Science.gov

Sample records for 2-component beam consisting

  1. A beam hardening correction method based on HL consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Tang, Shaojie; Yu, Hengyong

    2006-08-01

    XCT with polychromatic tube spectrum causes artifact called beam hardening effect. The current correction in CT device is carried by apriori polynomial from water phantom experiment. This paper proposes a new beam hardening correction algorithm that the correction polynomial depends on the relativity of projection data in angles, which obeys Helgasson-Ludwig Consistency (HL Consistency). Firstly, a bi-polynomial is constructed to characterize the beam hardening effect based on the physical model of medical x-ray imaging. In this bi-polynomial, a factor r(γ,β) represents the ratio of the attenuation contributions caused by high density mass (bone, etc.) to low density mass (muscle, vessel, blood, soft tissue, fat, etc.) respectively in the projection angle β and fan angle γ. Secondly, let r(γ,β)=0, the bi-polynomial is degraded as a sole-polynomial. The coefficient of this polynomial can be calculated based on HL Consistency. Then, the primary correction is reached, which is also more efficient in theoretical than the correction method in current CT devices. Thirdly, based on the result of a normal CT reconstruction from the corrected projection data, r(γ,β) can be estimated. Fourthly, the coefficient of bi-polynomial can also be calculated based HL Consistency and the final correction are achieved. Experiments of circular cone beam CT indicate this method an excellent property. Correcting beam hardening effect based on HL Consistency, not only achieving a self-adaptive and more precise correction, but also getting rid of regular inconvenient water phantom experiments, will renovate the correction technique of current CT devices.

  2. Consistency check of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadman, B.; Chawapun, N.; Ua-apisitwong, S.; Asakit, T.; Chumpu, N.; Rueansri, J.

    2016-03-01

    In radiotherapy, medical linear accelerator (Linac) is the key system used for radiation treatments delivery. Although, recommissioning was recommended after major modification of the machine by AAPM TG53, but it might not be practical in radiotherapy center with heavy workloads. The main purpose of this study was to compare photon beam physical data between initial commissioning and recommissioning of 6 MV Elekta Precise linac. The parameters for comparing were the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles. The clinical commissioning test cases followed IAEA-TECDOC-1583 were planned on REF 91230 IMRT Dose Verification Phantom by Philips’ Pinnacle treatment planning system. The Delta4PT was used for dose distribution verification with 90% passing criteria of the gamma index (3%/3mm). Our results revealed that the PDDs and beam profiles agreed within a tolerance limit recommended by TRS430. Most of the point doses and dose distribution verification passed the acceptance criteria. This study showed the consistency of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process. There was a good agreement between initial commissioning and recommissioning within a tolerance limit, demonstrated that the full recommissioning process might not be required. However, in the complex treatment planning geometry, the initial data should be applied with great caution.

  3. Self-consistent chaos in the beam-plasma instability

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, J.L. ); Meiss, J.D. . Applied Mathematics Program); Morrison, P.J. )

    1993-02-08

    The effect of self-consistency on Hamiltonian systems with a large number of degrees-of-freedom is investigated for the beam-plasma instability using the single-wave model of O'Neil, Winfrey, and Malmberg.The single-wave model is reviewed and then rederived within the Hamiltonian context, which leads naturally to canonical action- angle variables. Simulations are performed with a large (10[sup 4]) number of beam particles interacting with the single wave. It is observed that the system relaxes into a time asymptotic periodic state where only a few collective degrees are active; namely, a clump of trapped particles oscillating in a modulated wave, within a uniform chaotic sea with oscillating phase space boundaries. Thus self-consistency is seen to effectively reduce the number of degrees- of-freedom. A simple low degree-of-freedom model is derived that treats the clump as a single macroparticle, interacting with the wave and chaotic sea. The uniform chaotic sea is modeled by a fluid waterbag, where the waterbag boundaries correspond approximately to invariant tori. This low degree-of-freedom model is seen to compare well with the simulation.

  4. Self-consistent chaos in the beam-plasma instability

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, J.L.; Meiss, J.D.; Morrison, P.J.

    1993-02-08

    The effect of self-consistency on Hamiltonian systems with a large number of degrees-of-freedom is investigated for the beam-plasma instability using the single-wave model of O`Neil, Winfrey, and Malmberg.The single-wave model is reviewed and then rederived within the Hamiltonian context, which leads naturally to canonical action- angle variables. Simulations are performed with a large (10{sup 4}) number of beam particles interacting with the single wave. It is observed that the system relaxes into a time asymptotic periodic state where only a few collective degrees are active; namely, a clump of trapped particles oscillating in a modulated wave, within a uniform chaotic sea with oscillating phase space boundaries. Thus self-consistency is seen to effectively reduce the number of degrees- of-freedom. A simple low degree-of-freedom model is derived that treats the clump as a single macroparticle, interacting with the wave and chaotic sea. The uniform chaotic sea is modeled by a fluid waterbag, where the waterbag boundaries correspond approximately to invariant tori. This low degree-of-freedom model is seen to compare well with the simulation.

  5. Consistency.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2005-09-01

    Consistency is a reflection of having the right model, the right systems and the right implementation. As Vince Lombardi, the legendary coach of the Green Bay Packers, once said, "You don't do things right once in a while. You do them right all the time." To provide the ultimate level of patient care, reduce stress for the dentist and staff members and ensure high practice profitability, consistency is key.

  6. Simultaneous determination of electron beam profile and material response using self-consistent iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    We develop a novel iterative method to accurately measure electron beam shape (current density distribution) and monotonic material response as a function of position. A common method is to scan an electron beam across a knife edge along many angles to give an approximate measure of the beam profile, however such scans are not easy to obtain in all systems. The present work uses only an electron beam and multiple exposed regions of a thin film of photoresist to measure the complete beam profile for any beam shape, where the material response is characterized externally. This simplifies the setup of new experimental tools. We solve for self-consistent photoresist thickness loss response to dose and the electron beam profile simultaneously by optimizing a novel functional iteratively. We also show the successful implementation of the method in a real world data set corrupted by noise and other experimental variabilities.

  7. Experiments to validate self-consistent beam-gas-electron code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Sharp, W. M.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S. M.; Vay, J.-L.; Coleman, J. E.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Furman, M. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.

    2007-11-01

    The WARP-POSINST model tracks beam ions and secondary particles (ions, electrons, gas molecules) in a self-consistent manner with techniques developed for heavy-ion fusion and e-cloud studies in high-intensity accelerators. We have developed simple experiments to exercise the code. Heavy-ion beams striking a surface cause gas desorption and electron emission, both of which can limit beam performance. Subsequent beam ions can ionize the gas, producing additional electrons. Two parallel plates, on either side of the beam and orthogonal to the end wall, are biased as a dipole: one grounded and the other biased to ± 10 kV. The electron current to a positive plate jumps to the electron emission value; then ramps slowly due to ionization of desorbed gas. This is a rigorous test of the particle dynamics of the model and constrains the secondary particle production coefficients.

  8. Self-consistent Equilibrium Model of Low-aspect-ratio Toroidal Plasma with Energetic Beam Ions

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Belova; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.Z. Cheng

    2003-04-09

    A theoretical model is developed which allows the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of energetic beam ions in equilibrium calculations of low-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. A two-component plasma is considered, where the energetic ions are treated using a kinetic Vlasov description, while a one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic description is used to represent the thermal plasma. The model allows for an anisotropic distribution function and a large Larmor radius of the beam ions. Numerical results are obtained for neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Self-consistent equilibria with an anisotropic fast-ion distribution have been calculated for NSTX. It is shown for typical experimental parameters that the contribution of the energetic neutral-beam ions to the total current can be comparable to that of the background plasma, and that the kinetic modifications of the equilibrium can be significant. The range of validity of the finite-Larmor-radius expansion and of the reduced kinetic descriptions for the beam ions in NSTX is discussed. The calculated kinetic equilibria can be used for self-consistent numerical studies of beam-ion-driven instabilities in NSTX.

  9. A Self-Consistent Beam Loaded Travelling Wave Accelerator Model for use in TRACE-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, M. C.

    1997-05-01

    An optics model of a constant gradient traveling wave (CGTW) accelerator structure has been implemented for TRACE-3D. TRACE-3D is an envelope code including space charge that is used to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radio frequency (rf) accelerators when the effects of beam current might be significant. The new matrix model has been developed to allow incorporation of particle beam loading (current) effects on the accelerator gradient and the accelerator structure's beam focusing properties in a self-consistent manner. The beam loaded electric field for a CGTW accelerator structure is constant for only a particular design current (e.g., 0 current), otherwise it can be written as a function of accelerator attenuation and axial position along the structure. The variation of the electric field through the structure has been taken into account in the new model. CGTW structures differ substantially in focusing properties and beam loading properties from standing wave structures. Examples will be presented using the new TW model, propagating electron beams with different currents through the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's 3 m structure. The results will be compared to the zero current TW structure model in TRANSPORT and the Tank model (a standing wave structure model) in TRACE-3D. A computer demonstration of the code with the new element will also be presented.

  10. Longitudinal halo in beam bunches with self-consistent 6-D distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckstern, R. L.; Fedotov, A. V.; Kurennoy, S. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    1998-11-01

    We have explored the formation of longitudinal and transverse halos in 3-D axisymmetric beam bunches by starting with a self-consistent 6-D phase space distribution. Stationary distributions allow us to study the halo development mechanism without being obscured by beam redistribution and its effect on halo formation. The beam is then mismatched longitudinally and/or transversely, and we explore the rate, intensity and spatial extent of the halos which form, as a function of the beam charge and the mismatches. We find that the longitudinal halo forms first because the longitudinal tune depression is more severe than the transverse one for elongated bunches and conclude that it plays a major role in halo formation.

  11. MultiSIMNRA: A computational tool for self-consistent ion beam analysis using SIMNRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Mayer, M.; Moro, M. V.; Trindade, G. F.; Aguirre, F. R.; Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    SIMNRA is widely adopted by the scientific community of ion beam analysis for the simulation and interpretation of nuclear scattering techniques for material characterization. Taking advantage of its recognized reliability and quality of the simulations, we developed a computer program that uses multiple parallel sessions of SIMNRA to perform self-consistent analysis of data obtained by different ion beam techniques or in different experimental conditions of a given sample. In this paper, we present a result using MultiSIMNRA for a self-consistent multi-elemental analysis of a thin film produced by magnetron sputtering. The results demonstrate the potentialities of the self-consistent analysis and its feasibility using MultiSIMNRA.

  12. A self-consistent model of stripe geometry lasers based on the beam propagation method

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, P.; Patzak, E.; Yevick, D.

    1984-08-01

    Using the propagating beam technique to solve Maxwell's equations together with a shooting method solution to the carrier diffusion equation, the authors develop an iterative, self-consistent procedure for determing the properties of stripe geometry lasers. This procedure allows the authors to calculate the power-current characteristics, differential quantum efficiencies, gain distributions and near and far fields over a wide range of currents at and above threshold. Far above threshold, as expected, that symmetric and antisymmetric transverse modes can lase simultaneously.

  13. Characterisation of gunshot residue particles using self-consistent ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M. J.; Jeynes, C.

    2009-06-01

    Individual particles of gunshot residue were studied with particle-induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry using a 2.5 MeV H + beam focussed to ˜4 μm and self-consistent fitting of the data. The geometry of these spherical particles was considered in order to accurately fit the corresponding particle spectrum and therefore to quantify the trace element composition of these particles. The demonstrable self-consistency of this method allows the compositions of most residue particles to be determined unambiguously and with a higher sensitivity to trace elements than conventional methods.

  14. Stationary self-consistent distributions for a charged particle beam in the longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivotin, O. I.; Ovsyannikov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    A review of analytical solutions of the Vlasov equation for a beam of charged particles is given. These results are analyzed on the basis of a unified approach developed by the authors. In the context of this method, a space of integrals of motion is introduced in which the integrals of motion of particles are considered as coordinates. In this case, specifying a self-consistent distribution is reduced to defining a distribution density in this space. This approach allows us to simplify the construction and analysis of different self-consistent distributions. In particular, it is possible, in some cases, to derive new solutions by considering linear combinations of well-known solutions. This approach also makes it possible in many cases to give a visual geometric representation of self-consistent distributions in the space of integrals of motion.

  15. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhwan; Park, Miran; Sung, Younghun; Lee, Jaehak; Choi, Jiyoung; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation.

  16. Self-Consistent Simulations of Heavy-Ion Beams Interacting with Electron-Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Seidl, P A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Stoltz, P H; Veitzer, S; Verboncoeur, J P

    2006-08-04

    Electron-clouds and rising desorbed gas pressure limit the performance of many existing accelerators and, potentially, that of future accelerators including heavy-ion warm-dense matter and fusion drivers. For the latter, self-consistent simulation of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam(s) with the electron-cloud is necessary. To this end, we have merged the two codes WARP (HIF accelerator code) and POSINST (high-energy e-cloud build-up code), and added modules for neutral gas molecule generation, gas ionization, and electron tracking algorithms in magnetic fields with large time steps. The new tool is being benchmarked against the High-Current Experiment (HCX) and good agreement has been achieved. The simulations have also aided diagnostic interpretation and have identified unanticipated physical processes. We present the ''roadmap'' describing the different modules and their interconnections, along with detailed comparisons with HCX experimental results, as well as a preliminary application to the modeling of electron clouds in the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Self-consistent simulations of heavy-ion beams interacting with electron-clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A. W.; Stoltz, P. H.; Veitzer, S.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2007-07-01

    Electron clouds and rising desorbed gas pressure limit the performance of many existing accelerators and, potentially, that of future accelerators including heavy-ion warm-dense matter and fusion drivers. For the latter, self-consistent simulation of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam(s) with the electron cloud is necessary. To this end, we have merged the two codes WARP (HIF accelerator code) and POSINST (high-energy e-cloud build-up code), and added modules for neutral gas molecule generation, gas ionization, and electron tracking algorithms in magnetic fields with large time steps. The new tool is being benchmarked against the High-Current Experiment (HCX) and good agreement has been achieved. The simulations have also aided diagnostic interpretation and have identified unanticipated physical processes. We present the "roadmap" describing the different modules and their interconnections, along with detailed comparisons with HCX experimental results, as well as a preliminary application to the modeling of electron clouds in the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. SELF-CONSISTENT LANGEVIN SIMULATION OF COULOMB COLLISIONS IN CHARGED-PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. QIANG; R. RYNE; S. HABIB

    2000-05-01

    In many plasma physics and charged-particle beam dynamics problems, Coulomb collisions are modeled by a Fokker-Planck equation. In order to incorporate these collisions, we present a three-dimensional parallel Langevin simulation method using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach implemented on high-performance parallel computers. We perform, for the first time, a fully self-consistent simulation, in which the friction and diffusion coefficients are computed from first principles. We employ a two-dimensional domain decomposition approach within a message passing programming paradigm along with dynamic load balancing. Object oriented programming is used to encapsulate details of the communication syntax as well as to enhance reusability and extensibility. Performance tests on the SGI Origin 2000 and the Cray T3E-900 have demonstrated good scalability. Work is in progress to apply our technique to intrabeam scattering in accelerators.

  19. Consistency of atomic data for the interpretation of beam emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabie, E.; Brix, M.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Marchuk, O.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Ralchenko, Yu; Surrey, E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Zastrow, K. D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2010-12-01

    Several collisional-radiative (CR) models (Anderson et al 2000 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 42 781-806, Hutchinson 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 71-82, Marchuk et al 2008 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 10F532) have been developed to calculate the attenuation and the population of excited states of hydrogen or deuterium beams injected into tokamak plasmas. The datasets generated by these CR models are needed for the modelling of beam ion deposition and (excited) beam densities in current experiments, and the reliability of these data will be crucial to obtain helium ash densities on ITER combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy. Good agreement between the different CR models for the neutral beam (NB) is found, if corrections to the fundamental cross sections are taken into account. First the Hα and Hβ beam emission spectra from JET are compared with the expected intensities. Second, the line ratios within the Stark multiplet are compared with the predictions of a sublevel resolved model. The measured intensity of the full multiplet is ≈30% lower than expected on the basis of beam attenuation codes and the updated beam emission rates, but apart from the atomic data this could also be due to the characterization of the NB path and line of sight integration and the absolute calibration of the optics. The modelled n = 3 to n = 4 population agrees very well with the ratio of the measured Hα to Hβ beam emission intensities. Good agreement is found as well between the NB power fractions measured with beam emission in plasma and on the JET Neutral Beam Test Bed. The Stark line ratios and σ/π intensity ratio deviate from a statistical distribution, in agreement with the CR model in parabolic states from Marchuk et al (2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 011002).

  20. Light scattering by a cluster consisting of homogeneous axisymmetric particles illuminated with an arbitrarily focused electromagnetic Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hany L. S.; Wriedt, Thomas; Khaled, Elsayed Esam M.

    2016-04-01

    Scattering of an arbitrarily focused electromagnetic Gaussian beam by a chain cluster consisting of axisymmetric particles is presented. The illustrated technique in this paper combines the plane-waves spectrum method and the cluster T-matrix calculation technique. This combination provides a powerful mathematical and numerical tool to solve such types of scattering problems. Computed results are shown for different particles shapes in the cluster and for different beam focusing.

  1. Energy regeneration model of self-consistent field of electron beams into electric power*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Trifanov, I. V.; Snezhko, A. A.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider physic-mathematical models of electric processes in electron beams, conversion of beam parameters into electric power values and their transformation into users’ electric power grid (onboard spacecraft network). We perform computer simulation validating high energy efficiency of the studied processes to be applied in the electric power technology to produce the power as well as electric power plants and propulsion installation in the spacecraft.

  2. Photon-number statistics of twin beams: Self-consistent measurement, reconstruction, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peřina, Jan Jr.; Haderka, Ondřej; Michálek, Václav

    2014-12-04

    A method for the determination of photon-number statistics of twin beams using the joint signal-idler photocount statistics obtained by an iCCD camera is described. It also provides absolute quantum detection efficiency of the camera. Using the measured photocount statistics, quasi-distributions of integrated intensities are obtained. They attain negative values occurring in characteristic strips an a consequence of pairing of photons in twin beams.

  3. Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam with the Code WARP+POSINST

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P

    2005-10-11

    We present initial results for the self-consistent beam-cloud dynamics simulations for a sample LHC beam, using a newly developed set of modeling capability based on a merge [1] of the three-dimensional parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) accelerator code WARP [2] and the electron-cloud code POSINST [3]. Although the storage ring model we use as a test bed to contain the beam is much simpler and shorter than the LHC, its lattice elements are realistically modeled, as is the beam and the electron cloud dynamics. The simulated mechanisms for generation and absorption of the electrons at the walls are based on previously validated models available in POSINST [3, 4].

  4. Self-consistent simulation of radiation and space-charge in high-brightness relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, David R.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to preserve the quality of relativistic electron beams through transport bend elements such as a bunch compressor chicane is increasingly difficult as the current increases because of effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and space-charge. Theoretical CSR models and simulations, in their current state, often make unrealistic assumptions about the beam dynamics and/or structures. Therefore, we have developed a model and simulation that contains as many of these elements as possible for the purpose of making high-fidelity end-to-end simulations. Specifically, we are able to model, in a completely self-consistent, three-dimensional manner, the sustained interaction of radiation and space-charge from a relativistic electron beam in a toroidal waveguide with rectangular cross-section. We have accomplished this by combining a time-domain field solver that integrates a paraxial wave equation valid in a waveguide when the dimensions are small compared to the bending radius with a particle-in-cell dynamics code. The result is shown to agree with theory under a set of constraints, namely thin rigid beams, showing the stimulation resonant modes and including comparisons for waveguides approximating vacuum, and parallel plate shielding. Using a rigid beam, we also develop a scaling for the effect of beam width, comparing both our simulation and numerical integration of the retarded potentials. We further demonstrate the simulation calculates the correct longitudinal space-charge forces to produce the appropriate potential depression for a converging beam in a straight waveguide with constant dimensions. We then run fully three-dimensional, self-consistent end-to-end simulations of two types of bunch compressor designs, illustrating some of the basic scaling properties and perform a detailed analysis of the output phase-space distribution. Lastly, we show the unique ability of our simulation to model the evolution of charge/energy perturbations on a

  5. Self-consistent drift-diffusion-reaction model for the electron beam interaction with dielectric samples

    SciTech Connect

    Raftari, B. Budko, N. V. Vuik, C.

    2015-11-28

    The charging of insulating samples degrades the quality and complicates the interpretation of images in scanning electron microscopy and is important in other applications, such as particle detectors. In this paper, we analyze this nontrivial phenomenon on different time scales employing the drift-diffusion-reaction approach augmented with the trapping rate equations and a realistic semi-empirical source function describing the pulsed nature of the electron beam. We consider both the fast processes following the impact of a single primary electron, the slower dynamics resulting from the continuous bombardment of a sample, and the eventual approach to the steady-state regime.

  6. Self-consistent analysis of radiation and relativistic electron beam dynamics in a helical wiggler using Lienard-Wiechert fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tecimer, M.; Elias, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    Lienard-Wiechert (LW) fields, which are exact solutions of the Wave Equation for a point charge in free space, are employed to formulate a self-consistent treatment of the electron beam dynamics and the evolution of the generated radiation in long undulators. In a relativistic electron beam the internal forces leading to the interaction of the electrons with each other can be computed by means of retarded LW fields. The resulting electron beam dynamics enables us to obtain three dimensional radiation fields starting from an initial incoherent spontaneous emission, without introducing a seed wave at start-up. Based on the formalism employed here, both the evolution of the multi-bucket electron phase space dynamics in the beam body as well as edges and the relative slippage of the radiation with respect to the electrons in the considered short bunch are naturally embedded into the simulation model. In this paper, we present electromagnetic radiation studies, including multi-bucket electron phase dynamics and angular distribution of radiation in the time and frequency domain produced by a relativistic short electron beam bunch interacting with a circularly polarized magnetic undulator.

  7. Self-Consistent 3D Modeling of Electron Cloud Dynamics and Beam Response

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Molvik, A.; Stoltz, P.

    2007-04-02

    We present recent advances in the modeling of beam electron-cloud dynamics, including surface effects such as secondary electron emission, gas desorption, etc, and volumetric effects such as ionization of residual gas and charge-exchange reactions. Simulations for the HCX facility with the code WARP/POSINST will be described and their validity demonstrated by benchmarks against measurements. The code models a wide range of physical processes and uses a number of novel techniques, including a large-timestep electron mover that smoothly interpolates between direct orbit calculation and guiding-center drift equations, and a new computational technique, based on a Lorentz transformation to a moving frame, that allows the cost of a fully 3D simulation to be reduced to that of a quasi-static approximation.

  8. Toward fully self-consistent simulation of the interaction of E-Clouds and beams with WARP-POSINST

    SciTech Connect

    LLNL; Furman, M.A.; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Sonnad, K.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2012-04-09

    To predict the evolution of electron clouds and their effect on the beam, the high energy physics community has relied so far on the complementary use of 'buildup' and 'single/multi-bunch instability' reduced descriptions. The former describes the evolution of electron clouds at a given location in the ring, or 'station', under the influence of prescribed beams and external fields [1], while the latter (sometimes also referred as the 'quasi-static' approximation [2]) follows the interaction between the beams and the electron clouds around the accelerator with prescribed initial distributions of electrons, assumed to be concentrated at a number of discrete 'stations' around the ring. Examples of single bunch instability codes include HEADTAIL [3], QuickPIC [4, 5], and PEHTS [6]. By contrast, a fully self-consistent approach, in which both the electron cloud and beam distributions evolve simultaneously under their mutual influence without any restriction on their relative motion, is required for modeling the interaction of high-intensity beams with electron clouds for heavy-ion beam-driven fusion and warm-dense matter science. This community has relied on the use of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods through the development and use of the WARP-POSINST code suite [1, 7, 8]. The development of novel numerical techniques (including adaptive mesh refinement, and a new 'drift-Lorentz' particle mover for tracking charged particles in magnetic fields using large time steps) has enabled the first application of WARP-POSINST to the fully self-consistent modeling of beams and electron clouds in high energy accelerators [9], albeit for only a few betatron oscillations. It was recently observed [10] that there exists a preferred frame of reference which minimizes the number of computer operations needed to simulate the interaction of relativistic objects. This opens the possibility of reducing the cost of fully self-consistent simulations for the interaction of ultrarelativistic

  9. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: Consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    DOE PAGES

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-16

    In this study, several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends onmore » several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.« less

  10. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.

  11. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: Consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-12-16

    In this study, several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades.

  12. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    PubMed Central

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades. PMID:26670948

  13. Smart robotic manipulator systems consisting of a thin-walled beam and a spinning tip rotor: vibration and stability control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ohseop; Librescu, Liviu I.; Kwon, Hyuck-Dong

    2001-08-01

    Vibration and stability feedback control of a robotic manipulator modeled as a cantilevered thin-walled beam carrying a spinning rotor at its tip are investigated. The control is achieved via incorporation of adaptive capabilities that are provided by a system of piezoactuators bonded or embedded into the master structure. Based on converse piezoelectric effect, the piezoactuators produce a localized strain field in response to an applied voltage, and as a result, an adaptive change of vibrational and stability response characteristics is obtained. A feedback control law relating the piezoelectrically induced bending moments at the beam tip with the kinematical response quantities appropriately selected is used, and the beneficial effects of this control methodology upon the closed-loop eigenvibration characteristics and stability boundaries are highlighted. The cantilevered structure modeled as a thin-walled beam, and built-up from a composite material, encompasses on-classical features, such as anisotropy, transverse shear and secondary warping, and in this context a special ply-angle configuration inducing a structural coupling between flapping-lagging transverse shear is implemented. It is also shown that the directionality property of the material of the host structure used in conjunction with piezoelectric strain actuation capability, yields a dramatic enhancement of both the vibrational and stability behavior of the considered structural system.

  14. Cone beam CT dosimetry: A unified and self-consistent approach including all scan modalities—With or without phantom motion

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes a common methodology and measurement technique, encompassing both conventional (helical and axial) CT scanning using phantom translation and cone beam (or narrow fan beam) CT scans about a stationary phantom. Cone beam CT systems having beam widths along the z-axis wide enough to cover a significant anatomical length (50–160 mm) in a single axial rotation (e.g., in cardiac CT) are rapidly proliferating in the clinic, referred to herein as stationary cone beam CT (SCBCT). The integral format of the CTDI paradigm is not appropriate for a stationary phantom, and is not useful for predicting the dose in SCBCT, nor for perfusion studies or CT fluoroscopy. Likewise, the pencil chamber has limited utility in this domain (even one of extended length). Methods: By demonstrating, both experimentally and theoretically, the match between the dose distribution f(z) for a wide cone beam and that due to an axial scan series D˜(z), it is shown that the dose on the central ray of the cone beam f(0) is both spatially colocated and numerically equal to the dose predicted by CTDI for the axial series; and thus f(0) is the logical (and unique) choice for a SCBCT dose-descriptor consistent with the CTDI-based dose of conventional CT. This dose f(0) can be readily measured using a conventional (short) ionization chamber. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations of Boone [J. M. Boone, “Dose spread functions in computed tomography: A Monte Carlo study,” Med. Phys. 36, 4547–4554 (2009)], expressed as a scatter LSF (or DSF), allow the application of a convolution-based model [R. L. Dixon, M. T. Munley, and E. Bayram, “An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose,” Med. Phys. 32, 3712–3728 (2005)] of the axial dose profile f(z) for any primary beam width a (anyn×T), fan beam and cone beam alike, from a single LSF kernel; its simple form allows the results to be expressed as simple analytical equations

  15. Consistency in reference radiotherapy dosimetry: resolution of an apparent conundrum when 60Co is the reference quality for charged-particle and photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro; Wulff, Jörg; Burns, David T.; Palmans, Hugo

    2013-10-01

    Substantial changes in ion chamber perturbation correction factors in 60Co γ-rays, suggested by recent Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, would cause a decrease of about 1.5% in the reference dosimetry of all types of charged particles (electrons, protons and heavier ions) based on calculated kQ values. It has gone largely unnoticed that the ratio of calibration coefficients ND, w, Co60 and NK, air, Co60 yields an experimental value of Fch, Co60 = (sw-air pch)Co60 through ND, air, Co60. Coefficients provided by the IAEA and traceable to the BIPM for 91 NE-2571 chambers result in an average Fch, Co60 which is compared with published (and new) MC simulations and with the value in IAEA TRS-398. It is shown that TRS-398 agrees within 0.12% with the experimental Fch, Co60. The 1.5% difference resulting from MC calculations (1.1% for the new simulations) cannot be justified using current fundamental data and BIPM standards if consistency in the entire dosimetry chain is sought. For photons, MC kQ factors are compared with TRS-398. Using the same uncertainty for Wair, the two sets of data overlap considerably. Experimental kQ values from standards laboratories lie between the two sets of calculated values, showing no preference for one set over the other. Observed chamber-to-chamber differences, that include the effect of waterproof sleeves (also seen for 60Co), justify the recommendation in TRS-398 for kQ values specifically measured for the user chamber. Current developments on I-values for the stopping powers of water and graphite are presented. A weighted average Iwater = 78 ± 2 eV is obtained from published experimental and DRF-based values; this would decrease sw-air for all types of radiotherapy beams between 0.3% and 0.6%, and would consequently decrease the MC derived Fch, Co60. The implications of a recent proposal for Igraphite = 81 eV are analysed, resulting in a potential decrease of 0.7% in NK, air, Co60 which would raise the experimental Fch, Co60

  16. Consistency in reference radiotherapy dosimetry: resolution of an apparent conundrum when (60)Co is the reference quality for charged-particle and photon beams.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro; Wulff, Jörg; Burns, David T; Palmans, Hugo

    2013-10-01

    Substantial changes in ion chamber perturbation correction factors in (60)Co γ-rays, suggested by recent Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, would cause a decrease of about 1.5% in the reference dosimetry of all types of charged particles (electrons, protons and heavier ions) based on calculated kQ values. It has gone largely unnoticed that the ratio of calibration coefficients ND, w, Co60 and NK, air, Co60 yields an experimental value of Fch, Co60 = (sw-air pch)Co60 through ND, air, Co60. Coefficients provided by the IAEA and traceable to the BIPM for 91 NE-2571 chambers result in an average Fch, Co60 which is compared with published (and new) MC simulations and with the value in IAEA TRS-398. It is shown that TRS-398 agrees within 0.12% with the experimental Fch, Co60. The 1.5% difference resulting from MC calculations (1.1% for the new simulations) cannot be justified using current fundamental data and BIPM standards if consistency in the entire dosimetry chain is sought. For photons, MC kQ factors are compared with TRS-398. Using the same uncertainty for Wair, the two sets of data overlap considerably. Experimental kQ values from standards laboratories lie between the two sets of calculated values, showing no preference for one set over the other. Observed chamber-to-chamber differences, that include the effect of waterproof sleeves (also seen for (60)Co), justify the recommendation in TRS-398 for kQ values specifically measured for the user chamber. Current developments on I-values for the stopping powers of water and graphite are presented. A weighted average Iwater = 78 ± 2 eV is obtained from published experimental and DRF-based values; this would decrease sw-air for all types of radiotherapy beams between 0.3% and 0.6%, and would consequently decrease the MC derived Fch, Co60. The implications of a recent proposal for Igraphite = 81 eV are analysed, resulting in a potential decrease of 0.7% in NK, air, Co60 which would raise the experimental Fch, Co60

  17. Stimulated second-order processes in the interaction of a spinless quantum particle beam with a self-consistent electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.

    2011-02-15

    A nonlinear theory of interaction of two electromagnetic waves with a beam or a gas of spinless charged particles is developed. The effects of stimulated Compton scattering of electromagnetic waves and stimulated particle pair production (annihilation) during a collision of two electromagnetic quanta are investigated. Other stimulated processes that can occur only in a medium and decelerate electromagnetic waves are also considered. The relation between stimulated processes and various types of instabilities considered in classical electrodynamics of plasmas and plasmalike media is demonstrated.

  18. Accuracy Study of a 2-Component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John; Naylor, Steve; James, Kelly; Ramanath, Senthil

    1997-01-01

    A two-component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) which has recently been developed is described, and a series of velocity measurements which have been obtained to quantify the accuracy of the PDV system are summarized. This PDV system uses molecular iodine vapor cells as frequency discriminating filters to determine the Doppler shift of laser light which is scattered off of seed particles in a flow. The majority of results which have been obtained to date are for the mean velocity of a rotating wheel, although preliminary data are described for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. Accuracy of the present wheel velocity data is approximately +/- 1 % of full scale, while linearity of a single channel is on the order of +/- 0.5 % (i.e., +/- 0.6 m/sec and +/- 0.3 m/sec, out of 57 m/sec, respectively). The observed linearity of these results is on the order of the accuracy to which the speed of the rotating wheel has been set for individual data readings. The absolute accuracy of the rotating wheel data is shown to be consistent with the level of repeatability of the cell calibrations. The preliminary turbulent pipe flow data show consistent turbulence intensity values, and mean axial velocity profiles generally agree with pitot probe data. However, there is at present an offset error in the radial velocity which is on the order of 5-10 % of the mean axial velocity.

  19. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  20. Epipolar Consistency in Transmission Imaging.

