies demonstrated that MgO, Li2TiO3 and/or Li2Ti3O7 were formed through reactions with the metal and the constituents in the magnesia cement-investment after heating to 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C. Except for these conditions, TiO2 (rutile) was only formed on cpTi. For titanium alloys, the other components apart from Ti also formed simple and complex oxides such as Al2O3 and Al2TiO5 on Ti6Al4V, and Zr0.25Ti0.75Nb2O7 on the beta-type titanium alloy. However, no oxides containing V or Ta were formed. These results suggest that the constituents of titanium alloys reacted with the investment oxides and atmospheric oxygen to form external oxides due to the free energy of oxide formation and the concentration of each element on the metal surface.

  11. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  12. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. PMID:25611515

  13. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  14. Origami of thick panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures.

  15. Importance of Corneal Thickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section The Importance of Corneal Thickness email Send this article to ... is important because it can mask an accurate reading of eye pressure, causing doctors to treat you ...

  16. Plasma quench production of titanium from titanium tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    This project, Plasma Quench Production of Titanium from Titanium Tetrachloride, centers on developing a technique for rapidly quenching the high temperature metal species and preventing back reactions with the halide. The quenching technique chosen uses the temperature drop produced in a converging/diverging supersonic nozzle. The rapid quench provided by this nozzle prevents the back reaction of the halide and metal. The nature of the process produces nanosized particles (10 to 100 nm). The powders are collected by cyclone separators, the hydrogen flared, and the acid scrubbed. Aluminum and titanium powders have been produced in the laboratory-scale device at 1 gram per hour. Efforts to date to scale up this process have not been successful.

  17. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  18. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  19. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-05-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis.

  20. Method for Surface Texturing Titanium Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches a method of producing a textured surface upon an arbitrarily configured titanium or titanium alloy object for the purpose of improving bonding between the object and other materials such as polymer matrix composites and/or human bone for the direct in-growth of orthopaedic implants. The titanium or titanium alloy object is placed in an electrolytic cell having an ultrasonically agitated solution of sodium chloride therein whereby a pattern of uniform "pock mark" like pores or cavities are produced upon the object's surface. The process is very cost effective compared to other methods of producing rough surfaces on titanium and titanium alloy components. The surface textures produced by the present invention are etched directly into the parent metal at discrete sites separated by areas unaffected by the etching process. Bonding materials to such surface textures on titanium or titanium alloy can thus support a shear load even if adhesion of the bonding material is poor.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Antifungal Effect of Titanium, Zirconium and Aluminium Nanoparticles Coated Titanium Plates Against C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mohandoss, Karthikeyan; Balasubramaniam, Muthu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The topographical modifications may vary from millimeter wide grooves to nano size structures. Recently growing nano technology is rapidly advancing surface engineering in implant dentistry. This advancement has resulted in difference in surface properties including the morphology, chemistry, crystal structure and mechanical properties of the implant. Aim To evaluate the anticandidal effect of titanium, zirconium and aluminium nanoparticles against C. albicans at 24 hours, 72 hours and one week time interval. Materials and Methods According to ISO/TR 11175:1993, the samples were prepared with the dimension of 20mm diameter and 1mm thickness in grade IV titanium. A total of 40 samples were made and the samples were divided into four groups. The samples without coating were Group-A (control), samples coated with titanium nano particles were Group-B, samples coated with zirconium nano particles were Group-C and samples coated with aluminium nano particles were Group-D. The samples were cleaned by sonicating in acetone and subsequently in water three times for 15 min. Then they were treated with TiO2, ZrO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles. The discs were sterilized under uv radiation and placed in SDA for C.albicans. The colonies were counted in 24, 72 hours and one week intervals. Results The values were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD Test. Significance p-value was < .001, which showed that significant difference in C.F.U among the groups in titanium coated samples at 24 hours, 72 hours and one week time intervals. Conclusion TiO2 nanoparticles coated titanium plates showed significant anticandidal effect compared to ZrO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles at 24, 72 hours and one week time interval. PMID:26894177

  2. Process for reproducibly preparing titanium subhydride

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Richard S.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium subhydride is produced in a reactor by heating a selected amount of finely divided titanium compound at a selected temperature for a selected period of time under dynamic vacuum conditions. Hydrogen is removed substantially uniformly from each powder grain and there is produced a subhydride of substantially uniform titanium-hydrogen composition. Selection of the amount, temperature and time produces a subhydride of selected titanium-hydrogen composition.

  3. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  4. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  5. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  11. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  12. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  14. Production of hydroxyapatite layers on the plasma electrolytically oxidized surface of titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lugovskoy, Alex; Lugovskoy, Svetlana

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a bioactive material that is widely used for improving the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. Titanium can be coated with HA by various methods, such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), thermal spray, or plasma spray. HA coatings can also be grown on titanium surfaces by hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical methods. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), or microarc oxidation (MAO), is an electrochemical method that enables the production of a thick porous oxide layer on the surface of a titanium implant. If the electrolyte in which PEO is performed contains calcium and phosphate ions, the oxide layer produced may contain hydroxyapatite. The HA content can then be increased by subsequent hydrothermal treatment. The HA thus produced on titanium surfaces has attractive properties, such as a high porosity, a controllable thickness, and a considerable density, which favor its use in dental and bone surgery. This review summarizes the state of the art and possible further development of PEO for the production of HA on Ti implants.

  15. Analysis of metal surfaces coated with europium-doped titanium dioxide by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Głogocka, Daria; Noculak, Agnieszka; Pucińska, Joanna; Jopek, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina; Langner, Marek; Przybyło, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The surface passivation with titanium sol-gel coatings is a frequently used technique to control the adsorption of selected biological macromolecules and to reduce the exposure of the bulk material to biological matter. Due to the increasing number of new coating-preparation methods and new gel compositions with various types of additives, the quality and homogeneity determination of the surface covering is a critical factor affecting performance of any implanted material. While coating thickness is easy to determine, the homogeneity of the surface distribution of coating materials requires more elaborate methodologies. In the paper, the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based method, capable to quantitate the homogeneity and uniformity of the europium in titanium dioxide sol-gel coatings on stainless steel surfaces prepared with two different procedures: spin-coating and dip-coating, is presented. The emission intensity of titanium has been used to determine the coating thickness whereas the relative values of europium and titanium emission intensities provide data on the coating homogeneity. The obtained results show that the spin-coating technique provides better surface coverage with titanium dioxide. However, when the surface coating compositions were compared the dip-coating technique was more reliable.

  16. Femtosecond laser microstructuring of titanium surfaces for middle ear ossicular replacement prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus; Biedron, Slavomir; Fadeeva, Elena; Chichkov, Boris; Westhofen, Martin

    2009-02-01

    Introduction: While a variety of materials has been evaluated for replacement of human middle ear ossicles following inflammation, titanium and its alloys have shown excellent sound transmission properties and biocompatibility. However, cartilage thickness at the tympanic membrane interface deteriorates over time, while fibrous tissue formation may dislodge the titanium prosthesis. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of microstructures on titanium surfaces in contact with adjacent biological tissue. Materials and Methods: Titanium samples of 5mm diameter and 0,25mm thickness were structured by means of a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser operating at 970nm. The structures applied were lines of parabolic shape (cross-sectional) of 5µm (parallel), 5µm (cross-hatch) and 10µm width (parallel). The inter-groove distance between two maxima was exactly twice the line width. Results: Lines smaller than 5µm were not feasible due to the natural irregularity of the basic material with pits and level changes of up to 2µm. The process showed little debris and constant microstructure shape over the whole structured area (2x2mm). The resulting debris was examined for toxic by-products on human fibrobcytes and chondrocytes. Discussion: The results show that microstructures can be applied on titanium surfaces for human implantation with reproducible and constant shapes. Further studies will focus on cell culture which has suggested a relative selectivity for chondrocyte compared to fibrocyte growth in earlier studies with selected microstructures.

  17. Analysis of metal surfaces coated with europium-doped titanium dioxide by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Głogocka, Daria; Noculak, Agnieszka; Pucińska, Joanna; Jopek, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina; Langner, Marek; Przybyło, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The surface passivation with titanium sol-gel coatings is a frequently used technique to control the adsorption of selected biological macromolecules and to reduce the exposure of the bulk material to biological matter. Due to the increasing number of new coating-preparation methods and new gel compositions with various types of additives, the quality and homogeneity determination of the surface covering is a critical factor affecting performance of any implanted material. While coating thickness is easy to determine, the homogeneity of the surface distribution of coating materials requires more elaborate methodologies. In the paper, the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based method, capable to quantitate the homogeneity and uniformity of the europium in titanium dioxide sol-gel coatings on stainless steel surfaces prepared with two different procedures: spin-coating and dip-coating, is presented. The emission intensity of titanium has been used to determine the coating thickness whereas the relative values of europium and titanium emission intensities provide data on the coating homogeneity. The obtained results show that the spin-coating technique provides better surface coverage with titanium dioxide. However, when the surface coating compositions were compared the dip-coating technique was more reliable. PMID:26687457

  18. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  19. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  20. Surface characterization of radio-frequency glow discharged and autoclaved titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, D; Ong, J L; Raikar, G N; Lucas, L C; Lemons, J E; Nakamura, M

    1996-01-01

    To characterize titanium surfaces treated with radio-frequency glow discharge (RFGD) after media exposure, surface chemical analyses were performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIR-RAS). The RFGD treatments resulted in a cleaner surface as compared to as-sputtered or as-autoclaved titanium specimens. The oxide thickness of RFGD-treated titanium specimens was not statistically different from the as-autoclaved and as-sputter cleaned titanium specimens. Exposure to a phosphate-buffered saline solution revealed a greater deposition of calcium and phosphorous on the RFGD-treated surfaces. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles showed that calcium and phosphorous ions diffused into the titanium oxide layer. The calcium and phosphorous deposits were identified as amorphous calcium phosphate compounds using FTIR-RAS. These results suggest that RFGD treatments of titanium enhance calcium and/or phosphate affinity because of an increase in elemental interactions at the surface, thereby resulting in the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds.

  1. Surface characterization of radio-frequency glow discharged and autoclaved titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, D; Ong, J L; Raikar, G N; Lucas, L C; Lemons, J E; Nakamura, M

    1996-01-01

    To characterize titanium surfaces treated with radio-frequency glow discharge (RFGD) after media exposure, surface chemical analyses were performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIR-RAS). The RFGD treatments resulted in a cleaner surface as compared to as-sputtered or as-autoclaved titanium specimens. The oxide thickness of RFGD-treated titanium specimens was not statistically different from the as-autoclaved and as-sputter cleaned titanium specimens. Exposure to a phosphate-buffered saline solution revealed a greater deposition of calcium and phosphorous on the RFGD-treated surfaces. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles showed that calcium and phosphorous ions diffused into the titanium oxide layer. The calcium and phosphorous deposits were identified as amorphous calcium phosphate compounds using FTIR-RAS. These results suggest that RFGD treatments of titanium enhance calcium and/or phosphate affinity because of an increase in elemental interactions at the surface, thereby resulting in the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. PMID:8803338

  2. Hypervelocity-impact studies on titanium, titanium alloys, and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Bless, S.J.; Girrens, S.P.; Green, J.E.

    1982-08-01

    The hypervelocity-impact behavior of commercial-pure, Grade 2 Ti, Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.25Si, and pure beryllium was studied by impacting targets of these materials with millimeter-sized spheres of glass, copper, aluminum, and cadmium propelled from a light-gas gun at velocities ranging from 4.5 to 7.6 km/s. Target temperatures ranged from 295 to 775/sup 0/K when impacted. Semi-infinite targets were impacted to determine cratering behavior, and some correlations were made to thin-target perforation. Thin titanium targets with a variety of surface coatings and finishes were also impacted. Titanium and the titanium alloys were found to behave in a ductile manner when impacted, but beryllium was found to be brittle even at 775/sup 0/K. An extrapolation equation was used to optimize a titanium heat pipe radiator mass for a space nuclear power application.

  3. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  4. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  5. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    An eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  6. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  7. Effects of hydrothermal treatment with CaCl(2) solution on surface property and cell response of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Zhang, L; Udoh, K; Matsuya, S; Ishikawa, K

    2005-11-01

    In order to obtain early and good osteointegration after implantation of a titanium implant in the human body, the surface modified treatments using NaOH or H(2)O(2) etc. were reported. In this study, titanium was hydrothermally treated with CaCl(2) solutions at 200 degrees C for 24hr (CaCl(2)-HT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation clearly showed apatite deposition on the surface of CaCl(2) HT treated titanium faster than other chemical treated titanium immersion in simulated body fluid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrated that Ti--O--Ca bonding was formed on titanium surface by hydrothermal treatment with CaCl(2) solution. And it was revealed that thickness of TiO(2), which was known to play important roles for the formation of bone-like apatite, became approximately three times thicker than as-polished titanium. The amount of initial attached MC3T3-E1 cells on as-polished and NaOH, H(2)O(2) and this CaCl(2) HT treated titanium were almost the same values. After 5 days incubation, the growth rate of MC3T3-E1 cells on CaCl(2)-HT treated titanium was significantly higher than that on other chemical treated titanium. The hydrothermal treatment with 10-20 mmol/L CaCl(2) solution at 200 degrees C was an effective method for the fabrication of titanium implant with good bioactivity and osteoconductivity.

  8. Implantation induced hardening of nanocrystalline titanium thin films.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R; Amirthapandian, S; Mangamma, G; Ramaseshan, R; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K; Jayaram, V; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Formation of nanocrystalline TiN at low temperatures was demonstrated by combining Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and ion implantation techniques. The Ti films of nominal thickness approximatly 250 nm were deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 degrees C by ablating a high pure titanium target in UHV conditions using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. These films were implanted with 100 keV N+ ions with fluence ranging from 1.0 x 10(16) ions/cm2 to 1.0 x 10(17) ions/cm2 The structural, compositional and morphological evolutions were tracked using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the as-deposited titanium film is an fcc phase. With increasing ion fluence, its structure becomes amorphous phase before precipitation of nanocrystalline fcc TIN phase. Compositional depth profiles obtained from SIMS have shown the extent of nitrogen concentration gradient in the implantation zone. Both as-deposited and ion implanted films showed much higher hardness as compared to the bulk titanium. AFM studies revealed a gradual increase in surface roughness leading to surface patterning with increase in ion fluence.

  9. Mechanical and chemical analyses across dental porcelain fused to CP titanium or Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Souza, Júlio C M; Henriques, Bruno; Ariza, Edith; Martinelli, Antonio E; Nascimento, Rubens M; Silva, Filipe S; Rocha, Luís A; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the evolution of mechanical properties and chemical variation across veneering dental porcelain fused to different titanium-based substrates. Test samples were synthesized by fusing dental feldspar-based porcelain onto commercially pure titanium grade II or Ti6Al4V alloy. Samples were cross-sectioned at angles of 10 and 90° to the interface plane. Afterwards, nanoindentation tests and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging coupled to an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) system were carried out across interfaces extending from the metal towards the porcelain area. Elemental diffusion profiles across the porcelain-to-metal interfaces were also obtained by EDS analysis. The mismatch in mechanical properties found in porcelain-to-Ti6Al4V interfaces was lower than that of porcelain-to-CP titanium. Cracking was noticed at low-thickness veneering dental porcelain regions after the nanoindentation tests of samples cross-sectioned at low angles to the interface plane. A wide reaction zone between titanium and porcelain as well as higher incidence of defects was noticed at the porcelain-to-CP titanium interfaces. This study confirmed Ti6Al4V as an improved alternative to CP-titanium as it showed to establish a better interface with the veneering dental porcelain considering the slight chemical interaction and the lower mechanical properties mismatch. The elastic modulus of porcelain-to-Ti6Al4V samples showed to be less sensitive to porcelain thickness variations.

  10. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-06-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  11. Development of Low Density Titanium Alloys for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froes, F. H.; Suryanarayana, C.; Powell, C.; Ward-Close, C. Malcolm; Wilkes, D. M. J.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the results of a program designed to reduce the density of titanium by adding magnesium are presented. Because these two elements are immiscible under conventional ingot metallurgy techniques, two specialized powder metallurgy methods namely, mechanical alloying (MA) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) were implemented. The mechanical alloying experiments were done both at the University of Idaho and at the Defense Research Agency in UK. Since titanium is reactive with interstitial elements, a secondary goal of this research was to correlate solubility extensions with interstitial contamination content, especially oxygen and nitrogen. MA was carried out in SPEX 8000 shaker mils and different milling containers were utilized to control the level of contamination. Results showed that solubilities of Mg in Ti were obtained up to 28 at.% (16.4 wt. %) Mg in Ti for Ti-39.6 at. % (25 wt. %) Mg alloys, which greatly exceed those obtained under equilibrium conditions. This reflects a density reduction of approximately 26 %. Contamination of oxygen and nitrogen seemed to increase the solubility of magnesium in titanium in some cases; however, we were not able to make a clear correlation between contamination levels with solubilities. Work at the DRA has emphasized optimization of present PVD equipment, specifically composition and temperature control. Preliminary PVD data has shown Ti-Mg deposits have successfully been made up to 2 mm thick and that solubility extensions were achieved. The potential for density reduction of titanium by alloying with magnesium has been demonstrated; however, this work has only scratched the surface of the development of such low density alloys. Much research is needed before such alloys could be implemented into industry. Further funding is required in order to optimize the MA/PVD processes including contamination control, determination of optimal alloy compositions, microstructure development, and mechanical property

  12. Sensing of human plasma fibrinogen on polished, chemically etched and carbon treated titanium surfaces by diffractive optical element based sensor.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Raimo; Vetterl, Vladimir; Hason, Stanislav; Tuononen, Heikki; Silvennoinen, Martti; Myller, Kari; Cvrcek, Ladislav; Vanek, Jiri; Prachar, Patrik

    2008-07-01

    Adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on 6 differently treated titanium samples (polished, polished and etched, and 4 titanium carbide coatings samples produced by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method) is investigated by using diffractive optical element (DOE) sensor. Permittivity (susceptibility) change and fluctuation in optical roughness (R(opt)) of treated titanium surface in the presence of background electrolyte without and with HPF molecules are sensed by using DOE sensor and optical ellipsometry. Correlation between transmitted light and thickness of molecule layer was found. The findings allow to sense temporal organization and severity of adsorption of nano-scale HPF molecules on polished, on polished and etched, and on titanium carbide surface.

  13. Biocompatibility of supercritical CO2-treated titanium implants in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hill, C M; Kang, Q K; Wahl, C; Jimenez, A; Laberge, M; Drews, M; Matthews, M A; An, Y H

    2006-04-01

    Supercritical phase CO2 is a promising method for sterilizing implantable devices and tissue grafts. The goal of this study is to evaluate the biocompatibility of titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. At 5 weeks post implantation titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 produce a soft tissue reaction that is comparable to other methods of sterilization (steam autoclave, ultraviolet light radiation, ethylene oxide gas, and radio-frequency glow-discharge), as indicated by the thickness and density of the foreign body capsule, although there were some differences on the capillary density. Overall the soft tissue response to the implants was similar among all methods of sterilization, indicating supercritical phase CO2 treatment did not compromise the biocompatibility of the titanium implant.

  14. Marine microfouling on aluminum and titanium heat exchanger surfaces at the CEER OTEC Puerto Rico facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tosteson, T.R.; Axtmayer, R.W.; Ballantine, D.L.; Imam, S.; Morgon, T.; Revuelta, R.; Sasscer, D.S.; Zaidi, B.R.

    1980-12-01

    Since 30 January, 1980, an OTEC biofouling experiment has been in progress off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. The initiation and accumulation of microfouling on aluminum and titanium surfaces has been analyzed over a period of 143 days. Microfouling was assessed by determining the surface residue weight, organic carbon and nitrogen contents of this residue, the wet film thickness and the ATP content of this film. The development of biofouling on the aluminum and titanium surfaces appears to be different with respect to the relationship seen between biomass cycle and the bulk growth of the wet film on the respective surfaces. The increase in thermal resistance (R /SUB f/ ) of the aluminum and titanium heat exchanger tubes during the period of this experiment is correlated with the increase in the wet film volume associated with these test surfaces.

  15. Influence of laser cladding regimes on structural features and mechanical properties of coatings on titanium substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutina, Yulia N. Lazurenko, Daria V. Bataev, Ivan A.; Movtchan, Igor A.

    2015-10-27

    In this paper an influence of the tantalum content on the structure and properties of surface layers of the titanium alloy doped using a laser treatment technology was investigated. It was found that an increase of a quantity of filler powder per one millimeter of a track length contributed to a rise of the content of undissolved particles in coatings. The maximum thickness of a cladded layer was reached at the mass of powder per the length unit equaled to 5.5 g/cm. Coatings were characterized by the formation of a dendrite structure with attributes of segregation. The width of a quenched fusion zone grew with an increase in the rate of powder feed to the treated area. Significant strengthening of the titanium surface layer alloyed with tantalum was not observed; however, the presence of undissolved tantalum particles can decrease the hardness of titanium surface layers.

  16. Biocompatibility of supercritical CO2-treated titanium implants in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hill, C M; Kang, Q K; Wahl, C; Jimenez, A; Laberge, M; Drews, M; Matthews, M A; An, Y H

    2006-04-01

    Supercritical phase CO2 is a promising method for sterilizing implantable devices and tissue grafts. The goal of this study is to evaluate the biocompatibility of titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. At 5 weeks post implantation titanium implants sterilized by supercritical phase CO2 produce a soft tissue reaction that is comparable to other methods of sterilization (steam autoclave, ultraviolet light radiation, ethylene oxide gas, and radio-frequency glow-discharge), as indicated by the thickness and density of the foreign body capsule, although there were some differences on the capillary density. Overall the soft tissue response to the implants was similar among all methods of sterilization, indicating supercritical phase CO2 treatment did not compromise the biocompatibility of the titanium implant. PMID:16705612

  17. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  18. Electrical Characterization of Flexible Titanium Dioxide Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, Victoria; Gergel-Hackett, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    The memristor is a new fundamental circuit element with a resistance that depends on the magnitude and polarity of the voltage applied to it and the length of time that voltage is applied. Memristors are also nonvolatile, which means that when the bias is removed, a memristor retains its last resistive state. While memristors have potential applications ranging from alternative computer architectures to memory in inexpensive lightweight wearable sensors, the mechanism behind its switching is not well understood. One of the major questions to be resolved is whether memristive switching is electric field dependent or charge dependent. In the former case, a minimum bias is needed for switching to occur. In the latter case, a minimum amount of charge needs to pass through the device to cause switching. I will present the results of electrically characterizing flexible memristors that consist of a nm-thick layer of titanium dioxide sandwiched between two metal contacts in an effort to help establish whether their switching is charge or field-driven.

  19. Titanium for removable dentures. I. Laboratory procedures.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Togaya, T; Jean-Louis, M; Yabugami, M

    1997-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that titanium (Ti) removable partial dentures (RPDs) would function for a period of at least 2 years without failure, 10 patients were selected to receive dentures made from Ti and Co-Cr. The Ti RPDs were constructed identically to conventional cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) dentures. Five complete Ti dentures were also included and the laboratory procedures involved for making both complete and partial dentures were evaluated. The detection of internal defects by radiography made the screening of Ti castings possible and led to a rejection of specimens showing porosities of more than 0.5 mm in flexible members. Co-Cr frames on the other hand cannot be screened in this way. The success rate in the casting of Ti was 60% for both partial and complete dentures, but as casting technology has since improved, the rate is expected to be higher, particularly where complete denture palates have optimum thickness. The success rate in the casting of Co-Cr RPDs was 100% without radiographic screening. The weight difference between Ti and Co-Cr RPDs was in the range of 1.3 to 3.9 g at issue and is generally higher as the volume of denture frames increases. A large difference would be of clinical significance in maxillary complete dentures. The low density of Ti allows for the adoption of a useful pre-clinical quality-control process using commonly available dental X-ray units. PMID:9183026

  20. Deep flaws in weldments of aluminum and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Engstrom, W. L.; Bixler, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    Surface flawed specimens of 2219-T87 and 6Al-4V STA titanium weldments were tested to determine static failure modes, failure strength, and fatigue flaw growth characteristics. Thicknesses selected for this study were purposely set at values where, for most test conditions, abrupt instability of the flaw at fracture would not be expected. Static tests for the aluminum weldments were performed at room, LN2 and LH2 temperatures. Titanium static tests for tests were performed at room and LH2 temperatures. Results of the static tests were used to plot curves relating initial flaw size to leakage- or failure-stresses (i.e. "failure" locus curves). Cyclic tests, for both materials, were then performed at room temperature, using initial flaws only slightly below the previously established failure locus for typical proof stress levels. Cyclic testing was performed on pairs of specimens, one with and one without a simulated proof test cycle. Comparisons were made then to determine the value and effect of proof testing as affected by the various variables of proof and operating stress, flaw shape, material thickness, and alloy.

  1. The Effect of Taper Angle and Spline Geometry on the Initial Stability of Tapered, Splined Modular Titanium Stems.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jeffery L; Small, Scott R; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kang, Michael N; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    Design parameters affecting initial mechanical stability of tapered, splined modular titanium stems (TSMTSs) are not well understood. Furthermore, there is considerable variability in contemporary designs. We asked if spline geometry and stem taper angle could be optimized in TSMTS to improve mechanical stability to resist axial subsidence and increase torsional stability. Initial stability was quantified with stems of varied taper angle and spline geometry implanted in a foam model replicating 2cm diaphyseal engagement. Increased taper angle and a broad spline geometry exhibited significantly greater axial stability (+21%-269%) than other design combinations. Neither taper angle nor spline geometry significantly altered initial torsional stability. PMID:25754255

  2. Titanium K-Shell X-Ray Production from High Velocity Wire Arrays Implosions on the 20-MA Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J.P.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, R.C.; Coverdale, C.A.; Davis, J.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Nash, T.J.; Ruiz-Comacho, J.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Thornhill, J.W.; Whitney, K.G.

    1999-01-27

    The advent of the 20-MA Z accelerator [R.B. Spielman, C. Deeney, G.A. Chandler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105, (1997)] has enabled implosions of large diameter, high-wire-number arrays of titanium to begin testing Z-pinch K-shell scaling theories. The 2-cm long titanium arrays, which were mounted on a 40-mm diameter, produced between 75{+-}15 to 125{+-}20 kJ of K-shell x-rays. Mass scans indicate that, as predicted, higher velocity implosions in the series produced higher x-ray yields. Spectroscopic analyses indicate that these high velocity implosions achieved peak electron temperatures from 2.7{+-}0.1 to 3.2{+-}0.2 keV and obtained a K-shell emission mass participation of up to 12%.