    PubMed

    Aichert, André; Berger, Martin; Wang, Jian; Maass, Nicole; Doerfler, Arnd; Hornegger, Joachim; Maier, Andreas K

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the Epipolar Consistency Conditions (ECC) between two X-ray images from the Beer-Lambert law of X-ray attenuation and the Epipolar Geometry of two pinhole cameras, using Grangeat's theorem. We motivate the use of Oriented Projective Geometry to express redundant line integrals in projection images and define a consistency metric, which can be used, for instance, to estimate patient motion directly from a set of X-ray images. We describe in detail the mathematical tools to implement an algorithm to compute the Epipolar Consistency Metric and investigate its properties with detailed random studies on both artificial and real FD-CT data. A set of six reference projections of the CT scan of a fish were used to evaluate accuracy and precision of compensating for random disturbances of the ground truth projection matrix using an optimization of the consistency metric. In addition, we use three X-ray images of a pumpkin to prove applicability to real data. We conclude, that the metric might have potential in applications related to the estimation of projection geometry. By expression of redundancy between two arbitrary projection views, we in fact support any device or acquisition trajectory which uses a cone-beam geometry. We discuss certain geometric situations, where the ECC provide the ability to correct 3D motion, without the need for 3D reconstruction. PMID:25915956

  1. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    Proposed is a measure of indexing consistency based on the concept of "fuzzy sets." By this procedure a higher consistency value is assigned if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on…

  2. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  3. Consistency relation in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ryuichi

    2007-05-15

    We provide a consistency relation between cosmological observables in general relativity without relying on the equation of state of dark energy. The consistency relation should be satisfied if general relativity is the correct theory of gravity and dark energy clustering is negligible. As an extension, we also provide the DGP counterpart of the relation.

  4. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  5. The GATOR2 Component Wdr24 Regulates TORC1 Activity and Lysosome Function

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weili; Wei, Youheng; Jarnik, Michal; Reich, John; Lilly, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    TORC1 is a master regulator of metabolism in eukaryotes that responds to multiple upstream signaling pathways. The GATOR complex is a newly defined upstream regulator of TORC1 that contains two sub-complexes, GATOR1, which inhibits TORC1 activity in response to amino acid starvation and GATOR2, which opposes the activity of GATOR1. While the GATOR1 complex has been implicated in a wide array of human pathologies including cancer and hereditary forms of epilepsy, the in vivo relevance of the GATOR2 complex remains poorly understood in metazoans. Here we define the in vivo role of the GATOR2 component Wdr24 in Drosophila. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and cell biological techniques we demonstrate that Wdr24 has both TORC1 dependent and independent functions in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Through the characterization of a null allele, we show that Wdr24 is a critical effector of the GATOR2 complex that promotes the robust activation of TORC1 and cellular growth in a broad array of Drosophila tissues. Additionally, epistasis analysis between wdr24 and genes that encode components of the GATOR1 complex revealed that Wdr24 has a second critical function, the TORC1 independent regulation of lysosome dynamics and autophagic flux. Notably, we find that two additional members of the GATOR2 complex, Mio and Seh1, also have a TORC1 independent role in the regulation of lysosome function. These findings represent a surprising and previously unrecognized function of GATOR2 complex components in the regulation of lysosomes. Consistent with our findings in Drosophila, through the characterization of a wdr24-/- knockout HeLa cell line we determined that Wdr24 promotes lysosome acidification and autophagic flux in mammalian cells. Taken together our data support the model that Wdr24 is a key effector of the GATOR2 complex, required for both TORC1 activation and the TORC1 independent regulation of lysosomes. PMID:27166823

  6. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katherine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50 nm–100 nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  7. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  8. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  9. Infanticide and moral consistency.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Jeff

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this essay is to show that there are no easy options for those who are disturbed by the suggestion that infanticide may on occasion be morally permissible. The belief that infanticide is always wrong is doubtfully compatible with a range of widely shared moral beliefs that underlie various commonly accepted practices. Any set of beliefs about the morality of abortion, infanticide and the killing of animals that is internally consistent and even minimally credible will therefore unavoidably contain some beliefs that are counterintuitive.

  10. Consistent Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most fundamental yet difficult subjects in physics. Nonrelativistic quantum theory is presented here in a clear and systematic fashion, integrating Born's probabilistic interpretation with Schrödinger dynamics. Basic quantum principles are illustrated with simple examples requiring no mathematics beyond linear algebra and elementary probability theory. The quantum measurement process is consistently analyzed using fundamental quantum principles without referring to measurement. These same principles are used to resolve several of the paradoxes that have long perplexed physicists, including the double slit and Schrödinger's cat. The consistent histories formalism used here was first introduced by the author, and extended by M. Gell-Mann, J. Hartle and R. Omnès. Essential for researchers yet accessible to advanced undergraduate students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, this book is supplementary to standard textbooks. It will also be of interest to physicists and philosophers working on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Comprehensive account Written by one of the main figures in the field Paperback edition of successful work on philosophy of quantum mechanics

  11. Consistent quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  12. Photonic crystal beam splitters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chii-Chang; Chien, Hung-Da; Luan, Pi-Gang

    2004-11-20

    This work studies two-dimensional photonic crystal beam splitters with two input ports and two output ports. The beam splitter structure consists of two orthogonally crossed line defects and one point defect in square-lattice photonic crystals. The point defect is positioned at the intersection of the line defects to divide the input power into output ports. If the position and the size of the point defect are varied, the power of two output ports can be identical. The beam splitters can be used in photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometers or switches. The simulation results show that a large bandwidth of the extinction ratio larger than 20 dB can be obtained while two beams are interfered in the beam splitters. This enables photonic crystal beam splitters to be used in fiber optic communication systems.

  13. Prokaryotic 2-component systems and the OmpR/PhoB superfamily.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh-Phuong; Yoon, Joo-Mi; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Sang-Won

    2015-11-01

    In bacteria, 2-component regulatory systems (TCSs) are the critical information-processing pathways that link stimuli to specific adaptive responses. Signals perceived by membrane sensors, which are generally histidine kinases, are transmitted by response regulators (RRs) to allow cells to cope rapidly and effectively with environmental challenges. Over the past few decades, genes encoding components of TCSs and their responsive proteins have been identified, crystal structures have been described, and signaling mechanisms have been elucidated. Here, we review recent findings and interesting breakthroughs in bacterial TCS research. Furthermore, we discuss structural features, mechanisms of activation and regulation, and cross-regulation of RRs, with a focus on the largest RR family, OmpR/PhoB, to provide a comprehensive overview of these critically important signaling molecules.

  14. Magnetic beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Many nondestructive beam position monitors are known. However, these devices can not be used for DC particle beam diagnostics. We investigated a method of beam diagnostics applicable for the operative control of DC high power e-beam inside closed waveguide. A design of the detector for determination of{open_quote} center of mass {close_quote} position of DC particle beam was developed. It was shown that the monitor can be used as a nondestructive method for the beam position control in resonators. Magnetic field of the particle beam outside a resonator is used. The detector consists of the steel yokes and magnetic field sensors. The sensors measure magnetic fluxes in the steel yokes fixed outside the resonator. When the particle beam changes its position, these magnetic fluxes also change. Beam displacement sensitivity of the monitor depends on the steel yoke dimensions. The detector sensitivity is equal to 1 Gauss/mm for the conditions adequate to the FOM-FEM project.

  15. Inactivation of polycomb repressive complex 2 components in myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Score, Joannah; Hidalgo-Curtis, Claire; Jones, Amy V; Winkelmann, Nils; Skinner, Alison; Ward, Daniel; Zoi, Katerina; Ernst, Thomas; Stegelmann, Frank; Döhner, Konstanze; Chase, Andrew; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2012-02-01

    The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a highly conserved histone H3 lysine 27 methyltransferase that regulates the expression of developmental genes. Inactivating mutations of the catalytic component of PRC2, EZH2, are seen in myeloid disorders. We reasoned that the other 2 core PRC2 components, SUZ12 and EED, may also be mutational targets in these diseases, as well as associated factors such as JARID2. SUZ12 mutations were identified in 1 of 2 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasms with 17q acquired uniparental disomy and in 2 of 2 myelofibrosis cases with focal 17q11 deletions. All 3 were missense mutations affecting the highly conserved VEFS domain. Analysis of a further 146 myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm patients revealed an additional VEFS domain mutant, yielding a total mutation frequency of 1.4% (2 of 148). We did not find mutations of JARID2 or EED in association with acquired uniparental disomy for chromosome 6p or 11q, respectively; however, screening unselected cases identified missense mutations in EED (1 of 148; 1%) and JARID2 (3 of 148; 2%). All 3 SUZ12 mutations tested and the EED mutation reduced PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity in vitro, demonstrating that PRC2 function may be compromised in myeloid disorders by mutation of distinct genes.

  16. Switchable circular beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Joshi, Pankaj; Tan, Jin-Yi; De Smet, Jelle; Cuypers, Dieter; Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report two types of electrically tunable photonic devices with circularly symmetric polarization independent beam steering performance (beam condensing resp. beam broadening). The devices consist of circular micro grating structures combined with nematic liquid crystal (LC) layers with anti-parallel alignment. A single beam deflector converts a polarized and monochromatic green laser beam (λ =543.5 nm) into a diffraction pattern, with the peak intensity appearing at the third order when 0~{{V}\\text{pp}} is applied and at the zeroth order (no deflection) for voltages above 30~{{V}\\text{pp}} . Depending on the shape of the grating structure (non-inverted or inverted), the deflection is inwards or outwards. Both grating types can be made starting from the same diamond-tooled master mold. A polarized white light beam is symmetrically condensed resp. broadened over 2° in the off state and is passed through unchanged in the on state. By stacking two such devices with mutually orthogonal LC alignment layers, polarization independent switchable circular beam deflectors are realized with a high transmittance (>80%), and with the same beam steering performance as the polarization dependent single devices.

  17. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  18. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Evans, J. A.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field

  19. Generating stable tractor beams with dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Carl; Grbic, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Propagation-invariant beams that pull objects towards a light source are commonly known as tractor beams. Here, an efficient, linearly polarized tractor beam with improved stability is introduced. The beam consists of a superposition of transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic polarized Bessel beams of orders m =+1 and m =-1 . It is shown that this beam can stably pull a wide range of dielectric microparticles arbitrarily long distances, independent of ambient conditions. Next, a straightforward method of generating these high-performance beams is proposed. A Si metasurface transforms an incident linearly polarized Gaussian beam into the desired tractor beam. Full-wave simulations demonstrate that it is possible for this simple geometry to pull a polystyrene sphere a distance equal to the nondiffracting range of the Bessel beam. The simplicity of the setup and the robust performance of the proposed tractor beam significantly enhance the ability to manipulate matter with light.

  20. Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    1997-04-01

    Electron beams have played a significant role in semiconductor technology for more than twenty years. Early electron beam machines used a raster scanned beam spot to write patterns in electron-sensitive polymer resist materials. The main application of electron beam lithography has been in mask making. Despite the inherently high spatial resolution and wide process margins of electron beam lithography, the writing rate for semiconductor wafers has been too slow to be economically viable on a large scale. In the late 1970's, variable shape electron beam writing was developed, projecting a rectangular beam whose size can be varied for each "shot" exposure of a particular pattern, allowing some integrated circuits to be made economically where a variety of "customized" patterns are desired. In the cell or block projection electron beam exposure technique, a unit cell of a repetitive pattern is projected repeatedly to increase the level of parallelism. This can work well for highly repetitive patterns such as memory chips but is not well suited to complex varying patterns such as microprocessors. The rapid progress in the performance of integrated circuits has been largely driven by progress in optical lithography, through improvements in lens design and fabrication as well as the use of shorter wavelengths for the exposure radiation. Due to limitations from the opacity of lens and mask materials, it is unlikely that conventional optical printing methods can be used at wavelengths below 193 nm or feature sizes much below 180 nm. One candidate technology for a post-optical era is the Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron-beam Lithography (SCALPEL) approach, which combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam lithography with the throughput of a parallel projection system. A mask consisting of a low atomic number membrane and a high atomic number pattern layer is uniformly illuminated with high energy (100 ke

  1. The Principle of Energetic Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    A basic result in estimation theory is that the minimum variance estimate of the dynamical state, given the observations, is the conditional mean estimate. This result holds independently of the specifics of any dynamical or observation nonlinearity or stochasticity, requiring only that the probability density function of the state, conditioned on the observations, has two moments. For nonlinear dynamics that conserve a total energy, this general result implies the principle of energetic consistency: if the dynamical variables are taken to be the natural energy variables, then the sum of the total energy of the conditional mean and the trace of the conditional covariance matrix (the total variance) is constant between observations. Ensemble Kalman filtering methods are designed to approximate the evolution of the conditional mean and covariance matrix. For them the principle of energetic consistency holds independently of ensemble size, even with covariance localization. However, full Kalman filter experiments with advection dynamics have shown that a small amount of numerical dissipation can cause a large, state-dependent loss of total variance, to the detriment of filter performance. The principle of energetic consistency offers a simple way to test whether this spurious loss of variance limits ensemble filter performance in full-blown applications. The classical second-moment closure (third-moment discard) equations also satisfy the principle of energetic consistency, independently of the rank of the conditional covariance matrix. Low-rank approximation of these equations offers an energetically consistent, computationally viable alternative to ensemble filtering. Current formulations of long-window, weak-constraint, four-dimensional variational methods are designed to approximate the conditional mode rather than the conditional mean. Thus they neglect the nonlinear bias term in the second-moment closure equation for the conditional mean. The principle of

  2. LSST optical beam simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. A.; Sasian, J.; Gilmore, K.; Bradshaw, A.; Claver, C.; Klint, M.; Muller, G.; Poczulp, G.; Resseguie, E.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a camera beam simulator for the LSST which is capable of illuminating a 60mm field at f/1.2 with realistic astronomical scenes, enabling studies of CCD astrometric and photometric performance. The goal is to fully simulate LSST observing, in order to characterize charge transport and other features in the thick fully-depleted CCDs and to probe low level systematics under realistic conditions. The automated system simulates the centrally obscured LSST beam and sky scenes, including the spectral shape of the night sky. The doubly telecentric design uses a nearly unit magnification design consisting of a spherical mirror, three BK7 lenses, and one beam-splitter window. To achieve the relatively large field the beam-splitter window is used twice. The motivation for this LSST beam test facility was driven by the need to fully characterize a new generation of thick fully-depleted CCDs, and assess their suitability for the broad range of science which is planned for LSST. Due to the fast beam illumination and the thick silicon design [each pixel is 10 microns wide and over 100 microns deep] at long wavelengths there can be effects of photon transport and charge transport in the high purity silicon. The focal surface covers a field more than sufficient for a 40×40mm LSST CCD. Delivered optical quality meets design goals, with 50% energy within a 5 micron circle. The tests of CCD performance are briefly described.

  3. A low energy beam transport system for proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Zhang, Z. M.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2013-03-15

    A low energy beam transport (LEBT) system has been built for a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University in China. The LEBT, consisting of two solenoids and three short-drift sections, transports a pulsed proton beam of 60 mA of energy of 50 keV to the entrance of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Measurement has shown a normalized RMS beam emittance less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad at the end of the LEBT. Beam simulations were carried out to compare with the measurement and are in good agreement. Based on the successful CPHS LEBT development, a new LEBT for a China ADS projector has been designed. The features of the new design, including a beam chopper and beam simulations of the LEBT are presented and discussed along with CPHS LEBT development in this article.

  4. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  5. Development of 3D beam-beam simulation for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-06-01

    We present status of development of a 3D Beam-Beam simulation code for simulating the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The essential features of the code are 3D particle-in-cell Poisson solver for calculating the Beam-Beam electromagnetic interactions with additional modules for linear optics, machine impedance and chromaticity, and multiple bunch tracking. The simulations match synchrobetatron oscillations measured at the VEPP-2M collider. The impedance calculations show beam instability development consistent with analytic expressions.

  6. A Low-Mass H2 Component to the AU Microscopii Circumstellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Roberge, Aki; Lupu, Roxana E.; Redfield, Seth; Feldman, Paul D.

    2007-10-01

    We present a determination of the molecular gas mass in the AU Microscopii circumstellar disk. Direct detection of a gas component to the AU Mic disk has proven elusive, with upper limits derived from ultraviolet absorption line and submillimeter CO emission studies. Fluorescent emission lines of H2, pumped by the O VI λ1032 resonance line through the C-X (1-1) Q(3) λ1031.87 Å transition, are detected by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. These lines are used to derive the H2 column density associated with the AU Mic system. The derived column density is in the range N(H2)=1.9×1017 to 2.8×1015 cm-2, roughly 2 orders of magnitude lower than the upper limit inferred from absorption line studies. This range of column densities reflects the range of H2 excitation temperature consistent with the observations, T(H2)=800-2000 K, derived from the presence of emission lines excited by O VI in the absence of those excited by Lyα. Within the observational uncertainties, the data are consistent with the H2 gas residing in the disk. The inferred N(H2) range corresponds to H2-to-dust ratios of <~1/30:1 and a total M(H2)=4.0×10-4 to 5.8×10-6 M⊕. We use these results to predict the intensity of the associated rovibrational emission lines of H2 at infrared wavelengths covered by ground-based instruments, HST NICMOS, and the Spitzer IRS. Based in part on observations made with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, operated by the Johns Hopkins University for NASA.

  7. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  8. Electron Beams for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2004-11-01

    In the fast ignitor scenario an intense relativistic electron beam is used to deposit energy inside the fuel target and trigger the thermonuclear reaction. This electron beam is produced on the outer plasma layer of the target by the interaction of an ultra-intense laser. The energy transfer from the laser to the electron beam, and the stability of the propagation of the electron beam are crucial for a successful fast ignitor scheme. We have used three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the OSIRIS.framework [1] to explore the self-consistent generation of high current electron beams by ultra intense lasers. Novel laser pulse configurations are explored in order to generate electron beams transporting more energy, and capable of avoiding the deleterious effects of collisionless instabilities in the plasma corona. [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342-351, (Springer, Heidelberg, 2002);

  9. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  10. Consistent interpretations of quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Omnes, R. )

    1992-04-01

    Within the last decade, significant progress has been made towards a consistent and complete reformulation of the Copenhagen interpretation (an interpretation consisting in a formulation of the experimental aspects of physics in terms of the basic formalism; it is consistent if free from internal contradiction and complete if it provides precise predictions for all experiments). The main steps involved decoherence (the transition from linear superpositions of macroscopic states to a mixing), Griffiths histories describing the evolution of quantum properties, a convenient logical structure for dealing with histories, and also some progress in semiclassical physics, which was made possible by new methods. The main outcome is a theory of phenomena, viz., the classically meaningful properties of a macroscopic system. It shows in particular how and when determinism is valid. This theory can be used to give a deductive form to measurement theory, which now covers some cases that were initially devised as counterexamples against the Copenhagen interpretation. These theories are described, together with their applications to some key experiments and some of their consequences concerning epistemology.

  11. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  13. Deducing Wild 2 Components with a Statistical Dataset of Olivine in Chondrite Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, D. R.; Zolensky, M. E.; Le, L.

    2012-01-01

    , Wild 2 may have received a larger contribution from the Kakangari and/or enstatite chondrite forming regions. Alternatively, Wild 2 may have undergone accretion in an anomalously reducing region, marked by nebular condensation of this atypical forsterite. In [4], a similar conclusion was reached with an Fe-XANES study. We will also use similar lines of reasoning, and our previous conclusions in [5], to constrain the relative contributions of silicates that appear to have been radially transported from different ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite forming regions to the Kuiper Belt. In addition, the widespread depletion of Cr in these FeO-rich (Fa(sub greater than 20)) fragments is consistent with mild thermal metamorphism in Wild 2.

  14. Ion Beam Simulator

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  15. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  16. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  17. Beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanGinneken, A.; Edwards, D.; Harrison, M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of beam losses during the operation of a superconducting accelerator. The calculations use a combination of hadron/electromagnetic cascade plus elastic scattering codes with accelerator tracking routines. These calculations have been used in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab Tevatron. First accelerator geometry is described. The rest of the paper discusses a detailed attempt to simulate a fast extraction cycle, essentially in chronological order. Beginning with an unperturbed beam, the simulation generates proton phase-space distributions incident on the electrostatic septum. These interact either elastically or inelastically with the septum wires, and the products of these interactions are traced through the machine. Where these leave the accelerator, energy deposition levels in the magnets are calculated together with the projected response of the beam-loss monitors in this region. Finally, results of the calculation are compared with experimental data. (AIP)

  18. A Scale Free Solar Wind Interacting With A Characteristic Magnetospheric Scale ? - Disentangling The Dp1 and Dp2 Components By Means of Burst Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, N. W.; Freeman, M. P.; Riley, D. J.

    Takalo [1994] and Consolini [1997] have used the statistics of bursts defined by ex- ceedence of a constant threshold to show the presence of wideband fractal behaviour in the AE index i.e. the absence of preferred magnitude and time scales. Examination of a longer series by Consolini [1998] has however shown an apparent break in this scale invariance, roughly corresponding to typical substorm-related scales. However there is long-standing evidence for solar wind driving of one component of AE [e.g. Kamide and Baumjohann, 1993]. We present the results of a study [Freeman et al., GRL, 2000] which showed the presence of a similar scale free component in the solar wind epsilon function to that seen in AE, and scaling differences between AU and AL. Our results are consistent with the scale free component in AE originating from the solar-wind driven DP2 component, while the scale break would be consistent with the expected properties of the unloading DP1 component. We also discuss the results of a second study extending this methodology to the solar wind Poynting flux [Freeman et al., PRE, 2000] and consider the possible modifications to our picture implied by the work of Uritsky et al. [2001].

  19. Self-consistent flattened isochrones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James

    2014-05-01

    We present a family of self-consistent axisymmetric stellar systems that have analytic distribution functions (DFs) of the form f(J), so they depend on three integrals of motion and have triaxial velocity ellipsoids. The models, which are generalizations of Hénon's isochrone sphere, have four dimensionless parameters, two determining the part of the DF that is even in Lz and two determining the odd part of the DF (which determines the azimuthal velocity distribution). Outside their cores, the velocity ellipsoids of all models tend to point to the model's centre, and we argue that this behaviour is generic, so near the symmetry axis of a flattened model, the long axis of the velocity ellipsoid is naturally aligned with the symmetry axis and not perpendicular to it as in many published dynamical models of well-studied galaxies. By varying one of the DF parameters, the intensity of rotation can be increased from zero up to a maximum value set by the requirement that the DF be non-negative. Since angle-action coordinates are easily computed for these models, they are ideally suited for perturbative treatments and stability analysis. They can also be used to choose initial conditions for an N-body model that starts in perfect equilibrium, and to model observations of early-type galaxies. The modelling technique introduced here is readily extended to different radial density profiles, more complex kinematics and multicomponent systems. A number of important technical issues surrounding the determination of the models' observable properties are explained in two appendices.

  20. Conceptual development of the Laser Beam Manifold (LBM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.; Owen, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The laser beam manifold, a device for transforming a single, narrow, collimated beam of light into several beams of desired intensity ratios is described. The device consists of a single optical substrate with a metallic coating on both optical surfaces. By changing the entry point, the number of outgoing beams can be varied.

  1. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  2. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  3. Beam shaping for holographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2014-09-01

    Uniform intensity of laser radiation is very important in holographic and interferometry technologies, therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Holography and interferometry have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam, most important of them are flatness of phase front and extended depth of field. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality demanding holography and interferometry. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers piShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. This approach is used in SLM-based technologies of Computer Generated Holography, Dot-Matrix mastering of security holograms, holographic data storage, holographic projection, lithography, interferometric recording of Volume Bragg Gratings. High optical quality of resulting flat-top beam allows applying additional optical components to vary beam size and shape, thus adapting an optical system to requirements of a particular application. This paper will describe design basics of refractive beam shapers and optical layouts of their applying in holographic systems. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  4. Hybrid laser-beam-shaping system for rotatable dual beams with long depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Fu-Lung; Chen, Cheng-Huan; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Mao-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A laser processing system consisting of two diffractive elements and one refractive element is proposed enabling a Gaussian laser beam to be transformed into two beams with a depth of focus of up to 150 µm and focal spot smaller than 5 µm. For specific laser processing, the two beams are rotatable when the beam-splitting diffractive element is rotated. The overall system is versatile for laser cutting and drilling.

  5. Hybrid laser-beam-shaping system for rotatable dual beams with long depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Fu-Lung; Chen, Cheng-Huan; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Mao-Chi

    2016-08-01

    A laser processing system consisting of two diffractive elements and one refractive element is proposed enabling a Gaussian laser beam to be transformed into two beams with a depth of focus of up to 150 µm and focal spot smaller than 5 µm. For specific laser processing, the two beams are rotatable when the beam-splitting diffractive element is rotated. The overall system is versatile for laser cutting and drilling.

  6. Experimental validation of beam quality correction factors for proton beams.

    PubMed

    Gomà, Carles; Hofstetter-Boillat, Bénédicte; Safai, Sairos; Vörös, Sándor

    2015-04-21

    This paper presents a method to experimentally validate the beam quality correction factors (kQ) tabulated in IAEA TRS-398 for proton beams and to determine the kQ of non-tabulated ionization chambers (based on the already tabulated values). The method is based exclusively on ionometry and it consists in comparing the reading of two ionization chambers under the same reference conditions in a proton beam quality Q and a reference beam quality (60)Co. This allows one to experimentally determine the ratio between the kQ of the two ionization chambers. In this work, 7 different ionization chamber models were irradiated under the IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for (60)Co beams and proton beams. For the latter, the reference conditions for both modulated beams (spread-out Bragg peak field) and monoenergetic beams (pseudo-monoenergetic field) were studied. For monoenergetic beams, it was found that the experimental kQ values obtained for plane-parallel chambers are consistent with the values tabulated in IAEA TRS-398; whereas the kQ values obtained for cylindrical chambers are not consistent--being higher than the tabulated values. These results support the suggestion (of previous publications) that the IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams should be revised so that the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers is taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber at the reference depth. For modulated proton beams, the tabulated kQ values of all the ionization chambers studied in this work were found to be consistent with each other--except for the IBA FC65-G, whose experimental kQ value was found to be 0.6% lower than the tabulated one. The kQ of the PTW Advanced Markus chamber, which is not tabulated in IAEA TRS-398, was found to be 0.997 ± 0.042 (k = 2), based on the tabulated value of the PTW Markus chamber.

  7. Adjustment procedure for beam alignment in scanned ion-beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Y.; Takeshita, E.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saotome, N.; Tansho, R.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-09-01

    Control of the beam position for three-dimensional pencil-beam scanning is important because the position accuracy of the beam significantly impacts the alignment of the irradiation field. To suppress this effect, we have developed a simple procedure for beamline tuning. At first, beamline tuning is performed with steering magnets and fluorescent screen monitors to converge the beam's trajectory to a central orbit. Misalignment between the beam's position and the reference axis is checked by using the verification system, which consists of a screen monitor and an acrylic phantom. If the beam position deviates from the reference axis, two pairs of steering magnets, which are placed on downstream of the beam transport line, will be corrected. These adjustments are iterated until the deviations for eleven energies of the beam are within 0.5 mm of the reference axis. To demonstrate the success of our procedure, we used our procedure to perform beam commissioning at the Kanagawa Cancer Center.

  8. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Pande, R.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch.

  9. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  10. On the differentiation of N2 components in an appetitive choice task: evidence for the revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory.

    PubMed

    Leue, Anja; Chavanon, Mira-Lynn; Wacker, Jan; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2009-11-01

    Task- and personality-related modulations of the N2 were probed within the framework of the revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Using an appetitive choice task, we investigated 58 students with extreme scores on the behavioral inhibition system and behavioral approach system (BIS/BAS) scales. The baseline-to-peak N2 amplitude was sensitive to the strength of decision conflict and demonstrated RST-related personality differences. In addition to the baseline N2 amplitude, temporal PCA results suggested two N2 components accounting for a laterality effect and capturing different N2 patterns for BIS/BAS groups with increasing conflict level. Evidence for RST-related personality differences was obtained for baseline-to-peak N2 and tPCA components in the present task. The results support the RST prediction that BAS sensitivity modulates conflict processing and confirm the cognitive-motivational conflict concept of RST.

  11. A 2-component system is involved in the early stages of the Pisolithus tinctorius-Pinus greggii symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Martínez, Aseneth; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago Valentín; Toscano Morales, Roberto; Gómez-Silva, Lidia; Valdés, María; Hinojosa-Moya, Jesús; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis results in profound morphological and physiological modifications in both plant and fungus. This in turn is the product of differential gene expression in both co-symbionts, giving rise to specialized cell types capable of performing novel functions. During the precolonization stage, chemical signals from root exudates are sensed by the ectomycorrizal fungus, and vice versa, which are in principle responsible for the observed change in the developmental symbionts program. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the signaling and recognition between ectomycorrhizal fungi and their host plants. In the present work, we characterized a novel lactone, termed pinelactone, and identified a gene encoding for a histidine kinase in Pisolithus tictorius, which function is proposed to be the perception of the aforementioned metabolites. In this study, the use of closantel, a specific inhibitor of histidine kinase phosphorylation, affected the capacity for fungal colonization in the symbiosis between Pisolithus tinctorius and Pinus greggii, indicating that a 2-component system (TCS) may operate in the early events of plant-fungus interaction. Indeed, the metabolites induced the accumulation of Pisolithus tinctorius mRNA for a putative histidine kinase (termed Pthik1). Of note, Pthik1 was able to partially complement a S. cerevisiae histidine kinase mutant, demonstrating its role in the response to the presence of the aforementioned metabolites. Our results indicate a role of a 2-component pathway in the early stages of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis before colonization. Furthermore, a novel lactone from Pinus greggii root exudates may activate a signal transduction pathway that contributes to the establishment of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

  12. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  13. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  14. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  15. Propagation features of beams with axially symmetric polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, A. V.; Niziev, V. G.

    2001-04-01

    The general solution of the wave equation for axially symmetric polarized (ASP) beams consists of two independent solutions: an azimuthally polarized beam and a beam with longitudinal and radial field components. The maximum of the longitudinal field is at the beam axis where the transverse component is equal to zero. While the longitudinal component is maximum in the waist it does not contribute to beam divergence here, and therefore the wavefront of ASP-beams is flat in the focal plane. The ASP-beams are free from polarization aberrations, which are inherent for linearly polarized beams passing through a lens with large annular apertures, and these beams are prospective for experiments on obtaining `diffraction-free' beams. The formulae and their electromagnetic field analysis in the case of sharp focusing of ASP-beams in the Debye approximation are presented.

  16. Uncertainty of cesium-beam time standards due to beam asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1980-12-01

    As a consequence of the spatial phase distribution in the resonators of cesium-beam time and frequency standards, the generated frequency depends on the specific path of the atomic beam. A change of the position of the atomic beam source may result in a beam displacement normal to the beam direction. For a deflection system consisting of a combination of quadrupole and hexapole magnets for two-dimensional beam deflection, the displacement of the center of mass of the beam resulting from a misalignment of the beam source is computed. To this end, the distribution of the beam intensity on the collector is first determined. It is shown that for the cesium-beam time and frequency standard CS1 of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the uncertainty of the position of the center of mass of the beam entails a contribution to the uncertainty of the standard of less than 1 x 10 to the -15th. The amount of the displacement of the center of mass of the beam can be determined from the decrease of the beam flux on the collector caused by an adjustment of the beam source.

  17. Random sources for cusped beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-08-01

    We introduce two novel classes of partially coherent sources whose degrees of coherence are described by the rectangular Lorentz-correlated Schell-model (LSM) and rectangular fractional multi-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model (FMGSM) functions. Based on the generalized Collins formula, analytical expressions are derived for the spectral density distributions of these beams propagating through a stigmatic ABCD optical system. It is shown that beams belonging to both classes form the spectral density apex that is much higher and sharper than that generated by the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam with a comparable coherence state. We experimentally generate these beams by using a nematic, transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM) that serves as a random phase screen controlled by a computer. The experimental data is consistent with theoretical predictions. Moreover, it is illustrated that the FMGSM beam generated in our experiments has a better focusing capacity than the GSM beam with the same coherence state. The applications that can potentially benefit from the use of novel beams range from material surface processing, to communications and sensing through random media. PMID:27505746

  18. Beam emittance measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, t.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-05-04

    The RHIC proton polarimeters can operate in scanning mode, giving polarization profiles and transverse beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. The polarimeters function as wire scanners, providing a very good signal/noise ratio and high counting rate. This allows accurate bunch-by-bunch emittance measurements during fast target sweeps (<1 s) through the beam. Very thin carbon strip targets make these measurements practically non-destructive. Bunch by bunch emittance measurements are a powerful tool for machine set-up; in RHIC, individual proton beam transverse emittances can only be measured by CNI polarimeter scans. We discuss the consistency of these measurements with Ionization Profile Monitors (IPMs) and vernier scan luminosity measurements. Absolute accuracy limitations and cross-calibration of different techniques are also discussed.

  19. The NSNS High Energy Beam Transport Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.; Lee, Y. Y.; Ruggiero, A. G.; Weng, W. T.

    1997-05-01

    In the NSNS design, a 160 meter long transport line connects the 1 GeV linac to an accumulator ring and provides the desired foot-print. The linac beam has a current of 56 mA and pulse length of about 1 ms. This line consists of forteen 90^circ FODO cells, and accommodates a 60^circ achromatic bend, an energy compressor, part of the injection system, and enough diagnostic devices to measure the beam quality before injection. To reduce the uncontrolled beam losses this line has four beam halo scrapers and very tight tolerances of both transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics under space charge conditions. The design of this line will be presented together with input beam parameters and acceptance criteria of the beam at the accumulator.

  20. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We developed a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along nonconvex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implemented the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of nonconvex trajectories, thereby opening up a route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical applications.

  1. A Refined Zigzag Beam Theory for Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sciuva, Marco Di; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A new refined theory for laminated composite and sandwich beams that contains the kinematics of the Timoshenko Beam Theory as a proper baseline subset is presented. This variationally consistent theory is derived from the virtual work principle and employs a novel piecewise linear zigzag function that provides a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear flexible beams than other similar theories. This new zigzag function is unique in that it vanishes at the top and bottom bounding surfaces of a beam. The formulation does not enforce continuity of the transverse shear stress across the beam s cross-section, yet is robust. Two major shortcomings that are inherent in the previous zigzag theories, shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, and that have greatly limited the utility of these previous theories are discussed in detail. An approach that has successfully resolved these shortcomings is presented herein. Exact solutions for simply supported and cantilevered beams subjected to static loads are derived and the improved modelling capability of the new zigzag beam theory is demonstrated. In particular, extensive results for thick beams with highly heterogeneous material lay-ups are discussed and compared with corresponding results obtained from elasticity solutions, two other zigzag theories, and high-fidelity finite element analyses. Comparisons with the baseline Timoshenko Beam Theory are also presented. The comparisons clearly show the improved accuracy of the new, refined zigzag theory presented herein over similar existing theories. This new theory can be readily extended to plate and shell structures, and should be useful for obtaining relatively low-cost, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design an important class of high-performance aerospace structures.

  2. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  3. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  4. Ablation of the mTORC2 component rictor in brain or Purkinje cells affects size and neuron morphology.

    PubMed

    Thomanetz, Venus; Angliker, Nico; Cloëtta, Dimitri; Lustenberger, Regula M; Schweighauser, Manuel; Oliveri, Filippo; Suzuki, Noboru; Rüegg, Markus A

    2013-04-15

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) assembles into two distinct multi-protein complexes called mTORC1 and mTORC2. Whereas mTORC1 is known to regulate cell and organismal growth, the role of mTORC2 is less understood. We describe two mouse lines that are devoid of the mTORC2 component rictor in the entire central nervous system or in Purkinje cells. In both lines neurons were smaller and their morphology and function were strongly affected. The phenotypes were accompanied by loss of activation of Akt, PKC, and SGK1 without effects on mTORC1 activity. The striking decrease in the activation and expression of several PKC isoforms, the subsequent loss of activation of GAP-43 and MARCKS, and the established role of PKCs in spinocerebellar ataxia and in shaping the actin cytoskeleton strongly suggest that the morphological deficits observed in rictor-deficient neurons are mediated by PKCs. Together our experiments show that mTORC2 has a particularly important role in the brain and that it affects size, morphology, and function of neurons.

  5. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  6. BEAM CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Casey, W.; Job, P.K.

    2010-05-23

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam loss in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of {le} 10% full beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses don't exceed these levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation levels outside the shield walls. This beam containment system will measure, provide a level of control and alarm indication of the beam power losses along the beam path from the source (e-gun, linac) thru the injection system and the storage ring. This system will consist of collimators that will provide limits to (and potentially to measure) the beam miss-steering and control the loss points of the charge and monitors that will measure the average beam current losses along the beam path and alarm when this beam power loss exceeds the level set by the shielding specifications. This will require some new ideas in beam loss detection capability and collimation. The initial planning and R&D program will be presented.

  7. [Psychometric properties of a scale: internal consistency].

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Oviedo, Heidi C

    2008-01-01

    Internal consistency reliability is the degree of correlation between a scale's items. Internal consistency is calculated by Kuder-Richardson's formula 20 for dichotomous choices and Cronbach's alpha for polytomous items. 0.70 to 0.90 internal consistency is acceptable. 5-25 participants are needed for each item when computing the internal consistency of a twenty-item scale. Internal consistency varies according to population and then it is necessary to report it always that scale is used. PMID:19360231

  8. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  9. Neurocognitive Deficits in Male Alcoholics: An ERP/sLORETA Analysis of the N2 Component in an Equal Probability Go/NoGo Task

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, AK; Kamarajan, C; Tang, Y; Chorlian, DB; Roopesh, BN; Manz, N; Stimus, A; Rangaswamy, M; Porjesz, B

    2011-01-01

    In alcoholism research, studies concerning time-locked electrophysiological aspects of response inhibition have concentrated mainly on the P3 component of the event-related potential (ERP). The objective of the present study was to investigate the N2 component of the ERP to elucidate possible brain dysfunction related to the motor response and its inhibition using a Go/NoGo task in alcoholics. The sample consisted of 78 abstinent alcoholic males and 58 healthy male controls. The N2 peak was compared across group and task conditions. Alcoholics showed significantly reduced N2 peak amplitudes compared to normal controls for Go as well as NoGo task conditions. Control subjects showed significantly larger NoGo than Go N2 amplitudes at frontal regions, whereas alcoholics did not show any differences between task conditions at frontal regions. Standardized Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Analysis (sLORETA) indicated that alcoholics had significantly lower current density at the source than control subjects for the NoGo condition at bilateral anterior prefrontal regions, whereas the differences between groups during the Go trials was not statistically significant. Furthermore, NoGo current density across both groups revealed significantly more activation in bilateral anterior cingulate cortical (ACC) areas, with the maximum activation in the right cingulate regions. However, the magnitude of this difference was much less in alcoholics compared to control subjects. These findings suggest that alcoholics may have deficits in effortful processing during the motor response and its inhibition, suggestive of possible frontal lobe dysfunction. PMID:22024409

  10. The SSC beam scraper system

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, M.A.; Mokhov, N.V.; Yazynin Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino )

    1991-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of a full-scale study of a beam scraping system that is designed to guarantee reliable operation of the SSC throughout the whole cycle and for minimum background for experiments at the interaction regions. The machine aperture limits and beam loss formation are analyzed. Simulation programs and a calculational model are described. The physics of beam scraping is explored, and measures to increase significantly the system efficiency are determined. A tolerable scraping rate, taking into account scraper material integrity, quench limits in downstream superconducting magnets, radiation shielding requirements, and minimal beam halo levels at the IPs are also determined. Finally, a complete multi-component scraper system in the SSC East Cluster is proposed. Throughout the paper we define a scraper as a primary absorber consisting of precise movable jaws that have a flat inner edge along the circulation beam and which may be forced to touch the beam halo in horizontal or vertical planes. Secondary absorbers -- collimators -- are destined to intercept outscattered protons and other particles produced in scraper material. All these are surrounded with a radiation shielding. 15 refs., 50 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Two regimes of self-consistent heating of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    An experimental illustration of the transition between two basic transport regimes for wave-particle interaction is reported. A striking feature is that chaos, although present in both regimes, does not need to be invoked to explain the observed behavior. This experimental realization for a theoretical paradigm opens the possibility to check the validity of basic models, as is normally required in physics. Indeed, among seemingly simple problems exhibiting complex behavior is the classical interaction of an electron with electrostatic waves. Launching a low-intensity electron beam in a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) recently allowed observing the real-world consequences of the richness of the electron trajectory. Here we show that self-consistent effects are nevertheless acting on a modulated test electron beam through the collective excitation of beam modes. The transition between two different particle transport regimes (stochastic diffusion in a set of waves and slow chaos associated to a pulsating separatrix) is directly measured by increasing the amplitude of the excitation. PMID:22181220

  12. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  13. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  14. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  15. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  16. NK Muon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, G.

    1988-09-28

    The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

  17. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  18. Beam instabilities in hadron synchrotrons

    DOE PAGES

    Metral, E.; T. Argyropoulos; Bartosik, H.; Biancacci, N.; Buffat, X.; Esteban Muller, J. F.; Herr, W.; Iadarola, G.; Lasheen, A.; Li, K.; et al

    2016-04-01

    Beam instabilities cover a wide range of effects in particle accelerators and they have been the subjects of intense research for several decades. As the machines performance was pushed new mechanisms were revealed and nowadays the challenge consists in studying the interplays between all these intricate phenomena, as it is very often not possible to treat the different effects separately. Furthermore, the aim of this paper is to review the main mechanisms, discussing in particular the recent developments of beam instability theories and simulations.

  19. Resonant Absorption of Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    1999-11-01

    We report the first observation of enhanced laser-plasma optical absorption in a subcritical density plasma resulting from spatial resonances, here in the laser breakdown of a gas with a Bessel beam. The enhancement in absorption is directly correlated to enhancements both in confinement of laser radiation to the plasma and in its heating. Under certain conditions, azimuthal asymmetry in the laser beam is essential for efficient gas breakdown. Simulations of this absorption consistently explain the experimental observations. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9515509) and the US Department of Energy (DEF G0297 ER 41039).

  20. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  1. Advanced neutral-beam technology

    SciTech Connect

    Berkner, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described.

  2. White beam x-ray waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarre, A.; Salditt, T.; Panzner, T.; Pietsch, U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2004-07-12

    We report a white beam x-ray waveguide (WG) experiment. A resonant beam coupler x-ray waveguide (RBC) is used simultaneously as a broad bandpass (or multibandpass) monochromator and as a beam compressor. We show that, depending on the geometrical properties of the WG, the exiting beam consists of a defined number of wavelengths which can be shifted by changing the angle of incidence of the white x-ray synchrotron beam. The characteristic far-field pattern is recorded as a function of exit angle and energy. This x-ray optical setup may be used to enhance the intensity of coherent x-ray WG beams since the full energetic acceptance of the WG mode is transmitted.

  3. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  4. Propagation-invariant beams with quantum pendulum spectra: from Bessel beams to Gaussian beam-beams.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mark R; Ring, James D

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new class of propagation-invariant light beams with Fourier transform given by an eigenfunction of the quantum mechanical pendulum. These beams, whose spectra (restricted to a circle) are doubly periodic Mathieu functions in azimuth, depend on a field strength parameter. When the parameter is zero, pendulum beams are Bessel beams, and as the parameter approaches infinity, they resemble transversely propagating one-dimensional Gaussian wave packets (Gaussian beam-beams). Pendulum beams are the eigenfunctions of an operator that interpolates between the squared angular momentum operator and the linear momentum operator. The analysis reveals connections with Mathieu beams, and insight into the paraxial approximation.

  5. Method and apparatus for timing of laser beams in a multiple laser beam fusion system

    DOEpatents

    Eastman, Jay M.; Miller, Theodore L.

    1981-01-01

    The optical path lengths of a plurality of comparison laser beams directed to impinge upon a common target from different directions are compared to that of a master laser beam by using an optical heterodyne interferometric detection technique. The technique consists of frequency shifting the master laser beam and combining the master beam with a first one of the comparison laser beams to produce a time-varying heterodyne interference pattern which is detected by a photo-detector to produce an AC electrical signal indicative of the difference in the optical path lengths of the two beams which were combined. The optical path length of this first comparison laser beam is adjusted to compensate for the detected difference in the optical path lengths of the two beams. The optical path lengths of all of the comparison laser beams are made equal to the optical path length of the master laser beam by repeating the optical path length adjustment process for each of the comparison laser beams. In this manner, the comparison laser beams are synchronized or timed to arrive at the target within .+-.1.times.10.sup.-12 second of each other.

  6. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-04-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band \\(~8-12 GHz\\) through Ka-band \\(~30-35 GHz\\) frequency regions. The relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator project, whose aim is to study TBAs based upon extended relativistic klystrons, is described, and a new simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed, self-consistent calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed together with a beam line design that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beam line.

  7. The radiative-adiabatic model of 2-component (2 + 2) greenhouse effect is applicable for wide range of planetary environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaukhov, A. V.

    In earlier works (1) it is shown that the radiative-adiabatic model make it possible the analytical solution for the 2-component (2 + 2) greenhouse effect in the case of the optical dense atmosphere (Earth, Venus). Now we have obtained the analytical estimation of greenhouse effect not only for the planets with the high optical density of atmosphere but also for the low optical density of atmosphere (Mars) too. These estimations demonstrate a good accordance with the different types of observation data. The detailed analysis of the radiative-adiabatic model of greenhouse effect bring us to conclusion that the greenhouse effect is the most important internal factor for the planetary environment and climate forming. The role of greenhouse effect can be compared with the role of such important external factor as the intensity of incident radiation from the central star (Sun). The evidence of the sharp and significant changes in the climate history of the Mars (the trace of water erosion) and Venus (the anomaly in D/H ratio) give us the proof of the extremely important role of greenhouse effect. Indeed, this changes shift temperature of that planets in different directions (Mars now is colder and Venus is warmer than in the past). So, these changes can not be caused by an external parameter, such as the solar luminosity for example. In the present work we use the radiative-adiabatic model in the investigation of the planetary climate evolution for the planets of the Earth's group (Venus, Earth, and Mars). We show that the observed changes in the Mars and the Venus climate can be easily explained by the assumption of the significant changes of the concentration of the greenhouse gases in atmospheres of that planets. For the Earth we show that it is the role of biosphere's mechanisms that make the parameters of the Earth's climate so stable. We discuss also the possibility of the destruction of the biosphere's mechanisms of the Earth' climate stabilisation. In that case

  8. Antenna Beam Coverage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The strawman Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) design calls for the use of a CONUS beam for transmission between the supplier and the satellite and for fixed beams for transmission between the basic personal terminal and the satellite. The satellite uses a 3 m main reflector for transmission at 20 GHz and a 2 m main reflector for reception at 30 GHz. There are several types of spot beams under consideration for the PASS system besides fixed beams. The beam pattern of a CONUS coverage switched beam is shown along with that of a scanning beam. A switched beam refers to one in which the signal from the satellite is connected alternatively to various feed horns. Scanning beams are taken to mean beams whose footprints are moved between contiguous regions in the beam's coverage area. The advantages and disadvantages of switched and/or scanning beams relative to fixed beams. The consequences of using switched/scanning in lieu of fixed beams in the PASS design and attempts are made to evaluate the listed advantages and disadvantages. Two uses of switched/scanning beams are examined. To illustrate the implications of switched beams use on PASS system design, operation at two beam scan rates is explored.

  9. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    2001-01-08

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phasemore » space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.« less

  10. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  11. 3-D consistency dynamic constitutive model of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shiyun; Li, Hongnan; Lin, Gao

    2010-06-01

    Based on the consistency-viscoplastic constitutive model, the static William-Warnke model with threeparameters is modified and a consistency-viscoplastic William-Warnke model with three-parameters is developed that considers the effect of strain rates. Then, the tangent modulus of the consistency viscoplastic model is introduced and an implicit backward Elure iterative algorithm is developed. Comparisons between the numerical simulations and experimental data show that the consistency model properly provides the uniaxial and biaxial dynamic behaviors of concrete. To study the effect of strain rates on the dynamic response of concrete structures, the proposed model is used in the analysis of the dynamic response of a simply-supported beam and the results show that the strain rate has a significant effect on the displacement and stress magnitudes and distributions. Finally, the seismic responses of a 278 m high arch dam are obtained and compared by using the linear elastic model, as well as rate-independent and rate-dependent William-Warnke three-parameter models. The results indicate that the strain rate affects the first principal stresses, and the maximal equivalent viscoplastic strain rate of the arch dam. Numerical calculations and analyses reveal that considering the strain rate is important in the safety assessments of arch dams located in seismically active areas.

  12. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Optical Beam-Shear Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Szwaykowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    A technique for measuring optical beam shear is based on collecting light from the four quadrants of the beam and comparing the optical power collected from each quadrant with that from the other three quadrants. As used here, "shear" signifies lateral displacement of a beam of light from a nominal optical axis. A sensor for implementing this technique consists of a modified focusing lens and a quad-cell photodetector, both centered on the nominal optical axis. The modification of the lens consists in cutting the lens into four sectors (corresponding to the four quadrants) by sawing along two orthogonal diameters, then reassembling the lens following either of two approaches described next. In one approach, the lens is reassembled by gluing the sectors back together. In the simplest variant of this approach, the kerf of the saw matches the spacing of the photodetector cells, so that the focus of each sector crosses the axis of symmetry to fall on the opposite photodetector cell (see figure). In another variant of this approach, the lens sectors are spaced apart to make their individual foci to fall on separate photodetector cells, without crossing the optical axis. In the case of a sufficiently wide beam, the modified lens could be replaced with four independent lenses placed in a square array, each focusing onto an independent photodetector

  14. Parabolic scaling beams.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Xie, Changqing

    2014-06-15

    We generalize the concept of diffraction free beams to parabolic scaling beams (PSBs), whose normalized intensity scales parabolically during propagation. These beams are nondiffracting in the circular parabolic coordinate systems, and all the diffraction free beams of Durnin's type have counterparts as PSBs. Parabolic scaling Bessel beams with Gaussian apodization are investigated in detail, their nonparaxial extrapolations are derived, and experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions.

  15. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  16. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  17. Student Effort, Consistency, and Online Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patron, Hilde; Lopez, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how student effort, consistency, motivation, and marginal learning, influence student grades in an online course. We use data from eleven Microeconomics courses taught online for a total of 212 students. Our findings show that consistency, or less time variation, is a statistically significant explanatory variable, whereas…

  18. Does Acquiescence Affect Individual Items Consistently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kam, Chester Chun Seng; Zhou, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found the effects of acquiescence to be generally consistent across item "aggregates" within a single survey (i.e., essential tau-equivalence), but it is unknown whether this phenomenon is consistent at the" individual item" level. This article evaluated the often assumed but inadequately tested…

  19. 40 CFR 55.12 - Consistency updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Consistency updates. 55.12 Section 55.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.12 Consistency updates. (a) The Administrator will...

  20. Consistent-handed individuals are more authoritarian.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Keith B; Grillo, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Individuals differ in the consistency with which they use one hand over the other to perform everyday activities. Some individuals are very consistent, habitually using a single hand to perform most tasks. Others are relatively inconsistent, and hence make greater use of both hands. More- versus less-consistent individuals have been shown to differ in numerous aspects of personality and cognition. In several respects consistent-handed individuals resemble authoritarian individuals. For example, both consistent-handedness and authoritarianism have been linked to cognitive inflexibility. Therefore we hypothesised that consistent-handedness is an external marker for authoritarianism. Confirming our hypothesis, we found that consistent-handers scored higher than inconsistent-handers on a measure of submission to authority, were more likely to identify with a conservative political party (Republican), and expressed less-positive attitudes towards out-groups. We propose that authoritarianism may be influenced by the degree of interaction between the left and right brain hemispheres, which has been found to differ between consistent- and inconsistent-handed individuals. PMID:23586369

  1. Consistency and Enhancement Processes in Understanding Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stets, Jan E.; Asencio, Emily K.

    2008-01-01

    Many theories in the sociology of emotions assume that emotions emerge from the cognitive consistency principle. Congruence among cognitions produces good feelings whereas incongruence produces bad feelings. A work situation is simulated in which managers give feedback to workers that is consistent or inconsistent with what the workers expect to…

  2. 24 CFR 91.510 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., the proposed activities are consistent with the jurisdiction's strategic plan, and the location of the... of consistency of the application with the approved consolidated plan for the jurisdiction may be... unit of general local government that: is required to have a consolidated plan, is authorized to use...

  3. 24 CFR 91.510 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., the proposed activities are consistent with the jurisdiction's strategic plan, and the location of the... of consistency of the application with the approved consolidated plan for the jurisdiction may be... unit of general local government that: is required to have a consolidated plan, is authorized to use...

  4. [Hand Preference: Cognitive Development, Asymmetry, and Consistency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bathurst, Kay; And Others

    Reported are results of three studies: (1) Hand Preference Consistency during Infancy and Preschool Years (K. Bathurst and A. W. Gottfried), (2) Asymmetry of Verbal Processing: Influence of Family Handedness (K. Bathurst and D. W. Kee), (3) Consistency of Hand Preference and Cognitive Development in Young Children (K. Bathurst and A. W.…

  5. 44 CFR 206.349 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 206.349 Consistency determinations. Section 6(a)(6) of CBRA requires that certain actions be consistent with the purposes of that statute if the actions are to be carried out on a unit of the CBRA. The... associated with the coastal barriers along with Atlantic and Gulf coasts. For those actions where...

  6. Steps toward Promoting Consistency in Educational Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The literature indicates the advantages of decisions formulated through intuition, as well as the limitations, such as lack of consistency in similar situations. The principle of consistency (invariance), requiring that two equivalent versions of choice-problems will produce the same preference, is violated in intuitive judgment. This…

  7. Fermilab HINS Proton Ion Source Beam Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, W.M.; Apollinari, G.; Chaurize, S.; Hays, S.; Romanov, G.; Scarpine, V.; Schmidt, C.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The proton ion source for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac front-end at Fermilab has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec beam pulse with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5Hz. The beam is transported to the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. Beam profile measurements are made for different LEBT settings and results are compared to those from computer simulations. In lieu of direct emittance measurements, solenoid variation method based on profile measurements is used to reconstruct the beam emittance.

  8. Three-Way Tucker2 Component Analysis Solutions of Stimuli x Responses x Individuals Data with Simple Structure and the Fewest Core Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Kohei

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate stimulus-response designs can be described by a three-way array of stimuli by responses by individuals. Its underlying structure can be represented by a network based on the Tucker2 component model in which stimulus components are connected with response components by means of the links that differ between individuals. For each…

  9. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  10. ION BEAM COLLIMATOR

    DOEpatents

    Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

    1957-11-26

    A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

  11. RHIC electron lens beam transport system design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2010-10-01

    To apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC, two electron lenses are designed and will be installed at IP10. Electron beam transport system is one of important subsystem, which is used to transport electron beam from electron gun side to collector side. This system should be able to change beam size inside superconducting magnet and control beam position with 5 mm in horizontal and vertical plane. Some other design considerations for this beam transport system are also reported in this paper. The head-on beam-beam effect is one of important nonlinear source in storage ring and linear colliders, which have limited the luminosity improvement of many colliders, such as SppS, Tevatron and RHIC. In order to enhance the performance of colliders, beam-beam effects can be compensated with direct space charge compensation, indirect space charge compensation or betatron phase cancellation scheme. Like other colliders, indirect space charge compensation scheme (Electron Lens) was also proposed for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam-beam compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The two similar electron lenses are located in IR10 between the DX magnets. One RHIC electron lens consists of one DC electron gun, one superconducting magnet, one electron collector and beam transport system.

  12. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  13. Vibration Analysis of a Rotating Timoshenko Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIN, S. C.; HSIAO, K. M.

    2001-02-01

    The governing equations for linear vibration of a rotating Timoshenko beam are derived by the d‘Alembert principle and the virtual work principle. In order to capture all inertia effect and coupling between extensional and flexural deformation, the consistent linearization of the fully geometrically non-linear beam theory is used. The effect of Coriolis force on the natural frequency of the rotating beam is considered. A method based on the power series solution is proposed to solve the natural frequency of the rotating Timoshenko beam. Numerical examples are studied to verify the accuracy of the proposed method and to investigate the effect of Coriolis force on the natural frequency of rotating beams with different angular velocity, hub radius and slenderness ratio.

  14. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  15. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  16. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  17. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector → 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  18. Consistency of homogenization schemes in linear poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Bernhard; Dormieux, Luc

    2008-08-01

    In view of extending classical micromechanics of poroelasticity to the non-saturated regime, one has to deal with different pore stresses which may be affected by the size and the shape of the pores. Introducing the macrostrain and these pore stresses as loading parameters, the macrostress of a representative volume element of a porous material can be derived by means of Levin's theorem or by means of the direct formulation of the stress average rule, respectively. A consistency requirement for a given homogenization scheme is obtained from the condition that the two approaches should yield identical results. Classical approaches (Mori-Tanaka scheme, self-consistent scheme) are shown to be only conditionally consistent. In contrast, the Ponte Castañeda-Willis scheme proves to provide consistent descriptions both of porous matrix-inclusion composites and of porous polycrystals. To cite this article: B. Pichler, L. Dormieux, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  19. Safety performance functions incorporating design consistency variables.

    PubMed

    Montella, Alfonso; Imbriani, Lella Liana

    2015-01-01

    Highway design which ensures that successive elements are coordinated in such a way as to produce harmonious and homogeneous driver performances along the road is considered consistent and safe. On the other hand, an alignment which requires drivers to handle high speed gradients and does not meet drivers' expectancy is considered inconsistent and produces higher crash frequency. To increase the usefulness and the reliability of existing safety performance functions and contribute to solve inconsistencies of existing highways as well as inconsistencies arising in the design phase, we developed safety performance functions for rural motorways that incorporate design consistency measures. Since the design consistency variables were used only for curves, two different sets of models were fitted for tangents and curves. Models for the following crash characteristics were fitted: total, single-vehicle run-off-the-road, other single vehicle, multi vehicle, daytime, nighttime, non-rainy weather, rainy weather, dry pavement, wet pavement, property damage only, slight injury, and severe injury (including fatal). The design consistency parameters in this study are based on operating speed models developed through an instrumented vehicle equipped with a GPS continuous speed tracking from a field experiment conducted on the same motorway where the safety performance functions were fitted (motorway A16 in Italy). Study results show that geometric design consistency has a significant effect on safety of rural motorways. Previous studies on the relationship between geometric design consistency and crash frequency focused on two-lane rural highways since these highways have the higher crash rates and are generally characterized by considerable inconsistencies. Our study clearly highlights that the achievement of proper geometric design consistency is a key design element also on motorways because of the safety consequences of design inconsistencies. The design consistency measures

  20. Consistency relations for non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Wang, Yi

    2008-09-01

    We investigate consistency relations for non-Gaussianity. We provide a model-independent dynamical proof for the consistency relation for three-point correlation functions from the Hamiltonian and field redefinition. This relation can be applied to single-field inflation, multi-field inflation and the curvaton scenario. This relation can also be generalized to n-point correlation functions up to arbitrary order in perturbation theory and with arbitrary number of loops.

  1. Beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  2. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  3. Self-consistent simulation of cyclotron autoresonance maser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, K.D.; Danly, B.G.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1988-04-01

    A self-consistent, one-dimensional model of the cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier is developed, and numerical simulations based on this model are described. Detailed studies of the CARM gain and efficiency for a wide range of initial energy and velocity spreads are presented. The interaction efficiency is found to be substantially increased when the axial magnetic field is tapered. For example, efficiencies of greater than 41 percent are obtained for a 140-GHz CARM amplifier with a tapered axial magnetic field and a 700-kV 4.5-A electron beam with parallel velocity spreads of less than 1 percent. A discussion of the nonlinear bandwidth and interaction sensitivity to axial field inhomogeneities is presented.

  4. Beam dynamics design of the Compact Linear Collider Drive Beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajari, Sh. Sanaye; Shaker, H.; Doebert, S.

    2015-11-01

    In the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the RF power for the acceleration of the Main Beam is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel to the main linac. The longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics of the Drive Beam injector has been studied in detail and optimized. The injector consists of a thermionic gun followed by a bunching system, some accelerating structures, and a magnetic chicane. The bunching system contains three sub-harmonic bunchers, a prebuncher, and a traveling wave buncher all embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The main characteristic of the Drive Beam injector is the phase coding process done by the sub-harmonic bunching system operating at half the acceleration frequency. This process is essential for the frequency multiplication of the Drive Beam. During the phase coding process the unwanted satellite bunches are produced that adversely affects the machine power efficiency. The main challenge is to reduce the population of particles in the satellite bunches in the presence of strong space-charge forces due to the high beam current. The simulation of the beam dynamics has been carried out with PARMELA with the goal of optimizing the injector performance compared to the existing model studied for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The emphasis of the optimization was on decreasing the satellite population, the beam loss in the magnetic chicane and limiting the beam emittance growth in transverse plane.

  5. Piezoelectric performance of continuous beam and narrow supported beam arrays for artificial basilar membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Won Joon; Jang, Jongmoon; Kim, Sangwon; Choi, Hongsoo

    2014-09-01

    We report an experimental assessment of the electrical performance of two piezoelectric beam arrays for artificial basilar membranes (ABMs): a continuous beam array (CBA) and a narrow-supports beam array (NSBA). Both arrays consist of piezoelectric beams of sequentially varying lengths that mimic the frequency selectivity of mammalian cochleae. The narrow supports of the NSBA resulted in lateral deformation of the beams, whereas the CBA beams were flat. The displacement and piezoelectric output of each beam were measured at the resonance frequency of each beam using a scanning laser-Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). Both ABM prototypes showed mechanical frequency selectivity that depended on the beam length. The CBA generated a piezoelectric output in the range 6.6-23.2 μV and exhibited electrical frequency separability, whereas the NSBA failed to generate sufficient electrical potential due to the lateral deformation of the piezoelectric beams. The CBA was found to be more effective as an ABM, with potential for use in cochlear implants.

  6. Self-consistent asset pricing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevergne, Y.; Sornette, D.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the foundations of factor or regression models in the light of the self-consistency condition that the market portfolio (and more generally the risk factors) is (are) constituted of the assets whose returns it is (they are) supposed to explain. As already reported in several articles, self-consistency implies correlations between the return disturbances. As a consequence, the alphas and betas of the factor model are unobservable. Self-consistency leads to renormalized betas with zero effective alphas, which are observable with standard OLS regressions. When the conditions derived from internal consistency are not met, the model is necessarily incomplete, which means that some sources of risk cannot be replicated (or hedged) by a portfolio of stocks traded on the market, even for infinite economies. Analytical derivations and numerical simulations show that, for arbitrary choices of the proxy which are different from the true market portfolio, a modified linear regression holds with a non-zero value αi at the origin between an asset i's return and the proxy's return. Self-consistency also introduces “orthogonality” and “normality” conditions linking the betas, alphas (as well as the residuals) and the weights of the proxy portfolio. Two diagnostics based on these orthogonality and normality conditions are implemented on a basket of 323 assets which have been components of the S&P500 in the period from January 1990 to February 2005. These two diagnostics show interesting departures from dynamical self-consistency starting about 2 years before the end of the Internet bubble. Assuming that the CAPM holds with the self-consistency condition, the OLS method automatically obeys the resulting orthogonality and normality conditions and therefore provides a simple way to self-consistently assess the parameters of the model by using proxy portfolios made only of the assets which are used in the CAPM regressions. Finally, the factor decomposition with the

  7. Focusing and neutralization of intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon S.; Anders, Andre; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Henestroza, Enrique; Roy, Prabir; Shuman, Derek; Waldron, William; Sharp, William; Rose, Dave; Welch, Dale; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Eric

    2003-05-01

    In heavy ion inertial confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams through the target chamber is essential for the viability of an economically competitive heavy ion fusion power plant. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with PIC simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the NTX (Neutralized Transport Experiment) as shown in Figure 1. The experiment consists of 3 phases, each with physics issues of its own. Phase 1 is designed to generate a very high brightness potassium beam with variable perveance, using a beam aperturing technique. Phase 2 consists of magnetic transport through four pulsed quadrupoles. Here, beam tuning as well as the effects of phase space dilution through higher order nonlinear fields must be understood. In Phase 3, a converging ion beam at the exit of the magnetic section is transported through a drift section with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we present first results from all 3 phases of the experiment.

  8. Design for controllable optofluidic beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xionggui; Liang, Shan; Li, Rujian

    2016-01-01

    A novel configuration for controllable optofluidic beam splitter is proposed, which consists of the asymmetric Y-branch waveguide and the microfluidic channel filled with fluid mixture. The beam propagation method (BPM) is employed to numerically investigate the optical performance of device in our layout. The simulated results demonstrate that arbitrary splitting ratio and low optical loss for both TE and TM mode can be easily achieved, with a low dependence of wavelength and polarization. Particularly, the optofluidic beam splitter has advantages such as compact structure and large fabrication tolerance. The proposed device provides a new way to manipulate the optical power splitting, and has wide potential applications in integrated optofluidic system.

  9. Final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The NTX final focus system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final focus lattice consists of four pulsed quadrupole magnets. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. We will present experimental results from NTX on beam envelope and phase space distributions, and compare these results with particle simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP.

  10. Beam transport and bunch compression at TARLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Avni; Lehnert, Ulf

    2014-10-01

    The Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) will operate two InfraRed Free Electron Lasers (IR-FEL) covering the range of 3-250 μm. The facility will consist of an injector fed by a thermionic triode gun with two-stage RF bunch compression, two superconducting accelerating ELBE modules operating at continuous wave (CW) mode and two independent optical resonator systems with different undulator period lengths. The electron beam will also be used to generate Bremsstrahlung radiation. In this study, we present the electron beam transport including beam matching to the undulators and the shaping of the longitudinal phase space using magnetic dispersive sections.