  3. Thick Photoresist Original Master:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hirotaka; Sugihara, Okihiro; Kaino, Toshikuni; Ohe, Yuka; Okamoto, Naomichi; Hoshino, Masahito

    A simple and low-cost fabrication method of polymeric optical waveguides with large core sizes for plastic optical fibers is presented. The waveguides are fabricated by hot embossing with a rectangular ridge ultraviolet (UV)-cured epoxy resin stamper. The stamper is fabricated by replication of a rectangular groove mold that is made from silicone rubber replicated from a rectangular ridge original master made from thick photoresist (SU-8). A rectangular ridge shape of the original photoresist master of 1 mm size was realized by using a flattening process, which involves hot embossing before the exposure process and using a UV-cut filter during the exposure process.

  4. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Stolyarov, Vladimir V.; Latysh, Vladimir V.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2002-01-01

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  5. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  6. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  7. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  8. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1999-10-19

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  9. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1998-08-04

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag. 1 fig.

  10. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  11. [Comparison of fibroblastic cell compatibility of type I collagen-immobilized titanium between electrodeposition and immersion].

    PubMed

    Kyuragi, Takeru

    2014-03-01

    Titanium is widely used for medical implants. While many techniques for surface modification have been studied for optimizing its biocompatibility with hard tissues, little work has been undertaken to explore ways of maximizing its biocompatibility with soft tissues. We investigated cell attachment to titanium surfaces modified with bovine Type I collagen immobilized by either electrodeposition or a conventional immersion technique. The apparent thickness and durability of the immobilized collagen layer were evaluated prior to incubation of the collagen-immobilized titanium surfaces with NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The initial cell attachment and expression of actin and vinculin were evaluated. We determined that the immobilized collagen layer was much thicker and more durable when placed using the electrodeposition technique than the immersion technique. Both protocols produced materials that promoted better cell attachment, growth and structural protein expression than titanium alone. However, electrodeposition was ultimately superior to immersion because it is quicker to perform and produces a more durable collagen coating. We conclude that electrodeposition is an effective technique for immobilizing type I collagen on titanium surfaces, thus improving their cytocompatibility with fibroblasts.

  12. Improving blood-compatibility of titanium by coating collagen-heparin multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Li, Q. L.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, C.; Huang, N.

    2009-05-01

    This work deals with improving the blood-compatibility of titanium by coating it with heparin (Hep) and collagen (Col) using a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique. In the work described here, LBL-produced Hep-Col film growth is initialized by deposition of a layer of positively charged poly L-Lysine (PLL) on a titanium surface, which is negatively charged after treatment with NaOH, followed by formation of a multilayer thin film formed by alternating deposition of negatively charged heparin and positively charged collagen utilizing electrostatic interaction. The chemical composition, wettability, surface topography, mass and thickness of the film were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, water contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electronic analytical semi-microbalances, and XP stylus profilometry. The in vitro platelet adhesion and activation were investigated by a static platelet adhesion test probing the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release of adherent platelets after lysis and by a P-selectin assay. The clotting time was examined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time (PT) assays. All obtained data showed that the LBL film can significantly decrease platelet adhesion and activation, and prolong clotting time of APTT and PT compared to untreated titanium. LBL-produced Hep-Col films on titanium display more excellent anticoagulation performance than on the surface of titanium.

  13. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Titanium Surface Modified by PVD/PACVD Process.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Lee, Min-Joo; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) via crystal violet staining assay on titanium surface modified by physical vapor deposition/plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. Specimens were divided into the following three groups: polished titanium (control group), titanium modified by DC magnetron sputtering (group TiN-Ti), and titanium modified by plasma nitriding (group N-Ti). Surface characteristics of specimens were observed by using nanosurface 3D optical profiler and field emission scanning electron microscope. Group TiN-Ti showed TiN layer of 1.2 microm in thickness. Group N-Ti was identified as plasma nitriding with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Roughness average (Ra) of all specimens had values < or = 0.2 microm (the threshold Ra), which had no effect on bacterial adhesion. No significant difference of S. mutans adhesion was found between the surfaces of control, TiN-Ti, and N-Ti (P > 0.05). Within the process condition of this study, modified titanium surfaces by DC magnetron sputtering and plasma nitriding did not influence the adhesion of S. mutans.

  14. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Titanium Surface Modified by PVD/PACVD Process.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Lee, Min-Joo; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) via crystal violet staining assay on titanium surface modified by physical vapor deposition/plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. Specimens were divided into the following three groups: polished titanium (control group), titanium modified by DC magnetron sputtering (group TiN-Ti), and titanium modified by plasma nitriding (group N-Ti). Surface characteristics of specimens were observed by using nanosurface 3D optical profiler and field emission scanning electron microscope. Group TiN-Ti showed TiN layer of 1.2 microm in thickness. Group N-Ti was identified as plasma nitriding with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Roughness average (Ra) of all specimens had values < or = 0.2 microm (the threshold Ra), which had no effect on bacterial adhesion. No significant difference of S. mutans adhesion was found between the surfaces of control, TiN-Ti, and N-Ti (P > 0.05). Within the process condition of this study, modified titanium surfaces by DC magnetron sputtering and plasma nitriding did not influence the adhesion of S. mutans. PMID:27433640

  15. Submicron-patterning of bulk titanium by nanoimprint lithography and reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Lamers, E.; Walboomers, X. F.; Winnubst, L.; Jansen, J. A.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.

    2012-02-01

    Nanopatterns on titanium may enhance endosseous implant biofunctionality. To enable biological studies to prove this hypothesis, we developed a scalable method of fabricating nanogrooved titanium substrates. We defined nanogrooves by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and a subsequent pattern transfer to the surface of ASTM grade 2 bulk titanium applying a soft-mask for chlorine-based reactive ion etching (RIE). With respect to direct write lithographic techniques the method introduced here is fast and capable of delivering uniformly patterned areas of at least 4 cm2. A dedicated silicon nanostamp process has been designed to generate the required thickness of the soft-mask for the NIL-RIE pattern transfer. Stamps with pitch sizes from 1000 nm down to 300 nm were fabricated using laser interference lithography (LIL) and deep cryogenic silicon RIE. Although silicon nanomachining was proven to produce smaller pitch sizes of 200 nm and 150 nm respectively, successful pattern transfer to titanium was only possible down to a pitch of 300 nm. Hence, the smallest nanogrooves have a width of 140 nm. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that only very few contaminations arise from the fabrication process and a cytotoxicity assay on the nanopatterned surfaces confirmed that the obtained nanogrooved titanium specimens are suitable for in vivo studies in implantology research.

  16. Influence of anodization on the adhesion of calcium phosphate coatings on titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Daniel J; Seah, Kar Heng W

    2010-06-15

    Electrochemical deposition is an attractive technique for the deposition of calcium phosphate, especially hydroxyapatite, on titanium implants. However, the adhesion of these coatings to the titanium substrates needs to be improved for clinical use. It is demonstrated that anodization of a titanium alloy does marginally increase the adhesion of calcium phosphate coatings. Although scratch test measurements on coatings deposited at a constant potential appear to suggest that adhesion improves with increased thickness of the anodized layer, when a constant current is used to deposit the coatings their adhesion becomes independent of the thickness of the anodized layer. This apparent contradiction is explained by the thicker oxides acting as larger series resistors that reduce the magnitude of the current density when deposition is conducted at a constant potential. The resulting lower current density is responsible for increased adhesion of the calcium phosphate coating. It was also observed that surface roughness affects the interfacial adhesion strength between the coating and the titanium substrate, with a more adherent coating being formed over a rough surface. However, adhesion becomes independent of surface finish at levels smoother than 600 grit, suggesting that mechanical interlocking is not the sole force at play.

  17. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  18. Ultrasonic Inspection Of Thick Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friant, C. L.; Djordjevic, B. B.; O'Keefe, C. V.; Ferrell, W.; Klutz, T.

    1993-01-01

    Ultrasonics used to inspect large, relatively thick vessels for hidden defects. Report based on experiments in through-the-thickness transmission of ultrasonic waves in both steel and filament-wound composite cases of solid-fuel rocket motors.

  19. How thick is the lithosphere?

    PubMed

    Kanamori, H; Press, F

    1970-04-25

    A rapid decrease in shear velocity in the suboceanic mantle is used to infer the thickness of the lithosphere. It is proposed that new and highly precise group velocity data constrain the solutions and imply a thickness near 70 km.

  20. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  1. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  2. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Engin Vrana, Nihal

    2015-05-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  3. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    Early in 1958, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology was requested to participate in a lunar-probe mission code-named Juno II which would place a 15-lb Instrumented payload (Pioneer IV) in the vicinity of the moon. The vehicle was to use the same high-speed upper-stage assembly as flown on the successful Jupiter-C configuration; however, the first-stage booster was to be a Jupiter rather than a Redstone. An analysis of the intended flight and payload configuration Indicated that the feasibility of accomplishing the mission was questionable and that additional performance would have to be obtained if the mission was to be feasible. Since the most efficient way of Increasing the performance of a staged vehicle is to increase the performance of the last stage, a study of possible ways of doing this was made.. Because of the time schedule placed on this effort It was decided to reduce the weight of the fourth-stage rocket-motor case by substituting the annealed 6Al--4V titanium alloy for the Type 410 stainless steel. Although this introduced an unfamiliar material, It reduced the changes in design and fabrication techniques. This particular titanium alloy was chosen on the basis of previous tests which proved the suitability of the alloy as a pressure-vessel material when used at an annealed yield strength of about 120, 000 psi. The titanium-case fourth stage of Juno U is shown with the payload and on the missile in Fig. 1; the stainless-steel motor cases used in the Jupiter-C vehicle are shown in Fig. 2. The fourth-stage motor case has a diameter of 6 in., a length of approximately 38 in. center dot and a nominal cylindrical wall thickness of 0.025 in. As shown in Fig. 1, the case serves as the structural support of the payload and is aligned to the upper stage assembly through an alignment ring. The nozzle is threaded into the end of the motor case, and is of the ceramic-coated steel design. Figure 3 shows a comparison of the

  4. [Experimental research on porcelain fused to the surface of pure titanium and titanium alloys].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Ai, S; Xu, J

    1995-07-01

    Titanium material has been widely used in prosthodontics since the end of 1980s. However, the research on porcelain fused to the surfaces of titanium material was quite few. This article introduced the technological process of low-fusing dental porcelain--Ceratin fused to pure titanium and titanium alloys. The values of the bond strength of Ceratin and titanium substrates were obtained by shearing test with INSTRON Model-1185. The average value of the shearing strength between TA2 and Ceratin was 31. 01MPa. The corresponding value between TC4 and Ceratin was 33.73MPa. The interface between Ceratin and titanium substrate was observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of this research proposed that it is hopeful that Ceratin is used as special procelain with titanium material.

  5. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  6. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  11. Mineral resource of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Titanium is hip - at least when it comes to airplanes and jewelry. Known for its high strength-to weight ratio and its resistance to corrosion, titanium and its alloys can also be found in everything from knee replacements to eyeglass frames to baseball bats to fighter planes.

  12. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity...

  13. Wettability studies of topologically distinct titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Junkar, Ita; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V; Lorenzetti, Martina; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-05-01

    Biomedical implants made of titanium-based materials are expected to have certain essential features including high bone-to-implant contact and optimum osteointegration, which are often influenced by the surface topography and physicochemical properties of titanium surfaces. The surface structure in the nanoscale regime is presumed to alter/facilitate the protein binding, cell adhesion and proliferation, thereby reducing post-operative complications with increased lifespan of biomedical implants. The novelty of our TiO2 nanostructures lies mainly in the high level control over their morphology and roughness by mere compositional change and optimisation of the experimental parameters. The present work focuses on the wetting behaviour of various nanostructured titanium surfaces towards water. Kinetics of contact area of water droplet on macroscopically flat, nanoporous and nanotubular titanium surface topologies was monitored under similar evaporation conditions. The contact area of the water droplet on hydrophobic titanium planar surface (foil) was found to decrease during evaporation, whereas the contact area of the droplet on hydrophobic nanorough titanium surfaces practically remained unaffected until the complete evaporation. This demonstrates that the surface morphology and roughness at the nanoscale level substantially affect the titanium dioxide surface-water droplet interaction, opposing to previous observations for microscale structured surfaces. The difference in surface topographic nanofeatures of nanostructured titanium surfaces could be correlated not only with the time-dependency of the contact area, but also with time-dependency of the contact angle and electrochemical properties of these surfaces.

  14. Titanium carbide bipolar plate for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    2000-07-04

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate is made from titanium carbide for use in an eletrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  15. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  16. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  17. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    1998-05-08

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  18. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  19. PAH-concentrations and compositions in the top 2 cm of forest soils along a 120 km long transect through agricultural areas, forests and the city of Oslo, Norway.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henning; Reimann, Clemens; Finne, Tor Erik; Ottesen, Rolf Tore; Arnoldussen, Arnold

    2007-02-01

    The top 2 cm of forest soils were collected along a 120 km long south-north transect running through Norway's largest city Oslo. Forty samples were analysed for their polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH(16) as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) concentrations and compositions. Local variations in the PAH values are high and the reported concentrations are in general low (maximum sumPAH16: 2.6 mg/kg). The transect shows distinct differences of sumPAH16 values from south to north. PAH concentrations are substantially lower in the less populated areas at the north end of the transect than at the urbanised and much more populated south end. Several high values occur in a forested area to the north of Oslo, used for recreation purposes. The PAH distribution patterns point towards a predominantly pyrogenic origin. Local Cambrian carbon-rich black shales can be excluded as sources for PAHs in the forest soils. PMID:16787690

  20. Waterway Ice Thickness Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ship on the opposite page is a U. S. Steel Corporation tanker cruising through the ice-covered waters of the Great Lakes in the dead of winter. The ship's crew is able to navigate safely by plotting courses through open water or thin ice, a technique made possible by a multi-agency technology demonstration program in which NASA is a leading participant. Traditionally, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System is closed to shipping for more than three months of winter season because of ice blockage, particularly fluctuations in the thickness and location of ice cover due to storms, wind, currents and variable temperatures. Shippers have long sought a system of navigation that would allow year-round operation on the Lakes and produce enormous economic and fuel conservation benefits. Interrupted operations require that industrial firms stockpile materials to carry them through the impassable months, which is costly. Alternatively, they must haul cargos by more expensive overland transportation. Studies estimate the economic benefits of year-round Great Lakes shipping in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually and fuel consumption savings in the tens of millions of gallons. Under Project Icewarn, NASA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration collaborated in development and demonstration of a system that permits safe year-round operations. It employs airborne radars, satellite communications relay and facsimile transmission to provide shippers and ships' masters up-to-date ice charts. Lewis Research Center contributed an accurate methods of measuring ice thickness by means of a special "short-pulse" type of radar. In a three-year demonstration program, Coast Guard aircraft equipped with Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) flew over the Great Lakes three or four times a week. The SLAR, which can penetrate clouds, provided large area readings of the type and distribution of ice cover. The information was supplemented by short

  1. The present status of dental titanium casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Toru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Okuno, Osamu; Takada, Yukyo

    1998-09-01

    Experimentation in all aspects of titanium casting at universities and industries throughout the world for the last 20 years has made titanium and titanium-alloy casting nearly feasible for fabricating sound cast dental prostheses, including crowns, inlays, and partial and complete dentures. Titanium casting in dentistry has now almost reached the stage where it can seriously be considered as a new method to compete with dental casting using conventional noble and base-metal alloys. More than anything else, the strength of titanium’s appeal lies in its excellent biocompatibility, coupled with its comparatively low price and abundant supply. Research efforts to overcome some problems associated with this method, including studies on the development of new titanium alloys suitable for dental use, will continue at many research sites internationally.

  2. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  3. [Use of titanium alloys for medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Feofilov, R N; Chirkov, V K; Levin, M V

    1977-01-01

    On the ground of an analysis into properties of titanium and its alloys the fields of their possible utilization for making various medical instruments are proposed. Because of their insufficient hardness and wear-resistance the titanium alloys cannot be recommended for making medical instruments with thin cutting edges. For the reasons of their insufficient strength, low wear-resistance and substandard modulus of elasticity, it is inexpedient to use titanium alloys in making many types of clamping medical instruments. Nor is it advisable to employ titanium alloys in handles of the instruments, for this may lead to a contact corrosion of their working parts. The use of titanium alloys is recommended for making bone-joining members, retracting medical instruments, of the spatula and speculum types, some kinds of non-magnetic pincers and ultrasonic medical instruments.

  4. TiO{sub 2} nanotube, nanowire, and rhomboid-shaped particle thin films fixed on a titanium metal plate

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yuko; Noda, Iwao; Torikai, Toshio; Watari, Takanori; Hotokebuchi, Takao; Yada, Mitsunori

    2010-01-15

    Titanium dioxide thin films having various nanostructures could be formed by various treatments on sodium titanate nanotube thin films approximately 5 {mu}m thick fixed on titanium metal plates. Using an aqueous solution with a lower hydrochloric acid concentration (0.01 mol/L) and a higher reaction temperature (90 deg. C) than those previously employed, we obtained a hydrogen titanate nanotube thin film fixed onto a titanium metal plate by H{sup +} ion-exchange treatment of the sodium titanate nanotube thin film. Calcination of hydrogen titanate nanotube thin films yielded porous thin films consisting of anatase nanotubes, anatase nanowires, and anatase nanoparticles grown directly from the titanium metal plate. H{sup +} ion-exchange treatment of sodium titanate nanotube thin films at 140 deg. C resulted in porous thin films consisting of rhomboid-shaped anatase nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Titanium dioxide nanotube, nanowire, and rhombic particle thin films could be formed by various treatments on a sodium titanate nanotube thin film fixed on a titanium metal plate.

  5. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  6. Titanium in Engine Valve Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. E.; Sherman, A. M.; Bapna, M. R.

    1987-03-01

    Titanium alloys offer a unique combination of high strength-to-weight ratio, good corrosion resistance and favorable high temperature mechanical properties. Still, their relatively high cost has discouraged consideration for widespread use in automotive components. Recent demands for increased fuel economy have led to the consideration of these alloys for use as valve train materials where higher costs might be offset by improvements in performance and fuel economy. Lighter weight valve train components permit the use of lower spring loads, thus reducing friction and increasing fuel economy. Camshaft friction measurements made on a typical small displacement engine indicate that a twoto-four percent increase in fuel economy can be achieved. Valve train components are, however, subject to a severe operating environment, including elevated temperatures, sliding wear and high mechanical loads. This paper discusses the details of alloy and heat treatment selection for optimizing valve performance. When properly manufactured, titanium valves have been shown to withstand very stringent durability testing, indicating the technical feasibility of this approach to fuel economy improvement.

  7. Clinical effectiveness of the PolyScope™ endoscope system combined with holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary calculi with a diameter of less than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Gu, Si-Ping; Huang, Yun-Teng; You, Zhi-Yuan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Yi-Jin; He, Cao-Hui; Qi, Juan

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of the PolyScope™ endoscope system in the treatment of upper urinary calculi with a diameter of <2 cm. A total of 86 patients hospitalized with upper urinary tract calculi were included. The patients were placed under general or spinal anesthesia and in a lithotomy position. Following the dilation of the ureter, a guide wire was inserted under the direct vision of an F8/9.8 rigid ureteroscope, and an F12/14 flexible ureteral access sheath was positioned along the guide wire. Holmium laser lithotripsy was subsequently performed, using an F8.0 'PolyScope' modular flexible ureteroscope. Plain film of the kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) was performed 1 day subsequent to the surgery, in order to determine the result of the lithotripsy and the position of the double-J stent which was inserted after after holmium laser lithotripsy. In addition, in certain patients, KUB radiography was performed 2-4 weeks subsequent to the surgery, and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) was performed if the diameter of the residual stones was >6 mm. Lithotripsy was successful in 77 patients and the duration of the surgery ranged between 25 and 80 min (mean duration, 42 min). Little bleeding was observed. Three patients presented with a slight fever following the surgery; however, no ureteral perforation, high fever or septicemia was observed among the patients following anti-inflammatory treatment. The stone-free rate (SFR) of the single-pass lithotripsy was 89.5% (77/86) and the SFR with ESWL was 96.5% (83/86). The study demonstrated that the F8 modular flexible ureteroscope was safe, convenient and effective for the lithotripsy of upper-tract calculi.

  8. Femtosecond laser microstructuring and bioactive nanocoating of titanium surfaces in relation to chondrocyte growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus; Biedron, Slavomir; Fadeeva, Elena; Chichkov, Boris; Klee, Doris; Loos, Anneke; Sowa-Söhle, Eveline; Westhofen, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Titanium implants can be regarded as the current gold standard for restoration of sound transmission in the middle ear following destruction of the ossicular chain by chronic inflammation. Many efforts have been made to improve prosthesis design, while less attention had been given to the role of the interface. We present a study on chemical nanocoating on microstructured titanium contact surface with bioactive protein. Materials and Methods: Titanium samples of 5mm diameter and 0,25mm thickness were structured by means of a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser operating at 970nm with parallel lines of 5μm depth, 5μm width and 10μm inter-groove distance. In addition, various nanolayers were applied to titanium samples by aminosilanization, to which Star-Polyethylene glycole (Star-PEG) molecules plus biomarkers (e.g. RGD peptide sequence) were linked. Results: Chondrocytes could be cultured on microstructured surfaces without reduced rate of vital / dead cells compared to native surfaces. Chondrocytes also showed contact guidance by growing along ridges particularly on 5μm lines. On nanocoated titanium samples, first results showed a strong effect of Star-PEG suppressing unspecific protein absorption, while RGD peptide sequence did not promote chondrocyte cell growth. Discussion: According to these results, the idea of promoting cell growth on titanium prosthesis contact surfaces compared to non-contact surfaces (e.g. prosthesis shaft) by nanocoating is practicable. However, relative selectivity induced by microstructures for growth of chondrocytes compared to fibrocytes is subject to further evaluation.

  9. Effects of pico-to-nanometer-thin TiO2 coating on the biological properties of microroughened titanium.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yoshihiko; Ishizaki, Ken; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2011-11-01

    The independent, genuine role of surface chemistry in the biological properties of titanium is unknown. Although microtopography has been established as a standard surface feature in osseous titanium implants, unfavorable behavior and reactions of osteogenic cells are still observed on the surfaces. To further enhance the biological properties of microfeatured titanium surfaces, this study tested the hypotheses that (1) the surface chemistry of microroughened titanium surfaces can be controllably varied by coating with a very thin layer of TiO(2), without altering the existing topographical and roughness features; and (2) the change in the surface chemistry affects the biological properties of the titanium substrates. Using a slow-rate sputter deposition of molten TiO(2) nanoparticles, acid-etched microroughened titanium surfaces were coated with a TiO(2) layer of 300-pm to 6.3-nm thickness that increased the surface oxygen levels without altering the existing microtopography. The attachment, spreading behavior, and proliferation of osteoblasts, which are considered to be significantly impaired on microroughened surfaces compared with relatively smooth surfaces, were considerably increased on TiO(2)-coated microroughened surfaces. The rate of osteoblastic differentiation was represented by the increased levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineral deposition as well as by the upregulated expression of bone-related genes. These biological effects were exponentially correlated with the thickness of TiO(2) and surface oxygen percentage, implying that even a picometer-thin TiO(2) coating is effective in rapidly increasing the biological property of titanium followed by an additional mild increase or plateau induced by a nanometer-thick coating. These data suggest that a super-thin TiO(2) coating of pico-to-nanometer thickness enhances the biological properties of the proven microroughened titanium surfaces by controllably and exclusively modulating their surface

  10. Modification of the titanium alloy surface in electroexplosive alloying with boron carbide and subsequent electron-beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Victor E.; Budovskikh, Evgeniy A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Wang, Xinli; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2015-10-01

    The modification of the VT6 titanium alloy surface in electroexplosion alloying with plasma being formed in titanium foil with a weighed powder of boron carbide with subsequent irradiation by a pulsed electron beam has been carried out. An electroexplosive alloying zone of a thickness up to 50 μm with a gradient structure is found to form. The subsequent electron-beam treatment of the alloying zone results in smoothing of the alloying surface and is accompanied by the formation of the multilayer structure with alternating layers of various alloying degree at a depth of 30 μm.

  11. Modification of the titanium alloy surface in electroexplosive alloying with boron carbide and subsequent electron-beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, Victor E. Budovskikh, Evgeniy A. Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu. Semin, Alexander P.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Wang, Xinli

    2015-10-27

    The modification of the VT6 titanium alloy surface in electroexplosion alloying with plasma being formed in titanium foil with a weighed powder of boron carbide with subsequent irradiation by a pulsed electron beam has been carried out. An electroexplosive alloying zone of a thickness up to 50 μm with a gradient structure is found to form. The subsequent electron-beam treatment of the alloying zone results in smoothing of the alloying surface and is accompanied by the formation of the multilayer structure with alternating layers of various alloying degree at a depth of 30 μm.

  12. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium, carbide, molybdenum carbide, and titanium boride coatings and their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of titanium carbide, molybdenum carbide and titanium boride were tested as wear resistant coatings on stainless steel in a pin on disk apparatus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the sputtered films with regard to both bulk and interface composition in order to obtain maximum film performance. Significant improvements in friction behavior were obtained when properly biased films were deposited on deliberately preoxidized substrates. XPS depth profile data showed thick graded interfaces for bias deposited films even when adherence was poor. The addition of 10 percent hydrogen to the sputtering gas produced coatings with thin poorly adherent interfaces. Results suggest that some of the common practices in the field of sputtering may be detrimental to achieving maximum adherence and optimum composition for these refractory compounds.