  11. Consistency-based rectification of nonrigid registrations

    PubMed Central

    Gass, Tobias; Székely, Gábor; Goksel, Orcun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a technique to rectify nonrigid registrations by improving their group-wise consistency, which is a widely used unsupervised measure to assess pair-wise registration quality. While pair-wise registration methods cannot guarantee any group-wise consistency, group-wise approaches typically enforce perfect consistency by registering all images to a common reference. However, errors in individual registrations to the reference then propagate, distorting the mean and accumulating in the pair-wise registrations inferred via the reference. Furthermore, the assumption that perfect correspondences exist is not always true, e.g., for interpatient registration. The proposed consistency-based registration rectification (CBRR) method addresses these issues by minimizing the group-wise inconsistency of all pair-wise registrations using a regularized least-squares algorithm. The regularization controls the adherence to the original registration, which is additionally weighted by the local postregistration similarity. This allows CBRR to adaptively improve consistency while locally preserving accurate pair-wise registrations. We show that the resulting registrations are not only more consistent, but also have lower average transformation error when compared to known transformations in simulated data. On clinical data, we show improvements of up to 50% target registration error in breathing motion estimation from four-dimensional MRI and improvements in atlas-based segmentation quality of up to 65% in terms of mean surface distance in three-dimensional (3-D) CT. Such improvement was observed consistently using different registration algorithms, dimensionality (two-dimensional/3-D), and modalities (MRI/CT). PMID:26158083

  12. Laser beam complex amplitude measurement by phase diversity.

    PubMed

    Védrenne, Nicolas; Mugnier, Laurent M; Michau, Vincent; Velluet, Marie-Thérèse; Bierent, Rudolph

    2014-02-24

    The control of the optical quality of a laser beam requires a complex amplitude measurement able to deal with strong modulus variations and potentially highly perturbed wavefronts. The method proposed here consists in an extension of phase diversity to complex amplitude measurements that is effective for highly perturbed beams. Named camelot for Complex Amplitude MEasurement by a Likelihood Optimization Tool, it relies on the acquisition and processing of few images of the beam section taken along the optical path. The complex amplitude of the beam is retrieved from the images by the minimization of a Maximum a Posteriori error metric between the images and a model of the beam propagation. The analytical formalism of the method and its experimental validation are presented. The modulus of the beam is compared to a measurement of the beam profile, the phase of the beam is compared to a conventional phase diversity estimate. The precision of the experimental measurements is investigated by numerical simulations.

  13. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  14. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  15. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  16. Anomalous beam diffusion near beam-beam synchrobetatron resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Tanaji

    2012-10-01

    The diffusion process near low order synchrobetatron resonances driven by beam-beam interactions at a crossing angle is investigated. Macroscopic observables such as beam emittance, lifetime, and beam profiles are calculated. These are followed with detailed studies of microscopic quantities such as the evolution of the variance at several transverse amplitudes and single particle probability distribution functions. We present evidence to show that the observed diffusion is anomalous and the dynamics follows a non-Markovian continuous time random walk process. We derive a modified master equation to replace the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation in action-angle space and a fractional diffusion equation to describe the density evolution for this class of processes.

  17. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  18. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  19. Intra-beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwinski, A.

    Intra-beam scattering is analysed and the rise times or damping times of the beam dimensions are derived. The theoretical results are compared with experimental values obtained on the CERN AA and SPS machines.

  20. Laser-Beam Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Train of prisms and optical stop separate fundamental beam of laser from second and higher order harmonics of beam produced in certain crystals and by stimulated Raman scattering in gases and liquids.

  1. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  2. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm.

  3. Quantifying the Consistency of Scientific Databases

    PubMed Central

    Šubelj, Lovro; Bajec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana; Kastrin, Andrej; Levnajić, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Science is a social process with far-reaching impact on our modern society. In recent years, for the first time we are able to scientifically study the science itself. This is enabled by massive amounts of data on scientific publications that is increasingly becoming available. The data is contained in several databases such as Web of Science or PubMed, maintained by various public and private entities. Unfortunately, these databases are not always consistent, which considerably hinders this study. Relying on the powerful framework of complex networks, we conduct a systematic analysis of the consistency among six major scientific databases. We found that identifying a single "best" database is far from easy. Nevertheless, our results indicate appreciable differences in mutual consistency of different databases, which we interpret as recipes for future bibliometric studies. PMID:25984946

  4. Consistency and derangements in brane tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Jejjala, Vishnu; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-09-01

    Brane tilings describe Lagrangians (vector multiplets, chiral multiplets, and the superpotential) of four-dimensional { N }=1 supersymmetric gauge theories. These theories, written in terms of a bipartite graph on a torus, correspond to worldvolume theories on N D3-branes probing a toric Calabi–Yau threefold singularity. A pair of permutations compactly encapsulates the data necessary to specify a brane tiling. We show that geometric consistency for brane tilings, which ensures that the corresponding quantum field theories are well behaved, imposes constraints on the pair of permutations, restricting certain products constructed from the pair to have no one-cycles. Permutations without one-cycles are known as derangements. We illustrate this formulation of consistency with known brane tilings. Counting formulas for consistent brane tilings with an arbitrary number of chiral bifundamental fields are written down in terms of delta functions over symmetric groups.

  5. Consistency and derangements in brane tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Jejjala, Vishnu; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-09-01

    Brane tilings describe Lagrangians (vector multiplets, chiral multiplets, and the superpotential) of four-dimensional { N }=1 supersymmetric gauge theories. These theories, written in terms of a bipartite graph on a torus, correspond to worldvolume theories on N D3-branes probing a toric Calabi-Yau threefold singularity. A pair of permutations compactly encapsulates the data necessary to specify a brane tiling. We show that geometric consistency for brane tilings, which ensures that the corresponding quantum field theories are well behaved, imposes constraints on the pair of permutations, restricting certain products constructed from the pair to have no one-cycles. Permutations without one-cycles are known as derangements. We illustrate this formulation of consistency with known brane tilings. Counting formulas for consistent brane tilings with an arbitrary number of chiral bifundamental fields are written down in terms of delta functions over symmetric groups.

  6. Personalized recommendation based on unbiased consistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Recently, in physical dynamics, mass-diffusion-based recommendation algorithms on bipartite network provide an efficient solution by automatically pushing possible relevant items to users according to their past preferences. However, traditional mass-diffusion-based algorithms just focus on unidirectional mass diffusion from objects having been collected to those which should be recommended, resulting in a biased causal similarity estimation and not-so-good performance. In this letter, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus bidirectional mass diffusion abilities, no matter originated from objects having been collected or from those which should be recommended, should be consistently powerful, showing unbiased consistence. We further propose a consistence-based mass diffusion algorithm via bidirectional diffusion against biased causality, outperforming the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including Netflix, MovieLens, Amazon and Rate Your Music.

  7. Temporal and kinematic consistency predict sequence awareness.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, Molly J; Schieber, Marc H; Mink, Jonathan W

    2016-10-01

    Many human motor skills can be represented as a hierarchical series of movement patterns. Awareness of underlying patterns can improve performance and decrease cognitive load. Subjects (n = 30) tapped a finger sequence with changing stimulus-to-response mapping and a common movement sequence. Thirteen subjects (43 %) became aware that they were tapping a familiar movement sequence during the experiment. Subjects who became aware of the underlying motor pattern tapped with greater kinematic and temporal consistency from task onset, but consistency was not sufficient for awareness. We found no effect of age, musical experience, tapping evenness, or inter-key-interval on awareness of the pattern in the motor response. We propose that temporal or kinematic consistency reinforces a pattern representation, but cognitive engagement with the contents of the sequence is necessary to bring the pattern to conscious awareness. These findings predict benefit for movement strategies that limit temporal and kinematic variability during motor learning. PMID:27324192

  8. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  9. Free Vibration of a Rectangular Plate-Beam Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, M.; Yoshida, I.

    1996-07-01

    A free vibration analysis by the Rayleigh-Ritz method is presented for a rectangular plate-beam coupled system. The system consists of a cantilever rectangular plate and either a pair of beams or a single beam connected to the free end side furthest away from the support. Natural frequencies and vibration modes are provided for various system configurations: i.e., the length ratio between the plate and the beam, the aspect ratio of the plate, and the distance between beams. To confirm the validity of the analysis, an experiment was also conducted, with polystyrene test plates of 0·5 mm thickness. The respective results are in good agreement.

  10. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  11. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  12. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  13. Confinement of bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Mark; Chen, Chiping

    2001-05-01

    The non-relativistic motion is analyzed for a highly bunched beam propagating through a perfectly conducting cylindrical pipe confined radially by a constant magnetic field parallel to the conductor axis, using a Green's function technique and Hamiltonian dynamics analysis. It is shown that for the confinement of beams with the same charge per unit length, the maximum value of the effective self-field parameter for a highly bunched beam is significantly lower than the Brillouin density limit for an unbunched beam.

  14. Consistent matter couplings for Plebanski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennie, Felix; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2010-11-01

    We develop a scheme for the minimal coupling of all standard types of tensor and spinor field matter to Plebanski gravity. This theory is a geometric reformulation of vacuum general relativity in terms of two-form frames and connection one-forms, and provides a covariant basis for various quantization approaches. Using the spinor formalism we prove the consistency of the newly proposed matter coupling by demonstrating the full equivalence of Plebanski gravity plus matter to Einstein-Cartan gravity. As a by-product we also show the consistency of some previous suggestions for matter actions.

  15. Consistent Data Distribution Over Optical Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optics combined with IDE's provide consistent data communication between fault-tolerant computers. Data-transmission-checking system designed to provide consistent and reliable data communications for fault-tolerant and highly reliable computers. New technique performs variant of algorithm for fault-tolerant computers and uses fiber optics and independent decision elements (IDE's) to require fewer processors and fewer transmissions of messages. Enables fault-tolerant computers operating at different levels of redundancy to communicate with each other over triply redundant bus. Level of redundancy limited only by maximum number of wavelengths active on bus.

  16. Dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Tchoń, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    By analogy to the definition of the dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for robotic manipulators, we have designed a dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators built of a non-holonomic mobile platform and a holonomic on-board manipulator. The endogenous configuration space approach has been exploited as a source of conceptual guidelines. The new inverse guarantees a decoupling of the motion in the operational space from the forces exerted in the endogenous configuration space and annihilated by the dual Jacobian inverse. A performance study of the new Jacobian inverse as a tool for motion planning is presented.

  17. Accuracy and consistency of modern elastomeric pumps.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Robyn S; Missair, Andres; Pham, Phung; Gutierrez, Juan F; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blockade has become a popular method of achieving postoperative analgesia for many surgical procedures. The safety and reliability of infusion pumps are dependent on their flow rate accuracy and consistency. Knowledge of pump rate profiles can help physicians determine which infusion pump is best suited for their clinical applications and specific patient population. Several studies have investigated the accuracy of portable infusion pumps. Using methodology similar to that used by Ilfeld et al, we investigated the accuracy and consistency of several current elastomeric pumps. PMID:25140510

  18. Anticholinergic substances: A single consistent conformation

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Peter; Datta, Narayandas

    1980-01-01

    An interactive computer-graphics analysis of 24 antagonists of acetylcholine at peripheral autonomic post-ganglionic (muscarinic) nervous junctions and at similar junctions in the central nervous system, the crystal structures of which are known, has led to the determination of a single, consistent, energetically favorable conformation for all 24 substances, although their observed crystal structure conformations vary widely. The absolute configuration and the single, consistent (ideal) conformation of the chemical groups required for maximum anticholinergic activity are described quantitatively. Images PMID:16592775

  19. Beam shaping in high-power laser systems with using refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Beam Shaping of the spatial (transverse) profile of laser beams is highly desirable by building optical systems of high-power lasers as well in various applications with these lasers. Pumping of the crystals of Ti:Sapphire lasers by the laser radiation with uniform (flattop) intensity profile improves performance of these ultrashort pulse high-power lasers in terms of achievable efficiency, peak-power and stability, output beam profile. Specifications of the solid-state lasers built according to MOPA configuration can be also improved when radiation of the master oscillator is homogenized and then is amplified by the power amplifier. Features of building these high power lasers require that a beam shaping solution should be capable to work with single mode and multimode beams, provide flattop and super-Gauss intensity distributions, the consistency and divergence of a beam after the intensity re-distribution should be conserved and low absorption provided. These specific conditions are perfectly fulfilled by the refractive field mapping beam shapers due to their unique features: almost lossless intensity profile transformation, low output divergence, high transmittance and flatness of output beam profile, extended depth of field, adaptability to real intensity profiles of TEM00 and multimode laser sources. Combining of the refractive field mapping beam shapers with other optical components, like beam-expanders, relay imaging lenses, anamorphic optics makes it possible to generate the laser spots of necessary shape, size and intensity distribution. There are plenty of applications of high-power lasers where beam shaping bring benefits: irradiating photocathode of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), material ablation, micromachining, annealing in display making techniques, cladding, heat treating and others. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type, with emphasis on the features important for building and applications

  20. Study of beam-beam effects in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2010-05-23

    Beam-beam effects in eRHIC have a number of unique features, which distinguish them from both hadron and lepton colliders. Due to beam-beam interaction, both electron and hadron beams would suffer quality degradation or beam loss from without proper treatments. Those features need novel study and dedicate countermeasures. We study the beam dynamics and resulting luminosity of the characteristics, including mismatch, disruption and pinch effects on electron beam, in additional to their consequences on the opposing beam as a wake field and other incoherent effects of hadron beam. We also carry out countermeasures to prevent beam quality degrade and coherent instability.

  1. The Agfa Mayneord lecture: MRI of short and ultrashort T2 and T2* components of tissues, fluids and materials using clinical systems

    PubMed Central

    Bydder, G M

    2011-01-01

    A variety of techniques are now available to directly or indirectly detect signal from tissues, fluids and materials that have short, ultrashort or supershort T2 or T2* components. There are also methods of developing image contrast between tissues and fluids in the short T2 or T2* range that can provide visualisation of anatomy, which has not been previously seen with MRI. Magnetisation transfer methods can now be applied to previously invisible tissues, providing indirect access to supershort T2 components. Particular methods have been developed to target susceptibility effects and quantify them after correcting for anatomical distortion. Specific methods have also been developed to image the effects of magnetic iron oxide particles with positive contrast. Major advances have been made in techniques designed to correct for loss of signal and gross image distortion near metal. These methods are likely to substantially increase the range of application for MRI. PMID:22101579

  2. Dual beam optical interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A dual beam interferometer device is disclosed that enables moving an optics module in a direction, which changes the path lengths of two beams of light. The two beams reflect off a surface of an object and generate different speckle patterns detected by an element, such as a camera. The camera detects a characteristic of the surface.

  3. ATA beam director experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

    1986-06-23

    This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

  4. Cooling of stored beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.E.

    1986-10-15

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  5. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  6. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  7. Digitally Controlled Beam Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppler, W. W.; Kudva, B.; Dobbins, J. T.; Lee, C. S.; Van Lysel, M. S.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Mistretta, C. A.

    1982-12-01

    In digital fluorographic techniques the video camera must accommodate a wide dynamic range due to the large variation in the subject thickness within the field of view. Typically exposure factors and the optical aperture are selected such that the maximum video signal is obtained in the most transmissive region of the subject. Consequently, it has been shown that the signal-to-noise ratio is severely reduced in the dark regions. We have developed a prototype digital beam attenuator (DBA) which will alleviate this and some related problems in digital fluorography. The prototype DBA consists of a 6x6 array of pistons which are individually controlled. A membrane containing an attenuating solu-tion of (CeC13) in water and the piston matrix are placed between the x-ray tube and the subject. Under digital control the pistons are moved into the attenuating material in order to adjust the beam intensity over each of the 36 cells. The DBA control unit which digitizes the image during patient positioning will direct the pistons under hydraulic control to produce a uniform x-ray field exiting the subject. The pistons were designed to produce very little structural background in the image. In subtraction studies any structure would be cancelled. For non-subtraction studies such as cine-cardiology we are considering higher cell densities (eg. 64x64). Due to the narrow range of transmission provided by the DBA, in such studies ultra-high contrast films could be used to produce a high resolution quasi-subtraction display. Additional benefits of the DBA are: 1) reduced dose to the bright image areas when the dark areas are properly exposed. 2) improved scatter and glare to primary ratios, leading to improved contrast in the dark areas.

  8. Consistency of Students' Pace in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the consistency of students' behavior regarding their pace of actions over sessions within an online course. Pace in a session is defined as the number of logged actions divided by session length (in minutes). Log files of 6,112 students were collected, and datasets were constructed for examining pace…

  9. Developing consistent time series landsat data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Landsat series satellite has provided earth observation data record continuously since early 1970s. There are increasing demands on having a consistent time series of Landsat data products. In this presentation, I will summarize the work supported by the USGS Landsat Science Team project from 20...

  10. Image recognition and consistency of response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haygood, Tamara M.; Ryan, John; Liu, Qing Mary A.; Bassett, Roland; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the connection between conscious recognition of an image previously encountered in an experimental setting and consistency of response to the experimental question.
    Materials and Methods: Twenty-four radiologists viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and gave their opinion as to the position of a central venous catheter. One-to-three days later they again viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and again gave their opinion as to the position of the central venous catheter. Half of the radiographs in the second set were repeated images from the first set and half were new. The radiologists were asked of each image whether it had been included in the first set. For this study, we are evaluating only the 20 repeated images. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test and Fisher's exact test to determine the relationship between conscious recognition of a previously interpreted image and consistency in interpretation of the image.
    Results. There was no significant correlation between recognition of the image and consistency in response regarding the position of the central venous catheter. In fact, there was a trend in the opposite direction, with radiologists being slightly more likely to give a consistent response with respect to images they did not recognize than with respect to those they did recognize.
    Conclusion: Radiologists' recognition of previously-encountered images in an observer-performance study does not noticeably color their interpretation on the second encounter.

  11. Consistent Visual Analyses of Intrasubject Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Chung, Kyong-Mee; Gutshall, Katharine; Pitts, Steven C.; Kao, Joyce; Girolami, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Visual inspection of single-case data is the primary method of interpretation of the effects of an independent variable on a dependent variable in applied behavior analysis. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend the results of DeProspero and Cohen (1979) by reexamining the consistency of visual analysis across raters. We…

  12. Environmental Decision Support with Consistent Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most effective ways to pursue environmental progress is through the use of consistent metrics within a decision making framework. The US Environmental Protection Agency’s Sustainable Technology Division has developed TRACI, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of...

  13. 36 CFR 241.22 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FISH AND WILDLIFE Conservation of Fish, Wildlife, and Their Habitat, Chugach National Forest, Alaska... conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitat. A use or activity may be determined to be consistent if it will not materially interfere with or detract from the conservation of fish, wildlife and their...

  14. 36 CFR 241.22 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FISH AND WILDLIFE Conservation of Fish, Wildlife, and Their Habitat, Chugach National Forest, Alaska... conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitat. A use or activity may be determined to be consistent if it will not materially interfere with or detract from the conservation of fish, wildlife and their...

  15. 36 CFR 241.22 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FISH AND WILDLIFE Conservation of Fish, Wildlife, and Their Habitat, Chugach National Forest, Alaska... conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitat. A use or activity may be determined to be consistent if it will not materially interfere with or detract from the conservation of fish, wildlife and their...

  16. 24 CFR 91.510 - Consistency determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consistency determinations. 91.510 Section 91.510 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... HOPWA grant is a city that is the most populous unit of general local government in an EMSA, it...

  17. Effecting Consistency across Curriculum: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devasagayam, P. Raj; Mahaffey, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is the clarion call across all business schools which is driving the emphasis on assessing the attainment of learning outcomes. An issue that deems special attention in assurance of learning outcomes is related to consistency across courses and, more specifically, across multiple sections of the same course taught by…

  18. Consistency and stability of recombinant fermentations.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, M E; Builder, S E

    1994-01-01

    Production of proteins of consistent quality in heterologous, genetically-engineered expression systems is dependent upon identifying the manufacturing process parameters which have an impact on product structure, function, or purity, validating acceptable ranges for these variables, and performing the manufacturing process as specified. One of the factors which may affect product consistency is genetic instability of the primary product sequence, as well as instability of genes which code for proteins responsible for post-translational modification of the product. Approaches have been developed for mammalian expression systems to assure that product quality is not changing through mechanisms of genetic instability. Sensitive protein analytical methods, particularly peptide mapping, are used to evaluate product structure directly, and are more sensitive in detecting genetic instability than is direct genetic analysis by nucleotide sequencing of the recombinant gene or mRNA. These methods are being employed to demonstrate that the manufacturing process consistently yields a product of defined structure from cells cultured through the range of cell ages used in the manufacturing process and well beyond the maximum cell age defined for the process. The combination of well designed validation studies which demonstrate consistent product quality as a function of cell age, and rigorous quality control of every product lot by sensitive protein analytical methods provide the necessary assurance that product structure is not being altered through mechanisms of mutation and selection.

  19. RULE GENERALITY AND CONSISTENCY IN MATHEMATICS LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCANDURA, JOSEPH M.

    PSYCHOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES INVOLVED WITH RULE GENERALITY (DEGREE OF NONSPECIFICITY) AND PERFORMANCE CONSISTENCY IN MATHEMATICAL PRESENTATIONS WERE STUDIED. SPECIFICALLY, THE PURPOSES WERE (1) TO DETERMINE IF TEST BEHAVIOR CONFORMS TO THE SCOPE OF A VERBALLY ADMINISTERED TEST RULE, (2) TO EXPLORE THE INTERPRETABILITY OF VERBAL TEST RULES, AND (3) TO…

  20. Taking Another Look: Sensuous, Consistent Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townley, Mary Ross

    1983-01-01

    There is a natural progression from making single objects to creating sculpture. By modeling the forms of objects like funnels and light bulbs, students become aware of the quality of curves and the edges of angles. Sculptural form in architecture can be understood as consistency in the forms. (CS)

  1. Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

  2. Consistency and variability in functional localisers

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Keith J.; Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Knierim, Iris; Devlin, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying the use of functional localiser scans is that the voxels identified as the functional region-of-interest (fROI) are essentially the same as those activated by the main experimental manipulation. Intra-subject variability in the location of the fROI violates this assumption, reducing the sensitivity of the analysis and biasing the results. Here we investigated consistency and variability in fROIs in a set of 45 volunteers. They performed two functional localiser scans to identify word- and object-sensitive regions of ventral and lateral occipito-temporal cortex, respectively. In the main analyses, fROIs were defined as the category-selective voxels in each region and consistency was measured as the spatial overlap between scans. Consistency was greatest when minimally selective thresholds were used to define “active” voxels (p < 0.05 uncorrected), revealing that approximately 65% of the voxels were commonly activated by both scans. In contrast, highly selective thresholds (p < 10− 4 to 10− 6) yielded the lowest consistency values with less than 25% overlap of the voxels active in both scans. In other words, intra-subject variability was surprisingly high, with between one third and three quarters of the voxels in a given fROI not corresponding to those activated in the main task. This level of variability stands in striking contrast to the consistency seen in retinotopically-defined areas and has important implications for designing robust but efficient functional localiser scans. PMID:19289173

  3. Status of RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.M.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.K.; Lambiase, R.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    Two electron lenses are under construction for RHIC to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in order to increase both the peak and average luminosities. The final design of the overall system is reported as well as the status of the component design, acquisition, and manufacturing. An overview of the RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project is given in [1], and more details in [2]. With 2 head-on beam-beam interactions in IP6 and IP8, a third interaction with a low-energy electron beam is added near IP10 to partially compensate the the head-on beam-beam effect. Two electron lenses are under construction, one for each ring. Both will be located in a region common to both beams, but each lens will act only on one beam. With head-on beam-beam compensation up to a factor of two improvement in luminosity is expected together with a polarized source upgrade. The current RHIC polarized proton performance is documented in Ref. [4]. An electron lens (Fig. 1) consists of an DC electron gun, warm solenoids to focus the electron beam during transport, a superconducting main solenoid in which the interaction with the proton beam occurs, steering magnets, a collector, and instrumentation. The main developments in the last year are given below. The experimental program for polarized program at 100 GeV was expected to be finished by the time the electron lenses are commissioned. However, decadal plans by the RHIC experiments STAR and PHENIX show a continuing interest at both 100 GeV and 250 GeV, and a larger proton beam size has been accommodated in the design (Tab. 1). Over the last year beam and lattice parameters were optimized, and RHIC proton lattices are under development for optimized electron lens performance. The effect of the electron lens magnetic structure on the proton beam was evaluated, and found to be correctable. Experiments were done in RHIC and the Tevatron.

  4. A Sagnac-like interferometer for the generation of vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tonglu; Fu, Shiyao; Zhang, Shikun; Gao, Chunqing; He, Feng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a Sagnac-like scheme, to transform Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams into vector beams. The experimental apparatus of our scheme consists of a polarized beam splitter, two reflectors, and a quarter-wave plate (QWP). Firstly, holograms of spiral phase plates were encoded on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to generate different LG beams. Then, the generated LG beams were transformed into radially polarized vector beams. Azimuthally polarized vector beams were also obtained through placing a half-wave plate group behind the QWP. The intensity distribution of the generated vector beams is similar to the incident LG beams. A rotating polarizer is used to analyze the polarization distribution of the generated vector beams, and the results of which are highly consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  5. Development of a 50 MW Multiple Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R Lawrence; Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Collins, George

    2007-10-31

    The goal of this program was to develop a 50 MW, multiple beam klystron at 11.424 GHz. The device uses eight electron guns and beam lines to achieve the required power level at a beam voltage of 190 kV, consistent with solid state power supplies. The electron gun operates with confined flow focusing, which is unique among current multiple beam sources, and allows operation at power levels consistent with producing 10s of MWs of pulsed RF power. The circuit consists of a ring resonator input cavity, eight sets of buncher cavities, and a ring resonator output cavity. The RF output power is coupled into four rectangular waveguides equally spaced around the klystron. Eight individual collectors absorb the spent beam power in each beam. The klystron operates in a solenoid. The principle challenges in the design included development of the beam optics using confined flow focusing, shaping of the magnetic field in the gun region to avoid beam spiraling, coupling input power equally to all eight beam lines from a single input, and obtaining the required frequency and Q in the output cavity. The mechanical design was particularly complex due to the large parts count, number of braze and weld joints, and close proximity of the beam lines that limited access. Addressing vacuum leaks and cold testing the complex structures was particularly troublesome. At the conclusion of the program, the klystron is experiencing several vacuum leaks that are under repair. Efforts will continue to seal and test the klystron.

  6. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  7. Beams for kaon research

    SciTech Connect

    Pile, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed 1-2 GeV/c kaon beam line for BNL, designed to deliver momentum analyzed negative kaon beams with intensities above 10/sup 6/ per spill, is discussed. The beam intensity is expected to be about an order of magnitude greater than presently available and it is expected to be a clean beam with no more than 1:1 (..pi../sup -/,..mu../sup -/,e/sup -/)/K/sup -/. The beam line will allow a detailed investigation of strangeness -2 systems as well as continued investigations of strangeness -1 systems.

  8. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  9. Consistent Pauli reduction on group manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguet, A.; Pope, C. N.; Samtleben, H.

    2016-01-01

    We prove an old conjecture by Duff, Nilsson, Pope and Warner asserting that the NSsbnd NS sector of supergravity (and more general the bosonic string) allows for a consistent Pauli reduction on any d-dimensional group manifold G, keeping the full set of gauge bosons of the G × G isometry group of the bi-invariant metric on G. The main tool of the construction is a particular generalised Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz in double field theory which we explicitly construct in terms of the group's Killing vectors. Examples include the consistent reduction from ten dimensions on S3 ×S3 and on similar product spaces. The construction is another example of globally geometric non-toroidal compactifications inducing non-geometric fluxes.

  10. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S.

    2012-12-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  11. Self-Consistent Scattering and Transport Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    An average-atom model with ion correlations provides a compact and complete description of atomic-scale physics in dense, finite-temperature plasmas. The self-consistent ionic and electronic distributions from the model enable calculation of x-ray scattering signals and conductivities for material across a wide range of temperatures and densities. We propose a definition for the bound electronic states that ensures smooth behavior of these measurable properties under pressure ionization and compare the predictions of this model with those of less consistent models for Be, C, Al, and Fe. SNL is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp, for the U.S. DoE NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by DoE OFES Early Career grant FWP-14-017426.

  12. Self-consistency in Capital Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbrahim, Hamid

    2013-03-01

    Capital Markets are considered, at least in theory, information engines whereby traders contribute to price formation with their diverse perspectives. Regardless whether one believes in efficient market theory on not, actions by individual traders influence prices of securities, which in turn influence actions by other traders. This influence is exerted through a number of mechanisms including portfolio balancing, margin maintenance, trend following, and sentiment. As a result market behaviors emerge from a number of mechanisms ranging from self-consistency due to wisdom of the crowds and self-fulfilling prophecies, to more chaotic behavior resulting from dynamics similar to the three body system, namely the interplay between equities, options, and futures. This talk will address questions and findings regarding the search for self-consistency in capital markets.

  13. Observers are consistent when rating image conspicuity.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Moran; Cleary, Daniel R; Peters, Robert J; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Koch, Christof

    2007-11-01

    Human perception of an image's conspicuity depends on the stimulus itself and the observer's semantic interpretation. We investigated the relative contribution of the former, sensory-driven, component. Participants viewed sequences of images from five different classes-fractals, overhead satellite imagery, grayscale and colored natural scenes, and magazine covers-and graded each numerically according to its perceived conspicuity. We found significant consistency in this rating within and between observers for all image categories. In a subsequent recognition memory test, performance was significantly above chance for all categories, with the weakest memory for satellite imagery, and reaching near ceiling for magazine covers. When repeating the experiment after one year, ratings remained consistent within each observer and category, despite the absence of explicit scene memory. Our findings suggest that the rating of image conspicuity is driven by image-immanent, sensory factors common to all observers.

  14. Consistency Test and Constraint of Quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Gu, Je-AN; Chen, Pisin; /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2012-04-30

    In this paper we highlight our recent work in arXiv:0803.4504. In that work, we proposed a new consistency test of quintessence models for dark energy. Our test gave a simple and direct signature if certain category of quintessence models was not consistent with the observational data. For a category that passed the test, we further constrained its characteristic parameter. Specifically, we found that the exponential potential was ruled out at the 95% confidence level and the power-law potential was ruled out at the 68% confidence level based on the current observational data. We also found that the confidence interval of the index of the power-law potential was between -2 and 0 at the 95% confidence level.

  15. Beam breakup with longitudinal halo

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed an analytical model of cumulative beam breakup in linear accelerators that predicts the displacement of particles between bunches. Beam breakup is assumed to be caused by a periodic current consisting of an infinite bunch train. The particles in the halo do not contribute to the breakup but experience the deflecting fields and are displaced by them. Under certain circumstances, the displacement of particles in the halo can be considerably larger than that of the bunches. This may have important consequences for the design of high-current cw accelerators where even a small flux of particles striking components of the accelerator cannot be tolerated because of activation. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. A Vlasov equilibrium for space charge dominated beam in a misaligned solenoidal channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2012-08-15

    The effect of displacement and rotational misalignments of solenoid magnets with respect to the ideal beam propagation axis on the dynamics of intense charged particle beams have been studied. The equation of motion of the beam centroid has been obtained and found to be independent of any specific beam distribution. A Vlasov equilibrium distribution for the intense beam propagation through misaligned focussing channel has been obtained. Self-consistent simulation confirms the analytical result.

  17. Consistency of color representation in smart phones.

    PubMed

    Dain, Stephen J; Kwan, Benjamin; Wong, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    One of the barriers to the construction of consistent computer-based color vision tests has been the variety of monitors and computers. Consistency of color on a variety of screens has necessitated calibration of each setup individually. Color vision examination with a carefully controlled display has, as a consequence, been a laboratory rather than a clinical activity. Inevitably, smart phones have become a vehicle for color vision tests. They have the advantage that the processor and screen are associated and there are fewer models of smart phones than permutations of computers and monitors. Colorimetric consistency of display within a model may be a given. It may extend across models from the same manufacturer but is unlikely to extend between manufacturers especially where technologies vary. In this study, we measured the same set of colors in a JPEG file displayed on 11 samples of each of four models of smart phone (iPhone 4s, iPhone5, Samsung Galaxy S3, and Samsung Galaxy S4) using a Photo Research PR-730. The iPhones are white LED backlit LCD and the Samsung are OLEDs. The color gamut varies between models and comparison with sRGB space shows 61%, 85%, 117%, and 110%, respectively. The iPhones differ markedly from the Samsungs and from one another. This indicates that model-specific color lookup tables will be needed. Within each model, the primaries were quite consistent (despite the age of phone varying within each sample). The worst case in each model was the blue primary; the 95th percentile limits in the v' coordinate were ±0.008 for the iPhone 4 and ±0.004 for the other three models. The u'v' variation in white points was ±0.004 for the iPhone4 and ±0.002 for the others, although the spread of white points between models was u'v'±0.007. The differences are essentially the same for primaries at low luminance. The variation of colors intermediate between the primaries (e.g., red-purple, orange) mirror the variation in the primaries. The variation in

  18. Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (∼43%), suboptimal gating setup (∼37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (∼13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.

  19. Symmetric neutralized ion beams: Production, acceleration, propagation, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Nathaniel Kenneth

    This dissertation presents the first integrated experimental, computational, and theoretical research program on symmetric neutralized ion beams. A beam of this type is composed of positive and negative ions having equal charge-to-mass ratios, such that the beam has overall charge neutrality and its constituent ions respond symmetrically to electromagnetic forces. Under the right conditions, these beams may propagate undeflected across transverse magnetic fields due to beam polarization. Such propagation is studied here computationally, using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell code. Also, key theoretical differences between the propagation ability of these beams and that of beams consisting of positive ions and electrons are elucidated. An experimental method of producing a symmetric neutralized ion beam by merging together separate beams of positive and negative ions is demonstrated, and prototype collector hardware to diagnose the composition and energy distribution of the beam is developed. The ability of radio frequency quadrupole accelerators to simultaneously confine and accelerate the positive and negative ions of such a beam is demonstrated computationally and is confirmed experimentally, and a method to reestablish local charge neutrality in the beam after acceleration is conceived and simulated. The favorable scaling of such accelerators to small size and high frequency is illustrated. Finally, applications of the research to magnetic confinement fusion and topics for future study are presented.

  20. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOEpatents

    Kearney, Patrick A.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2003-04-29

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  2. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Barner, Allison K.; Benkwitt, Cassandra E.; Boersma, Kate S.; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B.; Ingeman, Kurt E.; Kindinger, Tye L.; Lindsley, Amy J.; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N.; Rowe, Jennifer C.; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A.; Heppell, Selina S.

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon’s diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  3. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Susan E; Thurman, Lindsey L; Barner, Allison K; Benkwitt, Cassandra E; Boersma, Kate S; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B; Ingeman, Kurt E; Kindinger, Tye L; Lindsley, Amy J; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N; Rowe, Jennifer C; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A; Heppell, Selina S

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon's diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  4. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Susan E; Thurman, Lindsey L; Barner, Allison K; Benkwitt, Cassandra E; Boersma, Kate S; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B; Ingeman, Kurt E; Kindinger, Tye L; Lindsley, Amy J; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N; Rowe, Jennifer C; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A; Heppell, Selina S

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon's diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  5. Self-consistent gravitational self-force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2010-01-01

    I review the problem of motion for small bodies in general relativity, with an emphasis on developing a self-consistent treatment of the gravitational self-force. An analysis of the various derivations extant in the literature leads me to formulate an asymptotic expansion in which the metric is expanded while a representative worldline is held fixed. I discuss the utility of this expansion for both exact point particles and asymptotically small bodies, contrasting it with a regular expansion in which both the metric and the worldline are expanded. Based on these preliminary analyses, I present a general method of deriving self-consistent equations of motion for arbitrarily structured (sufficiently compact) small bodies. My method utilizes two expansions: an inner expansion that keeps the size of the body fixed, and an outer expansion that lets the body shrink while holding its worldline fixed. By imposing the Lorenz gauge, I express the global solution to the Einstein equation in the outer expansion in terms of an integral over a worldtube of small radius surrounding the body. Appropriate boundary data on the tube are determined from a local-in-space expansion in a buffer region where both the inner and outer expansions are valid. This buffer-region expansion also results in an expression for the self-force in terms of irreducible pieces of the metric perturbation on the worldline. Based on the global solution, these pieces of the perturbation can be written in terms of a tail integral over the body’s past history. This approach can be applied at any order to obtain a self-consistent approximation that is valid on long time scales, both near and far from the small body. I conclude by discussing possible extensions of my method and comparing it to alternative approaches.

  6. Consistent energy treatment for radiation transport methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Steven James

    The approximations used in the standard multigroup method and cross section condensation procedure introduce several known errors, such those caused by spectral core environment effects and the neglect of the energy and angular coupling of the flux when condensing the total cross section. In this dissertation, a multigroup formulation is developed which maintains direct consistency with the continuous energy or fine-group structure, exhibiting the accuracy of the detailed energy spectrum within the coarse-group calculation. Two methods are then developed which seek to invert the condensation process -- turning the standard one-way condensation (from fine-group to coarse-group) into the first step of a two-way iterative process. The first method is based on the previously published Generalized Energy Condensation, which established a framework for obtaining the finegroup flux by preserving the flux energy spectrum in orthogonal energy expansion functions, but did not maintain a consistent coarse-group formulation. It is demonstrated that with a consistent extension of the GEC, a cross section recondensation scheme can be used to correct for the spectral core environment error. This is then verified numerically in a 1D VHTR core. In addition, a more practical and efficient new method, termed the "Subgroup Decomposition (SGD) Method," is developed which eliminates the need for expansion functions altogether, and allows the fine-group flux to be decomposed from a consistent coarse-group flux with minimal additional computation or memory requirements. This method, as a special case of a more general spline-approximation for radiation transport, is shown to be highly effective in a cross section recondensation scheme, providing fine-group results in a fraction of the time generally necessary to obtain a fine-group solution. In addition, a whole-core BWR benchmark problem is generated based on operating reactor parameters, in 2D and 3D. This contributes to the furthering

  7. Consistency of the triplet seesaw model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Fonseca, Renato M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-10-01

    Adding a scalar triplet to the Standard Model is one of the simplest ways of giving mass to neutrinos, providing at the same time a mechanism to stabilize the theory's vacuum. In this paper, we revisit these aspects of the type-II seesaw model pointing out that the bounded-from-below conditions for the scalar potential in use in the literature are not correct. We discuss some scenarios where the correction can be significant and sketch the typical scalar boson profile expected by consistency.

  8. Consistent Two-Dimensional Chiral Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smailagic, A.; Spallucci, E.

    We study chiral induced gravity in the light-cone gauge and show that the theory is consistent for a particular choice of chiralities. The corresponding Kac-Moody central charge has no forbidden region of complex values. Generalized analysis of the critical exponents is given and their relation to the SL(2,R) vacuum states is elucidated. All the parameters containing information about the theory can be traced back to the characteristics of the residual symmetry group in the light-cone gauge.

  9. Surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.

    2016-07-01

    Static time-delay corrections are frequency independent and ignore velocity variations away from the assumed vertical ray path through the subsurface. There is therefore a clear potential for improvement if the finite frequency nature of wave propagation can be properly accounted for. Such a method is presented here based on the Born approximation, the assumption of surface consistency and the misfit of instantaneous phase. The concept of instantaneous phase lends itself very well for sweep-like signals, hence these are the focus of this study. Analytical sensitivity kernels are derived that accurately predict frequency-dependent phase shifts due to P-wave anomalies in the near surface. They are quick to compute and robust near the source and receivers. An additional correction is presented that re-introduces the nonlinear relation between model perturbation and phase delay, which becomes relevant for stronger velocity anomalies. The phase shift as function of frequency is a slowly varying signal, its computation therefore does not require fine sampling even for broad-band sweeps. The kernels reveal interesting features of the sensitivity of seismic arrivals to the near surface: small anomalies can have a relative large impact resulting from the medium field term that is dominant near the source and receivers. Furthermore, even simple velocity anomalies can produce a distinct frequency-dependent phase behaviour. Unlike statics, the predicted phase corrections are smooth in space. Verification with spectral element simulations shows an excellent match for the predicted phase shifts over the entire seismic frequency band. Applying the phase shift to the reference sweep corrects for wavelet distortion, making the technique akin to surface consistent deconvolution, even though no division in the spectral domain is involved. As long as multiple scattering is mild, surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections outperform traditional statics for moderately large

  10. Consistency relations for the conformal mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Joyce, Austin; Khoury, Justin; Simonović, Marko E-mail: joyceau@sas.upenn.edu E-mail: marko.simonovic@sissa.it

    2013-04-01

    We systematically derive the consistency relations associated to the non-linearly realized symmetries of theories with spontaneously broken conformal symmetry but with a linearly-realized de Sitter subalgebra. These identities relate (N+1)-point correlation functions with a soft external Goldstone to N-point functions. These relations have direct implications for the recently proposed conformal mechanism for generating density perturbations in the early universe. We study the observational consequences, in particular a novel one-loop contribution to the four-point function, relevant for the stochastic scale-dependent bias and CMB μ-distortion.

  11. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana; Bartosik, Hannes; Cornelis, Karel; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Wenninger, Jorg

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  12. Single-bunch beams for BC-75

    SciTech Connect

    Sodja, J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Erickson, R.A.; Miller, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    On June 8, 1983, a beam consisting of a single S-band bunch was transported through the linac into the beam switchyard (BSY) and analyzed in the C-line (Beamline 27) at 30 GeV. The C-line toroid 2712 measured an intensity of approximately 2 x 10/sup 9/e/sup -//pulse. The exact intensity was uncertain due to the limited response time of the toroid for fast, single-bunch beams. However, the linear Q intensity monitors (Lin Q) showed the transmission of the beam through the linac between Sectors 2 and 30 to be fairly flat with an intensity of 3 x 10/sup 9/e/sup -//pulse in the final 19 sectors. The CID Faraday cup, which is located adjacent to the Gun Lin Q, was used to check the calibration of the Lin Q.

  13. Nonlocal analysis of finite-beam-driven instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serizawa, Y.; Dum, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The fully kinetic integral eigenmode equation in wave-number space is used to describe the nonlocal behavior of electrostatic waves in an electron-beam plasma, which are studied in the low-temperature-beam regime and the warm-beam regime. The case of strongly magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions, which corresponds to the waves in a frequency range from the lower-hybrid to the electron plasma frequency, is examined. Three wave modes are found. The first group consists of modes that have dispersive properties similar to the uniform, infinite beam-plasma system. Depending on the beam width, the growth rates are strongly reduced. The second group, surface modes, are localized at the periphery of the beam region and are less unstable than the unstable modes of the first group. The third group represents natural oscillations of the background plasma. These modes are virtually unaffected by the beam.

  14. Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.K.

    2005-04-12

    This paper reports the first observations of an anomalous hollow electron beam in the Duke storage ring. Created by exciting the single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, the hollow beam consists of a solid core inside and a large ring outside. We report the detailed measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern, spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying the transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wake field and the lattice nonlinearity. In addition, the hollow beam can be used as a powerful tool to study the linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  15. Beam coupling impedances of fast transmission-line kickers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast transmission-line kickers contain no ferrite and consist of two long metallic parallel plates supported by insulators inside a beam pipe. A beam is deflected by both the electric and magnetic fields of a TEM wave created by a pulse propagating along the strips in the direction opposite to the beam. Computations of the beam coupling impedances for such structures are difficult because of their length. In the paper, the beam coupling impedances of transmission-line kickers are calculated by combining analytical and numerical methods: the wake potentials computed in short models are extended analytically to obtain the wakes for the long kickers, and then the corresponding beam impedances are derived. At very low frequencies the results are compared with simple analytical expressions for the coupling impedances of striplines in beam position monitors.

  16. Numerical determination of injector design for high beam quality

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.

    1985-10-15

    The performance of a free electron laser strongly depends on the electron beam quality or brightness. The electron beam is transported into the free electron laser after it has been accelerated to the desired energy. Typically the maximum beam brightness produced by an accelerator is constrained by the beam brightness deliverd by the accelerator injector. Thus it is important to design the accelerator injector to yield the required electron beam brightness. The DPC (Darwin Particle Code) computer code has been written to numerically model accelerator injectors. DPC solves for the transport of a beam from emission through acceleration up to the full energy of the injector. The relativistic force equation is solved to determine particle orbits. Field equations are solved for self consistent electric and magnetic fields in the Darwin approximation. DPC has been used to investigate the beam quality consequences of A-K gap, accelerating stress, electrode configuration and axial magnetic field profile.

  17. Operation of the NuMI Beam Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, Robert M.; Indurthy, Dharma; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Pavlovich, Zarko; Proga, Marek; Bishai, Mary; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett; Harris, Debbie; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; McDonald, Jeffrey; Naples, Donna; Northacker, David; Erwin, Albert; Ping, Huican; Velissaris, Cristos

    2006-11-20

    The NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) facility produces an intense neutrino beam for experiments. The NuMI Beam Monitoring system consists of four arrays of ion chambers that measure the intensity and distribution of the remnant hadron and tertiary muon beams produced in association with the neutrinos. The ion chambers operate in an environment of high particle fluxes and high radiation.

  18. Generation of stochastic electromagnetic beams with complete controllable coherence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xudong; Chang, Chengcheng; Chen, Ziyang; Lin, Zhili; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-09-19

    We generate a stochastic electromagnetic beam (SEB) with complete controllable coherence, that is, the coherence degree can be controlled independently along two mutually perpendicular directions. We control the coherence of the SEB by adjusting the phase modulation magnitude applied onto two crossed phase only spatial light modulators. We measure the beam's coherence properties using Young's interference experiment, as well as the beam propagation factor. It is shown that the experimental results are consistent with our theoretical predictions. PMID:27661897

  19. Rocket-borne positive and neutral beam experimental plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. W.; Humphrey, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    In this report the design of a rocket-borne charge ejection payload consisting of proton and neutral hydrogen beams is presented. The experimental plan calls for beams to be emitted up, down, and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field to be intercepted by throw-away detectors (TADS). This experimental plan is designed to be very cost effective, while extending the present upper limit of heavy charged beams to higher levels and revealing significant scientific information.

  20. Halo Formation in 3-D Bunches with Self-Consistent Stationary Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, A. V.; Gluckstern, R. L.; Kurennoy, S. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    1998-04-01

    We have constructed, analytically and numerically, a new class of self-consistent 6-D phase space stationary distributions. The beam is then mismatched longitudinally and/or transversely, and we explore the formation of longitudinal and transverse halos in 3-D axisymmetric beam bunches. The longitudinal phase space clearly shows the typical "peanut" diagram observed in 2-D calculations. We find that the longitudinal halo forms first for comparable longitudinal and transverse mismatches because the longitudinal tune depression is more severe than the transverse one for elongated bunches. Of particular importance is the coupling between longitudinal and transverse motion and its effect on halo formation.

  1. ASTM/NBS base stock consistency study

    SciTech Connect

    Frassa, K.A.

    1980-11-01

    This paper summarizes the scope of a cooperative ASTM/NBS program established in June 1979. The contemplated study will ascertain the batch-to-batch consistency of re-refined and virgin base stocks manufactured by various processes. For one year, approximately eight to ten different base stocks samples, will be obtained by NBS every two weeks. One set of bi-monthly samples will be forwarded to each participant, on a coded basis monthly. Seven to eight samples will be obtained from six different re-refining processes and two virgin oil samples from a similar manufacturing process. The participants will report their results on a monthly basis. The second set of samples will be retained by NBS for an interim monthly sample study, if required, based on data analysis. Each sample's properties will be evaluated using various physical tests, chemical tests, and bench tests. The total testing program should define the batch-to-batch base stock consistency short of engine testing.

  2. Toward an internally consistent pressure scale

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yingwei; Ricolleau, Angele; Frank, Mark; Mibe, Kenji; Shen, Guoyin; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2007-01-01

    Our ability to interpret seismic observations including the seismic discontinuities and the density and velocity profiles in the earth's interior is critically dependent on the accuracy of pressure measurements up to 364 GPa at high temperature. Pressure scales based on the reduced shock-wave equations of state alone may predict pressure variations up to 7% in the megabar pressure range at room temperature and even higher percentage at high temperature, leading to large uncertainties in understanding the nature of the seismic discontinuities and chemical composition of the earth's interior. Here, we report compression data of gold (Au), platinum (Pt), the NaCl-B2 phase, and solid neon (Ne) at 300 K and high temperatures up to megabar pressures. Combined with existing experimental data, the compression data were used to establish internally consistent thermal equations of state of Au, Pt, NaCl-B2, and solid Ne. The internally consistent pressure scales provide a tractable, accurate baseline for comparing high pressure–temperature experimental data with theoretical calculations and the seismic observations, thereby advancing our understanding fundamental high-pressure phenomena and the chemistry and physics of the earth's interior. PMID:17483460

  3. Consistent Kaluza-Klein sphere reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, M.; Lü, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2000-09-01

    We study the circumstances under which a Kaluza-Klein reduction on an n-sphere, with a massless truncation that includes all the Yang-Mills fields of SO(n+1), can be consistent at the full non-linear level. We take as the starting point a theory comprising a p-form field strength and (possibly) a dilaton, coupled to gravity in the higher dimension D. We show that aside from the previously studied cases with (D,p)=(11,4) and (10,5) (associated with the S4 and S7 reductions of D=11 supergravity, and the S5 reduction of type IIB supergravity), the only other possibilities that allow consistent reductions are for p=2, reduced on S2, and for p=3, reduced on S3 or SD-3. We construct the fully non-linear Kaluza-Klein Ansätze in all these cases. In particular, we obtain D=3, N=8, SO(8) and D=7, N=2, SO(4) gauged supergravities from S7 and S3 reductions of N=1 supergravity in D=10.

  4. Consistency check of {Lambda}CDM phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas

    2011-03-15

    The standard model of cosmology {Lambda}CDM assumes general relativity, flat space, and the presence of a positive cosmological constant. We relax these assumptions allowing spatial curvature, a time-dependent effective dark energy equation of state, as well as modifications of the Poisson equation for the lensing potential, and modifications of the growth of linear matter density perturbations in alternate combinations. Using six parameters characterizing these relations, we check {Lambda}CDM for consistency utilizing cosmic microwave background anisotropies, cross correlations thereof with high-redshift galaxies through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, the Hubble constant, supernovae, and baryon acoustic oscillation distances, as well as the relation between weak gravitational lensing and galaxy flows. In all scenarios, we find consistency of the concordance model at the 95% confidence level. However, we emphasize that constraining supplementary background parameters and parametrizations of the growth of large-scale structure separately may lead to a priori exclusion of viable departures from the concordance model.

  5. On the consistent use of constructed observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis (We define the concept of functional redundancy, which is distinct from the usual concept of an operator basis redundancy, in the introduction.) and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the S parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables to consistently constrain the Standard Model EFT is only expected to grow with future LHC data, as more complex processes are studied.

  6. Planck 2013 results. XXXI. Consistency of the Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck design and scanning strategy provide many levels of redundancy that can be exploited to provide tests of internal consistency. One of the most important is the comparison of the 70 GHz (amplifier) and 100 GHz (bolometer) channels. Based on different instrument technologies, with feeds located differently in the focal plane, analysed independently by different teams using different software, and near the minimum of diffuse foreground emission, these channels are in effect two different experiments. The 143 GHz channel has the lowest noise level on Planck, and is near the minimum of unresolved foreground emission. In this paper, we analyse the level of consistency achieved in the 2013 Planck data. We concentrate on comparisons between the 70, 100, and 143 GHz channel maps and power spectra, particularly over the angular scales of the first and second acoustic peaks, on maps masked for diffuse Galactic emission and for strong unresolved sources. Difference maps covering angular scales from 8° to 15' are consistent with noise, and show no evidence of cosmic microwave background structure. Including small but important corrections for unresolved-source residuals, we demonstrate agreement (measured by deviation of the ratio from unity) between 70 and 100 GHz power spectra averaged over 70 ≤ ℓ ≤ 390 at the 0.8% level, and agreement between 143 and 100 GHz power spectra of 0.4% over the same ℓ range. These values are within and consistent with the overall uncertainties in calibration given in the Planck 2013 results. We also present results based on the 2013 likelihood analysis showing consistency at the 0.35% between the 100, 143, and 217 GHz power spectra. We analyse calibration procedures and beams to determine what fraction of these differences can be accounted for by known approximations or systematicerrors that could be controlled even better in the future, reducing uncertainties still further. Several possible small improvements are described

  7. Event-related potential (ERP) markers of melodic processing: The N2 component is modulated by structural complexity, not by melodic 'meaningfulness'.

    PubMed

    Minati, L; Salvatoni, L; Rosazza, C; Pietrocini, E; Visani, E; Panzica, F; Scaioli, V; Avanzini, G; Franceschetti, S

    2010-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the event-related potential (ERP) evoked by a note shows substantial differences depending on whether the note is part of a melodic context or presented in an unstructured repetition. In particular, the N2 component has been found to have considerably increased latency and a more frontal topography for notes presented in a melody. An open question is whether such effect is related to the 'meaningfulness' of a note sequence, that is due to the formation of abstract melodic entities, rather than more simply an indicator of cognitive load associated with processing a structurally-complex sequence as opposed to an unstructured repetition. In this study, we addressed this issue by recording ERPs from 10 healthy non-musicians listening to eight one-part unfamiliar tonal melodies and eight sequences of random notes. The two stimuli were matched for distribution of pitch, intervals and note duration as well as for entropy of the time-series of pitch and duration. While tonal melodies were rated more meaningful (p<0.001) and pleasant (p<0.001) by all participants, no effects were found for the N2 component amplitude (p> or =0.8) and latency (p=0.2). Combined with previous findings, this indicates that the N2 evoked by each individual note responds to the structural complexity of the note sequence, i.e., to the presence of pitch and duration changes, but not to higher-level processing related to the formation of abstract melodic entities. In contrast, we found that the amplitude of the P2 component was marginally (p=0.04) elevated for random notes as compared to tonal melodies. This may be related to attentional modulation, or more specifically to associative components of auditory processing. PMID:20600678

  8. Particle beam injection system

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  9. Craft Stick Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  10. KEKB beam instrumentation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinaga, M.; Flanagan, J.; Hiramatsu, S.; Ieiri, T.; Ikeda, H.; Ishii, H.; Kikutani, E.; Mimashi, T.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Mizuno, H.; Mori, K.; Tejima, M.; Tobiyama, M.

    2003-02-01

    For the stable high-luminosity operation and luminosity increase, the electron and positron storage rings of the KEK B-Factory (KEKB) is equipped with various beam instrumentations, which have been working well since the start of the commissioning in December, 1998. Details and performance of the beam-position monitor system based on the spectrum analysis using DSPs, the turn-by-turn BPM with four-dimensional function available for measurements of the individual bunch position, phase and intensity, the parametric beam-DCCTs designed so as to avoid the magnetic-core-selection problems for the parametric flux modulation, the bunch-by-bunch feedback system indispensable to suppress the strong multibunch instabilities in KEKB, the various optical beam diagnostic systems, such as synchrotron radiation interferometers for precise beam-size measurement, the tune meters, the bunch length monitors and the beam-loss monitors are described. Delicate machine tuning of KEKB is strongly supported by these instrumentations.

  11. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  12. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  13. Reduction of beam hardening artifacts in cone-beam CT imaging via SMART-RECON algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    When an automatic exposure control is introduced in C-arm cone beam CT data acquisition, the spectral inconsistencies between acquired projection data are exacerbated. As a result, conventional water/bone correction schemes are not as effective as in conventional diagnostic x-ray CT acquisitions with a fixed tube potential. In this paper, a new method was proposed to reconstruct several images with different degrees of spectral consistency and thus different levels of beam hardening artifacts. The new method relies neither on prior knowledge of the x-ray beam spectrum nor on prior compositional information of the imaging object. Numerical simulations were used to validate the algorithm.

  14. Contributions to the mini-workshop on beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of the Workshop was to assay the current understanding of compensation of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron with use of low-energy high-current electron beam, relevant accelerator technology, along with other novel techniques of the compensation and previous attempts. About 30 scientists representing seven institutions from four countries--FNAL, SLAC, BNL, Novosibirsk, CERN, and Dubna were in attendance. Twenty one talks were presented. The event gave firm ground for wider collaboration on experimental test of the compensation at the Tevatron collider. This report consists of vugraphs of talks given at the meeting.

  15. Hyperon beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report reviews the present status and recent results in hyperon physics concentrating on results from high energy hyperon beam experiments performed at Fermilab over the past several years. The report focuses on hyperon production polarization, precision hyperon magnetic moment measurements and radiative decay studies. Modern charged hyperon beam experiments are characterized by {approx}100m long apparatus and hyperon beams with {gamma}{sub Y}{approx}100 and hyperon fluxes in the 1-100 kHz range.

  16. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  17. Quantum cosmological consistency condition for inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Kiefer, Claus; Steinwachs, Christian F. E-mail: kiefer@thp.uni-koeln.de

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the quantum cosmological tunneling scenario for inflationary models. Within a path-integral approach, we derive the corresponding tunneling probability distribution. A sharp peak in this distribution can be interpreted as the initial condition for inflation and therefore as a quantum cosmological prediction for its energy scale. This energy scale is also a genuine prediction of any inflationary model by itself, as the primordial gravitons generated during inflation leave their imprint in the B-polarization of the cosmic microwave background. In this way, one can derive a consistency condition for inflationary models that guarantees compatibility with a tunneling origin and can lead to a testable quantum cosmological prediction. The general method is demonstrated explicitly for the model of natural inflation.

  18. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27472900

  19. Toward a Fully Consistent Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2009-07-07

    Dimitri Mihalas set the standard for all work in radiation hydrodynamics since 1984. The present contribution builds on 'Foundations of Radiation Hydrodynamics' to explore the relativistic effects that have prevented having a consistent non-relativistic theory. Much of what I have to say is in FRH, but the 3-D development is new. Results are presented for the relativistic radiation transport equation in the frame obtained by a Lorentz boost with the fluid velocity, and the exact momentum-integrated moment equations. The special-relativistic hydrodynamic equations are summarized, including the radiation contributions, and it is shown that exact conservation is obtained, and certain puzzles in the non-relativistic radhydro equations are explained.

  20. Plasma Diffusion in Self-Consistent Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smets, R.; Belmont, G.; Aunai, N.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of particle diffusion in position space, as a consequence ofeleclromagnetic fluctuations is addressed. Numerical results obtained with a self-consistent hybrid code are presented, and a method to calculate diffusion coefficient in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field is proposed. The diffusion is estimated for two different types of fluctuations. The first type (resuiting from an agyrotropic in itiai setting)is stationary, wide band white noise, and associated to Gaussian probability distribution function for the magnetic fluctuations. The second type (result ing from a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) is non-stationary, with a power-law spectrum, and a non-Gaussian probabi lity distribution function. The results of the study allow revisiting the question of loading particles of solar wind origin in the Earth magnetosphere.

  1. Consistent evolution in a pedestrian flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Junbiao; Wang, Kaihua

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, pedestrian evacuation considering different human behaviors is studied by using a cellular automaton (CA) model combined with the snowdrift game theory. The evacuees are divided into two types, i.e. cooperators and defectors, and two different human behaviors, herding behavior and independent behavior, are investigated. It is found from a large amount of numerical simulations that the ratios of the corresponding evacuee clusters are evolved to consistent states despite 11 typically different initial conditions, which may largely owe to self-organization effect. Moreover, an appropriate proportion of initial defectors who are of herding behavior, coupled with an appropriate proportion of initial defectors who are of rationally independent thinking, are two necessary factors for short evacuation time.

  2. Consistency tests for the cosmological constant.

    PubMed

    Zunckel, Caroline; Clarkson, Chris

    2008-10-31

    We propose consistency tests for the cosmological constant which provide a direct observational signal if Lambda is wrong, regardless of the densities of matter and curvature. As an example of its utility, our flat case test can warn of a small transition of the equation of state w(z) from w(z)=-1 of 20% from SNAP (Supernova Acceleration Probe) quality data at 4-sigma, even when direct reconstruction techniques see virtually no evidence for deviation from Lambda. It is shown to successfully rule out a wide range of non-Lambda dark energy models with no reliance on knowledge of Omega_{m} using SNAP quality data and a large range for using 10;{5} supernovae as forecasted for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. PMID:18999813

  3. Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

    2002-02-26

    Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

  4. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-07-29

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits.

  5. Plasma diffusion in self-consistent fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, R.; Belmont, G.; Aunai, N.; Rezeau, L.

    2011-10-15

    The problem of particle diffusion in position space, as a consequence of electromagnetic fluctuations is addressed. Numerical results obtained with a self-consistent hybrid code are presented, and a method to calculate diffusion coefficient in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field is proposed. The diffusion is estimated for two different types of fluctuations. The first type (resulting from an agyrotropic initial setting) is stationary, wide band white noise, and associated to Gaussian probability distribution function for the magnetic fluctuations. The second type (resulting from a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) is non-stationary, with a power-law spectrum, and a non-Gaussian probability distribution function. The results of the study allow revisiting the question of loading particles of solar wind origin in the Earth magnetosphere.

  6. Resolving Two Beams in Beam Splitters with a Beam Position Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2002-04-01

    The beam transport system for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) anticipates multiple beam splitters. Monitoring two transversely separated beams in a common beam pipe in the splitter sections imposes certain requirements on beam diagnostics for these sections. We explore a two-beam system in a generic beam monitor and study the feasibility of resolving the transverse positions of the two beams with one diagnostics device. Effects of unequal beam currents and of finite transverse sizes of the beams are explored analytically for both the ultra relativistic case and the long-wavelength limit.

  7. Quantifying consistent individual differences in habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Martin; Vander Wal, Eric; Zedrosser, Andreas; Swenson, Jon E; Kindberg, Jonas; Pelletier, Fanie

    2016-03-01

    Habitat selection is a fundamental behaviour that links individuals to the resources required for survival and reproduction. Although natural selection acts on an individual's phenotype, research on habitat selection often pools inter-individual patterns to provide inferences on the population scale. Here, we expanded a traditional approach of quantifying habitat selection at the individual level to explore the potential for consistent individual differences of habitat selection. We used random coefficients in resource selection functions (RSFs) and repeatability estimates to test for variability in habitat selection. We applied our method to a detailed dataset of GPS relocations of brown bears (Ursus arctos) taken over a period of 6 years, and assessed whether they displayed repeatable individual differences in habitat selection toward two habitat types: bogs and recent timber-harvest cut blocks. In our analyses, we controlled for the availability of habitat, i.e. the functional response in habitat selection. Repeatability estimates of habitat selection toward bogs and cut blocks were 0.304 and 0.420, respectively. Therefore, 30.4 and 42.0 % of the population-scale habitat selection variability for bogs and cut blocks, respectively, was due to differences among individuals, suggesting that consistent individual variation in habitat selection exists in brown bears. Using simulations, we posit that repeatability values of habitat selection are not related to the value and significance of β estimates in RSFs. Although individual differences in habitat selection could be the results of non-exclusive factors, our results illustrate the evolutionary potential of habitat selection.

  8. Quantifying consistent individual differences in habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Martin; Vander Wal, Eric; Zedrosser, Andreas; Swenson, Jon E; Kindberg, Jonas; Pelletier, Fanie

    2016-03-01

    Habitat selection is a fundamental behaviour that links individuals to the resources required for survival and reproduction. Although natural selection acts on an individual's phenotype, research on habitat selection often pools inter-individual patterns to provide inferences on the population scale. Here, we expanded a traditional approach of quantifying habitat selection at the individual level to explore the potential for consistent individual differences of habitat selection. We used random coefficients in resource selection functions (RSFs) and repeatability estimates to test for variability in habitat selection. We applied our method to a detailed dataset of GPS relocations of brown bears (Ursus arctos) taken over a period of 6 years, and assessed whether they displayed repeatable individual differences in habitat selection toward two habitat types: bogs and recent timber-harvest cut blocks. In our analyses, we controlled for the availability of habitat, i.e. the functional response in habitat selection. Repeatability estimates of habitat selection toward bogs and cut blocks were 0.304 and 0.420, respectively. Therefore, 30.4 and 42.0 % of the population-scale habitat selection variability for bogs and cut blocks, respectively, was due to differences among individuals, suggesting that consistent individual variation in habitat selection exists in brown bears. Using simulations, we posit that repeatability values of habitat selection are not related to the value and significance of β estimates in RSFs. Although individual differences in habitat selection could be the results of non-exclusive factors, our results illustrate the evolutionary potential of habitat selection. PMID:26597548

  9. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  10. Power beaming options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Some large scale power beaming applications are proposed for the purpose of stimulating research. The first proposal is for a combination of large phased arrays on the ground near power stations and passive reflectors in geostationary orbit. The systems would beam excess electrical power in microwave form to areas in need of electrical power. Another proposal is to build solar arrays in deserts and beam the energy around the world. Another proposal is to use lasers to beam energy from earth to orbiting spacecraft.

  11. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  12. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  13. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  14. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  15. Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sen, Tanaji; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2010-05-01

    In order to avoid the effects of long-range beam-beam interactions which produce beam blow-up and deteriorate beam life time, a compensation scheme with current carrying wires has been proposed. Two long-range beam-beam compensators were installed in RHIC rings in 2006. The effects of the compensators have been experimentally investigated. An indication was observed that the compensators are beneficial to beam life time in measurements performed in RHIC during 2009. In this paper, we report the effects of wire compensator on beam loss and emittance for proton-proton beams at collision energy.

  16. Computational challenges for beam-beam simulation for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-10-01

    In this article we will review the computational challenges in the beam-beam simulation for the polarized proton run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The difficulties in our multi-particle and million turn tracking to calculate the proton beam lifetime and proton beam emittance growth due to head-on beam-beam interaction and head-on beam-beam compensation are presented and discussed. Solutions to obtain meaningful physics results from these trackings are proposed and tested. In the end we will present the progress in the benchmarking of the RHIC operational proton beam lifetime.

  17. BEAM STOP DESIGN METHODOLOGY AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SNS BEAM STOP

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Plum, Michael A; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Lu, Wei; McTeer, Stephen Mark

    2010-01-01

    The design of accelerator components such as magnets, accelerator cavities and beam instruments tends to be a fairly standardized and collective effort within the particle accelerator community with well established performance, reliability and, in some cases, even budgetary criteria. Beam stop design, by contrast, has been comparatively subjective historically with much more general goals. This lack of rigor has lead to a variety of facility implementations with limited standardization and minimal consensus on approach to development within the particle accelerator community. At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), for example, there are four high power beam stops in use, three of which have significantly different design solutions. This paper describes the design of a new off-momentum beam stop for the SNS. The technical description of the system will be complemented by a discussion of design methodology. This paper presented an overview of the new SNS HEBT off-momentum beam stop and outlined a methodology for beam stop system design. The new beam stop consists of aluminium and steel blocks cooled by a closed-loop forced-air system and is expected to be commissioned this summer. The design methodology outlined in the paper represents a basic description of the process, data, analyses and critical decisions involved in the development of a beam stop system.