  13. Osteoconductivity of hydrophilic microstructured titanium implants with phosphate ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Jang, Je-Hee; Lee, Chong Soo; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and bone response of titanium implants produced by hydrothermal treatment using H(3)PO(4), and compared them with those of implants produced by commercial surface treatment methods - machining, acid etching, grit blasting, grit blasting/acid etching or spark anodization. The surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and stylus profilometry. The osteoconductivity of experimental implants was evaluated by removal torque testing and histomorphometric analysis after 6 weeks of implantation in rabbit tibiae. Hydrothermal treatment with H(3)PO(4) and subsequent heat treatment produced a crystalline phosphate ion-incorporated oxide (titanium oxide phosphate hydrate, Ti(2)O(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2); TiP) surface approximately 5microm in thickness, which had needle-like surface microstructures and superior wettability compared with the control surfaces. Significant increases in removal torque forces and bone-to-implant contact values were observed for TiP implants compared with those of the control implants (p<0.001). After thorough cleaning of the implants removed during the removal torque testing, a considerable quantity of attached bone was observed on the surfaces of the TiP implants. PMID:19332400

  14. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  15. Titanium Coating of the Boston Keratoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Jeong, Kyung Jae; Kolovou, Paraskevi Evi; Chiang, Homer H.; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the feasibility of using titanium to enhance adhesion of the Boston Keratoprosthesis (B-KPro), ultimately to decrease the risk of implant-associated complications. Methods Cylindrical rods were made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), PMMA coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) over a layer of polydopamine (PMMATiO2), smooth (Ti) and sandblasted (TiSB) titanium, and titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox and TiSBox). Topography and surface chemistry were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adhesion force between rods and porcine corneas was measured ex vivo. Titanium sleeves, smooth and sandblasted, were inserted around the stem of the B-KPro and implanted in rabbits. Tissue adhesion to the stem was assessed and compared to an unmodified B-Kpro after 1 month. Results X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated successful deposition of TiO2 on polydopamine-coated PMMA. Oxygen plasma treatment did not change the XPS spectra of titanium rods (Ti and TiSB), although it increased their hydrophilicity. The materials did not show cell toxicity. After 14 days of incubation, PMMATiO2, smooth titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox), and sandblasted titanium rods (TiSB, TiSBox) showed significantly higher adhesion forces than PMMA ex vivo. In vivo, the use of a TiSB sleeve around the stem of the B-KPro induced a significant increase in tissue adhesion compared to a Ti sleeve or bare PMMA. Conclusions Sandblasted titanium sleeves greatly enhanced adherence of the B-KPro to the rabbit cornea. This approach may improve adhesion with the donor cornea in humans as well. Translational Relevance This approach may improve adhesion with donor corneas in humans. PMID:27152247

  16. Oxygen-Barrier Coating for Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Unnam, Jalaiah

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen-barrier coating for titanium developed to provide effective and low-cost means for protecting titanium alloys from oxygen in environment when alloys used in high-temperature mechanical or structural applications. Provides protective surface layer, which reduces extent of surface oxidation of alloy and forms barrier to diffusion of oxygen, limiting contamination of substrate alloy by oxygen. Consists of submicron layer of aluminum deposited on surface of titanium by electron-beam evaporation, with submicron layer of dioxide sputtered onto aluminum to form coat.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  18. Contemplating a role for titanium in organisms.

    PubMed

    Zierden, Mark R; Valentine, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and some organisms sequester it avidly, though no essential biological role has yet been recognized. This Minireview addresses how the properties of titanium, especially in an oxic aqueous environment, might make a biological role difficult to recognize. It further considers how new -omic technologies might overcome the limitations of the past and help to reveal a specific role for this metal. While studies with well established model organisms have their rightful place, organisms that are known avid binders or sequesterers of titanium should be promising places to investigate a biological role.

  19. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ataya, Ali; Kline, Kristopher P; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies.

  20. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Ali; Kline, Kristopher P.; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies. PMID:26744684

  1. Titanium-potassium heat pipe corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1984-07-01

    An experimental study of the susceptibility of wickless titanium/potassium heat pipes to corrosive attack has been conducted in vacuo at 800/sup 0/K for 6511h and at 900/sup 0/K for 4797h without failure or degradation. Some movement of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen was observed in the titanium container tube, but no evidence of attack could be detected in metallographic cross sections of samples taken along the length of the heat pipes. The lack of observable attack of titanium by potassium under these conditions refutes previous reports of Ti-K incompatibility.

  2. Ultraviolet laser treatment of titanium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchev, Ivaylo; Minkovski, Nikolai; Dimitrov, Krasimir; Shipochka, Maria; Barbucha, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Interaction of a third harmonic of DPSS laser, wavelength 355 nm and pulse duration of 30 ns with titanium wafers was studied. It was investigated the structure of laser ablated titanium surface, depending on the laser beam scanning speed, and laser pulse frequency. The titanium surface modification was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XPS (X- ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Nanosecond irradiation with ultraviolet light of Ti plate led to the formation of high porous granular structures consisting of agglomerated micro- and submicro- particles.

  3. Nanomechanical behavior of (1 0 0) oriented titanium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, Kuraganti; Ghanashyam Krishna, Mamidipudi; Padmanabhan, Kuppuswamy Anantha

    2014-03-01

    Titanium thin films were deposited on single crystal Si (3 1 1) and polycrystalline 316 LN nuclear grade stainless steel substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction revealed that, irrespective of substrate type, films exhibit preferential growth along the (1 0 0) plane. The microstructure of the films corresponds to the zone-I type in structure zone model on both substrates. The hardness and Young's modulus of the films were extracted from load-displacement curves. The maximum values of hardness and Young's modulus were 12 and 132 GPa respectively for 220 nm thin film on SS substrate. The electrical resistivity data revealed that the films are metallic in nature and the resistivity is lower in the case of the 220 nm thickness film, on both substrates. The observed changes in mechanical and electrical properties can be correlated with variations in the microstructure of Ti films.

  4. Highly reliable spin-coated titanium dioxide dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sandip; Kumar, Arvind; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric degradation as low as 0.3 % has been observed for a highly reliable Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film after constant voltage stressing (CVS) with - 4 V for 105 second at room temperature (300 K). The film was fabricated by sol -gel spin - coating method on a lightly doped p-Si (~1015 cm-3) substrate. The equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) is 7 nm with a dielectric constant 33 (at 1 MHz). Metal - Oxide - Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors have been fabricated with an optimum annealing temperature of 800°C for one hour in a preheated furnace. The dielectric degradation is annealing temperature dependent. A degradation of 1.4 %, 1.2 % and 1.1 % has been observed for 400°C, 600°C and 1000°C temperature annealed MOS respectively. The dielectric degradation increases below or above the optimum temperature of annealing.

  5. [Comparison of the biological tolerance of titanium and titanium alloys in human gingiva cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Hehner, B; Heidemann, D

    1989-01-01

    Mirror-finished solid specimens of pure titanium and the titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V as well as Ti-5Al-2.5Fe showed no effects on the growth behavior and cell morphology of human gingival epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures. The growth of the cells contacting all three materials was uninhibited. SEM revealed growth of fibroblasts on the surfaces of the specimens, too. No differences could be found between the biocompatibility of titanium alloys and that of pure titanium. The formation of a stable surface oxide layer providing resistance to corrosion may be decisive.

  6. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  7. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  8. In vivo evaluation of plasma-sprayed titanium coating after alkali modification.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weichang; Liu, Xuanyong; Zheng, XueBin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, plasma-sprayed titanium coatings were modified by alkali treatment. The changes in chemical composition and structure of coatings were examined by SEM and AES. The results obtained indicated that a net-like microscopic texture feature, which was full of the interconnected fine porosity, appeared on the surface of alkali-modified titanium coatings. The surface chemical composition was also altered by alkali modification. A sodium titanate compound was formed on the surface of the titanium coating and replaced the native passivating oxide layer. Its thickness was measured as about 150 nm which was about 10 times of that of the as-sprayed coating. The bone bonding ability of titanium coatings were investigated using a canine model. The histological examination and SEM observation demonstrated that more new bone was formed on the surface of alkali-modified implants and grew more rapidly into the porosity. The alkali-modified implants were found to appose directly to the surrounding bone. In contrast, a gap was observed at the interface between the as-sprayed implants and bone. The push-out test showed that alkali-modified implants had a higher shear strength than as-sprayed implants after 1 month of implantation. An interfacial layer, containing Ti, Ca and P, was found to form at the interface between bone and the alkali-modified implant by EDS analysis.

  9. Bonding of low-fusing dental porcelain to commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Könönen, M; Kivilahti, J

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the investigation was to study the basic problems related to the firing of dental porcelain to commercially pure titanium. The firing of a low-fusing porcelain to sandblasted or electrolytically polished titanium was carried out in an ordinary dental furnace. The interfacial regions between the ceramic coatings and titanium were analyzed using scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Thermal stresses in the joints were evaluated by means of a finite element model based on multilayer elastic strain analysis. The chemical reactions and their formation sequence at 750 degrees C was predicted thermodynamically and observed experimentally both at 750 and 800 degrees C. The C-SAM results gave evidence that the integrity of the porcelain-titanium joints are better in the sandblasted samples than in the electropolished ones, where defects were larger. SEM analyses of the same samples confirmed the C-SAM findings. Because the reaction layers are more continuous in the electropolished samples, cracks propagated more readily in these samples during the cooling procedure. Both thermodynamic calculations and experimental chemical analyses strongly indicate that the cause for the cracking of the reaction zone is thin layer of Ti (oxo)silicide and/or a relatively thick solid solution layer of Ti and oxygen. PMID:7814430

  10. Permanent mold casting of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, M.; Sahoo, M.; Lavender, C.; paul.jablonski, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    A literature review indicated that data on the effect of various casting defects, such as inclusions and porosity, on the properties of titanium alloy castings were not readily available. This information is required to reduce the cost of fabricating titanium castings for potential automotive applications. To this end, a research project was initiated to develop data on the as-cast properties of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64). Step plate castings with 3.2, 6.3, 13, and 25 mm thick steps were produced in a high-density graphite mold following melting in an induction furnace with water-cooled copper hearth. The mechanical properties were determined in the as-cast condition and were found to be close to the values reported in standards. Few casting defects such as inclusions and porosity were observed, and the loss of strength due to these defects is not significant. It is shown that titanium castings with good mechanical properties can be produced in high-density graphite molds.

  11. Study of the laser marking process of cold sprayed titanium coatings on aluminium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Memola Capece Minutolo, F.; Squillace, A.; Velotti, C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the study of the laser marking process of titanium cold sprayed coatings on aluminium substrates. Despite several studies regarding the laser marking process are available in literature very few attention have been paid to the marking of cold sprayed coatings and there are no previous papers in literature. Also the phenomena occurring during the marking of a porous coating are to date not fully understood and will be discussed in this paper. The experimental campaign was also repeated on grade 2 titanium rolled sheets with a thickness of 2 mm. The marking tests were carried out under different experimental conditions varying the main process parameters (i.e. laser pulse power and laser scan speed), after that the mark sections were observed by optical microscope and SEM. Both the maximum penetration depth and width of the marks were acquired and also internal damages induced by the process were studied. A correlation between the process parameters and the mark's geometry was found. The results show the effectiveness of the laser process to produce high quality marks on both the titanium layer and the titanium sheet. Moreover, a higher mark penetration on Ti coating was observed compared to the Ti sheet. However, the results show also the possibility to introduce severe and hidden damages in both materials if the process parameters are not properly set.

  12. Characterization and quantification of oxides generated by anodization on titanium for implantation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloia Games, L.; Pastore, J.; Bouchet, A.; Ballarre, J.

    2011-12-01

    The use of titanium as implant material is widely known in the surgery field. The formation of natural or artificial compact and protective oxide is a convenient tool for metal protection and a good way to generate phosphate deposits to enhance biocompatibility and bone fixation with the existing tissue. The present work has the aim of superficially modify commercially pure titanium sheets used in orthopedics and odontology, with a potencistatic anodization process with an ammonium phosphate and ammonium fluoride solution as electrolyte. The objective is to generate titanium oxides doped with phosphorous on the surface, to promote bioactivity. The characterization and quantification of the generated deposits is presented as a starting point for the future application of these materials. The applied characterization methods are X ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis for evaluating the chemical and phase composition on the modified surface and PDI image analysis techniques that allow the segmentation of SEM images and the measurement and quantification of the oxides generated by the anodization process. The samples with polished treated surface at 30V have the deposit of a phosphate rich thick layer covering almost all the surface and spherical-shaped titanium oxide crystals randomly placed (covering more than 20% of the surface area).

  13. Electro-Explosive Doping of VT6 Titanium Alloy Surface by Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzareva, T. Yu; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Budovskkh, E. A.; Konovalov, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The studies carried out in this work target detection of changes in the surface layer of titanium alloy VT6 after electro-explosive alloying (EEA) by boron carbide. EEA of VT6 titanium alloy surface is the plasma alloying formed during the electric explosion of foil with the sample powder of boron carbide. Carbon fibers with weight 140 mg were used as an explosive conductor. Sample powder of boron carbide B4C was placed in the area of explosion on the carbon fibers. It was revealed that EEA of the surface layers of titanium alloy samples VT6 leads to the modification of the layer, thickness of which changes from 10 pm to 50 pm. Heterogeneous distribution of alloying elements was found in the treatment zone by the methods of X-ray microanalysis. A significant difference in their concentration in the identified layers leads to difference in their structural and tribological behaviour. It was revealed that after electro-explosive alloying the microhardness of titanium alloy VT6 significantly increases. Electro-explosive alloying leads to the formation of a structure of submicro- and nano-scale level. It allows strength and tribological properties of the treated surface to be increased.

  14. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  15. Velocity measurements of inert porous materials driven by infrared-laser-ablated thin-film titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedeaux, Brett C.; Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.

    2010-02-01

    This article presents and interprets a series of experiments performed to measure the velocity of four inert low-density porous materials that were accelerated by an ablated thin-film titanium metal, created by vaporizing a 250-nm-thick layer of titanium with a high-energy, Q-switched, pulsed, and 1.054 μm neodymium-glass laser. Inert powder materials were chosen to match, among other characteristics, the morphology of energetic materials under consideration for use in detonator applications. The observed behavior occurs near the thin-film titanium ablation layer, through complex physical mechanisms, including laser absorption in the metal layer, ablation and formation of confined plasma that is a blackbody absorber of the remaining photon energy, and vaporization of the remaining titanium metal. One-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling provided a basis of comparison with the measured velocities. We found, as predicted in wave-propagation-code modeling, that an Asay foil can indicate total momentum of the driven material that is mechanically softer (lower in shock impedance) than the foil. The key conclusion is that the specific impulse delivered by the laser transfers a corresponding momentum to soft, organic power columns that are readily compacted. Impulse from the laser is less efficient in transferring momentum to hard inorganic particles that are less readily compacted.

  16. Osteoblast response on co-modified titanium surfaces via anodization and electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Cem; Demirbilek, Murat; Yalçın, Eda; Bozkurt, Murat; Doğan, Metin; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2014-01-01

    Topography plays a key role in osseointegration and surface modifications at the subcellular level, increasing initial cell attachment in the early period. In the past decade, nanosized texture on metal like a nanotube layer and also more recently extracellular matrix like surface modifications - such as polymeric nanofibrils - have been proposed for a better osseointegration in the literature. Here, we investigate two types of nanoscaled modifications alone and together for the first time. We characterized different types of surface modifications morphologically and investigated how they affected osteoblast cells in vitro, in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. We anodized titanium samples with a thickness of 0.127 mm to obtain a nanotubular titania layer and the silk fibroin (SF), as a biocompatible polymeric material, was electrospun onto both anodized and unanodized samples to acquire 4 sample groups. We analyzed the resulting samples morphologically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium content were evaluated at 3, 7 and 14 days. We found that cell proliferation increased by 70% on the groups having two modifications respect to unmodified titanium and after 7 days, ALP activity and calcium content were 110% and 150%, respectively, higher on surfaces having both surface treatments than that of unmodified group. In conclusion, a nanotube layer and SF nanofibers on a titanium surface enhanced cell attachment and proliferation most. Comodification of titanium surfaces by anodization and SF electrospinning may be useful to enhance osseointegration but it requires in vivo confirmation.

  17. A comparative study of zirconium and titanium implants in rat: osseointegration and bone material quality.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Rebecca M; Katunar, María R; Gomez Sanchez, Andrea; Orellano, Juan C; Ceré, Silvia M; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Ballarre, Josefina

    2014-02-01

    Permanent metal implants are widely used in human medical treatments and orthopedics, for example as hip joint replacements. They are commonly made of titanium alloys and beyond the optimization of this established material, it is also essential to explore alternative implant materials in view of improved osseointegration. The aim of our study was to characterize the implant performance of zirconium in comparison to titanium implants. Zirconium implants have been characterized in a previous study concerning material properties and surface characteristics in vitro, such as oxide layer thickness and surface roughness. In the present study, we compare bone material quality around zirconium and titanium implants in terms of osseointegration and therefore characterized bone material properties in a rat model using a multi-method approach. We used light and electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate the osseointegration in terms of compositional and structural properties of the newly formed bone. Regarding the mineralization level, the mineral composition, and the alignment and order of the mineral particles, our results show that the maturity of the newly formed bone after 8 weeks of implantation is already very high. In conclusion, the bone material quality obtained for zirconium implants is at least as good as for titanium. It seems that the zirconium implants can be a good candidate for using as permanent metal prosthesis for orthopedic treatments.

  18. Enhanced osseointegration of titanium implants with nanostructured surfaces: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Salou, Laëtitia; Hoornaert, Alain; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are commonly used for dental implants because of their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The surface properties of titanium implants are key factors for rapid and stable bone tissue integration. Micro-rough surfaces are commonly prepared by grit-blasting and acid-etching. However, proteins and cells interact with implant surfaces in the nanometer range. The aim of this study was to compare the osseointegration of machined (MA), standard alumina grit-blasted and acid-etched (MICRO) and nanostructured (NANO) implants in rabbit femurs. The MICRO surface exhibited typical random cavities with an average roughness of 1.5 μm, while the NANO surface consisted of a regular array of titanium oxide nanotubes 37±11 nm in diameter and 160 nm thick. The MA and NANO surfaces had a similar average roughness of 0.5 μm. The three groups of implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. After 4 weeks, the pull-out test gave higher values for the NANO than for the other groups. Histology corroborated a direct apposition of bone tissue on to the NANO surface. Both the bone-to-implant contact and bone growth values were higher for the NANO than for the other implant surfaces. Overall, this study shows that the nanostructured surface improved the osseointegration of titanium implants and may be an alternative to conventional grit-blasted and acid-etched surface treatments.

  19. Copper/nickel eutectic brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutchera, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique joins titanium or one of its alloys to materials, such as iron, nickel or cobalt base material, or to refractory metals. To ensure formation of a satisfactory bond, the temperature, time, environment and pressure must be controlled.

  20. Determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Tetzlaff, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride involves dissolution of TiN in 10M hydrofluoric acid containing an oxidant. Released nitrogen is determined as ammonia. Best oxidizers are ferric chloride, potassium iodate, and potassium dichromate.

  1. Hot isostatic pressing of titanium based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Widmer, R.; Hebeisen, J.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of titanium in demanding aerospace and terrestrial applications is presented, and the necessity to reduce cost to increase use is discussed. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP`ing) can be utilized with titanium based materials to obtain cost reduction and to enhance performance. The science/technology of various facets of the titanium scenario where HIP`ing can be used to advantage is presented, including powder metallurgy, castings, metal matrix composites and use of thermochemical processing. The major application of HIP`ing for titanium based materials is in castings; followed by blended elemental concepts. Much work has been conducted on continuous fiber reinforced materials, with the first use in actual commercial components likely to occur in engine components. Discontinuously reinforced products are already in use in aerospace and terrestrial applications. For the future, developing processing such as mechanical alloying, nanostructured materials and rapidly solidified product could benefit from compaction by HIP`ing. 55 refs., 30 figs.

  2. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  7. Valve, normally open, titanium: Pyronetics Model 1425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos, E.

    1972-01-01

    An operating test series was applied to two explosive actuated, normally open, titanium valves. There were no failures. Tests included: proof pressure and external leakage test, gross leak test, post actuation leakage test, and burst pressure test.

  8. Shattering the myth of the resonantly photo-pumped neon-like titanium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J.; MacGowan, B.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Moreno, J.C.; Koch, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    Several years ago neon-like titanium (Z = 22) was made to lase at 326 {angstrom} on the 3p {yields} 3s (J = 0 {yields} 1) transition. At the time it was suggested that the lasing may be due to resonantly photo-pumping the neon-like titanium 2p {yields} 4d lines using 3s {yields} 2p and 3d {yields} 2p lines in carbon-like and nitrogen-like titanium which results in lasing on the 3p {yields} 3s transition in neon-like titanium. The strongest argument for this explanation was that adjacent elements (scandium and vanadium) did not lase while titanium was unique in having the above mentioned resonance. In addition a prepulse was required to make the titanium lase, suggestive of the formation of a low density plasma, and the plasma was very overstripped, so the above mentioned pump lines should be quite strong for photo-pumping. We have reinvestigated this laser system and will present results which show lasing on the 3p {yields} 3s (J = 0 {yields} 1) transition in neon-like chromium (Z = 24), iron (Z = 26), and nickel (Z = 28) at 285, 255, and 231 {angstrom} respectively. This destroys the myth of titanium being unique and makes highly unlikely that the previously mentioned photo-pumping mechanism is playing a significant role in the titanium laser. The chromium, iron, and nickel experiments all require a prepulse in order to lase and our calculations suggest that the prepulse is an exciting new way to create a uniform low density plasma when illuminating a thick slab target. This allows the proper conditions for gain and laser propagation for low Z neon-like ions and may also be applicable to other systems such as low Z nickel-like ions. We also will present experiments done on other low-Z materials and offer an explanation as to how the hyperfine effect is destroying the gain of neon-like ions with odd Z.

  9. Development of a thick film PZT foil sensor for use in structural health monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Pickwell, Andrew J; Dorey, Robert A; Mba, David

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is a technique of growing interest in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). The use of AE devices to monitor the health of structural components is currently limited by the cost of AE equipment, which prohibits the permanent placement of AE devices on structures for the purposes of continuous monitoring and the monitoring of areas with limited access. Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) can provide solutions to these problems. We present the manufacture of a 4.4-μm-thick lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film on a 110-μm-thick titanium foil substrate for use as an AE sensor. The thick-film sensor is benchmarked against commercially available AE sensors in static and dynamic monitoring applications. The thick-film AE device is found to perform well in the detection of AE in static applications. A low signal-to-noise ratio is found to prohibit the detection of AE in a dynamic application.

  10. Influence of colorant and film thickness on thermal aging characteristics of oxo-biodegradable plastic bags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuterio, Giselle Lou D.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Domingo, Carla Marie C.; Lim, Anna Patricia G.

    2016-05-01

    Functional, lightweight, strong and cheap plastic bags incorporated with pro-oxidants undergo accelerated degradation under exposure to heat and oxygen. This work investigated the effect of colorant and film thickness on thermal aging characteristics of commercial oxo-biodegradable plastic bag films at 70 °C. Degradation is monitored through changes in infrared absorption, weight, and tensile properties of thermally aged films. The presence of carbonyl band in infrared spectrum after 672 h of thermal aging supports the degradation behavior of exposed films. Results show that incorporation of colorant and increasing thickness exhibit low maximum weight uptake. Titanium dioxide as white colorant in films lowers the susceptibility of films to oxygen uptake but enhances physical degradation. Higher amount of pro-oxidant loading also contributes to faster degradation. Opaque films are characterized by low tensile strength and high elastic modulus. Decreasing the thickness contributes to lower tensile strength of films. Thermally aged films with colorant and low thickness promote enhanced degradation.

  11. Laboratory studies of the newly discovered infrared band at 4705.2 cm-1 (2.1253 micrometers) in the spectrum of Io: the tentative identification of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Trafton, L. M.; Lester, D. F.; Ramseyer, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss over 120 laboratory experiments pertaining to the identification of the new absorption band discovered by Trafton et al. (1991) at 4705.2 cm-1 (2.1253 micrometers) in the spectrum of Io. It is shown that this band is not due to overtones or combinations of the fundamental bands associated with the molecules (or their chemical complexes) already identified on Io, namely, SO2, H2S, and H2O. Thus, this band is due to a new, previously unidentified, component of Io. Experiments also demonstrate that the band is not due to molecular H2 frozen in SO2 frosts. Since the frequency of this band is very close to the first overtone of the nu 3 asymmetric stretching mode of CO2, we have investigated the spectral behavior of CO2 under a variety of conditions appropriate for Io. The profile of the Io band is not consistent with the rotational envelope expected for single, freely rotating, gaseous CO2 under Io-like conditions. It was found that pure, solid CO2 and CO2 intimately mixed in a matrix of solid SO2 and H2S produce bands with similar widths (5-10 cm-1), but that these bands consistently fall at frequencies about 10-20 cm-1 (approximately 0.007 micrometer) lower than the Io band. CO2 in SO2 : H2S ices also produces several additional bands that are not in the Io spectra. The spectral fit improves, however, as the CO2 concentration in SO2 increases, suggesting that CO2-CO2 interactions might be involved. A series of Ar : CO2 and Kr : CO2 matrix isolation experiments, as well as laboratory work done elsewhere, show that CO2 clustering shifts the band position to higher frequencies and provides a better fit to the Io band. Various laboratory experiments have shown that gaseous CO2 molecules have a propensity to cluster between 80 and 100 K, temperatures similar to those found on the colder regions of Io. We thus tentatively identify the newly discovered Io band at 4705.2 cm-1 (2.1253 micrometers) with CO2 multimers or "clusters" on Io. Whether these clusters are

  12. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I.

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  13. Atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide coatings on KD-II silicon carbide fibers and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shiyi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    To provide oxidation protection and/or to act as an interfacial coating, titanium oxide (TiO2) coatings were deposited on KD-II SiC fibers by employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water (H2O) as precursors. The average deposition rate was about 0.08 nm per cycle, and the prepared coatings were smooth, uniform and conformal, shielding the fibers entirely. The as-deposited coatings were amorphous regardless of the coating thickness, and changed to anatase and rutile crystal phase after annealing at 600 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. The oxidation measurement suggests that the TiO2 coating enhanced the oxidation resistance of SiC fibers obviously. SiC fibers coated with a 70-nm-thick TiO2 layer retained a relatively high tensile strength of 1.66 GPa even after exposition to air at 1400 °C for 1 h, and thick silica layer was not observed. In contrast, uncoated SiC fibers were oxidized dramatically through the same oxidation treatment, covered with a macro-cracked thick silica film, and the tensile strength was not measurable due to interfilament adhesion. The above results indicate that TiO2 films deposited by ALD are a promising oxidation resistance coating for SiC fibers.

  14. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  15. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  16. Hydrocarbon Deposition Attenuates Osteoblast Activity on Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, R.; Ueno, T.; Migita, S.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Doi, H.; Ogawa, T.; Hanawa, T.; Wakabayashi, N.

    2014-01-01

    Although the reported percentage of bone-implant contact is far lower than 100%, the cause of such low levels of bone formation has rarely been investigated. This study tested the negative biological effect of hydrocarbon deposition onto titanium surfaces, which has been reported to be inevitable. Osteogenic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on titanium disks on which the carbon concentration was experimentally regulated to achieve carbon/titanium (C/Ti) ratios of 0.3, 0.7, and 1.0. Initial cellular activities such as cell attachment and cell spreading were concentration-dependently suppressed by the amount of carbon on the titanium surface. The osteoblastic functions of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization were also reduced by more than 40% on the C/Ti (1.0) surface. These results indicate that osteoblast activity is influenced by the degree of hydrocarbon contamination on titanium implants and suggest that hydrocarbon decomposition before implant placement may increase the biocompatibility of titanium. PMID:24868012

  17. Initial cytotoxicity of novel titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C; Okabe, T

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the biological response to several novel titanium alloys that have promising physical properties for biomedical applications. Four commercial titanium alloys [Super-TIX(R) 800, Super-TIX(R) 51AF, TIMETAL(R) 21SRx, and Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM grade 5)] and three experimental titanium alloys [Ti-13Cr-3Cu, Ti-1.5Si and Ti-1.5Si-5Cu] were tested. Specimens (n = 6; 5.0 x 5.0 x 3.0 mm(3)) were cast in a centrifugal casting machine using a MgO-based investment and polished to 600 grit, removing 250 mum from each surface. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti: ASTM grade 2) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) were used as positive controls. The specimens were cleaned and disinfected, and then each cleaned specimen was placed in direct contact with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts for 72 h. The cytotoxicity [succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity] of the extracts was assessed using the MTT method. Cytotoxicity of the metals tested was not statistically different compared to the CP Ti and Teflon controls (p > 0.05). These novel titanium alloys pose cytotoxic risks no greater than many other commonly used alloys, including commercially pure titanium. The promising short-term biocompatibility of these Ti alloys is probably due to their excellent corrosion resistance under static conditions, even in biological environments.