  18. Neutral beam stopping and emission in fusion plasmas I: deuterium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, H.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Hoekstra, R.; Horton, L. D.; Howman, A. C.; Konig, R. W. T.; Martin, R.; Olson, R. E.; Summers, H. P.

    2000-07-01

    The charge transfer reaction of neutral deuterium beams with impurities enables one of the principle quantitative diagnostic measurements of the hot core fusion plasma; that is, charge exchange spectroscopy. The complementary measurement of beam emission spectroscopy has been fruitful in motional Stark wavelength shift and fluctuation studies, but less so in using absolute measured intensities. In the last two years we have achieved substantial improvement in the quantitative analysis and agreement between the observed and modelled beam emission at the JET Joint Undertaking. This has depended on improved spectral fitting of the overlayed Dα motional Stark multiplet, self-consistent beam emission and impurity charge exchange modelling and analysis, and revision of the data entering the modelling of the beam emission process. The paper outlines the present JET beam emission diagnostic system and the collisional radiative modelling of deuterium beam stopping and emission. The nature and organization of the effective derived data directly used in experimental interpretation at JET are described and some results of spectral analysis of deuterium beam emission given. The practical implementation of the methods described here is part of the ADAS Project.

  19. H- beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport.

    PubMed

    Gabor, C; Back, J J; Faircloth, D C; Izaola, Z; Lawrie, S R; Letchford, A P

    2012-02-01

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H(-) ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H(-) high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  20. H{sup -} beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, C.; Back, J. J.; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Izaola, Z.

    2012-02-15

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H{sup -} ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H{sup -} high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  1. Sonic Beam Model of Newton's Cradle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menger, Fredric M.; Rizvi, Syed A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The motions of Newton's cradle, consisting of several steel balls hanging side-by-side, have been analysed in terms of a sound pulse that travels via points of contact among the balls. This presupposes a focused energy beam. When the pulse reaches the fifth and final ball, the energy disperses and dislocates the ball with a trajectory equivalent…

  2. Radiometric consistency in source specifications for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Tirapu Azpiroz, Jaione; Lai, Kafai; Tian, Kehan; Melville, David O. S.; Totzeck, Michael; Blahnik, Vladan; Koolen, Armand; Flagello, Donis

    2008-03-01

    There is a surprising lack of clarity about the exact quantity that a lithographic source map should specify. Under the plausible interpretation that input source maps should tabulate radiance, one will find with standard imaging codes that simulated wafer plane source intensities appear to violate the brightness theorem. The apparent deviation (a cosine factor in the illumination pupil) represents one of many obliquity/inclination factors involved in propagation through the imaging system whose interpretation in the literature is often somewhat obscure, but which have become numerically significant in today's hyper-NA OPC applications. We show that the seeming brightness distortion in the illumination pupil arises because the customary direction-cosine gridding of this aperture yields non-uniform solid-angle subtense in the source pixels. Once the appropriate solid angle factor is included, each entry in the source map becomes proportional to the total |E|^2 that the associated pixel produces on the mask. This quantitative definition of lithographic source distributions is consistent with the plane-wave spectrum approach adopted by litho simulators, in that these simulators essentially propagate |E|^2 along the interfering diffraction orders from the mask input to the resist film. It can be shown using either the rigorous Franz formulation of vector diffraction theory, or an angular spectrum approach, that such an |E|^2 plane-wave weighting will provide the standard inclination factor if the source elements are incoherent and the mask model is accurate. This inclination factor is usually derived from a classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, and we show that the nominally discrepant inclination factors used by the various diffraction integrals of this class can all be made to yield the same result as the Franz formula when rigorous mask simulation is employed, and further that these cosine factors have a simple geometrical interpretation. On this basis

  3. Single-Plane Magnetically Focused Elongated Small Field Proton Beams.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Grant A; Slater, James M; Wroe, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    We previously performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically focused proton beams shaped by a single quadrapole magnet and thereby created narrow elongated beams with superior dose delivery characteristics (compared to collimated beams) suitable for targets of similar geometry. The present study seeks to experimentally validate these simulations using a focusing magnet consisting of 24 segments of samarium cobalt permanent magnetic material adhered into a hollow cylinder. Proton beams with properties relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications were delivered through the magnet to a water tank containing a diode detector or radiochromic film. Dose profiles were analyzed and compared with analogous Monte Carlo simulations. The focused beams produced elongated beam spots with high elliptical symmetry, indicative of magnet quality. Experimental data showed good agreement with simulations, affirming the utility of Monte Carlo simulations as a tool to model the inherent complexity of a magnetic focusing system. Compared to target-matched unfocused simulations, focused beams showed larger peak to entrance ratios (26% to 38%) and focused simulations showed a two-fold increase in beam delivery efficiency. These advantages can be attributed to the magnetic acceleration of protons in the transverse plane that tends to counteract the particle outscatter that leads to degradation of peak to entrance performance in small field proton beams. Our results have important clinical implications and suggest rare earth focusing magnet assemblies are feasible and could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering enhanced dose to narrow elongated targets (eg, in and around the spinal cord) in less time compared to collimated beams.

  4. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  5. Generalized arc consistency for global cardinality constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Regin, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A global cardinality constraint (gcc) is specified in terms of a set of variables X = (x{sub 1},..., x{sub p}) which take their values in a subset of V = (v{sub 1},...,v{sub d}). It constrains the number of times a value v{sub i} {epsilon} V is assigned to a variable in X to be in an interval [l{sub i}, c{sub i}]. Cardinality constraints have proved very useful in many real-life problems, such as scheduling, timetabling, or resource allocation. A gcc is more general than a constraint of difference, which requires each interval to be. In this paper, we present an efficient way of implementing generalized arc consistency for a gcc. The algorithm we propose is based on a new theorem of flow theory. Its space complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}) and its time complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar}{sup 2} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}). We also show how this algorithm can efficiently be combined with other filtering techniques.

  6. Self consistency grouping: a stringent clustering method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous types of clustering like single linkage and K-means have been widely studied and applied to a variety of scientific problems. However, the existing methods are not readily applicable for the problems that demand high stringency. Methods Our method, self consistency grouping, i.e. SCG, yields clusters whose members are closer in rank to each other than to any member outside the cluster. We do not define a distance metric; we use the best known distance metric and presume that it measures the correct distance. SCG does not impose any restriction on the size or the number of the clusters that it finds. The boundaries of clusters are determined by the inconsistencies in the ranks. In addition to the direct implementation that finds the complete structure of the (sub)clusters we implemented two faster versions. The fastest version is guaranteed to find only the clusters that are not subclusters of any other clusters and the other version yields the same output as the direct implementation but does so more efficiently. Results Our tests have demonstrated that SCG yields very few false positives. This was accomplished by introducing errors in the distance measurement. Clustering of protein domain representatives by structural similarity showed that SCG could recover homologous groups with high precision. Conclusions SCG has potential for finding biological relationships under stringent conditions. PMID:23320864

  7. Volume Haptics with Topology-Consistent Isosurfaces.

    PubMed

    Corenthy, Loc; Otaduy, Miguel A; Pastor, Luis; Garcia, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Haptic interfaces offer an intuitive way to interact with and manipulate 3D datasets, and may simplify the interpretation of visual information. This work proposes an algorithm to provide haptic feedback directly from volumetric datasets, as an aid to regular visualization. The haptic rendering algorithm lets users perceive isosurfaces in volumetric datasets, and it relies on several design features that ensure a robust and efficient rendering. A marching tetrahedra approach enables the dynamic extraction of a piecewise linear continuous isosurface. Robustness is achieved using a continuous collision detection step coupled with state-of-the-art proxy-based rendering methods over the extracted isosurface. The introduced marching tetrahedra approach guarantees that the extracted isosurface will match the topology of an equivalent isosurface computed using trilinear interpolation. The proposed haptic rendering algorithm improves the consistency between haptic and visual cues computing a second proxy on the isosurface displayed on screen. Our experiments demonstrate the improvements on the isosurface extraction stage as well as the robustness and the efficiency of the complete algorithm.

  8. Ciliate communities consistently associated with coral diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, M. J.; Séré, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    Incidences of coral disease are increasing. Most studies which focus on diseases in these organisms routinely assess variations in bacterial associates. However, other microorganism groups such as viruses, fungi and protozoa are only recently starting to receive attention. This study aimed at assessing the diversity of ciliates associated with coral diseases over a wide geographical range. Here we show that a wide variety of ciliates are associated with all nine coral diseases assessed. Many of these ciliates such as Trochilia petrani and Glauconema trihymene feed on the bacteria which are likely colonizing the bare skeleton exposed by the advancing disease lesion or the necrotic tissue itself. Others such as Pseudokeronopsis and Licnophora macfarlandi are common predators of other protozoans and will be attracted by the increase in other ciliate species to the lesion interface. However, a few ciliate species (namely Varistrombidium kielum, Philaster lucinda, Philaster guamense, a Euplotes sp., a Trachelotractus sp. and a Condylostoma sp.) appear to harbor symbiotic algae, potentially from the coral themselves, a result which may indicate that they play some role in the disease pathology at the very least. Although, from this study alone we are not able to discern what roles any of these ciliates play in disease causation, the consistent presence of such communities with disease lesion interfaces warrants further investigation.

  9. Odor recognition: familiarity, identifiability, and encoding consistency.

    PubMed

    Rabin, M D; Cain, W S

    1984-04-01

    The investigation examined the association between the perceived identity of odorous stimuli and the ability to recognize the previous occurrence of them. The stimuli comprised 20 relatively familiar odorous objects such as chocolate, leather, popcorn, and soy sauce. Participants rated the familiarity of the odors and sought to identify them. At various intervals up to 7 days after initial inspection, the participants sought to recognize the odors among sets of distractor odors that included such items as soap, cloves, pipe tobacco, and so on. The recognition response entailed a confidence rating as to whether or not an item had appeared in the original set. At the time of testing, the participants also sought to identify the stimuli again. The results upheld previous findings of excellent initial recognition memory for environmentally relevant odors and slow forgetting. The results also uncovered, for the first time, a strong association between recognition memory and identifiability, rated familiarity, and the ability to use an odor label consistently at inspection and subsequent testing. Encodability seems to enhance rather than to permit recognizability. Even items identified incorrectly or inconsistently were recognized at levels above chance.

  10. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  11. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  12. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  13. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  14. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  15. Observations And Measurements of Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.K.; Li, J.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    Anomalous hollow electron beams have been recently observed in the Duke storage ring. With a single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, a hollow beam can be created. This beam consists of a solid core beam inside and a large ring beam outside. In this paper, we report the measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern and spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wakefield and lattice nonlinearity. The hollow beam can also be used as a tool to study linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  16. Sound practices for consistent human visual inspection.

    PubMed

    Melchore, James A

    2011-03-01

    Numerous presentations and articles on manual inspection of pharmaceutical drug products have been released, since the pioneering articles on inspection by Knapp and associates Knapp and Kushner (J Parenter Drug Assoc 34:14, 1980); Knapp and Kushner (Bull Parenter Drug Assoc 34:369, 1980); Knapp and Kushner (J Parenter Sci Technol 35:176, 1981); Knapp and Kushner (J Parenter Sci Technol 37:170, 1983). This original work by Knapp and associates provided the industry with a statistical means of evaluating inspection performance. This methodology enabled measurement of individual inspector performance, performance of the entire inspector pool and provided basic suggestions for the conduct of manual inspection. Since that time, numerous subject matter experts (SMEs) have presented additional valuable information for the conduct of manual inspection Borchert et al. (J Parenter Sci Technol 40:212, 1986); Knapp and Abramson (J Parenter Sci Technol 44:74, 1990); Shabushnig et al. (1994); Knapp (1999); Knapp (2005); Cherris (2005); Budd (2005); Barber and Thomas (2005); Knapp (2005); Melchore (2007); Leversee and Ronald (2007); Melchore (2009); Budd (2007); Borchert et al. (1986); Berdovich (2005); Berdovich (2007); Knapp (2007); Leversee and Shabushing (2009); Budd (2009). Despite this abundance of knowledge, neither government regulations nor the multiple compendia provide more than minimal guidance or agreement for the conduct of manual inspection. One has to search the literature for useful information that has been published by SMEs in the field of Inspection. The purpose of this article is to restate the sound principles proclaimed by SMEs with the hope that they serve as a useful guideline to bring greater consistency to the conduct of manual inspection.

  17. Consistent scaling of persistence time in metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Gur; Ben-Zion, Yossi; Shnerb, Nadav M; Vasseur, David A

    2012-05-01

    Recent theory and experimental work in metapopulations and metacommunities demonstrates that long-term persistence is maximized when the rate at which individuals disperse among patches within the system is intermediate; if too low, local extinctions are more frequent than recolonizations, increasing the chance of regional-scale extinctions, and if too high, dynamics exhibit region-wide synchrony, and local extinctions occur in near unison across the region. Although common, little is known about how the size and topology of the metapopulation (metacommunity) affect this bell-shaped relationship between dispersal rate and regional persistence time. Using a suite of mathematical models, we examined the effects of dispersal, patch number, and topology on the regional persistence time when local populations are subject to demographic stochasticity. We found that the form of the relationship between regional persistence time and the number of patches is consistent across all models studied; however, the form of the relationship is distinctly different among low, intermediate, and high dispersal rates. Under low and intermediate dispersal rates, regional persistence times increase logarithmically and exponentially (respectively) with increasing numbers of patches, whereas under high dispersal, the form of the relationship depends on local dynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the forms of these relationships, which give rise to the bell-shaped relationship between dispersal rate and persistence time, are a product of recolonization and the region-wide synchronization (or lack thereof) of population dynamics. Identifying such metapopulation attributes that impact extinction risk is of utmost importance for managing and conserving the earth's evermore fragmented populations.

  18. Comparative exoplanetology with consistent retrieval methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, Joanna Katy; Aigrain, Suzanne; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Sing, David

    2016-10-01

    The number of hot Jupiters with broad wavelength spectroscopic data has finally become large enough to make comparative planetology a reasonable proposition. New results presented by Sing et al. (2016) showcase ten hot Jupiters with spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope and photometry from Spitzer, providing insights into the presence of clouds and hazes.Spectral retrieval methods allow interpretation of exoplanet spectra using simple models, with minimal prior assumptions. This is particularly useful for exotic exoplanets, for which we may not yet fully understand the physical processes responsible for their atmospheric characteristics. Consistent spectral retrieval of a range of exoplanets can allow robust comparisons of their derived atmospheric properties.I will present a retrieval analysis using the NEMESIS code (Irwin et al. 2008) of the ten hot Jupiter spectra presented by Sing et al. (2016). The only distinctive aspects of the model for each planet are the mass and radius, and the temperature range explored. All other a priori model parameters are common to all ten objects. We test a range of cloud and haze scenarios, which include: Rayleigh-dominated and grey clouds; different cloud top pressures; and both vertically extended and vertically confined clouds.All ten planets, with the exception of WASP-39b, can be well represented by models with at least some haze or cloud. Our analysis of cloud properties has uncovered trends in cloud top pressure, vertical extent and particle size with planet equilibrium temperature. Taken together, we suggest that these trends indicate condensation and sedimentation of at least two different cloud species across planets of different temperatures, with condensates forming higher up in hotter atmospheres and moving progressively further down in cooler planets.Sing, D. et al. (2016), Nature, 529, 59Irwin, P. G. J. et al. (2008), JQSRT, 109, 1136

  19. View from Europe: stability, consistency or pragmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunster, H.J.

    1988-08-01

    The last few years of this decade look like a period of reappraisal of radiation protection standards. The revised risk estimates from Japan will be available, and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation will be publishing new reports on biological topics. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has started a review of its basic recommendations, and the new specification for dose equivalent in radiation fields of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) will be coming into use. All this is occurring at a time when some countries are still trying to catch up with committed dose equivalent and the recently recommended change in the value of the quality factor for neutrons. In Europe, the problems of adapting to new ICRP recommendations are considerable. The European Community, including 12 states and nine languages, takes ICRP recommendations as a basis and develops council directives that are binding on member states, which have then to arrange for their own regulatory changes. Any substantial adjustments could take 5 y or more to work through the system. Clearly, the regulatory preference is for stability. Equally clearly, trade unions and public interest groups favor a rapid response to scientific developments (provided that the change is downward). Organizations such as the ICRP have to balance their desire for internal consistency and intellectual purity against the practical problems of their clients in adjusting to change. This paper indicates some of the changes that might be necessary over the next few years and how, given a pragmatic approach, they might be accommodated in Europe without too much regulatory confusion.

  20. Improving electrofishing catch consistency by standardizing power

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Randy W.; Gutreuter, Steve

    1995-01-01

    The electrical output of electrofishing equipment is commonly standardized by using either constant voltage or constant amperage, However, simplified circuit and wave theories of electricity suggest that standardization of power (wattage) available for transfer from water to fish may be critical for effective standardization of electrofishing. Electrofishing with standardized power ensures that constant power is transferable to fish regardless of water conditions. The in situ performance of standardized power output is poorly known. We used data collected by the interagency Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) in the upper Mississippi River system to assess the effectiveness of standardizing power output. The data consisted of 278 electrofishing collections, comprising 9,282 fishes in eight species groups, obtained during 1990 from main channel border, backwater, and tailwater aquatic areas in four reaches of the upper Mississippi River and one reach of the Illinois River. Variation in power output explained an average of 14.9% of catch variance for night electrofishing and 12.1 % for day electrofishing. Three patterns in catch per unit effort were observed for different species: increasing catch with increasing power, decreasing catch with increasing power, and no power-related pattern. Therefore, in addition to reducing catch variation, controlling power output may provide some capability to select particular species. The LTRMP adopted standardized power output beginning in 1991; standardized power output is adjusted for variation in water conductivity and water temperature by reference to a simple chart. Our data suggest that by standardizing electrofishing power output, the LTRMP has eliminated substantial amounts of catch variation at virtually no additional cost.

  1. A probe for real-time images of particle beams and their analyses in a merged-beams apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forand, J. L.; Wahlin, E.; Depaola, B. D.; Dunn, G. H.; Timmer, C.

    1990-01-01

    A real-time charged particle beam probe was developed, which can be used both as a beam diagnostic (beam tuning) and to quantitatively determine the three-dimensional density distribution of a beam. The probe consists of a microchannel plate, an aluminized phosphor screen deposited on a fiber-optic faceplate, a flexible fiber-optic bundle, and a charge injection device (CID) in tandem. Digital or analog video output of the CID is fed into a computer or oscilloscope, respectively, for analysis or observation. The probe can be moved continuously along the beams' paths to obtain 'pictures' of the beam at any desired interval, thus giving three-dimensional form factors. The beams, singly or simultaneously, may be observed on the monitor facilitating the task of beam adjustment for optimum overlap. The digital output is used for quantitative computation of the beam overlaps. The device is linear with beam intensity, but the performance degrades with time due to beam damage of the microchannel plate.

  2. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  3. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  4. Laser beam alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Kasner, William H.; Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

  5. ALPI Setup as the SPES Accelerator of Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoffi, G.; Bassato, G.; Battistella, A.; Bermudez, J.; Bortolato, D.; Canella, S.; Chalykh, B.; Comunian, M.; Facco, A.; Fagotti, E.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Gramegna, F.; Lamy, T.; Modanese, P.; Palmieri, A.; Pengo, R.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Porcellato, A.; Roncolato, C.; Scarpa, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project for a national exotic beam facility in Legnaro includes pivotal upgrades of the existing superconducting linac ALPI (Acceleratore Lineare Per Ioni), to make it appropriate as the RIB (Radioactive Ion Beam) accelerator. The new injector, consisting of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR)-type charge breeder and a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), will be described. Upgrade measures in ALPI to improve beam transmission and final energy, and handle low-intensity RIB will be explained, with the aim of increasing transmission to T > 90%, Ef by ~ 20%, reaching 10 MeV/u for the reference beam 132Sn.

  6. Measuring the full transverse beam matrix using a single octupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögren, J.; Ruber, R.; Ziemann, V.; Farabolini, W.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a method to fully determine the transverse beam matrix using a simple setup consisting of two steering magnets, an octupole field and a screen. This works in principle for any multipole field, i.e., sextupole, octupole magnet or a radio frequency structure with a multipole field. We have experimentally verified the method at the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility 3 at CERN using a Compact Linear Collider accelerating structure, which has an octupole component of the radio frequency fields. By observing the position shifts of the beam centroid together with changes in transverse beam size on a screen, we determined the full transverse beam matrix, with all correlations.

  7. Commissioning of polarized-proton and antiproton beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1988-05-04

    The author described the polarized-proton and polarized-antiproton beams up to 200 GeV/c at Fermilab. The beam line, called MP, consists of the 400-m long primary and 350-m long secondary beam line followed by 60-m long experimental hall. We discuss the characteristics of the polarized beams. The Fermilab polarization projects are designated at E-581/704 initiated and carried out by an international collaboration, Argonne (US), Fermilab (US), Kyoto-Kyushu-Hiroshima-KEK (Japan), LAPP (France), Northwestern University (US), Los Alamos Laboratory (US), Rice (US), Saclay (France), Serpukhov (USSR), INFN Trieste (Italy), and University of Texas (US).

  8. Free Electron Lasers with Slowly Varying Beam and Undulator Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    The performance of a free electron lasers (FEL) is affected when the electron beam energy varies alone the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime until FEL saturation. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theory of FELs with slowly-varying beam and undulator parameters. A general method is developed to apply the WKB approximation to the beam-radiation system by employing the adjoint eigenvector that is orthogonal to the eigenfunctions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations. This method may be useful for other slowly varying processes in beam dynamics.

  9. Beam Simulations for IRE and Driver-Status and Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Lee, E.P.; Sonnendrucker, E.

    2000-03-01

    The methods and codes employed in the U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program to simulate the beams in an Integrated Research Experiments (IRE) facility and a fusion driver are presented in overview. A new family of models incorporating accelerating module impedance, multi-beam, and self-magnetic effects is described, and initial WARP3d particle simulations of beams using these models are presented. Finally, plans for streamlining the machine-design simulation sequence, and for simulating beam dynamics from the source to the target in a consistent and comprehensive manner, are described.

  10. Beam Simulations for IRE and Driver - Status and Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Lee, E P

    2001-03-13

    The methods and codes employed in the U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program to simulate the beams in an Integrated Research Experiments (IRE) facility and a fusion driver are presented in overview. A new family of models incorporating accelerating module impedance, multi-beam, and self-magnetic effects is described, and initial WARP3d particle simulations of beams using these models are presented. Finally, plans for streamlining the machine-design simulation sequence, and for simulating beam dynamics from the source to the target in a consistent and comprehensive manner, are described.

  11. Beam profile shaping for laser radars that use detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, W B; Kastner, C J

    1982-01-15

    The beam shaper we developed shapes the transmit beam of a CO(2) laser radar that uses a linear detector array. It consists of a diffraction grating and an anamorphic prism beam compressor and produces a stretched profile that efficiently and uniformly illuminates the far-field footprint of the detector array. The diffraction grating phase modulates the near field or the laser beam to generate a far-field flattop intensity profile, whereas the compressor produces the necessary profile eccentricity. We have achieved conversion efficiencies in the 70-90% range.

  12. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  13. MINER{nu}A Test Beam Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.; Castorena, J.; Urrutia, Z.; Felix, J.; Zavala, G.

    2009-12-17

    MINER{nu}A Main INjector ExpeRiment {nu}-A is a high-statistic neutrino scattering experiment that will ran in the NuMI Beam Hall at Fermilab. To calibrate the energy response of the MINER{nu}A detector, a beamline is being designed for the MINER{nu}A Test Beam Detector (TBD). The TBD is a replica of the full MINER{nu}A detector at small scale for calibration studies of the main detector. The beamline design consists of the following parts: a copper target, used to generate tertiaries from an incoming secondary beam; a steel collimator for tertiaries, which also serves as a dump for the incoming beam; a time of fight system (scintillator planes); four wire chambers, for angle measurements and tracking; and two dipole magnets, used as an spectrometer. During last October, the first commissioning run of the MINER{nu}A Test Beam took place in the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. We commissioned the target and collimator of the new tertiary beamline.

  14. Consistent probabilistic outputs for protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Obozinski, Guillaume; Lanckriet, Gert; Grant, Charles; Jordan, Michael I; Noble, William Stafford

    2008-01-01

    In predicting hierarchical protein function annotations, such as terms in the Gene Ontology (GO), the simplest approach makes predictions for each term independently. However, this approach has the unfortunate consequence that the predictor may assign to a single protein a set of terms that are inconsistent with one another; for example, the predictor may assign a specific GO term to a given protein ('purine nucleotide binding') but not assign the parent term ('nucleotide binding'). Such predictions are difficult to interpret. In this work, we focus on methods for calibrating and combining independent predictions to obtain a set of probabilistic predictions that are consistent with the topology of the ontology. We call this procedure 'reconciliation'. We begin with a baseline method for predicting GO terms from a collection of data types using an ensemble of discriminative classifiers. We apply the method to a previously described benchmark data set, and we demonstrate that the resulting predictions are frequently inconsistent with the topology of the GO. We then consider 11 distinct reconciliation methods: three heuristic methods; four variants of a Bayesian network; an extension of logistic regression to the structured case; and three novel projection methods - isotonic regression and two variants of a Kullback-Leibler projection method. We evaluate each method in three different modes - per term, per protein and joint - corresponding to three types of prediction tasks. Although the principal goal of reconciliation is interpretability, it is important to assess whether interpretability comes at a cost in terms of precision and recall. Indeed, we find that many apparently reasonable reconciliation methods yield reconciled probabilities with significantly lower precision than the original, unreconciled estimates. On the other hand, we find that isotonic regression usually performs better than the underlying, unreconciled method, and almost never performs worse

  15. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  16. Hamiltonian description of a self-consistent interaction between charged particles and electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, R; Chandre, C; Vittot, M

    2008-09-01

    The Hamiltonian description of the self-consistent interaction between an electromagnetic plane wave and a copropagating beam of charged particles is considered. We show how the motion can be reduced to a one-dimensional Hamiltonian model (in a canonical setting) from the Vlasov-Maxwell Poisson brackets. The reduction to this paradigmatic Hamiltonian model is performed using a Lie algebraic formalism which allows us to preserve the Hamiltonian character at each step of the derivation.

  17. Helicopter engine exhaust rotor downwash effects on laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars; Seiffer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    The hot exhaust gases from engines on helicopters are pushed down by the rotor in a turbulent flow. When the optical path of a laser beam or optical sensor passes through this region severe aberrations of the optical field may result. These perturbations will lead to beam wander and beam distortions that can limit the performance of optical countermeasure systems. To quantify these effects the Italian Air Force Flight Test Centre hosted a trial for the "Airborne platform effects on lasers and warning sensors" (ALWS) EDA-project. Laser beams were propagated from the airport control tower to a target screen in a slant path with the helicopter hovering over this path. Collimated laser beams at 1.55-, 2- and 4.6-μm wavelength were imaged with high speed cameras. Large increases in beam wander and beam divergence were found, with beam wander up to 200 μrad root-mean-square and increases in beam divergence up to 1 mrad. To allow scaling to other laser beam parameters and geometries formulas for propagation in atmospheric turbulence were used even though the turbulence may not follow Kolmogorov statistics. By assuming that the plume is short compared to the total propagation distance the integrated structure parameter through the plume could be calculated. Values in the range 10-10 to 10-8 m1/3 were found when the laser beams passed through the exhaust gases below the helicopter tail. The integrated structure parameter values calculated from beam wander were consistently lower than those calculated from long term spot size, indicating that the method is not perfect but provides information about order of magnitudes. The measured results show that the engine exhaust for worst case beam directions will dominate over atmospheric turbulence even for kilometer path lengths from a helicopter at low altitude. How severe the effect is on system performance will depend on beam and target parameters.

  18. Design and performance of the pulsed positron beam at Chalmers University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileshina, L.; Nordlund, A.

    2009-09-01

    A slow monoenergetic pulsed positron beam at Chalmers University of Technology has been built. The system consists mainly of chopper, buncher and accelerator. The achieved positron energy range is in range between 230 eV and 15 keV. The FWHM of the beam resolution function is around 700 ps. The beam intensity is around 103 cps.

  19. ATA diagnostic beam dump conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    A diagnostic beam dump, able to withstand 72,000 pulses (10 kA, 50 MeV/pulse) per shift was designed and analyzed. The analysis shows that the conceptual beam dump design consisting of 80 vitreous carbon plate-foam elements is able to withstand the thermal and mechanical stresses generated. X-rays produced by bremsstrahlung are absorbed by a three element copper plate-foam x-ray absorber. Cooling between bursts of electron pulses is provided by pressurized helium.

  20. Simulation of ion beam injection and extraction in an EBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    An example simulation of Au+ charge breeding using FAR-TECH's integrated EBIS (electron beam ion source) modeling toolset is presented with the emphasis on ion beam injection and extraction. The trajectories of injected ions are calculated with PBGUNS (particle beam gun simulation) self-consistently by including the space charges from both ions and electrons. The ion beam, starting with initial conditions within the 100% acceptance of the electron beam, is then tracked by EBIS-PIC (particle-in-cell EBIS simulation code). In the trap, the evolution of the ion charge state distribution is estimated by charge state estimator. The extraction of charge bred ions is simulated with PBGUNS. The simulations of the ion injections show significant ion space charge effects on beam capture efficiency and the ionization efficiency.

  1. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, S. Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  2. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.

    1995-05-05

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms=root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in {ital z} or a closed to double-horned energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree`` and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms = root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parmeters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-homed energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree`` and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  4. Optimization of solenoid based low energy beam transport line for high current H+ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, R.; Singh, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Roy, S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2015-02-01

    A 20 MeV, 30 mA CW proton linac is being developed at BARC, Mumbai. This linac will consist of an ECR ion source followed by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and Drift tube Linac (DTL). The low energy beam transport (LEBT) line is used to match the beam from the ion source to the RFQ with minimum beam loss and increase in emittance. The LEBT is also used to eliminate the unwanted ions like H2+ and H3+ from entering the RFQ. In addition, space charge compensation is required for transportation of such high beam currents. All this requires careful design and optimization. Detailed beam dynamics simulations have been done to optimize the design of the LEBT using the Particle-in-cell code TRACEWIN. We find that with careful optimization it is possible to transport a 30 mA CW proton beam through the LEBT with 100% transmission and minimal emittance blow up, while at the same time suppressing unwanted species H2+ and H3+ to less than 3.3% of the total beam current.

  5. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  6. A driver linac for the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory : physics design and beam dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) being developed at ANL consists of an 833 MV heavy-ion driver linac capable of producing uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. We have designed all accelerator components including a two charge state LEBT, an RFQ, a MEBT, a superconducting linac, a stripper station and chicane. We present the results of an optimized linac design and end-to-end simulations including machine errors and detailed beam loss analysis. The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) has been proposed at ANL as a reduced scale of the original Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project with about half the cost but the same beam power. AEBL will address 90% or more of RIA physics but with reduced multi-users capabilities. The focus of this paper is the physics design and beam dynamics simulations of the AEBL driver linac. The reported results are for a multiple charge state U{sup 238} beam.

  7. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  8. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  9. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  10. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  11. Beam dynamics in SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.

    1997-07-01

    Beam dynamics issues affect many different aspects of the SLC performance. This paper concentrates on the multi-particle beam dynamics in the linac and the associated limitations that are imposed on the overall SLC performance. The beam behavior in the presence of strong wakefields has been studied in order to optimize the performance and to predict the expected emittances in high performance linacs. Emittance measurements and simulations are presented for the SLAC linac and are compared in detail. As the overall SLC performance depends on the accelerator stability, the tuning stability is discussed. Measurements are shown and the consequences for the performance of the SLC are discussed.

  12. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  13. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  14. Future e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders and beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous concepts, ranging from conventional to highly exotic, hae been proposed for the acceleration of electrons and positrons to very high energies. For any such concept to be viable, it must be possible to produce from it a set of consistent parameters for one of these ''benchmark'' machines. Attention is directed to the choice of parameters for a collider in the 300 GeV energy range, operating at a gradient on the order of 200 MV/m, using X-band power sources to drive a conventional disk-loaded accelerating structure. These rf power sources, while not completely conventional represent a reasonable extrapolation from present technology. The choice of linac parameters is strongly coupled to various beam-beam effects which take place when the electron and positron bunches collide. We summarize these beam-beam effects, and then return to the rf design of a 650 GeV center-of-mass collider. 14 refs.

  15. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to form metal vapors for neutral beam studies, an electron-beam heater and a power supply have been designed. The source, which measures about 30 x 50 x 70 mm, consists of a filament, accelerating plate (defined by pole pieces), and a supported target. The electrons from the filament are focused by the field penetration through a 2 mm slit in the high-voltage cage. They are then accelerated to about 5 kV to a ground plate. The electrons then follow a path in the magnetic field and strike the sample to be heated on its front surface. The assembly is attached to a water-cooled base plate. The electron beam source has produced beams of Ta and C particles with densities of about 10 to the 8th power/cu cm.

  16. Caution -- Beam Crossing Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, Kenneth L.

    2008-04-02

    There are times when a laser beam needs to cross between tables or even go from one room to another. This presents an interesting traffic-flow and safety challenge to both the laser safety officer and laser user. Fortunately it is a challenge that has several solutions But the simplest solution may not be the best one. For example, the simplest way to get a beam from one optical table to another is just to put a sturdy tube around it. That's a permanent solution, and it completely contains the laser beam. While this is laser safe, there can be egress issues if it blocks a walkway. One comment this author often hears is, 'We can just duck under the tube.' The fire marshal, as well as the laser safety officer, might have issues with this. Especially in the case of a darkened lab, a blocked walkway can present a hazard of its own. One good solution is to transport the beam from Point A to Point B through a fiberoptic cable, when that is possible. One should easily be able to run the fiber up and over any walkway or down through a conduit on the floor. An important concern often overlooked with fibers is a label at the termination end indicating disconnection may expose one to laser radiation. Suppose there's an experiment that is usually confined to a single optical table, but sometimes needs to expand to a second table. It's inconvenient to install a permanent tube between the tables, so some sort of temporary arrangement is desirable. I have often seen people casually lay a beam tube across support arms, and remove it when it's not needed. The problem with this approach is that there's no mechanism to prevent the beam from crossing if somebody's forgotten the tube, or if the tube gets knocked out of place. A better solution is a mechanism that only allows the beam to cross when the beam protection is in place. A swing shutter, or a guillotine and swing arm, are examples (Figures 1 and 2). Another alternative is a sensor, maybe a little microswitch, that activates a

  17. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  18. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  19. Physical and engineering aspect of carbon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Minohara, Shinichi; Yusa, Ken; Urakabe, Eriko; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Tomitani, Takehiro; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Iseki, Yasushi

    2003-08-26

    Conformal irradiation system of HIMAC has been up-graded for a clinical trial using a technique of a layer-stacking method. The system has been developed for localizing irradiation dose to target volume more effectively than the present irradiation dose. With dynamic control of the beam modifying devices, a pair of wobbler magnets, and multileaf collimator and range shifter, during the irradiation, more conformal radiotherapy can be achieved. The system, which has to be adequately safe for patient irradiations, was constructed and tested from a viewpoint of safety and the quality of the dose localization realized. A secondary beam line has been constructed for use of radioactive beam in heavy-ion radiotherapy. Spot scanning method has been adapted for the beam delivery system of the radioactive beam. Dose distributions of the spot beam were measured and analyzed taking into account of aberration of the beam optics. Distributions of the stopped positron-emitter beam can be observed by PET. Pencil beam of the positron-emitter, about 1 mm size, can also be used for measurements ranges of the test beam in patients using positron camera. The positron camera, consisting of a pair of Anger-type scintillation detectors, has been developed for this verification before treatment. Wash-out effect of the positron-emitter was examined using the positron camera installed. In this report, present status of the HIMAC irradiation system is described in detail.

  20. Laser beam shaping for biomedical microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Kaiser, Peter; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-04-01

    Uniform illumination of a working field is very important in optical systems of confocal microscopy and various implementations of fluorescence microscopy like TIR, SSIM, STORM, PALM to enhance performance of these laser-based research techniques. Widely used TEM00 laser sources are characterized by essentially non-uniform Gaussian intensity profile which leads usually to non-uniform intensity distribution in a microscope working field or in a field of microlenses array of a confocal microscope optical system, this non-uniform illumination results in instability of measuring procedure and reducing precision of quantitative measurements. Therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) profile is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Due to high demands to optical image quality the mentioned techniques have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam: flatness of phase front and extended depth of field, - from this point of view the microscopy techniques are similar to holography and interferometry. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality required in discussed microscopy techniques. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. The main function of a beam shaper is transformation of laser intensity profile, further beam transformation to provide optimum for a particular technique spot size and shape has to

  1. Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.

    2012-05-20

    During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

  2. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  3. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  4. Taming the emerging beams after the split of optical vortex solitons in a saturable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyna, Albert S.; de Araújo, Cid B.

    2016-01-01

    Control of the emerging beams obtained from the spontaneous splitting of an optical vortex soliton (OVS) due to the azimuthal modulation instability is demonstrated. The procedure adopted consisted of adding a control Gaussian beam, propagating collinearly with the OVS, and adjusting the beams' relative positions, radius, and intensities. Rotation of the emerging beams in the transverse plane and energy transfer between them were obtained using a control beam with smaller intensity than the vortex beam. The numerical simulations based on a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation, including saturable nonlinearity and three-photon absorption, are in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Beam chopper For the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) in the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Wang, J.; Milton, S.; Teng, L.

    1997-08-01

    The low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) is being built and will be tested with a short beam pulse from an rf gun in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory. In the LEUTL a beam chopper is used after the rf gun to deflect the unwanted beam to a beam dump. The beam chopper consists of a permanent magnet and an electric deflector that can compensate for the magnetic deflection. A 30-kV pulsed power supply is used for the electric deflector. The chopper subsystem was assembled and tested for beamline installation. The electrical and beam properties of the chopper assembly are presented.

  6. Scattering of a Tightly Focused Beam by an Optically Trapped Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2006-01-01

    Near-forward scattering of an optically trapped 5 m radius polystyrene latex sphere by the trapping beam was examined both theoretically and experimentally. Since the trapping beam is tightly focused, the beam fields superpose and interfere with the scattered fields in the forward hemisphere. The observed light intensity consists of a series of concentric bright and dark fringes centered about the forward scattering direction. Both the number of fringes and their contrast depend on the position of the trapping beam focal waist with respect to the sphere. The fringes are caused by diffraction due to the truncation of the tail of the trapping beam as the beam is transmitted through the sphere.

  7. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  8. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  9. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  10. Microwave beam power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.

    1989-01-01

    Information on microwave beam power is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on orbit transfer proulsion applications, costs of delivering 100 kWe of usable power, and costs of delivering a 1 kg payload into orbit.

  11. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  12. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  13. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  14. TRANSVERSE BEAM TRANSFER FUNCTIONS OF COLLIDING BEAMS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.; HERR, W.; PIELONI, T.

    2007-06-25

    We use transverse beam transfer functions to measure tune distributions of colliding beams in RHIC. The tune has a distribution due to the beam-beam interaction, nonlinear magnetic fields -- particularly in the interaction region magnets, and non-zero chromaticity in conjunction with momentum spread. The measured tune distributions are compared with calculations.

  15. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  16. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  17. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10/sup -8/ torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed.

  18. Nonparaxial hypergeometric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, V. V.; Kovalev, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    We derive an analytical expression to describe the exact solution of the Helmholtz equation in cylindrical coordinates as a product of two Kummer functions. The solution is presented as a sum of two terms that describe the nonparaxial hypergeometric light beams propagated along the optical axis in the positive and negative directions. With the distance from the initial plane becoming much larger than the wavelength of light, the expression derived for the nonparaxial hypergeometric beam coincides with that for a paraxial hypergeometric mode.

  19. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  20. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaupa, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Sartori, E.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2016-11-01

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  1. Transverse Beam Size Effects in Beam Position Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2001-04-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The corrections to BPM signals due to a finite beam size are found analytically for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current. The results for fields can also be directly applied for calculating the beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities.

  2. Test beams and polarized fixed target beams at the NLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomensky, Yury

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Mo/ller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  3. Variable-spot ion beam figuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lixiang; Qiu, Keqiang; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a new scheme of ion beam figuring (IBF), or rather variable-spot IBF, which is conducted at a constant scanning velocity with variable-spot ion beam collimated by a variable diaphragm. It aims at improving the reachability and adaptation of the figuring process within the limits of machine dynamics by varying the ion beam spot size instead of the scanning velocity. In contrast to the dwell time algorithm in the conventional IBF, the variable-spot IBF adopts a new algorithm, which consists of the scan path programming and the trajectory optimization using pattern search. In this algorithm, instead of the dwell time, a new concept, integral etching time, is proposed to interpret the process of variable-spot IBF. We conducted simulations to verify its feasibility and practicality. The simulation results indicate the variable-spot IBF is a promising alternative to the conventional approach.

  4. Oscillatory bending of a poroelastic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dajun; Cowin, Stephen C.

    1994-10-01

    An analytical solution of the oscillatory axial and bending loading of a poroelastic beam is presented. The pore pressure behavior in the beam is explored as a function of frequency of the applied load, the ratio of the bending to axial applied loading, and the leakage at the top and bottom of the beam. The conditions under which the pore pressure carries its largest fraction of the total applied loading are determined. The solution is illustrated using the values of the material parameters appropriate for living bone, which is a poroelastic medium. At high frequencies, in the free leakage case, our results are consistent with the notion that the percentage of the applied load carried by the pore fluid pressure is equal to the porosity of the medium.

  5. In-beam spectroscopy of 254No

    SciTech Connect

    Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Perkowski, J.; Rahkila, P.; Scholey, C.; Uusitalo, J.; Vel, K. van de; Amzal, N.; Bastin, J. E.; Butler, P. A.; Herzberg, R.-D.

    2006-04-26

    Evidence for the presence of non-yrast states in 254No has been observed in two different in-beam experiments carried out at the University of Jyvaeskylae. Firstly an in-beam conversion electron spectroscopic study was performed with the SACRED spectrometer, revealing a distribution consisting of high-multiplicity electron cascades. This provides an indirect proof of the presence of high K-bands in 254No. In a more recent in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic measurement, evidence for the decay of non-yrast states in 254No has been observed for the first time. It is speculated that the observation of high-energy {gamma} rays is due to the decay of a K = 3 band-head state.

  6. Fractal materials, beams, and fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Li, Jun

    2009-11-01

    Continuing in the vein of a recently developed generalization of continuum thermomechanics, in this paper we extend fracture mechanics and beam mechanics to materials described by fractional integrals involving D, d and R. By introducing a product measure instead of a Riesz measure, so as to ensure that the mechanical approach to continuum mechanics is consistent with the energetic approach, specific forms of continuum-type equations are derived. On this basis we study the energy aspects of fracture and, as an example, a Timoshenko beam made of a fractal material; the local form of elastodynamic equations of that beam is derived. In particular, we review the crack driving force G stemming from the Griffith fracture criterion in fractal media, considering either dead-load or fixed-grip conditions and the effects of ensemble averaging over random fractal materials.

  7. A Hardware transverse beam frequency response simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, J.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    We built an electronic instrument that can mimic the transverse beam frequency response. The instrument consists of (1) a time delay circuit with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) which contains a first-in-first-out random assess memory (FIFO RAM) and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC); (2) a variable phase shifter circuit which is based on an all pass filter with a bandwidth of 25kHz to 30kHz and (3) a commutating filter which is a nonlinear band pass filter. With this instrument, we can dynamically adjust the betatron tune, the synchrotron tune, and the chromaticity. Using this instrument, we are able to test other beam systems without using actual beam.

  8. Self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam in plasma wake field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, T.; Fedele, R.; Nicola, S. De; Tanjia, F.; Jovanović, D.; Mannan, A.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam is provided within the context of the theory of plasma wake field excitation. The self-consistent description of the beam dynamics is provided by coupling the Vlasov equation with a Poisson-type equation relating the plasma wake potential to the beam density. An analysis of the beam envelope self-modulation is then carried out and the criteria for the occurrence of the instability are discussed thereby.

  9. High power beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Oren

    2014-02-01

    In various modern scientific and industrial laser applications, beam-shaping optics manipulates the laser spot size and its intensity distribution. However the designed laser spot frequently deviates from the design goal due to real life imperfections and effects, such as: input laser distortions, optical distortion, heating, overall instabilities, and non-linear effects. Lasers provide the ability to accurately deliver large amounts of energy to a target area with very high accuracy. Thus monitoring beam size power and beam location is of high importance for high quality results and repeatability. Depending on the combination of wavelength, beam size and pulse duration , laser energy is absorbed by the material surface, yielding into processes such as cutting, welding, surface treatment, brazing and many other applications. This article will cover the aspect of laser beam measurements, especially at the focal point where it matters the most. A brief introduction to the material processing interactions will be covered, followed by fundamentals of laser beam propagation, novel measurement techniques, actual measurement and brief conclusions.

  10. Obtaining an equivalent beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1990-01-01

    In modeling a complex structure the researcher was faced with a component that would have logical appeal if it were modeled as a beam. The structure was a mast of a robot controlled gantry crane. The structure up to this point already had a large number of degrees of freedom, so the idea of conserving grid points by modeling the mast as a beam was attractive. The researcher decided to make a separate problem of of the mast and model it in three dimensions with plates, then extract the equivalent beam properties by setting up the loading to simulate beam-like deformation and constraints. The results could then be used to represent the mast as a beam in the full model. A comparison was made of properties derived from models of different constraints versus manual calculations. The researcher shows that the three-dimensional model is ineffective in trying to conform to the requirements of an equivalent beam representation. If a full 3-D plate model were used in the complete representation of the crane structure, good results would be obtained. Since the attempt is to economize on the size of the model, a better way to achieve the same results is to use substructuring and condense the mast to equivalent end boundary and intermediate mass points.

  11. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  12. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  13. Ion Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, I.

    The following sections are included: * FILM FORMATION BY ION BEAMS * Fundamental Processes in Film Formation by Low Energy Ion Beams * Comparison of ICB with Other Physical Vapor Deposition Methods * Vacuum Deposition * Sputter Deposition * Ion Plating * Ion Beam Deposition * Simultaneous Deposition and Implantation * Plasma Enhanced Deposition * Section I References * ION CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION AND CLUSTER BEAM FORMATION * Nucleation Process * Growth and Condensation Process * Section II References * CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLUSTER * Velocity of Clusters * Energy of Clusters * TEM Observation of Clusters * Structural Properties * Section III References * IONIZED CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION SYSTEM * Section IV References * FILM DEPOSITION PROCESS BY ICB * Fundamental Process * Effects of Kinetic Energy on the Film Properties * Epitaxial phenomena * Crystallographic Structure * Physical Structure of Films * Effects of the Electric Charge on the Film Properties * Section V References * APPLICATIONS * Silicon and Silicon Alloy Films * Low Temperature Epitaxy of Silicon Films * Thermally Stable a-Si Film Growth * High Quality SiO2 Film Deposition * Epitaxial A1 Films * Electromigration Resistant A1 Film * Thermally Stable Al/Si Contact * II-VI and III-V Compound Films * Thin Multiple Layered Film * CONCLUSIONS * Acknowledgements * Section VI References

  14. A beam transport system for an intense He(-) beam source.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Kikuchi, M; Nagamura, T; Sugawara, H; Takeuchi, S; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Shinto, K; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Wada, M

    2008-02-01

    We have been developing a test stand for fast He(0) beam production. One of the major issues is how to transport effectively the He(+) and He(-) beams from which the He(0) beam is produced. The beam should be focused in two transverse focal points, the center of the charge exchange cell and the electrostatic accelerator. We studied the beam transport system and effect of space charge neutralization in the test stand by experiments and calculation.

  15. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    DOE PAGES

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-01-29

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. We discuss a new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry. The resulting solution is applied to the problemmore » of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.« less

  16. Suppression of space charge induced beam halo in nonlinear focusing channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Yuri K.; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-04-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  17. Dual-Cantilever-Beam Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Emmitt A.; Speckhart, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity to velocity changes along beam axis reduced. Weighted-end cantilever beams of accelerometer deflected equally by acceleration in y direction. When acceleration to right as well as up or down, right beam deflected more, while left beam deflected less. Bridge circuit averages outputs of strain gauges measuring deflections, so cross-axis sensitivity of accelerometer reduced. New device simple and inexpensive.

  18. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  19. Holographic memory using beam steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Hanan, Jay C. (Inventor); Reyes, George F. (Inventor); Zhou, Hanying (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and system provide the ability for storing holograms at high speed. A single laser diode emits a collimated laser beam to both write to and read from a photorefractice crystal. One or more liquid crystal beam steering spatial light modulators (BSSLMs) steer a reference beam, split from the collimated laser beam, at high speed to the photorefractive crystal.

  20. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  1. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  2. Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    pBEAM (Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module) is a finite element code for beam-like structures. The methodology uses Euler? Bernoulli beam elements with 12 degrees of freedom (3 translation and 3 rotational at each end of the element).

  3. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  4. Ulysses Observations of the Properties of Multiple Ion Beams in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B. E.; Zhou, X.-Y.; Neugebauer, M.

    2010-03-25

    Properties of multiple ion beams in the solar wind beyond 1 AU as observed by the SWOOPS experiment on Ulysses are discussed. The solar wind proton distributions are approximated by a two beam bi-Maxwellian model. The slower outward traveling beam typically comprises the majority of the solar wind density. Differential streaming between the slower and faster proton beams decreases with distance from the Sun. The greatest difference between the beams in their evolution with distance from the Sun is that the parallel temperature component of the faster beam decreases more rapidly, r{sup -1.22}, than that of the slower beam, r{sup -0.39}. The difference in behavior for the perpendicular components (r{sup -0.46} for the faster beam and r{sup -0.73} for the slower beam) is real but less marked. The indication that relative perpendicular cooling is less for the faster beam while relative parallel cooling is greater and differential beam speed decreases is generally consistent with expectations from a streaming instability between the two proton beams. We have observed a dependence of the temperature anisotropy of the faster proton beam on the drift speed of the faster beam with respect to the slower beam; for large drifts (about 1.6 V{sub A}) the anisotropy, T{sub |}/T{sub perpendicular}, is smaller (about 0.8), whereas for slower drifts the parallel temperature is relatively hotter (anisotropy ratio of about 1.5).

  5. Beam Trail Tracking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; Carmichael, Linden Ralph; Neswold, Richard; Yuan, Zongwei

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for acquiring and sorting data from select devices depending on the destination of each particular beam pulse in the Fermilab accelerator chain. The 15 Hz beam that begins in the Fermilab ion source can be directed to a variety of additional accelerators, beam lines, beam dumps, and experiments. We have implemented a data acquisition system that senses the destination of each pulse and reads the appropriate beam intensity devices so that profiles of the beam can be stored and analysed for each type of beam trail. We envision utilizing this data long term to identify trends in the performance of the accelerators

  6. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  7. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  8. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  9. A dynamic loop at the active center of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component modulates substrate utilization and chemical communication with the E2 component.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sachin; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2007-09-21

    Our crystallographic studies have shown that two active center loops (an inner loop formed by residues 401-413 and outer loop formed by residues 541-557) of the E1 component of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex become organized only on binding a substrate analog that is capable of forming a stable thiamin diphosphate-bound covalent intermediate. We showed that residue His-407 on the inner loop has a key role in the mechanism, especially in the reductive acetylation of the E. coli dihydrolipoamide transacetylase component, whereas crystallographic results showed a role of this residue in a disorder-order transformation of these two loops, and the ordered conformation gives rise to numerous new contacts between the inner loop and the active center. We present mapping of the conserved residues on the inner loop. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and crystallographic studies on some inner loop variants led us to conclude that charged residues flanking His-407 are important for stabilization/ordering of the inner loop thereby facilitating completion of the active site. The results further suggest that a disorder to order transition of the dynamic inner loop is essential for substrate entry to the active site, for sequestering active site chemistry from undesirable side reactions, as well as for communication between the E1 and E2 components of the E. coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

  10. Yersinia pestis requires the 2-component regulatory system OmpR-EnvZ to resist innate immunity during the early and late stages of plague.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Angéline; Lemaître, Nadine; Titecat, Marie; Merchez, Maud; Deloison, Gaspard; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Marceau, Michaël; Sebbane, Florent

    2014-11-01

    Plague is transmitted by fleas or contaminated aerosols. To successfully produce disease, the causal agent (Yersinia pestis) must rapidly sense and respond to rapid variations in its environment. Here, we investigated the role of 2-component regulatory systems (2CSs) in plague because the latter are known to be key players in bacterial adaptation to environmental change. Along with the previously studied PhoP-PhoQ system, OmpR-EnvZ was the only one of Y. pestis' 23 other 2CSs required for production of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In vitro, OmpR-EnvZ was needed to counter serum complement and leukocytes but was not required for the secretion of antiphagocyte exotoxins. In vivo, Y. pestis lacking OmpR-EnvZ did not induce an early immune response in the skin and was fully virulent in neutropenic mice. We conclude that, throughout the course of Y. pestis infection, OmpR-EnvZ is required to counter toxic effectors secreted by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the tissues.

  11. QCD tests with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Takashi; SLD Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    The authors present three QCD studies performed by the SLD experiment at SLAC, utilizing the highly polarized SLC electron beam. They examined particle production differences in light quark and antiquark hemispheres, and observed more high momentum baryons and K{sup {minus}}`s than antibaryons and K{sup +}`s in quark hemispheres, consistent with the leading particle hypothesis. They performed a search for jet handedness in light q- and {anti q}-jets. Assuming Standard Model values of quark polarization in Z{sup 0} decays, they have set an improved upper limit on the analyzing power of the handedness method. They studied the correlation between the Z{sup 0} spin and the event-plane orientation in polarized Z{sup 0} decays into three jets.

  12. Tevatron beam position monitor upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; Banerjee, B.; Barker, B.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Bowden, M.; Cancelo, G.; Forster, B.; Duerling, G.; Haynes, B.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Mahlum, R.; Martens, M.; Mengel, M.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Pham, T.; Piccoli, L.; Steimel, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980's, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  13. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  14. Reduction of laser beam spray at 0.527 (micron)m in an ignition scale length plasma with temporal beam smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, C .; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R K; MacKinnon, A J; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Bahr, R; Seka, W

    2004-02-04

    We have measured the effect of laser smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) on beam spray, transmission and deflection of a 2{omega} (527 nm) high intensity (10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction beam through an underdense large scale length plasma. We observe a 40% reduction of the beam spray when SSD is used, consistent with modeling by a fluid laser-plasma interaction code (pF3d). We measured a decrease in beam transmission with increasing laser intensity, consistent with the onset of parametric instabilities.

  15. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  16. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, A.; Steffens, E.; Stancari, M.

    2009-08-04

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC)[2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  17. Dynamics of elastic nonlinear rotating composite beams with embedded actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorashi, Mehrdaad

    2009-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the nonlinear dynamics of composite beams is presented. The study consists of static and dynamic solutions with and without active elements. The static solution provides the initial conditions for the dynamic analysis. The dynamic problems considered include the analyses of clamped (hingeless) and articulated (hinged) accelerating rotating beams. Numerical solutions for the steady state and transient responses have been obtained. It is shown that the transient solution of the nonlinear formulation of accelerating rotating beam converges to the steady state solution obtained by the shooting method. The effect of perturbing the steady state solution has also been calculated and the results are shown to be compatible with those of the accelerating beam analysis. Next, the coupled flap-lag rigid body dynamics of a rotating articulated beam with hinge offset and subjected to aerodynamic forces is formulated. The solution to this rigid-body problem is then used, together with the finite difference method, in order to produce the nonlinear elasto-dynamic solution of an accelerating articulated beam. Next, the static and dynamic responses of nonlinear composite beams with embedded Anisotropic Piezo-composite Actuators (APA) are presented. The effect of activating actuators at various directions on the steady state force and moments generated in a rotating composite beam has been presented. With similar results for the transient response, this analysis can be used in controlling the response of adaptive rotating beams.

  18. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  19. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  20. Electron beam polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Charles K.

    1998-12-01

    Along with its well known charge and mass, the electron also carries an intrinsic angular momentum, or spin. The rules of quantum mechanics allow us to measure only the probability that the electron spin is in one of two allowed spin states. When a beam carries a net excess of electrons in one of these two allowed spin states, the beam is said to be polarized. The beam polarization may be measured by observing a sufficient number of electrons scattered by a spin-dependent interaction. For electrons, the useful scattering processes involve Coulomb scattering by heavy nuclei, or scattering from either polarized photons or other polarized electrons (known as Mott, Compton, and Mo/ller scattering, respectively). In this tutorial, we will briefly review how beam polarization is measured through a general scattering process, followed by a discussion of how the three scattering processes above are used to measure electron beam polarization. Descriptions of electron polarimeters based on the three scattering processes will be given.

  1. Improved Beam Diagnostic Spatial Calibration Using In-Situ Measurements of Beam Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.

    2014-10-01

    A new technique has been developed for determining the measurement geometry of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CER) on DIII-D. This technique removes uncertainty in the measurement geometry related to the position of the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This has been accomplished by combining standard measurements that use in-vessel calibration targets with spectroscopic measurements of Doppler shifted and Stark split beam emission to fully describe the neutral beam positions and CER views. A least squares fitting routine determines the measurement geometry consistent with all the calibration data. The use of beam emission measurements allows the position of the neutral beams to be determined in-situ by the same views that makeup the CER diagnostic. Results indicate that changes in the measurement geometry are required to create a consistent set of calibration measurements. However, changes in quantities derived from the geometry, e.g. ion temperature gradient and poloidal rotation, are small. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09H11466.

  2. Optical Device for Converting a Laser Beam into Two Co-aligned but Oppositely Directed Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Optical systems consisting of a series of optical elements require alignment from the input end to the output end. The optical elements can be mirrors, lenses, sources, detectors, or other devices. Complex optical systems are often difficult to align from end-to-end because the alignment beam must be inserted at one end in order for the beam to traverse the entire optical path to the other end. The ends of the optical train may not be easily accessible to the alignment beam. Typically, when a series of optical elements is to be aligned, an alignment laser beam is inserted into the optical path with a pick-off mirror at one end of the series of elements. But it may be impossible to insert the beam at an end-point. It can be difficult to locate the pick-off mirror at the desired position because there is not enough space, there is no mounting surface, or the location is occupied by a source, detector, or other component. Alternatively, the laser beam might be inserted at an intermediate location (not at an end-point) and sent, first in one direction and then the other, to the opposite ends of the optical system for alignment. However, in this case, alignment must be performed in two directions and extra effort is required to co-align the two beams to make them parallel and coincident, i.e., to follow the same path as an end-to-end beam. An optical device has been developed that accepts a laser beam as input and produces two co-aligned, but counter-propagating beams. In contrast to a conventional alignment laser placed at one end of the optical path, this invention can be placed at a convenient position within the optical train and aligned to send its two beams simultaneously along precisely opposite paths that, taken together, trace out exactly the same path as the conventional alignment laser. This invention allows the user the freedom to choose locations within the optical train for placement of the alignment beam. It is also self-aligned by design and requires

  3. Ultra-thin anisotropic metasurface for polarized beam splitting and reflected beam steering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenlong; Wang, Guangming; Li, Tangjing; Li, Haipeng; Zhuang, Yaqiang; Hou, Haisheng

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a polarization beam splitter utilizing an ultra-thin anisotropic metasurface. The proposed anisotropic element is composed of triple-layered rectangular patches spaced with double-layered dielectric isolators. By tailoring the metallic patches, the cell is capable of transmitting x-polarized waves efficiently and reflecting y-polarized beams with almost 100% efficiency at 15 GHz. In addition to this, the reflected phases can be modulated by adjusting the size of the element, which contributes to beam steering in reflection mode. By assigning gradient phases on the metasurface, the constructed sample has the ability to refract x-polarized waves normally and reflect y-polarized beams anomalously. For verification, a sample with a size of 240 × 240 mm2 is fabricated and measured. Consistent numerical and experimental results have both validated the efficiently anomalous reflection for y-polarized waves and normal refraction for x-polarized beams operating from 14.6-15.4 GHz. Furthermore, the proposed sample has a thickness of 0.1λ at 15 GHz, which provides a promising approach for steering and splitting beams in a compact size.

  4. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  5. A fan beam model for radio pulsars. I. Observational evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. G.; Pi, F. P.; Deng, C. L.; Wen, S. Q.; Ye, F.; Guan, K.Y.; Liu, Y.; Xu, L. Q.; Zheng, X. P.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a novel beam model for radio pulsars based on the scenario that the broadband and coherent emission from secondary relativistic particles, as they move along a flux tube in a dipolar magnetic field, form a radially extended sub-beam with unique properties. The whole radio beam may consist of several sub-beams, forming a fan-shaped pattern. When only one or a few flux tubes are active, the fan beam becomes very patchy. This model differs essentially from the conal beam models with respect to the beam structure and predictions on the relationship between pulse width and impact angle β (the angle between the line of sight and the magnetic pole) and the relationship between emission intensity and beam angular radius. The evidence for this model comes from the observed patchy beams of precessional binary pulsars and three statistical relationships found for a sample of 64 pulsars, of which β were mostly constrained by fitting polarization position angle data with the rotation vector model. With appropriate assumptions, the fan beam model can reproduce the relationship between 10% peak pulse width and |β|, the anticorrelation between the emission intensity and |β|, and the upper boundary line in the scatter plot of |β| versus pulsar distance. An extremely patchy beam model with the assumption of narrowband emission from one or a few flux tubes is studied and found unlikely to be a general model. The implications of the fan beam model for the studies on radio and gamma-ray pulsar populations and radio polarization are discussed.

  6. On the self-consistency of the principle of profile consistency results for sawtoothing tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Bretz, N.L.; Efthimion, P.C.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.W.; Murakami, M.; McGuire, K.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    The principle of profile consistency states that for fixed limiter safety factor q/sub a/, there exists unique natural equilibrium profile shapes for the current density j(r), and the electron temperature T/sub e/(r) for any tokamak plasma independent of the shapes of the heating power deposition profiles. The mathematical statement of the three basic consequences of this principle for sawtoothing discharges are: (r/sub 1//a) = F/sub 1/ (1/q/sub a/), /T/sub eo/ = F/sub 2/(1/q/sub a/), and a unique scaling law for the central electron temperature T/sub eo/, where r/sub 1/ is the sawtooth inversion radius and is the volume average T/sub e/. Since for a given T/sub e/(r), the ohmic current j(r) can be deduced from Ohm's law, given the function F/sub 1/, the function F/sub 2/ is uniquely fixed and vice versa. Also given F/sub 1/(1/q/sub a/), the central current density j/sub o/ = (V/sub L//2..pi..bRZ/sub eff/) T/sub eo//sup 3/2/ = (I/sub p//..pi..a/sup 2/) F/sub 3/(q/sub a/), where the function F/sub 3/ = (q/sub a//q/sub o/) is uniquely fixed by F/sub 1/. Here b approx. 6.53 /times/ 10/sup 3/ ln..lambda.., and I/sub p/, V/sub L/, Z/sub eff/, R, a, and q/sub o/ are the plasma current, loop voltage, effective ion charge, major and minor radius, and the central safety factor, respectively. Thus for a fixed j(r) or T/sub e/(r), the set of functions F/sub 1/, F/sub 2/, and F/sub 3/ is uniquely fixed. Further, the principle of profile consistency dictates that this set of functions F/sub 1/, F/sub 2/, and F/sub 3/ remain the same for all sawtoothing discharges in any tokamak regardless of its size, I/sub p/, V/sub L/, B/sub T/, etc. Here, we present a rather complete and detailed theoretical examination of this self-consistency of the measured values of T/sub e/(r), F/sub 1/, F/sub 2/, and F/sub 3/ for sawtoothing TFTR discharges. 55 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Beam shaping to provide round and square-shaped beams in optical systems of high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    Optical systems of modern high-power lasers require control of irradiance distribution: round or square-shaped flat-top or super-Gaussian irradiance profiles are optimum for amplification in MOPA lasers and for thermal load management while pumping of crystals of solid-state ultra-short pulse lasers to control heat and minimize its impact on the laser power and beam quality while maximizing overall laser efficiency, variable profiles are also important in irradiating of photocathode of Free Electron lasers (FEL). It is suggested to solve the task of irradiance re-distribution using field mapping refractive beam shapers like piShaper. The operational principle of these devices presumes transformation of laser beam intensity from Gaussian to flat-top one with high flatness of output wavefront, saving of beam consistency, providing collimated output beam of low divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible residual wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with ultra-short pulse lasers having broad spectrum. Using the same piShaper device it is possible to realize beams with flat-top, inverse Gauss or super Gauss irradiance distribution by simple variation of input beam diameter, and the beam shape can be round or square with soft edges. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type and optical layouts of their applying in optical systems of high-power lasers. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  8. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  9. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  10. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  11. Beamed energy propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Beamed energy concepts offer an alternative for an advanced propulsion system. The use of a remote power source reduces the weight of the propulsion system in flight and this, combined with the high performance, provides significant payload gains. Within the context of this study's baseline scenario, two beamed energy propulsion concepts are potentially attractive: solar thermal propulsion and laser thermal propulsion. The conceived beamed energy propulsion devices generally provide low thrust (tens of pounds to hundreds of pounds); therefore, they are typically suggested for cargo transportation. For the baseline scenario, these propulsion system can provide propulsion between the following nodes: (1) low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit; (2) low Earth orbit to low lunar orbit; (3) low lunar orbit to low Mars orbit--only solar thermal; and (4) lunar surface to low lunar orbit--only laser thermal.