  18. Titanium dioxide antireflection coating for silicon solar cells by spray deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, W.; Tracy, E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-speed production process is described for depositing a single-layer, quarter-wavelength thick antireflection coating of titanium dioxide on metal-patterned single-crystal silicon solar cells for terrestrial applications. Controlled atomization spraying of an organotitanium solution was selected as the most cost-effective method of film deposition using commercial automated equipment. The optimal composition consists of titanium isopropoxide as the titanium source, n-butyl acetate as the diluent solvent, sec-butanol as the leveling agent, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to render the material uniformly depositable. Application of the process to the coating of circular, large-diameter solar cells with either screen-printed silver metallization or with vacuum-evaporated Ti/Pd/Ag metallization showed increases of over 40% in the electrical conversion efficiency. Optical characteristics, corrosion resistance, and several other important properties of the spray-deposited film are reported. Experimental evidence indicates a wide tolerance in the coating thickness upon the overall efficiency of the cell. Considerations pertaining to the optimization of AR coatings in general are discussed, and a comprehensive critical survey of the literature is presented.

  19. Nano-scale analysis of titanium dioxide fingerprint-development powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A. J.; Jones, B. J.; Sears, V.; Bowman, V.

    2008-08-01

    Titanium dioxide based powders are regularly used in the development of latent fingerprints on dark surfaces. For analysis of prints on adhesive tapes, the titanium dioxide is suspended in a surfactant and used in the form of a small particle reagent (SPR). Analysis of commercially available products shows varying levels of effectiveness of print development, with some powders adhering to the background as well as the print. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of prints developed with different powders show a range of levels of aggregation of particles. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the fingerprint powder shows TiO2 particles with a surrounding coating, tens of nanometres thick, consisting of Al and Si rich material. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to determine the composition and chemical state of the surface of the powders; with a penetration depth of approximately 10nm, this technique demonstrates differing Ti: Al: Si ratios and oxidation states between the surfaces of different powders. Levels of titanium detected with this technique demonstrate variation in the integrity of the surface coating. The thickness, integrity and composition of the Al/Si-based coating is related to the level of aggregation of TiO2 particles and efficacy of print development.

  20. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    PubMed Central

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  1. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  2. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  3. Development of metal oxide impregnated stilbite thick film ethanol sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabole, M. P.; Lakhane, M. A.; Choudhari, A. L.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of the sensing efficiency of Titanium oxide/ Stilbite and Copper oxide /Stilbite composites towards detection of hazardous pollutants like ethanol. Stilbite based composites are prepared by physically mixing zeolite with metal oxides namely TiO2 and CuO with weight ratios of 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25. The resulting sensor materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy techniques. Composite sensors are fabricated in the form of thick film by using screen printing technique. The effect of metal oxide concentration on various ethanol sensing parameters such as operating temperature, maximum uptake capacity and response/recovery time are investigated. The results indicate that metal oxide impregnated stilbite composites have great potential as low temperature ethanol sensor.

  4. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  5. Improved Coal-Thickness Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    Summed signals and dielectric-filled antenna improve measurement. Improved FM radar for measuring thickness of coal seam eliminates spectrum splitting and reduces magnitude of echo from front coal surface.

  6. Edge-on thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, A.; Katkov, I.; Chilingarian, I.; Silchenko, O.; Moiseev, A.; Borisov, S.

    2016-06-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on early-type disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4 ‑ 5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ ‑0.2 ‑ 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its only disc is thick and old (10 Gyr) and its α-element abundance suggests a long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results prove the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  7. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  8. Fabrication of single-phase titanium carbide layers from MWCNTs using high DC pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Sik; Moon, Sook Young; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Bang, Sin Young; Choi, Bong Geun; Ham, Heon; Sekino, Tohru; Shim, Kwang Bo

    2010-02-01

    Single-phase layered titanium carbide (TiC) was successfully synthesized by reacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) under a high direct current (DC) pulse. Single-phase TiC layer fabrication is confirmed as the transformation of multi-layered graphene from MWCNTs. Therefore its thickness and width is almost identical to those of transformed graphene layers. This is the first report on the formation of single-phase layered nano-TiC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were used for the characteristic analysis of single-phase layered TiC structures.

  9. Fabrication of single-phase titanium carbide layers from MWCNTs using high DC pulse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Sik; Moon, Sook Young; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Bang, Sin Young; Choi, Bong Geun; Ham, Heon; Sekino, Tohru; Shim, Kwang Bo

    2010-02-01

    Single-phase layered titanium carbide (TiC) was successfully synthesized by reacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) under a high direct current (DC) pulse. Single-phase TiC layer fabrication is confirmed as the transformation of multi-layered graphene from MWCNTs. Therefore its thickness and width is almost identical to those of transformed graphene layers. This is the first report on the formation of single-phase layered nano-TiC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were used for the characteristic analysis of single-phase layered TiC structures. PMID:20051612

  10. Adsorption of micelle-forming surfactants from aqueous solutions on disperse titanium boride

    SciTech Connect

    Grodskii, A.S.; Komleva, E.A.; Frolov, Yu.G.

    1988-08-10

    Adsorption studies showed that nonionogenic and cationic surfactants are adsorbed on the surface of disperse titanium boride. Anionic surfactants are virtually not adsorbed due to the negative charge of the particles. It was found that in the region of low concentrations of surfactants in the solution, adsorption of Sintanols takes place in lyophobic regions and the surface of the particles becomes hydrophilic. The Sintamid molecules are adsorbed on the entire interface, including both hydrophobic and hydrophilic sections, with subsequent formation of bimolecular layers by adsorption on hydrophobic sections. Catamine-AB is adsorbed on hydrophilic sections of the surface also with the formation of bimolecular layers. Developed polymolecular layers up to 10-15 nm thick are formed on titanium boride particles from micellar solutions of nonionigenic and cationic surfactants.

  11. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  12. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to <5 vol% porosity is a one-step process requiring no intermediate machining steps. The melt infiltration method requires no external pressure. This prevents over-infiltration of the outer surface plies, which can lead to excessive residual porosity in the center of the part. However, processing of thick-section components required modification of the conventional process conditions, and the means by which the large amount of molten metal is introduced into the fiber preform. Modification of the low-temperature, ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process used to apply interface coatings to the fiber preform was also required to accommodate the high preform thickness. The thick-section CMC processing developed in this work proved to be invaluable for component development, fabrication, and testing in two complementary efforts. In a project for the Army, involving SiC/SiC blisk development, nominally 0.8 in. thick x 8 in. diameter (approx. 2 cm thick x 20 cm diameter) components were successfully infiltrated. Blisk hubs were machined using diamond-embedded cutting tools and successfully spin-tested. Good ply uniformity and extremely low residual porosity (<2

  13. Weldability of a titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Baeslack, W.A., III ); Mascorella, T.J. ); Kelly, T.J. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors report the weldability of an alpha-two titanium auuminide, Ti-13.5 wt-%Al-21.5 wt-%Nb (Ti-24 at.-%Al-11 at.-%Nb), investigated from a perspective of developing relationships between the weld cooling rate, microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior. Dilatometry studies performed over a range of cooling rates from 1{degree} to 150{degrees}C/s(1.8{degrees} to 270{degrees}F/s) show a continuous decrease in the body-centered cubic (BCC) to hexagonal close-packed (HCP) transformation start temperature. Water quenching from above the beta transus temperature provided a rapid cooling rate of 750{degrees}C/s(1350 {degrees}F/s), which promoted complete retention of BCC beta phase. Implications of the continuous-cooling phase transformation study on the joining of Ti-13.5 wt-%Al-21.5 wt-%Nb using alternate welding processes are discussed.

  14. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  15. Titanium template for scaphoid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, M; Schaefer, D J; Schumacher, R; Müller-Gerbl, M; Honigmann, P

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of a non-united scaphoid with a humpback deformity involves resection of the non-union followed by bone grafting and fixation of the fragments. Intraoperative control of the reconstruction is difficult owing to the complex three-dimensional shape of the scaphoid and the other carpal bones overlying the scaphoid on lateral radiographs. We developed a titanium template that fits exactly to the surfaces of the proximal and distal scaphoid poles to define their position relative to each other after resection of the non-union. The templates were designed on three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and manufactured using selective laser melting technology. Ten conserved human wrists were used to simulate the reconstruction. The achieved precision measured as the deviation of the surface of the reconstructed scaphoid from its virtual counterpart was good in five cases (maximal difference 1.5 mm), moderate in one case (maximal difference 3 mm) and inadequate in four cases (difference more than 3 mm). The main problems were attributed to the template design and can be avoided by improved pre-operative planning, as shown in a clinical case. PMID:25167978

  16. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  17. Engineering titanium surfaces for improving osteointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiong

    Titanium is one of the most important metallic biomedical materials in clinical applications. One of the key issues for successful application of titanium is the interaction at the interface between the titanium and the bone. The present study focuses on improving the surfaces of titanium to achieve better capability to bond with natural bone (i.e. better osteointegration). The objectives of this work include: (1) Developing microfabrication methods to produce micropatterns on titanium surfaces for promoting osteointegration; (2) Studying the calcium phosphate (Ca-P) formation on the chemical treated titanium surface and elucidating the mechanism of precipitation theoretically; and (3) Evaluating osteoconductivity of engineering titanium surfaces in vitro and in vivo. Through mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM), jet electrochemical micromachining (Jet-EMM) and the confined etchant layer technique (CELT) were attempted to produce micropatterns on titanium surfaces. TMEMM has a high etching rate and good reproducibility and was used to produce micro-hole arrays on Ti plates for in vivo testing. The driving force and nucleation rate of Ca-P precipitation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were analyzed based on the classical crystallization theory. SBF supersaturation with respect to HA, OCP and DCPD (dicalcium phosphate) was carefully calculated, considering all the association/dissociation reactions of related ion groups in SBF. The analysis indicates that the nucleation rate of OCP is substantially higher than that of HA, while HA is most thermodynamically stable in SBF. DCPD precipitation is thermodynamically impossible in normal SBF, unless calcium and phosphate ion concentrations of SBF increase. Osteoconduction of Ti6Al4V surfaces under various conditions, including micro-patterned, alkali-treated, micro-patterned plus alkali-treated, and surfaces without any treatment, was evaluated. TMEMM was used to fabricate micro-hole arrays on the titanium alloy

  18. Steel and titanium hollow sphere foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hurysz, K.M.; Clark, J.L.; Nagel, A.R.; Lee, K.J.; Cochran, J.K.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Hardwicke, C.U.

    1998-12-31

    Metal hollow sphere foams are fabricated by bonding millimeter sized metal alloy hollow spheres at points of contact. The spheres are formed as powder shells from slurries. For stainless steel spheres, the starting powder is a mixture of iron and chromium oxide. Thermal treatment in hydrogen reduces the oxides to Fe/Cr alloys with less than 2% porosity in sphere walls. The nominal composition is close to that of 405 stainless. Carburization in CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere followed by heat treatment produces foams of either 410 or 420 type stainless steels depending on carbon content. Compressive stress-strain behavior was measured on point contact bonded stainless foams both before and after carburization. Hardness measurements on steel sphere walls were used to estimate the yield strength. Relative strengths of the foams were positioned between open and closed cell models. This was encouraging because bonding in the foams was less than optimum and the hollow sphere walls contained defects. As processing improves, strengths should increase. To produce titanium alloy spheres, the starting powder is titanium alloy hydride. Thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere decomposes the hydride and sinters the titanium powder in the sphere walls to greater than 96% relative density. Both titanium and Ti-6V-4V spheres and foams have been produced. Oxygen contents are a concern for titanium compositions and processing is being altered to reduce oxygen levels to increase ductility.

  19. Titanium nitride deposited by dual ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamaji, S.; Maeyama, Y.; Ina, T.; Minowa, Y.

    1989-03-01

    Titanium nitride films have been prepared by the dual ion beam (DIB) deposition technique, which consists of the ionized cluster beam (ICB) and the ionized gas beam (IGB). As the source of ICB, vaporized titanium is ejected through the multinozzle of the crucible into a high vacuum chamber and is cooled and clustered by adiabatic expansion. The titanium clusters thus obtained are partially ionized in an electron shower and accelerated to the substrate. At the same time, as the source of IGB, nitrogen molecules are partially ionized, excited and decomposed in an electron shower and also accelerated to the substrate. These two beams collide and combine together on their way to the substrate. The characteristics of the ion current density and the properties of titanium nitride films are investigated. It is found that the DIB technique has a great advantage in preparing titanium nitride films of various crystalline structures from TiN to Ti 2N at a low temperature with a high deposition rate over a large substrate. Therefore, the chemical reaction is enhanced by the irradiation of the ionized and excited gases and the migration of ionized clusters on the substrate.

  20. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, TH.; Heeb, B.; Gauckler, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 microns. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains was parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6 deg. At 77 K/0T a critical current density of 15, 000 A/sq cm was reached in films of the dimension 1 cm x 2 cm x 20 microns (1 micron V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4 K/0T the highest value was 350,000 A/sq cm (1 nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  1. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B.

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  2. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  3. Effects of Oxide Film on the Corrosion Resistance of Titanium Grade 7 in Fluoride-Containing NaCl Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Whalen, M T; Wong, L

    2004-11-30

    The effects of oxide film on the corrosion behavior of Titanium Grade 7 (0.12-0.25% Pd) in fluoride-containing NaCl brines have been investigated. With the presence of a 0.6 {micro}m thick oxide layer, the annealed Ti grade 7 exhibited a significant improvement on the anodic polarization behavior. However, the oxide film did not demonstrate sustainable corrosion resistance in fluoride-containing solutions.

  4. System for measuring film thickness

    DOEpatents

    Batishko, Charles R.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Peters, Timothy J.; Rasmussen, Donald E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

  5. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  6. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  7. Individual prefabricated titanium implants and titanium mesh in skull base reconstructive surgery. A report of cases.

    PubMed

    Schipper, J; Ridder, G J; Spetzger, U; Teszler, C B; Fradis, M; Maier, W

    2004-05-01

    Titanium implants can be shaped by traditional hand forming, press shaping, modular construction by welding, construction on full-size models shaped from CT coordinates and, most recently, by computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that consist in the direct prefabrication of individual implants by milling them out of a solid block of titanium. The aim of our study was to present a set of preliminary cases of an ongoing program of reconstructive procedures of the skull base using titanium implants. The subjects underwent ablative procedures of the skull base with reconstruction either by titanium mesh or individual prefabricated CAD/CAM implants. Six patients have been operated on successfully since 2000: two received prefabricated CAD/CAM titanium plates and four others underwent reconstruction with titanium mesh. The stability of CAD/CAM plates is superior to that of mesh, thus it is more useful in reconstructing large lesions of the frontal skull base and the temporal and occipital bones. Titanium mesh was successfully used for defects smaller than 100 cm(2) or where selected viscerocranial defects are complicated in design and less reproducible by CAD/CAM. The intraoperative design, shaping and adjustment characteristic of titanium mesh can be dispensed with when CAD/CAM implants are used. The 3-D data set used in the CAD/CAM process also operates in the navigated simulation and planning of the ablation contours, the latter being of great assistance in establishing the optimal future defect. As a disadvantage, CAD/CAM technology is more expensive than titanium mesh, and the process is time-consuming as it is carried out in advance of surgery.

  8. Recent developments in Japanese titanium research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinomi, M.

    1996-07-01

    Activity in the titanium industries in Japan has been steadily increasing as the demand for titanium and titanium alloys in consumer goods grows. The key issues in continuing the growth of these applications are lowering costs and developing new markets. In this article, advances in R&D reported mainly in the Japanese journals and at Japanese conferences are briefly described.

  9. Biocompatible glass ceramic coatings for titanium alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A.S.; Ludanova, O.V.

    1995-11-01

    Coatings from hydroxylapatite and bioglass for titanium are considered. A review of patents and scientific publications shows that there are prerequisites for creating coatings on titanium alloys that would ensure the biological compatibility of titanium on the basis of known technologies.

  10. Titanium-nitrogen reaction investigated for application to gettering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Coleman, L. F.; Kyle, M. L.; Pierce, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Titanium is one of several gettering materials available for removing nitrogen from inert gases. The reaction rate of titanium-metal sponge and nitrogen in argon-nitrogen mixtures was studied at 900 degrees C. The rate was found to depend upon the partial pressure of nitrogen in the gas phase. Mathematical relationships simulate titanium systems.

  11. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  12. Laser action of optically pumped atomic titanium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, H.; Hirata, K.

    1989-09-01

    Laser action has been observed on the titanium 551.4 nm, 3D0(1)-F2, transition. A nitrogen laser is used to produce the titanium vapor by irradiating a metal plate, and the titanium atoms are optically pumped by another nitrogen laser.

  13. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  14. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  15. Enhancing osseointegration using surface-modified titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Oh, N.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Oh, S.; Appleford, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Bumgardner, J.; Haggard, W.; Ong, J.

    2006-07-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. The success of implants is due to osseointegration or the direct contact of the implant surface and bone without a fibrous connective tissue interface. This review discusses the enhancement of osseointegration by means of anodized microporous titanium surfaces, functionally macroporous graded titanium coatings, nanoscale titanium surfaces, and different bioactive factors.

  16. Effect of sample thickness on 511 keV single Compton-scattered gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-H, K. V.; Cristancho, F.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma backscattering experiments were performed on metal foils varying some geometric parameters of the assembly. A collimated beam from a 22Na source impinges on aluminum sheets of dimensions 33.3×20.4×1.0 cm3 and iron sheets of (33.2×20.4×0.2) cm3. The backscattered photons are detected by a 3″×3″ CsI scintillator detector placed at 90° to the incident beam. The experimental results show that thickness of metalic samples can be determined with a very small uncertainty.

  17. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  18. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  19. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  20. Process for preparing titanium nitride powder

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-06-17

    A process for making titanium nitride powder by reaction of titanium phosphates with sodium cyanide. The process of this invention may comprise mixing one or more phosphates of Ti with a cyanide salt in the absence of oxygen and heating to a temperature sufficient to cause reaction to occur. In the preferred embodiment the ratio of cyanide salt to Ti should be at least 2 which results in the major Ti-containing product being TiN rather than sodium titanium phosphate byproducts. The process is an improvement over prior processes since the byproducts are water soluble salts of sodium which can easily be removed from the preferred TiN product by washing. 2 tabs.

  1. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J G; Geremias, T C; Montero, J F D; Vahey, B R; Benfatti, C A M; Souza, J C M; Magini, R S; Pimenta, A L

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml(-)(1)), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5×10(2)CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4×10(2)CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. PMID:27524086

  2. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  3. Fermion localization on thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Tempo, Jose David

    2006-02-15

    We consider chiral fermion confinement in scalar thick branes, which are known to localize gravity, coupled through a Yukawa term. The conditions for the confinement and their behavior in the thin-wall limit are found for various different BPS branes, including double walls and branes interpolating between different AdS{sub 5} spacetimes. We show that only one massless chiral mode is localized in all these walls, whenever the wall thickness is keep finite. We also show that, independently of wall's thickness, chiral fermionic modes cannot be localized in dS{sub 4} walls embedded in a M{sub 5} spacetime. Finally, massive fermions in double wall spacetimes are also investigated. We find that, besides the massless chiral mode localization, these double walls support quasilocalized massive modes of both chiralities.

  4. Applications of film thickness equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    A number of applications of elastohydrodynamic film thickness expressions were considered. The motion of a steel ball over steel surfaces presenting varying degrees of conformity was examined. The equation for minimum film thickness in elliptical conjunctions under elastohydrodynamic conditions was applied to roller and ball bearings. An involute gear was also introduced, it was again found that the elliptical conjunction expression yielded a conservative estimate of the minimum film thickness. Continuously variable-speed drives like the Perbury gear, which present truly elliptical elastohydrodynamic conjunctions, are favored increasingly in mobile and static machinery. A representative elastohydrodynamic condition for this class of machinery is considered for power transmission equipment. The possibility of elastohydrodynamic films of water or oil forming between locomotive wheels and rails is examined. The important subject of traction on the railways is attracting considerable attention in various countries at the present time. The final example of a synovial joint introduced the equation developed for isoviscous-elastic regimes of lubrication.

  5. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  6. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs, <100 nm) are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO(2)-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO(2)-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  7. The effect of silica-containing binders on the titanium/face coat reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Frueh, C.; Poirier, D.R.; Maguire, M.C.

    1996-11-01

    The interactions of CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V with investment molds containing alumina/silica and yttria/silica face coat systems were studied. Containerless melting in a vacuum was employed and small test samples were made by drop casting into the molds. The effects of the face coat material and mold preheat temperatures on the thickness of the alpha case on the castings were evaluated with microhardness and microprobe measurements. It was found that the thickness of the alpha case was the same, whether a yttria/silica or alumina/silica face coat was used, indicating that the silica binder reacted with the titanium. Hence, the use of expensive refractories, such as yttria, represents an unnecessary cost when combined with a silica binder. It was also found that the alloyed titanium castings had a thinner alpha case than those produced from CP-Ti, which suggests that the thickness of the alpha case depends on the crystal structure of the alloy during cooling from high temperatures. Furthermore, castings made in small yttria crucibles used as molds exhibited little or no alpha case.

  8. CO2 lasers and temperature changes of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Oyster, D K; Parker, W B; Gher, M E

    1995-12-01

    Lasers may be useful in uncovering submerged implants or in removing contaminants from "ailing" implants. The purposes of this study were to record temperature changes at the bone-titanium implant interface when using a CO2 laser to: 1) uncover the implant at second stage surgery; and 2) "decontaminate" exposed implant threads. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize surface changes of lased implants, both uncontaminated or contaminated with blood or saliva. In part one, 28 titanium implants, measuring 3.75 mm by 7 to 20 mm, were placed into room temperature, fresh, resected pig mandibles and covered with a flap of gingiva. The overlying tissue was removed with a CO2 laser at different power levels. Bone-implant interface temperatures were measured with a thermocouple near the top of the implant, and 5 to 7 mm apical to the osseous crest. The effects of implant size, power level, tissue thickness, and operation time were evaluated. In part two, 5 mm by 4 mm bony dehiscences were created on 3 implants in one mandible and the exposed fixture threads lased at varying times and power levels. The results from part one showed temperature increases at the top thermocouple ranged from 4.2 to 16.8 degrees C and increases at the bottom thermocouple ranged from 2.0 to 11.5 degrees C. The results from part two showed temperature increases at the top thermocouple ranged from 1.2 to 11.7 degrees C and increases at the bottom thermocouple from 0.0 to 5.0 degrees C. If baseline ambient temperatures are 37 degrees C, then the temperature at the bone-implant interface might exceed 50 degrees C. SEM revealed no gross surface changes in lased uncontaminated implants, but laser treatment alone of contaminated implants failed to completely remove saliva or blood. Further study is needed regarding temperature increases and surface changes induced by lasers that may adversely affect osseointegration.

  9. Speckle in a thick diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Nien-An

    Theory and experiments on speckle generated from a thick diffuser are presented in this thesis. An overview of speckle from a diffuser in a 4F optical processor gives a basic understanding of the speckle formation and properties. The speckle size depends on the F number of the system, while the interior properties of a diffuser are evident in the wavelength dependence of speckle. We then move on to analyzing speckle from a thick diffuser, which is composed of particles embedded in a host medium. Emphasis on the theory is placed on solving for the wavelength decorrelation of speckle in a thick diffuser. A brief overview of the scattering theory for a particle using the Lorenz-Mie theory is included. Then we present a careful analysis of the speckle created by propagation through a thick diffuser. In the analysis we use an angular spectrum approach that is valid in the non-paraxial case together with a decomposition of the thick diffuser into a cascade of many screens. This calculation is well-suited to numerical analysis and an original computer software program has been provided as an Appendix in this thesis. By adding the scattered field from the randomly-located particles on any screen and propagating through a free space between each screen, one can generate a speckled field after going through the whole cascade. The theoretical predictions are summarized and later compared with experimental results on a series of opal milk glass diffusers. In many practical applications it is particularly advantageous to have mild thick diffusers of controllable diffusivity. We have extensively studied a new diffuser series fabricated using polystyrene spheres of various diameters embedded in gelatin. Theory and experiments are in good agreement.

  10. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  11. Beta titanium: a new orthodontic alloy.

    PubMed

    Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J

    1980-02-01

    Historically, few alloys have been used in the fabrication of orthodontic appliances. This article reviews the gold-based, stainless steel, chrome-cobalt-nickel, and nitinol alloys, as well as beta titanium, a new material for orthodontics. Mechanical properties and manipulative characteristics are summarized to develop a basis for the selection of the proper alloy for a given clinical situation. The beta titanium wire has a unique balance of low stiffness, high springback, formability, and weldability which indicates its use in a wide range of clinical applications. A number of such applications are described. PMID:6928342

  12. Laser deposition of multiwalled titanium oxide microtubes

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, A A; Arakelyan, Sergei M; Kutrovskaya, S V; Kucherik, A O; Prokoshev, V G

    2010-09-10

    We propose approaches to producing micro- and nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces via exposure to cw laser radiation and repetitive laser pulses. By varying the experimental geometry (angle of incidence, substrate-target separation and other parameters), various structures can be obtained. Titanium oxide tubes grown in a nonuniform magnetic field are up to 1 {mu}m in diameter and up to 500 {mu}m in length. Such structures can be used in catalytic filtration and as multiwalled structures similar to superlattices. (laser technologies)

  13. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  14. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  15. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.; Orshanskaya, E. G.

    2015-09-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density.

  16. Hydrogen partitioning and transport in titanium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Weon S.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the final summary of the research work perfomed from March 1, 1990 to August 28, 1993. Brief descriptions of the research findings are given on the surface variation of Ti-14Al-21Nb as a function of temperature under ultrahigh vacuum conditions; titanium aluminides: surface composition effects as a function of temperature; Auger electron intensity variation in oxygen-charged silver; and segregation of sulfur on a titanium surface studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. Each description details one or more of the attached corresponding figures. Published journal documents are provided as appendices to give further detail.

  17. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; deFromont, F.

    2007-03-01

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  18. Reliability of Various Measurement Stations for Determining Plantar Fascia Thickness and Echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Bisi-Balogun, Adebisi; Cassel, Michael; Mayer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relative and absolute reliability of ultrasound (US) measurements of the thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia (PF) at different measurement stations along its length using a standardized protocol. Twelve healthy subjects (24 feet) were enrolled. The PF was imaged in the longitudinal plane. Subjects were assessed twice to evaluate the intra-rater reliability. A quantitative evaluation of the thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia was performed using Image J, a digital image analysis and viewer software. A sonography evaluation of the thickness and echogenicity of the PF showed a high relative reliability with an Intra class correlation coefficient of ≥0.88 at all measurement stations. However, the measurement stations for both the PF thickness and echogenicity which showed the highest intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCs) did not have the highest absolute reliability. Compared to other measurement stations, measuring the PF thickness at 3 cm distal and the echogenicity at a region of interest 1 cm to 2 cm distal from its insertion at the medial calcaneal tubercle showed the highest absolute reliability with the least systematic bias and random error. Also, the reliability was higher using a mean of three measurements compared to one measurement. To reduce discrepancies in the interpretation of the thickness and echogenicity measurements of the PF, the absolute reliability of the different measurement stations should be considered in clinical practice and research rather than the relative reliability with the ICC. PMID:27089369

  19. Reliability of Various Measurement Stations for Determining Plantar Fascia Thickness and Echogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bisi-Balogun, Adebisi; Cassel, Michael; Mayer, Frank

    2016-04-13

    This study aimed to determine the relative and absolute reliability of ultrasound (US) measurements of the thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia (PF) at different measurement stations along its length using a standardized protocol. Twelve healthy subjects (24 feet) were enrolled. The PF was imaged in the longitudinal plane. Subjects were assessed twice to evaluate the intra-rater reliability. A quantitative evaluation of the thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia was performed using Image J, a digital image analysis and viewer software. A sonography evaluation of the thickness and echogenicity of the PF showed a high relative reliability with an Intra class correlation coefficient of ≥0.88 at all measurement stations. However, the measurement stations for both the PF thickness and echogenicity which showed the highest intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCs) did not have the highest absolute reliability. Compared to other measurement stations, measuring the PF thickness at 3 cm distal and the echogenicity at a region of interest 1 cm to 2 cm distal from its insertion at the medial calcaneal tubercle showed the highest absolute reliability with the least systematic bias and random error. Also, the reliability was higher using a mean of three measurements compared to one measurement. To reduce discrepancies in the interpretation of the thickness and echogenicity measurements of the PF, the absolute reliability of the different measurement stations should be considered in clinical practice and research rather than the relative reliability with the ICC.

  20. Procedure for Automated Eddy Current Crack Detection in Thin Titanium Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    This procedure provides the detailed instructions for conducting Eddy Current (EC) inspections of thin (5-30 mils) titanium membranes with thickness and material properties typical of the development of Ultra-Lightweight diaphragm Tanks Technology (ULTT). The inspection focuses on the detection of part-through, surface breaking fatigue cracks with depths between approximately 0.002" and 0.007" and aspect ratios (a/c) of 0.2-1.0 using an automated eddy current scanning and image processing technique.

  1. Structural characterisation of oxygen diffusion hardened alpha-tantalum PVD-coatings on titanium.

    PubMed

    Hertl, C; Koll, L; Schmitz, T; Werner, E; Gbureck, U

    2014-08-01

    Titanium substrates were coated with tantalum layers of 5 μm thickness using physical vapour deposition (PVD). The tantalum layers showed a (110)-preferred orientation. The coated samples were hardened by oxygen diffusion. Using X-ray diffraction the crystallographic structure of the tantalum coatings was characterised, comparing untreated and diffusion hardened specimen conditions. Oxygen depth profiles were determined by glow discharge spectrometry. The hardening effect of the heat treatment was examined by Vickers microhardness testing. The increase of surface hardness caused by oxygen diffusion was at least 50%.

  2. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene).

    PubMed

    Mashtalir, O; Lukatskaya, M R; Kolesnikov, A I; Raymundo-Piñero, E; Naguib, M; Barsoum, M W; Gogotsi, Y

    2016-04-28

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g(-1) in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  3. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Raymundo-Pinero, E.; Naguib, Michael; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-03-25

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. Furthermore, the hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g–1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  4. Titanium and Ruthenium Phthalocyanines for NO2 Sensors: A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Anna Maria; Pennesi, Giovanna; Rossi, Gentilina; Generosi, Amanda; Paci, Barbara; Albertini, Valerio Rossi

    2009-01-01

    This review presents studies devoted to the description and comprehension of phenomena connected with the sensing behaviour towards NO2 of films of two phthalocyanines, titanium bis-phthalocyanine and ruthenium phthalocyanine. Spectroscopic, conductometric, and morphological features recorded during exposure to the gas are explained and the mechanisms of gas-molecule interaction are also elucidated. The review also shows how X-ray reflectivity can be a useful tool for monitoring morphological parameters such as thickness and roughness that are demonstrated to be sensitive variables for monitoring the exposure of thin films of sensor materials to NO2 gas. PMID:22346697

  5. Eddy current thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Gary J.; Sinclair, Frank; Soskov, Alexander; Buff, James S.

    2015-06-16

    A sheet of a material is disposed in a melt of the material. The sheet is formed using a cooling plate in one instance. An exciting coil and sensing coil are positioned downstream of the cooling plate. The exciting coil and sensing coil use eddy currents to determine a thickness of the solid sheet on top of the melt.

  6. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed.

  7. Structure of molten titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.

    2014-09-01

    The x-ray structure factor of molten TiO2 has been measured, enabled by the use of aerodynamic levitation and laser beam heating, to a temperature of T=2250(30)K. The Ti-O coordination number in the melt is close to nTiO=5.0(2), with modal Ti-O bond length rTiO=1.881(5)Å, both values being significantly smaller than for the high temperature stable rutile crystal structure (nTiO=6.0,rTiO=1.959Å). The structural differences between melt and crystal are qualitatively similar to those for alumina, which is rationalized in terms of the similar field strengths of Ti4+ and Al3+. The diffraction data are used to generate physically and chemically reasonable structural models, which are then compared to the predictions based on various classical molecular dynamics (MD) potentials. Interatomic potentials, suitable for modeling molten TiO2, are introduced, given the inability of existing MD models to reproduce the diffraction data. These potentials have the additional advantage of being able to predict the density and thermal expansion of the melt, as well as solid amorphous TiO2, in agreement with published results. This is of critical importance given the strong correlation between density and structural parameters such as nTiO. The large thermal expansion of the melt is associated with weakly temperature dependent structural changes, whereby simulations show that nTiO=5.85(2)-[3.0(1)×10-4]T(K ,2.75Åcutoff). The TiO2 liquid is structurally analogous to the geophysically relevant high pressure liquid silica system at around 27 GPa. We argue that the predominance of fivefold polyhedra in the melt implies the existence of as-yet-undiscovered TiO2 polymorphs, based on lower-than-octahedral coordination numbers, which are likely to be metastable under ambient conditions. Given the industrial importance of titanium oxides, experimental and computational searches for such polymorphs are well warranted.

  8. Structure of molten titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.

    2014-09-18

    The x-ray structure factor of molten TiO2 has been measured for the first time, enabled by the use of aerodynamic levitation and laser beam heating, to a temperature of T = 2250(30) K. Ti-O coordination number in the melt is close to nTiO = 5.0(2), with modal Ti-O bond length rTiO = 1.881(5) Å, both values being significantly smaller than for the high temperature stable Rutile crystal structure (nTiO = 6.0, rTiO = 1.959 Å). The structural differences between melt and crystal are qualitatively similar to those for alumina, which is rationalized in terms of the similar field strengths of Ti4+ and Al3+. The diffraction data are used to generate physically and chemically reasonable structural models, which are then compared to the predictions based on various classical molecular dynamics (MD) potentials. New interatomic potentials, suitable for modelling molten TiO2, are introduced, given the inability of existing MD models to reproduce the diffraction data. These new potentials have the additional great advantage of being able to predict the density and thermal expansion of the melt, as well as solid amorphous TiO2, in agreement with published results. This is of critical importance given the strong correlation between density and structural parameters such as nTiO. The large thermal expansion of the melt is associated with weakly temperature dependent structural changes, whereby simulations show that nTiO = 5.85(2) – (3.0(1) x 10-4 )T (K, 2.75 Å cut-off). The TiO2 liquid is structurally analogous to the geophysically relevant high pressure liquid silica system at around 27 GPa. We argue that the predominance of 5-fold polyhedra in the melt implies the existence of as yet undiscovered TiO2 polymorphs, based on lowerthan-octahedral coordination numbers, which are likely to be metastable under ambient conditions. Given the industrial importance of titanium oxides, experimental and computational searches for such polymorphs are well warranted.

  9. The effect of heat- or ultra violet ozone-treatment of titanium on complement deposition from human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Linderbäck, Paula; Harmankaya, Necati; Askendal, Agneta; Areva, Sami; Lausmaa, Jukka; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-06-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a well known metallic biomaterial extensively used in dental, orthopaedic-, and occasionally also in blood contacting applications. It integrates well to bone and soft tissues, and is shown upon blood plasma contact to activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and bind complement factor 3b. The material properties depend largely on those of the nm-thick dense layer of TiO(2) that becomes rapidly formed upon contact with air and water. The spontaneously formed amorphous Ti-oxide has a pzc approximately 5-6 and its water solubility is at the order of 1-2 micromolar. It is often subjected to chemical- and heat treatments in order to increase the anatase- and rutile crystallinity, to modify the surface topography and to decrease the water solubility. In this work, we prepared sol-gel derived titanium and smooth PVD titanium surfaces, and analysed their oxide and protein deposition properties in human blood plasma before and after annealing at 100-500 degrees C or upon UVO-treatment for up to 96 hours. The blood plasma results show that complement deposition vanished irreversibly after heat treatment at 250-300 degrees C for 30 minutes or after UVO exposure for 24 hours or longer. XPS and infrared spectroscopy indicated change of surface water/hydroxyl binding upon the heat- and UVO treatments, and increased Ti oxidation. XRD analysis confirmed an increased crystallinity and both control (untreated) and annealed smooth titanium displayed low XRD-signals indicating some nanocrystallinity, with predominantly anatase phase. The current results show that the behaviour of titanium dioxide in blood contact can be controlled through relatively simple means, such as mild heating and illumination in UV-light, which both likely irreversibly change the stoichiometry and structure of the outmost layers of titanium dioxide and its OH/H(2)O binding characteristics.

  10. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  11. Titanium Oxide: A Bioactive Factor in Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Medina, P.; Sundaram, P. A.; Diffoot-Carlo, N.

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are currently accepted as the gold standard in dental applications. Their excellent biocompatibility has been attributed to the inert titanium surface through the formation of a thin native oxide which has been correlated to the excellent corrosion resistance of this material in body fluids. Whether this titanium oxide layer is essential to the outstanding biocompatibility of titanium surfaces in orthopedic biomaterial applications is still a moot point. To study this critical aspect further, human fetal osteoblasts were cultured on thermally oxidized and microarc oxidized (MAO) surfaces and cell differentiation, a key indicator in bone tissue growth, was quantified by measuring the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using a commercial assay kit. Cell attachment was similar on all the oxidized surfaces although ALP expression was highest on the oxidized titanium alloy surfaces. Untreated titanium alloy surfaces showed a distinctly lower degree of ALP activity. This indicates that titanium oxide clearly upregulates ALP expression in human fetal osteoblasts and may be a key bioactive factor that causes the excellent biocompatibility of titanium alloys. This result may make it imperative to incorporate titanium oxide in all hard tissue applications involving titanium and other alloys. PMID:26664360

  12. Biological surface modification of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haw-Ming; Hsieh, Sung-Chih; Teng, Nai-Chia; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Ou, Ken-Liang; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2011-06-01

    To improve the biological activity of titanium, by using of glow discharge plasma (GDP), albumin-grafted titanium disk have been implemented and carefully studied. Titanium disks were pre-treated with GDP in an environment filled with argon and allylamine gas. Glutaraldehyde was used as a cross-linking agent for albumin grafting. Then, the surface of the albumin-grafted titanium was examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, the static water contact angles of the albumin-grafted titanium disks were measured using goniometry. To observe the effects of albumin adsorption on cell behavior, MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on the surface-modified titanium disks. Blood coagulation resistance of the modified titanium was monitored and compared to the control titanium disks. The results demonstrated that MG-63 osteoblast-like cells cultured on the albumin-grafted titanium disks expressed better-differentiated morphology compare to cells grown on the control disks. Furthermore, albumin-grafting treatment significantly improved the surface wettability of the titanium disks and resulted in a significantly negative effect on thrombus formation. Based on these results, it was believed that the GDP can potentially improve the biofunctionality of titanium surfaces. PMID:21286829

  13. Formation of titanium(IV) transferrin by reaction of human serum apotransferrin with titanium complexes.

    PubMed

    Messori, L; Orioli, P; Banholzer, V; Pais, I; Zatta, P

    1999-01-15

    The reaction of human serum apotransferrin with titanium(IV) citrate under physiological conditions results in the formation of a specific bis-titanium(IV) transferrin adduct (Ti2Tf hereafter) with two titanium(IV) ions loaded at the iron binding sites. The same specific Ti2Tf complex is formed by reacting apotransferrin with titanium(III) chloride and exposing the sample to air. The derivative thus obtained was characterized by spectroscopic techniques, including absorption, UV difference, circular dichroism and 13C NMR spectroscopies, and shown to be stable within the pH range 5.5-9.0. Surprisingly, the reaction of apoTf with titanium(IV) nitrilotriacetate (NTA) does not lead to formation of appreciable amounts of Ti2Tf, even after long incubation times, although some weak interactions of Ti(IV)-NTA with apoTf are spectroscopically detected. Implications of the present results for a role of transferrin in the uptake, transport and delivery of soluble titanium(IV) compounds under physiological conditions are discussed. PMID:9928993

  14. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  15. Photoelectrochemical activity of titanium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdinezhad Roshan, Aida

    Crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films have been extensively investigated due to their various applications in a wide range of field such as photocatalysis, solar cells, gas sensors, self-cleaning windows, etc. The general objective of the present work can be categorized into two different parts. The first part of research is to acquire a fundamental understanding of thin film deposition and characterization of materials surfaces produced by Electrolytic Plasma Processing (EPP) and Magnetron Sputtering system. It has been tried to develop a crystalline layer of titanium dioxide thin film using these two techniques. Aluminum and titanium are the substrate materials. Also a part of study is to clean and roughen the substrate prior to the deposition to examine the effect of morphology. Aluminum was chosen as the substrate as well as titanium in order to enable us to get cheaper product. Second main portion of this work is to check the photoelectrochemical response of the deposited film and explore the effect of various parameters of coating process on this photoelectrochemical response.

  16. Aluminum penetration and fracture of titanium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Dorward, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Relatively porous titanium diboride (/approximately equals/96% dense) is penetrated with aluminum metal when used as a cathode in aluminum reduction cells operating at 970/sup 0/C. Metal penetration changes the predominant fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular, and has potentially important ramifications on mechanical properties. 3 refs.

  17. Preelectroplating Treatment Of Titanium Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael L.; Harvey, James S.

    1992-01-01

    New technique used to treat titanium honeycomb core electrochemically by applying conversion coat to keep honeycomb active and receptive to electroplating with solution of sodium bichromate and hydrofluoric acid. Maskant permits electroplating of controlled amount of filler metal on edge of honeycomb. Eliminates excess copper filler.

  18. Biocorrosion study of titanium-cobalt alloys.

    PubMed

    Chern Lin, J H; Lo, S J; Ju, C P

    1995-05-01

    The present work provides experimental results of corrosion behaviour in Hank's physiological solution and some other properties of in-house fabricated titanium-cobalt alloys with cobalt ranging from 25-30% in weight. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that, in water-quenched (WQ) alloys, beta-titanium is largely retained, whereas in furnace-cooled (FC) alloys, little beta-titanium is found. Hardness of the alloys increases with increasing cobalt content, ranging from 455 VHN for WQ Ti-25 wt% Co to 525 VHN for WQ Ti-30 wt% Co. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates that melting temperatures of the alloys are lower than that of pure titanium by about 600 degrees C. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that all measured break-down potentials in Hank's solution at 37 degrees C are higher than 800 mV. The breakdown potential for the FC Ti-25 Wt% Co alloy is even as high as nearly 1200 mV.

  19. Bioactive borate glass coatings for titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Peddi, Laxmikanth; Brow, Richard K; Brown, Roger F

    2008-09-01

    Bioactive borate glass coatings have been developed for titanium and titanium alloys. Glasses from the Na(2)O-CaO-B(2)O(3) system, modified by additions of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), and P(2)O(5), were characterized and compositions with thermal expansion matches to titanium were identified. Infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that a hydroxyapatite surface layer forms on the borate glasses after exposure to a simulated body fluid for 2 weeks at 37 degrees C; similar layers form on 45S5 Bioglass((R)) exposed to the same conditions. Assays with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells show the borate glasses exhibit in vitro biocompatibility similar to that of the 45S5 Bioglass((R)). An enameling technique was developed to form adherent borate glass coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy, with adhesive strengths of 36 +/- 2 MPa on polished substrates. The results show these new borate glasses to be promising candidates for forming bioactive coatings on titanium substrates.

  20. Titanium surface hydrophilicity enhances platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Titanium implant surface modification is a key strategy used to enhance osseointegration. Platelets are the first cells that interact with the implant surface whereupon they release a wide array of proteins that influence the subsequent healing process. This study therefore investigated the effect of titanium surface modification on the attachment and activation of human platelets. The surface characteristics of three titanium surfaces: smooth (SMO), micro-rough (SLA) and hydrophilic micro-rough (SLActive) and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets following exposure to these surfaces were determined. The SLActive surface showed the presence of significant nanoscale topographical features. While attached platelets appeared to be morphologically similar, significantly fewer platelets attached to the SLActive surface compared to both the SMO and SLA surfaces. The SLActive surface however induced the release of the higher levels of chemokines β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 from platelets. This study shows that titanium surface topography and chemistry have a significant effect on platelet activation and chemokine release.

  1. Lactobacillus assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2007-05-01

    An eco-friendly lactobacillus sp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40 60 nm are found.

  2. Titanium nitride electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Novak, Robert F.; Schmatz, Duane J.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1987-12-22

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film of titanium nitride as an electrode deposited onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  3. Coating for prevention of titanium combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, V. G.; Funkhouser, M.; Mcdaniel, P.

    1980-01-01

    A limited number of coating options for titanium gas turbine engine components were explored with the objective of minimizing potential combustion initiation and propagation without adversely affecting component mechanical properties. Objectives were met by two of the coatings, ion-plated platinum plus electroplated copper plus electroplated nickel and ion vapor deposited aluminum.

  4. [Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: occupational exposure limits].

    PubMed

    Swidwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is produced in Poland as a high production volume chemical (HPVC). It is used mainly as a pigment for paints and coatings, plastics, paper, and also as additives to food and pharmaceuticals. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are increasingly applied in cosmetics, textiles and plastics as the ultraviolet light blocker. This contributes to a growing occupational exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are potentially responsible for the most adverse effects of titanium dioxide. Due to the absence of separate fraction of nanoobjects and appropriate measurement methods the maximum admissible concentrations (MAC) for particles < 100 nm and nano-TiO2 cannot be established. In the world there are 2 proposals of occupational exposure levels for titanium dioxide nanoparticles: 0.3 mg/m3, proposed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and 0.6 mg/m3, proposed by experts of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). The authors of this article, based on the available data and existing methods for hygiene standards binding in Poland, concluded that the MAC value of 0.3 mg/m3 for nanoparticles TiO2 in the workplace air can be accepted.

  5. Effect of alloy chemistry and exposure conditions on the oxidation of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Shenoy, R. N.; Clark, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    Multiwall is a new thermal protection system concept for advanced space transportation vehicles. The system consists of discrete panels made up of multiple layers of foil gage metal. Titanium is the proposed candidate metal for multiwall panels in the reentry temperature range up to 675 C. Oxidation and embrittlement are the principal concerns related to the use of Ti in heat shield applications. The results of a broad study on the oxidation kinetics of several titanium alloys subjected to different exposure conditions are described. The alloys include commercially pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo. Oxidation studies were performed on these alloys exposed at 704 C in 5-760 torr air pressure and 0 to 50% relative humidity. The resulting weight gains were correlated with oxide thickness and substrate contamination. The contamination depth and weight gains due to solid solutioning were obtained from microhardness depth profiles and hardness versus weight percent oxygen calibration data.

  6. Corrosion resistance and ion dissolution of titanium with different surface microroughness.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Wen, X; Zhang, N

    1998-01-01

    In vitro corrosion resistance and ion dissolution of commercial pure titanium with different surface microroughness are studied adopting constant potential meter and atomic absorption spectroscopy. In terms of the surface roughness, titanium samples are divided into 5 groups: smooth surface, machining surface, 2 different microroughness surfaces and macrorough surface. Each group contains three category samples under different treatments: natural oxidation (24 h exposure to air), oxidation under 400 degrees C (400 degrees C, 45 min thermal oxidation), oxidation under 700 degrees C (700 degrees C, 45 min thermal oxidation). In Hanks corrosion media, comparative studies through constant potential anode polarization curves and titanium release rates of the 5 groups of Ti samples demonstrates that oxidation under 400 degrees C best increase corrosion resistance and decrease ion release sharply, oxidation under 700 degrees C is better than natural oxidation. Ti samples with a different surface roughness all have good corrosion resistance and their corrosion resistance drop with the raising of surface roughness. Comparing with macrorough surface and machining surface, microrough surfaces have better corrosion resistance and a lower ion release rate which are similar to those of smooth surfaces. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of machining surface Ti is the lowest. It is hypothesized that surface treatment methods such as surface thermal oxidation, surface aging and so on will improve the corrosion resistance and decrease the ion release rate of rough surface effectively by increasing the thickness of surface protection film, improving its structural uniformity and facilitating the formation of ordered, compact surface protection film.

  7. Detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods in steel and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Tedrow, T. L.; Mullen, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    X-radiographic, liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and magnetic particle testing techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 4340 steel (180 KSI-UTS) and 6Al-4V titanium (STA) alloy specimens. Sixty steel specimens containing a total of 176 fatigue cracks and 60 titanium specimens containing a total of 135 fatigue cracks were evaluated. The cracks ranged in length from .043 cm (0.017 inch) to 1.02 cm (.400 inch) and in depth from .005 cm (.002 inch) to .239 cm (.094 inch) for steel specimens. Lengths ranged from .048 cm (0.019 inch) to 1.03 cm (.407 inch) and depths from 0.010 cm (.004 inch) to .261 cm (0.103 inch) for titanium specimens. Specimen thicknesses were nominally .152 cm (0.060 inch) and 0.635 cm (0.250 inch) and surface finishes were nominally 125 rms. Specimens were evaluated in the "as machined" surface condition, after etch surface and after proof loading in a randomized inspection sequence.

  8. Transformation behavior of nickel-titanium orthodontic wires under tensile load.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Ohta, Mitsuru; Brantley, William A; Naganishi, Atsuko; Murakami, Takashi; Muguruma, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated transformations of nickel-titanium wires using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) under tensile load (100 gf or 500 gf). Two nickel-titanium wires, 35°C Copper Ni-Ti and Nitinol SE, were selected. DSC analyses were performed between -90° and 100°C. Specimens prepared for TMA were approximately 150 µm thick and 12 mm long. TMA analyses were performed between -120° and 100°C. With TMA, all transformation temperatures for a tensile load of 500 gf, obtained from both the heating and cooling curves, were higher than those for a tensile load of 100 gf. While mean A(s) and A(f) temperatures for Copper Ni-Ti obtained by TMA were much higher than those obtained by DSC analysis, mean M(s) and M(f) temperatures obtained by TMA were much lower than those obtained by DSC analysis. The transformation behavior of nickel-titanium wires with change in temperature was affected by application of tensile load.

  9. Preparation of Copper and Chromium Alloyed Layers on Pure Titanium by Plasma Surface Alloying Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Wang, Huizhen; Zhang, Xiangyu; Tang, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Cu-Cr alloyed layers with different Cu and Cr contents on pure titanium were obtained by means of plasma surface alloying technology. The microstructure, chemical composition and phase composition of Cu-Cr alloyed layers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the alloyed layers are bonded strongly to pure titanium substrate and consist of unbound Ti, CuTi, Cu3Ti, CuTi3 and Cr2Ti. The thickness of Cu5Cr5 and Cu7Cr3 alloyed layer are about 18 μm and 28 μm, respectively. The antibacterial properties against gram-negative Escherichia coli (E.coli, ATCC10536) and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, ATCC6538) of untreated pure titanium and Cu-Cr alloyed specimen were investigated by live/dead fluorescence staining method. The study shows that Cu-Cr alloyed layers exhibit excellent antibacterial activities against both E.coli and S.aureus within 24 h, which may be attributed to the formation of Cu-containing phases.

  10. Wear and corrosion resistance of anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings on titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiangyu; He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Anti-bacterial coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance play a vital role in ensuring the durability of implant materials in constant use. To this end, a novel anti-bacterial surface modification by combining magnetron sputtering with plasma nitriding was adopted in this paper to fabricate Cu-bearing Ti-based nitrides coatings (Ti-Cu-N) on titanium surface. The anti-bacterial properties of Ti-Cu-N coatings were evaluated. The microstructures and composition of the coatings were investigated by using FESEM, EDS, GDOES, XRD. The wear and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The results confirmed that an anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coating with a thickness of 6 μm and good adhesive strength to substrate was successfully achieved on titanium surface. As implied by XRD, the coatings were consisted of TiN, Ti2N, TiN0.3 phases. The surface micro-hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Cu-N coatings were significantly enhanced after plasma nitriding treatment. The analysis of potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plots obtained in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution suggested that the Ti-Cu-N coatings also exhibited an excellent corrosion resistance. As mentioned above, it can be concluded that the duplex-treatment reported here was a versatile approach to develop anti-bacterial Ti-Cu-N coatings with excellent comprehensive properties on titanium implants.

  11. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Makiko; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yamada, Masahiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-Il; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability. Methods and results Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light) were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition in the valleys and at the inclines of micro-roughened structures without affecting the existing micro-configuration. Micro-roughened titanium and apatite-deposited titanium surfaces had similar roughness values. The attachment, spreading, settling, proliferation, and alkaline phosphate activity of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts were promoted on apatite-coated titanium with photofunctionalization. Conclusion UV-photofunctionalization of titanium enabled faster deposition of nanoscale biomimetic apatite, resulting in the improved biological capability compared to the similarly prepared apatite-deposited titanium without photofunctionalization. Photofunctionalization-assisted biomimetic apatite

  12. Machined Titanium Heat-Pipe Wick Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Minnerly, Kenneth G.; Gernert, Nelson J.