  12. Active Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2008-03-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) plays a pivotal role in the diagnostics of hot fusion plasmas and is implemented currently in most of the operating devices. In the present report the main features of CXRS are summarized and supporting software packages encompassing "Spectral Analysis Code CXSFIT", "Charge Exchange Analysis Package CHEAP", and finally "Forward Prediction of Spectral Features" are described. Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) is proposed as indispensable cross-calibration tool for absolute local impurity density measurements and also for the continuous monitoring of the neutral beam power deposition profile. Finally, a full exploitation of the `Motional Stark Effect' pattern is proposed to deduce local pitch angles, total magnetic fields and possibly radial electric fields. For the proposed active beam spectroscopy diagnostic on ITER comprehensive performance studies have been carried out. Estimates of expected spectral signal-to-noise ratios are based on atomic modelling of neutral beam stopping and emissivities for CXRS, BES and background continuum radiation as well as extrapolations from present CXRS diagnostic systems on JET, Tore Supra, TEXTOR and ASDEX-UG. Supplementary to thermal features a further promising application of CXRS has been proposed recently for ITER, that is a study of slowing-down alpha particles in the energy range up to 2 MeV making use of the 100 keV/amu DNB (Diagnostic Neutral Beam) and the 500 keV/amu HNB (Heating Neutral Beam). Synthetic Fast Ion Slowing-Down spectra are evaluated in terms of source rates and slowing-down parameters

  13. Optimal beam focusing through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Beam spread and beam wandering are the most perceptible effects of atmospheric turbulence on propagating laser beams. The width of the mean irradiance profile is typically used to characterize the beam spread. This so-called long-term (LT) statistic allows for a relatively simple theoretical description. However, the LT beam size is not a very practical measure of the beam spread because its measurements are sensitive to the movements of the source and detector, and to the large-scale variations of the refractive index that are not associated with turbulence. The short-term (ST) beam spread is measured relative to the instantaneous position of the beam center and is free of these drawbacks, but has not been studied as thoroughly as the LT spread. We present a theoretical model for the ST beam irradiance that is based on the parabolic equation for the beam wave propagation in random media, and the Markov approximation for calculation of the statistics of the optical field, and discuss an approximation that allows introduction of the isoplanatic ST point spread function (PSF). Unlike the LT PSF, the ST PSF depends on the overall beam geometry. This allows optimization of the initial beam field in terms of minimizing the ST beam size at the observation plane. Calculations supporting this conjecture are presented for the simple case of the coherent Gaussian beam, and Kolmogorov turbulence.

  14. Optimal beam focusing through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Beam spread and beam wandering are the most perceptible effects of atmospheric turbulence on propagating laser beams. The width of the mean irradiance profile is typically used to characterize the beam spread. This so-called long-term (LT) statistic allows for a relatively simple theoretical description. However, the LT beam size is not a very practical measure of the beam spread because its measurements are sensitive to the movements of the source and detector, and to the large-scale variations of the refractive index that are not associated with turbulence. The short-term (ST) beam spread is measured relative to the instantaneous position of the beam center and is free of these drawbacks, but has not been studied as thoroughly as the LT spread. We present a theoretical model for the ST beam irradiance that is based on the parabolic equation for the beam wave propagation in random media, and the Markov approximation for calculation of the statistics of the optical field, and discuss an approximation that allows introduction of the isoplanatic ST point spread function (PSF). Unlike the LT PSF, the ST PSF depends on the overall beam geometry. This allows optimization of the initial beam field in terms of minimizing the ST beam size at the observation plane. Calculations supporting this conjecture are presented for the simple case of the coherent Gaussian beam, and Kolmogorov turbulence. PMID:26560908

  15. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  16. Dealing with megawatt beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The next generation of accelerators for MegaWatt proton, electron and heavy-ion beams puts unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in code developments are described for the critical modules related to these challenges. Examples are given for the most demanding areas: targets, collimators, beam absorbers, radiation shielding, induced radioactivity and radiation damage.

  17. Gaussian-profile beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1982-11-03

    The growth rate of the hose instability is derived for a beam with Gaussian radial profile, using the spread mass model of phase mix damping. It is found that the maximum growth rate of a convecting wave packet is 49% larger than that derived for a beam with the Bennett profile, and the inverse group velocity (dz/d tau) is also increased by about this amount. A general discussion of spread mass models is presented along with an explanation of the regurgitation phenomena seen in their numerical treatment.

  18. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  19. Beam deformation within an acousto-optic lens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenqiao; Li, Longhui; Wang, Jiancun; Hu, Qinglei; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-05-15

    The acousto-optic lens (AOL) is becoming a popular tool in the neuroscience field. Here we analyzed the deformation of the diffraction beam after passage through an AOL consisting of a pair of acousto-optic deflectors using both theoretical and experimental data. The results showed that, because of the high sensitivity of optical spatial frequencies of acousto-optic deflectors, the boundary strength of the diffraction beam of the AOL decreases significantly. When the focal length of AOL diminishes, the deformation of the diffraction beam becomes more serious with a smaller beam size. This deformation of the diffraction beam finally leads to a decreased illuminative numerical aperture, which worsens the image's spatial resolution. PMID:26393698

  20. Macroparticle simulation studies of a proton beam haloexperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gilpatrick, D.; Smith, H.V.; Wangler,T.P.; Schulze, M.E.

    2002-09-12

    We report macroparticle simulations for comparison withmeasured results from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupoleperiodic-focusing channel. An important issue is that the inputphase-space distribution is not experimentally known. Three differentinitial distributions with different shapes predict different beamprofiles in the transport system. Simulations have been fairly successfulin reproducing the core of the measured matched-beam profiles and thetrend of emittance growth as a function of mismatch factor, butunderestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams.In this study, we find that knowledge of the Courant-Snyder parametersand emittances of the input beam is not sufficient for reliableprediction of the halo. Input distributions iwth greater population inthe tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that isqualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formationin mismatched beams.

  1. Cherenkov detector for beam quality measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfanelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    A new detector to measure the machine induced background at larger radii has been developed and installed in the CMS experiment at the LHC. It consists of forty modules, each comprising a quartz bar read out by a photomultiplier tube. Since Cherenkov radiation is emitted in a forward cone around the charged particle trajectory, these detectors can distinguish between the arrival directions of the machine induced background and the collision products. The back-end electronics consists of a uTCA readout with excellent time resolution. The installation in the CMS is described and first commissioning measurements with the LHC beams in Run II are presented.

  2. Nonpropulsive applications of ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Eight centimeter ion beam sources utilizing xenon and argon have been developed that operate over a wide range of beam energies and currents. Three types of processes have been studied: sputter deposition, ion beam machining, and ion beam surface texturing. The broad range of source operating conditions allows optimum sputter deposition of various materials. An ion beam source was used to ion mill laser reflection holograms using photoresist patterns on silicon. Ion beam texturing was tried with many materials and has a multitude of potential applications.

  3. Tractor beams for optical micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, Aaron; Grier, David G.

    2016-03-01

    Tractor beams are traveling waves that transport illuminated objects in the retrograde direction relative to the direction of propagation. The theory of photokinetic effects identifies design criteria for long-range general- purpose tractor beams. These criteria distinguish first-order tractor beams that couple to induced dipole moments from higher-order tractor beams that rely on coupling to higher-order multipole moments to achieve pulling. First-order tractor beams are inherently longer-ranged and operate on a wider variety of materials. We explore the physics of first-order tractor beams in the context of a family of generalized solenoidal waves.

  4. The cooling of particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling.

  5. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  6. EFFECTS OF TRANSFERSE BEAM SIZE IN BEAM POSITIONS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. KURENNOY

    2001-06-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  7. Effects of transverse beam size in beam position monitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2001-01-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  8. Beam Fields and Energy Dissipation Inside the the BE Beam Pipe of the Super-B Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2010-09-10

    We study the bunch field diffusion and energy dissipation in the beam pipe of the Super-B detector, which consists of two coaxial Be thin pipes (half a millimeter). Cooling water will run between these two pipes. Gold and nickel will be sputtered (several microns) onto the beryllium pipe at different sides. The Maxwell equations for the beam fields in these thin layers are solved numerically for the case of infinite pipes. We also calculate the amplitude of the electromagnetic fields outside the beam pipe, which may be noticeable as the beam current can reach 4 A in each beam. Results of simulations are used for the design of this central part of the Super-B detector.

  9. CBEAM. 2-D: a two-dimensional beam field code

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, K.A.

    1985-05-01

    CBEAM.2-D is a two-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations for the case of an electron beam propagating through an air medium. Solutions are performed in the beam-retarded time frame. Conductivity is calculated self-consistently with field equations, allowing sophisticated dependence of plasma parameters to be handled. A unique feature of the code is that it is implemented on an IBM PC microcomputer in the BASIC language. Consequently, it should be available to a wide audience.

  10. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  11. Optimizing the electron beam parameters for head-on beam-beam compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Pikin, A.; Gu, X.

    2011-03-28

    Head-on beam-beam compensation is adopted to compensate the large beam-beam tune spread from the protonproton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Two e-lenses are being built and to be in stalled near IP10 in the end of 2011. In this article we perform numeric simulation to investigate the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse profile, size, current, offset and random errors in them. In this article we studied the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse shape, size, current, offset and their random errors. From the study, we require that the electron beam size can not be smaller than the proton beam's. And the random noise in the electron current should be better than 0.1%. The offset of electron beam w.r.t. the proton beam center is crucial to head-on beam-beam compensation. Its random errors should be below {+-}8{micro}m.

  12. Recycled Paper Beam Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kristin; Tabacchi, Jo

    2011-01-01

    As art department budgets across the country continue to shrink, art teachers are increasingly on the lookout for inexpensive materials that can be used to teach a range of concepts. In this article, the authors describe a newspaper beam tower project inspired by the book, "The Wonderful Towers of Watts" by Patricia Zelver. There are many more…

  13. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    During the previous reporting period (Quarter Six), the charging and removal of a fine, high resistivity aerosol using the advanced technology of electron beam precipitation was successfully accomplished. Precharging a dust stream circulating through the EBP wind tunnel produced collection efficiency figures of up to 40 times greater than with corona charging and collection alone (Table 1). The increased system collection efficiency attributed to electron beam precharging was determined to be the result of increased particle charge. It was found that as precharger electric field was raised, collection efficiency became greater. In sequence, saturation particle charge varies with the precharger electric field strength, particle migration velocity varies with the precharger and collector electric field, and collection efficiency varies with the migration velocity. Maximizing the system collection efficiency requires both a high charging electric field (provided by the E-beam precharger), and a high collecting electric field (provided by the collector wires and plates). Because increased particle collection efficiency is directly attributable to higher particle charge, the focus of research during Quarter Seven was shifted to learning more about the actual charge magnitude on the aerosol particles. Charge determinations in precipitators have traditionally been made on bulk dust samples collected from the flue gas stream, which gives an overall charge vs. mass (Q/M) ratio measurement. More recently, techniques have been developed which allow the measurement of the charge on individual particles in a rapid and repeatable fashion. One such advanced technique has been developed at FSU for use in characterizing the electron beam precharger.

  14. Beam current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  15. Beam current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kuchnir, Moyses; Mills, Frederick E.

    1987-01-01

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  16. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  17. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  18. The Technology Balance Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulson, Eddie K.

    2006-01-01

    "The Technology Balance Beam" is designed to question the role of technology within school districts. This case study chronicles a typical school district in relation to the school district's implementation of technology beginning in the 1995-1996 school year. The fundamental question that this scenario raises is, What is the balance between…

  19. Student Beam Chopping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brincat, Joseph; Behringer, Ernest R.

    2001-10-01

    Physics students who are early in their programs of study may not yet be prepared to understand the concepts underlying more advanced physics research. Nonetheless, it is possible to design projects that do not require a great deal of prerequisite knowledge and that are successful in developing important skills such as theoretical modeling, computation, experimentation, and data analysis. We present a beam-chopping project with the purpose of developing such skills. This project first requires the student to devise a theoretical model of a complete chopping cycle for a perfectly collimated, circular beam of uniform intensity. Then the student implements the model by writing a C language program that calculates the area of the transmitted beam. After setting up and acquiring data from an actual beam-chopping experiment, the student compares the theoretical results to the experimental data. Any observed differences provide impetus to refine the model, thereby illustrating the complementary roles of theory and experiment. We present this challenging yet realistic project as an example for introducing beginning students to research.

  20. Experimental Studies of beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaji Sen et al.

    2003-06-09

    The long-range beam-beam interactions limit the achievable luminosity in the Tevatron. During the past year several studies ere performed on ways of removing the limitations at all stages of the operational cycle. The authors report here on some of these studies, including the effects of changing the helical orbits at injection and collision, tune and chromaticity scans and coupling due to the beam-beam interactions.

  1. Quantitative Experiments With Electrons in a Positively Charged Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Covo, M K; Cohen, R; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Friedman, A; Leister, C; Lund, S M; Seidl, P; Sharp, W

    2006-10-27

    Intense ion beams are an extreme example of, and difficult to maintain as, a non-neutral plasma. Experiments and simulations are used to study the complex interactions between beam ions and (unwanted) electrons. Such ''electron clouds'' limit the performance of many accelerators. To characterize electron clouds, a number of parameters are measured including: total and local electron production and loss for each of three major sources, beam potential versus time, electron line-charge density, and gas pressure within the beam. Electron control methods include surface treatments to reduce electron and gas emission, and techniques to remove, or block, electrons from the beam. Detailed, self-consistent simulations include beam-transport fields, and electron and gas generation and consistent transport, to compute unexpectedly rich behavior, much of which is confirmed experimentally. For example, in a quadrupole magnetic field, ion and dense electron plasmas interact to produce multi-kV oscillations in the electron plasma and distortions of the beam velocity space distribution, without becoming homogenous or locally neutral.

  2. Self-pinched transport of an intense proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Young, F. C.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Rose, D. V.; Neri, J. M.; Weber, B. V.; Myers, M. C.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Mosher, D.; Olson, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    Ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) experiments have been carried out using a 1.1-MeV, 100-kA proton beam. A Rutherford scattering diagnostic and a LiF nuclear activation diagnostic measured the number of protons within a 5 cm radius at 50 cm into the transport region that was filled with low-pressure helium. Time-integrated signals from both diagnostics indicate self-pinching of the ion beam in a helium pressure window between 35 and 80 mTorr. Signals from these two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below this SPT pressure window. Interferometric measurements of electron densities during beam injection into vacuum are consistent with ballistic transport with co-moving electrons. Interferometric measurements for beam injection into helium show that the electron density increases quadratically with pressure through the SPT window and roughly linearly with pressure above the SPT window. The ionization fraction of the helium plateaus at about 1.5% for pressures above 80 mTorr. In the SPT window, the electron density is 3 to 20 times the beam density. Numerical simulations of these beam transport experiments produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Fatigue Testing of Wing Beam by the Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleakney, William M

    1938-01-01

    Preliminary fatigue tests on two aluminum-alloy wing-beam specimens subjected to reversed axial loading are described. The motion used consists in incorporating one or two reciprocating motors in a resonance system of which the specimen is the spring element. A description is given of the reciprocating motors, and of the method of assembling and adjusting the vibrating system. The results indicate that the method is well adapted to fatigue tests of not only uniform wing beams but also wing beams with asymmetrical local reinforcements.

  4. Noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaohong; Zheng, Yishu; Li, Hanqing

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a new family of noncoaxial Gauss-truncated Bessel beams through multiplying conventional symmetrical Bessel beams by a noncoaxial Gauss function. These beams can also be regarded as the exponential-truncated version of Bessel-Gauss beams since they can be transformed into the product of Bessel-Gauss beams and an exponential window function along a certain Cartesian axis. The closed-form solutions of the angular spectra and paraxial propagation of these beams were derived. These beams have asymmetrical intensity distributions and carry the same orbit angular momentum per photon as the corresponding Bessel-Gauss beams. While propagating along the z axis, the mth (m≠0) noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams rotate their intensity distributions and the mth-order vortex at the beam center has a transverse shift along the direction perpendicular to the offset axis. Depending on the product of the transverse scalar factor of the Bessel beams and the offset between the Gaussian window function and the center of the Bessel beams, the noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams can produce unit vortices with opposite signs in pairs during propagation. PMID:27140757

  5. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  6. Kinetic equilibrium of space charge dominated beams in a misaligned quadrupole focusing channel

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2013-07-15

    The dynamics of intense beam propagation through the misaligned quadrupole focusing channel has been studied in a self-consistent manner using nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The equations of motion of the beam centroid have been developed and found to be independent of any specific beam distribution. A Vlasov equilibrium distribution and beam envelope equations have been obtained, which provide us a theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of intense beam propagating in a misaligned quadrupole focusing channel. It is shown that the displaced quadrupoles only cause the centroid of the beam to wander off axis. The beam envelope around the centroid obeys the familiar Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij envelope equation that is independent of the centroid motion. However, the rotation of the quadrupole about its optical axis affects the beam envelope and causes an increase in the projected emittances in the two transverse planes due to the inter-plane coupling.

  7. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  8. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  9. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  10. Beam Rounders for Circular Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; Ya. Derbenev

    2001-07-01

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  11. Beam rounders for circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov and S. Nagaitsev

    2002-12-10

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  12. Obtaining slow beam spills at the SSC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ritson, D.

    1993-08-01

    There is substantial interest in providing slow-spill external proton beams in parallel with ``interaction running`` at the 20 TeV SSC collider. The proposal is to cause a flux of particles to impinge on a target consisting of a bent crystal extraction channel. Additionally, a slow spill onto a conventional internal target could be used as a source of secondary beams for physics or test purposes and might also be used for B-physics as proposed for HERA. The ``natural`` beam loss rates from elastic and diffractive beam gas scattering and IP collisions are not sufficient to provide suitably intense external proton beams. To prevent loss of luminosity, the rf excitation is non-linear and preferentially blows up the halo of the beam. The ``target`` is to be located at a region of high dispersion forcing particles at the edge of the momentum space onto the target. T. Lohse in this workshop has described a proposed internal target to be used at HERA that will not employ rf excitation but will use the finite loss rates observed at the HERA machine. The Hera losses are caused by a variety of sources in addition to beam gas scattering or IP interactions. Initially, the beam lifetime at HERA was too short to obtain satisfactory integrated luminosities. Subsequently, through careful attention to detail, the beam lifetime was increased to > 20 hours. Even with these changes, present loss rates provide the required intensity onto an internal target. The Tevatron and SPS proton anti-proton colliders have had similar experiences with their investigations of loss rates and also find that beam lifetimes may be substantially shorter than expected solely from beam gas and IP interactions. This paper proposes deliberately introducing controlled errors li

  13. Dual-beam laser traps in biology and medicine: when one beam is not enough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Graeme; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kreysing, Moritz; Boyde, Lars; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Delabre, Ulysse; Chalut, Kevin; Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-08-01

    Optical traps are nowadays quite ubiquitous in biophysical and biological studies. The term is often used synonymously with optical tweezers, one particular incarnation of optical traps. However, there is another kind of optical trap consisting of two non-focused, counter-propagating laser beams. This dual-beam trap predates optical tweezers by almost two decades and currently experiences a renaissance. The advantages of dual-beam traps include lower intensities on the trapped object, decoupling from imaging optics, and the possibility to trap cells and cell clusters up to 100 microns in diameter. When used for deforming cells this trap is referred to as an optical stretcher. I will review several applications of such traps in biology and medicine for the detection of cancer cells, sorting stem cells, testing light guiding properties of retinal cells and the controlled rotation of cells for single cell tomography.

  14. Modification & alignment of beam line of 10 MeV RF electron beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnwal, R.; Ghodke, S. R.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Kumar, M.; Jayaprakash, D.; Chindarkar, A. R.; Mishra, R. L.; Dolas, S.; Kulkarni, S. Y.; Kumar, M.; P, Dixit K.; S, Acharya; Barje, S. R.; Lawangare, N. K.; C, Saroj P.; Nimje, V. T.; Chandan, S.; Tillu, A. R.; V, Sharma; Chavan, R. B.; V, Yadav; P, Roychowdhury; Mittal, K. C.; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Ray, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    A 10 MeV, 10 kW RF industrial Electron linac designed and developed at BARC is installed at the Electron Beam Center Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. The entire RF accelerator assembly consists of Electron gun, RF source, RF linac structure, Beam diagnostic chamber, Drift tube, Scanning magnet, Beam sensing aperture, Scan horn, and is spread over two floors at EBC. The paper discusses in detail about the alignment procedure adopted for the equipments of 10 MeV RF beamline. The complete electron beamline will be maintained under ultra high vacuum of the order of 10-7 torr. The paper discusses about the present problem of alignment, measurement technique of alignment, reason for misalignment, possible ways to solve the problem, equipment used for alignment, supports & arrestors, verification of alignment under vacuum

  15. Freeform beam shaping for high-power multimode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2014-03-01

    Widening of using high power multimode lasers in industrial laser material processing is accompanied by special requirements to irradiance profiles in such technologies like metal or plastics welding, cladding, hardening, brazing, annealing, laser pumping and amplification in MOPA lasers. Typical irradiance distribution of high power multimode lasers: free space solid state, fiber-coupled solid state and diodes lasers, fiber lasers, is similar to Gaussian. Laser technologies can be essentially improved when irradiance distribution on a workpiece is uniform (flattop) or inverse-Gauss; when building high-power pulsed lasers it is possible to enhance efficiency of pumping and amplification by applying super-Gauss irradiance distribution with controlled convexity. Therefore, "freeform" beam shaping of multimode laser beams is an important task. A proved solution is refractive field mapping beam shaper like Shaper capable to control resulting irradiance profile - with the same unit it is possible to get various beam profiles and choose optimum one for a particular application. Operational principle of these devices implies transformation of laser irradiance distribution by conserving beam consistency, high transmittance, providing collimated low divergent output beam. Using additional optics makes it possible to create resulting laser spots of necessary size and round, elliptical or linear shape. Operation out of focal plane and, hence, in field of lower wavefront curvature, allows extending depth of field. The refractive beam shapers are implemented as telescopes and collimating systems, which can be connected directly to fiber-coupled lasers or fiber lasers, thus combining functions of beam collimation and irradiance transformation.

  16. Quantitative experiments with electrons in a positively charged beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Covo, M K; Cohen, R; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Friedman, A; Leister, C; Lund, S M; Seidl, P; Sharp, W

    2006-12-06

    Intense ion beams are difficult to maintain as non-neutral plasmas. Experiments and simulations are used to study the complex interactions between beam ions and (unwanted) electrons. Such ''electron clouds'' limit the performance of many accelerators. To characterize electron clouds, a number of parameters are measured including: total and local electron production and loss for each of three major sources, beam potential versus time, electron line-charge density, and gas pressure within the beam. Electron control methods include surface treatments to reduce electron and gas emission, and techniques to remove electrons from the beam, or block their capture by the beam. Detailed, self-consistent simulations include beam-transport fields, and electron and gas generation and transport; these compute unexpectedly rich behavior, much of which is confirmed experimentally. For example, in a quadrupole magnetic field, ion and dense electron plasmas interact to produce multi-kV oscillations in the electron plasma and distortions of the beam velocity space distribution, without the system becoming homogeneous or locally neutral.

  17. Beam Dump Design for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Fragmentation Line

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, W; Ahle, L E; Reyes, S

    2006-05-02

    Beam dumps for the heavy ion beams of the fragmentation line of the Rare Isotope Accelerator have been designed. The most severe operational case involves a continuous U beam impacting the beam dump with a power of 295 kW and a nominal spot diameter size of 5 cm. The dump mechanically consists of two rotating barrels with a water cooled outer wall of 2 mm thick aluminum. The barrels are 70 cm in diameter and axially long enough to intercept a variety of other beams. The aluminum wall absorbs approximately 15% of the U beam power with the rest absorbed in the water downstream of the wall. The water acts as an absorber of the beam and as a coolant for the 2 mm aluminum wall. The barrel rotates at less than 400 RPM, maximum aluminum temperatures are less than 100 C and maximum thermal fatigue stresses are low at 3.5 x 10{sup 7} Pa (5 ksi). Rotation of the dump results in relatively low radiation damage levels with an operating lifetime of years for most beams.

  18. A beam source model for scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  19. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  20. The concept of coupling impedance in the self-consistent plasma wake field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, R.; Akhter, T.; De Nicola, S.; Migliorati, M.; Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Palumbo, L.

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations, we describe the self-consistent interaction of a relativistic charged-particle beam with the surroundings while propagating through a plasma-based acceleration device. This is done in terms of the concept of coupling (longitudinal) impedance in full analogy with the conventional accelerators. It is shown that also here the coupling impedance is a very useful tool for the Nyquist-type stability analysis. Examples of specific physical situations are finally illustrated.

  1. Holographic memory using beam steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Hanan, Jay C. (Inventor); Reyes, George F. (Inventor); Zhou, Hanying (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and system provide the ability for storing holograms at high speed. A single laser diode emits a collimated laser beam to both write to and read from a photorefractice crystal. One or more liquid crystal beam steering spatial light modulators (BSSLMs) or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) mirrors steer a reference beam, split from the collimated laser beam, at high speed to the photorefractive crystal.

  2. Resolving two beams in beam splitters with a beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2002-01-01

    The beam transport system for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) anticipates multiple beam splitters. Monitoring two separated beams in a common beam pipe in the splitter sections imposes certain requirements on diagnostics for these sections. In this note we explore a two-beam system in a generic beam monitor and study the feasibility of resolving the positions of the two beams with a single diagnostic device. In the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), 20-ns beam pulses (bunches) are extracted from the 50-GeV main proton synchrotron and then are transported to the target by an elaborated transport system. The beam transport system splits the beam bunches into equal parts in its splitting sections so that up to 12 synchronous beam pulses can be delivered to the target for the multi-axis proton radiography. Information about the transverse positions of the beams in the splitters, and possibly the bunch longitudinal profile, should be delivered by some diagnostic devices. Possible candidates are the circular wall current monitors in the circular pipes connecting the splitter elements, or the conventional stripline BPMs. In any case, we need some estimates on how well the transverse positions of the two beams can be resolved by these monitors.

  3. Neisseria meningitidis Differentially Controls Host Cell Motility through PilC1 and PilC2 Components of Type IV Pili

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C.; Drab, Marek; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Nassif, Xavier; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a strictly human pathogen that has two facets since asymptomatic carriage can unpredictably turn into fulminant forms of infection. Meningococcal pathogenesis relies on the ability of the bacteria to break host epithelial or endothelial cellular barriers. Highly restrictive, yet poorly understood, mechanisms allow meningococcal adhesion to cells of only human origin. Adhesion of encapsulated and virulent meningococci to human cells relies on the expression of bacterial type four pili (T4P) that trigger intense host cell signalling. Among the components of the meningococcal T4P, the concomitantly expressed PilC1 and PilC2 proteins regulate pili exposure at the bacterial surface, and until now, PilC1 was believed to be specifically responsible for T4P-mediated meningococcal adhesion to human cells. Contrary to previous reports, we show that, like PilC1, the meningococcal PilC2 component is capable of mediating adhesion to human ME180 epithelial cells, with cortical plaque formation and F-actin condensation. However, PilC1 and PilC2 promote different effects on infected cells. Cellular tracking analysis revealed that PilC1-expressing meningococci caused a severe reduction in the motility of infected cells, which was not the case when cells were infected with PilC2-expressing strains. The amount of both total and phosphorylated forms of EGFR was dramatically reduced in cells upon PilC1-mediated infection. In contrast, PilC2-mediated infection did not notably affect the EGFR pathway, and these specificities were shared among unrelated meningococcal strains. These results suggest that meningococci have evolved a highly discriminative tool for differential adhesion in specific microenvironments where different cell types are present. Moreover, the fine-tuning of cellular control through the combined action of two concomitantly expressed, but distinctly regulated, T4P-associated variants of the same molecule (i.e. PilC1 and PilC2) brings a new

  4. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2{1/2}-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Titanium nitride deposited by dual ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamaji, S.; Maeyama, Y.; Ina, T.; Minowa, Y.

    1989-03-01

    Titanium nitride films have been prepared by the dual ion beam (DIB) deposition technique, which consists of the ionized cluster beam (ICB) and the ionized gas beam (IGB). As the source of ICB, vaporized titanium is ejected through the multinozzle of the crucible into a high vacuum chamber and is cooled and clustered by adiabatic expansion. The titanium clusters thus obtained are partially ionized in an electron shower and accelerated to the substrate. At the same time, as the source of IGB, nitrogen molecules are partially ionized, excited and decomposed in an electron shower and also accelerated to the substrate. These two beams collide and combine together on their way to the substrate. The characteristics of the ion current density and the properties of titanium nitride films are investigated. It is found that the DIB technique has a great advantage in preparing titanium nitride films of various crystalline structures from TiN to Ti 2N at a low temperature with a high deposition rate over a large substrate. Therefore, the chemical reaction is enhanced by the irradiation of the ionized and excited gases and the migration of ionized clusters on the substrate.

  6. LED beam shaping using microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Chi; Hsieh, Hsin-Ta; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2009-08-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are very popular light sources in the market currently because of their numerous advantages such as high efficiency, long life time, wide color gamut and cheap production costs [1]. For many applications, such as illumination tasks, backlight modules and projector light sources, a homogeneous illumination of the entrance pupil is desired. Because of LED's high brightness, we can combine the homogeneous illuminance areas in the target plane together as a backlight module for LCD display to solve unreadable problems in the portable devices under the sun. Mostly, the typical light distribution of a LED shows distinct Lambertian profile which is not suitable for the applications. To achieve a better adapted beam profile, an optical system with beam shaping qualities can be used. We design an optical system consisting of refractive microlens arrays and reflection-tubes that collimates and homogenizes LED's beam [2]. The smaller angle of beams, the higher contrast ratio we will get. And the design is less than 10mm in thickness, we can use it in many ways, such as backlight module of cell phones and head-up displays (HUDs). We believe this technology has advantages and provides us a high-brightness display to read information easily.

  7. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally, we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.

  8. Kiloamp high-brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brightness preservation of high-current relativistic electron beams under two different types of transport is discussed. Recent progress in improving the brightness of laser-guided beams in the Advanced Test Accelerator is reviewed. A strategy for the preservation of the brightness of space-charge-dominated beams in a solenoidal transport system is presented.

  9. Focusing Electron Beams at SLAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a set of magnets that focus high-energy electron and positron beams causing them to collide, annihilate each other, and generate new particles. Explains how dipoles bend the beam, how quadrupoles focus the beam, how the focal length is calculated, and the superconducting final focus. (MDH)

  10. Characterization of colloid thruster beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamero-Castano, M.; Ziemer, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we use retarding potential, time of flight, and a Faraday cup, to measure the energy and specific charge distributions of the electrospray particles as a function of the position within the beam, as well as beam profiles. This information is then used, together with a model of the beam, to calculate its spreading.

  11. Modeling FAMA ion beam diagnostics based on the Ptolemy II model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Beličev, P.; Radjenović, B.

    2012-10-01

    The previously developed model of ion beam transport control of the FAMA facility is further enhanced by equipping it with the model of ion beam diagnostics. The model of control, executing once, is adjusted so that it executes in iterative mode, where each iteration samples the input beam normally distributed over initial phase space and calculates a single trajectory through the facility beam lines. The model takes into account only the particles that manage to pass through all the beam line apertures, emulating in this way a Faraday cup and a beam profile meter. Generated are also beam phase space distributions and horizontal and vertical beam profiles at the end of the beam transport lines the FAMA facility consists of. By adding the model of ion beam diagnostics to the model of ion beam transport control, the process of determining optimal ion beam control parameters is eased and speeded up, and the understanding of influence of control parameters on the ion beam characteristics is improved.

  12. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  13. White beam slits and pink beam slits for the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Maser, J.; Powers, T.; Schmidt, O.; Rossi, E.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a clean cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam. The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.

  14. White Beam Slits and Pink Beam Slits for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Powers, T.; Schmidt, O.; Rossi, E.; Maser, J.

    2007-01-19

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a clean cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam.The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits' accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.

  15. Beam delivery system with a non-digitized diffractive beam splitter for laser-drilling of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2016-02-01

    We report a beam-delivery system consisting of a non-digitized diffractive beam splitter and a Fourier transform lens. The system is applied to the deep-drilling of silicon using a nanosecond pulse laser in the manufacture of inkjet printer heads. In this process, a circularly polarized pulse beam is divided into an array of uniform beams, which are then delivered precisely to the process points. To meet these requirements, the splitter was designed to be polarization-independent with an efficiency>95%. The optical elements were assembled so as to allow the fine tuning of the effective overall focal length by adjusting the wavefront curvature of the beam. Using the system, a beam alignment accuracy of<5 μm was achieved for a 12-mm-wide beam array and the throughput was substantially improved (10,000 points on a silicon wafer drilled in ~1 min). This beam-delivery scheme works for a variety of laser applications that require parallel processing.

  16. Beam-beam compensation in Tevatron: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir D. Shiltsev et al.

    2001-07-12

    The project of beam-beam compensation (BBC) in the Tevatron using electron beams [1] has passed a successful first step in experimental studies. The first Tevatron electron lens (TEL) has been installed in the Tevatron, commissioned, and demonstrated the theoretically predicted shift of betatron frequencies of a high energy proton beam due to a high current low energy electron beam. After the first series of studies in March-April 2001 (total of 7 shifts), we achieved tuneshifts of 980 GeV protons of about dQ=+0.007 with some 3 A of the electron beam current while the proton lifetime was in the range of 10 hours (some 24 hours at the best). Future work will include diagnostics improvement, beam studies with antiprotons, and fabrication of the 2nd TEL.

  17. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, Guillaume Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry

    2014-02-15

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  18. Experimental Evidence for Beam-Beam Disruption at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, Nan

    1999-05-21

    A significant enhancement from beam-beam disruption was observed for the first time during the 1997-98 run of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Disruption, or pinch effect, is due to the decrease in effective beam size during collisions as each beam is focused by the field of the other beam. With beam intensities of 4.0 10{sup 10} per bunch, bunch lengths of 1.1 mm, and horizontal and vertical beam sizes of {sigma}{sub x} = 1.5 {micro}m and {sigma}{sub y} = 0.65 {micro}m, the luminosity increase from disruption was more than 100%. Measured data rates as recorded by the SLD detector were in agreement with the theoretically calculated disruption enhancement.

  19. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  20. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.