    2009-01-01

    Wick structures fabricated by machining of titanium porous material are essential components of lightweight titanium/ water heat pipes of a type now being developed for operation at temperatures up to 530 K in high-radiation environments. In the fabrication of some prior heat pipes, wicks have been made by extruding axial grooves into aluminum unfortunately, titanium cannot be extruded. In the fabrication of some other prior heat pipes, wicks have been made by in-situ sintering of metal powders shaped by the use of forming mandrels that are subsequently removed, but in the specific application that gave rise to the present fabrication method, the required dimensions and shapes of the heat-pipe structures would make it very difficult if not impossible to remove the mandrels due to the length and the small diameter. In the present method, a wick is made from one or more sections that are fabricated separately and assembled outside the tube that constitutes the outer heat pipe wall. The starting wick material is a slab of porous titanium material. This material is machined in its original flat configuration to form axial grooves. In addition, interlocking features are machined at the mating ends of short wick sections that are to be assembled to make a full-length continuous wick structure. Once the sections have been thus assembled, the resulting full-length flat wick structure is rolled into a cylindrical shape and inserted in the heatpipe tube (see figure). This wick-structure fabrication method is not limited to titanium/water heat pipes: It could be extended to other heat pipe materials and working fluids in which the wicks could be made from materials that could be pre-formed into porous slabs.

  13. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium. PMID:27582071

  14. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium.

  15. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  16. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Towner, R.R.; Gray, J.M.; Porter, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Ilmenite and rutile are currently the most important titanium-bearing minerals, although anatase may be important in the future. Both ilmenite and rutile occur in hard-rock and placer deposits, but at present all rutile production and about half of the ilmenite production are from placer deposits. Anatase occurs in laterite deposits in Brazil, which at present are largely undeveloped. World ilmenite resources in identified deposits that are economically exploitable (R1E} are sufficient for about 150 years at current production rates, and about two-thirds of these resources are in China, the Soviet Union, and Norway. World rutile R1E resources would last about 80 years at current production rates, and some 54 percent of these resources are in Australia, the United States, and Italy. Combined R1E resources of anatase (which are all in Brazil) and rutile would last 300 years at current rutile production rates. Over 95 percent of the world's mine production of titanium-bearing minerals is used to manufacture titanium dioxide pigment for paint and other products. Most of the remaining 4 to 5 percent of production, which is largely rutile, is used for making titanium metal. Australia and Canada are the largest ilmenite producers, together supplying about half the world total; South Africa, Norway, and the Soviet Union together account for another third. Australia accounts for half the total world rutile production, with Sierra Leone and South Africa together accounting for another third. Australia and Norway are the largest exporters of titanium minerals. Unless major new deposits are discovered and developed in the traditional producing countries, the pattern of world production of both ilmenite and rutile could change substantially by 2020.

  17. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  18. Preparation of thick molybdenum targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thick natural molybdenum deposits on nickel plated copper substrates were prepared by thermal decomposition of molybdenum hexacarbonyl vapors on a heated surface in an inert gas atmosphere. The molybdenum metal atoms are firmly bonded to the substrate atoms, thus providing an excellent thermal contact across the junction. Molybdenum targets thus prepared should be useful for internal bombardment in a cyclotron where thermal energy inputs can exceed 10 kW.

  19. Crustal Thickness Beneath Ocean Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.; Cullers, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    We measured the thickness of the Earth's crust beneath about two dozen of the GDSN or GEOSCOPE stations located on ocean islands by stacking moveout-corrected high-quality P-to-S receiver functions (RFs). The RFs were filtered in the 0.05-0.5 Hz frequency bands to compress strong noises that are common for ocean island stations. Given the small (less than 2 s) time separation between the direct P and the P-to-S converted phase from the Moho, the PSmS phase, which has a negative polarity and can be clearly observed at almost all the stations, is used for the stacking. Preliminary resulting thickness at each of the stations is as follows: AFI (12.4 km), AIS (13.6), ASCN (9.6), BBSR (9.9), BORG (9.4), CRZF (6.6), GUMO (8.0), HNR (8.0), HOPE (19.0), KIP (13.0), MSEY (10.7), MSVF (15.1), NOUC (15.1), PAF (8.9), POHA (17.0), PPT (12.3), PTCN (10.4), RAR (12.8), RER (13.8), RPN (9.3), SEY (14.9), SHEL (17.5), TBT (14.1), XMAS (11.8). Crustal thickness at some of the stations has been measured previously, and our results are in general agreement with those measurements. Possible age-dependence of the resulting thickness and geological implications in the understanding of plume-lithosphere interactions and formation of ocean islands will be presented.

  20. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  1. Measuring Rind Thickness on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Miller, J.; Brown, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nondestructive test determines rind thickness of polyurethane foam. Surface harness of foam measured by Shore durometer method: hardness on Shore D scale correlates well with rind thickness. Shore D hardness of 20, for example, indicates rind thickness of 0.04 inch (1 millimeter). New hardness test makes it easy to determine rind thickness of sample nondestructively and to adjust fabrication variables accordingly.

  2. Soliton models for thick branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyravi, Marzieh; Riazi, Nematollah; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present new soliton solutions for thick branes in 4+1 dimensions. In particular, we consider brane models based on the sine-Gordon (SG), φ 4 and φ 6 scalar fields, which have broken Z2 symmetry in some cases and are responsible for supporting and stabilizing the thick branes. The origin of the symmetry breaking in these models resides in the fact that the modified scalar field potential may have non-degenerate vacua. These vacua determine the cosmological constant on both sides of the brane. We also study the geodesic equations along the fifth dimension, in order to explore the particle motion in the neighborhood of the brane. Furthermore, we examine the stability of the thick branes, by determining the sign of the w^2 term in the expansion of the potential for the resulting Schrödinger-like equation, where w is the five-dimensional coordinate. It turns out that the φ ^4 brane is stable, while there are unstable modes for certain ranges of the model parameters in the SG and φ ^6 branes.

  3. Mechanical evaluation of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) structures with electron beam melting (EBM).

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Jayanthi; Starly, Binil; Raman, Shivakumar; Christensen, Andy

    2010-04-01

    Patient specific porous implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to their better performance over their generic counterparts. The recent introduction of electron beam melting (EBM) for the processing of titanium has led to a one step fabrication of porous custom titanium implants with controlled porosity to meet the requirements of the anatomy and functions at the region of implantation. This paper discusses an image based micro-structural analysis and the mechanical characterization of porous Ti6Al4V structures fabricated using the EBM rapid manufacturing process. SEM studies have indicated the complete melting of the powder material with no evidence of poor inter-layer bonding. Micro-CT scan analysis of the samples indicate well formed titanium struts and fully interconnected pores with porosities varying from 49.75%-70.32%. Compression tests of the samples showed effective stiffness values ranging from 0.57(+/-0.05)-2.92(+/-0.17)GPa and compressive strength values of 7.28(+/-0.93)-163.02(+/-11.98)MPa. For nearly the same porosity values of 49.75% and 50.75%, with a variation in only the strut thickness in the sample sets, the compressive stiffness and strength decreased significantly from 2.92 GPa to 0.57 GPa (80.5% reduction) and 163.02 MPa to 7.28 MPa (93.54 % reduction) respectively. The grain density of the fabricated Ti6Al4V structures was found to be 4.423 g/cm(3) equivalent to that of dense Ti6Al4V parts fabricated using conventional methods. In conclusion, from a mechanical strength viewpoint, we have found that the porous structures produced by the electron beam melting process present a promising rapid manufacturing process for the direct fabrication of customized titanium implants for enabling personalized medicine.

  4. Porous titania surfaces on titanium with hierarchical macro- and mesoporosities for enhancing cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang; Müller, Werner E G; Wang, Xiaohong; Lilja, Louise; Shen, Zhijian

    2015-02-01

    Titanium received a macroporous titania surface layer by anodization, which contains open pores with average pore diameter around 5 μm. An additional mesoporous titania top layer following the contour of the macropores, of 100-200 nm thickness and with a pore diameter of 10nm, was formed by using the evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) method with titanium (IV) tetraethoxide as the precursor. A coherent laminar titania surface layer was thus obtained, creating a hierarchical macro- and mesoporous surface that was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. The interfacial bonding between the surface layers and the titanium matrix was characterized by the scratch test that confirmed a stable and strong bonding of titania surface layers on titanium. The wettability to water and the effects on the osteosarcoma cell line (SaOS-2) proliferation and mineralization of the formed titania surface layers were studied systematically by cell culture and scanning electron microscopy. The results proved that the porous titania surface with hierarchical macro- and mesoporosities was hydrophilic that significantly promoted cell attachment and spreading. A synergistic role of the hierarchical macro- and mesoporosities was revealed in terms of enhancing cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization, compared with the titania surface with solo scale topography.

  5. Upgrading Titanium Ore Through Selective Chlorination Using Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jungshin; Okabe, Toru H.

    2013-06-01

    To develop a simple and effective process for upgrading low-grade titanium ore (ilmenite, mainly FeTiO3), a new selective chlorination process based on the use of calcium chloride (CaCl2) as the chlorine source was investigated in this study. Titanium ore and a titanium ore/CaCl2 mixture were placed in two separate crucibles inside a gas-tight quartz tube that was then positioned in a horizontal furnace. In the experiments, the titanium ore in the two crucibles reacted with either HCl produced from CaCl2 or CaCl2 itself at 1100 K (827 °C), leading to the selective removal of the iron present in the titanium ore as iron chlorides [FeCl x (l,g) ( x = 2, 3)]. Various kinds of titanium ores produced in different countries were used as feedstock, and the influence of the particle size and atmosphere on the selective chlorination was investigated. Under certain conditions, titanium dioxide (TiO2) with purity of about 97 pct was directly obtained in a single step from titanium ore containing 51 pct TiO2. Thus, selective chlorination is a feasible method for producing high purity titanium dioxide from low-grade titanium ore.

  6. Novel antioxidant capability of titanium induced by UV light treatment.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takeshi; Ikeda, Takayuki; Tsukimura, Naoki; Ishijima, Manabu; Minamikawa, Hajime; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-11-01

    The intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a representative form of cellular oxidative stress and plays an important role in triggering adverse cellular events, such as the inflammatory reaction and delayed or compromised differentiation. Osteoblastic reaction to titanium with particular focus on ROS production remains unknown. Ultraviolet (UV) light treatment improves the physicochemical properties of titanium, specifically the induction of super hydrophilicity and removal of hydrocarbon, and eventually enhances its osteoconductivity. We hypothesized that there is a favorable regulatory change of ROS production within osteoblasts in contact with UV-treated titanium. Osteoblasts were cultured on titanium disks with or without UV-pretreatment. The intracellular production of ROS was higher on acid-etch-created rough titanium surfaces than on machine-prepared smooth ones. The ROS production was reduced by 40-50% by UV pretreatment of titanium regardless of the surface roughness. Oxidative DNA damage, as detected by 8-OHdG expression, was alleviated by 50% on UV-treated titanium surfaces. The expression of inflammatory cytokines was consistently lower in osteoblasts cultured on UV-treated titanium. ROS scavenger, glutathione, remained more without being depleted in osteoblasts on UV-treated titanium. Bio-burden test further showed that culturing osteoblasts on UV-treated titanium can significantly reduce the ROS production even with the presence of hydrogen peroxide, an oxidative stress inducer. These data suggest that the intracellular production of ROS and relevant inflammatory reaction, which unavoidably occurs in osteoblasts in contact with titanium, can be significantly reduced by UV pretreatment of titanium, implying a novel antioxidant capability of the particular titanium. PMID:27639113

  7. Rapid prototyped porous nickel-titanium scaffolds as bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bormann, Therese; Rossi, Antonella; Müller, Bert; Schumacher, Ralf; Martin, Ivan; de Wild, Michael; Wendt, David

    2014-01-01

    While calcium phosphate-based ceramics are currently the most widely used materials in bone repair, they generally lack tensile strength for initial load bearing. Bulk titanium is the gold standard of metallic implant materials, but does not match the mechanical properties of the surrounding bone, potentially leading to problems of fixation and bone resorption. As an alternative, nickel-titanium alloys possess a unique combination of mechanical properties including a relatively low elastic modulus, pseudoelasticity, and high damping capacity, matching the properties of bone better than any other metallic material. With the ultimate goal of fabricating porous implants for spinal, orthopedic and dental applications, nickel-titanium substrates were fabricated by means of selective laser melting. The response of human mesenchymal stromal cells to the nickel-titanium substrates was compared to mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on clinically used titanium. Selective laser melted titanium as well as surface-treated nickel-titanium and titanium served as controls. Mesenchymal stromal cells had similar proliferation rates when cultured on selective laser melted nickel-titanium, clinically used titanium, or controls. Osteogenic differentiation was similar for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the selected materials, as indicated by similar gene expression levels of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Mesenchymal stromal cells seeded and cultured on porous three-dimensional selective laser melted nickel-titanium scaffolds homogeneously colonized the scaffold, and following osteogenic induction, filled the scaffold's pore volume with extracellular matrix. The combination of bone-related mechanical properties of selective laser melted nickel-titanium with its cytocompatibility and support of osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells highlights its potential as a superior bone substitute as compared to clinically used titanium.

  8. Novel antioxidant capability of titanium induced by UV light treatment.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takeshi; Ikeda, Takayuki; Tsukimura, Naoki; Ishijima, Manabu; Minamikawa, Hajime; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-11-01

    The intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a representative form of cellular oxidative stress and plays an important role in triggering adverse cellular events, such as the inflammatory reaction and delayed or compromised differentiation. Osteoblastic reaction to titanium with particular focus on ROS production remains unknown. Ultraviolet (UV) light treatment improves the physicochemical properties of titanium, specifically the induction of super hydrophilicity and removal of hydrocarbon, and eventually enhances its osteoconductivity. We hypothesized that there is a favorable regulatory change of ROS production within osteoblasts in contact with UV-treated titanium. Osteoblasts were cultured on titanium disks with or without UV-pretreatment. The intracellular production of ROS was higher on acid-etch-created rough titanium surfaces than on machine-prepared smooth ones. The ROS production was reduced by 40-50% by UV pretreatment of titanium regardless of the surface roughness. Oxidative DNA damage, as detected by 8-OHdG expression, was alleviated by 50% on UV-treated titanium surfaces. The expression of inflammatory cytokines was consistently lower in osteoblasts cultured on UV-treated titanium. ROS scavenger, glutathione, remained more without being depleted in osteoblasts on UV-treated titanium. Bio-burden test further showed that culturing osteoblasts on UV-treated titanium can significantly reduce the ROS production even with the presence of hydrogen peroxide, an oxidative stress inducer. These data suggest that the intracellular production of ROS and relevant inflammatory reaction, which unavoidably occurs in osteoblasts in contact with titanium, can be significantly reduced by UV pretreatment of titanium, implying a novel antioxidant capability of the particular titanium.

  9. Rapid prototyped porous nickel-titanium scaffolds as bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bormann, Therese; Rossi, Antonella; Müller, Bert; Schumacher, Ralf; Martin, Ivan; de Wild, Michael; Wendt, David

    2014-01-01

    While calcium phosphate-based ceramics are currently the most widely used materials in bone repair, they generally lack tensile strength for initial load bearing. Bulk titanium is the gold standard of metallic implant materials, but does not match the mechanical properties of the surrounding bone, potentially leading to problems of fixation and bone resorption. As an alternative, nickel-titanium alloys possess a unique combination of mechanical properties including a relatively low elastic modulus, pseudoelasticity, and high damping capacity, matching the properties of bone better than any other metallic material. With the ultimate goal of fabricating porous implants for spinal, orthopedic and dental applications, nickel-titanium substrates were fabricated by means of selective laser melting. The response of human mesenchymal stromal cells to the nickel-titanium substrates was compared to mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on clinically used titanium. Selective laser melted titanium as well as surface-treated nickel-titanium and titanium served as controls. Mesenchymal stromal cells had similar proliferation rates when cultured on selective laser melted nickel-titanium, clinically used titanium, or controls. Osteogenic differentiation was similar for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the selected materials, as indicated by similar gene expression levels of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Mesenchymal stromal cells seeded and cultured on porous three-dimensional selective laser melted nickel-titanium scaffolds homogeneously colonized the scaffold, and following osteogenic induction, filled the scaffold's pore volume with extracellular matrix. The combination of bone-related mechanical properties of selective laser melted nickel-titanium with its cytocompatibility and support of osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells highlights its potential as a superior bone substitute as compared to clinically used titanium. PMID:25383165

  10. Rapid prototyped porous nickel–titanium scaffolds as bone substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bormann, Therese; Rossi, Antonella; Müller, Bert; Schumacher, Ralf; Martin, Ivan; Wendt, David

    2014-01-01

    While calcium phosphate–based ceramics are currently the most widely used materials in bone repair, they generally lack tensile strength for initial load bearing. Bulk titanium is the gold standard of metallic implant materials, but does not match the mechanical properties of the surrounding bone, potentially leading to problems of fixation and bone resorption. As an alternative, nickel–titanium alloys possess a unique combination of mechanical properties including a relatively low elastic modulus, pseudoelasticity, and high damping capacity, matching the properties of bone better than any other metallic material. With the ultimate goal of fabricating porous implants for spinal, orthopedic and dental applications, nickel–titanium substrates were fabricated by means of selective laser melting. The response of human mesenchymal stromal cells to the nickel–titanium substrates was compared to mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on clinically used titanium. Selective laser melted titanium as well as surface-treated nickel–titanium and titanium served as controls. Mesenchymal stromal cells had similar proliferation rates when cultured on selective laser melted nickel–titanium, clinically used titanium, or controls. Osteogenic differentiation was similar for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on the selected materials, as indicated by similar gene expression levels of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Mesenchymal stromal cells seeded and cultured on porous three-dimensional selective laser melted nickel–titanium scaffolds homogeneously colonized the scaffold, and following osteogenic induction, filled the scaffold’s pore volume with extracellular matrix. The combination of bone-related mechanical properties of selective laser melted nickel–titanium with its cytocompatibility and support of osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells highlights its potential as a superior bone substitute as compared to clinically used titanium. PMID:25383165

  11. [Study on biocompatibility of titanium alloys].

    PubMed

    Kodama, T

    1989-06-01

    The biocompatibility of two different titanium alloys, Ti-6Al-4V ELI and Ti-5Al-2, 5Fe, and pure titanium were evaluated. The results were as follows: 1) Titanium alloys were implanted into the dorsal subcutaneous tissues of the Hartley guinea-pig for 12 weeks, immersed in calf serum or in Ringer's solution for 8 weeks. The surface changes of the titanium alloys were observed by SEM and the chemical composition was analyzed by XMA. No evident surface changes were found. 2) Three hundred mg, 200 mg and 100 mg of the powders of the tested materials were immersed in 2ml of Eagle's MEM, incubated for 1-7 days, 8-21 days and 22-70 days at 37 C degrees. The amount of metallic elements dissolved in the solutions was measured by ICP and AAS. The detected corrosion rates of V and Al contained in the solution, in which Ti-6Al-4V ELI 100 mg was immersed for 1-7 days, were 194.3 +/- 17.6 and 73.0 +/- 28, 1 pg/mg alloy/day, respectively. V was released more than Al. The amount of Ti was below the detectable limit. The solution Ti-5Al-2.5 Fe 100 mg immersed for 1-7 days contained 31.9 +/- 34.4 pg/mg alloy/day Fe and 25.7 +/- 6.3 pg/mg alloy/day Al. Only in the solution 300 mg immersed for 1-7 days was Ti detected at 1.4 pg/mg alloy/day. 3) By the bacterial mutation assay of Salmonella typhimurium TA 98, Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 and Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA, the solutions, in which the tested materials were immersed, were not found to be mutagenic. 4) By the UDS assay, the grain counts on autoradiography with the solutions, in which the tested materials were immersed, were not greater than the negative control. The results suggest an excellent corrosion resistance of the titanium alloys. Mutagenicity was negative by these mutation assays, indicating that the tested alloys and pure titanium are safe for humans and animals.

  12. Oxidation of commercial purity titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Shenoy, R. N.; Clark, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of commercial purity Ti-A55 exposed to laboratory air in the 593-760 C temperature range were continuously monitored by thermogravimetric analysis. The oxide thickness was measured by microscopy, and the substrate contamination was estimated from microhardness measurements. The microhardness depth profiles were converted to oxygen composition profiles using calibration depth. The oxygen diffusion coefficient in alpha-Ti appears to be approximately concentration-independent in the 1-10 at. pct oxygen range. Diffusion coefficient for oxygen in TiO2 has been estimated as a function of temperature and is found to be about 50 times the value in alpha-Ti. The metallographically prepared cross sections of the oxidized specimens revealed a 'moving boundary' in the substrate, parallel to the oxide-metal interface. This boundary was associated with a specific oxygen level of 5.0 + or - 0.5 at. pct. It occurred at a distance from the oxide-metal interface which was correlatable with temperature and time of exposure. The diffusion coefficient corresponding to the composition of this moving boundary is in excellent agreement with the effective diffusion coefficient for the substrate contamination.

  13. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    PubMed

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading. PMID:24124540

  14. Corrosion resistance of cast irons and titanium alloys as reference engineered metal barriers for use in basalt geologic storage: a literature assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Charlot, L.A.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A survey and assessment of the literature on the corrosion resistance of cast irons and low-alloy titanium are presented. Selected engineering properties of cast iron and titanium are briefly described; however, the corrosion resistance of cast iron and titanium in aqueous solutions or in soils and their use in a basalt repository are emphasized. In evaluating the potential use of cast iron and titanium as structural barrier materials for long-lived nuclear waste packages, it is assumed that titanium has the general corrosion resistance to be used in relatively thin cross sections whereas the cost and availability of cast iron allows its use even in very thick cross sections. Based on this assumption, the survey showed that: The uniform corrosion of low-alloy titanium in a basalt environment is expected to be extremely low. A linear extrapolation of general corrosion rates with an added corrosion allowance suggests that a 3.2- to 6.4-mm-thick wall may have a life of 1000 yr. Pitting and crevice corrosion are not likely corrosion modes in basalt ground waters. It is also unlikely that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in the commercially pure (CP) titanium alloy or in palladiumor molybdenum-alloyed titanium materials. Low-alloy cast irons may be used as barrier metals if the environment surrounding the metal keeps the alloy in the passive range. The solubility of the corrosion product and the semipermeable nature of the oxide film allow significant uniform corrosion over long time periods. A linear extrapolation of high-temperature corrosion rates on carbon steels and corrosion rates of cast irons in soils gives an estimated metal penetration of 51 to 64 mm after 1000 yr. A corrosion allowance of 3 to 5 times that suggests that an acceptable cast iron wall may be from 178 to 305 mm thick. Although they cannot be fully assessed, pitting and crevice corrosion should not affect cast iron due to the ground-water chemistry of basalt.

  15. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-05-04

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm(2) and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells.

  16. Transient thermal analysis of a titanium multiwall thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The application of the SPAR thermal analyzer to the thermal analysis of a thermal protection system concept is discussed. The titanium multiwall thermal protection system concept consists of alternate flat and dimpled sheets which are joined together at the crests of the dimples and formed into 30 cm by 30 cm (12 in. by 12 in.) tiles. The tiles are mechanically attached to the structure. The complex tile geometry complicates thermal analysis. Three modes of heat transfer were considered: conduction through the gas inside the tile, conduction through the metal, and radiation between the various layers. The voids between the dimpled and flat sheets were designed to be small enough so that natural convection is insignificant (e.g., Grashof number 1000). A two step approach was used in the thermal analysis of the multiwall thermal protection system. First, an effective normal (through-the-thickness) thermal conductivity was obtained from a steady state analysis using a detailed SPAR finite element model of a small symmetric section of the multiwall tile. This effective conductivity was then used in simple one dimensional finite element models for preliminary analysis of several transient heat transfer problems.

  17. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, P.; Chan, Y. -H.; Fang, X. -Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chou, M. Y.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Fedorov, A. -V.; Chiang, T. -C.

    2015-11-16

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene--a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering.more » The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The behavior of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk.« less

  18. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Chan, Y. -H.; Fang, X. -Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chou, M. Y.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Fedorov, A. -V.; Chiang, T. -C.

    2015-11-16

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene--a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering. The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The behavior of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk.

  19. Titanium Alloy Strong Back for IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byron, Glenn P.; Kai-Wang, Chan

    2011-01-01

    A titanium-alloy mirror-holding fixture called a strong back allows the temporary and permanent bonding of a 50 degree D263 glass x-ray mirror (IXO here stands for International X-ray Observatory). The strong back is used to hold and position a mirror segment so that mounting tabs may be bonded to the mirror with ultra-low distortion of the optical surface. Ti-15%Mo alloy was the material of choice for the strong back and tabs because the coefficient of thermal expansion closely matches that of the D263 glass and the material is relatively easy to machine. This invention has the ability to transfer bonded mounting points from a temporary location on the strong back to a permanent location on the strong back with minimal distortion. Secondly, it converts a single mirror segment into a rigid body with an acceptable amount of distortion of the mirror, and then maneuvers that rigid body into optical alignment such that the mirror segment can be bonded into a housing simulator or mirror module. Key problems are that the mirrors are 0.4-mm thick and have a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Because the mirrors are so thin, they are very flexible and are easily distorted. When permanently bonding the mirror, the goal is to achieve a less than 1-micron distortion. Temperature deviations in the lab, which have been measured to be around 1 C, have caused significant distortions in the mirror segment.

  20. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-01-01

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm(2) and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27166761

  1. Deposition Kinetics of Bioinspired Phenolic Coatings on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geißler, Sebastian; Barrantes, Alejandro; Tengvall, Pentti; Messersmith, Phillip B; Tiainen, Hanna

    2016-08-16

    Polyphenols can form functional coatings on a variety of different materials through auto-oxidative surface polymerization in a manner similar to polydopamine coatings. However, the mechanisms behind the coating deposition are poorly understood. We report the coating deposition kinetics of the polyphenol tannic acid (TA) and the simple phenolic compound pyrogallol (PG) on titanium surfaces. The coating deposition was followed in real time over a period of 24 h using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). TA coatings revealed a multiphasic layer formation: the deposition of an initial rigid layer was followed by the buildup of an increasingly dissipative layer, before mass adsorption stopped after approximately 5 h of coating time. The PG deposition was biphasic, starting with the adsorption of a nonrigid viscoelastic layer which was followed by layer stiffening upon further mass adsorption. Coating evaluation by ellipsometry and AFM confirmed the deposition kinetics determined by QCM-D and revealed maximum coating thicknesses of approximately 50 and 75 nm for TA and PG, respectively. Chemical characterization of the coatings and polymerized polyphenol particles indicated the involvement of both physical and chemical interactions in the auto-oxidation reactions.

  2. Cubic titanium dioxide photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Jinho; Kang, Misook

    Following from the recently evolved concept of significantly improving the photovoltaic efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by reducing the loss of electrons on the spherical surface of titanium dioxide, this study examines the synthesis of cubic TiO 2 with a special morphology to overcome this electron loss and investigates its application to DSSCs. Cubic TiO 2 is synthesized by an advanced rapid hydrothermal method, with the addition of an amine species additive. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirm the cubic shape of the TiO 2 particles with a diameter less than 5-10 nm. Using N719 dye under illumination with 100 mW cm -2 simulated sunlight, the application of cubic TiO 2 to DSSCs affords an energy conversion efficiency of approximately 9.77% (4.0-μm thick TiO 2 film), which is considerably enhanced compared with that achieved using a commercial, spherical TiO 2. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and impedance analyses reveal that the electrons are transferred more rapidly to the surface of a cubic TiO 2 film than on a spherical TiO 2 film.

  3. Properties of pulsed laser deposited fluorinated hydroxyapatite films on titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.V.; Smirnov, V.V.; Laureti, S.; Generosi, A.; Varvaro, G.; Fosca, M.; Ferro, D.; Cesaro, S. Nunziante; Albertini, V. Rossi; Barinov, S.M.

    2010-09-15

    Fluorinated hydroxyapatite coated titanium was investigated for application as implant coating for bone substitute materials in orthopaedics and dentistry. Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for films preparation. Fluorinated hydroxyapatite target composition, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 1.37}(OH){sub 0.63}, was maintained at 2 J/cm{sup 2} of laser fluence and 500-600 {sup o}C of the substrate temperature. Prepared films had a compact microstructure, composed of spherical micrometric-size aggregates. The average surface roughness resulted to be of 3 nm for the film grown at 500 {sup o}C and of 10 nm for that grown at 600 {sup o}C, showing that the temperature increase did not favour the growth of a more fine granulated surface. The films were polycrystalline with no preferential growth orientation. The films grown at 500-600 {sup o}C were about 8 {mu}m thick and possessed a hardness of 12-13 GPa. Lower or higher substrate temperature provides the possibility to obtain coatings with different fine texture and roughness, thus tayloring them for various applications.

  4. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Chan, Y-H; Fang, X-Y; Zhang, Y; Chou, M Y; Mo, S-K; Hussain, Z; Fedorov, A-V; Chiang, T-C

    2015-01-01

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene-a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering. The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The observed Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) behaviour of the gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk. PMID:26568512

  5. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-01-01

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm2 and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27166761

  6. Deposition Kinetics of Bioinspired Phenolic Coatings on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geißler, Sebastian; Barrantes, Alejandro; Tengvall, Pentti; Messersmith, Phillip B; Tiainen, Hanna

    2016-08-16

    Polyphenols can form functional coatings on a variety of different materials through auto-oxidative surface polymerization in a manner similar to polydopamine coatings. However, the mechanisms behind the coating deposition are poorly understood. We report the coating deposition kinetics of the polyphenol tannic acid (TA) and the simple phenolic compound pyrogallol (PG) on titanium surfaces. The coating deposition was followed in real time over a period of 24 h using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). TA coatings revealed a multiphasic layer formation: the deposition of an initial rigid layer was followed by the buildup of an increasingly dissipative layer, before mass adsorption stopped after approximately 5 h of coating time. The PG deposition was biphasic, starting with the adsorption of a nonrigid viscoelastic layer which was followed by layer stiffening upon further mass adsorption. Coating evaluation by ellipsometry and AFM confirmed the deposition kinetics determined by QCM-D and revealed maximum coating thicknesses of approximately 50 and 75 nm for TA and PG, respectively. Chemical characterization of the coatings and polymerized polyphenol particles indicated the involvement of both physical and chemical interactions in the auto-oxidation reactions. PMID:27452793

  7. Durability evaluation of biopolymer coating on titanium alloy substrate.

    PubMed

    Ryan Stanfield, J; Bamberg, Stacy

    2014-07-01

    For this study, a commercially available phosphorylcholine (PC) polymer was applied to Ti6Al4V ELI. A multivariate approach to design a statistically significant array of experiments was employed to evaluate and estimate optimization of PC-immobilization process factors. The seven process factors analyzed were (1) power level for RFGD plasma treatment, (2) duration of plasma treatment, (3) concentration of PC solution used to coat samples, (4) rate at which samples were dipped in/out of the solution, (5) temperature for curing, (6) relative humidity level during curing, and (7) duration of curing. Imaging and analysis of the coating were done via fluorescence microscopy (FM), confirming the uniform coverage of PC polymer on titanium substrate. The process factors were evaluated by three measured responses: initial thickness, coating durability and degree of cross-linked coating, which were assessed by FM, a spray test and extraction in IPA, respectively. Variations in PC solution concentration showed no impact on fouling resistance of the resultant coating. It was hypothesized that the PC-application process factors could be optimized to yield favorable outcomes in durability and degree of cross-linked coating responses. The resulting statistical model indicates that PC solution concentration, dip rate, and cure temperature are the three greatest singular effects on both durability and degree of cross-linking. In addition, plasma treatment of the substrate with O2 was effective in enhancing the degree of cross-linking of the polymer surface.

  8. Tribocorrosion behaviour of anodic treated titanium surfaces intended for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A. C.; Oliveira, F.; Wenger, F.; Ponthiaux, P.; Celis, J.-P.; Rocha, L. A.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion plays an important role in the lifetime of metallic implants. Once implanted, biomaterials are subjected to micro-movements in aggressive biological fluids. Titanium is widely used as an implant material because it spontaneously forms a compact and protective nanometric thick oxide layer, mainly TiO2, in ambient air. That layer provides good corrosion resistance, and very low toxicity, but its low wear resistance is a concern. In this work, an anodizing treatment was performed on commercial pure titanium to form a homogeneous thick oxide surface layer in order to provide bioactivity and improve the biological, chemical and mechanical properties. Anodizing was performed in an electrolyte containing β-glycerophosphate and calcium acetate. The influence of the calcium acetate content on the tribocorrosion behaviour of the anodized material was studied. The concentration of calcium acetate in the electrolyte was found to largely affect the crystallographic structure of the resulting oxide layer. Better tribocorrosion behaviour was noticed on increasing the calcium acetate concentration.

  9. Local Fine Structural Insight into Mechanism of Electrochemical Passivation of Titanium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yu, Hongying; Wang, Ke; Xu, Haisong; Wang, Shaoyang; Sun, Dongbai

    2016-07-20

    Electrochemically formed passive film on titanium in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution and its thickness, composition, chemical state, and local fine structure are examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure. AES analysis reveals that the thickness and composition of oxide film are proportional to the reciprocal of current density in potentiodynamic polarization. XPS depth profiles of the chemical states of titanium exhibit the coexistence of various valences cations in the surface. Quantitative X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of the local electronic structure of the topmost surface (∼5.0 nm) shows that the ratio of [TiO2]/[Ti2O3] is consistent with that of passivation/dissolution of electrochemical activity. Theoretical calculation and analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at Ti K-edge indicate that both the structures of passivation and dissolution are distorted caused by the appearance of two different sites of Ti-O and Ti-Ti. And the bound water in the topmost surface plays a vital role in structural disorder confirmed by XPS. Overall, the increase of average Ti-O coordination causes the electrochemical passivation, and the dissolution is due to the decrease of average Ti-Ti coordination. The structural variations of passivation in coordination number and interatomic distance are in good agreement with the prediction of point defect model. PMID:27355902

  10. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, M. R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.; Naguib, M.; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization methods, additional XRD patterns (Fig. S1) and INS spectra (Fig. S2-S4). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01462c

  11. The crustal thickness of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clitheroe, G.; Gudmundsson, O.; Kennett, B.L.N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Australian continent using the temporary broadband stations of the Skippy and Kimba projects and permanent broadband stations. We isolate near-receiver information, in the form of crustal P-to-S conversions, using the receiver function technique. Stacked receiver functions are inverted for S velocity structure using a Genetic Algorithm approach to Receiver Function Inversion (GARFI). From the resulting velocity models we are able to determine the Moho depth and to classify the width of the crust-mantle transition for 65 broadband stations. Using these results and 51 independent estimates of crustal thickness from refraction and reflection profiles, we present a new, improved, map of Moho depth for the Australian continent. The thinnest crust (25 km) occurs in the Archean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia; the thickest crust (61 km) occurs in Proterozoic central Australia. The average crustal thickness is 38.8 km (standard deviation 6.2 km). Interpolation error estimates are made using kriging and fall into the range 2.5-7.0 km. We find generally good agreement between the depth to the seismologically defined Moho and xenolith-derived estimates of crustal thickness beneath northeastern Australia. However, beneath the Lachlan Fold Belt the estimates are not in agreement, and it is possible that the two techniques are mapping differing parts of a broad Moho transition zone. The Archean cratons of Western Australia appear to have remained largely stable since cratonization, reflected in only slight variation of Moho depth. The largely Proterozoic center of Australia shows relatively thicker crust overall as well as major Moho offsets. We see evidence of the margin of the contact between the Precambrian craton and the Tasman Orogen, referred to as the Tasman Line. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  13. Compton imaging with thick Si and CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Mythili; Wulf, Eric A.; Phlips, Bernard; Krawczynski, Henric; Martin, Jerrad; Dowknott, Paul

    2012-08-01

    A Compton imaging telescope has been constructed using a 0.2 cm thick Silicon (Si) detector of active area 9.0×9.0 cm2 and a pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector of dimensions 2.0×2.0×0.5 cm3. The Si detector is double sided with 64 strips per side in two orthogonal directions. The CZT detector has 64 pixels of pitch 0.25 cm. We used several ASICs (32 channel) to read out both detectors. A 137Cs source was used in the study. The energy deposited in the Si and CZT detectors and the points of interaction of the γ-ray in both detectors were read out. We varied the position of the source as well as the vertical separation between the Si and CZT detectors and measured the angular resolution of the source image for the different configurations. The best angular resolution (1σ) was 2.4°. Monte Carlo simulations were run for similar detector configurations and agree with the experimental results.

  14. PEM Anchorage on Titanium Using Catechol Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Hélène; Barrere, Amélie; Schoentstein, Frédérique; Chavanne, Marie-Hélène; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Mora, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background This study deals with the anchorage of polyelectrolyte films onto titanium surfaces via a cathecol-based linker for biomedical applications. Methodology The following study uses a molecule functionalized with a catechol and a carboxylic acid: 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid. This molecule is anchored to the TiO2 substrate via the catechol while the carboxylic acid reacts with polymers bearing amine groups. By providing a film anchorage of chemisorption type, it makes possible to deposit polyelectrolytes on the surface of titanium. Principal Findings Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the different steps of grafting have been successfully performed. Conclusions This method based on catechol anchorage of polyelectrolytes open a window towards large possibilities of clinical applications. PMID:23226262

  15. Biocorrosion study of titanium-nickel alloys.

    PubMed

    Chern Lin, J H; Lo, S J; Ju, C P

    1996-02-01

    The present study provides results of the corrosion behaviour in Hank's physiological solution and some other properties of three Ti-Ni alloys with 18, 25 and 28.4 wt% Ni, respectively. Results indicate that alpha-titanium and Ti2Ni were the two major phases in all three Ti-Ni alloys. The relative amount of the Ti2Ni phase increased with additional Ni content. Hardness of the Ti-Ni alloys also increased with added nickel content, ranging from 310 to 390 VHN, similar to the hardness of enamel. Melting temperatures of the Ti-Ni alloys were all lower than that of pure titanium by least 600 degrees C. The three Ti-Ni alloys behaved almost identically when potentiodynamically polarized in Hank's solution at 37 degrees C. The critical anodic current densities of the alloys were nearly 30 microA/cm2 and the breakdown potentials were all above 1100 mV (SCE).

  16. Titanium nanostructural surface processing for improved biocompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-C.; Lee, S.-Y.; Chen, C.-C.; Shyng, Y.-C.; Ou, K.-L.

    2006-10-23

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incident x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were conducted to evaluate the effect of titanium hydride on the formation of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} on Ti during anodization. Nano-titanium-hydride was formed cathodically before anodizing and served as a sacrificial nanoprecipitate during anodization. Surface oxidation occurred and a multinanoporous structure formed after cathodic pretreatments followed by anodization treatment. The sacrificial nanoprecipitate is directly dissolved and the Ti transformed to nanoporous TiO{sub 2} by anodization. The formation of sacrificial nanoprecipitates by cathodic pretreatment and of the multinanostructure by anodization is believed to improve biocompatibility, thereby promoting osseointegration.

  17. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  18. Environmental Studies on Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Smialek, James L.; Brady, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Titanium aluminides are attractive alternatives to superalloys in moderate temperature applications (600 to 850 C) by virtue of their high strength-to-density ratio (high specific strength). These alloys are also more ductile than competing intermetallic systems. However, most Ti-based alloys tend to degrade through interstitial embrittlement and rapid oxidation during exposure to elevated temperatures. Therefore, their environmental behavior must be thoroughly investigated before they can be developed further. The goals of titanium aluminide environmental studies at the NASA Lewis Research Center are twofold: characterize the degradation mechanisms for advanced structural alloys and determine what means are available to minimize degradation. The studies to date have covered the alpha 2 (Ti3Al), orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb), and gamma (TiAl) classes of alloys.

  19. Welding of gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An article made of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, cooling the entire article to a welding temperature of from about 1000.degree. F. to about 1400.degree. F., welding a preselected region in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected region so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected region, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the gamma titanium aluminide alloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  20. Corrosion behavior of titanium boride composite coating fabricated on commercially pure titanium in Ringer's solution for bioimplant applications.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Bose; Singh, Raghuvir; Pathak, Lokesh Chandra

    2015-03-01

    The boriding of commercially pure titanium was performed at 850°C, 910°C, and 1050°C for varied soaking periods (1, 3 and 5h) to enhance the surface properties desirable for bioimplant applications. The coating developed was characterized for the evolution of phases, microstructure and morphology, microhardness, and consequent corrosion behavior in the Ringer's solution. Formation of the TiB2 layer at the outermost surface followed by the TiB whiskers across the borided CpTi is unveiled. Total thickness of the composite layer on the substrates borided at 850, 910, and 1050°C for 5h was found to be 19.1, 26.4, and 18.2μm respectively which includes <3μm thick TiB2 layer. The presence of TiB2 phase was attributed to the high hardness ~2968Hv15gf of the composite coating. The anodic polarization studies in the simulated body fluid unveiled a reduction in the pitting corrosion resistance after boriding the CpTi specimens. However, this value is >0.55VSCE (electrochemical potential in in-vivo physiological environment) and hence remains within the safe region. Both the untreated and borided CpTi specimens show two passive zones associated with different passivation current densities. Among the CpTi borided at various times and temperatures, a 3h treated shows better corrosion resistance. The corrosion of borided CpTi occurred through the dissolution of TiB2. PMID:25579920

  1. Corrosion behavior of titanium boride composite coating fabricated on commercially pure titanium in Ringer's solution for bioimplant applications.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Bose; Singh, Raghuvir; Pathak, Lokesh Chandra

    2015-03-01

    The boriding of commercially pure titanium was performed at 850°C, 910°C, and 1050°C for varied soaking periods (1, 3 and 5h) to enhance the surface properties desirable for bioimplant applications. The coating developed was characterized for the evolution of phases, microstructure and morphology, microhardness, and consequent corrosion behavior in the Ringer's solution. Formation of the TiB2 layer at the outermost surface followed by the TiB whiskers across the borided CpTi is unveiled. Total thickness of the composite layer on the substrates borided at 850, 910, and 1050°C for 5h was found to be 19.1, 26.4, and 18.2μm respectively which includes <3μm thick TiB2 layer. The presence of TiB2 phase was attributed to the high hardness ~2968Hv15gf of the composite coating. The anodic polarization studies in the simulated body fluid unveiled a reduction in the pitting corrosion resistance after boriding the CpTi specimens. However, this value is >0.55VSCE (electrochemical potential in in-vivo physiological environment) and hence remains within the safe region. Both the untreated and borided CpTi specimens show two passive zones associated with different passivation current densities. Among the CpTi borided at various times and temperatures, a 3h treated shows better corrosion resistance. The corrosion of borided CpTi occurred through the dissolution of TiB2.

  2. Rheological Behavior of Titanium Dioxide Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua-Gui; Li, Chun-Zhong; Gu, Hong-Chen; Fang, Tu-Nan

    2001-04-01

    The rheological properties of titanium dioxide dispersed in water are measured over a wide range of powder concentrations, temperatures, and pH values. The value of intrinsic viscosity of titanium dioxide measured with an Ubbelohde capillary viscometer is 3.55, which is useful for determining the shape and aggregation property of the particles. The yield stress and steady shear viscosity of titanium dioxide with broad and narrow particle size distributions were measured over a wide range of solid volume fractions on a Brabender rheometer. It is observed that the rheological properties of the suspensions are quite different due to the difference in particle size distributions. Quemada, Casson, and Zhou's models were used to fit the experimental data and useful parameters were obtained. Calculated data are also in good agreement with the experimental data. As expected, the shear viscosity and yield stress decrease with increasing temperature. But when the temperature is around 50 degrees C, yield stress increases with increasing temperature while shear viscosity exhibits a complex behavior. The phenomena are very interesting and special. The Peclet number was used to analyze the shear thickening behavior. Models were also used to describe the shear viscosity under different temperatures and the master plots of the reduced variables eta/eta(infinity) vs t(c)gamma; at different temperatures are superimposed, which means the agreement is fair and the models are suitable to describe the rheological properties of titanium dioxide suspensions. pH effects were investigated on a Rheometrics RFS-II rheometer and it was found that pH can change the surface charge of the particles, which also affects the rheological behavior. The pH at which maximum shear viscosity and yield stress occur is in concordance with the isoelectric point. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, George R.; Clark, Ronald K.; Robinson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

  4. Powder processing of hybrid titanium neural electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose Luis, Jr.

    A preliminary investigation into the powder production of a novel hybrid titanium neural electrode for EEG is presented. The rheological behavior of titanium powder suspensions using sodium alginate as a dispersant are examined for optimal slip casting conditions. Electrodes were slip cast and sintered at 950°C for 1 hr, 1000°C for 1, 3, and 6 hrs, and 1050°C for 1 hr. Residual porosities from sintering are characterized using Archimedes' technique and image analysis. The pore network is gel impregnated by submerging the electrodes in electrically conductive gel and placing them in a chamber under vacuum. Gel evaporation of the impregnated electrodes is examined. Electrodes are characterized in the dry and gelled states using impedance spectrometry and compared to a standard silver- silver chloride electrode. Power spectral densities for the sensors in the dry and gelled state are also compared. Residual porosities for the sintered specimens were between 50.59% and 44.81%. Gel evaporation tests show most of the impregnated gel evaporating within 20 min of exposure to atmospheric conditions with prolonged evaporation times for electrodes with higher impregnated gel mass. Impedance measurements of the produced electrodes indicate the low impedance of the hybrid electrodes are due to the increased contact area of the porous electrode. Power spectral densities of the titanium electrode behave similar to a standard silver-silver chloride electrode. Tests suggest the powder processed hybrid titanium electrode's performance is better than current dry contact electrodes and comparable to standard gelled silver-silver chloride electrodes.

  5. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Xu, Q.

    1992-03-17

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  6. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  7. A single crystalline porphyrinic titanium metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian -Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying -Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou, Lanfang; Teat, Simon J.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Zhou, Hong -Cai

    2015-04-28

    We successfully assembled the photocatalytic titanium-oxo cluster and photosensitizing porphyrinic linker into a metal–organic framework (MOF), namely PCN-22. A preformed titanium-oxo carboxylate cluster is adopted as the starting material to judiciously control the MOF growth process to afford single crystals. This synthetic method is useful to obtain highly crystalline titanium MOFs, which has been a daunting challenge in this field. Moreover, PCN-22 demonstrated permanent porosity and photocatalytic activities toward alcohol oxidation.

  8. Titanium in the family automobile: The cost challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froes, F. H.; Friedrich, H.; Kiese, J.; Bergoint, D.

    2004-02-01

    With advances in extraction/fabrication techniques and ever-increasing gasoline prices, the advantage of using lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and titanium in automobiles continues to increase, particularly for the first two metals. The major drawback for titanium, much more so than the other light metals, is high cost. However, innovative extraction and fabrication approaches are leading to decreased cost. This paper discusses the present status and future potential for titanium use in the family automobile.

  9. Iron-titanium-mischmetal alloys for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary Dale

    1978-01-01

    A method for the preparation of an iron-titanium-mischmetal alloy which is used for the storage of hydrogen. The alloy is prepared by air-melting an iron charge in a clay-graphite crucible, adding titanium and deoxidizing with mischmetal. The resultant alloy contains less than about 0.1% oxygen and exhibits a capability for hydrogen sorption in less than half the time required by vacuum-melted, iron-titanium alloys.

  10. Ag-doped titanium dioxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei Sheini, Navid; Rohani, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been utilized for the fabrication of oxygen sensitive ceramic bodies. In this work, disk-shaped TiO2 pellets are fabricated by the sintering of the press- formed anatase powder at 1000°C. Two silver contacts are printed on one of the top base of each sample. Silver wire segments are connected to the printed electrodes. It is shown that the gradual diffusion of silver into titanium dioxide from the electrodes profoundly affects the resistive properties of the ceramic samples. SEM, XRD and EDAX analyses are carried out to determine the position of the silver diffused in the structure. At 35°C, before silver diffusion, the electrical resistance of the device decreases ten times in response to the presence of 3000 ppm ethanol contamination. Sensitivity (Rair/Rgas) to reducing gases is severely affected by the silver doping level in the titanium dioxide. The progress of silver diffusion continuously decreases the sensitivity till it become less than one. Further progress in silver diffusion brings the devices to the condition at which the resistance increases at the presents of reducing gases. In this condition, inverse sensitivities (Rgas/Rair) as large as 103 are demonstrated.

  11. Thin-Film Fracture During Nanoindentation of a Titanium Oxide Film–Titanium System

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Mengzhi; Bahr, David F.

    2001-09-09

    Nanoindentation testing of the titanium oxide/titanium system with electrochemically grown oxide films exhibits permanent deformation prior to a yield excusion, indicating that the occurrence of this suddent discontinuity is predominantly controlled by oxide film cracking rather than dislocaton nucleation and multiplication. Observations of circumferential cracking also lend support to this explanation. A model has been developed to predict the mechanical response prior to oxide fracture for the case of a hard coating on a soft substrate. During loading contact, the hard coating undergoes elastic deflection which may include both bending and membrane stretching effects, while the substrate is elastoplastically deformed. The model works well for surface films thicker than 20 nm. Additionally, the maximum radial tensile stress in anodically grown titanium oxide, which is responsible for film cracking at the critical load, is approximately 15 GPa.

  12. The wear of titanium, titanium alloy, and UHMW polyethylene caused by LTI carbon and Stellite 21.

    PubMed

    Shim, H S

    1977-08-01

    The comparative wear resistance of a commercially pure titanium (A-70), a titanium alloy (Beta III), and a UHMW polyethylene (Lennite) has been evaluated by employing a test procedure described previously. Either an LTI carbon or a Stellite 21 was the disk material. All material combinations exhibited a low volume wear rate ranging from about 1.2 x 10(-6) to 1.6 x 10(-6) mm3/km. The wear behavior of pure titanium seems to be related not only to its mechanical properties but also to its chemical reactivity with the test environment. A comparison of the current results with earlier data for LTI carbons suggests that LTI carbons may be used as a component material for many artificial joints. PMID:615881

  13. Kinetics of Hydrochloric Acid Leaching of Titanium from Titanium-Bearing Electric Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fuqiang; Chen, Feng; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao; Travyanov, Andrew Yakovlevich; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2016-05-01

    The hydrochloric acid leaching of titanium from titanium-bearing electric furnace slag was investigated under different experimental conditions. The results indicate that particle size, hydrochloric acid concentration and reaction temperature were of significance to the leaching kinetics. Specifically, reaction temperature was the most important factor followed by hydrochloric acid concentration and particle size. The shrinking core model was used to describe the leaching process which was controlled by surface chemical reaction. The kinetic equation was obtained and the activation energy was found to be 43.16 kJ/mol. Iron and calcium species were almost completely dissolved in the acid when the extraction degree of titanium reached 99.84%. MgO (19.34 wt.%) and Al2O3 (32.45 wt.%) in the spinel were still in the leaching residue and SiO2 (43.53 wt.%) in the form of quartz remained in the leaching residue.

  14. Spectral reflectance properties of carbonaceous chondrites: 2. CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E. A.; Hudon, P.; Hiroi, T.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mann, P.

    2011-11-01

    We have examined the spectral reflectance properties and available modal mineralogies of 39 CM carbonaceous chondrites to determine their range of spectral variability and to diagnose their spectral features. We have also reviewed the published literature on CM mineralogy and subclassification, surveyed the published spectral literature and added new measurements of CM chondrites and relevant end members and mineral mixtures, and measured 11 parameters and searched pair-wise for correlations between all quantities. CM spectra are characterized by overall slopes that can range from modestly blue-sloped to red-sloped, with brighter spectra being generally more red-sloped. Spectral slopes, as measured by the 2.4:0.56 μm and 2.4 μm:visible region peak reflectance ratios, range from 0.90 to 2.32, and 0.81 to 2.24, respectively, with values <1 indicating blue-sloped spectra. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be even more blue-sloped than bulk samples, with ratios as low as 0.85. There is no apparent correlation between spectral slope and grain size for CM chondrite spectra - both fine-grained powders and chips can exhibit blue-sloped spectra. Maximum reflectance across the 0.3-2.5 μm interval ranges from 2.9% to 20.0%, and from 2.8% to 14.0% at 0.56 μm. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be darker than bulk samples, with maximum reflectance as low as 2.1%. CM spectra exhibit nearly ubiquitous absorption bands near 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 μm, with depths up to 12%, and, less commonly, absorption bands in other wavelength regions (e.g., 0.4-0.5, 0.65, 2.2 μm). The depths of the 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 μm absorption features vary largely in tandem, suggesting a single cause, specifically serpentine-group phyllosilicates. The generally high Fe content, high phyllosilicate abundance relative to mafic silicates, and dual Fe valence state in CM phyllosilicates, all suggest that the phyllosilicates will exhibit strong absorption bands in the 0.7 μm region (due to Fe 3+-Fe 2+ charge transfers), and the 0.9-1.2 μm region (due to Fe 2+ crystal field transitions), and generally dominate over mafic silicates. CM petrologic subtypes exhibit a positive correlation between degree of aqueous alteration and depth of the 0.7 μm absorption band. This is consistent with the decrease in fine-grained opaques that accompanies aqueous alteration. There is no consistent relationship between degree of aqueous alteration and evidence for a 0.65 μm region saponite-group phyllosilicate absorption band. Spectra of different subsamples of a single CM can show large variations in absolute reflectance and overall slope. This is probably due to petrologic variations that likely exist within a single CM chondrite, as duplicate spectra for a single subsample show much less spectral variability. When the full suite of available CM spectra is considered, few clear spectral-compositional trends emerge. This indicates that multiple compositional and physical factors affect absolute reflectance, absorption band depths, and absorption band wavelength positions. Asteroids with reflectance spectra that exhibit absorption features consistent with CM spectra (i.e., absorption bands near 0.7 and 0.9 μm) include members from multiple taxonomic groups. This suggests that on CM parent bodies, aqueous alteration resulted in the consistent production of serpentine-group phyllosilicates, however resulting absolute reflectances and spectral shapes seen in CM reflectance spectra are highly variable, accounting for the presence of phyllosilicate features in reflectance spectra of asteroids across diverse taxonomic groups.

  15. Enceladus’ Emission at 2cm: an Anomaly Near the Equator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Paul; Janssen, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Cassini spacecraft flew by Enceladus on 5 November 2011, configured to acquire SAR imaging of most of the surface with the RADAR instrument. While not optimized for acquiring radiometer data, the pass nonetheless recorded thermal emission from most of the surface. We report on global patterns of thermal emission. The thermal emission is consistent with dielectric constants of pure water or methane ice, but cannot discriminate between the two. The emissivity is low (≈0.5), consistent with substantial volume scattering. The most intriguing result, however, is an anomaly in the thermal emission on Enceladus’ leading hemisphere. This anomaly is at a similar location to anomalies previously detected with the CIRS instrument on Mimas and Tethys (Howett et al, 2011, 2012, Schenk et al 2011). Whether or not the anomaly on Enceladus is the same phenomenon remains to be seen. Possible origins and implications are discussed.

  16. Glow discharge assisted oxynitriding process of titanium for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchoń, Tadeusz; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Grzonka, Justyna; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Michał; Kamiński, Janusz; Kulikowski, Krzysztof; Borowski, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J.

    2015-04-01

    The plasma oxynitriding process is a prospective method of producing titanium oxides as an integral part of a diffusive nitrided surface layer on titanium implants. This hybrid process, which combines glow discharge assisted nitriding and oxidizing, permits producing TiO2 + Ti2N + αTi(N)-type diffusive surface layers. The oxynitrided surface layers improve the corrosion and wear resistance of the substrate material. Additionally, the nanocrystalline titanium oxide TiO2 (rutile) improves the biological properties of titanium and its alloys when in contact with blood, whereas the TiN + Ti2N + αTi(N) zone eliminates the effect of metalosis.

  17. Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Janey, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular-level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

  18. Electrodeposition of pronectin for titanium to augment gingival epithelium adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shingo; Asano, Kazunari; Miyazawa, Atsuko; Satoh, Tazuko; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-05-01

    This paper is one trial of surface modification of titanium with pronectin F+ (PN) of an artificial protein to enhance gingival adhesion. Titanium plates were electrodeposited in the PN solution to prepare PN-electrodeposited titanium plates. When PN detachment from the PN-electrodeposited titanium plates was investigated, no detachment was observed, in contrast to the case of titanium plates simply coated with PN. A cell culture experiment demonstrated that electrodeposited PN had an inherent ability to enhance the initial attachment of gingival epithelial cells. The PN-electrodeposited titanium plates were implanted between the gingival epithelium and the underlying bone tissue of rabbits to evaluate epithelial growth on the plates and their gingival adhesion. Non-treated and PN-coated titanium plates were used as controls. PN electrodeposition enhanced epithelial growth and adhesion of titanium plates to a significantly great extent compared with PN-coated plates. These findings demonstrate that PN electrodeposition is a promising method to enhance epithelium adhesion onto a titanium surface.

  19. Granulomatous disease associated with pulmonary deposition of titanium.

    PubMed

    Redline, S; Barna, B P; Tomashefski, J F; Abraham, J L

    1986-10-01

    A patient presented with granulomatous lung disease associated with the pulmonary deposition of various metallic particles. To evaluate the relation between the metallic dust and the granulomatous process, lymphocyte transformation tests to aluminium sulphate, titanium chloride, beryllium sulphate, and nickel sulphate were performed. A lymphocyte proliferative response to titanium chloride was observed on two separate occasions; no responses to the other metals were shown. These results are consistent with hypersensitivity to titanium, and suggest, in this individual, a possible aetiological role between the inhalation of titanium and a granulomatous disease process.

  20. Tissue response to titanium implant using scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Vijay P.; Mittal, Ankur; Agarwal, Amit; Pandey, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Most of the surgeons now use titanium miniplates because of its biocompatibility and corrosion resistant properties; studies have shown that these titanium particles are released in the surrounding tissues causing tissue necrosis and if these implants are placed for a long period, the adverse effect of these implants are more severe. It therefore necessitates a study to find out whether these titanium particles are released into surrounding tissues from titanium miniplates used for maxillofacial fractures so that we could use these implants, that is, bone plates and screws with more confidence. PMID:24163546

  1. Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1985-03-12

    A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

  2. Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, Yuki; Ichiki, Ryuta; Kasamura, Kotaro; Yoshida, Masashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V has been achieved by using a pulsed-arc plasma jet with a N2/H2 gas mixture, where the plasma jet plume is sprayed onto the titanium surface under atmospheric pressure. We successfully formed a titanium nitride layer on the sample surface. Moreover, the diffusion layer was also formed, the hardness of which was increased from that of as-received titanium. The nitride layer growth was found to be diffusion-controlled, as in other conventional nitriding methods.

  3. Color Anodizing of Titanium Coated Rolled Carbon Steel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Sarajan, Zohair; Mobarakeh, Hooman Nikbakht; Namiranian, Sohrab

    2011-12-26

    As an important kind of structural materials, the titanium cladded steel plates have the advantages of both metals and have been applied in aviation, spaceflight, chemical and nuclear industries. In this study, the specimens which were prepared under soldering mechanism during rolling were anodized by electrochemical process under a given conditions. The color anodizing takes place by physical phenomenon of color interference. Part of incident light on the titanium oxide is reflected and the other part reflects inside coated titanium layer. Major part of the light which reflects from titanium-oxide interface, reflects again inside of the oxide layer.

  4. Effect of hydroxyapatite thickness on metal ion release from Ti6Al4V substrates.

    PubMed

    Sousa, S R; Barbosa, M A

    1996-02-01

    The electrochemical dissolution behaviour of Ti6Al4V alloy coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) by plasma spraying was studied in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) and compared with that of polished and grit-blasted passivated surfaces. Two different nominal thicknesses of HA (50 and 200 micro m) were used. Taking a polished passivated surface as reference, grit blasting of the substrate increased the electrical charge used in the oxidation of Ti6Al4V alloy at constant potential, as a result of increased surface area. However, only HA coatings with a thickness of 200 micro m were capable of reducing the charge to values lower than those measured for polished surfaces. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has also shown that only 200 micro m thick coatings are effective in reducing the oxidation rate of the substrate. Furthermore, in potentiostatic experiments the 50 micro m thick coating detached from the substrate, which did not occur with the 200 micro m thick coating. However, after 6 months immersion in HBSS, detachment occurred in some regions of both coatings. No titanium, aluminium or vanadium were detected in solution by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. These data indicate that HA is an effective barrier to metal ion release, even for the thinner coatings, due to formation of metal phosphates or to incorporation of metal ions in the HA structure. PMID:8938233

  5. Measurement of Work Hardening Behavior of Pure Titanium Sheet Using A Servo-Controlled Tube Bulge Testing Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sumita, Takeshi; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Hayashida, Yasuhiro

    2011-05-04

    Biaxial stress tests of rolled pure titanium sheet (JIS 1, 0.5 mm thick) have been carried out in order to investigate the anisotropic plastic deformation under biaxial tension. Rolled pure titanium sheet was bent and welded to make tubular specimens. Combined tension-internal pressure was applied to the tubular specimens using the servo-controlled tube bulge testing apparatus developed by one of the authors [Kuwabara, T., Yoshida, K., Narihara, K., Takahashi S., Int. J. Plasticity 21 (1), 101-117 (2002)], so that the strain rate ratio, {epsilon}{sub {phi}}:{epsilon}{theta}, in the axial ({phi}) and circumferential ({theta}) directions of the specimen was controlled to be constant. Contours of plastic work at different levels of plastic strain and stress paths under constant strain rate ratios have been observed in the first quadrant of stress space. It is found that the test material exhibits significant differential work hardening behavior with the increase of plastic work.

  6. Measurement of coating thickness using laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martsinukov, S. A.; Kostrin, D. K.; Chernigovskiy, V. V.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of thermal processes during the measurement of coating thickness with the use of heating with laser radiation is conducted. The obtained curves of the heating process allow determining thickness of the formed coatings.

  7. Tuning anatase and rutile phase ratios and nanoscale surface features by anodization processing onto titanium substrate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Roach, M D; Williamson, R S; Blakely, I P; Didier, L M

    2016-01-01

    Both the anatase (A) and rutile (R) phases of titanium oxide have shown enhanced antimicrobial and bioactivity levels but the specific A/R phase ratio needed for the best results is still unknown. In this study titanium samples were anodized to produce specific ratios of anatase and rutile phases within the oxide layers. Specific ratios produced included maximum A minimum R, minimum A maximum R, 50% A 50% R, minimum A minimum R, and a non-anodized titanium control group. Samples were characterized for phase distributions within the oxide layers, surface porosity, corrosion resistance, and bioactivity. Results indicated the targeted phase ratios were reproducibly achieved during the anodization process. Samples containing the highest levels of anatase showed the largest individual pore sizes, but a lower overall percent porosity value compared to samples containing higher rutile levels. EBSD examination of the anodized layer cross-sections provided valuable new spatial information on the distribution of anatase and rutile phases within the anodized layers. Highly porous oxide layers showed significantly higher corrosion rates compared to non-anodized titanium, but no significant differences were shown in the icorr values between samples containing primarily anatase phase, samples containing primarily rutile phase, and samples containing an approximate 50:50 mixture of the two phases. Minimum A minimum R samples showed substantially less porosity compared to the other anodization groups, a significantly lower oxide thickness, and comparable corrosion rates to non-anodized titanium. All samples within the study showed apatite production in simulated body fluid within the seven day test period indicating enhanced bioactivity.

  8. Nanometer thick elastic graphene engine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hak; Tan, Jun You; Toh, Chee-Tat; Koenig, Steven P; Fedorov, V E; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-05-14

    Significant progress has been made in the construction and theoretical understanding of molecular motors because of their potential use. Here, we have demonstrated fabrication of a simple but powerful 1 nm thick graphene engine. The engine comprises a high elastic membrane-piston made of graphene and weakly chemisorbed ClF3 molecules as the high power volume changeable actuator, while a 532 nm LASER acts as the ignition plug. Rapid volume expansion of the ClF3 molecules leads to graphene blisters. The size of the blister is controllable by changing the ignition parameters. The estimated internal pressure per expansion cycle of the engine is about ∼10(6) Pa. The graphene engine presented here shows exceptional reliability, showing no degradation after 10,000 cycles. PMID:24773247

  9. Creating universes with thick walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, Andrew; Albrecht, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a “thick wall”, which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the “Farhi-Guth-Guven” (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  10. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  11. Amputee Socks: Thickness of Multiple Socks

    PubMed Central

    Cagle, John C; Yu, Alan J; Ciol, Marcia A; Sanders, JE

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim It is unclear how total sock ply and thickness are related when more than one sock is worn. The objectives were to determine if the thickness of one multi-ply amputee sock of ply P was the same as the thickness of a stack of reduced-ply socks of total ply P; and if the thickness of N single socks stacked one on top of the other was equal to the sum (1 to N) of the single sock thicknesses. Technique Using a custom instrument, compressive stresses were applied while sock thickness was measured. Discussion The thickness of one multi-ply sock of ply P was typically less than the thickness of a stack of reduced-ply socks of total ply P. The thickness of N single socks stacked one on top of the other was approximately equal to the sum (1 to N) of the single sock thicknesses. Clinical Relevance Our findings suggest three 1-ply socks to be 20% greater in thickness than one 3-ply sock, and one 3-ply + two 1-ply socks to be 30% greater in thickness than one 5-ply sock. PMID:24240023

  12. Microstructure and properties of laser-borided composite layers formed on commercially pure titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulka, M.; Makuch, N.; Dziarski, P.; Piasecki, A.; Miklaszewski, A.

    2014-03-01

    Laser-boriding was proposed in order to produce composite boride layers on commercially pure titanium. Three zones were observed in the microstructure: laser-borided re-melted zone (TiB, TiB2 and Tiα'-phase), heat affected zone (Tiα'-phase) and the substrate without heat treatment (Tiα-phase). The stick-like titanium borides occurred in the re-melted zone. In some areas, the tubular nature of titanium borides was visible. Among the sticks of titanium borides the needles of Tiα'-phase appeared. The high overlapping of multiple laser tracks (86%) caused the formation of uniform laser-alloyed layer in respect of the thickness. The microcracks and pores were not detected in the laser-borided composite layer. The high hardness of the re-melted zone (1250-1650 HV) was obtained. The hardness gradually decreased up to 250-300 HV in heat affected zone and up to about 200 HV in the substrate. In case of higher laser beam power used (1.95 kW), the re-melted zone was thicker and more homogeneous in respect of the microstructure and hardness. The craters obtained at the surface after the Rockwell C indentation test evidently revealed ideal cohesion of the laser-borided layer (HF1 standard). The significant increase in wear resistance of laser-borided composite layers was observed in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The lower mass wear intensity factors were obtained for laser-alloyed layers. The measurements of relative mass loss were also used in order to evaluate wear behavior of the investigated materials. The tests of laser-borided layers showed the catastrophic wear of the counter-specimens. The separated particles of counter-sample caused the accelerated wear of the laser-alloyed specimen. The longer duration of the tests, carried out without the change in a counter-specimen, caused the adhesion of counter-sample particles on the laser-borided specimen. The increased contact surface was the reason for the higher temperature and created the favourable

  13. Effect of titanium nitride/titanium coatings on the stress corrosion of nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires in artificial saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Kuang; Liu, I.-Hua; Liu, Cheng; Chang, Chen-Jung; Kung, Kuan-Chen; Liu, Yen-Ting; Lee, Tzer-Min; Jou, Jin-Long

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop titanium nitride (TiN)/titanium (Ti) coating on orthodontic nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires and to study the stress corrosion of specimens in vitro, simulating the intra-oral environment in as realistic a manner as possible. TiN/Ti coatings were formed on orthodontic NiTi wires by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The characteristics of untreated and TiN/Ti-coated NiTi wires were evaluated by measurement of corrosion potential (Ecorr), corrosion current densities (Icorr), breakdown potential (Eb), and surface morphology in artificial saliva with different pH and three-point bending conditions. From the potentiodynamic polarization and SEM results, the untreated NiTi wires showed localized corrosion compared with the uniform corrosion observed in the TiN/Ti-coated specimen under both unstressed and stressed conditions. The bending stress influenced the corrosion current density and breakdown potential of untreated specimens at both pH 2 and pH 5.3. Although the bending stress influenced the corrosion current of the TiN/Ti-coated specimens, stable and passive corrosion behavior of the stressed specimen was observed even at 2.0 V (Ag/AgCl). It should be noted that the surface properties of the NiTi alloy could determine clinical performance. For orthodontic application, the mechanical damage destroys the protective oxide film of NiTi; however, the self-repairing capacity of the passive film of NiTi alloys is inferior to Ti in chloride-containing solutions. In this study, the TiN coating was found able to provide protection against mechanical damage, while the Ti interlayer improved the corrosion properties in an aggressive environment.

  14. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandan, Omid

    The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology in medical and biological applications has increased dramatically in the past decade due to the potential for enhanced sensitivity, functionality, and performance associated with the miniaturization of devices, as well as the market potential for low-cost, personalized medicine. However, the utility of such devices in clinical medicine is ultimately limited due to factors associated with prevailing micromachined materials such as silicon, as it poses concerns of safety and reliability due to its intrinsically brittle properties, making it prone to catastrophic failure. Recent advances in titanium (Ti) micromachining provides an opportunity to create devices with enhanced safety and performance due to its proven biocompatibility and high fracture toughness, which causes it to fail by means of graceful, plasticity-based deformation. Motivated by this opportunity, we discuss our efforts to advance Ti MEMS technology in two ways: 1) Through the development of titanium-based microneedles (MNs) that seek to provide a safer, simpler, and more efficacious means of ocular drug delivery, and 2) Through the advancement of Ti anodic bonding for future realization of robust microfluidic devices for photocatalysis applications. As for the first of these thrusts, we show that MN devices with in-plane geometry and through-thickness fenestrations that serve as drug reservoirs for passive delivery via diffusive transport from fast-dissolving coatings can be fabricated utilizing Ti deep reactive ion etching (Ti DRIE). Our mechanical testing and finite element analysis (FEA) results suggest that these devices possess sufficient stiffness for reliable corneal insertion. Our MN coating studies show that, relative to solid MNs of identical shank dimension, fenestrated devices can increase drug carrying capacity by 5-fold. Furthermore, we demonstrate that through-etched fenestrations provide a protective cavity for delivering

  15. [Possibilities for improvement of the surface properties of dental implants (2). The use of ceramic oxides in surface coating for titanium and tantalum implants].

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Kovács, L; Vargha, K

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion-resistant, 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure was produced on the surface of titanium implants. The layer contains a bioactive component, it is made from the material of the implant, adheres well and gives an aesthetically pleasant impression. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for their qualitative characterization. These tests demonstrated the good properties of the implants. The procedure is protected internationally by patents.

  16. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of calcium phosphate-base composite layer on titanium and its alloys via plasma electrolytic oxidation: A review paper.

    PubMed

    Rafieerad, A R; Ashra, M R; Mahmoodian, R; Bushroa, A R

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, calcium phosphate-base composites, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and carbonate apatite (CA) have been considered desirable and biocompatible coating layers in clinical and biomedical applications such as implants because of the high resistance of the composites. This review focuses on the effects of voltage, time and electrolytes on a calcium phosphate-base composite layer in case of pure titanium and other biomedical grade titanium alloys via the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. Remarkably, these parameters changed the structure, morphology, pH, thickness and crystallinity of the obtained coating for various engineering and biomedical applications. Hence, the structured layer caused improvement of the biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and assignment of extra benefits for Osseo integration. The fabricated layer with a thickness range of 10 to 20 μm was evaluated for physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological characteristics via XRD, FESEM, EDS, EIS and corrosion analysis respectively, to determine the effects of the applied parameters and various electrolytes on morphology and phase transition. Moreover, it was observed that during PEO, the concentration of calcium, phosphor and titanium shifts upward, which leads to an enhanced bioactivity by altering the thickness. The results confirm that the crystallinity, thickness and contents of composite layer can be changed by applying thermal treatments. The corrosion behavior was investigated via the potentiodynamic polarization test in a body-simulated environment. Here, the optimum corrosion resistance was obtained for the coating process condition at 500 V for 15 min in Ringer solution. This review has been summarized, aiming at the further development of PEO by producing more adequate titanium-base implants along with desired mechanical and biomedical features.

  17. Titanium-based mixed oxides from a series of titanium(IV) citrate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Yuanfu; Zhang Hualin; Hong Qiming; Weng Weizheng; Wan Huilin; Zhou Zhaohui

    2007-11-15

    The isostructural hexaaquatransition-metal/titanium citrate complexes (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[M(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}][Ti(H{sub 2}cit){sub 3}]{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O [M(II)=Mn 1, Fe 2, Co 3, Ni 4, Cu 5, and Zn 6] (H{sub 4}cit=citric acid), which were synthesized by reacting titanium(IV) citrate with divalent metal salts in the 1.0-3.5 pH range, adopt hydrogen-bonded chain motifs. The crystal structures feature three bidentate citrate anions that chelate to the titanium atom through their negatively charged {alpha}-alkoxy and {alpha}-carboxy oxygen atoms; the chelation is consistent with the large downfield shifts of {sup 13}C NMR for carbon atoms for complex 6. The thermal decomposition of the complexes furnishes mixed metal oxides. The main-group magnesium analog when heated at 600 deg. C yielded MgTi{sub 2}O{sub 5} that is of the pseudobrookite type; the particle size is approximately 30 nm. - Graphical abstract: A series of heterobimetallic titanium citrate complexes with novel dodecameric water clusters were isolated and used as molecular precursors in an attempt to the preparations of mixed oxides MTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  18. Enhanced Cellular Adhesion on Titanium by Silk Functionalized with titanium binding and RGD peptides

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Guillaume; Blanchi, Thomas; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Calabrese, Rossella; Rossi, Claire; Vigneron, Pascale; Duval, Jean-Luc; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on titanium represents a challenge for implantable materials. In order to improve adhesion at the cell/material interface we used a new approach based on the molecular recognition of titanium by specific peptides. Silk fibroin protein was chemically grafted with titanium binding peptide (TiBP) to increase adsorption of these chimeric proteins to the metal surface. Quartz Crystal Microbalance was used to quantify the specific adsorption of TiBP-functionalized silk and an increase in protein deposition by more than 35% was demonstrated due to the presence of the binding peptide. A silk protein grafted with TiBP and fibronectin-derived RGD peptide was then prepared. The adherence of fibroblasts on the titanium surface modified with the multifunctional silk coating demonstrated an increase in the number of adhering cells by 60%. The improved adhesion was demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunocytochemical staining of focal contact points. Chick embryo organotypic culture also revealed strong adhesion of endothelial cells expanding on the multifunctional silk-peptide coating. These results demonstrated that silk functionalized with TiBP and RGD represents a promising approach to modify cell-biomaterial interfaces, opening new perspectives for implantable medical devices, especially when reendothelialization is required. PMID:22975628

  19. Intelligent processing for thick composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Daniel Dong-Ok

    2000-10-01

    Manufacturing thick composite parts are associated with adverse curing conditions such as large in-plane temperature gradient and exotherms. The condition is further aggravated because the manufacturer's cycle and the existing cure control systems do not adequately counter such affects. In response, the forecast-based thermal control system is developed to have better cure control for thick composites. Accurate cure kinetic model is crucial for correctly identifying the amount of heat generated for composite process simulation. A new technique for identifying cure parameters for Hercules AS4/3502 prepreg is presented by normalizing the DSC data. The cure kinetics is based on an autocatalytic model for the proposed method, which uses dynamic and isothermal DSC data to determine its parameters. Existing models are also used to determine kinetic parameters but rendered inadequate because of the material's temperature dependent final degree of cure. The model predictions determined from the new technique showed good agreement to both isothermal and dynamic DSC data. The final degree of cure was also in good agreement with experimental data. A realistic cure simulation model including bleeder ply analysis and compaction is validated with Hercules AS4/3501-6 based laminates. The nonsymmetrical temperature distribution resulting from the presence of bleeder plies agreed well to the model prediction. Some of the discrepancies in the predicted compaction behavior were attributed to inaccurate viscosity and permeability models. The temperature prediction was quite good for the 3cm laminate. The validated process simulation model along with cure kinetics model for AS4/3502 prepreg were integrated into the thermal control system. The 3cm Hercules AS4/3501-6 and AS4/3502 laminate were fabricated. The resulting cure cycles satisfied all imposed requirements by minimizing exotherms and temperature gradient. Although the duration of the cure cycles increased, such phenomena was

  20. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30 requests to use the NCELs... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10553 - Potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium titanium oxide. 721.10553... Substances § 721.10553 Potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10553 - Potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium titanium oxide. 721.10553... Substances § 721.10553 Potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30 requests to use the NCELs... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30 requests to use the NCELs... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30 requests to use the NCELs... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  6. 14. VIEW OF VACUUM COATING CHAMBER. THE SYSTEM USED TITANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF VACUUM COATING CHAMBER. THE SYSTEM USED TITANIUM VAPORS TO DEPOSIT TITANIUM COATING ONTO URANIUM PARTS UNDER A VACUUM. (1/11/83) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  7. Biocompatibility of Textile Titanium Nickel Implants with Fibroblast Culture.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Anikeev, S G; Gunther, V E

    2015-05-01

    The parameters of biocompatibility of titanium nickel implants of different design with fibroblast culture are studied. Colonization of textile and mesh implants with fibroblasts and tissue development depend on the size of mesh cells and thread diameter. Titanium nickel implants of different constructions do not inhibit the growth of fibroblast culture. PMID:26028231

  8. Biocompatibility of Textile Titanium Nickel Implants with Fibroblast Culture.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Anikeev, S G; Gunther, V E

    2015-05-01

    The parameters of biocompatibility of titanium nickel implants of different design with fibroblast culture are studied. Colonization of textile and mesh implants with fibroblasts and tissue development depend on the size of mesh cells and thread diameter. Titanium nickel implants of different constructions do not inhibit the growth of fibroblast culture.

  9. Microbiologically induced corrosive properties of the titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, A; Mayanagi, G; Nakajo, K; Sasaki, K; Takahashi, N

    2014-05-01

    Corrosion of titanium is the major concern when it is used for dental treatment. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of the microbiologically induced corrosive properties of titanium. An experimental well was made of polymethyl methacrylate with pure titanium at the bottom. Viable or killed cells of Streptococcus mutans were packed into the well, and pH at the bacteria-titanium interface was monitored with and without glucose. Before and after 90-minute incubation, the electrochemical behavior on the titanium surface was measured by means of a potentiostat. The oxygen concentration under bacterial cells was monitored with oxygen-sensitive fluorescent film. The amount of titanium eluted was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The corrosion current and passive current under killed cells were low and stable during 90 min, while those under viable cells increased, regardless of the glucose-induced pH fall. The polarization resistance and oxygen concentration under killed cells were high and stable, while those under viable cells decreased. No elution of titanium was detected. Viable bacterial cells may form 'oxygen concentration cells' through metabolism-coupled oxygen consumption and subsequently induce corrosive properties of the titanium surface.

  10. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J.

    1991-02-13

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance...

  15. Fabrication and characterization of oxygen - diffused titanium using spectroscopy method.

    PubMed

    Lubas, M; Sitarz, M; Jasinski, J J; Jelen, P; Klita, L; Podsiad, P; Jasinski, J

    2014-12-10

    A thin native oxide film that forms on the titanium surface makes contact with the bone tissue has been considered to be of great importance to successful osseointegration. The study investigated oxygen-diffused grade 2 titanium obtained by introducing oxygen into the titanium crystal lattice using thermal treatment in fluidized bed performed at 610°C and 640°C in 6, 8, 12h. The thermal treatment at different temperatures and different times led to the formation of a TiO2 rutile film on the titanium surface and a concentration gradient of oxygen into titanium (XRD/GID analyses and GDOS results). Moreover Raman spectroscopy results showed that the TiO2 film on the surface titanium was composed of two oxides (TiO2), i.e. anatase and rutile, for the analyzed variants of heat treatment. The aim of the present study was to establish the optimum conditions for obtaining oxygen-diffused TiO2 film. The results obtained in the study demonstrated that the use of a fluidized bed for titanium oxidation processes allows for obtaining uniform oxide layers with good adhesion to the substrate, thus improving the titanium surface to suit biomedical applications.

  16. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30 requests to use the NCELs... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons whose § 721.30... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10602 Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead niobium...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10601 Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lanthanum...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10601 Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lanthanum...